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Sample records for childhood leukemia relapse

  1. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  2. Minimal residual disease analysis by eight-color flow cytometry in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Karawajew, Leonid; Dworzak, Michael; Ratei, Richard; Rhein, Peter; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Buldini, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Hrusak, Ondrej; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Henze, Günter; Seeger, Karl; von Stackelberg, Arend; Mejstrikova, Ester; Eckert, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Multiparametric flow cytometry is an alternative approach to the polymerase chain reaction method for evaluating minimal residual disease in treatment protocols for primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given considerable differences between primary and relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment regimens, flow cytometric assessment of minimal residual disease in relapsed leukemia requires an independent comprehensive investigation. In the present study we addressed evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry in the clinical trial for childhood relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia using eight-color flow cytometry. The major challenge of the study was to reliably identify low amounts of residual leukemic cells against the complex background of regeneration, characteristic of follow-up samples during relapse treatment. In a prospective study of 263 follow-up bone marrow samples from 122 patients with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we tested various B-cell markers, adapted the antibody panel to the treatment protocol, and evaluated its performance by a blinded parallel comparison with the polymerase chain reaction data. The resulting eight-color single-tube panel showed a consistently high overall concordance (P<0.001) and, under optimal conditions, sensitivity similar to that of the reference polymerase chain reaction method. Overall, evaluation of minimal residual disease by flow cytometry can be successfully integrated into the clinical management of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia either as complementary to the polymerase chain reaction or as an independent risk stratification tool. ALL-REZ BFM 2002 clinical trial information: NCT00114348.

  3. Relapse specific mutations in NT5C2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julia A.; Wang, Jinhua; Hogan, Laura E.; Yang, Jun J.; Dandekar, Smita; Patel, Jay P.; Tang, Zuojian; Zumbo, Paul; Li, Sheng; Zavadil, Jiri; Levine, Ross L.; Cardozo, Timothy; Hunger, Stephen P.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Evans, William E.; Morrison, Debra J.; Mason, Christopher E.; Carroll, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis despite intensive retreatment, due to intrinsic drug resistance1-2. The biological pathways that mediate resistance are unknown. Here we report the transcriptome profiles of matched diagnosis and relapse bone marrow specimens from ten pediatric B lymphoblastic leukemia patients using RNA-sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing identified 20 newly acquired novel non-synonymous mutations not present at initial diagnosis, of which two patients harbored relapse specific mutations in the same gene, NT5C2, a 5′-nucleotidase. Full exon sequencing of NT5C2 was completed in 61 additional relapse specimens, identifying five additional cases. Enzymatic analysis of mutant proteins revealed that base substitutions conferred increased enzymatic activity and resistance to treatment with nucleoside analogue therapies. Clinically, all patients who harbored NT5C2 mutations relapsed early, or within 36 months of initial diagnosis (p=0.03). These results suggest that mutations in NT5C2 are associated with the outgrowth of drug resistant clones in ALL. PMID:23377183

  4. Relapse-specific mutations in NT5C2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Julia A; Wang, Jinhua; Hogan, Laura E; Yang, Jun J; Dandekar, Smita; Patel, Jay P; Tang, Zuojian; Zumbo, Paul; Li, Sheng; Zavadil, Jiri; Levine, Ross L; Cardozo, Timothy; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Evans, William E; Morrison, Debra J; Mason, Christopher E; Carroll, William L

    2013-03-01

    Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis, despite intensive retreatment, owing to intrinsic drug resistance. The biological pathways that mediate resistance are unknown. Here, we report the transcriptome profiles of matched diagnosis and relapse bone marrow specimens from ten individuals with pediatric B-lymphoblastic leukemia using RNA sequencing. Transcriptome sequencing identified 20 newly acquired, novel nonsynonymous mutations not present at initial diagnosis, with 2 individuals harboring relapse-specific mutations in the same gene, NT5C2, encoding a 5'-nucleotidase. Full-exon sequencing of NT5C2 was completed in 61 further relapse specimens, identifying additional mutations in 5 cases. Enzymatic analysis of mutant proteins showed that base substitutions conferred increased enzymatic activity and resistance to treatment with nucleoside analog therapies. Clinically, all individuals who harbored NT5C2 mutations relapsed early, within 36 months of initial diagnosis (P = 0.03). These results suggest that mutations in NT5C2 are associated with the outgrowth of drug-resistant clones in ALL.

  5. [Molecular biology and childhood leukemia: E2A-PBX1 and central nervous system relapse].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. The inclusion of molecular biology techniques in the diagnosis and prognostic stratification of these patients has allowed major treatment achievements in developed countries. One of the best studied gene rearrangements is E2A-PBX1, which predicts isolated central nervous system relapse in patients with ALL. However, further research on the search for new molecular markers related to prognosis of patients with childhood leukemia is required. Such studies need the integration of different disciplines, including epidemiology. Epidemiological studies are needed not only to accelerate the discovery of new molecular markers and new biological signals as to the etiology and pathophysiology of cancer, but also to evaluate the clinical impact of these findings in well-defined populations.

  6. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  7. KRAS and CREBBP mutations: a relapse-linked malicious liaison in childhood high hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malinowska-Ozdowy, K; Frech, C; Schönegger, A; Eckert, C; Cazzaniga, G; Stanulla, M; zur Stadt, U; Mecklenbräuker, A; Schuster, M; Kneidinger, D; von Stackelberg, A; Locatelli, F; Schrappe, M; Horstmann, M A; Attarbaschi, A; Bock, C; Mann, G; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R

    2015-08-01

    High hyperdiploidy defines the largest genetic entity of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Despite its relatively low recurrence risk, this subgroup generates a high proportion of relapses. The cause and origin of these relapses remains obscure. We therefore explored the mutational landscape in high hyperdiploid (HD) ALL with whole-exome (n=19) and subsequent targeted deep sequencing of 60 genes in 100 relapsing and 51 non-relapsing cases. We identified multiple clones at diagnosis that were primarily defined by a variety of mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/Ras pathway and chromatin-modifying genes. The relapse clones consisted of reappearing as well as new mutations, and overall contained more mutations. Although RTK/Ras pathway mutations were similarly frequent between diagnosis and relapse, both intergenic and intragenic heterogeneity was essentially lost at relapse. CREBBP mutations, however, increased from initially 18-30% at relapse, then commonly co-occurred with KRAS mutations (P<0.001) and these relapses appeared primarily early (P=0.012). Our results confirm the exceptional susceptibility of HD ALL to RTK/Ras pathway and CREBBP mutations, but, more importantly, suggest that mutant KRAS and CREBBP might cooperate and equip cells with the necessary capacity to evolve into a relapse-generating clone.

  8. Randomized multicentric Italian study on two treatment regimens for marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M R; Masera, G; Zurlo, M G; Amadori, S; Mandelli, F; Bagnulo, S; Carli, M; Zanesco, L; Dini, G; Guazzelli, C

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a multicentric randomized clinical trial on the treatment of first hematological relapse in childhood ALL. Induction treatment consisted of vincristine, adriamycin, L-asparaginase, and prednisone. Patients achieving complete remission were randomized to two maintenance regimens (A and B). Regimen A consisted of five different drug associations including VM26 and IDMTX in a sequential schedule; Regimen B was essentially classical Spiers schedule for the first year, followed by a milder treatment. Eighty-four of 102 evaluable patients (82%) achieved second complete remission. The two maintenance regimens were similar as regards duration of second complete remission (median duration A, 32 weeks; B, 37 weeks) and toxicity. Better results were obtained in patients relapsing after 12 months from suspension of treatment in first complete remission than in those relapsing within the first year off therapy (82.8% vs. 31.4%). In group A fewer CNS relapses were reported. The two regimens produced results similar to those reported by other authors. The good prognosis in patients relapsing at least 1 year after treatment suspension in first complete remission must be emphasized.

  9. Chemokines and relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A role in migration and in resistance to antileukemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Ana M; Martínez, Carolina; González, Miguel; Luque, Alfonso; Melen, Gustavo J; Martínez, Jesús; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Lassaletta, Álvaro; Madero, Luís; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We studied whether chemokines may have a role in relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We compared the levels of chemokine receptors in marrow samples from 82 children with ALL at diagnosis versus 15 at relapses, and quantified the levels of chemokines in central system fluid (CSF) samples. The functional role of specific chemokines was studied in vitro and in vivo. The expression of some chemokine receptors was upregulated upon leukemic relapse, both in B- and in T-ALL, and in cases of medullary and extramedullary involvement. CXCL10 induced chemotaxis in leukemic cell lines and in primary leukemic cells, depending upon the levels of CXCR3 expression. CXCL10 specifically diminished chemotherapy-induced apoptosis on ALL cells expressing CXCR3, partially inhibiting caspase activation and maintaining the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, immunodeficient mice engrafted with CXCR3-expressing human leukemic cells showed decreased infiltration of marrow, spleen, and CNS after receiving a CXCR3-antagonist molecule. CXCR3 signaling in ALL may have a dual function: chemotactic for the localisation of leukemic blasts in specific niches, and it may also confer resistance to chemotherapy, enhancing the chances for relapses.

  10. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Children About Childhood Leukemia What Is Childhood Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  11. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Mutational profiling of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling-Wen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Mayakonda, Anand; Tan, Kar-Tong; Chien, Wenwen; Lin, De-Chen; Jiang, Yan-Yi; Xu, Liang; Garg, Manoj; Lao, Zhen-Tang; Lill, Michael; Yang, Henry; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-03-02

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of deaths of childhood cancer. Although relapse usually happens in the bone marrow, extramedullary relapse occasionally occurs including either the central nervous system or testis (<1-2%). We selected two pediatric ALL patients who experienced testicular relapse and interrogated their leukemic cells with exome sequencing. The sequencing results and clonality analyses suggest that relapse of patient D483 directly evolved from the leukemic clone at diagnosis which survived chemotherapy. In contrast, relapse leukemia cells (both bone marrow and testis) of patient D727 were likely derived from a common ancestral clone, and testicular relapse likely arose independently from the bone marrow relapsed leukemia. Our findings decipher the mutational spectra and shed light on the clonal evolution of two cases of pediatric ALL with testicular relapse. Presence of CREBBP/NT5C2 mutations suggests that a personalized therapeutic approach should be applied to these two patients.

  13. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Bone Marrow Childhood Cancer Neutropenia Stem Cell Transplants Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ...

  14. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia Many of the symptoms of childhood leukemia can ... Child’s Doctor About Childhood Leukemia? More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  15. Improving risk stratification of patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Glutathione-S-Transferases polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of relapse.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Daiana B; Abbate, Mercedes; Riccheri, María C; Nuñez, Myriam; Alfonso, Graciela; Gueron, Geraldine; De Siervi, Adriana; Vazquez, Elba; Cotignola, Javier

    2017-01-03

    The inclusion of genotype at Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) diagnosis as a genetic predictor of disease outcome is under constant study. However, results are inconclusive and seem to be population specific. We analyzed the predictive value of germline polymorphisms for childhood ALL relapse and survival. We retrospectively recruited 140 Argentine patients with de novo ALL. Genotypes were analyzed using PCR-RFLP (GSTP1 c.313A > G, MDR1 c.3435T > C, and MTHFR c.665C > T) and multiplex PCR (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null). Patients with the GSTP1 c.313GG genotype had an increased risk for relapse in univariate (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.03-6.82, p = 0.04) and multivariate (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.17-8.83, p = 0.02) models. The combined genotype slightly increased risk for relapse in the univariate (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.09-7.32, p = 0.03) and multivariate (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.14-7.79, p = 0.03) models for patients with 2/3-risk-genotypes (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null, GSTP1 c.313GG). The Recurrence-Free Survival (RFS) was shorter for GSTP1 c.313GG (p = 0.025) and 2/3-risk-genotypes (p = 0.021). GST polymorphisms increased the risk of relapse and RFS of patients with childhood ALL. The inclusion of these genetic markers in ALL treatment protocols might improve risk stratification and reduce the number of relapses and deaths.

  16. Improving risk stratification of patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Glutathione-S-Transferases polymorphisms are associated with increased risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Riccheri, María C.; Nuñez, Myriam; Alfonso, Graciela; Gueron, Geraldine; De Siervi, Adriana; Vazquez, Elba; Cotignola, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of genotype at Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) diagnosis as a genetic predictor of disease outcome is under constant study. However, results are inconclusive and seem to be population specific. We analyzed the predictive value of germline polymorphisms for childhood ALL relapse and survival. We retrospectively recruited 140 Argentine patients with de novo ALL. Genotypes were analyzed using PCR-RFLP (GSTP1 c.313A > G, MDR1 c.3435T > C, and MTHFR c.665C > T) and multiplex PCR (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null). Patients with the GSTP1 c.313GG genotype had an increased risk for relapse in univariate (OR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.03–6.82, p = 0.04) and multivariate (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.17–8.83, p = 0.02) models. The combined genotype slightly increased risk for relapse in the univariate (OR = 2.82, 95% CI = 1.09–7.32, p = 0.03) and multivariate (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.14–7.79, p = 0.03) models for patients with 2/3-risk-genotypes (GSTT1 null, GSTM1 null, GSTP1 c.313GG). The Recurrence-Free Survival (RFS) was shorter for GSTP1 c.313GG (p = 0.025) and 2/3-risk-genotypes (p = 0.021). GST polymorphisms increased the risk of relapse and RFS of patients with childhood ALL. The inclusion of these genetic markers in ALL treatment protocols might improve risk stratification and reduce the number of relapses and deaths. PMID:27058755

  17. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia after elective cessation of initial treatment: failure of subsequent treatment with cyclophosphamide, cytosine arabinoside, vincristine and prednisone (COAP).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Hitchcock-Bryan, S

    1981-01-01

    Although the majority of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can electively stop treatment after 2 1/2-5 years of continuous disease-free remission, 20-25% of those patients relapse after discontinuation of therapy. We treated 15 patients whose disease recurred after stopping treatment. Fourteen of them attained complete remission, but the median duration of disease-free survival was only 11 months. In this population, the site of initial relapse, bone marrow or testicle, did not influence subsequent outcome. Patients who relapsed within six months of stopping initial therapy had shorter second remissions than those who relapsed after six months. We conclude that the combination chemotherapy utilized in this study was inadequate for the control of relapsed ALL. Future programs will have to use different drug combinations or bone marrow transplantation.

  19. What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia? Leukemia is the most common cancer in children ... Childhood Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  20. Integration of genetic and clinical risk factors improves prognostication in relapsed childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Julie A. E.; Enshaei, Amir; Parker, Catriona A.; Sutton, Rosemary; Kuiper, Roland P.; Erhorn, Amy; Minto, Lynne; Venn, Nicola C.; Law, Tamara; Yu, Jiangyan; Schwab, Claire; Davies, Rosanna; Matheson, Elizabeth; Davies, Alysia; Sonneveld, Edwin; den Boer, Monique L.; Love, Sharon B.; Harrison, Christine J.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Revesz, Tamas; Saha, Vaskar

    2016-01-01

    Somatic genetic abnormalities are initiators and drivers of disease and have proven clinical utility at initial diagnosis. However, the genetic landscape and its clinical utility at relapse are less well understood and have not been studied comprehensively. We analyzed cytogenetic data from 427 children with relapsed B-cell precursor ALL treated on the international trial, ALLR3. Also we screened 238 patients with a marrow relapse for selected copy number alterations (CNAs) and mutations. Cytogenetic risk groups were predictive of outcome postrelapse and survival rates at 5 years for patients with good, intermediate-, and high-risk cytogenetics were 68%, 47%, and 26%, respectively (P < .001). TP53 alterations and NR3C1/BTG1 deletions were associated with a higher risk of progression: hazard ratio 2.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.70, P < .001) and 2.15 (1.32-3.48, P = .002). NRAS mutations were associated with an increased risk of progression among standard-risk patients with high hyperdiploidy: 3.17 (1.15-8.71, P = .026). Patients classified clinically as standard and high risk had distinct genetic profiles. The outcome of clinical standard-risk patients with high-risk cytogenetics was equivalent to clinical high-risk patients. Screening patients at relapse for key genetic abnormalities will enable the integration of genetic and clinical risk factors to improve patient stratification and outcome. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #ISCRTN45724312. PMID:27229005

  1. How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed? Most of the signs and symptoms of ... enlarged spleen or liver. Tests to look for leukemia in children If the doctor thinks your child ...

  2. Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Childhood Leukemia and Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Singer, Amanda W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer, affecting 3,800 children per year in the United States. Its annual incidence has increased over the last decades, especially among Latinos. Although most children diagnosed with leukemia are now cured, many suffer long-term complications, and primary prevention efforts are urgently needed. The early onset of leukemia – usually before age five – and the presence at birth of “pre-leukemic” genetic signatures indicate that pre- and postnatal events are critical to the development of the disease. In contrast to most pediatric cancers, there is a growing body of literature – in the United States and internationally – that has implicated several environmental, infectious, and dietary risk factors in the etiology of childhood leukemia, mainly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common subtype. For example, exposures to pesticides, tobacco smoke, solvents, and traffic emissions have consistently demonstrated positive associations with the risk of developing childhood leukemia. In contrast, intake of vitamins and folate supplementation during the pre-conception period or pregnancy, breastfeeding, and exposure to routine childhood infections have been shown to reduce the risk of childhood leukemia. Some children may be especially vulnerable to these risk factors, as demonstrated by a disproportionate burden of childhood leukemia in the Latino population of California. The evidence supporting the associations between childhood leukemia and its risk factors – including pooled analyses from around the world and systematic reviews – is strong; however, the dissemination of this knowledge to clinicians has been limited. To protect children’s health, it is prudent to initiate programs designed to alter exposure to well-established leukemia risk factors rather than to suspend judgement until no uncertainty remains. Primary prevention programs for childhood leukemia would also result in the significant co

  4. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  5. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  7. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Outcome of Reinduction Chemotherapy with a Modified Dose of Idarubicin for Children with Marrow-Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results of the Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (CALL)-0603 Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective trial was conducted to develop an effective and safe reinduction regimen for marrow-relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by modifying the dose of idarubicin. Between 2006 and 2009, the trial accrued 44 patients, 1 to 21 years old with first marrow-relapsed ALL. The reinduction regimen comprised prednisolone, vincristine, L-asparaginase, and idarubicin (10 mg/m2/week). The idarubicin dose was adjusted according to the degree of myelosuppression. The second complete remission (CR2) rate was 72.7%, obtained by 54.2% of patients with early relapse < 24 months after initial diagnosis and 95.0% of those with late relapse (P = 0.002). Five patients entered remission with extended treatment, resulting in a final CR2 rate of 84.1%. The CR2 rate was not significantly different according to the idarubicin dose. The induction death rate was 2.3% (1/44). The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 22.2% ± 6.4% and 27.3% ± 6.7% for all patients, 4.2% ± 4.1% and 8.3% ± 5.6% for early relapsers, and 43.8% ± 11.4% and 50.0% ± 11.2% for late relapsers, respectively. Early relapse and slow response to reinduction chemotherapy were predictors of poor outcomes. In conclusion, a modified dose of idarubicin was effectively incorporated into the reinduction regimen for late marrow-relapsed ALL with a low toxic death rate. However, the CR2 rate for early relapsers was suboptimal, and the second remission was not durable in most patients. PMID:28244291

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Clonal origins of relapse in ETV6-RUNX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    van Delft, Frederik W; Horsley, Sharon; Colman, Sue; Anderson, Kristina; Bateman, Caroline; Kempski, Helena; Zuna, Jan; Eckert, Cornelia; Saha, Vaskar; Kearney, Lyndal; Ford, Anthony; Greaves, Mel

    2011-06-09

    B-cell precursor childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion has an overall good prognosis, but relapses occur, usually after cessation of treatment and occasionally many years later. We have investigated the clonal origins of relapse by comparing the profiles of genomewide copy number alterations at presentation in 21 patients with those in matched relapse (12-119 months). We identified, in total, 159 copy number alterations at presentation and 231 at relapse (excluding Ig/TCR). Deletions of CDKN2A/B or CCNC (6q16.2-3) or both increased from 38% at presentation to 76% in relapse, suggesting that cell-cycle deregulation contributed to emergence of relapse. A novel observation was recurrent gain of chromosome 16 (2 patients at presentation, 4 at relapse) and deletion of plasmocytoma variant translocation 1 in 3 patients. The data indicate that, irrespective of time to relapse, the relapse clone was derived from either a major or minor clone at presentation. Backtracking analysis by FISH identified a minor subclone at diagnosis whose genotype matched that observed in relapse ∼ 10 years later. These data indicate subclonal diversity at diagnosis, providing a variable basis for intraclonal origins of relapse and extended periods (years) of dormancy, possibly by quiescence, for stem cells in ETV6-RUNX1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  13. Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, J J; Parker, G S; Rosen, S; Prenney, B; Healey, R; Caldwell, G G

    1986-01-01

    Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents. PMID:3083476

  14. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  15. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material.

  16. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-17

    Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Relapsed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Relapsed Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Refractory Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Relapsed Biphenotypic Leukemia; Refractory Biphenotypic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in Blast Crisis

  18. Mutational landscape, clonal evolution patterns, and role of RAS mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koichi; Khiabanian, Hossein; da Silva-Almeida, Ana C.; Tzoneva, Gannie; Abate, Francesco; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Carpenter, Zachary; Penson, Alex; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Eckert, Cornelia; Nicolas, Concepción; Balbin, Milagros; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2016-01-01

    Although multiagent combination chemotherapy is curative in a significant fraction of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 20% of cases relapse and most die because of chemorefractory disease. Here we used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape at relapse in pediatric ALL cases. These analyses identified numerous relapse-associated mutated genes intertwined in chemotherapy resistance-related protein complexes. In this context, RAS-MAPK pathway-activating mutations in the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) genes were present in 24 of 55 (44%) cases in our series. Interestingly, some leukemias showed retention or emergence of RAS mutant clones at relapse, whereas in others RAS mutant clones present at diagnosis were replaced by RAS wild-type populations, supporting a role for both positive and negative selection evolutionary pressures in clonal evolution of RAS-mutant leukemia. Consistently, functional dissection of mouse and human wild-type and mutant RAS isogenic leukemia cells demonstrated induction of methotrexate resistance but also improved the response to vincristine in mutant RAS-expressing lymphoblasts. These results highlight the central role of chemotherapy-driven selection as a central mechanism of leukemia clonal evolution in relapsed ALL, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized dual role of RAS mutations as drivers of both sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27655895

  19. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  20. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Has Responded to Treatment With Imatinib Mesylate, Dasatinib, or Nilotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  3. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Leukemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Leukemia Print A A A ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Leucemia About Leukemia The term leukemia refers to cancers of the ...

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia? A risk factor is anything that affects a ... of leukemia. Having a brother or sister with leukemia Siblings (brothers and sisters) of children with leukemia ...

  5. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. Childhood leukemia around nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Hatch, M

    1992-12-15

    Epidemiologic studies on the health effects of living near nuclear facilities have been rare and, indeed, radiobiological models would not predict any detectable increase in cancer risk to the general public from the very low levels of radioactivity emitted by nuclear installations. Thus the recent evidence suggesting an excess of childhood leukemias in the vicinity of certain nuclear sites in the United Kingdom has generated considerable controversy. To help resolve the uncertainty and enhance interpretability of results, future epidemiologic studies will need to be designed with great care (and within realistic cost limits). This commentary suggests three areas for methodologic consideration: (i) definition and modelling of radiation exposure; (ii) selection of cancer sites and sensitive subgroups; and (iii) use of incidence or mortality data. Specific suggestions for further epidemiologic research are offered as well.

  7. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  8. Incidence and risk factors for central nervous system relapse in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cancela, Camila Silva Peres; Murao, Mitiko; Viana, Marcos Borato; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite all the advances in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, central nervous system relapse remains an important obstacle to curing these patients. This study analyzed the incidence of central nervous system relapse and the risk factors for its occurrence in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods This study has a retrospective cohort design. The studied population comprised 199 children and adolescents with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia followed up at Hospital das Clinicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) between March 2001 and August 2009 and submitted to the Grupo Brasileiro de Tratamento de Leucemia da Infância - acute lymphoblastic leukemia (GBTLI-LLA-99) treatment protocol. Results The estimated probabilities of overall survival and event free survival at 5 years were 69.5% (± 3.6%) and 58.8% (± 4.0%), respectively. The cumulative incidence of central nervous system (isolated or combined) relapse was 11.0% at 8 years. The estimated rate of isolated central nervous system relapse at 8 years was 6.8%. In patients with a blood leukocyte count at diagnosis ≥ 50 x 109/L, the estimated rate of isolated or combined central nervous system relapse was higher than in the group with a count < 50 x 109/L (p-value = 0.0008). There was no difference in cumulative central nervous system relapse (isolated or combined) for the other analyzed variables: immunophenotype, traumatic lumbar puncture, interval between diagnosis and first lumbar puncture and place where the procedure was performed. Conclusions These results suggest that a leukocyte count > 50 x 109/L at diagnosis seems to be a significant prognostic factor for a higher incidence of central nervous system relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:23323068

  9. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  11. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  12. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive

  14. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Integrating Genomics into Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy of childhood, is a genetically complex entity that remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. Major advances in genomic and epigenomic profiling during the past decade have appreciably enhanced knowledge of the biology of de novo and relapsed ALL and have facilitated more precise risk stratification of patients. These achievements have also provided critical insights regarding potentially targetable lesions for development of new therapeutic approaches in the era of precision medicine. This review delineates the current genetic landscape of childhood ALL with emphasis upon patient outcomes with contemporary treatment regimens, as well as therapeutic implications of newly identified genomic alterations in specific subsets of ALL. PMID:26194091

  15. Relapse of Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia as a Breast Mass

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In acute leukemia, leukemic infiltration of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) that presented as a breast mass. A 30-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of a right breast mass with nipple discharge and easy fatigue. She had received chemotherapy and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for BAL and had been in complete remission for the last 2 years. Core needle biopsy of the breast mass revealed monomorphous infiltrates of blast cells with round nuclei and fine chromatin, consistent with leukemic infiltration. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy showed diffuse infiltration of immature cells. However, bone marrow karyotyping showed 46, XY, suggesting complete engraftment of transplanted donor cells. This is the report of BAL recurring as a breast mass. In the differential diagnosis of a breast mass, extramedullary relapse should be considered when the patient has a history of leukemia. PMID:28053635

  16. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL.

  17. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  18. Dasatinib in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia That Did Not Respond to Imatinib Mesylate

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Keep in Mind Quality of Life: Outcome of a Ten-Year Series of Post-Transplantation Early Relapses in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-A Report from the Grand Ouest Oncology Study Group for Children in France.

    PubMed

    Haro, Sophie; Tavenard, Aude; Rialland, Fanny; Taque, Sophie; Guillerm, Gaelle; Blouin, Pascale; Esvan, Maxime; Pellier, Isabelle; Gandemer, Virginie

    2016-05-01

    Relapses of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) early after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in children are uncommon but associated with a very poor prognosis. Whereas there are no current recommendations for the management of these relapses, the children's quality of life is an important issue. We studied the outcomes, including 1-year overall survival, complete remission, and quality of life, of 19 children with ALL who relapsed within the first year after their transplantation treated in the 5 participating centers between 2000 and 2011 Patients were distributed as follows: supportive care only (group A), outpatient treatment (mainly steroid and vincristine, group B), or intensive inpatient treatment (group C). There were no significant differences in 1-year overall survival (31.5% for the entire cohort) or remission rate for time between transplantation and relapse (< 6 months or 6 to 12 months), transplantation or disease characteristics, or treatment group. However, time spent in hospital (for treatment and complications) significantly differed between treatment groups B and C (20.8% ± 13.0 versus 59.1% ± 32.9, respectively; P < .05). No differences in organ toxicities, school attendance, or Lansky scores were found between treatment groups. Our sample size-limited data indicate, in a prepersonalized medicine era, that children treated with steroid and vincristine have the same prognosis as those treated with intensive therapy, but they may benefit from improved quality of life. Nevertheless, new therapeutic strategies are required and future prospective trials would help to establish recommendations.

  20. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2015-06-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 gene (PRPS1), which encodes a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapsed childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL) cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early during treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially before clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy-resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol effectively abrogated PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. These results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of the de novo purine synthesis pathway in thiopurine resistance, and they offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and thiopurine-resistant ALL.

  2. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  4. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  5. Immunoregulatory properties of childhood leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Banker, D.S.; Pahwa, R.N.; Miller, D.R.; Hilgartner, M.W.; Good, R.A.; Pahwa, S.G.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of in vitro humoral immune responses and immunoregulatory properties of leukemic cell was carried out in 17 children with acute leukemia prior to therapy. Leukemias were of the non-T, non-B-cell type in 13 patients and of T-cell origin in four. Bone marrow and peripheral blood cells consisted of 24-96% lymphoblasts and were generally deficient in surface Ig-positive cells. Induction of Ig secreting cells in response to pokeweed mitogen was markedly decreased in marrow and peripheral mononuclear cell cultures of leukemic patients. Co-culture of leukemic cells with normal lymphocytes led to marked deviations from the expected Ig secreting-cell response of the cell mixtures. The predominant effect was enhancement, as was the case with eight non-T, non-B-cell and one T-cell leukemia samples. Suppression of the Ig secreting-cell response was observed in only three instances, two with non-T, non-B-cell and one with T-cell leukemia samples. These findings implicate non-T, non-B as well as more differentiated leukemic cells in having the potential for modifying Ig production by B cells.

  6. Therapies on the Horizon for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, William L.; Hunger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review The prognosis for children with the most common childhood malignancy, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved dramatically. However the burden of therapy can be substantial with long term side effects and certain subgroups continue to have a poor outcome. Recent Advances The recent discovery of new genetic alterations in high risk subsets provide targets for precision medicine-based interventions using existing FDA approved agents. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches are being deployed in relapsed ALL, one of the leading causes of cancer cell death in children. Moreover genomic analysis has charted the evolution of tumor subclones and relapse specific alterations now provide a mechanistic explanation for drug resistance setting the stage for targeted therapy. There is greater recognition that host factors, genetic polymorphisms, influence cancer risk, response to therapy and toxicity. In the future it is anticipated that they will be integrated into clinical decision making to maximize cure and minimize side effects. Recent efforts to limit prophylactic central nervous system irradiation have been successful thereby sparing many children late neurocognitive impairments. Summary Integration of advances in precision medicine approaches and novel agents will continue to increase the cure rate and decrease the burden of therapy for childhood ALL. PMID:26576011

  7. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Clinical Evidence Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaink, Alexis; Higgins, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia accounts for nearly a third of childhood cancers in Canada, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) comprising nearly 80% of cases. Identification of prognostic factors that allow risk stratification and tailored treatment have improved overall survival. However, nearly a quarter of patients considered standard risk on the basis of conventional prognostic factors still relapse, and relapse is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Relapse is thought to result from extremely low levels of leukemic cells left over once complete remission is reached, termed minimal residual disease (MRD). Poor event-free survival (EFS) as well as overall survival for those who are classified as MRD-positive have been substantiated in seminal studies demonstrating the prognostic value of MRD for EFS in the past few decades. This review sought to further elucidate the relationship between MRD and EFS by looking at relapse, the primary determinant of EFS and the biological mechanism through which MRD is thought to act. This evidence review aimed to ascertain whether MRD is an independent prognostic factor for relapse and to assess the effect of MRD-directed treatment on patient-important outcomes in childhood ALL. Methods Large prospective cohort studies with a priori multivariable analysis that includes potential confounders are required to draw confirmatory conclusions about the independence of a prognostic factor. Data on the prognostic value of MRD for relapse measured by molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor rearrangements) or flow cytometry for leukemia-associated immunophenotypes or difference-from-normal approach were abstracted from included studies. Relevant data on relapse, EFS, and overall survival were abstracted from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of MRD-directed treatment. Results A total of 2,832 citations were reviewed, of which 12 studies were included in this

  8. Improvement of the Outcome of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children Using a Risk-Based Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Francesco; Duval, Michel; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laverdiere, Caroline; Delva, Yves-Line; Cellot, Sonia; Teira, Pierre; Bittencourt, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a leading cause of death by cancer in children. Our institution has switched relapse treatment strategy to improve survival. We reviewed records of first relapse/refractory childhood ALL between 1996 and 2012. Based on length of first remission, relapse site and immunophenotype, patients were classified into two groups: standard-risk relapse (SRR) and high-risk relapse and refractory (HRRR). Before 2007, all patients were uniformly treated with the same induction as at presentation, followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Since 2007, treatment was given according to risk of failure: SRR were mostly treated with chemotherapy; HRRR patients underwent HSCT after intensive chemotherapy, aiming reduction of pre-transplant disease burden. Sixty-four patients were included. Thirty (47%) were SRR and 34 (53%) HRRR, including 11 with refractory ALL. Five-years overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were similar for SRR, but were significantly higher with new risk-based strategy for HRRR: 56% versus 17% (P = 0.03) for OS, and 56% vs 11% for EFS (P = 0.008), respectively. In multivariate analysis, treatment strategy was significantly associated with survival. In conclusion, change for a risk-based strategy in our institution increased survival of high-risk patients to levels similar of those of standard-risk patients. PMID:27632202

  9. Improvement of the Outcome of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Children Using a Risk-Based Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Francesco; Duval, Michel; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Laverdiere, Caroline; Delva, Yves-Line; Cellot, Sonia; Teira, Pierre; Bittencourt, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a leading cause of death by cancer in children. Our institution has switched relapse treatment strategy to improve survival. We reviewed records of first relapse/refractory childhood ALL between 1996 and 2012. Based on length of first remission, relapse site and immunophenotype, patients were classified into two groups: standard-risk relapse (SRR) and high-risk relapse and refractory (HRRR). Before 2007, all patients were uniformly treated with the same induction as at presentation, followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Since 2007, treatment was given according to risk of failure: SRR were mostly treated with chemotherapy; HRRR patients underwent HSCT after intensive chemotherapy, aiming reduction of pre-transplant disease burden. Sixty-four patients were included. Thirty (47%) were SRR and 34 (53%) HRRR, including 11 with refractory ALL. Five-years overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were similar for SRR, but were significantly higher with new risk-based strategy for HRRR: 56% versus 17% (P = 0.03) for OS, and 56% vs 11% for EFS (P = 0.008), respectively. In multivariate analysis, treatment strategy was significantly associated with survival. In conclusion, change for a risk-based strategy in our institution increased survival of high-risk patients to levels similar of those of standard-risk patients.

  10. Survival and risk of relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a Mexican population is affected by dihydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    GÓMEZ-GÓMEZ, YAZMÍN; ORGANISTA-NAVA, JORGE; SAAVEDRA-HERRERA, MÓNICA VIRGINIA; RIVERA-RAMÍREZ, ANA BERTHA; TERÁN-PORCAYO, MARCO ANTONIO; DEL CARMEN ALARCÓN-ROMERO, LUZ; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; LEYVA-VÁZQUEZ, MARCO ANTONIO

    2012-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the major target of methotrexate, a key component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. Polymorphisms in the gene coding for DHFR have been associated with adverse event treatment. This study evaluated the effect of the -A317G and C829T polymorphisms in the DHFR gene on survival and risk of relapse of ALL. Seventy patients with ALL and 100 healthy individuals were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. An association between the polymorphisms and the risk of relapse was found (p<0.05); patients with the -317G/G genotype were found to have an 8.55 (95% CI 1.84–39.70) higher chance of relapse and carriers of the 829T/T genotype had a 14.0 (95% CI 1.13–172.63) higher chance of relapse. Other variables, such as age and leukocyte count, were associated (p<0.05) with the risk of relapse of the disease. Individuals with the G/G and T/T genotype of the -A317G and C829T polymorphisms had poorer survival compared to other genotype groups (log-rank test; p<0.05). Although preliminary, these data seem to suggest a role for the DHFR polymorphisms in the risk of relapse of ALL and the mortality risk in these patients. PMID:22969948

  11. Surviving childhood leukemia: career, family, and future expectations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Chris; Pikler, Vanessa I; Lavish, Lea A; Keune, Kristen M; Hutto, C J

    2008-01-01

    The authors examine the impact of childhood leukemia on the career development of 11 young adult survivors, using consensual qualitative research. They discuss the results and implications of childhood leukemia on the survivor's career, family, and future expectations, and provide recommendations for addressing the critical coping and management challenges encountered by survivors, their families, and the helping professionals who treat them.

  12. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, John C; Harrington, Bonnie; O’Brien, Susan; Jones, Jeffrey A; Schuh, Anna; Devereux, Steve; Chaves, Jorge; Wierda, William G; Awan, Farrukh T; Brown, Jennifer R; Hillmen, Peter; Stephens, Deborah M; Ghia, Paolo; Barrientos, Jacqueline C; Pagel, John M; Woyach, Jennifer; Johnson, Dave; Huang, Jane; Wang, Xiaolin; Lannutti, Brian J; Covey, Todd; Fardis, Maria; McGreivy, Jesse; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Izumi, Raquel; Diacovo, Thomas G; Johnson, Amy J; Furman, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Background Irreversible inhibition of Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) by ibrutinib represents a significant therapeutic advance for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, ibrutinib also irreversibly inhibits alternative kinase targets, which potentially compromise its therapeutic index. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a more selective irreversible Btk inhibitor specifically designed to improve upon the safety and efficacy of first generation Btk inhibitors. Methods Sixty-one patients with relapsed CLL were treated in a phase 1–2 multicenter study designed to assess the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral acalabrutinib. Patients were continuously treated with acalabrutinib 100 to 400 mg once daily in the dose-escalation portion of the study, and 100 mg twice daily in the expansion portion. Results Patient demographics include a median age of 62 years; median of 3 prior therapies; 31% del(17)(p13.1) and 75% unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred. The most common adverse events observed were headache (43%), diarrhea (39%) and increased weight (26%). Most adverse events were Grade 1–2. At a median follow-up of 14.3 months, the best overall response rate was 95%, including 85% partial response, 10% partial response with lymphocytosis and 5% stable disease. In patients with del(17)(p13.1), the best overall response was 100%. No cases of Richter’s transformation and only 1 CLL progression have occurred. Conclusions Acalabrutinib is a highly selective Btk inhibitor that provides effective and well tolerated treatment for patients with relapsed CLL, including those with del(17)(p13.1). PMID:26641137

  13. Idelalisib and Rituximab in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheson, Bruce D.; Pagel, John M.; Hillmen, Peter; Barrientos, Jacqueline C.; Zelenetz, Andrew D.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Flinn, Ian; Ghia, Paolo; Eradat, Herbert; Ervin, Thomas; Lamanna, Nicole; Coiffier, Bertrand; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Ma, Shuo; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Cramer, Paula; Aiello, Maria; Johnson, Dave M.; Miller, Langdon L.; Li, Daniel; Jahn, Thomas M.; Dansey, Roger D.; Hallek, Michael; O’Brien, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who have clinically significant coexisting medical conditions are less able to undergo standard chemo-therapy. Effective therapies with acceptable side-effect profiles are needed for this patient population. METHODS In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 study, we assessed the efficacy and safety of idelalisib, an oral inhibitor of the delta iso-form of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, in combination with rituximab versus rituximab plus placebo. We randomly assigned 220 patients with decreased renal function, previous therapy-induced myelosuppression, or major coexisting illnesses to receive rituximab and either idelalisib (at a dose of 150 mg) or placebo twice daily. The primary end point was progression-free survival. At the first prespecified interim analysis, the study was stopped early on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board owing to overwhelming efficacy. RESULTS The median progression-free survival was 5.5 months in the placebo group and was not reached in the idelalisib group (hazard ratio for progression or death in the idelalisib group, 0.15; P<0.001). Patients receiving idelalisib versus those receiving placebo had improved rates of overall response (81% vs. 13%; odds ratio, 29.92; P<0.001) and overall survival at 12 months (92% vs. 80%; hazard ratio for death, 0.28; P = 0.02). Serious adverse events occurred in 40% of the patients receiving idelalisib and rituximab and in 35% of those receiving placebo and rituximab. CONCLUSIONS The combination of idelalisib and rituximab, as compared with placebo and rituximab, significantly improved progression-free survival, response rate, and overall survival among patients with relapsed CLL who were less able to undergo chemo-therapy. (Funded by Gilead; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01539512.) PMID:24450857

  14. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Th Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25, 1.55) (using 2,785 cases and 3,635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI: 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases and 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases and 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases and 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases and 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases and 2,655 controls), respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants' exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate the associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood.

  15. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP) in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Sallan, S E; Camitta, B M; Chan, D M; Traggis, D; Jaffe, N

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated with intermittent cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytosine arabinoside, and prednisone (COAP). Group A (no prior relapse) and Group B (prior single-agent relapse) received COAP after 12 months on another chemotherapy regimen. Children in Group C (prior relapse on multiagent regimens) received COAP following A-COAP (asparaginase plus COAP) reinduction. Median disease-free survival after beginning COAP was not reached for Group A, but was only 7 months for Groups B and C. As of November 1976, there were 8 of 15 Group A patients, 1 of 12 Group B patients, and 1 of 28 Group C patients who had remained disease-free from 38 to 60 (median 54.5) months and were off chemotherapy. COAP has activity in childhood ALL. However, effectiveness is markedly diminished in patients with prior bone marrow relapse.

  16. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Joachim B.; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R.; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, ‘type 1’ relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas ‘type 2’ relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  17. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Joachim B; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-11-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, 'type 1' relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas 'type 2' relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition.

  18. Improving Access To Novel Agents For Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Gaynon, Paul S.; Sposto, Richard; Wayne, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer. Despite great progress in the development of curative therapy, leukemia remains a leading cause of death from disease in childhood and survivors are at life-long risk of complications of treatment. New agents are needed to further increase cure rates and decrease treatment-associated toxicities. The complex biology and aggressive nature of childhood leukemia, coupled with the relatively small patient population available for study, pose specific challenges to the development of new therapies. In this review, we discuss strategies and initiatives designed to improve access to new agents in the treatment of pediatric leukemia. PMID:25678105

  19. The contributions of the European Medicines Agency and its pediatric committee to the fight against childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Klaus; Walson, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the diagnosis of childhood leukemia is no longer a death sentence, too many patients still die, more with acute myeloid leukemia than with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The European Union pediatric legislation was introduced to improve pharmaceutical treatment of children, but some question whether the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approach is helping children with leukemia. Some have even suggested that the decisions of EMA pediatric committee (PDCO) are counterproductive. This study was designed to investigate the impact of PDCO-issued pediatric investigation plans (PIPs) for leukemia drugs. Methods All PIPs listed under “oncology” were downloaded from the EMA website. Non-leukemia decisions including misclassifications, waivers (no PIP), and solid tumors were discarded. The leukemia decisions were analyzed, compared to pediatric leukemia trials in the database http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, and discussed in the light of current literature. Results The PDCO leukemia decisions demand clinical trials in pediatric leukemia for all new adult drugs without prioritization. However, because leukemia in children is different and much rarer than in adults, these decisions have resulted in proposed studies that are scientifically and ethically questionable. They are also unnecessary, since once promising new compounds are approved for adults, more appropriate, prioritized pediatric leukemia trials are initiated worldwide without PDCO involvement. Conclusion EMA/PDCO leukemia PIPs do little to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia. The unintended negative effects of the flawed EMA/PDCO’s standardized requesting of non-prioritized testing of every new adult leukemia drug in children with relapsed or refractory disease expose these children to questionable trials, and could undermine public trust in pediatric clinical research. Institutions, investigators, and ethics committees/institutional review boards need to be skeptical of trials

  20. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. ETS-related gene is a novel prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Zhao; Jia, Ming; Luo, Ze-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Li, Si-Si; Zhang, Jing-Ying; Guo, Xiao-Ping; Tang, Yong-Min

    2017-01-01

    The ETS-related gene (ERG) has been demonstrated to be associated with overall survival in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia and acute T cell-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in adult patients. However, there are no data available regarding the impact of ERG expression on childhood ALL. In the present study, ERG expression levels were analyzed in bone marrow samples from 119 ALL pediatric patients. ALL patients demonstrated higher ERG expression compared with the controls (P<0.0001). In addition, low ERG expression identified a group of patients with higher white blood cell counts (P=0.011), higher percentages of T-ALL immunophenotype (P=0.027), and higher relapse rates (P=0.009). Survival analyses demonstrated that low ERG expression was associated with inferior relapse-free survival (RFS) in childhood ALL (P=0.036) and was an independent prognostic factor in multivariable analyses for RFS. In conclusion, low ERG expression is associated with poor outcomes and may be used to serve as a molecular prognostic marker to identify patients with a high risk of relapse in childhood ALL.

  2. MK2206 in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood

  3. Therapeutic Allogeneic Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Childhood Leukemia--A Look at the Past, the Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findeisen, Regina; Barber, William H.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of childhood leukemia. The causes, the survival period, different types (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia), symptoms, treatment, side effects of treatment (including learning problems), and the expected future direction of…

  5. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Predicting relapse risk in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Hunger, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    Intensive multi-agent chemotherapy regimens and the introduction of risk-stratified therapy have substantially improved cure rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Current risk allocation schemas are imperfect, as some children are classified as lower-risk and treated with less intensive therapy relapse, while others deemed higher-risk are probably over-treated. Most cooperative groups previously used morphological clearance of blasts in blood and marrow during the initial phases of chemotherapy as a primary factor for risk group allocation; however, this has largely been replaced by the detection of minimal residual disease (MRD). Other than age and white blood cell count (WBC) at presentation, many clinical variables previously used for risk group allocation are no longer prognostic, as MRD and the presence of sentinel genetic lesions are more reliable at predicting outcome. Currently, a number of sentinel genetic lesions are used by most cooperative groups for risk stratification; however, in the near future patients will probably be risk-stratified using genomic signatures and clustering algorithms, rather than individual genetic alterations. This review will describe the clinical, biological, and response-based features known to predict relapse risk in childhood ALL, including those currently used and those likely to be used in the near future to risk-stratify therapy.

  7. Home pesticide exposures and risk of childhood leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Metayer, Catherine; Clavel, Jacqueline; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Roman, Eve; Magnani, Corrado; Spector, Logan G; Petridou, Eleni; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Miligi, Lucia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Simpson, Jill; Zhang, Luoping; Rondelli, Roberto; Baka, Margarita; Orsi, Laurent; Moschovi, Maria; Kang, Alice Y; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Some previous studies have suggested that home pesticide exposure before birth and during a child's early years may increase the risk of childhood leukemia. To further investigate this, we pooled individual level data from 12 case-control studies in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Exposure data were harmonized into compatible formats. Pooled analyses were undertaken using multivariable unconditional logistic regression. The odds ratio (ORs) for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) associated with any pesticide exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and after birth were 1.39 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25, 1.55) (using (2,785 cases, 3635 controls), 1.43 (95% CI 1.32, 1.54) (5,055 cases, 7,370 controls) and 1.36 (95% CI 1.23, 1.51) (4,162 cases 5,179 controls), respectively. Corresponding ORs for risk of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) were 1.49 (95% CI 1.02, 2.16) (173 cases, 1,789 controls), 1.55 (95% CI 1.21, 1.99) (344 cases, 4,666 controls) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.76, 1.53) (198 cases, 2,655 controls) respectively. There was little difference by type of pesticide used. The relative similarity in ORs between leukaemia types, time periods and pesticide types may be explained by similar exposure patterns and effects across the time periods in ALL and AML, participants’ exposure to multiple pesticides, or recall bias. Although some recall bias is likely, until a better study design can be found to investigate associations between home pesticide use and childhood leukaemia in an equally large sample, it would appear prudent to limit the use of home pesticides before and during pregnancy, and during childhood. PMID:26061779

  8. Secondary Philadelphia chromosome and erythrophagocytosis in a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Katalin; Galani, Komal; Conley, Christopher R.; Greipp, Patricia T.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) as a secondary change during the course of hematopoietic malignancies is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Few cases of secondary Ph have been reported after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A secondary Ph at relapse is of clinical importance because it provides a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors along with or in replacement of chemotherapy. We describe a case of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after HCT that developed a BCR/ABL-1 translocation along with erythrophagocytosis by blasts as a secondary change at the time of relapse. The progression of this patient's myeloid neoplasm from myelodysplastic syndrome to acute myeloid leukemia and relapsed AML after HCT was accompanied by a stepwise cytogenetic evolution: a deletion 20q abnormality subsequently acquired deletion 7q and, finally, at relapse after HCT, a secondary Ph was gained. The relationship between the secondary Ph and the erythrophagocytosis by blasts is not clear. We review the possible pathogenesis and cytogenetic associations of erythrophagocytosis by blasts, a rare feature in acute leukemias. PMID:25074248

  9. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  10. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  11. Dexamethasone exposure and asparaginase antibodies affect relapse risk in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Liu, Chengcheng; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Fernandez, Christian A; Howard, Scott C; Campana, Dario; Panetta, John C; Bowman, W Paul; Evans, William E; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V

    2012-02-16

    We have previously hypothesized that higher systemic exposure to asparaginase may cause increased exposure to dexamethasone, both critical chemotherapeutic agents for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Whether interpatient pharmaco-kinetic differences in dexamethasone contribute to relapse risk has never been studied. The impact of plasma clearance of dexamethasone and anti-asparaginase antibody levels on risk of relapse was assessed in 410 children who were treated on a front-line clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia and were evaluable for all pharmacologic measures, using multivariate analyses, adjusting for standard clinical and biologic prognostic factors. Dexamethasone clearance (mean ± SD) was higher (P = 3 × 10(-8)) in patients whose sera was positive (17.7 ± 18.6 L/h per m(2)) versus nega-tive (10.6 ± 5.99 L/h per m(2)) for anti-asparaginase antibodies. In multivariate analyses, higher dexamethasone clearance was associated with a higher risk of any relapse (P = .01) and of central nervous system relapse (P = .014). Central nervous system relapse was also more common in patients with anti-asparaginase antibodies (P = .019). In conclusion, systemic clearance of dexamethasone is higher in patients with anti-asparaginase antibodies. Lower exposure to both drugs was associated with an increased risk of relapse.

  12. Factors associated with improved outcomes after second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Neethu N; Jenkins, Lydia M; Cui, Haiyan; Jenkins, Craig; Anwer, Faiz; Yeager, Andrew M; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    A second allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is an important therapeutic consideration for patients relapsing after their first. We conducted a retrospective review of 41 pediatric patients with leukemia that underwent a second allo-HCT at our institution. Overall, 53.7 and 43.9 % of patients were alive and disease-free at 1 and 5 years, respectively, after the second allo-HCT. The factors affecting outcome by both univariate and multivariate analysis were interval between transplants and the use of a myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen prior to second transplant. Outcomes were inferior in patients who received their second transplant <6 months from their first HCT when compared to patients in whom the interval between HCTs was 6-12 or more than 12 months. Interval between HCTs was also significant when each type of leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) n = 21, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) n = 11, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) n = 7) was analyzed separately. In univariate analysis, use of the same donor and use of a matched sibling donor resulted in significant improved outcome. There was not a significant association between disease-free survival (DFS) and age, remission status, use of total body irradiation (TBI) before second HCT, or type of leukemia. Second allogeneic HCT can be a curative therapeutic option for leukemia patients relapsing after their first transplant. As more targeted therapies have become available, patients that relapse after first HCT are more likely to achieve remission. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be more candidates for second HCT with improved performance and remission status, ultimately leading to a better outcome with the second HCT.

  13. Fetal growth and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    PubMed

    Milne, Elizabeth; Greenop, Kathryn R; Metayer, Catherine; Schüz, Joachim; Petridou, Eleni; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Roman, Eve; Dockerty, John D; Spector, Logan G; Koifman, Sérgio; Orsi, Laurent; Rudant, Jérémie; Dessypris, Nick; Simpson, Jill; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Baka, Margarita; Faro, Alessandra; Armstrong, Bruce K; Clavel, Jacqueline; Buffler, Patricia A

    2013-12-15

    Positive associations have been reported between the measures of accelerated fetal growth and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated this association by pooling individual-level data from 12 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Two measures of fetal growth-weight-for-gestational-age and proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW)-were analysed. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and combined in fixed effects meta-analyses. Pooled analyses of all data were also undertaken using multivariable logistic regression. Subgroup analyses were undertaken when possible. Data on weight for gestational age were available for 7,348 cases and 12,489 controls from all 12 studies and POBW data were available for 1,680 cases and 3,139 controls from three studies. The summary ORs from the meta-analyses were 1.24 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.36) for children who were large for gestational age relative to appropriate for gestational age, and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.24) for a one-standard deviation increase in POBW. The pooled analyses produced similar results. The summary and pooled ORs for small-for-gestational-age children were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.95), respectively. Results were consistent across subgroups defined by sex, ethnicity and immunophenotype, and when the analysis was restricted to children who did not have high birth weight. The evidence that accelerated fetal growth is associated with a modest increased risk of childhood ALL is strong and consistent with known biological mechanisms involving insulin-like growth factors. © 2013 UICC.

  14. Fetal Growth and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC)

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Elizabeth; Greenop, Kathryn R.; Metayer, Catherine; Schüz, Joachim; Petridou, Eleni; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Roman, Eve; Dockerty, John D.; Spector, Logan G.; Koifman, Sérgio; Orsi, Laurent; Rudant, Jérémie; Dessypris, Nick; Simpson, Jill; Lightfoot, Tracy; Kaatsch, Peter; Baka, Margarita; Faro, Alessandra; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Positive associations have been reported between measures of accelerated fetal growth and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated this association by pooling individual-level data from 12 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. Two measures of fetal growth – weight-for-gestational-age and proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW) – were analysed. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and combined in fixed effects meta-analyses. Pooled analyses of all data were also undertaken using multivariable logistic regression. Subgroup analyses were undertaken when possible. Data on weight for gestational age were available for 7,348 cases and 12,489 controls from all 12 studies and POBW data were available for 1,680 cases and 3,139 controls from three studies. The summary ORs from the meta-analyses were 1.24 (95% CI 1.13, 1.36) for children who were large for gestational age relative to appropriate for gestational age, and 1.16 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.24) for a one standard deviation increase in POBW. The pooled analyses produced similar results. The summary and pooled ORs for small-for-gestational-age children were 0.83 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.92) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.77, 0.95) respectively. Results were consistent across subgroups defined by sex, ethnicity and immunophenotype, and when the analysis was restricted to children who did not have high birth weight. The evidence that accelerated fetal growth is associated with a modest increased risk of childhood ALL is strong and consistent with known biological mechanisms involving insulin like growth factors. PMID:23754574

  15. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, Lymphoma, or T-Cell Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-04

    Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Choriocarcinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germinoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Central Nervous System Teratoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Ependymoblastoma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Medulloepithelioma; Childhood Mixed Glioma; Childhood Oligodendroglioma; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Gonadotroph Adenoma; Pituitary Basophilic Adenoma; Pituitary Chromophobe Adenoma; Pituitary Eosinophilic Adenoma; Prolactin Secreting Adenoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Pituitary Tumor; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; TSH Secreting Adenoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Green, Margaret L; Leisenring, Wendy M; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Riddell, Stanley R; Boeckh, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival.

  17. Socioeconomic Status and Childhood Leukemia Incidence in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Martin; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Spoerri, Adrian; Schmidlin, Kurt; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne; Brazzola, Pierluigi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Zwahlen, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) discrepancies exist for child and adult cancer morbidity and are a major public health concern. In this Swiss population-based matched case–control study on the etiology of childhood leukemia, we selected the cases from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry diagnosed since 1991 and the controls randomly from census. We assigned eight controls per case from the 1990 and 2000 census and matched them by the year of birth and gender. SES information for both cases and controls was obtained from census records by probabilistic record linkage. We investigated the association of SES with childhood leukemia in Switzerland, and explored whether it varied with different definitions of socioeconomic status (parental education, living condition, area-based SES), time period, and age. In conditional logistic regression analyses of 565 leukemia cases and 4433 controls, we found no consistent evidence for an association between SES and childhood leukemia. The odds ratio comparing the highest with the lowest SES category ranged from 0.95 (95% CI: 0.71–1.26; Ptrend = 0.73) for paternal education to 1.37 (1.00–1.89; Ptrend = 0.064) for maternal education. No effect modification was found for time period and age at diagnosis. Based on this population-based study, which avoided participation and reporting bias, we assume the potential association of socioeconomic status and childhood leukemia if existing to be small. This study did not find evidence that socioeconomic status, of Switzerland or comparable countries, is a relevant risk factor or strong confounder in etiological investigations on childhood leukemia. PMID:26175964

  18. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  19. Breastfeeding as a Protective Effect Against Childhood Leukemia and Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mehran; Haghighat, Mahmoud; Dialameh, Zahra; Tahmasbi, Leila; Parand, Shirin; Bardestani, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past several years, breastfeeding has been associated with many benefits as well as protective effects against many diseases. There is limited evidence for the relationship between breastfeeding and the incidence of leukemia. Objectives In this study, we evaluate the correlation of childhood leukemia and lymphoma with breastfeeding duration in children in southern Iran. Patients and methods Through this case control study, we compared 123 patients with leukemia and lymphoma to a control group of 137 healthy children. Statistical analysis was done using the Chi-square test and t-test as well as logistic regression methods. A P-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Our findings showed that breastfeeding duration had no significant difference between cases and controls. However, the rural living percentage in patients with leukemia and lymphoma was higher than in the control group (39.8% versus 14.6% [P < 0.001 and OR = 3.87]) and parents’ exposure to chemical materials during the war between Iran and Iraq was higher in sick patients (6.5% versus 0% [OR = 20.2%]). Conclusions The current study showed that breastfeeding duration has no protective effect against childhood leukemia and lymphoma. In addition, we suggest that some factors such as living in a rural area, smoking during pregnancy, parents’ exposure to chemical materials and low socioeconomic status can increase the incidence rate of childhood leukemia and lymphoma. PMID:28144455

  20. Molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia with emphasis on chemical exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Buffler, P.A.; Smith, M.T.; Wood, S.; Reynolds, P.

    1996-12-31

    Developing markets in the Pacific Basin depend heavily on the production and export of consumer goods. The generation of hazardous waste as a by-product of industrial production can be linked to adverse health outcomes, such as childhood leukemia, in ways that are presently unknown. In California, exposures resulting from hazardous waste disposal are of concern in the etiology of childhood cancer. Approximately 63% of the 57 hazardous waste sites that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) included in the national priority list under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) statute were in the six-county San Francisco Bay area. This area includes California`s Silicon Valley, where a disproportionate majority of these sites are located. Although only one study links hazardous waste disposal to childhood leukemia evidence is accumulating that in utero and maternal pesticide exposures as well as chemical exposures during childhood are important in the etiology of childhood leukemia. This study investigates whether children with leukemia have common genetic changes, whether children with genetic changes experience common chemical exposures, and whether the occurrences of these genetic changes correspond to the same temporal sequence as exposure. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study design and report on the status of research activity. 10 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. TNF-α increases in the CSF of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before CNS relapse.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Gamboa-Alonso, Carmen Magdalena; Jiménez-Castillo, Raúl Alberto; López-Silva, Leslie Jazmín; Pinzón-Uresti, Mónica Andrea; Gómez-De León, Andrés; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2017-03-01

    There is scarce information regarding the concentration of cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their clinical association with CNS status. A prospective analysis of 40 patients <18years with newly diagnosed ALL was performed. Human cytokine magnetic bead panel assay values of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, TNF-α in CSF at diagnosis, end of induction to remission, and 6months after diagnosis were determined. IL-6 and MCP-1 values showed a significant increment at the end of induction. From the whole group 4 (10.0%), patients relapsed to the CNS at a median of 11.48months. A significantly higher value of TNF-α at third determination in these CNS-relapsed patients was documented, 7.48 vs. 2.86pg/mL in 36 children without relapse (p=0.024). TNF-α concentration increased at a median 5.48months before CNS relapse. By receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, the best cut-off point of TNF-α concentration that better predicted CNS relapse was ≥1.79pg/mL. In conclusion an increase in TNF-α concentration on CSF preceded CNS relapse in children with ALL. An increase in MCP-1 and IL-6 was not associated to CNS relapse and appears to result from an inflammatory response after IT injection of chemotherapy.

  2. Secondary Philadelphia chromosome and erythrophagocytosis in a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kelemen, Katalin; Galani, Komal; Conley, Christopher R; Greipp, Patricia T

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) as a secondary change during the course of hematopoietic malignancies is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Few cases of secondary Ph have been reported after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A secondary Ph at relapse is of clinical importance because it provides a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors along with or in replacement of chemotherapy. We describe a case of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after HCT that developed a BCR-ABL1 translocation along with erythrophagocytosis by blasts as a secondary change at the time of relapse. The progression of this patient's myeloid neoplasm from myelodysplastic syndrome to AML to relapsed AML after HCT was accompanied by a stepwise cytogenetic evolution: A deletion 20q abnormality subsequently acquired a deletion 7q and, finally, at relapse after HCT, a secondary Ph was gained. The relationship between the secondary Ph and the erythrophagocytosis by blasts is not clear. We review the possible pathogenesis and cytogenetic associations of erythrophagocytosis by blasts, a rare feature in acute leukemias.

  3. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in the backbone of ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapse B-ALL cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early on-treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially prior to clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol can effectively abrogate PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. Overall these results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of de novo purine pathway in thiopurine resistance, and offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  4. Childhood leukemia and residential proximity to industrial and urban sites

    SciTech Connect

    García-Pérez, Javier; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Morales-Piga, Antonio; Pardo Romaguera, Elena; Tamayo, Ibon; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo; and others

    2015-07-15

    Background: Few risk factors for the childhood leukemia are well established. While a small fraction of cases of childhood leukemia might be partially attributable to some diseases or ionizing radiation exposure, the role of industrial and urban pollution also needs to be assessed. Objectives: To ascertain the possible effect of residential proximity to both industrial and urban areas on childhood leukemia, taking into account industrial groups and toxic substances released. Methods: We conducted a population-based case–control study of childhood leukemia in Spain, covering 638 incident cases gathered from the Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumors and for those Autonomous Regions with 100% coverage (period 1990-2011), and 13,188 controls, individually matched by year of birth, sex, and autonomous region of residence. Distances were computed from the respective subject’s residences to the 1068 industries and the 157 urban areas with ≥10,000 inhabitants, located in the study area. Using logistic regression, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for categories of distance to industrial and urban pollution sources were calculated, with adjustment for matching variables. Results: Excess risk of childhood leukemia was observed for children living near (≤2.5 km) industries (OR=1.31; 95%CI=1.03–1.67) – particularly glass and mineral fibers (OR=2.42; 95%CI=1.49–3.92), surface treatment using organic solvents (OR=1.87; 95%CI=1.24–2.83), galvanization (OR=1.86; 95%CI=1.07–3.21), production and processing of metals (OR=1.69; 95%CI=1.22–2.34), and surface treatment of metals (OR=1.62; 95%CI=1.22–2.15) – , and urban areas (OR=1.36; 95%CI=1.02–1.80). Conclusions: Our study furnishes some evidence that living in the proximity of industrial and urban sites may be a risk factor for childhood leukemia. - Highlights: • We studied proximity to both industrial and urban sites on childhood leukemia. • We conducted a case–control study in

  5. Current Approaches in the Treatment of Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Nestor R.; Mo, Clifton C.; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The limited sensitivity of the historical treatment response criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has resulted in a different paradigm for treatment compared with most other cancers presenting with widely disseminated disease. Initial cytotoxic induction chemotherapy is often able to reduce tumor burden to a level sufficient to meet the current criteria for “complete” remission. Nevertheless, most AML patients ultimately die from their disease, most commonly as clinically evident relapsed AML. Despite a variety of available salvage therapy options, prognosis in patients with relapsed or refractory AML is generally poor. In this review, we outline the commonly utilized salvage cytotoxic therapy interventions and then highlight novel investigational efforts currently in clinical trials using both pathway-targeted agents and immunotherapy based approaches. We conclude that there is no current standard of care for adult relapsed or refractory AML other than offering referral to an appropriate clinical trial. PMID:25932335

  6. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mody, Mayur D; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S; Kota, Vamsi K

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  7. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  8. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Childhood leukemia: electric and magnetic fields as possible risk factors.

    PubMed Central

    Brain, Joseph D; Kavet, Robert; McCormick, David L; Poole, Charles; Silverman, Lewis B; Smith, Thomas J; Valberg, Peter A; Van Etten, R A; Weaver, James C

    2003-01-01

    Numerous epidemiologic studies have reported associations between measures of power-line electric or magnetic fields (EMFs) and childhood leukemia. The basis for such associations remains unexplained. In children, acute lymphoblastic leukemia represents approximately three-quarters of all U.S. leukemia types. Some risk factors for childhood leukemia have been established, and others are suspected. Pathogenesis, as investigated in animal models, is consistent with the multistep model of acute leukemia development. Studies of carcinogenicity in animals, however, are overwhelmingly negative and do not support the hypothesis that EMF exposure is a significant risk factor for hematopoietic neoplasia. We may fail to observe effects from EMFs because, from a mechanistic perspective, the effects of EMFs on biology are very weak. Cells and organs function despite many sources of chemical "noise" (e.g., stochastic, temperature, concentration, mechanical, and electrical noise), which exceed the induced EMF "signal" by a large factor. However, the inability to detect EMF effects in bioassay systems may be caused by the choice made for "EMF exposure." "Contact currents" or "contact voltages" have been proposed as a novel exposure metric, because their magnitude is related to measured power-line magnetic fields. A contact current occurs when a person touches two conductive surfaces at different voltages. Modeled analyses support contact currents as a plausible metric because of correlations with residential magnetic fields and opportunity for exposure. The possible role of contact currents as an explanatory variable in the reported associations between EMFs and childhood leukemia will need to be clarified by further measurements, biophysical analyses, bioassay studies, and epidemiology. PMID:12782499

  10. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone. PMID:26438511

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing after first-line pediatric-inspired therapy: a retrospective GRAALL study

    PubMed Central

    Desjonquères, A; Chevallier, P; Thomas, X; Huguet, F; Leguay, T; Bernard, M; Bay, J-O; Tavernier, E; Charbonnier, A; Isnard, F; Hunault, M; Turlure, P; Renaud, M; Bastié, J-N; Himberlin, C; Lepretre, S; Lioure, B; Lhéritier, V; Asnafi, V; Beldjord, K; Lafage-Pochitaloff, M; Béné, M C; Ifrah, N; Dombret, H

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph− ALL) relapsing after pediatric-inspired front-line therapy is ill known. Here 229 relapsing Ph− ALL younger adults (18–63 years) treated within the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003/-2005 trials were considered. Salvage regimens consisted of potentially curative therapies in 194 cases, low-intensity therapies in 21, allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) in 6 and best supportive care in 8. Overall, 77 patients received allo-SCT after relapse. The median follow-up was 3.1 years. A second complete remission (CR2) was achieved in 121 patients (53%). In multivariate analysis, only younger age <45 years (P=0.008) and CR1 duration ⩾18 months (P=0.009) predicted CR2. Overall survival (OS) at 2 and 5 years was 19.3% (14–24%) and 13.3% (8–18%), respectively. In CR2 patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 and 5 years was 29.0% (21–38%) and 25% (17–33%). In multivariate analysis, CR1 duration ⩾18 months and allo-SCT after relapse were associated with longer DFS (P<0.009 and P=0.004, respectively) and longer OS (P=0.004 and P<0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, although younger adults relapsing after pediatric-inspired ALL therapies retain a poor outcome, some of them may be cured if CR1 duration ⩾18 months and if allo-SCT can be performed in CR2. New therapies are definitely needed for these patients. PMID:27935576

  12. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  13. Neuropsychological Functioning in Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeb, Roger N.; Regan, Judith M.

    1998-01-01

    Examined neuropsychological functioning of survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent central-nervous-system prophylactic treatment. Findings replicated past research in showing survivors perform poorly on visual-motor integration tasks and develop a Nonverbal Learning Disability. Findings offer recommendations for future research and…

  14. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J.; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W.; Smedby, Karin E.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  15. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  16. Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia with unusual multiple bone invasions: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HANGAI, MAYUMI; WATANABE, KENTARO; SHIOZAWA, RYOSUKE; HIWATARI, MITSUTERU; IDA, KOHMEI; TAKITA, JUNKO

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a unique pediatric case with multiple bone invasions of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during remission. An eight-year-old male with a history of ALL was admitted complaining of intermittent and migrating pain in the limb 2 years following complete remission. Magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed abnormal multifocal involvement in the bones and corresponding soft tissues. Repeated bone marrow (BM) aspiration indicated normal cellular marrow without leukemic cells, and marked leukemic cell infiltration in different sections of the ilium, respectively. These findings suggested isolated bone relapse, and it is probable that systematic BM relapse occurred as a consequence. PMID:24944655

  17. Use of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in the treatment of pediatric relapsed/ refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Elif; Sahdev, Indira

    2008-03-05

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO, MylotargTM) is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy agent that has been studied in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at first relapse in adults. There is limited experience in pediatric patients. We report six patients with refractory/relapsed CD33+AML who were treated with GO on compassionate-use basis. One patient attained remission. One patient is still alive following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and one patient died in remission. Two patients were refractory and three patients had a response with <5% blasts in the bone marrow. Fever and chills, hypotension and hypoxia were observed as side effects. Three patients developed veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver. Two of these three patients had persistence of VOD at the time of their deaths. One patient treated postSCT had bone marrow response without VOD. GO should be used cautiously in chemotherapy-refractory AML pediatric patients due to the high incidence of VOD.

  18. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Relapse Presenting With Central Nervous System Blast Crisis and Bilateral Optic Nerve Infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mbekeani, Joyce N; Abdel Fattah, Maaly; Al Nounou, Randa M; Chebbo, Wahiba; Dogar, Mohammed Asif

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral, simultaneous optic nerve sheath infiltration as a manifestation of leukemia relapse is very rare. A 45-year-old woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia was successfully treated to cytogenetic bone marrow remission 1 year previously and maintained on imatinib. She developed total bilateral blindness with marked, bilateral optic disc edema and evidence of bilateral optic nerve infiltration on magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebrospinal fluid cytology confirmed central nervous system (CNS) blast crisis. She recovered visual acuity of 20/20 in the right eye, and 20/25 in the left eye with salvage systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy before radiation therapy. Our report underscores the importance of timely and aggressive intervention of blast crisis of the CNS and the need for CNS penetrating induction and maintenance therapy.

  19. Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis Presenting as a Sole Sign of Relapsed Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kshitij; Panchal, Harsha; Parikh, Sonia; Modi, Gaurang; Talele, Avinash; Anand, Asha; Uparkar, Urmila; Joshi, Nitin; Khatawani, Itesh

    2016-06-01

    The author describes paediatric case of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) presented as aleukemic leukaemia cutis (ALC). A 2 year old child was admitted in tertiary oncology centre. He suffered from pre B cell ALL with absent Philadelphia chromosome. This patient received multiagent induction chemotherapy as per Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) protocol for ALL. He achieved remission after 28 days of treatment. Subsequently he presented with multiple skin lesions in the form of multiple small erythematous violaceous macules, papules, plaques and nodules on face, chest and back regions. Histopathological examination of biopsy of skin revealed diffuse infiltration of tumor cells with prominent nucleoli, scant eosinophilic cytoplasm and numerous mitotic figures consistent with LC. Immunohistochemistry was positive for CD 10, CD 19, CD 22, CD 24, CD 79-a and TdT while negative for surface immunoglobulin. At the time of presentation his peripheral blood smear and bone marrow examination was negative for malignant cells. Sanctuary sites including central nervous system and testicles were not involved. So patient was diagnosed as ALC. He was managed as per BFM relapse protocol for ALL. Skin lesions disappeared completely after 2 weeks of treatment. Unfortunately patient developed bone marrow and testicular relapse after 2 months. He was given testicular radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy for relapsed ALL. But his marrow was showing persistent activity and he expired after 4 months.

  20. Treating relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: liposome-encapsulated vincristine

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Tyler; Farag, Sherif S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a disease with poor outcomes in adults. While induction chemotherapy achieves a complete remission in almost 90% of patients, the majority will relapse and die of their disease. Relapsed ALL is associated with a high reinduction mortality and chemotherapy resistance, with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offering the only therapy with curative potential. However, there is no efficacious and well tolerated standard regimen accepted as a “bridge” to allogeneic stem cell transplantation or as definitive treatment for patients who are not transplant candidates. Vincristine is an active drug in patients with ALL, but its dose intensity is limited by neurotoxicity, and its full potential as an anticancer drug is thus not realized. Encapsulation of vincristine into sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle liposomes facilitates dose-intensification and densification to enhanced target tissues with reduced potential for toxicity. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI) is associated with significant responses in clinically advanced ALL, and has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed and clinically advanced Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL. This review provides an overview of the preclinical and clinical studies leading to the approval of VSLI for the treatment of relapsed and refractory ALL, and suggests potential areas of future clinical development. PMID:24072970

  1. Treating relapsed or refractory Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: liposome-encapsulated vincristine.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tyler; Farag, Sherif S

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a disease with poor outcomes in adults. While induction chemotherapy achieves a complete remission in almost 90% of patients, the majority will relapse and die of their disease. Relapsed ALL is associated with a high reinduction mortality and chemotherapy resistance, with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation offering the only therapy with curative potential. However, there is no efficacious and well tolerated standard regimen accepted as a "bridge" to allogeneic stem cell transplantation or as definitive treatment for patients who are not transplant candidates. Vincristine is an active drug in patients with ALL, but its dose intensity is limited by neurotoxicity, and its full potential as an anticancer drug is thus not realized. Encapsulation of vincristine into sphingomyelin and cholesterol nanoparticle liposomes facilitates dose-intensification and densification to enhanced target tissues with reduced potential for toxicity. Vincristine sulfate liposome injection (VSLI) is associated with significant responses in clinically advanced ALL, and has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed and clinically advanced Philadelphia chromosome-negative ALL. This review provides an overview of the preclinical and clinical studies leading to the approval of VSLI for the treatment of relapsed and refractory ALL, and suggests potential areas of future clinical development.

  2. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR), and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR) per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level). Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3); acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million), followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million), and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million). The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million). For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million) and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million). The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8%) were classified as high

  3. Cyclophosphamide, ara-C and topotecan (CAT) for patients with refractory or relapsed acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cortes, J; Estey, E; Beran, M; O'Brien, S; Giles, F; Koller, C; Keating, M; Kantarjian, H

    2000-02-01

    Topotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor with significant activity in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Pre-clinical data suggest a synergistic activity with DNA damaging agents such as cyclophosphamide, where topotecan might prevent the repair of cyclophosphamide-induced DNA damage. We thus designed a combination including cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 every 12 hours given on days 1 to 3; topotecan 1.25 mg/m2/day by continuous infusion on days 2 to 6, and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) 2 g/m2 over 4 hours daily for 5 days on days 2 to 6 (CAT). Sixty six (63 evaluable) patients were treated. Fifty two patients had refractory (n=12) or relapsed (n=40) acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and eleven had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) (refractory n=3, relapsed n=8); their median age was 57 years (range, 18 to 79 years). Eleven patients (17%) achieved a complete remission (CR), and two patients (3%) had a hematologic improvement (HI; met all criteria for CR except for platelets < 100x10(9)/L), for an overall response rate of 20%. Responses occurred in 12 of 52 AML patients (23%), including 10 CR (19%) and 2 HI (4%), and in 1 of 11 patients with ALL (9%). Myelosuppression was universal; there were 23 episodes of pneumonia or sepsis and 18 episodes of fever of unknown origin complicating 74 courses of CAT. Non-hematologic toxicity was mostly gastrointestinal, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and mucositis, but was severe in only 8%. In summary, the CAT regimen is well tolerated and has significant anti-leukemia activity which warrants further investigation.

  4. Successful cell-mediated cytokine-activated immunotherapy for relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Shapira, Michael Y; Resnick, Igor B; Amar, Avraham; Kristt, Don; Dray, Lilianne; Budowski, Einat; Or, Reuven

    2009-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely aggressive disease with a high relapse rate even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report the successful outcome of cell-mediated cytokine-activated immunotherapy in a high-risk pediatric AML patient who relapsed shortly after allogeneic HSCT. Donor lymphocyte infusion along with interferon induced a graft-versus-leukemia effect, presenting as a reversible episode of graft-versus-host disease, which led to stable complete donor chimerism and total eradication of AML for over 24 months, at the time of this report. The curative potential of immunotherapy in hematological malignancies is discussed.

  5. Relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemodialysis-dependent patient treated with arsenic trioxide: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In the relapsed setting, arsenic trioxide remains the backbone of treatment. Scant literature exists regarding treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with renal failure. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to report a safe and effective means of treatment for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in the setting of advanced renal failure, employing titration of arsenic trioxide based on clinical parameters rather than arsenic trioxide levels. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man with a history of acute promyelocytic leukemia in remission for 3 years, as well as dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure secondary to a solitary kidney and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy presented to our hospital with bone marrow biopsy-confirmed relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Arsenic trioxide was begun at a low dose with dose escalation based only on side effect profile monitoring and not laboratory testing for induction as well as maintenance without undue toxicity. Our patient achieved and remains in complete hematologic and molecular remission as of this writing. Conclusion Arsenic trioxide can be used safely and effectively to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with advanced renal failure using careful monitoring of side effects rather than blood levels of arsenic to guide therapeutic dosing. PMID:23078653

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. PMID:27668104

  7. Pharmacogenetics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Pombar-Gomez, Maria; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. Although treatment outcome has improved owing to advances in chemotherapy, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails while some patients experience severe toxicity. In the last few years, several pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to search for markers of outcome and toxicity in pediatric ALL. However, to date, TPMT is the only pharmacogenetic marker in ALL with clinical guidelines for drug dosing. In this article, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in pharmacogenetics for pediatric ALL, such as the interest drawn by methotrexate transporters in the context of methotrexate treatment. Even if most of the studies are centered on coding genes, we will also point to new approaches focusing on noncoding regions and epigenetic variation that could be interesting for consideration in the near future.

  8. Evolution of a FLT3-TKD mutated subclone at meningeal relapse in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bochtler, Tilmann; Fröhling, Stefan; Weichert, Wilko; Endris, Volker; Thiede, Christian; Hutter, Barbara; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D.; Krämer, Alwin

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the case of an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient who—although negative for FLT3 mutations at diagnosis—developed isolated FLT3 tyrosine kinase II domain (FLT3-TKD)-positive meningeal relapse, which, in retrospect, could be traced back to a minute bone marrow subclone present at first diagnosis. Initially, the 48-yr-old female diagnosed with high-risk APL had achieved complete molecular remission after standard treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy according to the AIDA (ATRA plus idarubicin) protocol. Thirteen months after the start of ATRA maintenance, the patient suffered clinically overt meningeal relapse along with minute molecular traces of PML/RARA (promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor alpha) in the bone marrow. Following treatment with arsenic trioxide and ATRA in combination with intrathecal cytarabine and methotrexate, the patient achieved a complete molecular remission in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow, which currently lasts for 2 yr after completion of therapy. Whole-exome sequencing and subsequent ultradeep targeted resequencing revealed a heterozygous FLT3-TKD mutation in CSF leukemic cells (p.D835Y, c.2503G>T, 1000/1961 reads [51%]), which was undetectable in the concurrent bone marrow sample. Interestingly, the FLT3-TKD mutated meningeal clone originated from a small bone marrow subclone present in a variant allele frequency of 0.4% (6/1553 reads) at initial diagnosis. This case highlights the concept of clonal evolution with a subclone harboring an additional mutation being selected as the “fittest” and leading to meningeal relapse. It also further supports earlier suggestions that FLT3 mutations may play a role for migration and clonal expansion in the CSF sanctuary site. PMID:27626069

  9. Ibrutinib efficacy and tolerability in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia following allogeneic HCT

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Christine E.; Sahaf, Bita; Logan, Aaron C.; O’Brien, Susan; Byrd, John C.; Hillmen, Peter; Brown, Jennifer R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Mato, Anthony R.; Keating, Michael J.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Clow, Fong; Rezvani, Andrew R.; Styles, Lori; Coutre, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib, a potent and irreversible small-molecule inhibitor of both Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and interleukin-2 inducible kinase (ITK), has been used to treat relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Here, we present 27 patients with relapsed CLL following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) who subsequently received ibrutinib salvage therapy. Sixteen of these patients were part of multi-institutional clinical trials and achieved an overall response rate of 87.5%. An additional 11 patients were treated at Stanford University following US Food and Drug Administration approval of ibrutinib; 7 (64%) achieved a complete response, and 3 (27%) achieved a partial response. Of the 9 patients treated at Stanford who had mixed chimerism–associated CLL relapse, 4 (44%) converted to full donor chimerism following ibrutinib initiation, in association with disease response. Four of 11 (36%) patients evaluated by ClonoSeq achieved minimal residual disease negativity with CLL <1/10 000 white blood cells, which persisted even after ibrutinib was discontinued, in 1 case even after 26 months. None of the 27 patients developed graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) following ibrutinib initiation. We postulate that ibrutinib augments the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) benefit through a T-cell–mediated effect, most likely due to ITK inhibition. To investigate the immune modulatory effects of ibrutinib, we completed comprehensive immune phenotype characterization of peripheral B and T cells from treated patients. Our results show that ibrutinib selectively targets pre–germinal B cells and depletes Th2 helper cells. Furthermore, these effects persisted after drug discontinuation. In total, our results provide evidence that ibrutinib effectively augments GVL without causing GVHD. PMID:27802969

  10. FCR and Bevacizumab (FCR-B) Treatment in Patients with Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Preetesh; Lee, Hun Ju; Qiao, Wei; Wierda, William; Benjamini, Ohad; Burger, Jan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Estrov, Zeev; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael; O’Brien, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) often achieve response with chemoimmunotherapy but have short remission durations. Studies have shown that patients with CLL have increased angiogenesis in the microenvironment; levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors such as VEGF and/or angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) are also elevated. Increased angiogenesis correlates with poor outcome in CLL. Bevacizumab (B) is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting VEGF-A. In this study, we analysed whether a combination of bevacizumab (B) with FCR chemoimmunotherapy (FCR-B) could improve outcomes in patients with relapsed CLL. Sixty-two patients were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 60 years (range, 31–84 years) and 40% had received >1 prior therapy for CLL. Sixty-one patients were evaluable for toxicity and 57 were evaluable for response. Six cycles were planned; 36 (59%) patients completed ≥ 4–6 cycles of the regimen. The overall response rate (ORR) was 79% with 13 (23%) complete remissions (CR), 8 (14%) nodular partial remissions (nPR) and 24 (43%) partial remissions (PR). The median progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 13.5 and 45 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities included febrile neutropenia (n=40), infections (n=21), thrombocytopenia (n=18) and anemia (n=9). Results with FCR-B were similar to those observed with an historical cohort of relapsed patients treated with FCR. PMID:25043749

  11. Liposomal vincristine for relapsed or refractory Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Priyanka; Hess, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies that arise from clonal proliferation of immature lymphoid cells in the bone marrow, peripheral blood and other organs. There are approximately 3000 new adult cases diagnosed every year in the United States with a 5-year overall survival ranging from 22% to 50%. Most adult patients with ALL who achieve a complete response will ultimately relapse and for this subset of patients the only hope of curative therapy is successful re-induction to achieve a complete response followed by allogeneic transplant. Conventional vincristine has been used in all phases of ALL therapy but its efficacy is limited by cumulative toxicity, typically neuropathic in nature. Historically, the dose of conventional vincristine has been capped at 2 mg to avoid severe neurotoxicity. Liposomal vincristine [as vincristine sulfate liposomal injection (VSLI)] constitutes encapsulating vincristine in a sphingomyelin/cholesterol envelope. This process is thought to enhance drug delivery to the target tissues, decrease neurotoxicity by reducing the percentage of free drug in the plasma and therefore results in increased efficacy with acceptable toxicity. Results from recent trials using VSLI in the setting of relapsed/refractory Ph-negative ALL have been encouraging. VSLI as salvage monotherapy has been successful in inducing complete responses in a minority of adults with relapsed/refractory ALL so that they can be bridged to stem-cell transplantation. Rigorous post-approval testing needs to be conducted to clarify its utility in the clinic. PMID:24490021

  12. Treatment delay and the risk of relapse in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Amelia; Collins, Anna; Fox, Kahlia; Shields, Sarah; Ritchie, Petra; Kirby, Maria; Revesz, Tamas

    2017-03-13

    Delays or interruptions in chemotherapy due to toxicity such as neutropenia or severe infections are common in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Based on the reports of worse outcomes in children with poorer compliance with therapy, there has been concern that toxicity-induced therapy interruptions could also compromise treatment outcome. In a retrospective study of treatment delays in our hospital between 2003 and 2013, the case notes of 141 patients were reviewed. The cumulative lengths of delays during the whole length of chemotherapy, during the intensive phase of treatment, and during maintenance treatment were analyzed. Within these categories, delays were split between less and more than the median value. The risk of relapse did not differ between patients with a longer or shorter delay during the total length of treatment or during the intensive phase. In addition, there was a trend when comparing patients above vs below the mean in length of treatment delays during maintenance, and there was a statistically significant difference in relapses when comparing patients in the lowest and highest quartiles of maintenance delays, with fewer relapses among those patients in the highest quartile for treatment delays.

  13. [Analysis of gene expression and DNA methylation patterns in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Kazutoshi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka

    2016-04-01

    The 5-year survival rate of patients with childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) now exceeds 90%, though there are still patients who fail to achieve remission or relapse early. To improve the outcomes of these cases, new diagnostic markers for stratification of those with unfavorable outcomes and novel targets for treatment have been investigated based on data from the OMICs analysis. We performed gene expression analysis of leukemic cells from 91 near-diploid BCP-ALL cases without specific fusion genes enrolled in Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group (TCCSG)-L0416 & L0616 clinical trials employing the Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. Among them, DNA methylation status was analyzed in 24 cases by using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Herein, initially, the current situations of gene expression analysis and DNA methylation analysis of childhood BCP-ALL are reviewed. Then, our analyses of gene expressions and DNA methylation related to the prognosis of childhood ALL without fusion genes are presented.

  14. Small sizes and indolent evolutionary dynamics challenge the potential role of P2RY8-CRLF2-harboring clones as main relapse-driving force in childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Morak, Maria; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Fischer, Susanna; Nassimbeni, Christine; Grausenburger, Reinhard; Bastelberger, Stephan; Krentz, Stefanie; Cario, Gunnar; Kasper, David; Schmitt, Klaus; Russell, Lisa J; Pötschger, Ulrike; Stanulla, Martin; Eckert, Conny; Mann, Georg; Haas, Oskar A; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate

    2012-12-20

    The P2RY8-CRLF2 fusion defines a particular relapse-prone subset of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (AIEOP-BFM) 2000 protocols. To investigate whether and to what extent different clone sizes influence disease and relapse development, we quantified the genomic P2RY8-CRLF2 fusion product and correlated it with the corresponding CRLF2 expression levels in patients enrolled in the BFM-ALL 2000 protocol in Austria. Of 268 cases without recurrent chromosomal translocations and high hyperdiploidy, representing approximately 50% of all cases, 67 (25%) were P2RY8-CRLF2 positive. The respective clone sizes were ≥ 20% in 27% and < 20% in 73% of them. The cumulative incidence of relapse of the entire fusion-positive group was clone size independent and significantly higher than that of the fusion-negative group (35% ± 8% vs 13% ± 3%, P = .008) and primarily confined to the non-high-risk group. Of 22 P2RY8-CRLF2-positive diagnosis/relapse pairs, only 4/8 had the fusion-positive dominant clone conserved at relapse, whereas none of the original 14 fusion-positive small clones reappeared as the dominant relapse clone. We conclude that the majority of P2RY8-CRLF2-positive clones are small at diagnosis and virtually never generate a dominant relapse clone. Our findings therefore suggest that P2RY8-CRLF2-positive clones do not have the necessary proliferative or selective advantage to evolve into a disease-relevant relapse clone.

  15. Maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, M.; Adami, H.O.; Ericson, A. )

    1991-07-15

    This report describes an exploratory population-based study of maternal and perinatal risk factors for childhood leukemia in Sweden. The Swedish National Cancer Registry ascertained 411 cases in successive birth cohorts from 1973 through 1984 recorded in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. Using the latter, we matched five controls without cancer to each case by sex and month and year of birth. Mothers of children with leukemia were more likely to have been exposed to nitrous oxide anesthesia during delivery than mothers of controls (odds ratio (OR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0, 1.6). Children with leukemia were more likely than controls to have Down's syndrome (OR = 32.5; 95% CI = 7.3, 144.0) or cleft lip or cleft palate (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.0, 24.8); to have had a diagnosis associated with difficult labor but unspecified complications (OR = 4.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 18.2) or with other conditions of the fetus or newborn (OR = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1, 2.1), specifically, uncomplicated physiological jaundice (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 2.9); or to have received supplemental oxygen (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.3, 4.9). Because multiple potential risk factors were analyzed in this study, future studies need to check these findings. The authors did not confirm the previously reported higher risks for childhood leukemia associated with being male, having a high birth weight, or being born to a woman of advanced maternal age.

  16. Clinical study of Mito-FLAG regimen in treatment of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng; Cai, Fangfang; Jiang, Lei; Zhang, Shenghui; Shen, Zhijian; Sun, Lan; Gao, Shenmeng

    2013-03-01

    Patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have unfavorable prognosis and require innovative therapeutic approaches. In this study we used fludarabine combined with a middle dose of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), mitoxantrone and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) as a salvage therapy for patients with relapsed AML in China. Forty-five patients with relapsed AML were treated with the Mito-FLAG regimen consisting of mitoxantrone (7 mg/m(2), day 1, 3 and 5), fludarabine (30 mg/m(2), days 1-5), Ara-C (1 g/m(2), over 3 h every 12 h, days 1-5) and G-CSF [5 μg/kg/day subcutaneously from day 0 until the white blood count (WBC) was >20×10(9)/l]. Patients with a partial response (PR) received another course of the same regimen. Patients with a suitable donor and aged <50 years received allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Twenty-three patients (51%) and 3 patients (7%) achieved complete remission (CR) and PR, respectively, following one or two courses of Mito-FLAG, and the overall response (OR) rate was 58%. Nine patients (20%) received allo-SCT and 4 patients (9%) succumbed early. Hematological toxicity and infections were the most prominent toxicities of this regimen. Other toxicities included nausea, vomiting, bleeding, hyperbilirubinemia, renal toxicity and arrhythmia. The probability of overall survival (OS) at 4 years was 19% (95% CI, 11-26%) and the probability of 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 29% for all 23 patients in CR (95% CI, 18-41%). Our data suggest that Mito-FLAG is a highly effective and well-tolerated salvage regimen for relapsed AML.

  17. Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Relapsed/Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, Issa F.; Bassett, Roland; Poindexter, Nancy; O'Brien, Susan; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.; Hsu, Yvonne; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J.; Champlin, Richard; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation (NST) in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is not well established. The authors report on long-term experience with NST in relapsed/refractory CLL and define prognostic factors associated with outcome. METHODS The authors reviewed the outcome of 86 patients with relapsed/relapsed CLL enrolled in sequential NST protocols. RESULTS The median patient age was 58 years. Patients were heavily pretreated before transplantation, and 43 required immunomanipulation after NST for persistent or recurrent disease. Immunomanipulation included withdrawal of immunosuppression, rituximab, and step-wise donor lymphocyte infusions. Of 43 patients receiving immunomanipulation, 20 (47%) experienced a complete remission. Patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype A1+/A2−/B44− were more likely to experience a complete remission (P ¼ .0009), with rates of 9%, 36%, 50%, and 91%, respectively, for 0, 1, 2, and 3 of these HLA factors. This resulted in significant improvement in progression-free-survival rates of 68.2% at 5 years for patients with all 3 HLA factors. Overall, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 51%. In a multivariate model, a CD4 count of <100/mm3 and a below normal serum immunoglobulin G level at study entry were associated with a short survival duration (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS These results confirm the potential cure of relapsed/refractory CLL with NST and provide the first evidence that immunoglobulin G and CD4 levels are predictive of overall survival after NST in CLL and that human leukocyte antigen alleles predict response to immunomanipulation. PMID:21455998

  18. The prognostic significance of early treatment response in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01

    PubMed Central

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael N.; Gibson, Brenda; Tamminga, Rienk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Hasle, Henrik; Maschan, Alexey; Bertrand, Yves; Leverger, Guy; von Neuhoff, Christine; Razzouk, Bassem; Rizzari, Carmelo; Smisek, Petr; Smith, Owen P.; Stark, Batia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan L.

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of early response to treatment has not been reported in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. In order to identify an early and easily applicable prognostic factor allowing subsequent treatment modifications, we assessed leukemic blast counts in the bone marrow by morphology on days 15 and 28 after first reinduction in 338 patients of the international Relapsed-AML2001/01 trial. Both day 15 and day 28 status was classified as good (≤20% leukemic blasts) in 77% of patients. The correlation between day 15 and 28 blast percentages was significant, but not strong (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, P<0.001). Survival probability decreased in a stepwise fashion along with rising blast counts at day 28. Patients with bone marrow blast counts at this time-point of ≤5%, 6–10%, 11–20% and >20% had 4-year probabilities of survival of 52%±3% versus 36%±10% versus 21%±9% versus 14%±4%, respectively, P<0.0001; this trend was not seen for day 15 results. Multivariate analysis showed that early treatment response at day 28 had the strongest prognostic significance, superseding even time to relapse (< or ≥12 months). In conclusion, an early response to treatment, measured on day 28, is a strong and independent prognostic factor potentially useful for treatment stratification in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with ISRCTN code: 94206677. PMID:24763401

  19. Intraventricular meningioma after cranial irradiation for childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ney, Douglas E; Huse, Jason T; Dunkel, Ira J; Steinherz, Peter G; Haque, Sofia; Khakoo, Yasmin

    2010-10-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common brain tumors in adults. They are most commonly located over the cerebral convexities and are infrequently found in an intraventricular location. Ionizing cranial radiation is a risk factor for late occurrence of meningiomas within the radiation field. While pathologic grading of meningiomas is straightforward, significant variability often exists between pathologists in applying standard grading criteria. This has implications for prognosis. Radiation-induced meningiomas may also have predilection to recur. The authors describe a case of an intraventricular meningioma occurring 23 years after cranial irradiation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  20. Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Todd M; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Ness, Kirsten K

    2016-04-01

    Treatment-related obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Both conditions often begin during therapy. Preventive measures, including dietary counseling and tailored exercise, should be initiated early in the course of survivorship, with referral to specialists to optimize success. However, among adults who develop obesity or the metabolic syndrome and who do not respond to lifestyle therapy, medical intervention may be indicated to manage underlying pathology, such as growth hormone deficiency, or to mitigate risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Because no specific clinical trials have been done in this population to treat metabolic syndrome or its components, clinicians who follow adult survivors of childhood ALL should use the existing American Heart Association/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Scientific Statement to guide their approach.

  1. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  2. Institutional experience with clofarabine and cytarabine in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lucas; Fernandez-Navarro, Jose Maria; Del Mar Andres, Maria; Bautista, Francisco; Tasso, Maria; Verdeguer, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Cytarabine (1000 mg/m/d intravenous for 5 d) and clofarabine (40 mg/m/d intravenous for 5 d) were given every 28 days to 9 children with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia at our institution. Among 19 courses, there were 18 infectious episodes. Median hospitalization time was 13 days (7.7 to 30.5 d) per cycle. Hepatobiliary abnormalities included alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase elevation and hyperbilirubinemia. Four patients achieved complete remission (one after an earlier allogeneic Haematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant). Four patients are alive disease free. In summary, a proportion of children responded and was able to receive allogeneic Haematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant. Side effects were tolerable, although hospitalization time was prolonged.

  3. Current Strategies for the Detection of Minimal Residual Disease in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Juliana Maria Camargos; Xavier, Sandra Guerra; de Lima Souza, Marcelo Eduardo; Assumpção, Juliana Godoy; Murao, Mitiko; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer in children. Current treatment strategies for childhood ALL result in long-term remission for approximately 90% of patients. However, the therapeutic response is worse among those who relapse. Several risk stratification approaches based on clinical and biological aspects have been proposed to intensify treatment in patients with high risk of relapse and reduce toxicity on those with a greater probability of cure. The detection of residual leukemic cells (minimal residual disease, MRD) is the most important prognostic factor to identify high-risk patients, allowing redefinition of chemotherapy. In the last decades, several standardized research protocols evaluated MRD using immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and/or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction at different time points during treatment. Both methods are highly sensitive (10−3 a 10−5), but expensive, complex, and, because of that, require qualified staff and frequently are restricted to reference centers. The aim of this article was to review technical aspects of immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to evaluate MRD in ALL. PMID:27158437

  4. Neuropsychological sequelae of central nervous system prophylaxis in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Said, J.A.; Waters, B.G.; Cousens, P.; Stevens, M.M.

    1989-04-01

    We assessed neuropsychologically 106 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had all received cranial irradiation for the prevention of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia 1-13 years previously. Children were assessed for adverse late effects of their therapy, using age-appropriate Wechsler measures of overall intellectual ability and supplementary tests. Forty-five siblings near in age to the patients were tested as controls. The patients who had had the most intensive central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis were found to have a WISC-R Full Scale IQ 17 points lower than the sibling control group. Performance IQ was more affected than verbal IQ. The patients were more easily distracted and less able to concentrate. The severity of the aftereffects was related to younger age at the time of CNS prophylaxis and to a higher dose of cranial irradiation but not to time since CNS prophylaxis. CNS prophylaxis using a combination of cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate has lowered the incidence of CNS relapse in childhood ALL but is associated with considerable long-term morbidity in survivors.

  5. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  6. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Idelalisib sensitivity and mechanisms of disease progression in relapsed TCF3-PBX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eldfors, S; Kuusanmäki, H; Kontro, M; Majumder, M M; Parsons, A; Edgren, H; Pemovska, T; Kallioniemi, O; Wennerberg, K; Gökbuget, N; Burmeister, T; Porkka, K; Heckman, C A

    2017-01-01

    TCF3-PBX1 (E2A-PBX1) is a recurrent gene fusion in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL), which is caused by the translocation t(1;19)(q23;p13). TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL patients typically benefit from chemotherapy; however, many relapse and subsequently develop resistant disease with few effective treatment options. Mechanisms driving disease progression and therapy resistance have not been studied in TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL. Here, we aimed to identify novel treatment options for TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL by profiling leukemia cells from a relapsed patient, and determine molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis and progression. By drug-sensitivity testing of leukemic blasts from the index patient, control samples and TCF3-PBX1 positive and negative BCP-ALL cell lines, we identified the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase delta (p110δ) inhibitor idelalisib as an effective treatment for TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL. This was further supported by evidence showing TCF3-PBX1 directly regulates expression of PIK3CD, the gene encoding p110δ. Other somatic mutations to TP53 and MTOR, as well as aberrant expression of CXCR4, may influence additional drug sensitivities specific to the index patient and accompanied progression of the disease. Our results suggest that idelalisib is a promising treatment option for patients with TCF3-PBX1 BCP-ALL, whereas other drugs could be useful depending on the genetic context of individual patients. PMID:27461063

  8. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  9. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. The role of idelalisib in the treatment of relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Kruti Sheth; Cheson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first in class, delta isoform specific, PI3-kinase inhibitor. Based on its high level of efficacy and acceptable safety profile, this oral drug has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as a single agent for the treatment of relapsed or refractory small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and in combination with rituximab for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Adverse effects of particular concern include diarrhea, pneumonitis, and transient elevations of hepatic transaminase levels. Efforts to improve on the activity of this drug have included combinations with standard chemotherapy agents, such as bendamustine, and other targeted therapies, including checkpoint inhibitors. However, other combinations have been associated with life-threatening and fatal toxicities. Thus, the development of such regimens should be conducted carefully in the context of a clinical research study. Idelalisib has a vital role as second-line therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, especially for patients with high-risk disease and multiple comorbidities, and studies are exploring the use of this agent as front-line therapy to improve the outcome of patients with indolent B-cell malignancies. PMID:27054023

  13. Lymphocyte aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness in acute leukemia of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Blumer, J.L.; Dunn, R.; Esterhay, M.D.; Yamashita, T.S.; Gross, S.

    1981-12-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity and inducibility were examined in mitogen-stimulated cultured lymphocytes from children with acute leukemia in remission, with nonleukemic malignancies, and with no family or personal history of malignant disease. Neither morphological differences nor differences in mitogen responsivelness were observed among the three sources of cells studied. Levels of constitutive and dibenzanthracene-induced AHH activity were found to be similar among the three groups by analysis of variance. However, when results were analyzed in terms of inducibility ratios, it was found that cells from leukemic children were significantly less inducible (p < 0.005) than cells from unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancies. The reason for this difference became apparent when statistical criteria were employed for the phenotypic separation of individuals who were highly aromatic hydrocarbon responsive and minimally responsive. A significantly larger proportion (p < 0.001) of leukemic children than unaffected children or children with nonleukemic malignancy were found to be minimally aromatic hydrocarbon responsive. Moreover, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing while on therapy, longer durations of the first remission were correlated (r = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the highly inducible AHH phenotype.

  14. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Parental occupational paint exposure and risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Magnani, Corrado; Petridou, Eleni; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Dockerty, John D; Glass, Deborah C; Lightfoot, Tracy; Miligi, Lucia; Rudant, Jérémie; Baka, Margarita; Rondelli, Roberto; Amigou, Alicia; Simpson, Jill; Kang, Alice; Moschovi, Maria; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that parental occupational paint exposure around the time of conception or pregnancy increases the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring. Methods We obtained individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Meta-analyses of study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were undertaken, as well as pooled analyses of individual data using unconditional logistic regression. Results Using individual data from fathers of 8,185 cases and 14,210 controls, the pooled OR for paternal exposure around conception and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was 0.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76, 1.14). Analysis of data from 8,156 ALL case mothers and 14,568 control mothers produced a pooled OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.39, 1.68) for exposure during pregnancy. For acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the pooled ORs for paternal and maternal exposure were 0.96 (95% CI 0.65, 1.41) and 1.31 (95% CI 0.38, 4.47) respectively, based on data from 1,231 case and 11,392 control fathers and 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers. Heterogeneity among the individual studies ranged from low to modest. Conclusions Null findings for paternal exposure for both ALL and AML are consistent with previous reports. Despite the large sample size, results for maternal exposure to paints in pregnancy were based on small numbers of exposed. Overall, we found no evidence that parental occupational exposure to paints increases the risk of leukemia in the offspring, but further data on home exposure are needed. PMID:25088805

  2. A 50-Year Journey to Cure Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.

    2013-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of Seminars in Hematology coincides with the 50th of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and both milestones are inexorably linked to studies contributing to the cure of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We thought it fitting, therefore, to mark these events by traveling back in time to point out some of the achievements, institutions, study groups and individuals that have made cure of childhood ALL a reality. In many instances, progress was driven by new ideas, while in others it was driven by new experimental tools that allowed more precise assessment of the biology of leukemic blasts and their utility in selecting therapy. We also discuss a number of contemporary advances that point the way to exciting future directions. Whatever pathways are taken, a clear challenge will be to use emerging genome-based or immunologic-based treatment options in ways that will enhance, rather than duplicate or compromise, recent gains in outcome with classic cytotoxic chemotherapy. The theme of this journey serves as a reminder of the chief ingredient of any research directed to a catastrophic disease such as ALL. It is the audacity of a small group of investigators who confronted a childhood cancer with the goal of cure, not palliation, as their mindset. PMID:23953334

  3. Parental occupational pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: findings from the childhood leukemia international consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen D; Fritschi, Lin; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Glass, Deborah C; Miligi, Lucia; Dockerty, John D; Lightfoot, Tracy; Clavel, Jacqueline; Roman, Eve; Spector, Logan G; Kaatsch, Peter; Metayer, Catherine; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Simpson, Jill; Rudant, Jérémie; Sidi, Vasiliki; Rondelli, Roberto; Orsi, Laurent; Kang, Alice Y; Petridou, Eleni; Schüz, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    Maternal occupational pesticide exposure during pregnancy and/or paternal occupational pesticide exposure around conception have been suggested to increase risk of leukemia in the offspring. With a view to providing insight in this area we pooled individual level data from 13 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC). Occupational data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled individual analyses were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Using exposure data from mothers of 8,236 cases, and 14,850 controls, and from fathers of 8,169 cases and 14,201 controls the odds ratio (OR) for maternal exposure during pregnancy and the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was 1.01 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78, 1.30] and for paternal exposure around conception 1.20 (95% 1.06, 1.38). For acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the OR for maternal exposure during pregnancy was 1.94 (CI 1.19, 3.18) and for paternal exposure around conception 0.91 (CI 0.66, 1.24.) based on data from 1,329 case and 12,141 control mothers, and 1,231 case and 11,383 control fathers. Our finding of a significantly increased risk of AML in the offspring with maternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy is consistent with previous reports. We also found a slight increase in risk of ALL with paternal exposure around conception which appeared to be more evident in children diagnosed at the age of 5 years or more and those with T cell ALL which raises interesting questions on possible mechanisms.

  4. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Home paint exposures and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Helen D; Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Petridou, Eleni; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Spector, Logan G; Clavel, Jacqueline; Dockerty, John D; Zhang, Luoping; Armstrong, Bruce K; Rudant, Jérémie; Fritschi, Lin; Amigou, Alicia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Kang, Alice Y; Stiakaki, Eftychia; Schüz, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose It has been suggested that home paint exposure increases the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods We obtained individual level data from eight case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium. All studies had home paint exposure data (sometimes including lacquers and varnishes) for the pregnancy period with additional data for the 1–3 month period before conception in five, the year before conception in two, and the period after birth in four studies respectively. Cytogenetic subtype data were available for some studies. Data were harmonized to a compatible format. Pooled analyses of individual data were undertaken using unconditional logistic regression. Results Based on 3,002 cases and 3,836 controls, the pooled odds ratio (OR) for home paint exposure in the 1–3 months before conception and risk of ALL was 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28, 1.85), while based on 1160 cases and 1641 controls for exposure in the year before conception it was 1.00 (95% CI 0.86, 1.17). For exposure during pregnancy, using 4,382 cases and 5,747 controls, the pooled OR was 1.14 (95% CI 1.04, 1.25) and for exposure after birth, the OR was 1.22 (95% CI 1.07, 1.39), based on data from 1,962 cases and 2,973 controls. The risk was greater for certain cytogenetic subtypes and if someone other than the parents did the painting. Conclusions Home paint exposure shortly before conception, during pregnancy and/or after birth appeared to increase the risk of childhood ALL. It may be prudent to limit exposure during these periods. PMID:26134047

  7. [Rapid tapering of cyclosporine for cytogenetic relapse shortly after bone marrow transplantation in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Nakata, M; Sato, N; Kamiya, Y; Maeda, A; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Murayama, T; Yokozawa, T; Takeyama, K; Narabayashi, M; Takenaka, T; Tobinai, K

    1998-06-01

    A 53-year-old female case of cytogenetically relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) who achieved remission by withdrawal of immunosuppressant is reported. On day 690 of this presentation she is well and alive with performance status of 100%. She had episodes of cyclic oscillation of her neutrophil count during hydroxyurea therapy lasting 1 year before transplantation. Increase of the neutrophils at the time of BMT might have contributed to her early relapse on day 207. Withdrawal of immunosuppressant was successful at least in this case.

  8. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Webinar Presentation: Using Metabolomics with Neonatal Blood Spots to Discover Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Using Metabolomics with Neonatal Blood Spots to Discover Causes of Childhood Leukemia, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2016 Webinar Series: Exposome held on May 11, 2016.

  10. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Liposomal daunorubicin, fludarabine, and cytarabine (FLAD) as bridge therapy to stem cell transplant in relapsed and refractory acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    De Astis, Enrico; Clavio, Marino; Raiola, Anna Maria; Ghiso, Anna; Guolo, Fabio; Minetto, Paola; Galaverna, Federica; Miglino, Maurizio; Di Grazia, Carmen; Ballerini, Filippo; Marani, Carlo; Pastori, Giordana; Mitscheunig, Laura; Cruciani, Fabio; Lovera, Davide; Varaldo, Riccardo; Ghiggi, Chiara; Lemoli, Roberto Massimo; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Gobbi, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia are still undefined and often unsatisfactory. We report the outcome of 79 patients with relapsed-refractory acute leukemia treated with fludarabine, cytarabine, and liposomal daunorubicin (FLAD regimen) followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), when clinically indicated, between May 2000 and January 2013. Forty-one patients had acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and 38 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two patients with myeloid blast crises of CML and three with lymphoid blast crises were included in the AML and ALL subgroups, respectively. Median age was 48 years (range 13-77). FLAD was well tolerated with negligible, nonhematological toxicity. Six patients (7.5 %) died before response evaluation. Forty-seven patients achieved hematologic complete response (CR). Complete remission rate was 53 and 65 % among AML and ALL patients, respectively. No CR was recorded among 11 refractory AML patients. Twenty-four patients (30 %) underwent HSCT. Nine patients received stem cells from an HLA identical sibling, and 15 from an alternative donor (3 unrelated matched, 12 haploidentical sibling). Median overall survival in AML and ALL patients receiving FLAD therapy was 9 and 8 months, respectively. A 5-year projected OS for patients receiving the whole program (FLAD + HSCT) was 24 % for AML patients (median survival 43 months), 28 % for ALL patients treated in relapse (median survival 15 months), and 0 % for ALL patients treated for refractory disease. In this paper, we show that FLAD seems to be an effective bridge therapy to HSCT for a part of poor prognosis acute leukemia patients. However, prospective studies are needed to confirm our results.

  12. Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT), postnatal immune dysfunction and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2009-01-01

    The developing immune system is a sensitive target for environmentally-induced disruption producing postnatal immune dysfunction. Unique immune maturational events occur during critical windows of prenatal/perinatal development and environmentally-induced disruption of one-time events can have serious health consequences. Additionally, the specialized immunological conditions necessary to bring a semi-allogeneic fetus to term place restrictions on both the maternal and offspring immune systems. These features combine not only to increase the risk of early-life immune insult (ELII), which includes xenobiotically-induced developmental immunotoxicity (DIT), but also to influence the nature of DIT-associated diseases for the child. Exposure to certain toxicants as well as maternal infections and other pregnancy stressors is known to induce postnatal immune dysfunction. Because dysfunctional immune responses to childhood infections have been proposed to play a role in childhood leukemia, DIT is a potential risk factor for this disease. This review details the range of disease susceptibilities impacted by DIT and discusses the importance of effective DIT safety testing for drugs and chemicals as a preventative measure.

  13. Obesity as the initial manifestation of central nervous system relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Dan; Li, Yan-Hong; Ke, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Li-Bin; Luo, Xue-Qun

    2012-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission experienced hyperphagia, obesity, and emotional disorders. Cytomorphologic examination of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and cranial MRI did not help in differentiating between central nervous system leukemia (CNSL) and other CNS diseases including tuberculosis in this boy. Flow cytometric CSF analysis on repeated lumber puncture detected lymphoblasts, while microscopic CSF examination did not definitively show relapse disease. The diagnosis of CNSL was thus made and confirmed by the response to leukemia treatment. Obesity can be the first manifestation of CNSL and the diagnosis can be challenging. A combination of CSF cytomorphology, CSF flow cytometry, and cranial MRI can be useful in the diagnosis of the disease. Two mechanisms of CNSL-related obesity are discussed based on the literature review.

  14. Lenalidomide induces complete and partial remissions in patients with relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Lee, Bang-Ning; Schlette, Ellen J; O'Brien, Susan M; Gao, Hui; Wen, Sijin; Wierda, William G; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Cohen, Evan N; Li, Changping; Reuben, James M; Keating, Michael J

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated the activity of lenalidomide in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Lenalidomide was given at 10 mg daily with dose escalation up to 25 mg daily. Three patients (7%) achieved a complete response (CR), one a nodular partial remission, and 10 patients a partial remission (PR), for an overall response (OR) rate of 32%. Treatment with lenalidomide was associated with an OR rate of 31% in patients with 11q or 17p deletion, of 24% in patients with unmutated V(H), and of 25% in patients with fludarabine-refractory disease. The most common toxicity was myelosuppression, and the median daily dose of lenalidomide tolerated was 10 mg. Plasma levels of angiogenic factors, inflammatory cytokines, and cytokine receptors were measured at baseline, day 7, and day 28. There was a dramatic increase in median interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 levels on day 7, whereas no changes were observed in median vascular endothelial growth factor levels (20 patients studied). According to our experience, lenalidomide given as a continuous treatment has antitumor activity in heavily pretreated patients with CLL.

  15. Fludarabine in resistant or relapsing B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the Spanish Group experience.

    PubMed

    Montserrat, E; Lopez-Lorenzo, J L; Manso, F; Martin, A; Prieto, E; Arias-Sampedro, J; Fernandez, M N; Oyarzabal, F J; Odriozola, J; Alcala, A; Garcia-Conde, J; Guardia, R; Bosch, F

    1996-05-01

    Fludarabine produces high response rates in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Nevertheless, response to fludarabine of patients with previously treated CLL varies from 17% to 74% (0% to 38% CR). In 68 patients with heavily pretreated and advanced CLL, an overall response rate to fludarabine of 28% (4% CR) was observed. Response correlated with sensitivity of the disease to previous treatments (relapsing vs. refractory disease) (62% vs. 20%; p = 0.005) and, albeit not significantly, with the number of cycles of fludarabine (>3 vs. < or = 3) that patients could receive (36% vs. 15%; p = NS). Responding patients had a longer survival (median, not reached) than those not responding (median, 11 months) (p = 0.03). Severe toxicity was observed in some cases. It is concluded that fludarabine is a highly useful agent in CLL. However, in order to improve its effectiveness and decrease its toxicity, fludarabine should be given as soon as a lack of response to front-line therapy is observed and before the disease becomes completely resistant to therapy.

  16. Cerebral embolism through hematogenous dissemination of pulmonary mucormycosis complicating relapsed leukemia.

    PubMed

    Higo, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yamazaki, Sho; Ando, Sumiyo; Gonoi, Wataru; Ishida, Masanori; Okuma, Hidemi; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Ohtomo, Kuni; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2015-01-01

    Invasive mucormycosis in patients with hematological diseases mostly occurs in the lungs. Invasive mucormycosis of other anatomical sites is relatively infrequent and its pathogenesis has not so far been well elucidated. Here, we describe an autopsy case of pulmonary invasive mucormycosis complicated by cerebral embolism with infarct. A 77-year-old Japanese woman with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia complained of left visual disturbance and weakness of the lower limbs. The diagnosis of leukemic infiltration to the central nervous system was made. Repeated intrathecal injection of methotrexate plus cytarabine resulted in partial amelioration of the neurologic symptoms. However, the patient then developed fever, dyspnea, and subsequent right hemiparesis. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a consolidative shadow with halo sign in the left lung field, which was compatible with either invasive pulmonary aspergillosis or mucormycosis. These findings accounted for fever and dyspnea, but not hemiparesis. Despite antifungal therapy, the patient succumbed to death after two weeks. Autopsy revealed pulmonary invasive mucormycosis with a fungal ball in the lumina of the adjacent ascending aorta. Intriguingly, autopsy and postmortem CT scan identified left cerebral infarct due to mucormycosis, which accounted for the right hemiparesis. It is likely that the fungal ball caused the cerebral embolism through hematogenous dissemination. We should suspect hematogenous dissemination when we see a patient with pulmonary invasive mucormycosis developing neurologic symptoms.

  17. Blinatumomab vs historical standard therapy of adult relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gökbuget, N; Kelsh, M; Chia, V; Advani, A; Bassan, R; Dombret, H; Doubek, M; Fielding, A K; Giebel, S; Haddad, V; Hoelzer, D; Holland, C; Ifrah, N; Katz, A; Maniar, T; Martinelli, G; Morgades, M; O'Brien, S; Ribera, J-M; Rowe, J M; Stein, A; Topp, M; Wadleigh, M; Kantarjian, H

    2016-09-23

    We compared outcomes from a single-arm study of blinatumomab in adult patients with B-precursor Ph-negative relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (R/R ALL) with a historical data set from Europe and the United States. Estimates of complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS) were weighted by the frequency distribution of prognostic factors in the blinatumomab trial. Outcomes were also compared between the trial and historical data using propensity score methods. The historical cohort included 694 patients with CR data and 1112 patients with OS data compared with 189 patients with CR and survival data in the blinatumomab trial. The weighted analysis revealed a CR rate of 24% (95% CI: 20-27%) and a median OS of 3.3 months (95% CI: 2.8-3.6) in the historical cohort compared with a CR/CRh rate of 43% (95% CI: 36-50%) and a median OS of 6.1 months (95% CI: 4.2-7.5) in the blinatumomab trial. Propensity score analysis estimated increased odds of CR/CRh (OR=2.68, 95% CI: 1.67-4.31) and improved OS (HR=0.536, 95% CI: 0.394-0.730) with blinatumomab. The analysis demonstrates the application of different study designs and statistical methods to compare novel therapies for R/R ALL with historical data.

  18. Identification of a genetically defined ultra-high-risk group in relapsed pediatric T-lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Richter-Pechańska, P; Kunz, J B; Hof, J; Zimmermann, M; Rausch, T; Bandapalli, O R; Orlova, E; Scapinello, G; Sagi, J C; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Cario, G; Kirschner-Schwabe, R; Eckert, C; Benes, V; Korbel, J O; Muckenthaler, M U; Kulozik, A E

    2017-02-03

    In the search for genes that define critical steps of relapse in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and can serve as prognostic markers, we performed targeted sequencing of 313 leukemia-related genes in 214 patients: 67 samples collected at the time of relapse and 147 at initial diagnosis. As relapse-specific genetic events, we identified activating mutations in NT5C2 (P=0.0001, Fisher's exact test), inactivation of TP53 (P=0.0007, Fisher's exact test) and duplication of chr17:q11.2-24.3 (P=0.0068, Fisher's exact test) in 32/67 of T-ALL relapse samples. Alterations of TP53 were frequently homozygous events, which significantly correlated with higher rates of copy number alterations in other genes compared with wild-type TP53 (P=0.0004, Mann-Whitney's test). We subsequently focused on mutations with prognostic impact and identified genes governing DNA integrity (TP53, n=8; USP7, n=4; MSH6, n=4), having key roles in the RAS signaling pathway (KRAS, NRAS, n=8), as well as IL7R (n=4) and CNOT3 (n=4) to be exclusively mutated in fatal relapses. These markers recognize 24/49 patients with a second event. In 17 of these patients with mostly refractory relapse and dire need for efficient treatment, we identified candidate targets for personalized therapy with p53 reactivating compounds, MEK inhibitors or JAK/STAT-inhibitors that may be incorporated in future treatment strategies.

  19. COBL is a novel hotspot for IKZF1 deletions in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Bruno Almeida; Meyer, Claus; Barbosa, Thayana Conceição; zur Stadt, Udo; Horstmann, Martin; Venn, Nicola C.; Heatley, Susan; White, Deborah L.; Sutton, Rosemary; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Marschalek, Rolf; Emerenciano, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    IKZF1 deletion (ΔIKZF1) is an important predictor of relapse in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Because of its clinical importance, we previously mapped breakpoints of intragenic deletions and developed a multiplex PCR assay to detect recurrent intragenic ΔIKZF1. Since the multiplex PCR was not able to detect complete deletions (IKZF1 Δ1-8), which account for ~30% of all ΔIKZF1, we aimed at investigating the genomic scenery of IKZF1 Δ1-8. Six samples of cases with IKZF1 Δ1-8 were analyzed by microarray assay, which identified monosomy 7, isochromosome 7q, and large interstitial deletions presenting breakpoints within COBL gene. Then, we established a multiplex ligation-probe amplification (MLPA) assay and screened copy number alterations within chromosome 7 in 43 diagnostic samples with IKZF1 Δ1-8. Our results revealed that monosomy and large interstitial deletions within chromosome 7 are the main causes of IKZF1 Δ1-8. Detailed analysis using long distance inverse PCR showed that six patients (16%) had large interstitial deletions starting within intronic regions of COBL at diagnosis, which is ~611 Kb downstream of IKZF1, suggesting that COBL is a hotspot for ΔIKZF1. We also investigated a series of 25 intragenic deletions (Δ2–8, Δ3–8 or Δ4–8) and 24 relapsed samples, and found one IKZF1-COBL tail-to-tail fusion, thus supporting that COBL is a novel hotspot for ΔIKZF1. Finally, using RIC score methodology, we show that breakpoint sequences of IKZF1 Δ1-8 are not analog to RAG-recognition sites, suggesting a different mechanism of error promotion than that suggested for intragenic ΔIKZF1. PMID:27419633

  20. Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, D. Scott; Thurber, Jill R.; Miles, Kenneth; Gilbert, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Leukemias (blood cell cancers) and central nervous system tumors are the most frequently occurring types of cancer in children. Mortality rates from all childhood cancers have decreased over the past 2 decades. As a result, many childhood cancer survivors are now returning to their schools after having been successfully treated. Although most of…

  1. RNA sequencing unravels the genetics of refractory/relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Prognostic and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Gianfelici, Valentina; Chiaretti, Sabina; Demeyer, Sofie; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Messina, Monica; La Starza, Roberta; Peragine, Nadia; Paoloni, Francesca; Geerdens, Ellen; Pierini, Valentina; Elia, Loredana; Mancini, Marco; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Apicella, Valerio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Mecucci, Cristina; Guarini, Anna; Cools, Jan; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite therapeutic improvements, a sizable number of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still have a poor outcome. To unravel the genomic background associated with refractoriness, we evaluated the transcriptome of 19 cases of refractory/early relapsed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (discovery cohort) by performing RNA-sequencing on diagnostic material. The incidence and prognostic impact of the most frequently mutated pathways were validated by Sanger sequencing on genomic DNA from diagnostic samples of an independent cohort of 49 cases (validation cohort), including refractory, relapsed and responsive cases. Combined gene expression and fusion transcript analyses in the discovery cohort revealed the presence of known oncogenes and identified novel rearrangements inducing overexpression, as well as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Mutation analysis identified JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN as the most commonly disrupted pathways in patients with chemorefractory disease or early relapse, frequently in association with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. The analysis on the validation cohort documented a significantly higher risk of relapse, inferior overall survival, disease-free survival and event-free survival in patients with JAK/STAT or RAS/PTEN alterations. Conversely, a significantly better survival was observed in patients harboring only NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations: this favorable prognostic effect was abrogated by the presence of concomitant mutations. Preliminary in vitro assays on primary cells demonstrated sensitivity to specific inhibitors. These data document the negative prognostic impact of JAK/STAT and RAS/PTEN mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest the potential clinical application of JAK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors in patients harboring mutations in these pathways. PMID:27151993

  2. Prognosis and treatment after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: 1985. A report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Bleyer, W.A.; Sather, H.; Hammond, G.D.

    1986-07-15

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma constitute 42% to 45% of the cancers in infants, children, and adolescents: In 1985, an estimated 2025 children were newly diagnosed with these two cancers and 900 (43%) of the pediatric cancer deaths in the United States have been projected to be due to these diseases. The single most important obstacle to preventing these deaths is relapse, and prevention of relapse or salvage of the patient who has had a relapse continues to be a major therapeutic challenge. The most important initial step in the treatment of the child whose disease has relapsed is to determine, to the extent possible, the prognosis. In a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a relapse confers an extremely poor prognosis, regardless of site of relapse, tumor histology, or other original prognostic factors, prior therapy, or time to relapse. In the child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in relapse, the prognosis depends on multiple factors. The primary therapy is chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy with marrow grafting. Other options exist, including no therapy, or investigational therapy. The therapy selected should be predicated on the prognosis. In the child with an isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse off therapy, minimum therapy should be administered, particularly if the relapse occurred without prior cranial irradiation. In the child whose relapse is more than 6 months off therapy, conventional therapy should be considered. Also, a patient with an isolated CNS relapse on therapy after prior cranial irradiation should be given moderate therapy. Bone marrow transplantation or high-dose chemoradiotherapy with autologous marrow rescue should be reserved in children with a second or subsequent extramedullary relapse, and possibly for those with a first isolated overt testicular relapse on therapy.

  3. Phase I/II study of the hypoxia-activated prodrug PR104 in refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Konopleva, Marina; Thall, Peter F; Yi, Cecilia Arana; Borthakur, Gautam; Coveler, Andrew; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Benito, Juliana; Konoplev, Sergej; Gu, Yongchuan; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Faderl, Stefan; Thomas, Deborah; Cortes, Jorge; Kadia, Tapan; Kornblau, Steven; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Nguyen, Hoang Q; Feliu, Jennie; Lu, Hongbo; Wei, Caimiao; Wilson, William R; Melink, Teresa J; Gutheil, John C; Andreeff, Michael; Estey, Elihu H; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-07-01

    We previously demonstrated vast expansion of hypoxic areas in the leukemic microenvironment and provided a rationale for using hypoxia-activated prodrugs. PR104 is a phosphate ester that is rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo to the corresponding alcohol PR-104A and further reduced to the amine and hydroxyl-amine nitrogen mustards that induce DNA cross-linking in hypoxic cells under low oxygen concentrations. In this phase I/II study, patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (n=40) after 1 or 2 prior treatments or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=10) after any number of prior treatments received PR104; dose ranged from 1.1 to 4 g/m(2). The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were myelosuppression (anemia 62%, neutropenia 50%, thrombocytopenia 46%), febrile neutropenia (40%), infection (24%), and enterocolitis (14%). Ten of 31 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (32%) and 2 of 10 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (20%) who received 3 g/m(2) or 4 g/m(2) had a response (complete response, n=1; complete response without platelet recovery, n=5; morphological leukemia-free state, n=6). The extent of hypoxia was evaluated by the hypoxia tracer pimonidazole administered prior to a bone marrow biopsy and by immunohistochemical assessments of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha and carbonic anhydrase IX. A high fraction of leukemic cells expressed these markers, and PR104 administration resulted in measurable decrease of the proportions of hypoxic cells. These findings indicate that hypoxia is a prevalent feature of the leukemic microenvironment and that targeting hypoxia with hypoxia-activated prodrugs warrants further evaluation in acute leukemia. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01037556.

  4. Steinmaus and Smith Respond to "Proximity to Gasoline Stations and Childhood Leukemia".

    PubMed

    Steinmaus, Craig; Smith, Martyn T

    2017-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of adult leukemia, but its role in childhood leukemia is less clear. In a recent meta-analysis, we identified associations of childhood leukemia with occupational and household product benzene exposure and traffic-related pollution. Residential proximity to gasoline stations or automobile repair facilities may be another source of benzene, and in 3 studies assessing these sources, we identified a summary relative risk of 1.59 (95% confidence interval: 0.70, 3.62). Although not statistically significant, this summary relative risk was of a magnitude similar to that of our other positive findings. In this issue of the Journal (Am J Epidemiol 2017;185(1):5-7), Dr. Infante suggested that meta-analyses of studies on childhood leukemia and proximity to gasoline stations should involve some criteria that differ from those we used. These suggested criteria involved combining leukemia subtypes, excluding automobile repair facilities, and using nonleukemia cancers as control subjects. We redid our meta-analysis using these new criteria and obtained a summary relative risk of 2.42 (95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.89). Overall, although this result should be interpreted in light of the relatively small sample size (3 studies) and its post-hoc nature, it provides additional new evidence for associations of childhood leukemia with both residential proximity to gasoline stations and exposure to benzene.

  5. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Very late recurrences of leukemia: why does leukemia awake after many years of dormancy?

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Uberti, Joseph P; Schiffer, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    We report a heterogeneous group of very late recurrences of leukemia occurring more than 10 years after initial treatment including 2 cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) which recurred after more than 20 years of remission, 2 cases of donor cell leukemia which developed more than 10 years after allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 2 cases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) relapsing 13 and 17 years after allograft. Case descriptions are followed by a discussion regarding possible mechanisms leading to leukemia recurrence and a review of the literature.

  7. Meningosis prophylaxis with intrathecal /sup 198/Au-colloid and methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, O.; Stoll, W.; Plenert, W.

    1982-01-15

    Since 1972, telecobalt irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) has been successfully replaced in Jena by intrathecal colloidal radioactive gold (/sup 198/Au) plus ITMTX for meningosis prophylaxis in leukemia. Seventy-three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were given 1.24-4.89 mCi (45.8-181 MBq) of colloidal 198Au IT after successful initiation of remission. During cytostatic therapy, the following relapses occurred: meningosis leucaemica, five patients (6.8%); bone-marrow relapse and the meningosis leucaemica, one patient; and bone-marrow relapse, 20 patients (27.4%). In 18 children, combination chemotherapy was terminated after two and a half or three years of treatment. After that time, one meningeal relapse and six bone-marrow relapses occurred. Within the first 24 hours after application of radioactive gold, headaches, vomiting, and fever occurred in less than 10% of the children. An apathy syndrome, leukecephalopathy, or severe infections, were not observed in a single case. Radioactive gold spreads in the subarachnoid space and is phagocytized by the arachnoidea. The tumoricide effect extends selectively over the space of distribution of the latent meningosis leucaemia. The cerebral parenchyma remains unaffected by radiation. Thus, radioactive gold may be preferable to telecobalt irradiation in preventing central nervous system leukemia.

  8. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  10. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse <12 months, including refractory patients), FLT3-ITD-positive status and high-risk cytogenetics were the three strongest independent adverse prognostic factors for OS and EFS in this series. We then defined three subgroups with striking different outcomes at 2 years: no adverse factor (favourable, N=36): OS 58%, EFS 45%; one adverse factor (intermediate, N=54): OS 37%, EFS 31%; two or three adverse factors (poor, N=43): OS 12%, EFS 12% (P<10(-4), P=0.001). This new simplified Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  11. Hypertension and Life-Threatening Bleeding in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Treated with FLT3 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Karapınar, Deniz; Karadaş, Nihal; Önder Siviş, Zühal; Balkan, Can; Kavaklı, Kaan; Aydınok, Yeşim

    2015-09-01

    Experiences with new multikinase inhibitors are limited, especially in children. In this report we summarize our experience with 2 patients with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), one with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3-internal tandem duplication mutation and the other with a single base mutation (D835Y). Both patients received sorafenib, one for 19 days and the other for 42 days, with clofarabine-including chemotherapy. One additionally received sunitinib for a total of 20 days. Both patients developed severe pancytopenia, hypertension, life-threatening bleedings from the gastrointestinal system, and, finally, intrapulmonary hemorrhage. Although both reached severe aplasia of the bone marrow without blastic infiltration, death occurred with neutropenic sepsis.

  12. Commentary on "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Ara

    2011-01-01

    This commentary pertains to the article, "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations" by D. Scott Hermann, Jill R. Thurber, Kenneth Miles, and Gloria Gilbert in this issue (2011) regarding pediatric leukemia. The authors present a literature review regarding leukemia in…

  13. Early relapse after rituximab chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Flora; Buslig, Julia; Szegedi, Istvan; Scholtz, Beata; Kappelmayer, Janos; Kiss, Csongor

    2008-02-01

    In relapsed/refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of the B-cell lineage rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody was used successfully in some cases. We report on a 15-year-old female with relapsed CD20-positive B-cell progenitor ALL treated with rituximab because of positive minimal residual disease signals after chemotherapy, as checked by flow cytometry and real time quantitative-PCR. Rituximab eliminated the CD20-positive subpopulation, but not the more immature leukemic cells. The patient died with fulminant aspergillosis before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation could be performed.

  14. The Role of HDACs Inhibitors in Childhood and Adolescence Acute Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Masetti, Riccardo; Serravalle, Salvatore; Biagi, Carlotta; Pession, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs) are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia. PMID:21318168

  15. The concurrent occurrence of Leishmania chagasi infection and childhood acute leukemia in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Gisele Moledo; Azevedo-Silva, Fernanda; dos Santos Thuler, Luiz Claudio; Pina, Eugênia Terra Granado; Souza, Celeste S.F.; Calabrese, Katia; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the co-existence of Leishmania chagasi infection and childhood leukemia in patients naïve to treatment; this has serious clinical and epidemiological implications. Methods The seroprevalence of L. chagasi antibodies prior to any treatment was investigated in children with clinical features of acute leukemia. Serological tests were performed in 470 samples drawn from under 14-year-old children from different regions of Brazil with clinical suspicion of acute leukemia. Acute leukemia subtypes were characterized by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Morphological analyses of bone marrow aspirates were systematically performed to visualize blast cells and/or the formation of L. chagasi amastigotes. Data analysis used a standard univariate procedure and the Pearson's chi-square test. Results The plasma of 437 children (93%) displayed antibodies against L. chagasi by indirect immunofluorescence assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests. Of the 437 patients diagnosed from 2002 to 2006, 254 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 92 had acute myeloid leukemia, and 91 did not have acute leukemia. The seroprevalence of L. chagasi antibodies according to the indirect immunofluorescence assay test (22.5%) was similar in children with or without acute leukemia (p-value = 0.76). The co-existence of visceral leishmanasis and acute leukemia was confirmed in 24 children. The overall survival of these children was poor with a high death rate during the first year of leukemia treatment. Conclusion In the differential diagnosis of childhood leukemia, visceral leishmanasis should be considered as a potential concurrent disease in regions where L. chagasi is endemic. PMID:25305169

  16. Psychosocial aspects of survivors of childhood cancer or leukemia.

    PubMed

    Massimo, L; Zarri, D; Caprino, D

    2005-12-01

    The majority of childhood cancer patients can expect nowadays to be cured and the percentage is now between 70% and 80%. The number of long-term survivors, off- threatment for at least 5 years, is rising rapidly and is becoming a new population, which needs a special care. It is becoming increasingly important to know how to prevent and treat the physical late effects as well as the psychosocial ones. The oldest among these patients are now in their 40's. How will their old age be like? Are they really cured? The aim of this study is to present a detailed survey of the literature on this topic as well as the authors' personal experience. Several techniques of psychological investigation for this population are highlighted. The semistructured interviews are mostly used for mono-institutional research, while the narrative dialogues are useful for small groups of patients. Questionnaires are usually conducted by epidemiologists for large groups of survivors. Tests are used for specific items such as defense mechanisms, self-esteem, relationships within the family, fear, and panic. The evaluation of the post-traumatic stress disorder is considered and the most important literature data are reported. It is also stressed the need of prevention of any type of psychosocial distress. In conclusion, most of the survivors appear to lead normal adult lives, to have obtained high school degrees, good jobs, and several have families and children. Nevertheless, a small percentage show some psychological or social problems, such as anxiety, depression, fear over the future or over relapse, a second primary, or sterility. The most vulnerable among them are females, people in poor financial conditions, the unemployed and those with poor educations.

  17. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Cancer incidence in the vicinity of Finnish nuclear power plants: an emphasis on childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Heinävaara, Sirpa; Toikkanen, Salla; Pasanen, Kari; Verkasalo, Pia K; Kurttio, Päivi; Auvinen, Anssi

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this paper was to study cancer incidence, especially leukemia in children (<15 years), in the vicinity of Finnish nuclear power plants (NPPs). We used three different approaches: ecological analysis at municipality level, residential cohorts defined from census data, and case-control analysis with individual residential histories. The standardized incidence ratio of childhood leukemia for the seven municipalities in the vicinity of NPPs was 1.0 (95% CI 0.6, 1.6) compared to the rest of Finland. The two cohorts defined by censuses of 1980 and 1990 gave rate ratios of 1.0 (95% CI 0.3, 2.6) and 0.9 (95% CI 0.2, 2.7), respectively, for childhood leukemia in the population residing within 15 km from the NPPs compared to the 15-50 km zone. The case-control analysis with 16 cases of childhood leukemia and 64 matched population-based controls gave an odds ratio for average distance between residence and NPP in the closest 5-9.9 km zone of 0.7 (95% CI 0.1, 10.4) compared to > or =30 km zone. Our results do not indicate an increase in childhood leukemia and other cancers in the vicinity of Finnish NPPs though the small sample size limits the strength of conclusions. The conclusion was the same for adults.

  19. Impact of Ego-resilience and Family Function on Quality of Life in Childhood Leukemia Survivors

    PubMed Central

    CHO, Ok-Hee; YOO, Yang-Sook; HWANG, Kyung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine the impact of ego-resilience and family function on quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Methods: This study targeted 100 pediatric leukemia survivors, who visited the Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Center in South Korea from Aug to Dec 2011. A structured questionnaire of ego-resilience, family function and quality of life used to collect data through direct interview with the pediatric patients and their parents. The correlation between the study variables analyzed using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and the impact on quality of life analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression. Results: Ego-resilience (r = 0.69, P<0.001) and family function (r =0.46, P< 0.001) had a positive correlation with quality of life and all the sub-categories of quality of life. Ego-resilience was a major factor affecting quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors, with an explanatory power of 48%. The explanatory power for quality of life increased to 53% when age and family function were included. Conclusion: Ego-resilience, age, and family function affect quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Hence, strategies are required to construct age-matched programs to improve quality of life, in order to help restore the necessary ego-resilience and to strengthen family function in childhood leukemia survivors. PMID:28032062

  20. Extramedullary relapse in lumbar spine of patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia after remission for 16 years: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhengmei; Tao, Shandong; Deng, Yuan; Chen, Yue; Song, Lixiao; Ding, Banghe; Chen, Kankan; Yu, Liang; Wang, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a common myeloid leukemia. At the newly diagnosed stage, it can be fatal because of the serious complication-disseminated intravascular coagulation. With the advent and early application of all-trans retinoic acid, most APL patients can achieve a long-term survival, and only a minority of patients will develop extramedullary relapse after remission. The most common site of extramedullary relapse is central nervous system, while other sites are relatively rare. Here, we report a particularly rare APL patient who experienced extramedullary relapse with lumbar spine as the isolated site after a rather long time of remission for 16 years. At the time of relapse, the main clinical manifestations of the patient are obvious low back pain, weakness in lower limbs and limitation of activity. After treatment of local radiotherapy combined with ATRA and arsenic trioxide, the patient achieved and maintained a second complete remission by now. PMID:26885224

  1. External auditory canal and middle ear relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Thereza Christina Sampaio; Coser, Virginia Maria; Brûlé, Alice Odette; Coser, Pedro Luis; Pereira, Waldir Veiga

    2010-04-01

    Extramedullary involvement occurs infrequently in acute promyelocytic leukemia and is said to be more common after treatment with all-trans retinoic acid. We describe a 9-year-old girl who had an isolated external auditory canal and middle ear relapse after treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy. A patient with cytogenetically and molecularly confirmed acute promyelocytic leukemia developed isolated extramedullary relapse in the auditory canal and middle ear 4 years and 9 months after initial diagnosis, while in hematologic and molecular remission, successfully treated with arsenic trioxide alone.

  2. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Prognostic value of MRD-dynamics in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the MB-2002/2008 protocols.

    PubMed

    Meleshko, Alexander N; Savva, Natalia N; Fedasenka, Uladzimir U; Romancova, Alexandra S; Krasko, Olga V; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Aleinikova, Olga V

    2011-10-01

    Detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) during the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by RQ-PCR analysis of clonal Ig/TCR rearrangements is used for risk group stratification in European treatment protocols. In Belarus patients with childhood ALL are treated according to ALL-MB protocols, which do not use MRD-based risk stratification. To evaluate the prognostic significance of MRD for ALL-MB-2002/2008 protocols, MRD was quantified by RQ-PCR in 68 ALL patients at four time points: on day 15, on day 36, before and after maintenance therapy (MT). MRD positivity, as well as quantitative level of MRD were analyzed and compared between patients who stayed in remission and relapsed. Relapse-free survival revealed to be significantly associated with MRD levels at different time points. Unfavorable prognosis was shown for MRD≥10(-3) on day 36 (p<0.001), and any positive MRD before (p<0.001) and after (p=0.001) MT. Multivariate Cox regression analysis proved MRD as independent significant prognosis factor at day 36 (p=0.005) and before MT (p=0.001). We conclude, that MRD quantified by RQ-PCR in children with ALL treated with ALL-MB protocols is feasible and independently associated with outcome. MRD may be a suitable parameter for treatment stratification in MB protocols in future.

  4. CTLA-4 genotype and relapse incidence in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission after induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, A; Brunet, S; Berlanga, J J; Tormo, M; Nomdedeu, J; Guardia, R; Ribera, J M; Heras, I; Llorente, A; Hoyos, M; Esteve, J; Besalduch, J; Bueno, J; Sierra, J; Gallardo, D

    2009-03-01

    The recently described single-nucleotide polymorphism CT60, located in the 3'-untranslated region of the CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 ) gene, has been associated with susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases and has also been shown to be involved in immune responses following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, the contribution of the CTLA4 genotype to the control of minimal residual disease in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has yet to be explored. We investigated the association between the CTLA4 CT60 A/G genotype and the incidence of leukemic relapse in 143 adult patients with AML in first complete remission after the same chemotherapy protocol (CETLAM LAM'03). The CT60 AA genotype was associated with a higher rate of leukemic relapse (56.4 vs 35.6%, P=0.004; hazard ratio (HR)=2.64, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.36-5.14) and lower overall survival at 3 years (39.4 vs 68.4%, P=0.004; HR=2.80, 95% CI=1.39-5.64). This is the first study to report an association between polymorphisms at CTLA-4 and AML relapse.

  5. T-cell-replete haploidentical stem cell transplantation is highly efficacious for relapsed and refractory childhood acute leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S; Ito, M; Sano, H; Mochizuki, K; Akaihata, M; Waragai, T; Ohara, Y; Hosoya, M; Ohto, H; Kikuta, A

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite improvements in first-line therapies, the outcomes of relapsed or refractory childhood acute leukaemia that has not achieved complete remission after relapse, has relapsed after stem cell transplantation (SCT), has primary induction failure and has relapsed with a very unfavourable cytogenetic risk profile, are dismal. Objectives and Methods We evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of T-cell-replete haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (haplo-SCT) with low-dose anti-human thymocyte immunoglobulin (ATG), tacrolimus, methotrexate and prednisolone (PSL) in 14 paediatric patients with high-risk childhood acute leukaemia. Results All patients achieved complete engraftment. The median time to reaching an absolute neutrophil count of more than 0.5 × 109 L−1 was 14 days. Acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) of grades II–IV and III–IV developed in 10 (71%) and 2 (14%) patients, respectively. Treatment-related mortality and relapse occurred in one (7%) patient and six (43%) patients, respectively. Eleven patients were alive and seven of them were disease-free with a median follow-up of 36 months (range: 30–159 months). The probability of event-free survival after 2 years was 50%. Conclusion These findings indicate that T-cell-replete haplo-SCT, with low-dose ATG and PSL, provides sustained remission with an acceptable risk of GVHD in paediatric patients with advanced haematologic malignancies. PMID:25224311

  6. High curability via intensive reinduction chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in young adults with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Sweden 2003–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Piotr; Åström, Maria; Ahlberg, Lucia; Bernell, Per; Hulegårdh, Erik; Hägglund, Hans; Karlsson, Karin; Markuszewska-Kuczymska, Alicja; Tomaszewska-Toporska, Beata; Smedmyr, Bengt; Hallböök, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Background A minority of patients with adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse are rescued. The aim of this population-based study was to assess the results of reinduction treatment and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients in second complete remission. Design and Methods Between 2003–2007, 76 adults (<66 years) with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Burkitt’s leukemia excluded) were prospectively reported to The Swedish Adult Acute Leukemia Registry and later evaluated. Results Reinduction with: (i) mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine (MEA); (ii) fludarabine, cytarabine, pegylated-asparaginase plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG-Asp); and (iii) cytarabine, betamethasone, cyclophosphamide, daunorubicin, and vincristine (ABCDV) resulted in complete remission in 6/9 (67%), 10/16 (63%) and 9/21 (43%) of the patients, respectively. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation was performed during second complete remission in 29 patients. Multivariate analysis regarding overall survival after relapse revealed that age over 35 years at diagnosis and relapse within 18 months were negative prognostic factors. Overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years were 22% (95% CI: 13–32) and 15% (95% CI: 7–24). Of 19 patients less than 35 years at diagnosis who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in second remission, ten (53%) are still alive at a median of 5.5 years (range, 4.2–8.3) after relapse, whereas all patients over 35 years old at diagnosis have died. Conclusions Allogeneic stem cell transplantation remains the treatment of choice for young adults with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Both (i) mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine and (ii) fludarabine, cytarabine, pegylated-asparaginase plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor seem effective as reinduction treatments and should be further evaluated. New salvage strategies are needed, especially for patients over 35 years old at diagnosis. PMID:22511497

  7. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  8. Radiation-induced meningiomas: a shadow in the success story of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Joanna; Pääkkö, Eija; Harila, Marika; Herva, Riitta; Tuominen, Juho; Koivula, Antero; Lanning, Marjatta; Harila-Saari, Arja

    2009-10-01

    While the prognosis of acute childhood leukemia has improved, long-term survivors are increasingly experiencing late effects of the treatment. Cranially irradiated survivors are predisposed to the development of CNS tumors. Our aim was to describe the incidence of secondary brain tumors and to define the significance of treatment-related risk factors and host characteristics in a cohort of childhood leukemia survivors. Our cohort consisted of 60 consecutive cranially irradiated adult survivors of childhood leukemia treated in Oulu University Hospital (Oulu, Finland); MRI of the brain was performed on 49. The sites of the tumors, their histology, and details of the leukemia treatment were determined. Of the 49 patients, 11 (22%) 1-8 years of age at the time of diagnosis developed meningioma later in life, while no other brain tumors were seen. In this cohort, the development of meningioma seemed to show undisputable linkage with long latency periods (mean, 25 years; range, 14-34 years) and an increasing incidence 20 years after the treatment (47%). Three patients had multiple meningiomas, two had recurrent disease, and one had an atypical meningioma. Age at the time of irradiation, gender, or cumulative doses of chemotherapeutic agents showed no significant association with the development of meningiomas. The high incidence of meningiomas in this study was associated with long follow-up periods. Although the cohort is small, it seems probable that the increasing incidence of meningioma will shadow the future of cranially irradiated leukemia survivors. Systematic brain imaging after the treatment is therefore justifiable.

  9. Late MRD response determines relapse risk overall and in subsets of childhood T-cell ALL: results of the AIEOP-BFM-ALL 2000 study.

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Martin; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Bartram, Claus R; Schrauder, André; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Möricke, Anja; Parasole, Rosanna; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael; Buldini, Barbara; Reiter, Alfred; Basso, Giuseppe; Klingebiel, Thomas; Messina, Chiara; Ratei, Richard; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Koehler, Rolf; Locatelli, Franco; Schäfer, Beat W; Aricò, Maurizio; Welte, Karl; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Gadner, Helmut; Biondi, Andrea; Conter, Valentino

    2011-08-25

    The prognostic value of MRD in large series of childhood T-ALL has not yet been established. Trial AIEOP-BFM-ALL 2000 introduced standardized quantitative assessment of MRD for stratification, based on immunoglobulin and TCR gene rearrangements as polymerase chain reaction targets: Patients were considered MRD standard risk (MRD-SR) if MRD was negative at day 33 (time point 1 [TP1]) and day 78 (TP2), analyzed by at least 2 sensitive markers; MRD intermediate risk (MRD-IR) if positive either at day 33 or 78 and < 10(-3) at day 78; and MRD high risk (MRD-HR) if ≥ 10(-3) at day 78. A total of 464 patients with T-ALL were stratified by MRD: 16% of them were MRD-SR, 63% MRD-IR, and 21% MRD-HR. Their 7-year event-free-survival (SE) was 91.1% (3.5%), 80.6% (2.3%), and 49.8% (5.1%) (P < .001), respectively. Negativity of MRD at TP1 was the most favorable prognostic factor. An excellent outcome was also obtained in 32% of patients turning MRD negative only at TP2, indicating that early (TP1) MRD levels were irrelevant if MRD at TP2 was negative (48% of all patients). MRD ≥ 10(-3) at TP2 constitutes the most important predictive factor for relapse in childhood T-ALL. The study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; "Combination Chemotherapy Based on Risk of Relapse in Treating Young Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia," protocol identification #NCT00430118 for BFM and #NCT00613457 for AIEOP.

  10. Whole-exome sequencing reveals potential molecular predictors of relapse after discontinuation of the targeted therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, Svetlana A; Lavrov, Alexander V; Chelysheva, Ekaterina Yu; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Shukhov, Oleg A; Turkina, Anna; Kutsev, Sergey I

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease well treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The aim was to identify genes with a predictive value for relapse-free survival after TKI cessation in CML patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing of DNA from six CML patients in long-lasting deep molecular remission. Patients were divided into two groups with relapse (n = 3) and without relapse (n = 3) after TKI discontinuation. We found variants in genes CYP1B1, ALPK2, and IRF1 in group of patients with relapse and one variant in gene PARP9 in group of patients without relapse. We verified prognostic value of the found markers in a small group of patients with TKI discontinuation and demonstrated their high sensitivity (77%), specificity (86%), positive (85%), and negative (79%) predictive values. Thus we revealed genetic variants, which are potential markers of outcome prediction in CML patients after TKI discontinuation.

  11. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  12. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  14. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation.

  15. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  16. [Clinical translational research of chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) cells for the treatment of relapsed and refractory B-cell lymphoma/leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shun-Zong; Su, Hang

    2014-08-01

    B-cell lymphoma and leukemia are the most common subtypes of malignant lymphomas. Relapse and refractory to multiple therapy are the main reasons of treatment failure. As the classical anti-tumor methods, surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and palliative therapy have cured lots of cancer patients. However, each year many patients still died of different kinds of hard-to-treat cancers. Although the ratio of complete remission of B-cell lymphoma/leukemia patients particularly with CD20 positive mature B cell malignancies has been largely increased after the application of Rituximab in clinic, nearly 20%-40% patients still died due to relapse and refractory to the treatment. During last five years, the development of chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) cells, especially CD19 CAR-T cells, which can recognize CD19 specifically expressed on B cells and have been demonstrated to be significantly effective to relapsed and refractory B cell lymphoma/leukemia in clinical trials, has gradually attracted extensively concerning from researchers and clinicians. Many medical institutions all over the world (besides in China) have registered the clinical trials for B-cell lymphoma/leukemia patients by use of CAR-T cells. In this review, we summarize the developmental history, the main ongoing clinical trials and proved potential adverse affects of CD19 CAR-T cells for the treatment of patients with B-cell lymphoma/leukemia.

  17. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Outcome after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients included in four consecutive risk-adapted trials by the PETHEMA Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Oriol, Albert; Vives, Susana; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Tormo, Mar; Heras, Inmaculada; Rivas, Concepción; Bethencourt, Concepción; Moscardó, Federico; Bueno, Javier; Grande, Carlos; del Potro, Eloy; Guardia, Ramon; Brunet, Salut; Bergua, Juan; Bernal, Teresa; Moreno, Maria-José; Calvo, Carlota; Bastida, Pilar; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background About one half of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are not cured of the disease and ultimately die. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the outcome of adult patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the characteristics, the outcome and the prognostic factors for survival after first relapse in a series of 263 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (excluding those with mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) prospectively enrolled in four consecutive risk-adapted PETHEMA trials. Results The median overall survival after relapse was 4.5 months (95% CI, 4–5 months) with a 5-year overall survival of 10% (95% CI, 8%–12%); 45% of patients receiving intensive second-line treatment achieved a second complete remission and 22% (95% CI, 14%–30%) of them remained disease free at 5 years. Factors predicting a good outcome after rescue therapy were age less than 30 years (2-year overall survival of 21% versus 10% for those over 30 years old; P<0.022) and a first remission lasting more than 2 years (2-year overall survival of 36% versus 17% among those with a shorter first remission; P<0.001). Patients under 30 years old whose first complete remission lasted longer than 2 years had a 5-year overall survival of 38% (95% CI, 23%–53%) and a 5-year disease-free survival of 53% (95% CI, 34%–72%). Conclusions The prognosis of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse is poor. Those aged less than 30 years with a first complete remission lasting longer than 2 years have reasonable possibilities of becoming long-term survivors while patients over this age or those who relapse early cannot be successfully rescued using the therapies currently available. PMID:20145276

  19. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Childhood Leukemia and Parental Occupational Pesticide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, Donald T.; Turner, Michelle C.; Krewski, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of childhood leukemia and parental occupational pesticide exposure. Data sources Searches of MEDLINE (1950–2009) and other electronic databases yielded 31 included studies. Data extraction Two authors independently abstracted data and assessed the quality of each study. Data synthesis Random effects models were used to obtain summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was no overall association between childhood leukemia and any paternal occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.88–1.34); there were slightly elevated risks in subgroups of studies with low total-quality scores (OR = 1.39; 95% CI, 0.99–1.95), ill-defined exposure time windows (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.00–1.85), and exposure information collected after offspring leukemia diagnosis (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.05–1.70). Childhood leukemia was associated with prenatal maternal occupational pesticide exposure (OR = 2.09; 95% CI, 1.51–2.88); this association was slightly stronger for studies with high exposure-measurement-quality scores (OR = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.68–3.58), higher confounder control scores (OR = 2.38; 95% CI, 1.56–3.62), and farm-related exposures (OR = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.53–3.89). Childhood leukemia risk was also elevated for prenatal maternal occupational exposure to insecticides (OR = 2.72; 95% CI, 1.47–5.04) and herbicides (OR = 3.62; 95% CI, 1.28–10.3). Conclusions Childhood leukemia was associated with prenatal maternal occupational pesticide exposure in analyses of all studies combined and in several subgroups. Associations with paternal occupational pesticide exposure were weaker and less consistent. Research needs include improved pesticide exposure indices, continued follow-up of existing cohorts, genetic susceptibility assessment, and basic research on childhood leukemia initiation and progression. PMID:20019898

  20. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  1. Phase I Trial of Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation Transplantation Conditioning in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Anthony; Palmer, Joycelynne; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Al Malki, Monzr M; Aldoss, Ibrahim; Ali, Haris; Aribi, Ahmed; Farol, Len; Karanes, Chatchada; Khaled, Samer; Liu, An; O'Donnell, Margaret; Parker, Pablo; Pawlowska, Anna; Pullarkat, Vinod; Radany, Eric; Rosenthal, Joseph; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Salhotra, Amandeep; Sanchez, James F; Schultheiss, Tim; Spielberger, Ricardo; Thomas, Sandra H; Snyder, David; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Marcucci, Guido; Forman, Stephen J; Wong, Jeffrey

    2017-04-01

    Current conditioning regimens provide insufficient disease control in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with active disease. Intensification of chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation (TBI) is not feasible because of excessive toxicity. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) allows for precise delivery and increased intensity treatment via sculpting radiation to sites with high disease burden or high risk for disease involvement, while sparing normal tissue. We conducted a phase I trial in 51 patients (age range, 16 to 57 years) with relapsed/refractory acute leukemia undergoing HSCT (matched related, matched unrelated, or 1-allele mismatched unrelated) with active disease, combining escalating doses of TMLI (range, 1200 to 2000 cGy) with cyclophosphamide (CY) and etoposide (VP16). The maximum tolerated dose was declared at 2000 cGy, as TMLI simulation studies indicated that >2000 cGy might deliver doses toxic for normal organs at or exceeding those delivered by standard TBI. The post-transplantation nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rate was only 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], .7 to 12.0) at day +100 and 8.1% (95% CI, 2.5 to 18.0) at 1 year. The cumulative incidence of grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 43.1% (95% CI, 29.2 to 56.3) and for grade III and IV, it was 13.7% (95% CI, 6.9 to 27.3). The day +30 complete remission rate for all patients was 88% and was 100% for those treated at 2000 cGy. The overall 1-year survival was 55.5% (95% CI, 40.7 to 68.1). The TMLI/CY/VP16 conditioning regimen is well tolerated at TMLI doses up to 2000 cGy with a low 100-day and 1-year NRM rate and no increased risk of GVHD with higher doses of radiation.

  2. Incidence, risk factors and clinical outcome of leukemia relapses with loss of the mismatched HLA after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crucitti, L; Crocchiolo, R; Toffalori, C; Mazzi, B; Greco, R; Signori, A; Sizzano, F; Chiesa, L; Zino, E; Lupo Stanghellini, M T; Assanelli, A; Carrabba, M G; Marktel, S; Marcatti, M; Bordignon, C; Corti, C; Bernardi, M; Peccatori, J; Bonini, C; Fleischhauer, K; Ciceri, F; Vago, L

    2015-05-01

    Genomic loss of the mismatched human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is a recently described mechanism of leukemia immune escape and relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Here we first evaluated its incidence, risk factors and outcome in 233 consecutive transplants from partially HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors (MMRD and MMUD, respectively). We documented 84 relapses, 23 of which with HLA loss. All the HLA loss relapses occurred after MMRD HSCT, and 20/23 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Upon MMRD HSCT, HLA loss variants accounted for 33% of the relapses (23/69), occurring later than their 'classical' counterparts (median: 307 vs 88 days, P<0.0001). Active disease at HSCT increased the risk of HLA loss (hazard ratio (HR): 10.16; confidence interval (CI): 2.65-38.92; P=0.001), whereas older patient ages had a protective role (HR: 0.16; CI: 0.05-0.46; P=0.001). A weaker association with HLA loss was observed for graft T-cell dose and occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. Outcome after 'classical' and HLA loss relapses was similarly poor, and second transplantation from a different donor appeared to provide a slight advantage for survival. In conclusion, HLA loss is a frequent mechanism of evasion from T-cell alloreactivity and relapse in patients with myeloid malignancies transplanted from MMRDs, warranting routine screening in this transplantation setting.

  3. Relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: outcome and prognostic factors: the Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Subcommittee of the GETH (Grupo Español de Trasplante Hemopoyético).

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Gomez, V; Tomás, J F; Parody, R; Sureda, A; Sanz, G; Cañizo, C; Díez, J L; Boqué, C

    2005-08-01

    In order to analyze the outcome of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), we investigated data from 107 patients reported to the Spanish Registry, GETH. In all, 93 (87%) patients were treated after relapse; 36 out of 49 that failed to achieve a response received a second relapse-treatment, and seven a third one. At the last follow-up, the number of patients in molecular or cytogenetic remission was 29 and 13, respectively. Overall survival and progression-free survival after relapse were 53.6% (95% CI: 42.9--64.2) and 52% (95% CI: 41-63) at 5 years, respectively. In multivariate analysis, survival was significantly related to CML phase at relapse (cytogenetic or chronic phase vs advanced phases) and time from transplant to relapse (<1 vs >or=1 year). Patients with no adverse factors had a better survival compared with patients with one or two adverse features (65 vs 35 vs 0%, respectively). We conclude that a significant proportion of CML patients that relapse after transplantation can regain complete and long-lasting remissions with one or more salvage therapies. Disease stage at relapse and time from transplant to relapse should be taken into account when comparing results of different salvage treatments.

  4. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Central nervous system involvement at first relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy without intrathecal prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos, Pau; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Debén, Guillermo; Prates, Virginia; Tormo, Mar; Rubio, Vicente; Pérez, Inmaculada; Fernández, Isolda; Viguria, Maricruz; Rayón, Chelo; González, José; de la Serna, Javier; Esteve, Jordi; Bergua, Juan M.; Rivas, Concha; González, Marcos; González, Jose D.; Negri, Silvia; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of and risk factors for central nervous system recurrence in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia are not well established and remain a controversial matter. Design and Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 739 patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia enrolled in two consecutive trials (PETHEMA LPA96 and LPA99) received induction therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. Consolidation therapy comprised three courses of anthracycline monochemotherapy (LPA96), with all-trans retinoic acid and reinforced doses of idarubicin in patients with an intermediate or high risk of relapse (LPA99). Central nervous system prophylaxis was not given. Results Central nervous system relapse was documented in 11 patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of central nervous system relapse was 1.7% (LPA96 3.2% and LPA99 1.2%; p=0.09). The cumulative incidence was 0%, 0.8%, and 5.5% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Relapse risk score (p=0.0001) and the occurrence of central nervous system hemorrhage during induction (5-year cumulative incidence 18.7%, p=0.006) were independent risk factors for central nervous system relapse. Conclusions This study shows a low incidence of central nervous system relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia following therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline without specific central nervous system prophylaxis. Central nervous system relapse was significantly associated with high white blood cell counts and prior central nervous system hemorrhage, which emerged as independent prognostic factors. PMID:19608685

  6. Novel targeted drug therapies for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patrick; Hunger, Stephen P; Smith, Franklin O; Carroll, William L; Reaman, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    The cure rates for childhood acute leukemia have dramatically improved to approximately 70% overal, with treatments that include intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy and, in some cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, many children still die of their disease or of treatment-related toxicities. Even in patients that are cured, there can be significant and, not uncommonly debilitating, acute and late complications of treatment. Improved understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of leukemia and the increasing availability of high-throughput genomic techniques have facilitated the development of molecularly targeted therapies that have the potential to be more effective and less toxic than the standard approaches. In this article, we review the progress to date with agents that are showing promise in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia, including monoclonal antibodies, inhibitors of kinases and other signaling molecules (e.g., BCR–ABL, FLT3, farnesyltransferase, mTOR and γ-secretase), agents that target epigenetic regulation of gene expression (DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and proteasome inhibitors. For the specific agents in each of these classes, we summarize the published preclinical data and the clinical trials that have been completed, are in progress or are being planned for children with acute leukemia. Finally, we discuss potential challenges to the success of molecularly targeted therapy, including proper target identification, adequate targeting of leukemia stem cells, developing synergistic and tolerable combinations of agents and designing adequately powered clinical trials to test efficacy in molecularly defined subsets of patients. PMID:20126514

  7. Phase II Study of Lenalidomide and Rituximab As Salvage Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wen, Sijin; Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan; Sargent, Rachel; Burger, Jan A.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug active as salvage therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We combined lenalidomide with rituximab to improve response rates in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine adult patients (age 42 to 82 years) with relapsed or refractory CLL were enrolled onto a phase II study of lenalidomide and rituximab. Patients had received prior fludarabine-based therapy or chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously) was administered weekly during cycle one and on day 1 of cycles three to 12. Lenalidomide was started on day 9 of cycle one at 10 mg orally and administered daily continuously. Each cycle was 28 days. Rituximab was administered for 12 cycles; lenalidomide could continue indefinitely if patients benefitted clinically. Results The overall response rate was 66%, including 12% complete responses and 12% nodular partial remissions. Time to treatment failure was 17.4 months. Median overall survival has not been reached; estimated survival at 36 months is 71%. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was neutropenia (73% of patients). Fourteen patients (24%) experienced a grade 3 to 4 infection or febrile episode. There was one episode of grade 3 tumor lysis; one patient experienced renal failure during the first cycle of therapy, and one venous thromboembolic event occurred during the study. Conclusion The combination of lenalidomide and rituximab is active in patients with recurrent CLL and warrants further investigation. PMID:23270003

  8. A phase 2 study of the oral farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Reiffers, Josy; Lowenberg, Bob; Thomas, Xavier; Huguet, Francoise; Fenaux, Pierre; Zhang, Steven; Rackoff, Wayne; De Porre, Peter; Stone, Richard

    2007-06-15

    This phase 2 study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the oral farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib in adults with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients (n=252) received tipifarnib 600 mg twice a day for 21 days in 28-day cycles. Median age was 62 years; 99 (39%) patients were 65 years or older. Eleven (4%) of 252 patients achieved complete remission (CR) or complete remission with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp; 9 CR and 2 CRp). Nineteen patients (8%), including those who achieved CR/CRp, achieved a reduction in bone marrow blasts to less than 5% blasts. Bone marrow blasts were reduced more than 50% in an additional 8 patients (total = 27; 11%). Median survival was 369 days for patients who achieved CR/CRp. Myelosuppression was the most common adverse event. The most common nonhematologic toxicities were fever, nausea, and hypokalemia. Single-agent treatment with tipifarnib induced durable CR/CRp, which was associated with prolonged survival, in some patients with refractory or relapsed AML. The response rate observed in this heavily pretreated group of patients suggests the requirement to enhance the response rate either by combining tipifarnib with other active agents or determining factors that are predictive of response.

  9. Obinutuzumab (GA101) in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia: final data from the phase 1/2 GAUGUIN study.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Guillaume; de Guibert, Sophie; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Morschhauser, Franck; Leblond, Veronique; Dupuis, Jehan; Mahe, Beatrice; Bouabdallah, Reda; Lei, Guiyuan; Wenger, Michael; Wassner-Fritsch, Elisabeth; Hallek, Michael

    2014-10-02

    GAUGUIN evaluated the safety and efficacy of obinutuzumab (GA101) monotherapy in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In phase 1 (dose escalation), 13 patients received obinutuzumab 400 to 1200 mg (days 1 and 8 of cycle 1; day 1 of cycles 2-8). In phase 2, 20 patients received a fixed dose of 1000 mg (days 1, 8, and 15 of cycle 1; day 1 of cycles 2-8). Infusion-related reactions occurred in nearly all patients, but few were grade 3/4. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 7 patients in phase 1 (but was not dose-related) and in 4 patients in phase 2. Overall end-of-treatment response (all partial responses) was 62% (phase 1) and 15% (phase 2); best overall response was 62% and 30%, respectively. Phase 2 median progression-free survival was 10.7 months and median duration of response was 8.9 months. In summary, obinutuzumab monotherapy is active in patients with heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory CLL.

  10. Relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia retreated with rituximab: interim results of the PERLE study.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, Driss; Choquet, Sylvain; Sanhes, Laurence; Mahé, Béatrice; Hacini, Maya; Fitoussi, Olivier; Arkam, Yazid; Orfeuvre, Hubert; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Barry, Marly; Jourdan, Eric; Dreyfus, Brigitte; Tempescul, Adrian; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Bardet, Aurélie; Leconte, Pierre; Maynadié, Marc; Delmer, Alain

    2017-06-01

    This prospective non-interventional study assessed the management of relapsed/refractory CLL after one or two treatments with rituximab, and retreatment with a rituximab-based regimen. An interim analysis was performed at the end of the induction period in 192 evaluable patients. Median age was 72 years [35-89], first relapse (55%), and second relapse (45%). Rituximab administered during first (68%), second (92%), or both treatment lines (20%). R-bendamustine administered in 56% of patients, R-purine analogs (21%), and R-alkylating agents (19%). The overall response rate (ORR) was 74.6%, in favor of R-purine analogs (90%), R-bendamustine (75%), and R-alkylating agents (69%). Lower ORR in Del 17p patients (43%) and third time rituximab (31%). Most frequent adverse events were hematological (23% patients) including neutropenia (11%) and infections (12%); grade 3/4 AEs (23% patients), mainly hematological (18%); death during induction treatment (7%). This first large study focusing on relapsed/refractory CLL patients retreated with rituximab-based regimens is still ongoing.

  11. Neurologic morbidity and quality of life in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a prospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Raja B.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ledet, Davonna S.; Morris, E. Brannon; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.; Krull, Kevin R.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Crom, Debbie; Browne, Emily; Zhu, Liang; Rai, Shesh; Srivastava, Deokumar; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with potentially neurotoxic drugs and neurologic complications in long-term survivors are inadequately studied. This study investigated neurologic morbidity and its effect on quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. Methods Prospective, single institution, cross-sectional, institutional review board-approved study of long-term ALL survivors. Participants were recruited from institutional clinics. Participants answered an investigator-administered questionnaire followed by evaluation by a neurologist. Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed. Results Of the 162 participants recruited over a 3-year period, 83.3 % reported at least one neurologic symptom of interest, 16.7 % had single symptom, 11.1 % had two symptoms, and 55.6 % had three or more symptoms. Symptoms were mild and disability was low in the majority of participants with neurologic symptoms. Median age at ALL diagnosis was 3.9 years (0.4–18.6), median age at study enrollment was 15.7 years (6.9–28.9), and median time from completion of ALL therapy was 7.4 years (1.9–20.3). On multivariable analyses, female sex correlated with presence of dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, and neuropathy; use of≥10 doses of triple intrathecal chemotherapy correlated with uri-nary incontinence, back pain, and neuropathy; cranial radiation with ataxia; history of ALL relapse with fatigue; and CNS leukemia at diagnosis with seizures. Decline in mental QOL was associated with migraine and tension type headaches, while physical QOL was impaired by presence of dizziness and falls. Overall, good QOL and physical function was maintained by a majority of participants. Conclusions Neurologic symptoms were present in 83 % long-term ALL survivors. Symptoms related morbidity and QOL impairment is low in majority of survivors. Female sex, ≥10 doses of intrathecal chemotherapy, and history of ALL relapse predispose to impaired QOL

  12. Therapy of relapsed leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with T cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Nobuharu; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Chaney, Colette N.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Loeb, Keith R.; Gooley, Ted A.; Brown, Michele L.; Koo, Kevin K. W.; Rosinski, Kellie V.; Ogawa, Seishi; Matsubara, Aiko; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of donor T cells that recognize recipient minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) is a potential strategy for preventing or treating leukemic relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A total of 7 patients with recurrent leukemia after major histocompatibility complex (MHC)–matched allogeneic HCT were treated with infusions of donor-derived, ex vivo–expanded CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for tissue-restricted recipient mHAgs. The safety of T-cell therapy, in vivo persistence of transferred CTLs, and disease response were assessed. Molecular characterization of the mHAgs recognized by CTL clones administered to 3 patients was performed to provide insight into the antileukemic activity and safety of T-cell therapy. Pulmonary toxicity of CTL infusion was seen in 3 patients, was severe in 1 patient, and correlated with the level of expression of the mHAg-encoding genes in lung tissue. Adoptively transferred CTLs persisted in the blood up to 21 days after infusion, and 5 patients achieved complete but transient remissions after therapy. The results of these studies illustrate the potential to selectively enhance graft-versus-leukemia activity by the adoptive transfer of mHAg-specific T-cell clones and the challenges for the broad application of this approach in allogeneic HCT. This study has been registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00107354. PMID:20071660

  13. CD19-Targeted CAR T cells as novel cancer immunotherapy for relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-10-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated significant potential for the treatment of patients with chemotherapy-resistant hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. One type of immunotherapy involves the adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target a tumor. These hybrid proteins are composed of the antigen-binding domains of an antibody fused to T-cell receptor signaling machinery. CAR T cells that target CD19 recently have made the jump from the laboratory to the clinic, and the results have been remarkable. CD19-targeted CAR T cells have induced complete remissions of disease in up to 90% of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), who have an expected complete response rate of 30% in response to chemotherapy. The high efficacy of CAR T cells in B-ALL suggests that regulatory approval of this therapy for this routinely fatal leukemia is on the horizon. We review the preclinical development of CAR T cells and their early clinical application for lymphoma. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of the use of CAR T cells in patients with B-ALL. In addition, we discuss the unique toxicities associated with this therapy and the management schemes that have been developed.

  14. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-21

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  15. Diffuse cerebral vasospasm with infarct after intrathecal cytarabine in childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyung; Yoon, Ju Young; Park, Hyeon Jin; Son, Meong Hi; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Woojun; Kim, Ho Jin; Lee, Sang Hyun; Park, Byung-Kiu

    2014-12-01

    Although the varied neurotoxicity of intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy for treatment of childhood acute leukemia is well known, most are related to transient post-puncture headache, drug-induced arachnoiditis, or leukoencephalopathy after methotrexate or cytarabine. Cerebral vasospasm leading to acute infarct after IT chemotherapy is very uncommon in children. Reported herein is a rare case of diffuse cerebral vasospasm with subsequent cerebral infarct after IT cytarabine in a 7-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who successfully recovered with supportive management, and a review of the literature.

  16. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Efficacy of lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Zhao, Ming; Zhu, Yuan-Chao; Hu, Xin; Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic results of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are very disappointing at present. Lenalidomide has been proved to be effective for relapsed/refractory CLL as a single agent or in combination with various chemo-immunotherapeutic regimens. However, current clinical experience in its usage is still limited. Because of existing considerable variability in different studies, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to describe overall response rate (ORR) of lenalidomide in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. Pooled estimate of cumulative prevalence of total ORR was 42.23 % (95 % confidence interval [CI], 32.49-52.61 %), while pooled ORR in regimen with lenalidomide plus anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAbs) and lenalidomide mono-therapy were 60.01 % (95 % CI, 53.86-65.86 %) and 24.38 % (95 % CI, 16.15-35.06 %), respectively. There was no significant difference between L + R (lenalidomide plus rituximab) group and L + O (lenalidomide plus ofatumumab) group, with pooled ORR of 66.38 % (95 % CI, 57.96-73.87 %) and 57.40 % (95 % CI, 46.46-67.65 %), respectively. When co-administrated with anti-CD20 mAbs, dosage of lenalidomide was not the key factor of ORR in combination therapy. Pooled ORR of patient with high-risk cytogenetic in L + anti-CD20 mAbs group was 56.74 % (95 % CI, 45.53-67.30 %). In comparison with patients without high-risk cytogenetic receiving the same treatment regimen, no significant difference was observed, with relative risk (RR) of 0.87 (95 % CI 0.68-1.11). Our finding demonstrated that lenalidomide plus anti-CD20 mAbs could be an efficient therapy regimen for relapsed/refractory CLL patients, especially for those with high-risk cytogenetic factor.

  1. Minimal Residual Disease Evaluation in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gajic-Veljanoski, O.; Pham, B.; Pechlivanoglou, P.; Krahn, M.; Higgins, Caroline; Bielecki, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Minimal residual disease (MRD) testing by higher performance techniques such as flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be used to detect the proportion of remaining leukemic cells in bone marrow or peripheral blood during and after the first phases of chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The results of MRD testing are used to reclassify these patients and guide changes in treatment according to their future risk of relapse. We conducted a systematic review of the economic literature, cost-effectiveness analysis, and budget-impact analysis to ascertain the cost-effectiveness and economic impact of MRD testing by flow cytometry for management of childhood precursor B-cell ALL in Ontario. Methods A systematic literature search (1998–2014) identified studies that examined the incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing by either flow cytometry or PCR. We developed a lifetime state-transition (Markov) microsimulation model to quantify the cost-effectiveness of MRD testing followed by risk-directed therapy to no MRD testing and to estimate its marginal effect on health outcomes and on costs. Model input parameters were based on the literature, expert opinion, and data from the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Using predictions from our Markov model, we estimated the 1-year cost burden of MRD testing versus no testing and forecasted its economic impact over 3 and 5 years. Results In a base-case cost-effectiveness analysis, compared with no testing, MRD testing by flow cytometry at the end of induction and consolidation was associated with an increased discounted survival of 0.0958 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and increased discounted costs of $4,180, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $43,613/QALY gained. After accounting for parameter uncertainty, incremental cost-effectiveness of MRD testing was associated with an ICER of $50,249/QALY gained. In

  2. Critical windows of exposure to household pesticides and risk of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaomei; Buffler, Patricia A; Gunier, Robert B; Dahl, Gary; Smith, Martyn T; Reinier, Kyndaron; Reynolds, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    The potential etiologic role of household pesticide exposures was examined in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. A total of 162 patients (0-14 years old) with newly diagnosed leukemia were rapidly ascertained during 1995-1999, and 162 matched control subjects were randomly selected from the birth registry. The use of professional pest control services at any time from 1 year before birth to 3 years after was associated with a significantly increased risk of childhood leukemia [odds ratio (OR) = 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-5.7], and the exposure during year 2 was associated with the highest risk (OR = 3.6; 95% CI, 1.6-8.3). The ORs for exposure to insecticides during the 3 months before pregnancy, pregnancy, and years 1, 2, and 3 were 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.1), 2.1 (95% CI, 1.3-3.5), 1.7 (95% CI, 1.0-2.9), 1.6 (95% CI, 1.0-2.7), and 1.2 (95% CI, 0.7-2.1), respectively. Insecticide exposures early in life appear to be more significant than later exposures, and the highest risk was observed for exposure during pregnancy. Additionally, more frequent exposure to insecticides was associated with a higher risk. In contrast to insecticides, the association between herbicides and leukemia was weak and nonsignificant. Pesticides were also grouped based on where they were applied. Exposure to indoor pesticides was associated with an increased risk, whereas no significant association was observed for exposure to outdoor pesticides. The findings suggest that exposure to household pesticides is associated with an elevated risk of childhood leukemia and further indicate the importance of the timing and location of exposure. PMID:12204832

  3. World Health Organization Grade II Oligodendroglioma Occurring after Successful Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang-In; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Park, Jung-Yul; Chung, Yong-Gu

    2016-01-01

    When treating childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), secondary neoplasms are a significant long term problem. Radiation is generally accepted to be a major cause of the development of secondary neoplasms. Following treatment for ALL, a variety of secondary tumors, including brain tumors, hematologic malignancies, sarcomas, thyroid cancers, and skin cancers have been reported. However, oligodendroglioma as a secondary neoplasm is extremely rare. Herein we present a case of secondary oligodendroglioma occurring 13 years after the end of ALL treatment. PMID:27867928

  4. Outcome of refractory and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia in children treated during 2005–2011 – experience of the Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG)

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Jacek; Skalska-Sadowska, Jolanta; Wachowiak, Jacek; Zając-Spychała, Olga; Niewiadomska-Wojnałowicz, Izabela; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Balwierz, Walentyna; Pawińska-Wąsikowska, Katarzyna; Goździk, Jolanta; Chybicka, Alicja; Potocka, Kinga; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Muszyńska-Rosłan, Katarzyna; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Karolczyk, Grażyna; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Wójcik, Beata; Badowska, Wanda; Urasiński, Tomasz; Ociepa, Tomasz; Matysiak, Michał; Sikorska-Fic, Barbara; Szczepański, Tomasz; Tomaszewska, Renata; Sobol, Grażyna; Wieczorek, Maria; Karpińska-Derda, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent studies showed relatively better outcome for children with refractory (refAML) and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (relAML). Treatment of these patients has not been unified within Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG) so far. The goal of this study is to analyze the results of this therapy performed between 2005–2011. Material and methods The outcome data of 16 patients with refAML and 62 with relAML were analyzed retrospectively. Reinduction was usually based on idarubicine, fludarabine and cytarabine with allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in 5 refAML and 30 relAML children. Results Seventy seven percent relAML patients entered second complete remission (CR2). Five-year OS and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated at 16% and 30%. The outcome for patients after alloHSCT in CR2 (63%) was better than that of those not transplanted (36%) with 5-year OS of 34% vs. 2-year of 7% and 5-year DFS of 40% vs. 12.5%. Second complete remission achievement and alloHSCT were the most significant predictors of better prognosis (p = 0.000 and p = 0.024). The outcome of refAML children was significantly worse than relAML with first remission (CR1) rate of 33%, OS and DFS of 25% at 3 years and 53% at 2 years, respectively. All survivors of refAML were treated with alloHSCT after CR1. Conclusions The uniform reinduction regimen of the documented efficacy and subsequent alloHSCT in remission is needed to improve the outcome for ref/relAML children treated within PPLLSG. The focus should be on the future risk-directed both front and second line AML therapy. PMID:24876821

  5. Residential Proximity to Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Rudolph P.; Gunier, Robert; Von Behren, Julie; Hertz, Andrew; Crouse, Vonda; Buffler, Patricia A.; Reynolds, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    Ambient exposure from residential proximity to applications of agricultural pesticides may contribute to the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using residential histories collected from the families of 213 ALL cases and 268 matched controls enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study, the authors assessed residential proximity within a half-mile (804.5 meters) of pesticide applications by linking address histories with reports of agricultural pesticide use. Proximity was ascertained during different time windows of exposure, including the first year of life and the child’s lifetime through the date of diagnosis for cases or reference for controls. Agricultural pesticides were categorized a priori into groups based on similarities in toxicological effects, physicochemical properties, and target pests or uses. The effects of moderate and high exposure for each group of pesticides were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Elevated ALL risk was associated with lifetime moderate exposure, but not high exposure, to certain physicochemical categories of pesticides, including organophosphates, cholorinated phenols, and triazines, and with pesticides classified as insecticides or fumigants. A similar pattern was also observed for several toxicological groups of pesticides. These findings suggest future directions for the identification of specific pesticides that may play a role in the etiology of childhood leukemia. PMID:19700145

  6. In utero cytomegalovirus infection and development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Francis, Stephen Starko; Wallace, Amelia D; Wendt, George A; Li, Linlin; Liu, Fenyong; Riley, Lee W; Kogan, Scott; Walsh, Kyle M; de Smith, Adam J; Dahl, Gary V; Ma, Xiaomei; Delwart, Eric; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2017-03-23

    It is widely suspected, yet controversial, that infection plays an etiologic role in the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer and a disease with a confirmed prenatal origin in most cases. We investigated infections at diagnosis and then assessed the timing of infection at birth in children with ALL and age, gender, and ethnicity matched controls to identify potential causal initiating infections. Comprehensive untargeted virome and bacterial analyses of pretreatment bone marrow specimens (n = 127 ALL in comparison with 38 acute myeloid leukemia cases in a comparison group) revealed prevalent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection at diagnosis in childhood ALL, demonstrating active viral transcription in leukemia blasts as well as intact virions in serum. Screening of newborn blood samples revealed a significantly higher prevalence of in utero CMV infection in ALL cases (n = 268) than healthy controls (n = 270) (odds ratio [OR], 3.71, confidence interval [CI], 1.56-7.92, P = .0016). Risk was more pronounced in Hispanics (OR=5.90, CI=1.89-25.96) than in non-Hispanic whites (OR=2.10 CI= 0.69-7.13). This is the first study to suggest that congenital CMV infection is a risk factor for childhood ALL and is more prominent in Hispanic children. Further investigation of CMV as an etiologic agent for ALL is warranted.

  7. Hypothesis: The risk of childhood leukemia is related to combinations of power-frequency and static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D. |; Thomas, D.C.; London, S.J.; Peters, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The authors present a hypothesis that the risk of childhood leukemia is related to exposure to specific combinations of static and extremely-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields. Laboratory data from calcium efflux and diatom mobility experiments were used with the gyromagnetic equation to predict combinations of 60 Hz and static magnetic fields hypothesized to enhance leukemia risk. The laboratory data predicted 19 bands of the static field magnitude with a bandwidth of 9.1 {mu}T that, together with 60 Hz magnetic fields, are expected to have biological activity. The authors then assessed the association between this exposure metric and childhood leukemia using data from a case-control study in Los Angeles County. ELF and static magnetic fields were measured in the bedrooms of 124 cases determined from a tumor registry and 99 controls drawn from friends and random digit dialing. Although no association was found for childhood leukemia in relation to measured ELF or static magnetic fields alone, an increasing trend of leukemia risk with measured ELF fields was found for subjects within these static field bands. When the 60 Hz magnetic fields were assessed according to the Wertheimer-Leeper code for wiring configurations, leukemia risks were again greater with the hypothesized exposure conditions. Although the risk estimates are based on limited magnetic field measurements for a small number of subjects, these findings suggest that the risk of childhood leukemia may be related to the combined effects of the static and ELF magnetic fields.

  8. High expression of costimulatory molecules correlates with low relapse-free survival probability in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Graf, M; Reif, S; Hecht, K; Pelka-Fleischer, R; Kroell, T; Pfister, K; Schmetzer, H

    2005-05-01

    Costimulatory molecules such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 (CD11a), LFA-3 (CD58), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 (CD54), neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (CD56), B7-1 (CD80), or B7-2 (CD86) are important regulatory elements in healthy immunological cascades, but their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has only been rarely investigated. We studied their expression on mononuclear bone marrow (BM) cells from 105 patients with AML at initial diagnosis and evaluated their prognostic significance. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed using antibodies directly conjugated with fluorescein. A BM sample was considered positive if more than 20% of the cells in the blast containing gate expressed the respective marker. The surface expression of CD11a (27 of 29 cases positive with an average of 71% positive blasts; 27(+)/29, 71%), CD54 (23(+)/33, 37%), CD56 (24(+)/93, 20%), CD58 (29(+)/29, 95%), CD80 (13(+)/28, 30%), and CD86 (19(+)/29, 39%) was measured. The expression of these markers in different French-American-British (FAB) classification types (M0-M5) was heterogeneous, except for CD56, which showed a higher proportion of positive cells in monocytic subtypes of AML. In addition, cases with a "poor risk" karyotype as well as patients succumbing to "early death" after double induction therapy according to the AML Cooperative Group (CG) protocol were characterized by a high expression of CD56. Relapse-free survival analyses demonstrated that patients with more than 8% CD56(+) cells in the BM relapsed significantly sooner. CD54 was preferentially expressed in AML M4(eo) and in addition in "favorable" cytogenetic risk groups and in cases that had responded to AML-CG therapy. Only very high proportions (>60%) of CD54(+) cells were associated with a lower probability for relapse-free survival. CD80 and CD86 expressions were similar in all FAB types. Patients who had responded to AML-CG therapy showed higher CD80

  9. Germline variants in MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex genes in childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The MRE11, RAD50, and NBN genes encode proteins of the MRE11-RAD50-NBN (MRN) complex involved in cellular response to DNA damage and the maintenance of genome stability. In our previous study we showed that the germline p.I171V mutation in NBN may be considered as a risk factor in the development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and some specific haplotypes of that gene may be associated with childhood leukemia. These findings raise important questions about the role of mutations in others genes of the MRN complex in childhood leukemia. The aim of this study was to answer the question whether MRE11 and RAD50 alterations may be associated with childhood ALL or AML. Methods We estimated the frequency of constitutional mutations and polymorphisms in selected regions of MRE11, RAD50, and NBN in the group of 220 children diagnosed with childhood leukemias and controls (n=504/2200). The analysis was performed by specific amplification of region of interest by PCR and followed by multi-temperature single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-MSSCP) technique. We performed two molecular tests to examine any potential function of the detected the c.551+19G>A SNP in RAD50 gene. To our knowledge, this is the first analysis of the MRE11, RAD50 and NBN genes in childhood leukemia. Results The frequency of either the AA genotype or A allele of RAD50_rs17166050 were significantly different in controls compared to leukemia group (ALL+AML) (p<0.0019 and p<0.0019, respectively). The cDNA analysis of AA or GA genotypes carriers has not revealed evidence of splicing abnormality of RAD50 pre-mRNA. We measured the allelic-specific expression of G and A alleles at c.551+19G>A and the statistically significant overexpression of the G allele has been observed. Additionally we confirmed the higher incidence of the p.I171V mutation in the leukemia group (7/220) than among controls (12/2400) (p<0.0001). Conclusion The formerly reported sequence variants in the RAD50

  10. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Ofatumumab and Lenalidomide for Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Correlation between Responses and Immune Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, Candida; Falchi, Lorenzo; ten Hacken, Elisa; Gao, Hui; Shaim, Hila; Van Roosbroeck, Katrien; Calin, George; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Wang, Xuemei; Wierda, William G.; Rezvani, Katayoun; Reuben, James M.; Burger, Jan A.; Keating, Michael J.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated efficacy and tolerability of the combination of ofatumumab and lenalidomide in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and explored whether immune system characteristics could influence the response to treatment. Experimental Design Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this phase II study. Ofatumumab was administered at a dose of 300 mg on day 1, 1,000 mg on days 8, 15, and 22 during course 1, 1,000 mg on day 1 during courses 3–6, and once every other course during courses 7–24 (28-day courses). Oral lenalidomide (10 mg daily) was started on day 9 and continued for as long as a clinical benefit was observed. Results The overall response rate was 71%. Eight patients (24%) achieved a complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete recovery of blood counts, including 9% with minimal residual disease-negative CR. The median progression-free survival was 16 months, and the estimated 5-year survival was 53%. The most common treatment-related toxicity was neutropenia (grade >2 in 18% of the 574 patient courses). The most frequent infectious complications were pneumonia and neutropenic fever (24% and 9% of patients, respectively). We observed that patients who achieved a CR had at baseline higher numbers and a better preserved function of T cells and natural killer cells compared with non-responders. Conclusions The combination of ofatumumab and lenalidomide is a well-tolerated regimen that induces durable responses in the majority of patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. Our correlative data suggest a role of competent immune system in supporting the efficacy of this treatment. PMID:26733610

  12. Vaccination to improve the persistence of CD19CAR gene-modified T cells in relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rossig, C; Pule, M; Altvater, B; Saiagh, S; Wright, G; Ghorashian, S; Clifton-Hadley, L; Champion, K; Sattar, Z; Popova, B; Hackshaw, A; Smith, P; Roberts, T; Biagi, E; Dreno, B; Rousseau, R; Kailayangiri, S; Ahlmann, M; Hough, R; Kremens, B; Sauer, M G; Veys, P; Goulden, N; Cummins, M; Amrolia, P J

    2017-03-10

    Trials with second generation CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) T-cells report unprecedented responses but are associated with risk of cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Instead, we studied the use of donor Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cells (EBV CTL) transduced with a first generation CD19CAR, relying on the endogenous T-cell receptor for proliferation. We conducted a multi-center phase I/II study of donor CD19CAR transduced EBV CTL in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Patients were eligible pre-emptively if they developed molecular relapse (>5 × 10(-4)) post first stem cell transplant (SCT), or prophylactically post second SCT. An initial cohort showed poor expansion/persistence. We therefore investigated EBV-directed vaccination to enhance expansion/persistence. Eleven patients were treated. No CRS, neurotoxicity or graft versus host disease (GVHD) was observed. At 1 month, 5 patients were in CR (4 continuing, 1 de novo), 1 PR, 3 had stable disease and 3 no response. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 10 of 11 have relapsed, 2 are alive with disease and 1 alive in CR 3 years. Although CD19CAR CTL expansion was poor, persistence was enhanced by vaccination. Median persistence was 0 (range: 0-28) days without vaccination compared to 56 (range: 0-221) days with vaccination (P=0.06). This study demonstrates the feasibility of multi-center studies of CAR T cell therapy and the potential for enhancing persistence with vaccination.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.39.

  13. Phase 1 Multicenter Study of Vincristine Sulfate Liposomes Injection and Dexamethasone in Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Deborah A.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Stock, Wendy; Heffner, Leonard T.; Faderl, Stefan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wierda, William; Pierce, Sherry; Lu, Biao; Deitcher, Steven R.; O’Brien, Susan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dose intensification of chemotherapy has improved outcome for younger adults with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Novel formulations of standard chemotherapy agents may further reduce the incidence of disease recurrence after frontline chemotherapy. Vincristine (VCR) sulfate liposomes injection (VSLI) is a sphingomyelin/cholesterol nanoparticle encapsulated VCR formulation that improves the pharmacokinetic profile of VCR without augmenting neurotoxicity. METHODS A phase 1 trial of weekly, intravenous VSLI at 1.5 mg/m2, 1.825 mg/m2, 2.0 mg/m2, 2.25 mg/m2, or 2.4 mg/m2 was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) using a standard, 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. Dexamethasone (40 mg) was given on Days 1 through 4 and on Days 11 through 14 of each 4-week cycle. RESULTS Thirty-six adults with relapsed/refractory ALL, all previously treated with conventional VCR, received at least 1 dose of VSLI. The MTD of VSLI was 2.25 mg/m2 based on dose-limiting toxicities of grade 3 motor neuropathy, grade 4 seizure, and grade 4 hepatotoxicity in 1 patient each at the 2.4 mg/m2 dose level. The most common toxicities attributed to VSLI included peripheral neuropathy (55%) and constipation (53%). A complete response (CR) was achieved in 7 of 36 patients (19%) based on an intent-to-treat analysis; the CR rate was 29% for the 14 patients who underwent therapy as their first salvage attempt. Four of 7 patients who achieved a CR underwent subsequent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in remission. CONCLUSIONS In this study, VSLI plus dexamethasone appeared to be an effective salvage therapy option for relapsed/refractory ALL. A phase 2, international, multicenter clinical trial assessing the efficacy of single-agent VSLI as second salvage therapy for patients with previously treated ALL is underway. PMID:19708032

  14. Translocation 2;19 in a patient with probable relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mark, H F; Gray, Y; Rintels, P

    1997-01-01

    We report the cytogenetic and hematopathologic results from a patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia. Although the initial specimen revealed an apparently normal male karyotype, a translocation, t(2;19)(q21;p13), was detected in the second specimen. It is not clear whether this was a primary or secondary and possibly chemotherapy-induced abnormality. In an extensive search of the recent medical literature database (Medline, 1966 to the present; CancerLit, 1983 to the present, MDX Health Digest, 1988 to the present; HealthSTAR, 1975 to the present, and CINAHL, 1982 to the present), we found no previous report of this specific translocation. This case is of interest not only because of its cytogenetic rarity and its unique clinical features, but also because of the fact that this patient worked in construction management, performing offshore drilling in oil fields for several years, and also worked with plastics and polymer film for about 4 years, although this past history of possible genotoxic exposure may or may not be of relevance. In addition, it is also of interest that one of the translocation breakpoints, 19p13, is apparently identical to that found in the 1;19 translocation associated with pre-B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  15. Metformin Hydrochloride and Ritonavir in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-22

    Anemia; Fatigue; Fever; Lymphadenopathy; Lymphocytosis; Night Sweats; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Splenomegaly; Thrombocytopenia; Weight Loss

  16. Temporal changes in water quality at a childhood leukemia cluster

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1997, 15 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia and one case of acute myelocytic leukemia have been diagnosed in children and teenagers who live, or have lived, in an area centered on the town of Fallon, Nevada. The expected rate for the population is about one case every five years. In 2001, 99 domestic and municipal wells and one industrial well were sampled in the Fallon area. Twenty-nine of these wells had been sampled previously in 1989. Statistical comparison of concentrations of major ions and trace elements in those 29 wells between 1989 and 2001 using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicate water quality did not substantially change over that period; however, short-term changes may have occurred that were not detected. Volatile organic compounds were seldom detected in ground water samples and those that are regulated were consistently found at concentrations less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). The MCL for gross-alpha radioactivity and arsenic, radon, and uranium concentrations were commonly exceeded, and sometimes were greatly exceeded. Statistical comparisons using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test indicate gross-alpha and -beta radioactivity, arsenic, uranium, and radon concentrations in wells used by families having a child with leukemia did not statistically differ from the remainder of the domestic wells sampled during this investigation. Isotopic measurements indicate the uranium was natural and not the result of a 1963 underground nuclear bomb test near Fallon. In arid and semiarid areas where trace-element concentrations can greatly exceed the MCL, household reverse-osmosis units may not reduce their concentrations to safe levels. In parts of the world where radon concentrations are high, water consumed first thing in the morning may be appreciably more radioactive than water consumed a few minutes later after the pressure tank has been emptied because secular equilibrium between radon and its immediate daughter

  17. Association between MTR A2756G polymorphism and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jia; Wang, Yadan; Zhang, Hang; Hu, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Abstract To date, many studies on the association between methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have provided either controversial or inconclusive results. To clarify the effect of MTR A2756G on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a meta-analysis of all relevant studies was performed. The fixed effects model showed that the 2756A allele was associated with a decreased risk of childhood ALL compared with the G allele (ORA vs. G = 0.872; 95% CI 0.782-0.974; p = 0.015, I(2) = 46.9%). Additionally, when comparing subjects with ALL and controls with AA vs. AG or AA vs. AG + GG (dominant model), significant differences were found in the fixed effects model (ORAA vs. AG = 0.869; 95% CI 0.760-0.994; p = 0.040, I(2) = 26.4%; ORAA vs. AG+ GG = 0.858; 95% CI 0.754-0.976; p = 0.020, I(2) = 39.6%). In a subgroup analysis in a population with the same background, individuals with the AA genotype had a reduced risk of developing ALL compared to individuals with the AG genotype. In conclusion, our study provides evidence suggesting that MTR A2756G is associated with a reduced risk of developing childhood ALL.

  18. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nousome, Darryl; Lupo, Philip J.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Discovering genetic predictors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) necessitates the evaluation of novel factors including maternal genetic effects, which are a proxy for the intrauterine environment, and robust epidemiologic study designs. Therefore, we evaluated five maternal and offspring xenobiotic metabolism haplotypes and the risk of childhood ALL among 120 case-parent triads. Two of the five haplotypes were significantly associated with risk: GSTM3/GSTM4 (P=0.01) and GSTP1 (P=0.02). The EPHX1 haplotype was marginally associated with risk (P=0.05), whereas haplotypes in CYP1B1 and GSTA4 were not. Our results suggest genetic variation in xenobiotic metabolism is important in childhood ALL etiology. PMID:23433810

  20. Challenges identifying genetic determinants of pediatric cancers--the childhood leukemia experience.

    PubMed

    Sinnett, Daniel; Labuda, Damian; Krajinovic, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric cancers affect approximately 1 in every 500 children before the age of 15. Little is known about the etiology of this heterogeneous group of diseases despite the fact they constitute the major cause of death by disease among this population. Because of its relatively high prevalence, most of the work done in pediatric oncogenetics has been focused on leukemias, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although it is now well accepted that genetic variation plays a significant role in determining individual's cancer susceptibility, few studies have explored genetic susceptibility to childhood leukemia with respect to common polymorphisms. The biochemical and genetic mechanisms contributing to cancer susceptibility are numerous and can be grouped into broad categories: (1) cellular growth and differentiation, (2) DNA replication and repair, (3) metabolism of carcinogens (4) apoptosis, (5) oxidative stress response and (6) cell cycle. To evaluate whether candidate genes in these pathways are involved in childhood leukemogenesis, we conducted case-control studies. We showed that leukemogenesis in children may be associated with DNA variants in some of these genes and that the combination of genotypes seems to be more predictive of risk than either of them independently. We also observed that, at least at some loci, the parental genetics might be important in predicting the risk of cancer in this pediatric model of a complex disease. Taken together, these results indicate that the investigation of a single enzyme and/or a single genotype might not be sufficient to explain the etiology of childhood leukemia because of the complexity of the environment and that of the inter-individual variability in cancer susceptibility.

  1. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    PubMed Central

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Kershenbaum, Aaron; Wray, Lisa; McWilliams, Thomas; Cannon, Shannon; Devidas, Meenakshi; Stork, Linda; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1). One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3–0.9). Our study provides data that relapse risk in pediatric ALL is associated with germline variations in TPMT, MTR and SLC19A1. PMID:26605150

  2. A phase I study of intermediate dose cytarabine in combination with lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Brady, William E; Tan, Wei; Vigil, Carlos E; Thompson, James E; Ford, Laurie A; Dickey, Noelle M; L Bashaw, Heather; Sperrazza, Jill; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S

    2016-04-01

    Relapsed/refractory (r/r) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) remains a therapeutic challenge. Cytarabine arabinoside (AraC) forms the backbone of most regimens, with complete responses (CR) ranging from 17 to 20%. Lenalidomide (Len) is approved by the FDA for multiple myeloma and myelodysplasia and has demonstrated activity in AML. We developed a phase I study to evaluate the safety and tolerability of Len in combination with intermediate dose AraC (1.5 g/m(2)/day given on days 1-5) in adults with r/r AML. The maximally tolerated dose for this combination was 10mg daily on days 6-26 of a 28 day cycle. Dose de-escalation from 25mg was required due to rash, liver function abnormalities, and hypokalemia. Of 32 evaluable patients, five achieved CR (16%), 5CRi (16%) and 3 had hematological improvements for an overall response rate of 41% (13/32). Median overall survival (95% confidence interval) for patients treated on study was 5.8 (2.5-10.6) months and disease free survival was 3.4 (2.3-6.2) months. This single institute phase I trial of Len and intermediate dose AraC was associated with marked skin and other toxicities. At the dose and schedule tested, this combination did not appear to result in improved CR over single agent AraC for r/r AML.

  3. Entospletinib and Obinutuzumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-24

    Anemia; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Fatigue; Fever; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Hairy Cell Leukemia; Lymphadenopathy; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Night Sweats; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Richter Syndrome; Splenomegaly; Thrombocytopenia; Weight Loss

  4. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  6. A case-control study of childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts: the relationship between leukemia incidence and exposure to public drinking water.

    PubMed

    Costas, Kevin; Knorr, Robert S; Condon, Suzanne K

    2002-12-02

    A 1981 Massachusetts Department of Public Health study confirmed a childhood leukemia cluster in Woburn, Massachusetts. Our follow-up investigation attempts to identify factors potentially responsible for the cluster. Woburn has a 130-year industrial history that resulted in significant local deposition of tannery and chemical manufacturing waste. In 1979, two of the city's eight municipal drinking water wells were closed when tests identified contamination with solvents including trichloroethylene. By 1986, 21 childhood leukemia cases had been observed (5.52 expected during the seventeen year period) and the case-control investigation discussed herein was begun. Nineteen cases and 37 matched controls comprised the study population. A water distribution model provided contaminated public water exposure estimates for subject residences. Results identified a non-significant association between potential for exposure to contaminated water during maternal pregnancy and leukemia diagnosis, (odds ratio = 8.33, 95% CI 0.73-94.67). However, a significant dose-response relationship (P < 0.05) was identified for this exposure period. In contrast, the child's potential for exposure from birth to diagnosis showed no association with leukemia risk. Wide confidence intervals suggest cautious interpretation of association magnitudes. Since 1986, expected incidence has been observed in Woburn including 8 consecutive years with no new childhood leukemia diagnoses.

  7. Incidence of childhood leukemia and oil exploitation in the Amazon basin of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Hurtig, Anna-Karin; San Sebastián, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether there was any difference in childhood leukemia incidence rates between populations living in the proximity to oil fields and those living in areas free from oil exploitation in the Amazon basin of Ecuador, 91 cancer cases among children (0-14 years) from the provinces of Sucumbios, Orellana, Napo, and Pastaza during the period 1985-2000 were studied. The relative risks for all leukemias indicated significantly elevated levels in the youngest age group (0-4 years), both genders combined (RR 3.48, 95% CI 1.25-9.67), and in all age groups (0-14 years) combined for females (RR 2.60, 95% CI 1.11-6.08) and both genders combined (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.35-4.86). There was no significant difference between the two groups in all other cancer sites combined. Study results are compatible with a relationship between childhood leukemia incidence and living in the proximity of oil fields in the Ecuadorian Amazon.

  8. Long-term Survival and Late Effects among 1-year Survivors of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Acute Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christine N.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Loren, Alison W.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C.; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A.; Porter, David L.; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A.; Warwick, Anne B.; Wood, William A.; Yu, Lolie C.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1-year or more following second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant following disease relapse; among these 325 survived relapse-free at 1-year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplant in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least one year were 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status prior to second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (HR 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission prior to second HCT, P<0.01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults following second transplant. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of non-relapse mortality followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least one of the studied late effects at 10-years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence 22%) and cataracts (20%), and in adults were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease-free for at least 1-year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and non-relapse morbidity and mortality. Novel approaches

  9. Differences in Childhood Leukemia Incidence and Survival between Southern Thailand and the United States: A Population-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Demanelis, Kathryn; Sriplung, Hutcha; Meza, Rafael; Wiangnon, Surapon; Rozek, Laura S.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Lupo, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Childhood leukemia incidence and survival varies globally, and this variation may be attributed to environmental risk factors, genetics, and/or disparities in diagnosis and treatment. PROCEDURE We analyzed childhood leukemia incidence and survival trends in children age 0–19 years from 1990 to 2011 in Songkhla, Thailand (n=316) and compared these results to US data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry (n=6,738). We computed relative survival using Ederer II and estimated survival functions using the Kaplan-Meier method. Changes in incidence and five-year survival by year of diagnosis were evaluated using joinpoint regression and are reported as annual percent changes (APC). RESULTS The age-standardized incidence of leukemia was 3.2 and 4.1 cases per 100,000 in Songkhla and SEER-9, respectively. In Songkhla, incidence from 1990–2011 significantly increased for leukemia (APC=1.7%, p=0.031) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (APC=1.8%, p=0.033). Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) incidence significantly increased (APC=4.2%, p=0.044) and was significantly different from the US (p=0.026), where incidence was stable during the same period (APC=0.3%, p=0.541). The overall five-year relative survival for leukemia was lower than that reported in the US (43% vs. 79%). Five-year survival significantly improved by at least 2% per year from 1990–2011 in Songkhla for leukemia, ALL, and AML (p<0.050). CONCLUSIONS While leukemia and ALL incidence increased in Songkhla, differences in leukemia trends, particularly AML incidence, may suggest etiologic or diagnostic differences between Songkhla and the US. This work highlights the importance of evaluating childhood cancer trends in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:25962869

  10. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C. )

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child's sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children's electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  11. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C.

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child`s sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children`s electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  12. Examining the medical resource utilization and costs of relapsed and refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, S.; Seung, S.J.; Cheung, M.C.; Fraser, G.; Kuriakose, B.; Trambitas, C.; Mittmann, N.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to collect medical resource utilization data and costs in Ontario for the management of patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic lymphoma (cll) who have undergone at least 1 treatment course and have been stratified by Rai staging. Methods This retrospective longitudinal cohort study, conducted by chart review, analyzed anonymized patient records from two cancer centres in Ontario. Comprehensive records of 86 patients meeting the inclusion criteria were used to obtain resource utilization, which, multiplied by unit costs, were used to determine overall and mean costs. Descriptive statistics are presented for patient demographics, medical resource utilization, and costing data. Results The total cost for the cohort was $2.2 million over a mean follow-up period of 4.7 years. The mean total cost per patient (regardless of follow-up) was $25,736. In terms of Rai staging, overall mean costs were highest for stage iv patients. Almost 50% of the total cost was attributable to cll treatments, among which fludarabine-based treatments had the highest utilization. Conclusions For this Canadian cll cohort, medical resource utilization and costs were determined to be $2.2 million, with cll treatments accounting for about half the cost. Costs generally increased with Rai stage. PMID:28270732

  13. The Association of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes with the Risk of Childhood Leukemia in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Ji, Hong-Xue; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Miao, Chia-En; Hsu, Yuan-Nian; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most prevalent type of pediatric cancer, the causes of which are likely to involve an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. To evaluate the effects of the genotypic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) on childhood ALL risk in Taiwan, two well-known polymorphic genotypes of MTHFR, C677T (rs1801133) and A1298C (rs1801131), were analyzed to examine the extent of their associations with childhood ALL susceptibility and to discuss the MTHFR genotypic contribution to childhood ALL risk among different populations. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 266 patients with childhood ALL and an equal number of non-cancer controls recruited were genotyped utilizing PCR-RFLP methodology. The MTHFR C677T genotype, but not the A1298C, was differently distributed between childhood ALL and control groups. The CT and TT of MTHFR C677T genotypes were significantly more frequently found in controls than in childhood ALL patients (odds ratios=0.60 and 0.48, 95% confidence intervals=0.42–0.87 and 0.24–0.97, respectively). As for gender, the boys carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype conferred a lower odds ratio of 0.51 (95% confidence interval=0.32–0.81, P=0.0113) for childhood ALL. As for age, those equal to or greater than 3.5 years of age at onset of disease carrying the MTHFR C677T CT or TT genotype were of lower risk (odds ratio= 0.43 and 95% confidence interval=0.26–0.71, P=0.0016). Conclusions Our results indicated that the MTHFR C677T T allele was a protective biomarker for childhood ALL in Taiwan, and the association was more significant in male patients and in patients 3.5 years of age or older at onset of disease. PMID:25793509

  14. Minimal Residual Disease as a Predictive Factor for Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in Adult Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First and Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Grubovikj, Rada M.; Alavi, Asif; Koppel, Ahrin; Territo, Mary; Schiller, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is potentially curative for patients with high-risk leukemia, but disease recurrence remains the leading cause of treatment failure. Our objective was to determine the impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) by any technique in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in morphologic first and second complete remission undergoing allo-SCT. Fifty nine patients were eligible for the study of 160 patients transplanted over ten years. For the MRD assessment we used multiparametric flow cytometry, cytogenetics and fluorescent in situ hybridization; 19 patients (32.2%) were identified as MRD positive. Patients with MRD had a consistently worse outcome over those without MRD, with 3-years leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 15.8% vs. 62.4% and overall survival (OS) of 17.5% vs. 62.3%. Relapse rate was significantly higher in MRD-positive patients; 3 years relapse rate in MRD-positive patients was 57.9% vs. 15.1% in MRD-negative patients. Detection of MRD in complete remission was associated with increased overall mortality (HR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.45–7.57; p = 0.0044) and relapse (HR = 5.26; 95% CI: 2.0–14.0; p = 0.001), even after controlling for other risk factors. Our study showed that for patients in morphologic complete remission the presence of MRD predicts for significantly increased risk of relapse and reduced LFS and OS. PMID:24213327

  15. Paternal Smoking and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruiling; Zhang, Luoping; McHale, Cliona M.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association between paternal smoking and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Method. We identified 18 published epidemiologic studies that reported data on both paternal smoking and childhood ALL risk. We performed a meta-analysis and analyzed dose-response relationships on ALL risk for smoking during preconception, during pregnancy, after birth, and ever smoking. Results. The summary odds ratio (OR) of childhood ALL associated with paternal smoking was 1.11 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.05–1.18, I2 = 18%) during any time period, 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08–1.46, I2 = 53%) preconception; 1.24 (95% CI: 1.07–1.43, I2 = 54%) during pregnancy, and 1.24 (95% CI: 0.96–1.60, I2 = 64%) after birth, with a dose-response relationship between childhood ALL and paternal smoking preconception or after birth. Conclusion. The evidence supports a positive association between childhood ALL and paternal ever smoking and at each exposure time period examined. Future epidemiologic studies should assess paternal smoking during well-defined exposure windows and should include biomarkers to assess smoking exposure and toxicological mechanisms. PMID:21765828

  16. High-dose cytarabine as salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia--is more better or more of the same?

    PubMed

    Wolach, Ofir; Itchaki, Gilad; Bar-Natan, Michal; Yeshurun, Moshe; Ram, Ron; Herscovici, Corina; Shpilberg, Ofer; Douer, Dan; Tallman, Martin S; Raanani, Pia

    2016-03-01

    Cytarabine is the backbone of most chemotherapeutic regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), yet the optimal dose for salvage therapy of refractory or relapsed AML (RR-AML) has not been established. Very high dose single-agent cytarabine at 36 g/m(2) (ARA-36) was previously shown to be effective and tolerable in RR-AML. In this retrospective analysis, we aim to describe the toxicity and efficacy of ARA-36 as salvage therapy for patients with AML who are primary refractory to intensive daunorubicin-containing induction or those relapsing after allogeneic stem cell transplant (alloSCT). Fifteen patients, median age 53 years, were included in the analysis. Six patients were treated for induction failure, one had resistant APL, and eight relapsed after alloSCT. Complete remission was achieved in 60% of patients. Surviving patients were followed for a median of 8.5 months. One-year overall survival was 54% (95% CI 30%-86%), and relapse rate from remission (n = 9) was 56%. Grade III/IV pulmonary, infectious, ocular and gastrointestinal toxicities occurred in 26%, 20%, 20% and 20% of patients respectively. Salvage therapy with ARA-36 regimen for RR-AML has considerable efficacy with manageable toxicity in patients with induction failure or post-transplant relapse. Overall survival in these high-risk patients still remains poor.

  17. Deep targeted sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia unveils distinct mutational patterns between genetic subtypes and novel relapse-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, C. Mårten; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica; Freyhult, Eva; Ekman, Diana; Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Raine, Amanda; Övernäs, Elin; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Frost, Britt-Marie; Grandér, Dan; Heyman, Mats; Palle, Josefine; Forestier, Erik; Lönnerholm, Gudmar

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the mutational patterns of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we performed deep next generation sequencing of 872 cancer genes in 172 diagnostic and 24 relapse samples from 172 pediatric ALL patients. We found an overall greater mutational burden and more driver mutations in T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients compared to B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL) patients. In addition, the majority of the mutations in T-ALL had occurred in the original leukemic clone, while most of the mutations in BCP-ALL were subclonal. BCP-ALL patients carrying any of the recurrent translocations ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL or TCF3-PBX1 harbored few mutations in driver genes compared to other BCP-ALL patients. Specifically in BCP-ALL, we identified ATRX as a novel putative driver gene and uncovered an association between somatic mutations in the Notch signaling pathway at ALL diagnosis and increased risk of relapse. Furthermore, we identified EP300, ARID1A and SH2B3 as relapse-associated genes. The genes highlighted in our study were frequently involved in epigenetic regulation, associated with germline susceptibility to ALL, and present in minor subclones at diagnosis that became dominant at relapse. We observed a high degree of clonal heterogeneity and evolution between diagnosis and relapse in both BCP-ALL and T-ALL, which could have implications for the treatment efficiency. PMID:27590521

  18. Application of FTIR microspectroscopy for the follow-up of childhood leukemia chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Mordehai, J.; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Levi, C.; Huleihal, Mahmud; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Moser, A.; Kapelushnik, J.

    2001-11-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) accounts for majority of the childhood leukemia. Outcome of children with ALL treatment has improved dramatically. Sensitive techniques are available today for detection of minimal residual disease in children with ALL, which provide insight into the effective cytotoxic treatment. Here, we present a case study, where lymphocytes isolated from two children before and after the treatment were characterized using microscopic Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Significant changes in the absorbance and spectral pattern in the wavenumber region between 800-1800 cm-1 were found after the treatment. Preliminary analysis of the spectra revealed that the protein content decreased in the T-lymphoma patient before the treatment in comparison to the age matched controls. The chemotherapy treatment resulted in decreased nucleic acids, total carbohydrates and cholesterol contents to a remarkable extent in both B and T lymphoma patients.

  19. Childhood leukemia and cancers near German nuclear reactors: significance, context, and ramifications of recent studies.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, Rudi H

    2009-01-01

    A government-sponsored study of childhood cancer in the proximity of German nuclear power plants (German acronym KiKK) found that children < 5 years living < 5 km from plant exhaust stacks had twice the risk for contracting leukemia as those residing > 5 km. The researchers concluded that since "this result was not to be expected under current radiation-epidemiological knowledge" and confounders could not be identified, the observed association of leukemia incidence with residential proximity to nuclear plants "remains unexplained." This unjustified conclusion illustrates the dissonance between evidence and assumptions. There exist serious flaws and gaps in the knowledge on which accepted models for population exposure and radiation risk are based. Studies with results contradictory to those of KiKK lack statistical power to invalidate its findings. The KiKK study's ramifications add to the urgency for a public policy debate regarding the health impact of nuclear power generation.

  20. Clonal analysis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with "cytogenetically independent" cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Pui, C H; Raskind, W H; Kitchingman, G R; Raimondi, S C; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Crist, W M; Fialkow, P J; Williams, D L

    1989-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is generally regarded as a clonal disease in which a single abnormal progenitor cell gives rise to neoplastic progeny. Five of 463 cases of childhood ALL with adequately banded leukemic cells were found to have two cytogenetically independent cell populations. In addition, two of the four cases tested had more than two rearranged immunoglobulin genes and (or) T cell receptor genes. To investigate the clonality of these unusual leukemias, we examined the neoplastic cells for X-linked markers extrinsic to the disease. Leukemic cells from each of the three patients heterozygous for an X-linked, restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a single active parental allele, suggesting that both apparently independent cell populations developed from a common progenitor. These cases provide evidence that leukemogenesis involves a multistep process of mutation and suggest that karyotypic abnormalities may be a late event of malignant transformation. Images PMID:2566623

  1. A phase I study of escalated dose subcutaneous alemtuzumab given weekly with rituximab in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jennifer R; Messmer, Bradley; Werner, Lillian; Davids, Matthew S; Mikler, Evgeny; Supko, Jeffrey G; Fisher, David C; LaCasce, Ann S; Armand, Philippe; Jacobsen, Eric; Dalton, Virginia; Tesar, Bethany; Fernandes, Stacey M; McDonough, Sean; Ritz, Jerome; Rassenti, Laura; Kipps, Thomas J; Neuberg, Donna; Freedman, Arnold S

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed the safety and preliminary efficacy of escalated dose subcutaneous alemtuzumab in combination with rituximab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Twenty-eight patients with relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia were treated on four dosing cohorts of weekly rituximab at 375 mg/m(2) and alemtuzumab doses that started at 30 mg three times per week and escalated to weekly dosing over four weeks, culminating with 90 mg weekly. One dose limiting toxicity of a rituximab infusion reaction was seen in cohort 2, but the regimen was otherwise well tolerated without evidence of differential toxicity by cohort. The overall response rate by National Cancer Institute-Working Group criteria was 61%, and the rate of complete bone marrow response was 43%, most of whom were negative for minimal residual disease. The addition of CT scan evaluation per International Workshop on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia 2008 criteria reduced the overall response rate to 14%. Median overall survival was 35 months, with 12 patients able to proceed to stem cell transplantation. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that chronic lymphocytic leukemia involving more than 80% of the bone marrow at study start was associated with lower trough concentrations of alemtuzumab and rituximab, and that higher trough serum concentrations of alemtuzumab were associated with complete bone marrow clearance. We conclude that escalated subcutaneous doses of alemtuzumab given weekly are well tolerated and result in excellent bone marrow clearance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, helping patients to proceed to stem cell transplantation. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier:00330252).

  2. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Unconventional oil and gas development and risk of childhood leukemia: Assessing the evidence.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Elise G; Trinh, Pauline; Ma, Xiaomei; Leaderer, Brian P; Ward, Mary H; Deziel, Nicole C

    2017-01-15

    The widespread distribution of unconventional oil and gas (UO&G) wells and other facilities in the United States potentially exposes millions of people to air and water pollutants, including known or suspected carcinogens. Childhood leukemia is a particular concern because of the disease severity, vulnerable population, and short disease latency. A comprehensive review of carcinogens and leukemogens associated with UO&G development is not available and could inform future exposure monitoring studies and human health assessments. The objective of this analysis was to assess the evidence of carcinogenicity of water contaminants and air pollutants related to UO&G development. We obtained a list of 1177 chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluids and wastewater from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and constructed a list of 143 UO&G-related air pollutants through a review of scientific papers published through 2015 using PubMed and ProQuest databases. We assessed carcinogenicity and evidence of increased risk for leukemia/lymphoma of these chemicals using International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) monographs. The majority of compounds (>80%) were not evaluated by IARC and therefore could not be reviewed. Of the 111 potential water contaminants and 29 potential air pollutants evaluated by IARC (119 unique compounds), 49 water and 20 air pollutants were known, probable, or possible human carcinogens (55 unique compounds). A total of 17 water and 11 air pollutants (20 unique compounds) had evidence of increased risk for leukemia/lymphoma, including benzene, 1,3-butadiene, cadmium, diesel exhaust, and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Though information on the carcinogenicity of compounds associated with UO&G development was limited, our assessment identified 20 known or suspected carcinogens that could be measured in future studies to advance exposure and risk assessments of cancer-causing agents. Our findings support the need for investigation into

  4. Potential impacts of radon, terrestrial gamma and cosmic rays on childhood leukemia in France: a quantitative risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Olivier; Ancelet, Sophie; Richardson, David B; Hémon, Denis; Ielsch, Géraldine; Demoury, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline; Laurier, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    Previous epidemiological studies and quantitative risk assessments (QRA) have suggested that natural background radiation may be a cause of childhood leukemia. The present work uses a QRA approach to predict the excess risk of childhood leukemia in France related to three components of natural radiation: radon, cosmic rays and terrestrial gamma rays, using excess relative and absolute risk models proposed by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Both models were developed from the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese A-bomb survivors. Previous risk assessments were extended by considering uncertainties in radiation-related leukemia risk model parameters as part of this process, within a Bayesian framework. Estimated red bone marrow doses cumulated during childhood by the average French child due to radon, terrestrial gamma and cosmic rays are 4.4, 7.5 and 4.3 mSv, respectively. The excess fractions of cases (expressed as percentages) associated with these sources of natural radiation are 20 % [95 % credible interval (CI) 0-68 %] and 4 % (95 % CI 0-11 %) under the excess relative and excess absolute risk models, respectively. The large CIs, as well as the different point estimates obtained under these two models, highlight the uncertainties in predictions of radiation-related childhood leukemia risks. These results are only valid provided that models developed from the LSS can be transferred to the population of French children and to chronic natural radiation exposures, and must be considered in view of the currently limited knowledge concerning other potential risk factors for childhood leukemia. Last, they emphasize the need for further epidemiological investigations of the effects of natural radiation on childhood leukemia to reduce uncertainties and help refine radiation protection standards.

  5. Ophthalmic evaluation of long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R.G. Jr.; Chauvenet, A.R.; Smith, T.J.; Schwartz, A.C.

    1986-08-15

    Thirty-four long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations to detect retinopathy or other ocular sequelae. Sixteen of the 34 patients received whole brain radiation (greater than or equal to 2400 rad). All 18 patients in the non-radiated group had normal eye examinations, while 4 of 16 in the radiated group had ocular abnormalities. None of the ocular abnormalities could be definitely attributed to radiation and all patients had normal visual acuity. No radiation retinopathy was found in either group.

  6. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as ''cold'' lesions on bone scan: a report of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Caudle, R.J.; Crawford, A.H.; Gelfand, M.J.; Gruppo, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    ''Cold'' lesions on bone scan have been reported in a variety of disease processes, including infection, avascular necrosis, and cysts. We present two cases of children who presented with large ''cold'' areas on technetium bone scans and were treated initially for septic processes. Acute childhood leukemia frequently presents with bone or joint pain, fever, and elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Although the diagnosis may be difficult if the characteristic clinical signs and laboratory findings are absent, the presence of anemia should alert the physician to the possibility of malignancy. Bone scanning provides a sensitive method of localizing pathology, but diagnosis requires biopsy or marrow aspiration.

  7. Toxicity and efficacy of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in children with leukemia/lymphoma relapsing in the central nervous system: a retrospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Parasole, Rosanna; Petruzziello, Fara; Messina, Chiara; Barisone, Elena; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Cesaro, Simone; Testi, Anna Maria; De Matteo, Antonia; Varotto, Stefania; Berger, Massimo; Morello, William; Menna, Giuseppe; Poggi, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    The toxicity and efficacy of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (LC) were evaluated in children with central nervous system (CNS) relapsed/refractory acute leukemia/lymphoma. Thirty patients (male:female ratio 21:9; median age 9.4 years) with CNS relapsed/resistant disease were treated with intrathecal LC at dosages adjusted for age. Twenty-seven (90%) patients simultaneously received systemic chemotherapy, including concurrent high-dose cytarabine or methotrexate in 21 (70%) cases. Of 28 patients evaluable for response, 25 patients (89%) achieved CNS complete remission and three (11%) partial remission. The median number of intrathecal LC administrations per patient was 4. The cerebrospinal fluid was cleared after a median of 3 intrathecal LC administrations. Neurological toxicity ≥ grade 3 occurred in four (13%) patients. No permanent sequelae were observed. The median overall survival was 20.9 months and the 5-year probability of survival was 46%. These encouraging data suggest that intrathecal LC is well tolerated and effective in children with relapsed/refractory CNS leukemia/lymphoma.

  8. Brain volume and cognitive function in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Michelle N; Krull, Kevin R

    2013-10-01

    The survival rate for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is greater than 80%. However, many of these survivors develop long-term chronic health conditions, with a relatively common late effect being neurocognitive dysfunction. Although neurocognitive impairments have decreased in frequency and severity as treatment has evolved, there is a subset of survivors in the current treatment era that are especially vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of ALL and its treatment. Additionally, little is known about long-term brain development as survivors mature into adulthood. A recent study by Zeller et al. compared neurocognitive function and brain volume in 130 adult survivors of childhood ALL to 130 healthy adults matched on age and sex. They identified the caudate as particularly sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy. We discuss the implications and limitations of this study, including how their findings support the concept of individual vulnerability to ALL and its treatment.

  9. Relapse after non-T-cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia: early transplantation, use of an unrelated donor, and chronic graft-versus-host disease are protective.

    PubMed

    Enright, H; Davies, S M; DeFor, T; Shu, X; Weisdorf, D; Miller, W; Ramsay, N K; Arthur, D; Verfaillie, C; Miller, J; Kersey, J; McGlave, P

    1996-07-15

    We analyzed the incidence of posttransplant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) relapse in 283 consecutive related-donor (n = 177) and unrelated-donor (n = 106) allogeneic transplant recipients. Twenty-two of 165 related-donor recipients with stable or advanced disease at the time of transplant had hematologic relapse of CML following transplant (5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of relapse, 20%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11 to 30%). One of 12 patients transplanted in second stable phase following blast crisis also relapsed. Fifteen related-donor transplant recipients relapsed within 5 years of transplant; however, seven relapsed between 5 and 9 years after transplant. Factors independently associated with an increased risk of posttransplant relapse for related-donor recipients included prolonged interval between diagnosis and transplant (relative risk, [RR], 3.81; P = .009) and bone marrow basophilia (RR, 5.62; P = .01). Related-donor recipients with posttransplant chronic graft-versus-host disease (CGVHD) had a decreased risk of relapse (RR, 0.24; P = .005). Only two of 106 unrelated-donor transplant recipients relapsed following transplant (5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of relapse, 3%; 95% CI, 0% to 7%). When both related- and unrelated-donor recipients were considered, the use of an unrelated donor was independently associated with a decreased risk of relapse (RR, 0.24; P = .07). Twelve of 16 relapsing patients who received further therapy (nine of 13 who underwent second transplant and three of three who received donor leukocyte infusions) remain alive. This analysis shows that relapse, sometimes occurring long after transplant, is an important adverse outcome in allogeneic transplantation for CML. Early transplant, posttransplant CGVHD, and use of an unrelated donor are associated with a reduced incidence of relapse, perhaps due to allogeneic disparities enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

  10. TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in minimal residual disease within childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Yin, Kailin; Dong, Yujun; Wang, Pingzhang; Xue, Yun; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Yuqi; Wang, Yuedan

    2017-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem. In this study, a novel gene therapy target for childhood T-ALL to overcome chemoresistance was discovered: TFDP3 increased in the minimal residual disease (MRD) positive childhood T-ALL patients. Then, we established a preclinical model of resistance to induction therapy to examine the functional relevance of TFDP3 to chemoresistance in MRD derived from Jurkat/E6-1. Jurkat xenografts in NOD/SCID mice were exposed to a four drug combination (VXLD) of vincristine (VCR), dexamethasone (DEX), L-asparaginase (L-asp) and daunorubicin (DNR). During the 4-week VXLD treatment, the level of TFDP3 increased 4-fold. High expression of TFDP3 was identified in the re-emerging lines (Jurkat/MRD) with increased chemoresistance, which is correlated with partially promoter demethylation of TFDP3. Downregulation of TFDP3 by RNA interference reversed chemoresistance in Jurkat/MRD accompanied by reinstated E2F1 activity that coincided with increased levels of p53, p73, and associated proapoptotic target genes. Importantly, TFDP3 silencing in vivo induced apparent benefit to overcome chemoresistance in combination with VXLD treatment. Collectively, TFDP3 confers chemoresistance in MRD within childhood T-ALL, indicating that TFDP3 is a potential gene therapy target for residual cancer. PMID:27902457

  11. Long-term survival and late effects among one-year survivors of second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christine N; Majhail, Navneet S; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A; Hayashi, Robert J; Hsu, Jack W; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kasow, Kimberly A; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M; Loren, Alison W; Marks, David I; Maziarz, Richard T; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A; Porter, David L; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A; Warwick, Anne B; Wood, William A; Yu, Lolie C; Jacobsohn, David A; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1 year or more after a second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant after disease relapse; among these, 325 were relapse free at 1 year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplantation in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least 1 year was 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status before second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission before second HCT, P < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults after second transplantation. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of nonrelapse mortality, followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least 1 of the studied late effects within 10 years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence, 22%) and cataracts (20%); in adults they were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease free for at least 1 year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. Novel

  12. Household pesticide exposure and the risk of childhood acute leukemia in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gao, Yu; Shi, Rong; Chen, Didi; Wang, Xiaojin; Kamijima, Michihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Tamie; Khalequzzaman, Md; Zhou, Yijun; Zheng, Ying; Bao, Pingping; Tian, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Childhood acute leukemia (AL) is the most common malignant tumor in children, but its etiology remains largely unknown. We investigated the relationship between household exposure to pesticides and childhood AL. Between 2009 and 2010 in Shanghai, a total of 248 newly diagnosed cases of AL and 111 gender-, age-, and hospital-matched controls were included. Five nonspecific dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides (OPPs) [including dimethyl phosphate (DMP), diethyl phosphate (DEP), dimethyl thiophosphate (DMTP), diethyl thiophosphate (DETP), and diethyl dithiophosphate (DEDTP)] in the urine were analyzed by gas chromatography. The results showed that the median DMP, DEP, DMTP, DETP, and DEDEP levels adjusted for creatinine (Cr) in cases (13.2, 10.0, 31.3, 8.5, and 6.1 μg g(-1), respectively) were all significantly elevated compared with those in controls (3.6, 3.6, 13.3, 2.7, and 1.7 μg g(-1), respectively) (P < 0.05). The household use of mosquito repellent was significantly associated with an increased risk of childhood AL (odds ratio (OR) = 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.1). Moreover, higher exposures were significantly associated with an elevated risk of childhood AL for DMs, DEs, and DAPs. Our findings support the notion that the household use of pesticides may play a role in the etiology of childhood AL and provide some evidence to warrant further investigation of the link between household pesticide exposures and childhood AL in Shanghai.

  13. Parental, In Utero, and Early-Life Exposure to Benzene and the Risk of Childhood Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carlos-Wallace, Frolayne M.; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T.; Rader, Gabriella; Steinmaus, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of adult leukemia, but whether it is associated with childhood leukemia remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis in which we reviewed the epidemiologic literature on this topic and explored causal inference, bias, and heterogeneity. The exposure metrics that we evaluated included occupational and household use of benzenes and solvents, traffic density, and traffic-related air pollution. For studies of occupational and household product exposure published from 1987 to 2014, the summary relative risk for childhood leukemia was 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53, 2.52; n = 20). In these studies, the summary relative risk was higher for acute myeloid leukemia (summary relative risk (sRR) = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.72, 3.18; n = 6) than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sRR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.21, 2.05; n = 14). The summary relative risk was higher for maternal versus paternal exposure, in studies that assessed benzene versus all solvents, and in studies of gestational exposure. In studies of traffic density or traffic-related air pollution published from 1999 to 2014, the summary relative risk was 1.48 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.99; n = 12); it was higher for acute myeloid leukemia (sRR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.34, 3.20) than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sRR = 1.49; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.08) and in studies that involved detailed models of traffic pollution (sRR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.49). Overall, we identified evidence of associations between childhood leukemia and several different potential metrics of benzene exposure. PMID:26589707

  14. Parental, In Utero, and Early-Life Exposure to Benzene and the Risk of Childhood Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlos-Wallace, Frolayne M; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Rader, Gabriella; Steinmaus, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of adult leukemia, but whether it is associated with childhood leukemia remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis in which we reviewed the epidemiologic literature on this topic and explored causal inference, bias, and heterogeneity. The exposure metrics that we evaluated included occupational and household use of benzenes and solvents, traffic density, and traffic-related air pollution. For studies of occupational and household product exposure published from 1987 to 2014, the summary relative risk for childhood leukemia was 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53, 2.52; n = 20). In these studies, the summary relative risk was higher for acute myeloid leukemia (summary relative risk (sRR) = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.72, 3.18; n = 6) than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sRR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.21, 2.05; n = 14). The summary relative risk was higher for maternal versus paternal exposure, in studies that assessed benzene versus all solvents, and in studies of gestational exposure. In studies of traffic density or traffic-related air pollution published from 1999 to 2014, the summary relative risk was 1.48 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.99; n = 12); it was higher for acute myeloid leukemia (sRR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.34, 3.20) than for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (sRR = 1.49; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.08) and in studies that involved detailed models of traffic pollution (sRR = 1.70; 95% CI: 1.16, 2.49). Overall, we identified evidence of associations between childhood leukemia and several different potential metrics of benzene exposure.

  15. Childhood leukemia--risk factors and the need for an interdisciplinary research agenda.

    PubMed

    Ziegelberger, Gunde; Dehos, Anne; Grosche, Bernd; Hornhardt, Sabine; Jung, Thomas; Weiss, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified high as well as low-frequency fields as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2B). For high frequency fields the recent assessment is based mainly on weak positive associations described in some epidemiological studies between glioma and acoustic neuroma and the use of mobile and other wireless phones. Also for lowfrequency fields the evidence is based on epidemiological findings revealing a statistic association between childhood leukemia (CL) and low-level magnetic fields. The basic findings are already 10 years old. They have since been supported by further epidemiological studies. However, the knowledge on the main/crucial question of causality has not improved. This fact and in addition the small, but statistically significant increased incidence of CL in the surrounding of German nuclear power plants have motivated the German Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) to work toward a better understanding of the main causes of CL. A long-term strategic research agenda has been developed which builds on an interdisciplinary, international network and aims at clarifying the aetiology of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. Treatment outcomes in relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia patients initially treated with all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic compound-based combined therapies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Huang, Xiaojun; Bao, Li; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Honghu; Jiang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary combined therapies that include the use of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic compounds have reduced relapse rates from ~50 to <10% in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients, however relapse treatment remains controversial. Treatment outcomes in relapsed patients with APL previously treated with combined ATRA + arsenic compound therapy were investigated. A retrospective, observational study was conducted of 25 patients with APL (male to female ratio, 17:8; mean age, 36.4±10.3 years) exhibiting first-time relapse following combined ATRA + arsenic compound therapy. These patients were subsequently treated with secondary ATRA + arsenic compound therapy, salvage chemotherapy, monoclonal antibody therapy or intrathecal chemotherapy, between January 1994 and December 2010. The overall remission rate, duration of remission and toxic effects were assessed. Patient outcomes included mortality during secondary induction therapy (6/25, 24.0%); complete recovery from central nervous system (CNS) relapse following intrathecal chemotherapy (1/25, 4.0%); complete remission following ATRA + arsenic compound therapy (10/25, 40.0%), chemotherapy (3/25, 12.0%) and targeted therapy (1/25, 4.0%); and non-remission (NR) following ATRA + arsenic compound therapy (4/25, 16%). Four (16.0%) patients were subsequently treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), two of which remained disease-free at the end of the study period and two of which succumbed to the disease. Secondary bone marrow and CNS relapse occurred in 14 (56.0%) patients and one (4.0%) patient, respectively. ATRA + arsenic compound-based combination therapy was effective in re-inducing morphological remission in relapsed patients with APL with previous exposure to ATRA + arsenic compounds, producing low molecular remission rates and high risk of secondary relapse. Furthermore, investigation of early allo-HSCT is required to determine its potential as a therapeutic

  17. High rate of hematological responses to sorafenib in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Piemontese, Simona; Carrabba, Matteo G; Tresoldi, Cristina; Messina, Carlo; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Assanelli, Andrea; Corti, Consuelo; Bernardi, Massimo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Relapse represents the most significant cause of failure of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and available therapies are largely unsatisfactory. In this study, we retrospectively collected data on the off-label use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, either alone or in association with hypomethylating agents and adoptive immunotherapy, in 13 patients with post-transplantation FLT3-ITD-positive AML relapses. Hematological response was documented in 12 of 13 patients (92%), and five of 13 (38%) achieved complete bone marrow remission. Treatment was overall manageable in the outpatient setting, although all patients experienced significant adverse events, especially severe cytopenias (requiring a donor stem cell boost in five patients) and typical hand-foot syndrome. None of the patients developed graft-vs.-host disease following sorafenib alone, whereas this was frequently observed when this was given in association with donor T-cell infusions. Six patients are alive and in remission at the last follow-up, and four could be bridged to a second allogeneic HSCT, configuring a 65 ± 14% overall survival at 100 d from relapse. Taken together, our data suggest that sorafenib might represent a valid treatment option for patients with FLT3-ITD-positive post-transplantation relapses, manageable also in combination with other therapeutic strategies.

  18. Eye on the B-ALL: B-cell receptor repertoires reveal persistence of numerous B-lymphoblastic leukemia subclones from diagnosis to relapse

    PubMed Central

    Bashford-Rogers, R J M; Nicolaou, K A; Bartram, J; Goulden, N J; Loizou, L; Koumas, L; Chi, J; Hubank, M; Kellam, P; Costeas, P A; Vassiliou, G S

    2016-01-01

    The strongest predictor of relapse in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is the level of persistence of tumor cells after initial therapy. The high mutation rate of the B-cell receptor (BCR) locus allows high-resolution tracking of the architecture, evolution and clonal dynamics of B-ALL. Using longitudinal BCR repertoire sequencing, we find that the BCR undergoes an unexpectedly high level of clonal diversification in B-ALL cells through both somatic hypermutation and secondary rearrangements, which can be used for tracking the subclonal composition of the disease and detect minimal residual disease with unprecedented sensitivity. We go on to investigate clonal dynamics of B-ALL using BCR phylogenetic analyses of paired diagnosis-relapse samples and find that large numbers of small leukemic subclones present at diagnosis re-emerge at relapse alongside a dominant clone. Our findings suggest that in all informative relapsed patients, the survival of large numbers of clonogenic cells beyond initial chemotherapy is a surrogate for inherent partial chemoresistance or inadequate therapy, providing an increased opportunity for subsequent emergence of fully resistant clones. These results frame early cytoreduction as an important determinant of long-term outcome. PMID:27211266

  19. Influence of time to complete remission and duration of all-trans retinoic acid therapy on the relapse risk in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia receiving AIDA protocols.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Minotti, Clara; Latagliata, Roberto; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Salaroli, Adriano; Loglisci, Maria Giovanna; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Despite the impressive results obtained with standard chemotherapy, approximately 20% of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients undergo disease relapse thereby requiring salvage therapy. Few data is available on long-term prognosis in relation to time to complete remission (CR): we reviewed 142 patients treated with AIDA protocols and we found that 42 out of 142 (29.6%) patients achieved CR after 35 days (median time, 42 days). No significant differences in presenting features, including FAB subtype, type of PML/RARA transcript and relapse risk at presentation between the two patient groups achieving CR > or <35 days were revealed, except for male sex and older age that were significantly associated with delayed CR. Rate of relapse was 31% in patients with delayed CR compared to 17% in the group of patients who achieved CR<35 days (p=0.001), with a 5-year CIR of 29.6% compared to 12% (p=0.03). APL patients with delayed CR should be more closely monitored during follow-up for early identification of relapse and prompt administration of pre-emptive salvage therapy.

  20. Increased BMI correlates with higher risk of disease relapse and differentiation syndrome in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with the AIDA protocols.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Mazzarella, Luca; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Disalvatore, Davide; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Cimino, Giuseppe; Testi, Anna Maria; Avvisati, Giuseppe; Petti, Maria Concetta; Minotti, Clara; Latagliata, Roberto; Foà, Robin; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-01-05

    We investigated whether body mass index (BMI) correlates with distinct outcomes in newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The study population included 144 patients with newly diagnosed and genetically confirmed APL consecutively treated at a single institution. All patients received All-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin according to the GIMEMA protocols AIDA-0493 and AIDA-2000. Outcome estimates according to the BMI were carried out together with multivariable analysis for the risk of relapse and differentiation syndrome. Fifty-four (37.5%) were under/normal weight (BMI < 25), whereas 90 (62.5%) patients were overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25). An increased BMI was associated with older age (P < .0001) and male sex (P = .02). BMI was the most powerful predictor of differentiation syndrome in multivariable analysis (odds ratio = 7.24; 95% CI, 1.50-34; P = .014). After a median follow-up of 6 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years was 31.6% (95% CI, 22.7%-43.8%) in overweight/obese and 11.2% (95% CI, 5.3%-23.8%) in underweight/normal weight patients (P = .029). Multivariable analysis showed that BMI was an independent predictor of relapse (hazard ratio = 2.45, 95% CI, 1.00-5.99, in overweight/obese vs under/normal weight patients, P = .049). An increased BMI at diagnosis is associated with a higher risk of developing differentiation syndrome and disease relapse in APL patients treated with AIDA protocols.

  1. Minimal Residual Disease and Childhood Leukemia: Standard of Care Recommendations From the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario MRD Working Group.

    PubMed

    Athale, Uma H; Gibson, Paul J; Bradley, Nicole M; Malkin, David M; Hitzler, Johann

    2016-06-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) is an independent predictor of relapse risk in children with leukemia and is widely used for risk-adapted treatment. This article summarizes current evidence supporting the use of MRD, including clinical significance, current international clinical practice, impact statement, and recommended indications. The proposed MRD recommendations have been endorsed by the MRD Working Group of the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario and provide the foundation for a strategy that aims at equitable access to MRD evaluation for children with leukemia.

  2. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... exist, including hairy cell leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative disorders. Factors that may increase your risk of developing some types of leukemia include: Previous cancer treatment. People who've had certain types of ...

  4. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  5. Late thyroid complications in survivors of childhood acute leukemia. An L.E.A. study

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Claire; Auquier, Pascal; Bertrand, Yves; Chastagner, Philippe; Kanold, Justyna; Poirée, Maryline; Thouvenin, Sandrine; Ducassou, Stephane; Plantaz, Dominique; Tabone, Marie-Dominique; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Sirvent, Anne; Villes, Virginie; Barlogis, Vincent; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Berbis, Julie; Michel, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid complications are known side effects of irradiation. However, the risk of such complications in childhood acute leukemia survivors who received either central nervous system irradiation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is less described. We prospectively evaluated the incidence and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction and tumors in survivors of childhood acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemia. A total of 588 patients were evaluated for thyroid function, and 502 individuals were assessed for thyroid tumors (median follow-up duration: 12.6 and 12.5 years, respectively). The cumulative incidence of hypothyroidism was 17.3% (95% CI: 14.1–21.1) and 24.6% (95% CI: 20.4–29.6) at 10 and 20 years from leukemia diagnosis, respectively. Patients who received total body irradiation (with or without prior central nervous system irradiation) were at higher risk of hypothyroidism (adjusted HR: 2.87; P=0.04 and 2.79, P=0.01, respectively) as compared with transplanted patients who never received any irradiation. Patients transplanted without total body irradiation who received central nervous system irradiation were also at higher risk (adjusted HR: 3.39; P=0.02). Patients irradiated or transplanted at older than 10 years of age had a lower risk (adjusted HR: 0.61; P=0.02). Thyroid malignancy was found in 26 patients (5.2%). Among them, two patients had never received any type of irradiation: alkylating agents could also promote thyroid cancer. The cumulative incidence of thyroid malignancy was 9.6% (95% CI: 6.0–15.0) at 20 years. Women were at higher risk than men (adjusted HR: 4.74; P=0.002). In conclusion, thyroid complications are frequent among patients who undergo transplantation after total body irradiation and those who received prior central nervous system irradiation. Close monitoring is thus warranted for these patients. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT 01756599. PMID:26969082

  6. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Association between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and use of electrical appliances during pregnancy and childhood.

    PubMed

    Hatch, E E; Linet, M S; Kleinerman, R A; Tarone, R E; Severson, R K; Hartsock, C T; Haines, C; Kaune, W T; Friedman, D; Robison, L L; Wacholder, S

    1998-05-01

    As part of a comprehensive study of residential magnetic field exposure in nine midwestern and mid-Atlantic states, we evaluated the use of appliances by 640 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 0-14 years of age, diagnosed between 1989 and 1993, and 640 matched control children. Mothers were interviewed regarding use of electrical appliances during their pregnancy with the subject and the child's postnatal use. The risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was elevated in children whose mothers reported use of an electric blanket or mattress pad during pregnancy [odds ratio (OR) = 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-2.29] but was reduced for use of sewing machines during pregnancy (OR = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.59-0.98). The risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia was increased with children's use of electric blankets or mattress pads (OR = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.52-4.98) and three other electrical appliances (hair dryers, video machines in arcades, and video games connected to a television), but the patterns of risk for duration in years of use and frequency of use were inconsistent for most appliances used by children. Risks rose with increasing number of hours per day children spent watching television, but risks were similar regardless of the usual distance from the television. The inconsistency in the dose-response patterns for many appliances, reporting and selection bias, and the lack of an effect for measured 60 Hertz magnetic fields or wire codes in our companion study must be considered before ascribing these associations to exposures from magnetic fields.

  8. Commentary on "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    This is a commentary on the article, "Childhood Leukemia Survivors and Their Return to School: A Literature Review, Case Study, and Recommendations" by D. Scott Hermann, Jill R. Thurber, Kenneth Miles, and Gloria Gilbert in this issue (2011). This article addresses issues related to the compatibility of the suggested practices with contemporary…

  9. Dust-metal Loadings and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B.; Hammond, S. Katharine; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001–2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in less than 15% of homes. Relationships between dust-metal loadings (μg metal per m2 carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child’s age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust-metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.94 (0.83, 1.05), cadmium: 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), chromium: 0.99 (0.87, 1.12), copper: 0.96 (0.90, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.92 (0.80, 1.07), tin: 0.93 (0.82, 1.05), and zinc: 0.91 (0.81, 1.02)]. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL. PMID:25736162

  10. Dust metal loadings and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Todd P; Ward, Mary H; Colt, Joanne S; Dahl, Gary; Ducore, Jonathan; Reinier, Kyndaron; Gunier, Robert B; Katharine Hammond, S; Rappaport, Stephen M; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and the levels of metals in carpet dust. A dust sample was collected from the homes of 142 ALL cases and 187 controls participating in the California Childhood Leukemia Study using a high volume small surface sampler (2001-2006). Samples were analyzed using microwave-assisted acid digestion in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, tungsten, and zinc. Eight metals were detected in at least 85% of the case and control homes; tungsten was detected in <15% of homes. Relationships between dust metal loadings (μg metal per m(2) carpet) and ALL risk were modeled using multivariable logistic regression, adjusting for the child's age, sex, and race/ethnicity and confounders, including household annual income. A doubling of dust metal loadings was not associated with significant changes in ALL risk (odds ratio (95% confidence interval): arsenic: 0.96 (0.86, 1.07), cadmium: 0.92 (0.81, 1.05), chromium: 1.01 (0.90, 1.14), copper: 0.97 (0.91, 1.03), lead: 1.01 (0.93, 1.10), nickel: 0.95 (0.82, 1.09), tin: 0.96 (0.86, 1.08), and zinc: 0.94 (0.84, 1.05)). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that metals in carpet dust are risk factors for childhood ALL.

  11. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. A Multicenter Experience from Lebanon in Childhood and Adolescent Acute Myeloid Leukemia: High rate of Early Death in Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Roula A.; Horkos, Jessy G.; Bustros, Youssef D.; Farhat, Hussein Z.; Abla, Oussama

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease with marked heterogeneity. Despite major improvement in outcome, it remains a life-threatening malignancy. Demographic and clinical data on pediatric AML is lacking among the Lebanese population. Purpose We aimed to identify clinical, molecular and outcome data in children with AML in Lebanon. Methods A retrospective chart review of children with AML diagnosed in three Lebanese hospitals during the past 8 years was conducted. Results From May 2002 through March 2010, we identified 24 children with AML in Saint George Hospital University Medical Center, University Medical Center Rizk Hospital, and Abou-Jaoude Hospital. Males and females were equally represented; median age at diagnosis was 9 years (range 1–24) and median WBC at diagnosis was 31 × 109/L (range: 2.1–376 × 109/L). Twenty five percent of patients (6 out of 24) had acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Karyotype was normal in 33% of patients; t(8;21), inv (16), t(8;9), t(7;11), t(9;11), complex chromosomal abnormality, monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 were the most common cytogenetic abnormalities encountered. Patients were treated on different European and North American protocols. Twelve patients (50%) achieved morphologic CR after cycle 1, 6 of them (50%) had bone marrow relapse within 11 months from diagnosis. Nine patients underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant, and 3 of them are alive at 5 years post-transplant. Early death rate was 16.6% of patients, mainly those with APL and a presenting WBC > 10 × 109/L. Fifty per cent of APL patients had an early death due to DIC despite starting ATRA therapy. Overall, median survival for AML patients who died from disease progression was 25.8 months (range: 1–60 months). Overall disease-free survival was 30.4%. Patients < 10 years of age had a 50% survival rate compared to 0% in patients > 10 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the needs in Lebanon for better supportive care of children with APL

  14. Poor adherence to dietary guidelines among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Robien, Kim; Ness, Kirsten K; Klesges, Lisa M; Baker, K Scott; Gurney, James G

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, conditions that healthy dietary patterns may help ameliorate or prevent. To evaluate the usual dietary intake of adult survivors of childhood ALL, food frequency questionnaire data were collected from 72 participants, and compared with the 2007 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) Cancer Prevention recommendations, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and the 2005 United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Guide. Mean daily energy intake was consistent with estimated requirements; however, mean body mass index was 27.1 kg/m2 (overweight). Dietary index scores averaged fewer than half the possible number of points on all 3 scales, indicating poor adherence to recommended guidelines. No study participant reported complete adherence to any set of guidelines. Although half the participants met minimal daily goals for 5 servings of fruits and vegetables (WCRF/AICR recommendations) and childhood ALL is not concordant with dietary recommendations that may help reduce their risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease, or other treatment-related late effects.

  15. Gene expression profiles in a panel of childhood leukemia cell lines mirror critical features of the disease.

    PubMed

    Kees, Ursula R; Ford, Jette; Watson, Marcia; Murch, Ashleigh; Ringńer, Markus; Walker, Robert L; Meltzer, Paul

    2003-07-01

    The development of new drugs against cancer requires established cell lines. They are needed for in vitro studies to identify candidate drugs and in xenograft models to measure drug efficacy in vivo. Specific criteria need to be fulfilled by cell lines used in the evaluation of potential novel therapeutic agents. It is imperative that they display the features of the particular cancer under investigation. Given the documented heterogeneity of cancers, relevant subtypes need to be represented. In this study, we have examined these aspects for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A panel of 13 leukemia cell lines recently established in our laboratory was analyzed. We used cDNA microarrays to define the gene expression profiles and compared the data with immunophenotyping and cytogenetic analyses. The expression profiles obtained showed excellent concordance with corresponding protein levels. Importantly, the panel of lines displayed the critical genetic features identified in clinically important acute lymphoblastic leukemia subtypes in childhood leukemia patients.

  16. MRD detection of leukemia relapse using HLA typing by FACS in combination with FISH after mismatched allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Eri; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Tsuma, Yusuke; Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Tamura, Shinichi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Hosoi, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Loss of mismatched HLA is a cause of relapse following HLA-mismatched allo-SCT. We directly detected the loss of mismatched HLA alleles in relapsed leukemic cells at a MRD level using HLA typing by multicolor FACS (HLA-Flow) in combination with FISH in the BM of two patients with MLL-AF9-positive AML, at 6 and 10 months after mismatched allo-SCT. HLA-Flow with FISH analysis detected relapsed leukemic cells not expressing a mismatched HLA allele and harboring the MLL rearrangement. Simultaneously, real-time quantitative RT-PCR detected a low copy number of MLL-AF9 transcripts, consistent with MRD detection. HLA-Flow with FISH is a powerful method for detecting molecular relapse after mismatched allo-SCT and provides important information on the HLA expression status of the relapsed leukemic cells to help determine the next intervention.

  17. Caesarean delivery and risk of childhood leukaemia: a pooled analysis from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC)

    PubMed Central

    Marcotte, Erin L; Thomopoulos, Thomas P; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline; Petridou, Eleni Th; Schüz, Joachim; Ezzat, Sameera; Dockerty, John D; Metayer, Catherine; Magnani, Corrado; Scheurer, Michael E; Mueller, Beth A; Mora, Ana M; Wesseling, Catharina; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Rashed, Wafaa M; Francis, Stephen S; Ajrouche, Roula; Erdmann, Friederike; Orsi, Laurent; Spector, Logan G

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Results from case-control studies have shown an increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in young children born by caesarean delivery, and prelabour caesarean delivery in particular; however, an association of method of delivery with childhood leukaemia subtypes has yet to be established. We therefore did a pooled analysis of data to investigate the association between childhood leukaemia and caesarean delivery. Methods We pooled data from 13 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium done in nine countries (Canada, Costa Rica, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, New Zealand, and the USA) for births from 1970-2013. We analysed caesarean delivery overall and by indications that probably resulted in prelabour caesarean delivery or emergency caesarean delivery. We used multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for child's birthweight, sex, age, ethnic origin, parental education, maternal age, and study, to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for the risk of ALL and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in children aged 0-14 years at diagnosis. Findings The studies provided data for 8780 ALL cases, 1332 AML cases, and 23 459 controls, of which the birth delivery method was known for 8655 (99%) ALL cases, 1292 (97%) AML cases, and 23 351 (>99%) controls. Indications for caesarean delivery were available in four studies (there were caesarean deliveries for 1061 of 4313 ALL cases, 138 of 664 AML cases, and 1401 of 5884 controls). The OR for all indications of caesarean delivery and ALL was 1.06 (95% CI 0.99–1.13), and was significant for prelabour caesarean delivery and ALL (1.23 [1.04-1.47]; p=0.018). Emergency caesarean delivery was not associated with ALL (OR 1.02 [95% CI 0.81-1.30]). AML was not associated with caesarean delivery (all indications OR 0.99 [95% CI 0.84-1.17]; prelabour caesarean delivery 0.83 [0.54-1.26]; and emergency caesarean delivery 1.05 [0.63-1.77]). Interpretation Our

  18. Hematopoiesis-restricted minor histocompatibility antigens HA-1- or HA-2-specific T cells can induce complete remissions of relapsed leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Marijt, W. A. Erik; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Kloosterboer, Freke M.; Goulmy, Els; Kester, Michel G. D.; van der Hoorn, Menno A. W. G.; van Luxemburg-Heys, Simone A. P.; Hoogeboom, Manja; Mutis, Tuna; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; van Rood, Jon J.; Willemze, Roel; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik

    2003-01-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) into patients with a relapse of their leukemia or multiple myeloma after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) has been shown to be a successful treatment approach. The hematopoiesis-restricted minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) HA-1 or HA-2 expressed on malignant cells of the recipient may serve as target antigens for alloreactive donor T cells. Recently we treated three mHAg HA-1- and/or HA-2-positive patients with a relapse of their disease after alloSCT with DLI from their mHAg HA-1- and/or HA-2-negative donors. Using HLA-A2/HA-1 and HA-2 peptide tetrameric complexes we showed the emergence of HA-1- and HA-2-specific CD8+ T cells in the blood of the recipients 5–7 weeks after DLI. The appearance of these tetramer-positive cells was followed immediately by a complete remission of the disease and restoration of 100% donor chimerism in each of the patients. Furthermore, cloned tetramer-positive T cells isolated during the clinical response specifically recognized HA-1 and HA-2 expressing malignant progenitor cells of the recipient and inhibited the growth of leukemic precursor cells in vitro. Thus, HA-1- and HA-2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes emerging in the blood of patients after DLI demonstrate graft-versus-leukemia or myeloma reactivity resulting in a durable remission. This finding implies that in vitro generated HA-1- and HA-2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes could be used as adoptive immunotherapy to treat hematological malignances relapsing after alloSCT. PMID:12601144

  19. Chemomodulation of sequential high-dose cytarabine by fludarabine in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia: a randomized trial of the AMLCG.

    PubMed

    Fiegl, M; Unterhalt, M; Kern, W; Braess, J; Spiekermann, K; Staib, P; Grüneisen, A; Wörmann, B; Schöndube, D; Serve, H; Reichle, A; Hentrich, M; Schiel, X; Sauerland, C; Heinecke, A; Rieger, C; Beelen, D; Berdel, W E; Büchner, T; Hiddemann, W

    2014-05-01

    Chemomodulation of cytarabine by fludarabine has been attributed with a higher antileukemic efficacy, but randomized trials to address this question are rare. We therefore conducted a multicenter, randomized phase III study to evaluate the antileukemic efficacy of adding fludarabine to sequential high-dose cytarabine+idarubicin (SHAI) re-induction chemotherapy in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients (n=326, of which 281 were evaluable) were randomly assigned to SHAI (cytarabine, 1 g/m(2) bid, days 1-2 and 8-9 (3 g/m(2) for patients ≤ 60 years with refractory AML or ≥ 2nd relapse); idarubicin 10 mg/m(2) daily, days 3-4 and 10-11) or F-SHAI (SHAI with fludarabine, 15 mg/m(2), 4 h before cytarabine). Although complete remission (CR) rates (35% SHAI and 44% F-SHAI) and overall survival did not differ between both regimens, fludarabine prolonged time to treatment failure from 2.04 to 3.38 months (median, P<0.05). Twenty-seven percent of patients proceeded to allogeneic stem cell transplantation, with a significantly higher number of patients in CR or incomplete remission in the F-SHAI group (22 vs 10%, P<0.01). In conclusion, fludarabine has a beneficial, although moderate, impact on the antileukemic efficacy of high-dose cytarabine-based salvage therapy for relapsed and refractory AML.

  20. Intrathecal donor lymphocyte infusion for isolated leukemia relapse in the central nervous system following allogeneic stem cell transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Ryu; Nakazawa, Yozo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Saito, Shoji; Tanaka, Miyuki; Shiohara, Masaaki; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Koike, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy with a bone marrow relapse of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia underwent stem-cell transplantation from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical mother. Five months later, he relapsed with central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Systemic chemotherapy and repeated intrathecal chemotherapy induced consciousness disturbances and frequent arrhythmia, prompting us to discontinue the chemotherapy. He had already received an 18-Gy prophylactic cranial irradiation, an 8-Gy total body irradiation, and a 15-Gy local irradiation for pituitary gland involvement. We therefore performed five intrathecal donor lymphocyte infusions (IDLIs) in escalating doses from 1 × 10(4) up to 1 × 10(6) cells/kg. All IDLIs were safe without infusion reactions or graft-versus-host disease. After the second and later IDLIs, donor mononuclear cells were continuously detected in cerebrospinal fluid; however, he did not achieve donor-dominant chimerism. Based on our case and four cases reported in the literature, the efficacy of IDLI therapy is limited for CNS relapse of hematological malignancies. However, we suggest that IDLI remains a feasible and safe option, as no GVHD or other adverse effects occurred, even in the HLA-haploidentical setting. We will make further efforts to increase the efficacy.

  1. Residential Proximity to Heavy-Traffic Roads, Benzene Exposure, and Childhood Leukemia-The GEOCAP Study, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Houot, Jennifer; Marquant, Fabienne; Goujon, Stéphanie; Faure, Laure; Honoré, Cécile; Roth, Marie-Hélène; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-10-15

    Childhood leukemia may be associated with traffic-related environmental exposure to benzene, and additional data are needed. The Géolocalisation des Cancers Pédiatriques (GEOCAP) Study, a nationwide French case-control study, was designed to avoid selection bias due to differential participation and misclassification. The study compared the 2,760 childhood leukemia cases diagnosed in France between 2002 and 2007 (including 2,275 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 418 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML)) with 30,000 contemporaneous child population controls. The residence addresses were precisely geocoded, and 3 indicators of residential proximity to traffic were considered. Estimates of benzene concentrations were also available for the Île-de-France region (including Paris). A 300-m increase in major road length within 150 m of the geocoded address was significantly associated with AML (odds ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 1.4) but not with ALL (odds ratio = 1.0, 95% confidence interval: 0.9, 1.1), and the association was reinforced in the Île-de-France region when this indicator was combined with benzene estimates. These results, which were free from any participation bias and based on objectively determined indices of exposure, showed an increased incidence of AML associated with heavy-traffic road density near a child's home. The results support a role for traffic-related benzene exposure in the etiology of childhood AML.

  2. Molecular Analysis of Central Nervous System Disease Spectrum in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Chindo; Sitthi-Amorn, Jitsuda; Douglas, Jessica; Ramani, Ritika; Miele, Lucio; Vijayakumar, Vani; Karlson, Cynthia; Chipeta, James; Megason, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of the central nervous system (CNS) is an essential therapeutic component in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The goal of this study was to identify molecular signatures distinguishing patients with CNS disease from those without the disease in pediatric patients with ALL. We analyzed gene expression data from 207 pediatric patients with ALL. Patients without CNS were classified as CNS1, while those with mild and advanced CNS disease were classified as CNS2 and CNS3, respectively. We compared gene expression levels among the three disease classes. We identified gene signatures distinguishing the three disease classes. Pathway analysis revealed molecular networks and biological pathways dysregulated in response to CNS disease involvement. The identified pathways included the ILK, WNT, B-cell receptor, AMPK, ERK5, and JAK signaling pathways. The results demonstrate that transcription profiling could be used to stratify patients to guide therapeutic decision-making in pediatric ALL. PMID:26997880

  3. MTHFR polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: influence on methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Umerez, Maitane; Gutierrez-Camino, Ángela; Muñoz-Maldonado, Carmen; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2017-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an important component in the therapy used to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme for MTX pharmacokinetics. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, affecting MTHFR activity, have been widely studied as potential markers of MTX toxicity and/or outcome in pediatric ALL. In this review, we show that the majority of published reports do not find association or present opposite effect. Therefore, MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms do not seem to be good markers of MTX-related toxicity and/or outcome in pediatric ALL. The efforts should be focused on other genes, such as transporter genes or microRNA-related genes. PMID:28392709

  4. Significance of CD66c expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Miharu, Masashi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Kajiwara, Michiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inukai, Takeshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Takashi; Nanmoku, Toru; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akira; Sugita, Kanji; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Upon analyzing 696 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cases, we identified the characteristics of CD66c expression. In addition to the confirmation of strong correlation with BCR-ABL positivity and hyperdiploid, we further observed that CD66c is frequently expressed in CRLF2-positive (11/15, p<0.01 against chimeric gene-negative) as well as hypodiploid cases (3/4), whereas it is never expressed in ETV6-RUNX1, MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, and E2A-PBX1-positive cases. Although the expression of CD66c itself is not directly linked to the prognosis, the accompanying genetic abnormalities are important prognostic factors for BCP-ALL, indicating the importance of CD66c expression in the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL.

  5. Health Promotion for Adolescent Childhood Leukemia Survivors: Building on Prevention Science and eHealth

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Diane L.; Lindemulder, Susan J.; Goldberg, Linn; Stadler, Diane D.; Smith, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Teenage survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased morbidity likely due to their prior multicomponent treatment. Habits established in adolescence can impact individuals’ subsequent adult behaviors. Accordingly, healthy lifestyles, avoiding harmful actions, and appropriate disease surveillance are of heightened importance among teenage survivors. We review the findings from prevention science and their relevance to heath promotion. The capabilities and current uses of eHealth components including e-learning, serious video games, exergaming, behavior tracking, individual messaging, and social networking are briefly presented. The health promotion needs of adolescent survivors are aligned with those eHealth aspects to propose a new paradigm to enhance the wellbeing of adolescent ALL survivors. PMID:23109253

  6. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C.

    1995-06-01

    This project employed an improved methodology and provided important insights into the possible association between EMF and childhood leukemia. The project identified wire codes as a risk factor that defies easy explanation. Of note is that improvements in study quality have not led to a concomitant improvement in the clarity of the relationship between magnetic fields and cancer risk. While this study does not point to strong biases or confounding factors, it also fails to identify magnetic fields as the underlying factor for the observed pattern of results. It has, however, identified issues that need to be pursued in future research, such as the importance of wire codes, the potential role of geomagnetic fields, and the selection of an appropriate control group.

  7. Webinar Presentation: Update on DNA Methylation Alterations at Birth from Pregnancy Folate Intake and Smoking from the California Childhood Leukemia Study

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Update on DNA Methylation Alterations at Birth from Pregnancy Folate Intake and Smoking from the California Childhood Leukemia Study, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Epigenetics held on Apr. 8, 2015.

  8. Tobacco Smoke Exposure and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic and Myeloid Leukemias by Cytogenetic Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Zhang, Luoping; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Bartley, Karen; Schiffman, Joshua; Ma, Xiaomei; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Selvin, Steve; Fu, Cecilia H.; Ducore, Jonathan; Smith, Martyn T.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke contains carcinogens known to damage somatic and germ cells. We investigated the effect tobacco smoke on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML), especially subtypes of pre-natal origin like ALL with translocation t(12;21) or high-hyperdiploidy (51–67 chromosomes). Methods We collected information on exposures to tobacco smoking before conception, during pregnancy, and after birth in 767 ALL cases, 135 AML cases, and 1,139 controls (1996–2008). Among cases, chromosome translocations, deletions, or aneuploidy were identified by conventional karyotype and fluorescence in-situ hybridization. Results Multivariable regression analyses for ALL and AML overall showed no definite evidence of associations with self-reported (yes/no) parental prenatal active smoking and child's passive smoking. However, children with history of paternal prenatal smoking combined with postnatal passive smoking had a 1.5-fold increased risk of ALL (95% CI: 1.01–2.23), compared to those without smoking history (ORs for pre- or postnatal smoking only were close to one). This joint effect was seen for B-cell precursor ALL with t(12;21) (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.04–4.16), but not high hyperdiploid B-cell ALL. Similarly, child's passive smoking was associated with an elevated risk of AML with chromosome structural changes (OR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.01–7.58), but not aneuploidy. Conclusions our data suggest that exposure to tobacco smoking before were associated with increased risks of childhood ALL and AML; and risks varied by timing of exposure (before and/or after birth) and cytogenetic subtype, based on imprecise estimates. Impact Parents should limit exposures to tobacco smoke before and after the child's birth. PMID:23853208

  9. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Reisi, Nahid; Azhir, Afshin; Hashemipour, Mahin; Raeissi, Pouran; Amini, Abasgholi; Moafi, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran. METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007), 55 children (33 male and 22 female) diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) crite-ria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years) and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55) of survivors (10 male, 1 female) met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004). Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was positively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p ≤ 0.001), systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively), insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001) and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors. PMID:21772869

  10. Elevated incidence of childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts: NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program searches for causes

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L.; Chen, J.; Hemond, H.F.; Thilly, W.G.

    1995-09-01

    Between 1966 and 1986, the childhood leukemia rate in Woburn, Massachusetts, was 4-fold higher than the national average. A multidisciplinary research team from MIT, which is being supported by the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program, has explored the possible importance of a temporal correlation between the period of elevated leukemia and a previously unrecognized mobilization of toxic metals from a waste disposal site in north Woburn. Residents of Woburn may have been exposed to arsenic (70 {mu}g/l) and chromium (240 {mu}g/l) at levels in excess of federal drinking water standards (50 {mu}g/l for each metal) by consuming municipal groundwater contaminated with these metals. Research is currently underway (a) to elucidate the mechanisms and the pathways by which these metals were transported form the waste disposal site to the drinking water supply; (b) to determine the identity of the principal human cell mutagens in samples of aquifer materials collected form the site of the municipal supply wells; and (c) to measure the extent of exposure and genetic change in residents who consumed the contaminated well water. 11 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Childhood Leukemia and 50 Hz Magnetic Fields: Findings from the Italian SETIL Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Salvan, Alberto; Ranucci, Alessandra; Lagorio, Susanna; Magnani, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    We report on an Italian case-control study on childhood leukemia and exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). Eligible for inclusion were 745 leukemia cases, aged 0–10 years at diagnosis in 1998–2001, and 1475 sex- and age-matched population controls. Parents of 683 cases and 1044 controls (92% vs. 71%) were interviewed. ELF-MF measurements (24–48 h), in the child’s bedroom of the dwelling inhabited one year before diagnosis, were available for 412 cases and 587 controls included in the main conditional regression analyses. The magnetic field induction was 0.04 μT on average (geometric mean), with 0.6% of cases and 1.6% of controls exposed to >0.3 μT. The impact of changes in the statistical model, exposure metric, and data-set restriction criteria was explored via sensitivity analyses. No exposure-disease association was observed in analyses based on continuous exposure, while analyses based on categorical variables were characterized by incoherent exposure-outcome relationships. In conclusion, our results may be affected by several sources of bias and they are noninformative at exposure levels >0.3 μT. Nonetheless, the study may contribute to future meta- or pooled analyses. Furthermore, exposure levels among population controls are useful to estimate attributable risk. PMID:25689995

  12. Genomic profiling of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia reveals a changing mutational landscape from disease diagnosis to relapse | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The genomic and clinical information used to develop and implement therapeutic approaches for AML originated primarily from adult patients and has been generalized to patients with pediatric AML. However, age-specific molecular alterations are becoming more evident and may signify the need to age-stratify treatment regimens. The NCI/COG TARGET-AML initiative employed whole exome capture sequencing (WXS) to interrogate the genomic landscape of matched trios representing specimens collected upon diagnosis, remission, and relapse from 20 cases of de novo childhood AML.

  13. Systemic Exposure to Thiopurines and Risk of Relapse in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Children’s Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Hageman, Lindsey; Chen, Yanjun; Kim, Heeyoung; Sun, Can-Lan; Kornegay, Nancy; Evans, William E; Angiolillo, Anne L; Bostrom, Bruce; Casillas, Jacqueline; Lew, Glen; Maloney, Kelly W; Mascarenhas, Leo; Ritchey, A. Kim; Termuhlen, Amanda M; Carroll, William L; Wong, F Lennie; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Importance Variability in prescribed 6-mercaptopurine and lack of adherence to 6-mercaptopurine could result in intra-individual variability in systemic exposure to 6-mercaptopurine (measured as erythrocyte thioguanine nucleotide levels) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The impact of intra-individual variability in systemic exposure to 6-mercaptopurine on relapse risk is unknown. Objective To determine impact of high intra-individual variability in 6-mercaptopurine systemic exposure on relapse risk in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design Prospective longitudinal design; daily adherence monitoring, 6-mercaptopurine dose-intensity and erythrocyte thioguanine nucleotide levels (pmol/8*10^8 erythrocytes) measured for 6 consecutive months per patient; cohort followed for a median of 6.7 years from diagnosis. Setting Children’s Oncology Group study (COG-AALL03N1); 94 participating institutions; ambulatory care setting. Participants Participants included 742 children meeting the following eligibility criteria: diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia at ≤21 years; in first continuous remission at study entry; receiving self/parent/caregiver-administered oral 6-mercaptopurine during maintenance. Median age at diagnosis: 5 years; 68% were male; 43% with NCI-based high-risk disease. Main Outcome Measures Adherence measured electronically using Medication Event Monitoring System that recorded date/time of each 6-mercaptopurine bottle opening; adherence rate defined as ratio of days of 6-mercaptopurine bottle opened to days when 6-mercaptopurine prescribed. 6-mercaptopurine doses actually prescribed were divided by planned protocol doses (75mg/m2/day) to compute average monthly dose-intensity. Electronically-monitored adherence (68,716 person-days), 6-mercaptopurine dose-intensity (120,439 person-days) and monthly erythrocyte thioguanine nucleotide levels (n=3,944 measurements) contributed to the analysis. Using intra-individual coefficients of

  14. Expression of Ik6 and Ik8 Isoforms and Their Association with Relapse and Death in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-León, Adriana; Juárez-Velázquez, Rocío; Medrano-Hernández, Alma; Cuenca-Roldán, Teresa; Salas-Labadía, Consuelo; del Pilar Navarrete-Meneses, María; Rivera-Luna, Roberto; López-Hernández, Gerardo; Paredes-Aguilera, Rogelio; Pérez-Vera, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the 6 and 8 dominant-negative Ikaros isoforms in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been associated with a high risk of relapse and death; due to these isoforms disrupting the differentiation and proliferation of lymphoid cells. The aim of this study was to know the frequency of Ik6 and Ik8 in 113 Mexican ALL-children treated within the National Popular Medical Insurance Program to determine whether there was an association with relapse-free survival, event-free survival and overall survival, and to assess its usefulness in the initial stratification of patients. The expression of these isoforms was analyzed using specific primer sets and nested RT-PCR. The detected transcripts were classified according to the isoforms’s sizes reported. A non-expected band of 300 bp from one patient was analyzed by sequencing. Twenty-six patients expressed Ik6 and/or Ik8 and one of them expressed a variant of Ik8 denominated Ik8-deleted. Although the presence of them was not statistically associated with lower relapse free survival (p = 0.432), event free survival (p = 0.667) or overall survival (p = 0.531), inferior overall survival was observed in patients that expressed these isoforms and showed high or standard risk by age and white blood-cell count at diagnosis. Of the 26 patients Ik6+ and/or Ik8+, 14 did not present adverse events; from them 6 were exclusively Ik6+ and/or Ik8+, and 8 were positive for the other Ikaros isoforms (Ik1, Ik2, Ik5, Ik3A, Ik4, Ik4A, Ik7). In the patients studied, the expression of Ik6 and Ik8 did not constitute an independent prognostic factor for relapse or death related to disease; therefore, they could not be used in the initial risk stratification. PMID:26131904

  15. Residential Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in California

    PubMed Central

    Colt, Joanne S.; Deziel, Nicole C.; Whitehead, Todd P.; Reynolds, Peggy; Gunier, Robert B.; Nishioka, Marcia; Dahl, Gary V.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Metayer, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: House dust is a major source of exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are found at high levels in U.S. homes. Methods: We studied 167 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases 0–7 years of age and 214 birth certificate controls matched on date of birth, sex, and race/ethnicity from the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. In 2001–2007, we sampled carpets in the room where the child spent the most time while awake; we used a high-volume small-surface sampler or we took dust from the home vacuum. We measured concentrations of 14 PBDE congeners including penta (28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154), octa (183, 196, 197, 203), and decaBDEs (206–209). Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for demographics, income, year of dust collection, and sampling method. Results: BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209 were found at the highest concentrations (medians, 1,173, 1,579, and 938 ng/g, respectively). Comparing the highest to lowest quartile, we found no association with ALL for summed pentaBDEs (OR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4, 1.3), octaBDEs (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.7, 2.3), or decaBDEs (OR = 1.0; 95% CI: 0.6, 1.8). Comparing homes in the highest concentration (nanograms per gram) tertile to those with no detections, we observed significantly increased ALL risk for BDE-196 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.8), BDE-203 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), BDE-206 (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.9), and BDE-207 (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.8). Conclusion: We found no association with ALL for common PBDEs, but we observed positive associations for specific octa and nonaBDEs. Additional studies with repeated sampling and biological measures would be informative. Citation: Ward MH, Colt JS, Deziel NC, Whitehead TP, Reynolds P, Gunier RB, Nishioka M, Dahl GV, Rappaport SM, Buffler PA, Metayer C. 2014. Residential levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in California. Environ Health Perspect 122:1110–1116

  16. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. Contribution of diet and physical activity to metabolic parameters among survivors of childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tonorezos, Emily S.; Robien, Kim; Eshelman-Kent, Debra; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Church, Timothy S.; Ross, Robert; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Determine the relationship between diet and metabolic abnormalities among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods We surveyed 117 adult survivors of childhood ALL using the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire. Physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) was measured with the SenseWear Pro2 Armband. Insulin resistance was estimated using the Homeostasis Model for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Visceral and subcutaneous adiposity were measured by abdominal CT. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern was calculated using the index developed by Trichopoulou. Subjects were compared using multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender. Results Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern was associated with lower visceral adiposity (P=0.07), subcutaneous adiposity (P<0.001), waist circumference (P=0.005), and body mass index (P=0.04). For each point higher on the Mediterranean Diet Score, the odds of having the metabolic syndrome fell by 31% (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.50, 0.94; P = 0.019). Higher dairy intake was associated with higher HOMA-IR (P =0.014), but other individual components of the Mediterranean diet, such as low intake of meat or high intake of fruits and vegetables, were not significant. PAEE was not independently associated with metabolic outcomes, although higher PAEE was associated with lower body mass index. Conclusions Adherence to a Mediterranean diet pattern was associated with better metabolic and anthropometric parameters in this cross-sectional study of ALL survivors. PMID:23187859

  18. Altered neutrophil immunophenotypes in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Elen; Bacelar, Thiago S.; Ciudad, Juana; Ribeiro, Maria Cecília M.; Garcia, Daniela R.N.; Sedek, Lukasz; Maia, Simone F.; Aranha, Daniel B.; Machado, Indyara C.; Ikeda, Arissa; Baglioli, Bianca F.; Lopez-Duarte, Nathalia; Teixeira, Lisandra A. C.; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Silva, Maria Luiza M.; Land, Marcelo G.P.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of evidences suggest a genetic predisposition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that might favor the occurrence of the driver genetic alterations. Such genetic background might also translate into phenotypic alterations of residual hematopoietic cells. Whether such phenotypic alterations are present in bone marrow (BM) cells from childhood B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL remains to be investigated. Here we analyzed the immunophenotypic profile of BM and peripheral blood (PB) maturing/matured neutrophils from 118 children with BCP-ALL and their relationship with the features of the disease. Our results showed altered neutrophil phenotypes in most (77%) BCP-ALL cases. The most frequently altered marker was CD10 (53%), followed by CD33 (34%), CD13 (15%), CD15/CD65 (10%) and CD123 (7%). Of note, patients with altered neutrophil phenotypes had younger age (p = 0.03) and lower percentages of BM maturing neutrophils (p = 0.004) together with greater BM lymphocyte (p = 0.04), and mature B-cell (p = 0.03) counts. No significant association was found between an altered neutrophil phenotype and other disease features. These findings point out the potential existence of an altered residual hematopoiesis in most childhood BCP-ALL cases. PMID:27028865

  19. [Clinical study on regimen cyclophosphamide, Ara-C and topotecan (CAT) in treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Qin, Tie-Jun; Xu, Ze-Feng; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Jian

    2009-10-01

    Up to now, no consensus has been reached on the standard salvage regimen for patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study was purposed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination chemotherapy composing of cyclophosphamide (Cy), cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) and topotecan (CAT regimen) for 37 refractory or relapsed AML patients. The dosing regimen was as follows: Cy 300 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion, every 12 hours on days 1-3, topotecan 1.25 mg/m2 by intravenous continuous infusion over 6 hours daily on days 2 to 6, Ara-C 500 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion over 2 hours daily for 5 days on days 2-6. The results showed that all patients completed one cycle of chemotherapy. 12 patients (32.4%) achieved complete remission (CR), 2 (5.4%) achieved partial remission (PR), and the 23 remaining patients achieved no remission (NR). The overall response rate (RR) was 37.8%. Among 18 relapsed cases, 6 cases had CR (33.3%), 2 cases achieved PR (11.1%), and 10 cases were with NR (55.6%). Among 19 refractory cases, 6 had CR (31.6%), and 13 (68.4%) were with NR. There was no statistically significant difference in RR between refractory and relapsed groups (31.6% and 44.4%, respectively) (p=0.42). Myelosuppression was universal. Mild non-hematologic toxicities were mainly gastrointestinal, as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. The incidence of severe (grade III-IV) non-hematologic toxicity, such as oral mucositis and infection was 37.8% and 86.5% respectively. Only one patient died of severe infection during the observation (within 28 days from start of chemotherapy). The time of median follow-up was 4 (0-33) months, the median overall survival (OS) was 4 (1.8-6.2) months. The median OS for responders was longer than that for non-responders (9 vs 2 months respectively, p=0.00). In conclusion, the CAT regimen of lower dose is well tolerated and has certain anti-leukemia effect, and worthy to be further investigated.

  20. Impaired mitochondrial function is abrogated by dexrazoxane in doxorubicin-treated childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E.; Anderson, Lynn M.; Miller, Tracie L.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Stevenson, Kristen E.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Franco, Vivian I.; LiButti, Daniel E.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Vrooman, Lynda M.; Sallan, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Impaired cardiac function in doxorubicin-treated childhood cancer survivors is partly mediated by disruption of mitochondrial energy production. Doxorubicin intercalates into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disrupting genes encoding for polypeptides that make ATP. METHODS This cross-sectional study examined mtDNA copy numbers/cell and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 64 childhood survivors of high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated on Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Childhood ALL protocols who had received doxorubicin alone (42%) or with dexrazoxane (58%), a cardioprotectant. Mitochondrial DNA copies per cell and OXPHOS enzyme activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase (Complex I, CI) and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV, CIV) were measured by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) immunoassay and thin layer chromatography, respectively. RESULTS At a median follow-up of 7.8 years after treatment, the median number of mtDNA copies per cell for patients treated with doxorubicin alone was significantly higher than for those who also received dexrazoxane (medians, 1106.3 and 310.5; P=0.001). No significant differences were detected between groups for CI or CIV activities. CONCLUSIONS Doxorubicin-treated survivors had increased PBMC mtDNA copies/cell and concomitant use of dexrazoxane was associated with lower mtDNA copies/cell. Due to a possible compensatory increase in mtDNA copies/cell to maintain mitochondrial function in the setting of mitochondrial dysfunction, overall OXPHOS activity was not different between groups. The long-term sustainability of this compensatory response in these survivors at risk for cardiac dysfunction over their lifespan is concerning. PMID:26762648

  1. Feasibility of a study of VHCC wire code as a risk factor for childhood leukemia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.L.; Wachtel, H.; Langholz, B.; Ebi, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    Several studies have reported an association between living in very high current configuration (VHCC) residences and an elevated risk of childhood cancer, particularly leukemia. The basis for these associations is not well understood. Both the exposure, living in a VHCC residence, and the outcome (childhood cancer) are rare. This results in too few cases and controls in most studies to be able to evaluate the role of potential confounding factors. To better understand this association, an epidemiologic study design was developed that can efficiently locate and study both cases and controls living in VHCC residences. The study is designed to avoid, and perhaps explore, the potential biases in earlier studies.

  2. Phase I dose escalation trial of the novel proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Awan, Farrukh T; Flynn, Joseph M; Jones, Jeffrey A; Andritsos, Leslie A; Maddocks, Kami J; Sass, Ellen J; Lucas, Margaret S; Chase, Weihong; Waymer, Sharon; Ling, Yonghua; Jiang, Yao; Phelps, Mitch A; Byrd, John C; Lucas, David M; Woyach, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome complex degrades proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes and is a powerful therapeutic target in several malignancies. Carfilzomib is a potent proteasome inhibitor which induces rapid chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell apoptosis in vitro. We conducted a phase I dose-escalation trial to determine the safety and tolerability of carfilzomib in relapsed/refractory CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). Nineteen patients were treated with carfilzomib initially at 20 mg/m(2), then escalated in four cohorts (27, 36, 45 and 56 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15 and 16 of 28-day cycles. Therapy was generally well tolerated, and no dose limiting toxicities were observed. The most common hematologic toxicities were thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. All patients evaluable for response had stable disease, including patients with del17p13 and fludarabine-resistant disease. This trial shows acceptable tolerability and limited preliminary efficacy of carfilzomib in CLL and SLL.

  3. Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia: A risk assessment by the ARIMMORA consortium.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Joachim; Dasenbrock, Clemens; Ravazzani, Paolo; Röösli, Martin; Schär, Primo; Bounds, Patricia L; Erdmann, Friederike; Borkhardt, Arndt; Cobaleda, César; Fedrowitz, Maren; Hamnerius, Yngve; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Seger, Rony; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Ziegelberger, Gunde; Capstick, Myles; Manser, Melissa; Müller, Meike; Schmid, Christoph D; Schürmann, David; Struchen, Benjamin; Kuster, Niels

    2016-03-15

    Exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) was evaluated in an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" in 2001, based on increased childhood leukemia risk observed in epidemiological studies. We conducted a hazard assessment using available scientific evidence published before March 2015, with inclusion of new research findings from the Advanced Research on Interaction Mechanisms of electroMagnetic exposures with Organisms for Risk Assessment (ARIMMORA) project. The IARC Monograph evaluation scheme was applied to hazard identification. In ARIMMORA for the first time, a transgenic mouse model was used to mimic the most common childhood leukemia: new pathogenic mechanisms were indicated, but more data are needed to draw definitive conclusions. Although experiments in different animal strains showed exposure-related decreases of CD8+ T-cells, a role in carcinogenesis must be further established. No direct damage of DNA by exposure was observed. Overall in the literature, there is limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, with only weak supporting evidence from mechanistic studies. New exposure data from ARIMMORA confirmed that if the association is nevertheless causal, up to 2% of childhood leukemias in Europe, as previously estimated, may be attributable to ELF-MF. In summary, ARIMMORA concludes that the relationship between ELF-MF and childhood leukemia remains consistent with possible carcinogenicity in humans. While this scientific uncertainty is dissatisfactory for science and public health, new mechanistic insight from ARIMMORA experiments points to future research that could provide a step-change in future assessments. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Childhood leukemia genetic bottleneck phenomenon related to TEL-AML1: the postulation by a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Petar; Ivanovski, Ivan; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Jovanović, Ivana

    2012-03-01

    Childhood leukemia bottleneck phenomenon is the most mysterious corollary of the prenatal origin discovery of leukemogenic chromosome translocations. The bottleneck is evidence that leukemia initiation, by in utero acquired chromosome translocations that generate functional fusion genes, is far more common than the incidence rate of corresponding leukemia. For childhood TEL-AML1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) this equates to approximately 100 times. Practically this means that among a hundred children born with TEL-AML1 fusion gene, only one child will later in its life develop ALL. The key data necessary for unraveling of this mystery were discovered in 2002. It was the level of TEL-AML1(+) cells’ frequency. The bottleneck is caused by the very low body TEL-AML1(+) cell count. Only one out of a thousand B cells carries TEL-AML1 fusion gene. TEL-AML1(+) body cell count is low because TEL-AML1 fusion is generated at cell level of 10(-3) to 10(-4) just during the late fetal lymphopoiesis i.e. after the 36th gestational week.

  5. Radium-226-contaminated drinking water: hypothesis on an exposure pathway in a population with elevated childhood leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, W; Kranefeld, A; Schmitz-Feuerhake, I

    1993-01-01

    A recent epidemiological survey on childhood malignant disease in the region of Ellweiler, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, revealed a significantly increased incidence of childhood leukemia, but observed incidences of lymphoma and solid tumors were normal. Established risk factors such as individual exposure to chemicals as well as hereditary genetic disorders were ruled out in interviews with the patients or their families. The general population in the region, however, is subjected to considerable doses of ionizing radiation due to high levels of external gamma radiation and high activities of indoor radon. Radiation-specific chromosome aberrations were found in one of two healthy siblings and one father of leukemia patients as well as in any of three probands living in houses with high indoor radon activities. Radon and natural gamma radiation, however, cannot explain the geographical pattern of the cases. Four out of seven cases were observed in two particular villages near a uranium processing plant. The drinking water of these villages partly came from a small river that was contaminated with radium-226 washed out from the dumps of the uranium plant. Only sparse measurements of 226Ra are available, but derived red bone marrow doses for children in the two villages obtained from a simple radio-ecological model show the significance of the drinking water pathway. Prenatal 226Ra exposure of fetuses due to placental transfer and accumulation may have led to significant doses and may explain the excess cases of childhood leukemia in the region even in quantitative terms. PMID:8143601

  6. Chemotherapy versus Hypomethylating Agents for the Treatment of Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Motabi, Ibraheem H; Ghobadi, Armin; Liu, Jingxia; Schroeder, Mark; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockler-Goldstein, Keith E; Uy, Geoffrey L; Vij, Ravi; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). For patients with relapsed disease after transplantation, intensive chemotherapy followed by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) or a second allo-SCT may result in a durable response in some patients. High-intensity chemotherapy and less aggressive therapy with hypomethylating agents (HAs) with and without DLI are often used for relapse after allo-SCT. Here we compared the treatment outcomes of intensive chemotherapy with that of HAs in relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT. Patients who had received a second SCT within 90 days of the relapse date were excluded. The primary endpoints were overall response rate (ORR) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were complete remission (CR) rate and progression-free survival (PFS). One hundred patients were included: 73 patients received chemotherapy and 27 patients received an HA. Fifty-six percent of patients in the chemotherapy group and 33% of patients in the HA group received at least 1 DLI after treatment. Treatment with chemotherapy resulted in a higher ORR (51% versus 19%, P = .004) and a higher CR rate (40% versus 7%, P = .002). The median OS (6 versus 3.9 months, P = .01) and PFS (4.9 versus 3.8 months, P = .02) were longer in the chemotherapy group. Similar benefit of chemotherapy over HAs was maintained in all treatment outcomes after controlling for the use of DLI. The use of chemotherapy followed by DLI offered the greatest benefit (ORR, 68%; CR, 59%, 1-year OS, 44%; and median OS, 9.8 months). In conclusion, in our hands, with limited numbers, the use of more conventional salvage chemotherapy, with DLI when possible, for the treatment of relapsed AML and MDS after allo-SCT is associated with better outcomes than nonchemotherapy (HA) options.

  7. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse.

    PubMed

    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children receiving, respectively, HSC Transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical family donor or an unrelated CB donor, for both malignant (46) and non-malignant disorders (11). Relative and absolute sj and beta-TREC values indicated comparable thymic function reconstitution at 3 and 6 months after the allograft in both groups. Compared to children with non-malignant disorders, those with hematological malignancies had significantly lower pre-transplantation TREC counts. Patients who relapsed after HSCT had a significantly less efficient thymic function both before and 6 months after HSCT with especially low beta-TREC values, this finding suggesting an impact of early intra-thymic T-cell differentiation on the occurrence of leukemia relapse.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Dose Escalation of the Heat Shock Protein Inhibitor 17-AAG in Combination with Bortezomib in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Alison R.; Klisovic, Rebecca; Johnston, Jeffrey S.; Jiang, Yao; Geyer, Susan; Kefauver, Cheryl; Binkley, Philip; Byrd, John C.; Grever, Michael R.; Garzon, Ramiro; Phelps, Mitch A.; Marcucci, Guido; Blum, Kristie A.; Blum, William

    2013-01-01

    This phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLT) of the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor 17-allyamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) in combination with bortezomib, and to provide pharmacokinetic data in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eleven patients were enrolled. The MTD was 17-AAG 150mg/m2 and bortezomib 0.7mg/m2. Hepatic toxicity and cardiac toxicity were dose limiting. Co-administration on day 4 led to a decrease in clearance (p=0.005) and increase in AUC (p=.032) of 17-amino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AG) not observed when 17-AAG was administered alone. Pharmacokinetic parameters of patients who developed toxicities and those who did not were not different. The combination of 17-AAG and bortezomib led to toxicity without measurable response in patients with relapsed or refractory AML. Pharmacokinetic data provide insight for studies of related agents in AML; next generation HSP90 inhibitors are appealing for further development in this area. PMID:23256542

  11. Novel gene targets detected by genomic profiling in a consecutive series of 126 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Setareh; Hansson, Markus; Karlsson, Karin; Biloglav, Andrea; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, adult cases of this disease are associated with a very poor prognosis. In order to ascertain whether the frequencies and patterns of submicroscopic changes, identifiable with single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, differ between childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of 126 adult cases, the largest series to date, including 18 paired diagnostic and relapse samples. Apart from identifying characteristic microdeletions of the CDKN2A, EBF1, ETV6, IKZF1, PAX5 and RB1 genes, the present study uncovered novel, focal deletions of the BCAT1, BTLA, NR3C1, PIK3AP1 and SERP2 genes in 2-6% of the adult cases. IKZF1 deletions were associated with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P=0.036), BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P<0.001), and higher white blood cell counts (P=0.005). In addition, recurrent deletions of RASSF3 and TOX were seen in relapse samples. Comparing paired diagnostic/relapse samples revealed identical changes at diagnosis and relapse in 27%, clonal evolution in 22%, and relapses evolving from ancestral clones in 50%, akin to what has previously been reported in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicating that the mechanisms of relapse may be similar in adult and childhood cases. These findings provide novel insights into the leukemogenesis of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, showing similarities to childhood disease in the pattern of deletions and the clonal relationship between diagnostic and relapse samples, but with the adult cases harboring additional aberrations that have not been described in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  12. High dose cytarabine plus gemtuzumab ozogamicin for patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 19902.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard M; Moser, Barry; Sanford, Ben; Schulman, Philip; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Allen, Steven; Stock, Wendy; Galinsky, Ilene; Vij, Ravi; Marcucci, Guido; Hurd, David; Larson, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), an anti-CD33 immunoconjugate, was combined with high dose cytarabine (HiDAC; cytarabine 3g/m(2) over 3h daily for 5 days) for adults with relapsed or refractory AML. HiDAC plus GO 9mg/m(2) on day 7 and 4.5mg/m(2) on day 14 was not tolerated, but HiDAC followed by GO 9mg/m(2) on day 7 was safe: 12/37 (32%) patients with relapsed AML achieved complete remission. Median overall survival was 8.9 months. No grade 4 hepatic veno-occlusive disease was observed. This regimen merits further study, both in this setting and as a remission consolidation therapy.

  13. A phase I trial of the aurora kinase inhibitor, ENMD-2076, in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yee, Karen W L; Chen, Hsiao-Wei T; Hedley, David W; Chow, Sue; Brandwein, Joseph; Schuh, Andre C; Schimmer, Aaron D; Gupta, Vikas; Sanfelice, Deborah; Johnson, Tara; Le, Lisa W; Arnott, Jamie; Bray, Mark R; Sidor, Carolyn; Minden, Mark D

    2016-10-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel, orally-active molecule that inhibits Aurora A kinase, as well as c-Kit, FLT3 and VEGFR2. A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and toxicities of ENMD-2076 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Patients received escalating doses of ENMD-2076 administered orally daily [225 mg (n = 7), 375 mg (n = 6), 325 mg (n = 9), or 275 mg (n = 5)]. Twenty-seven patients were treated (26 AML; 1 CMML-2). The most common non-hematological toxicities of any grade, regardless of association with drug, were fatigue, diarrhea, dysphonia, dyspnea, hypertension, constipation, and abdominal pain. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) consisted of grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 typhilitis, grade 3 syncope and grade 3 QTc prolongation). Of the 16 evaluable patients, one patient achieved a complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), three experienced a morphologic leukemia-free state (MLFS) with a major hematologic improvement in platelets (HI-P), and 5 other patients had a reduction in marrow blast percentage (i.e. 11-65 %). The RP2D in this patient population is 225 mg orally once daily.

  14. Exposure to electromagnetic fields (non-ionizing radiation) and its relationship with childhood leukemia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Calvente, I; Fernandez, M F; Villalba, J; Olea, N; Nuñez, M I

    2010-07-15

    Childhood exposure to physical contamination, including non-ionizing radiation, has been implicated in numerous diseases, raising concerns about the widespread and increasing sources of exposure to this type of radiation. The primary objective of this review was to analyze the current state of knowledge on the association between environmental exposure to non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Scientific publications between 1979 and 2008 that include examination of this association have been reviewed using the MEDLINE/PubMed database. Studies to date have not convincingly confirmed or ruled out an association between non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood leukemia. Discrepancies among the conclusions of the studies may also be influenced by confounding factors, selection bias, and misclassification. Childhood defects can result from genetic or epigenetic damage and from effects on the embryo or fetus, which may both be related to environmental exposure of the parent before conception or during the pregnancy. It is therefore critical for researchers to define a priori the type and "window" of exposure to be assessed. Methodological problems to be solved include the proper diagnostic classification of individuals and the estimated exposure to non-ionizing radiation, which may act through various mechanisms of action. There appears to be an urgent need to reconsider exposure limits for low frequency and static magnetic fields, based on combined experimental and epidemiological research into the relationship between exposure to non-ionizing radiation and adverse human health effects.

  15. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. TEL/AML-1 fusion gene. its frequency and prognostic significance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamil, A; Theil, K S; Kahwash, S; Ruymann, F B; Klopfenstein, K J

    2000-10-15

    TEL gene rearrangement due to the 12;21 chromosome translocation is believed to be the most common molecular genetic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and prognostic significance of TEL/AML-1 fusion gene resulting from a cryptic t(12;21)(p13;q22). Bone marrow samples from 86 patients diagnosed over the past 5 years at Columbus Children's Hospital were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for TEL/AML-1 fusion gene, using LSI((R)) DNA probes. The positive cases were analyzed for clinical outcome. Patients in this study received treatment according to Children's Cancer Group (CCG) protocols. Fifteen of the 86 cases (17%) were positive for the fusion gene. All were B-cell lineage and except for one, all were CD10 positive. TEL/AML-1 was not found in any T-cell ALL. The mean overall survival (OS) following diagnosis for the TEL/AML-1-positive group was significantly longer than for the TEL/AML-1-negative group by log-rank = 7.84, P = 0.005. Similarly, the event-free survival (EFS) after remission for the positive group (median 94.5 months) was longer than the negative group (median 57 months) by log-rank = 7.19, P = 0.007. This study confirms that the TEL/AML-1 fusion gene may be the most common genetic event in childhood ALL, occurring in 17% of the patients. It appears restricted to the B-cell lineage. In this study, the presence of a TEL/AML-1 fusion gene was statistically significant in predicting both OS and EFS, indicating a favorable clinical outcome for these patients. Screening for TEL/AML-1 should become routine at diagnosis and a useful biological variable for risk stratification in future clinical trials.

  17. Genetic Mediators of Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Kevin R.; Bhojwani, Deepa; Conklin, Heather M.; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk for neurocognitive problems, with significant interindividual variability in outcome. This study examined genetic polymorphisms associated with variability in neurocognitive outcome. Patients and Methods Neurocognitive outcomes were evaluated at the end of therapy in 243 survivors treated on an institutional protocol featuring risk-adapted chemotherapy without prophylactic cranial irradiation. Polymorphisms in genes related to pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of antileukemic agents, drug metabolism, oxidative stress, and attention problems in noncancer populations were examined as predictors of outcome, using multiple general linear models and controlling for age at diagnosis, sex, race, and treatment intensity. Results Compared with national norms, the cohort demonstrated significantly higher rates of problems on direct assessment of sustained attention (P = .01) and on parent ratings of attention problems (P = .02). Children with the A2756G polymorphism in methionine synthase (MS) were more likely to demonstrate deficits in attentiveness (P = .03) and response speed (P = .02), whereas those with various polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase demonstrated increased performance variability (P = .01) and reduced attentiveness (P = .003). Polymorphisms in monoamine oxidase (T1460CA) were associated with increased attention variability (P = .03). Parent-reported attention problems were more common in children with the Cys112Arg polymorphism in apoliopoprotein E4 (P = .01). Conclusion These results are consistent with our previous report of association between attention problems and MS in an independent cohort of long-term survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy only. The results also raise the possibility of an impact from genetic predispositions related to oxidative stress and CNS integrity. PMID:23650422

  18. Detection of clonality by polymerase chain reaction in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D A; Nowak, J S

    1994-09-01

    DNA-based PCR with various sets of primers for TCR gamma/delta, and Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes were used to study clonality in childhood B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Amplification of the IgH CDR-III was observed in 75 of 120 analyzed cases (62.5%). From all analyzed groups, the IgH gene rearrangement was most often observed in pre-B ALL (85.7%) and was rather rare in null-ALL (34.5%). TCR delta gene rearrangement was the most common, and was observed in 77 patients (64.2%). The typical pattern of rearrangements was defined as an incomplete V delta 2 to D delta 3, V delta 2 to D delta 2, or D delta 3 to D delta 2 recombination product. Rearrangements of TCR gamma gene we observed in 61 cases (50.8%). TCR gamma gene rearrangements were detected predominantly in null-ALL and early B-ALL (55.2% and 60%, respectively) and were rather rare in other groups. Of all eight V segments of V gamma I group, the most frequent gene usage concerns regions V gamma 2, V gamma 4, and psi V gamma 7. We have confirmed that IgH gene amplification, together with TCR gamma and delta gene amplification, provides a rapid, sensitive approach to assessing clonality in ALL almost in 100% of cases.

  19. In vitro cellular drug resistance and prognosis in newly diagnosed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaspers, G J; Veerman, A J; Pieters, R; Van Zantwijk, C H; Smets, L A; Van Wering, E R; Van Der Does-Van Den Berg, A

    1997-10-01

    As an important determinant of the response to chemotherapy, measurements of cellular drug resistance may provide prognostically significant information, which could be useful for optimal risk-group stratification. The objective of this report is to determine the relation between in vitro resistance to 12 drugs, measured with the colorimetric methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium (MTT) assay, and long-term clinical response to chemotherapy in 152 children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. At risk-group stratified analyses, in vitro resistance to prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine were each significantly (P < .01) related to the probability of disease-free survival (pDFS) after combination chemotherapy. The combination of data for prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine provided a drug-resistance profile with prognostic independent significance superior to that of any single drug or any other factor. The 3-years pDFS was 100% for the group with the most sensitive profile, 20% of all patients, 84% (SE 6%) for the group with an intermediately sensitive profile, 40% of all patients, and 43% (SE 8%) for the remaining group with the most resistant profile (P < .001). In conclusion, the extent of in vitro cellular resistance to prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and vincristine, measured using the MTT assay, was significantly related to the clinical response to combination chemotherapy. Treatment failure in newly diagnosed childhood ALL can be predicted based on cellular drug resistance data.

  20. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. High miR-24 expression is associated with risk of relapse and poor survival in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    ORGANISTA-NAVA, JORGE; GÓMEZ-GÓMEZ, YAZMÍN; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; ALARCÓN-ROMERO, LUZ DEL CARMEN; SAAVEDRA-HERRERA, MÓNICA VIRGINIA; RIVERA-RAMÍREZ, ANA BERTHA; GARZÓN-BARRIENTOS, VÍCTOR HUGO; LEYVA-VÁZQUEZ, MARCO ANTONIO

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in the development and progression of acute leukemia (AL). miR-24 promotes the survival of hematopoietic cells. However, little is known concerning the function of miR-24 in human AL. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-24 expression in AL. miR-24 expression in 147 patients with AL and 100 healthy individuals was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The results showed that compared with the healthy individuals, the expression of miR-24 in AL patients was significantly higher (p<0.001). In addition, miR-24 was expressed at significantly higher levels in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and at significantly lower levels in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (p<0.001). More importantly, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that AL patients with high miR-24 expression tended to have shorter overall survival (p<0.05). In the multivariate analysis stratified for known prognostic variables, miR-24 was identified as an independent prognostic marker. Our data indicated that miR-24 upregulation was associated with poor prognosis in AL. miR-24 was identified for the first time as an independent marker for predicting the clinical outcome of AL patients. PMID:25672522

  2. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  4. Maternal Benzene Exposure during Pregnancy and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis of Epidemiologic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhu, Jie; Bi, Yongyi; Bai, YuE; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of childhood leukemia is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, studies on maternal benzene exposure during pregnancy and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have not been systematically assessed. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between maternal solvent, paint, petroleum exposure, and smoking during pregnancy and risk of childhood ALL. Methods Relevant studies up to September 1st, 2013 were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library and the Web of Science databases. The effects were pooled using either fixed or random effect models based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Results Twenty-eight case-control studies and one cohort study were included for analysis, with a total of 16,695 cases and 1,472,786 controls involved. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for ALL was 1.25 (1.09, 1.45) for solvent, 1.23 (1.02, 1.47) for paint, 1.42 (1.10, 1.84) for petroleum exposure, and 0.99 (0.93, 1.06) for maternal smoking during pregnancy. No publication bias was found in this meta-analysis and consistent results were observed for subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Childhood ALL was associated with maternal solvent, paint, and petroleum exposure during pregnancy. No association was found between ALL and maternal smoking during pregnancy. Avoidance of maternal occupational and environmental benzene exposure during pregnancy could contribute to a decrease in the risk of childhood ALL. PMID:25333868

  5. Profile of venetoclax and its potential in the context of treatment of relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Huber, Henriette; Edenhofer, Simone; Estenfelder, Sven; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, dramatic changes have occurred in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The current standard for young and fit patients with CLL remains chemoimmunotherapy, namely the fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) regimen. However, novel oral therapies are presently being introduced and represent a considerable breakthrough concerning effectiveness and safety profile. In particular, the very high-risk group of CLL patients, defined by the genetic aberration del(17p) and/or TP53 mutation, benefit from the new agents. These genetic abnormalities are the most relevant negative prognostic markers in the context of chemoimmunotherapy. New targeted therapies allow different approaches to improve outcomes.

  6. Profile of venetoclax and its potential in the context of treatment of relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Henriette; Edenhofer, Simone; Estenfelder, Sven; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, dramatic changes have occurred in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The current standard for young and fit patients with CLL remains chemoimmunotherapy, namely the fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) regimen. However, novel oral therapies are presently being introduced and represent a considerable breakthrough concerning effectiveness and safety profile. In particular, the very high-risk group of CLL patients, defined by the genetic aberration del(17p) and/or TP53 mutation, benefit from the new agents. These genetic abnormalities are the most relevant negative prognostic markers in the context of chemoimmunotherapy. New targeted therapies allow different approaches to improve outcomes. PMID:28223822

  7. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. 5-Year Survival in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Randomized, Phase III Trial of Fludarabine Plus Cyclophosphamide With or Without Oblimersen

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Susan; Moore, Joseph O.; Boyd, Thomas E.; Larratt, Loree M.; Skotnicki, Aleksander B.; Koziner, Benjamin; Chanan-Khan, Asher A.; Seymour, John F.; Gribben, John; Itri, Loretta M.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A randomized trial of oblimersen plus fludarabine/cyclophosphamide (OBL-FC; n = 120) versus FC (n = 121) was conducted in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The primary end point was met: the complete response (CR) rate, defined as complete or nodular partial response, was significantly greater with OBL-FC than with FC (17% v 7%; P = .025). Among patients with CR, response duration was significantly longer with OBL-FC than with FC (median not reached; > 36 months v 22 months; P = .03). Maximum benefit with OBL-FC, including a four-fold increase in CR rate and a survival benefit with 3 years of follow-up (hazard ratio, 0.53; P = .05), was observed in patients with fludarabine-sensitive disease. We evaluated long-term survival and poststudy CLL therapy among all randomly assigned patients. Methods Poststudy CLL treatment information was collected. Patients were observed for survival for up to 5 years from the date of random assignment. Results Poststudy CLL treatment was balanced between arms. Intent-to-treat analysis of 5-year survival showed no significant between-treatment difference (hazard ratio, 0.87; P = .34). Among the greater than 40% of patients with complete or partial remission, a significant 5-year survival benefit was observed with OBL-FC (hazard ratio, 0.60; P = .038). Among patients with fludarabine-sensitive disease who had previously demonstrated maximum benefit with OBL-FC, the previously observed survival benefit improved: a 50% reduction in the risk of death was observed (P = .004). Conclusion In relapsed/refractory CLL, OBL combined with FC offers patients who achieve complete or partial remission, as well as those who have fludarabine-sensitive disease, a significant survival benefit. PMID:19738118

  9. Mixed T Lymphocyte Chimerism after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation Is Predictive for Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hans C; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Charafeddine, Yasmeen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alatrash, Gheath; Andersson, Borje S; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Ciurea, Stefan; Oran, Betul; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism testing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represents a promising tool for predicting disease relapse, although its precise role in this setting remains unclear. We investigated the predictive value of T lymphocyte chimerism analysis at 90 to 120 days after allo-HSCT in 378 patients with AML/MDS who underwent busulfan/fludarabine-based myeloablative preparative regimens. Of 265 (70%) patients with available T lymphocyte chimerism data, 43% of patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2) at the time of transplantation had complete (100%) donor T lymphocytes at day +90 to +120 compared with 60% of patients in the non-CR1/CR2 cohort (P = .005). In CR1/CR2 patients, donor T lymphocyte chimerism ≤ 85% at day +90 to +120 was associated with a higher frequency of 3-year disease progression (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 46% versus 15%; 95% CI, 9% to 23%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .04). However, in the more advanced, non-CR1/CR2 cohort, mixed T lymphocyte chimerism was not associated with relapse (37%; 95% CI, 20% to 66% versus 34%; 95% CI, 25% to 47%; HR, 1.3; P = .60). These findings demonstrate that early T lymphocyte chimerism testing at day +90 to +120 is a useful approach for predicting AML/MDS disease recurrence in patients in CR1/CR2 at the time of transplantation.

  10. Radium-226-contaminated drinking water: Hypothesis on an exposure pathway in a population with elevated childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, W.; Kranefeld, A.; Schmitz-Feuerhake, I.

    1993-10-01

    A recent epidemiological survey on childhood malignant disease in the region of Ellweiler, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, revealed a significantly increased incidence of childhood leukemia, but observed incidences of lymphoma and solid tumors were normal. Established risk factors such as individual exposure to chemicals as well as hereditary genetic disorders were ruled out in interviews with the patients or their families. The general population in the region, however, is subjected to considerable doses of ionizing radiation due to high levels of external {gamma} radiation and high activities of indoor radon. Radiation-specific chromosome aberrations were found in one of two healthy siblings and one father of leukemia patients as well as in any of three probands living in houses with high indoor radon activities. Radon and natural {gamma} radiation, however, cannot explain the geographical pattern of the cases. Four out of seven cases were observed in two particular villages near a uranium processing plant. The drinking water of these villages partly came from a small river that was contaminated with radium-226 washed out from the dumps of the uranium plant. Only sparse measurements of {sup 226}Ra are available, but derived red bone marrow doses for children in the two villages obtained from a simple radio-ecological model show the significance of the drinking water pathway. Prenatal {sup 226}Ra exposure of fetuses due to placental transfer and accumulation may have led to significant doses and may explain the excess cases of childhood leukemia in the region even in quantitative terms. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  11. Tobacco Smoke and Risk of Childhood Acute Non-Lymphocytic Leukemia: Findings from the SETIL Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Stefano; Farioli, Andrea; Legittimo, Patrizia; Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Ranucci, Alessandra; Salvan, Alberto; Rondelli, Roberto; Magnani, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental smoking and exposure of the mother or the child to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) as risk factors for Acute non-Lymphocytic Leukemia (AnLL) were investigated. Methods Incident cases of childhood AnLL were enrolled in 14 Italian Regions during 1998–2001. We estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) conducting logistic regression models including 82 cases of AnLL and 1,044 controls. Inverse probability weighting was applied adjusting for: age; sex; provenience; birth order; birth weight; breastfeeding; parental educational level age, birth year, and occupational exposure to benzene. Results Paternal smoke in the conception period was associated with AnLL (OR for ≥11 cigarettes/day  = 1.79, 95% CI 1.01–3.15; P trend 0.05). An apparent effect modification by maternal age was identified: only children of mothers aged below 30 presented increased risks. We found weak statistical evidence of an association of AnLL with maternal exposure to ETS (OR for exposure>3 hours/day  = 1.85, 95%CI 0.97–3.52; P trend 0.07). No association was observed between AnLL and either maternal smoking during pregnancy or child exposure to ETS. Conclusions This study is consistent with the hypothesis that paternal smoke is associated with AnLL. We observed statistical evidence of an association between maternal exposure to ETS and AnLL, but believe bias might have inflated our estimates. PMID:25401754

  12. Childhood leukemia around French nuclear power plants--the Geocap study, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Sermage-Faure, Claire; Laurier, Dominique; Goujon-Bellec, Stéphanie; Chartier, Michel; Guyot-Goubin, Aurélie; Rudant, Jérémie; Hémon, Denis; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work is to study the risk of childhood acute leukemia (AL) around French nuclear power plants (NPPs). The nationwide Geocap case-control study included the 2,753 cases diagnosed in mainland France over 2002-2007 and 30,000 contemporaneous population controls. The last addresses were geocoded and located around the 19 NPPs. The study used distance to NPPs and a dose-based geographic zoning (DBGZ), based on the estimated dose to bone marrow related to NPP gaseous discharges. An odds ratio (OR) of 1.9 [1.0-3.3], based on 14 cases, was evidenced for children living within 5 km of NPPs compared to those living 20 km or further away, and a very similar association was observed in the concomitant incidence study (standardized incidence ratio (SIR)=1.9 [1.0-3.2]). These results were similar for all the 5-year-age groups. They persisted after stratification for several contextual characteristics of the municipalities of residence. Conversely, using the DBGZ resulted in OR and SIR close to one in all of the dose categories. There was no increase in AL incidence over 1990-2001 and over the entire 1990-2007 period. The results suggest a possible excess risk of AL in the close vicinity of French NPPs in 2002-2007. The absence of any association with the DBGZ may indicate that the association is not explained by NPP gaseous discharges. Overall, the findings call for investigation for potential risk factors related to the vicinity of NPP and collaborative analysis of multisite studies conducted in various countries.

  13. Energy balance and fitness in adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Karlage, Robyn E.; Lanctot, Jennifer Q.; Howell, Carrie R.; Lu, Lu; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on body composition, energy balance, and fitness among survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), especially those treated without cranial radiation therapy (CRT). This analysis compares these metrics among 365 ALL survivors with a mean age of 28.6 ± 5.9 years (149 treated with and 216 without CRT) and 365 age-, sex-, and race-matched peers. We also report risk factors for outcomes among survivors treated without CRT. Male survivors not exposed to CRT had abnormal body composition when compared with peers (% body fat, 26.2 ± 8.2 vs 22.7 ± 7.1). Survivors without CRT had similar energy balance but had significantly impaired quadriceps strength (−21.9 ± 6.0 Newton-meters [Nm]/kg, 60°/s) and endurance (−11.4 ± 4.6 Nm/kg, 300°/s), exercise capacity (−2.0 ± 2.1 ml/kg per minute), low-back and hamstring flexibility (−4.7 ± 1.6 cm), and dorsiflexion range of motion (−3.1 ± 0.9°) and higher modified total neuropathy scores (+1.6 ± 1.1) than peers. Cumulative asparaginase dose ≥120 000 IU/m2 was associated with impaired flexibility, vincristine dose ≥39 mg/m2 with peripheral neuropathy, glucocorticoid (prednisone equivalent) dose ≥8000 mg/m2 with hand weakness, and intrathecal methotrexate dose ≥225 mg with dorsiflexion weakness. Physical inactivity was associated with hand weakness and decreased exercise capacity. Smoking was associated with peripheral neuropathy. Elimination of CRT from ALL therapy has improved, but not eliminated, body-composition outcomes. Survivors remain at risk for impaired fitness. PMID:25814529

  14. Risk of childhood leukemia associated with diagnostic irradiation and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes.

    PubMed Central

    Infante-Rivard, C; Mathonnet, G; Sinnett, D

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with reported postnatal diagnostic X rays and to determine if it was modified in the presence of variants in genes involved in DNA repair. We conducted a population-based case-control study with 491 cases and 491 healthy controls among children 0-9 years of age at diagnosis. To evaluate gene-environment interaction, we used a subgroup of 129 cases. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for one reported postnatal child X ray versus none was 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-1.49], whereas the OR for two or more X rays was 1.61 (CI, 1.13-2.28). Among girls, the former ORs were 1.14 (CI, 0.66-1.96) and 2.26 (1. 20-4.23), respectively. Among girls who carried the hMSH3 [exon (ex) 23] variant, the ORs were 3.33 (CI, 0.75-14.82) for one X ray and 0. 27 (CI, 0.05-1.57) for two or more X rays, whereas among those who carried the XRCCI (ex 6) variant, the ORs were 1.45 (0.11-19.08) and 6.66 (0.78-56.63), respectively. On the other hand, at low levels of exposure, boys seemed protected by the variant hMLH1 (ex 8). The latter results must be interpreted with caution but suggest that the effect of diagnostic X rays could be modified by variants in repair genes according to sex. Few studies have evaluated the risk of postnatal diagnostic irradiation, which was moderately strong here; we are not aware of any studies that also considered the effect of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes. Based on the present results, both aspects deserve further study. PMID:10856021

  15. Evaluation of functional RAGE gene polymorphisms in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia-A case-control study from Iran.

    PubMed

    Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Hashemi, Mohammad; Hasani, Seyed-Shahab-Adin; Naderi, Majid; Sadeghi-Bojd, Simin; Taheri, Mohsen

    2017-03-04

    We examined the possible relationship between three RAGE polymorphisms, -429C/T, -374 T/A, and 63-bp deletion, and susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in an Iranian population. This study included 75 ALL patients and 115 healthy subjects. Genotyping was performed using HEXA-ARMS-polymerase chain reaction. We found no significant association among RAGE gene polymorphisms and the risk for ALL at genotype, allelic and haplotype levels (P > 0.05). The hemoglobin levels were higher in patients with RAGE -374 TT than in the TA carriers (P = 0.019). Our results demonstrated that the RAGE gene variations were not associated with risk of pediatrics ALL.

  16. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  17. T-cell-rich HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed/refractory pediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia without posttransplant tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Akaihata, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Shogo; Ohto, Hitoshi; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    Intensive chemotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) improves the prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-ALL). However, the prognosis of cases of relapsed or refractory Ph-ALL remains poor. Here, we aimed to assess the efficacy of T-cell-rich HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (TCR-haplo-HSCT) in eight patients with relapsed or refractory pediatric Ph-ALL. Transplant-related mortality was observed in two patients. All patients discontinued TKI after receiving TCR-haplo-HSCT. The 3-year probability of overall survival and event-free survival was 75.0 and 62.5%, respectively. These results indicate the efficacy of TCR-haplo-HSCT for relapsed/refractory pediatric Ph-ALL.

  18. Focal cranial hyperostosis from meningioma: a complication from previous radiation treatment for childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2014-03-01

    Nearly 75% of childhood cancer survivors will experience an adverse late effect from previous therapy. In patients previously treated with cranial irradiation, the late effect can manifest as secondary central nervous system tumors. Presented is a case of a 20 year man with a history of T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed at age 22 months, treated with chemotherapy and cranial irradiation. He had developed increasing prominence of the top of his head over several months. Plain radiograph showed frontal calvarium thickening with focal "hair-on-end" periosteal reaction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing dural-based mass with transcalvarial extension, confirmed after resection to be meningioma (World Health Organization Grade I). This case illustrates an atypical presentation of a late effect of childhood cancer treatment and highlights the need to be informed about prior treatments received and potential attendant complications.

  19. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and lenalidomide in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A multicenter phase I-II GIMEMA trial.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Francesca R; Carella, Angelo M; Molica, Stefano; Paoloni, Francesca; Liberati, Anna M; Zaja, Francesco; Belsito, Valeria; Cortellezzi, Agostino; Rizzi, Rita; Tosi, Patrizia; Spriano, Mauro; Ferretti, Antonietta; Nanni, Mauro; Marinelli, Marilisa; De Propris, Maria S; Orlando, Sonia M; Vignetti, Marco; Cuneo, Antonio; Guarini, Anna R; Foà, Robin

    2017-07-01

    The activity and safety of a regimen combining lenalidomide with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (FC) was investigated in patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Treatment consisted of six monthly courses of the FC regimen combined with 14 days of lenalidomide given at the starting dose of 2.5 mg during course 1. The maximum tolerated dose of lenalidomide was 5 mg. Forty patients were assessed for response, 66% were IGHV unmutated, 45% showed deletion 11q or 17p. The overall response and complete remission rates were 62.5% and 22.5%, respectively, the median progression-free and overall survival (OS) were 19 and 45 months, respectively. Grade 3-4 granulocytopenia was observed in 65% of cases, severe infections in 7.5%, the lenalidomide-related toxicity was mild. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that low-dose lenalidomide associated with the FC schedule is an effective treatment for R/R patients with CLL, associated with an acceptable safety profile.

  20. High dose cytarabine, mitoxantrone and L-asparaginase (HAMA) salvage for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tamjeed; Holwerda, Scott; Klepin, Heidi D.; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R.; Lyerly, Susan; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that affects older patients. The role of salvage therapy in the elderly is controversial and there is little data on efficacy. Outcomes for 94 relapsed or refractory AML patients who received salvage HAMA therapy were analyzed. Of the 94 patients 66 were ≥60, including 26 patients ≥70, and 28 were <60 years old. Early mortality (30-day) was 14% (4% <60, 18% ≥60 years old). Overall, 27% of patients died during hospitalization or were discharged to hospice (11% <60, 33% ≥60 years old). CR/CRi was achieved in 41% of patients (61% <60, 33% ≥60 years old). Median survival was 6.1 months (15.7 <60, 5.2 ≥60). Patients ≥60 who achieved a CR/CRi had a median survival of 11.7 months. At 12 months 56% of patients <60 were alive versus 24% of patients ≥60. At 24 months these numbers fell to 40% and 2% respectively. In those <60 years old, 50% went on to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whereas 14% of patients in the ≥60 cohort did so. In conclusion, HAMA salvage therapy results in a 33% response rate in patients ≥60 years old with acceptable toxicity. PMID:26154683

  1. High dose cytarabine, mitoxantrone and l-asparaginase (HAMA) salvage for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Tamjeed; Holwerda, Scott; Klepin, Heidi D; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Lyerly, Susan; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that affects older patients. The role of salvage therapy in the elderly is controversial and there is little data on efficacy. Outcomes for 94 relapsed or refractory AML patients who received salvage HAMA therapy were analyzed. Of the 94 patients 66 were ≥60, including 26 patients ≥70, and 28 were <60 years old. Early mortality (30-day) was 14% (4%<60, 18%≥60 years old). Overall, 27% of patients died during hospitalization or were discharged to hospice (11%<60, 33%≥60 years old). CR/CRi was achieved in 41% of patients (61%<60, 33%≥60 years old). Median survival was 6.1 months (15.7<60, 5.2≥60). Patients ≥60 who achieved a CR/CRi had a median survival of 11.7 months. At 12 months 56% of patients <60 were alive versus 24% of patients ≥60. At 24 months these numbers fell to 40% and 2% respectively. In those <60 years old, 50% went on to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) whereas 14% of patients in the ≥60 cohort did so. In conclusion, HAMA salvage therapy results in a 33% response rate in patients ≥60 years old with acceptable toxicity.

  2. Early relapse of JAK2 V617F-positive chronic neutrophilic leukemia with central nervous system infiltration after unrelated bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Sato, Tomohiko; Goyama, Susumu; Noda, Naohiro; Shoda, Eriko; Oshima, Kumi; Inoue, Morihiro; Izutsu, Koji; Watanabe, Takuro; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Fukayama, Masashi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2007-05-01

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare myeloproliferative disorder characterized by a proliferation mainly of mature neutrophils. The prognosis is generally poor and an optimal therapeutic strategy remains to be determined. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is expected to be the only curative therapy so far. We report a 46-year-old male with progressive CNL who underwent bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-matched unrelated donor. After engraftment was achieved on day 35, relapse of CNL was confirmed on day 50. The progression of CNL was very rapid afterward and infiltration to the central nervous system was observed. The Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F homozygous mutation was detected from the peripheral blood or bone marrow samples throughout the clinical course. From comparison with reports of successful HSCT for CNL in the literature, it was inferred that HSCT should be performed in a stable status before progression. Furthermore, JAK2 V617F-positive CNL may contain an aggressive disease entity in contrast to previous reports. Accumulation of experiences is required to establish a definite role of HSCT in the treatment of CNL and a prognostic significance of JAK2 mutation in CNL.

  3. Blinatumomab and Nivolumab With or Without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Poor-Risk Relapsed or Refractory CD19+ Precursor B-Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1

  4. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  5. Clinical impact of circulating microRNAs as blood-based marker in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Swellam, Menha; El-Khazragy, Nashwa

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression participates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study aimed to investigate the expression of miRNA-100, miRNA-196a, and miRNA-146a among childhood ALL and study their correlation with other hematological parameters and different phenotypes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) were obtained from 85 childhood ALL and 25 healthy children for the detection of miRNA expression using quantitative real-time PCR. Significant higher median levels were reported for ALL compared to control children. The diagnostic efficacy for miRNA-146a was superior as both sensitivity and specificity were absolute. A significant correlation was observed between higher expression of miRNA-100 and lower platelet and lymphocyte counts; high expression of miRNA-146a showed significant correlation with low total leukocyte count (TLC) and lymphocyte counts. Significant relation was reported between studied miRNAs and different phenotyping. miRNA-100, miRNA-196a, and miRNA-146a have significant role in childhood ALL leukemogenesis, and they may be useful as biological diagnostic molecular markers.

  6. Absolute lymphocyte count is associated with minimal residual disease level in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Qiang; Feng, Jian-Hua; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Shi, Shu-Wen; Xu, Wei-Qun

    2013-06-01

    The prognostic value of absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) has been a recent matter of debate in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In the current study, ALCs at the time of diagnosis (ALC-0), after 7 days of initial therapy (ALC-8) and at interim of the induction therapy (ALC-22) were examined in Chinese children with B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL and correlated with the level of minimal residual disease (MRD) at day 22 of induction therapy. Medical and laboratory records of 140 patients diagnosed with childhood BCP ALL were retrieved and analyzed. ALC-22 is significantly correlated with MRD level at day 22 of therapy and can be a good prognostic factor for childhood BCP-ALL. Furthermore, lymphocyte count at initial diagnosis is correlated with MRD level at day 22 in childhood BCP-ALL with the immnunophenotype of CD19(pos)/CD10(pos)/CD34(pos)/CD45(neg) and role as a new prognostic factor was determined.

  7. Effects of Maternal Diet During Pregnancy on the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Abiri, Behnaz; Kelishadi, Roya; Sadeghi, Homa; Azizi-Soleiman, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common type of leukemia in children that can be affected by maternal diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate maternal dietary risk factors of ALL. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Springer Link, Wiley Online, Science Direct, Mosby, ISI Web of Science, OVID, ProQuest, and Scopus from database inception until February 2, 2016. Two reviewers scanned titles, abstracts, and keywords of articles after excluding duplicates. We included case-control studies evaluating the relationship between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood ALL. The search resulted in 2,940 papers, of which 11 full-text articles met the criteria for inclusion in the review and were analyzed. The finding of these studies suggest that maternal diet composed largely of vegetables, fruits, and protein sources before and during pregnancy can reduce the risk of ALL in offspring. Maternal alcohol intake had no effect. Nevertheless, inherent limitations of case-control studies like measurement error, random error, recall bias, and selection bias preclude conclusive evidence. Persuading pregnant women to follow a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and protein may reduce the risk of childhood ALL. Avoiding alcohol intake seems prudent.

  8. RIP1 is required for IAP inhibitor-mediated sensitization of childhood acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Löder, S; Fakler, M; Schoeneberger, H; Cristofanon, S; Leibacher, J; Vanlangenakker, N; Bertrand, M J M; Vandenabeele, P; Jeremias, I; Debatin, K-M; Fulda, S

    2012-05-01

    Evasion of apoptosis may contribute to poor treatment response in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), calling for novel treatment strategies. Here, we report that inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) at subtoxic concentrations cooperate with various anticancer drugs (that is, AraC, Gemcitabine, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Etoposide, Vincristine and Taxol) to induce apoptosis in ALL cells in a synergistic manner as calculated by combination index and to reduce long-term clonogenic survival. Importantly, we identify RIP1 as a critical regulator of this synergism of IAP inhibitors and AraC that mediates the formation of a RIP1/FADD/caspase-8 complex via an autocrine/paracrine loop of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα). Knockdown of RIP1 abolishes formation of this complex and subsequent activation of caspase-8 and -3, mitochondrial perturbations and apoptosis. Similarly, inhibition of RIP1 kinase activity by Necrostatin-1 or blockage of TNFα by Enbrel inhibits IAP inhibitor- and AraC-triggered interaction of RIP1, FADD and caspase-8 and apoptosis. In contrast to malignant cells, IAP inhibitors and AraC at equimolar concentrations are non-toxic to normal peripheral blood lymphocytes or mesenchymal stromal cells. Thus, our findings provide first evidence that IAP inhibitors present a promising strategy to prime childhood ALL cells for chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in a RIP1-dependent manner. These data have important implications for developing apoptosis-targeted therapies in childhood leukemia.

  9. Induction of autophagy-dependent necroptosis is required for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to overcome glucocorticoid resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonapace, Laura; Bornhauser, Beat C.; Schmitz, Maike; Cario, Gunnar; Ziegler, Urs; Niggli, Felix K.; Schäfer, Beat W.; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In vivo resistance to first-line chemotherapy, including to glucocorticoids, is a strong predictor of poor outcome in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Modulation of cell death regulators represents an attractive strategy for subverting such drug resistance. Here we report complete resensitization of multidrug-resistant childhood ALL cells to glucocorticoids and other cytotoxic agents with subcytotoxic concentrations of obatoclax, a putative antagonist of BCL-2 family members. The reversal of glucocorticoid resistance occurred through rapid activation of autophagy-dependent necroptosis, which bypassed the block in mitochondrial apoptosis. This effect was associated with dissociation of the autophagy inducer beclin-1 from the antiapoptotic BCL-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) and with a marked decrease in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Consistent with a protective role for mTOR in glucocorticoid resistance in childhood ALL, combination of rapamycin with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone triggered autophagy-dependent cell death, with characteristic features of necroptosis. Execution of cell death, but not induction of autophagy, was strictly dependent on expression of receptor-interacting protein (RIP-1) kinase and cylindromatosis (turban tumor syndrome) (CYLD), two key regulators of necroptosis. Accordingly, both inhibition of RIP-1 and interference with CYLD restored glucocorticoid resistance completely. Together with evidence for a chemosensitizing activity of obatoclax in vivo, our data provide a compelling rationale for clinical translation of this pharmacological approach into treatments for patients with refractory ALL. PMID:20200450

  10. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  11. Germline Genetic Variation in ETV6 and Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: a Systematic Genetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, Takaya; Metzger, Monika L.; Wu, Gang; Nishii, Rina; Qian, Maoxiang; Devidas, Meenakshi; Yang, Wenjian; Cheng, Cheng; Cao; Emily, Quinn; Raimondi, Susana; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Raetz, Elizabeth; Larsen, Eric; Martin, Paul L.; Bowman, W. Paul; Winick, Naomi; Komada, Yoshihiro; Wang, Shuoguo; Edmonson, Michael; Xu, Heng; Mardis, Elaine; Fulton, Robert; Pui; Mullighan, Charles; Evans, William E.; Zhang, Jinghui; Hunger, Stephen P.; Relling, Mary V.; Nichols, Kim E.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hereditary predisposition is rarely suspected for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent studies identified germline ETV6 variations associated with marked familial clustering of hematologic malignancies, pointing to this gene as a potentially important genetic determinant for ALL susceptibility. The aims of the current study are to comprehensively identify ALL predisposition variants in ETV6 and to determine the extent to which they contribute to the overall risk of childhood ALL. Methods Whole-exome sequencing of an index family with multiple cases of ALL was performed to identify causal variants for ALL predisposition. Targeted sequencing of ETV6 was done in 4,405 children from the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital frontline ALL trials. Patients were included in this study on the basis of their enrollment in these clinical trials and the availability of germline DNA. ETV6 variant genotypes were compared with non-ALL controls to define ALL-related germline risk variants. ETV6 variant function was characterized bioinformatically and correlated with clinical and demographic features in 2,021 children with ALL. Findings We identified a novel nonsense ETV6 variant (p.R359X) with a high penetrance of familial ALL. Subsequent targeted sequencing of ETV6 in 4,405 childhood ALL cases discovered 31 exonic variants (4 nonsense, 21 missense, 1 splice site, and 5 frame shift variants) that are potentially related to ALL risk in 35 cases (0.79%). Fifteen (48%) of the 31 ALL-related ETV6 variants clustered in the ETS domain and predicted to be highly deleterious. Children with ALL-related ETV6 variants were significantly older at leukemia diagnosis than others (10.2 years [IQR 5.3-13.8] vs 4.7 years [IQR 3.0-8.7], P=0.017). The hyperdiploid leukemia karyotype was strikingly overrepresented in ALL cases harboring germline ETV6 risk variants compared to the wildtype group (9 of 14 cases [64.3%] vs 538 of 2

  12. Phase 1 and Extension Study of Clofarabine plus Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, S; Balakrishnan, K; Thomas, DA; Ravandi, F; Borthakur, G; Burger, J; Ferrajoli, A; Cortes, J; O’Brien, S; Kadia, T; Feliu, J; Plunkett, W; Gandhi, V; Kantarjian, HM

    2014-01-01

    Background Clofarabine is a nucleoside analog with activity in children with ALL. Based on the hypothesis that clofarabine inhibits DNA repair following exposure to DNA damaging agents, we designed a phase 1 and extension study to evaluate the combination of clofarabine with cyclophosphamide in adult patients with relapsed/refractory ALL. Methods The continual reassessment method (CRM) was used to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results Fifty patients with a median age of 30 years (range 21–72 years) were enrolled of whom 30 patients were part of the phase 1 group. Clofarabine 40 mg/m2 iv daily x 3 days and cyclophosphamide 200 mg/m2 iv q 12 hours x 3 days were established as the MTD. Dose limiting toxicities were diarrhea, transaminase elevations, and skin rashes. The response rate of the whole study group was 14% including 10% of patients who achieved complete remission (CR) or CR without platelet recovery. Three responses occurred in patients with primary refractory disease. Early mortality (< 30 days) was 6%. The median response duration was 69 days (range 5–315 days). Median overall survival was about 3 months. Compared to day 1 (cyclophosphamide alone), H2AX phosphorylation was increased on day 2 when clofarabine and cyclophosphamide were administered as a couplet (n = 8). Conclusions The combination of clofarabine plus cyclophosphamide at the doses used in this study and in a group of heavily pretreated patients with ALL is only moderately effective. Other doses, alternative schedules, or a more favorable patient population may achieve better results. (Word count: 248) PMID:24440659

  13. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  14. Role of Radiation Dose in the Risk of Secondary Leukemia After a Solid Tumor in Childhood Treated Between 1980 and 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Aurore; Haddy, Nadia; Le Deley, Marie-Cecile; Rubino, Carole; Lassalle, Mathilde; Samsaldin, Akthar; Quiniou, Eric; Chompret, Agnes; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vathaire, Florent de

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of secondary leukemia as a function of radiation dose, taking into account heterogeneous radiation dose distribution. Methods and Materials: We analyzed a case-control study that investigated the risk of secondary leukemia and myelodysplasia after a solid tumor in childhood; it included 61 patients with leukemia matched with 196 controls. Complete clinical, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy histories were recorded for each patient in the study. Average radiation dose to each of seven bone marrow components for each patient was incorporated into the models, and corresponding risks were summed up. Conditional maximum likelihood methods were used to estimate risk parameters. Results: Whatever the model, we failed to evidence a role for the radiation dose to active bone marrow in the risk of later leukemia, myelodysplasia, or myeloproliferative syndrome, when adjusting for epipodophyllotoxin and anthracycline doses. This result was confirmed when fitting models that included total dose of radiation delivered during radiotherapy, when fitting models taking into account dose per fraction, and when restricting the analysis to acute myeloid leukemia. Conclusions: In contrast to results found in similar studies that included children treated before the use of epipodophyllotoxins, this study failed to show a role for radiotherapy in the risk of secondary leukemia after childhood cancer in children treated between 1980 and 1999. This discrepancy was probably due to a competitive mechanism between these two carcinogens.

  15. Familial history of cancer and childhood acute leukemia: a French population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ripert, Mahaut; Menegaux, Florence; Perel, Yves; Méchinaud, Françoise; Plouvier, Emmanuel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lutz, Patrick; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lamagnére, Jean-Pierre; Margueritte, Geneviève; Boutard, Patrick; Robert, Alain; Armari-Alla, Corinne; Munzer, Martine; Millot, Frédéric; de Lumley, Lionel; Berthou, Christian; Rialland, Xavier; Pautard, Brigitte; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Objective A case-control study was conducted to investigate the role of a familial history of cancer in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia (AL). Methods The history of cancer in the relatives of 472 cases was compared to that of 567 population-based controls. Recruitment was frequency matched on age, gender and region. The familial history of cancer in each child’s relatives was reported by the mother in response to a standardized self-administered questionnaire. Results A familial history of solid tumor in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of ALL (OR=1.6 [1.2–2.1]), while a familial history of hematopoietic malignancies in first- or second-degree relatives was associated with an increased risk of AML (OR=4.3 [1.4–13]). The ORs for the histories of cancer increased with the number of relatives with cancer (OR=1.5 [1.1–2.0] for one relative and OR=2.3 [1.3–3.8] for two relatives or more; ptrend<0.0001). Significant associations between childhood AL and familial history of genital cancers and brain tumor were also observed (OR=2.7 [1.2–5.8], OR=10.7 [1.3–86], respectively). Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis that a familial history of cancer may play a role in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. It also evidences some specific associations that require further investigation. PMID:17923819

  16. Long-term results of Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group trials for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1984-1999.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, M; Ohara, A; Manabe, A; Kumagai, M; Shimada, H; Kikuchi, A; Mori, T; Saito, M; Akiyama, M; Fukushima, T; Koike, K; Shiobara, M; Ogawa, C; Kanazawa, T; Noguchi, Y; Oota, S; Okimoto, Y; Yabe, H; Kajiwara, M; Tomizawa, D; Ko, K; Sugita, K; Kaneko, T; Maeda, M; Inukai, T; Goto, H; Takahashi, H; Isoyama, K; Hayashi, Y; Hosoya, R; Hanada, R

    2010-02-01

    We report the long-term results of Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group's studies L84-11, L89-12, L92-13, and L95-14 for 1846 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which were conducted between 1984 and 1999. The value of event-free survival (EFS)+/-s.e. was 67.2+/-2.2% at 10 years in L84-11, which was not improved in the following two studies, and eventually improved to 75.0+/-1.8% at 10 years in L95-14 study. The lower EFS of the L89-12 reflected a high rate of induction failure because of infection and delayed remission in very high-risk patients. The L92-13 study was characterized by short maintenance therapy; it resulted in poor EFS, particularly in the standard-risk (SR) group and boys. Females did significantly better than males in EFS in the early three studies. The gender difference was not significant in overall survival, partly because >60% of the males survived after the testicular relapse. Randomized studies in the former three protocols revealed that intermediate- or high-dose methotrexate therapy significantly reduced the testicular relapse rate. In the L95-14 study, gender difference disappeared in EFS. Contrary to the results of larger-scale studies, the randomized control study in the L95-14 reconfirmed with updated data that dexamethasone 8 mg/m(2) had no advantage over prednisolone 60 mg/m(2) in the SR and intermediate-risk groups. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was assigned to 100, 80, 44, and 44% of the patients in the studies, respectively. Isolated central nervous system relapse rates decreased to <2% in the last two trials. Secondary brain tumors developed in 12 patients at 8-22 years after cranial irradiation. Improvement of the remission induction rates and the complete omission of irradiation are currently main objectives in our studies.

  17. Substantial Susceptibility of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia to BCL2 Inhibition: Results of a Phase I Study of Navitoclax in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Andrew W.; Seymour, John F.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Wierda, William G.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Khaw, Seong Lin; Carney, Dennis A.; He, Simon Z.; Huang, David C.S.; Xiong, Hao; Cui, Yue; Busman, Todd A.; McKeegan, Evelyn M.; Krivoshik, Andrew P.; Enschede, Sari H.; Humerickhouse, Rod

    2012-01-01

    Purpose BCL2 overexpression is a hallmark of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The novel BH3 mimetic navitoclax (ABT-263) specifically inhibits BCL2 and related proteins BCL-xl and BCL-w, potently inducing apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro. A phase I trial in patients with CLL was conducted to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and biologic activity of oral navitoclax. Patients and Methods Twenty-nine patients with relapsed or refractory CLL received daily navitoclax for 14 days (10, 110, 200, or 250 mg/d; n = 15) or 21 days (125, 200, 250, or 300 mg/d; n = 14) of each 21-day cycle. Dose escalation decisions were informed by continual reassessment methodology. Results Lymphocytosis was reduced by more than 50% in 19 of 21 patients with baseline lymphocytosis. Among 26 patients treated with navitoclax ≥ 110 mg/d, nine (35%) achieved a partial response and seven maintained stable disease for more than 6 months. Median treatment duration was 7 months (range, 1 to ≥ 29 months). Median progression-free survival was 25 months. Activity was observed in patients with fludarabine-refractory disease, bulky adenopathy, and del(17p) CLL. Thrombocytopenia due to BCL-xl inhibition was the major dose-limiting toxicity and was dose-related. Low MCL1 expression and high BIM:MCL1 or BIM:BCL2 ratios in leukemic cells correlated with response. We determined that the navitoclax dose of 250 mg/d in a continuous dosing schedule was optimal for phase II studies. Conclusion BCL2 is a valid therapeutic target in CLL, and its inhibition by navitoclax warrants further evaluation as monotherapy and in combination in this disease. PMID:22184378

  18. Relationship between venetoclax exposure, rituximab coadministration, and progression-free survival in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia: demonstration of synergy.

    PubMed

    Freise, Kevin J; Jones, Aksana K; Menon, Rajeev M; Verdugo, Maria E; Humerickhouse, Rod A; Awni, Walid M; Salem, Ahmed Hamed

    2016-12-16

    Venetoclax is indicated at a dosage of 400 mg daily (QD) for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with 17p deletion who have received at least 1 prior therapy. Ongoing trials are evaluating venetoclax in combination with CD20 targeting monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab. The objective of this research was to characterize the relationship between venetoclax exposures and progression-free survival (PFS) and to evaluate the effect of rituximab coadministration on PFS in patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). A total of 323 patients from 3 clinical studies of venetoclax, with and without rituximab coadministration, were pooled for the analyses. A time-variant relative risk survival model was used to relate plasma venetoclax concentrations and rituximab administration to PFS. Demographics and baseline disease characteristics were evaluated for their effect on PFS. A concentration-dependent effect of venetoclax on PFS and a prolonged synergistic effect of 6 cycles of concomitant rituximab were identified. The 17p deletion chromosomal aberration was not identified to affect the PFS of patients treated with venetoclax. A venetoclax dose of 400 mg daily QD was estimated to result in a substantial median PFS of 1.8 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-2.1), whereas the addition of 6 cycles of rituximab was estimated to increase the median PFS to 3.9 years (95% CI, 2.8-5.6). The analysis demonstrates a concentration-dependent effect of venetoclax on PFS and also a synergistic effect with rituximab. Combining venetoclax with the CD20 targeting monoclonal antibody rituximab in R/R CLL/SLL patients provides substantial synergistic benefit compared with increasing the venetoclax monotherapy dose.

  19. Dose study of the multikinase inhibitor, LY2457546, in patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wacheck, Volker; Lahn, Michael; Dickinson, Gemma; Füreder, Wolfgang; Meyer, Renata; Herndlhofer, Susanne; Füreder, Thorsten; Dorfner, Georg; Pillay, Sada; André, Valérie; Burkholder, Timothy P; Akunda, Jacqueline K; Flye-Blakemore, Leann; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Schlenk, Richard F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a life-threatening malignancy with limited treatment options in chemotherapy-refractory patients. A first-in-human dose study was designed to investigate a safe and biologically effective dose range for LY2457546, a novel multikinase inhibitor, in patients with relapsed AML. Methods: In this nonrandomized, open-label, dose escalation Phase I study, LY2457546 was administered orally once a day. Safety, pharmacokinetics, changes in phosphorylation of target kinases in AML blasts, and risk of drug–drug interactions (DDI) were assessed. Results: Five patients were treated at the starting and predicted minimal biologically effective dose of 50 mg/day. The most commonly observed adverse events were febrile neutropenia, epistaxis, petechiae, and headache. The majority of adverse events (81%) were Grade 1 or 2. One patient had generalized muscle weakness (Grade 3), which was deemed to be a dose-limiting toxicity. Notably, the pharmacokinetic profile of LY2457546 showed virtually no elimination of LY2457546 within 24 hours, and thus prevented further dose escalation. No significant DDI were observed. Ex vivo flow cytometry studies showed downregulation of the phosphoproteins, pcKIT, pFLT3, and pS6, in AML blasts after LY2457546 administration. No medically relevant responses were observed in the five treated patients. Conclusion: No biologically effective dose could be established for LY2457546 in chemotherapy-resistant AML patients. Lack of drug clearance prevented safe dose escalation, and the study was terminated early. Future efforts should be made to develop derivatives with a more favorable pharmacokinetic profile. PMID:21625399

  20. Distance to High-Voltage Power Lines and Risk of Childhood Leukemia – an Analysis of Confounding by and Interaction with Other Potential Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira V.; Rod, Naja H.; Albieri, Vanna; Andersen, Claus E.; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Johansen, Christoffer; Schüz, Joachim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters the association between distance to nearest power line and childhood leukemia. We included 1024 cases aged <15, diagnosed with leukemia during 1968–1991, from the Danish Cancer Registry and 2048 controls randomly selected from the Danish childhood population and individually matched by gender and year of birth. We used geographical information systems to determine the distance between residence at birth and the nearest 132–400 kV overhead power line. Concentrations of domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution (NOx at the front door) were estimated using validated models. We found a statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon regarding risk of childhood leukemia (p = 0.01) when using the median radon level as cut-off point but not when using the 75th percentile (p = 0.90). We found no evidence of an interaction between distance to nearest power line and traffic-related air pollution (p = 0.73). We found almost no change in the estimated association between distance to power line and risk of childhood leukemia when adjusting for socioeconomic status of the municipality, urbanization, maternal age, birth order, domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution. The statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon was based on few exposed cases and controls and sensitive to the choice of exposure categorization and might, therefore, be due to chance. PMID:25259740

  1. Distance to high-voltage power lines and risk of childhood leukemia--an analysis of confounding by and interaction with other potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Camilla; Bräuner, Elvira V; Rod, Naja H; Albieri, Vanna; Andersen, Claus E; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Johansen, Christoffer; Schüz, Joachim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an interaction between distance from residence at birth to nearest power line and domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution, respectively, in relation to childhood leukemia risk. Further, we investigated whether adjusting for potential confounders alters the association between distance to nearest power line and childhood leukemia. We included 1024 cases aged <15, diagnosed with leukemia during 1968-1991, from the Danish Cancer Registry and 2048 controls randomly selected from the Danish childhood population and individually matched by gender and year of birth. We used geographical information systems to determine the distance between residence at birth and the nearest 132-400 kV overhead power line. Concentrations of domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution (NOx at the front door) were estimated using validated models. We found a statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon regarding risk of childhood leukemia (p = 0.01) when using the median radon level as cut-off point but not when using the 75th percentile (p = 0.90). We found no evidence of an interaction between distance to nearest power line and traffic-related air pollution (p = 0.73). We found almost no change in the estimated association between distance to power line and risk of childhood leukemia when adjusting for socioeconomic status of the municipality, urbanization, maternal age, birth order, domestic radon and traffic-related air pollution. The statistically significant interaction between distance to nearest power line and domestic radon was based on few exposed cases and controls and sensitive to the choice of exposure categorization and might, therefore, be due to chance.

  2. Childhood CT scans linked to leukemia and brain cancer later in life

    Cancer.gov

    Children and young adults scanned multiple times by computed tomography (CT), a commonly used diagnostic tool, have a small increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors in the decade following their first scan.

  3. More Chemotherapy May Help after Initial Treatment for Childhood Leukemia Fails

    Cancer.gov

    A study suggests that at least some children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who respond poorly to initial chemotherapy may do better if they receive additional chemotherapy rather than a stem cell transplant.

  4. Effects of Methylphenidate on Attention Deficits in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-16

    ALL, Childhood; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, L1; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, L2; Leukemia, Lymphoblastic, Acute, Philadelphia-Positive; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L2; Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, Childhood; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, L1; Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute, L2; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Lymphocytic Leukemia, L1; Lymphocytic Leukemia, L2; Brain Tumors; Cancer of the Brain; Cancer of Brain; Malignant Primary Brain Tumors; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant

  5. Birth Weight and Acute Childhood Leukemia: A Meta-analysis of Observational Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Leukemia (Henderson ES, Lister TA, Greaves MF, eds). Phildelphia: W.B. Sanders Co.,1996;419-445. 9. Ron E, Modan B. Thyroid and other neoplasms ...Press, 1984;139. 102 10. Zipursky A, Brown E, Christensen H, et al: Leukemia and/or myeloproliferative syndrome in neonates with Down syndrome...Cancer 1994;70:531- 536. 102. MacMahon B, Newill VA. Birth characteristics of children dying of malignant neoplasms . J Natl Cancer Inst 1962;28:231

  6. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  10. Medical progress, psychological factors and global care of the patient: lessons from the treatment of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Digilio, Girolamo; Digilio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The history of treatment of childhood leukemia is a meaningful model of ethical, bioethical and organizational repercussions of medical progress. Specifically, it has provided precious indications and very useful tools to cope with several of the more important problems of modern medicine: the value of controlled randomized studies; the risks of intense medicalization impairing the quality of care; the importance of a valid doctor-patient relationship; the psycho-emotive involvement of the pediatric staff; and last but not least, the need of an unrelenting effort of humanization of the procedures and environments, hand in hand with the frequent adjustments of the protocols according to scientific and technological progress. Finally, the authors comment upon the first cures (1962-1966) observed in the Pediatrics Clinic of the Sapienza University of Rome.

  11. Phase 1 trial of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with enocitabine and daunorubicin for elderly patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia: Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group (JALSG)-GML208 study.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshikazu; Wakita, Atsushi; Takada, Satoru; Mihara, Masahiro; Gotoh, Moritaka; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Ohtake, Shigeki; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Naoe, Tomoki

    2012-10-01

    We conducted a phase 1 study of a combination of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) plus conventional chemotherapy in elderly patients (≥ 65 years old) with relapsed or refractory CD33-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients received a standard dose of enocitabine (200 mg/m² × 8 days) and daunorubicin (30 mg/m² × days 1-3) plus an escalating dose of GO (1.5-5 mg/m² on day 4). The dose escalation of GO was done according to a standard 3 + 3 design following a modified Fibonacci sequence. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in three patients (median age, 71) at level 1 (1.5 mg/m²) or in three patients (median age, 73) at level 2 (3 mg/m²). Neither veno-occlusive diseases nor sinusoidal obstructive syndromes were noted at either level. However, as GO was withdrawn from the US market in June 2010, based on a randomized study in newly diagnosed AML, we decided not to proceed to the level 3 (5 mg/m²) in order to avoid possibly more severe adverse effects, and also because all six patients experienced grade 4 myelosuppression, with complete remission in three. This study showed that 3 mg/m² of GO in combination with enocitabine and daunorubicin may be a recommendable dose for a phase 2 study in Japanese elderly patients with CD33-positive AML. The study was registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Clinical Trials Registry ( http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ ) as UMIN000002603.

  12. Chemotherapy Pharmacodynamics and Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Outcomes in Long-Term Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Liu, Wei; Fellah, Slim; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Kimberg, Cara; Ogg, Robert; Srivastava, Deokumar; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine associations among methotrexate pharmacodynamics, neuroimaging, and neurocognitive outcomes in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on a contemporary chemotherapy-only protocol. Patients and Methods This longitudinal study linked pharmacokinetic assays collected during therapy to neurocognitive and brain imaging outcomes during long-term follow-up. A total of 218 (72.2%) of 302 eligible long-term survivors were recruited for outcome studies when they were more than 5 years post-diagnosis and older than 8 years of age. At long-term follow-up, survivors were an average of 13.8 years old and 7.7 years from diagnosis, and 51% were male. Neurocognitive testing, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during an executive function task, and structural MRI with diffusion tensor imaging were conducted. Generalized linear models were developed to identify predictors, and models were adjusted for age at diagnosis, sex, and parent education. Results Intelligence was within normal limits (mean, 98; standard deviation, 14) compared with population expectations (mean, 100; standard deviation, 15), though measures of executive function, processing speed, and memory were less than population means (all P < .02 after correction for false discovery rates). Higher plasma concentration of methotrexate was associated with a poorer executive function score (P < .02). Higher plasma methotrexate was also associated with higher functional MRI activity, with thicker cortices in dorsolateral prefrontal brain regions, and with white matter microstructure in the frontostriatal tact. Neurocognitive impairment was associated with these imaging findings as well. Associations did not change after adjustment for age or dose of leucovorin rescue. Conclusion Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on contemporary chemotherapy-only protocols demonstrate executive dysfunction. A higher plasma concentration of methotrexate was

  13. Risk of leukemia in relation to exposure to ambient air toxics in pregnancy and early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E; Park, Andrew S; Qiu, Jiaheng; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    There are few established causes of leukemia, the most common type of cancer in children. Studies in adults suggest a role for specific environmental agents, but little is known about any effect from exposures in pregnancy to toxics in ambient air. In our case-control study, we ascertained 69 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 46 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from California Cancer Registry records of children < age 6, and 19,209 controls from California birth records within 2km (1.3 miles) (ALL) and 6km (3.8 miles) (AML) of an air toxics monitoring station between 1990–2007. Information on air toxics exposures was taken from community air monitors. We used logistic regression to estimate the risk of leukemia associated with one interquartile range increase in air toxic exposure. Risk of ALL was elevated with 3rd trimester exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR=1.16, 95%CI 1.04, 1.29), arsenic (OR=1.33, 95%CI 1.02, 1.73), benzene (OR=1.50, 95%CI 1.08, 2.09), and three other toxics related to fuel combustion. Risk of AML was increased with 3rd trimester exposure to chloroform (OR=1.30, 95%CI 1.00, 1.69), benzene (1.75, 95%CI 1.04, 2.93), and two other traffic-related toxics. During the child’s first year, exposure to butadiene, ortho-xylene, and toluene increased risk for AML and exposure to selenium increased risk for ALL. Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults; this study supports that ambient exposures to this and other chemicals in pregnancy and early life may also increase leukemia risk in children. PMID:24472648

  14. Childhood lymphoblastic leukemia adverse drug reactions: study of risk factors and therapy prognosis by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyubin, A.; Lavrova, A.; Babak, S.; Malaschenko, V.; Borisova, A.; Opryshko, N.

    2016-10-01

    The treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can result in the side-effects such as kidney affection, hepatic failure and tissue hypoxia. We study dynamics of special biochemical marker of these pathologies - adenosine triphosphate, that is well-known substance of energy metabolism. We use methods of confocal microscopy for determining the cellular and mitochondrial concentration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Quantitative values of adenosine triphosphate were calculated for each patient and correlation with degree of side-effects had been done. The application of confocal microscopy for studying of side-effects and therapy of lymphoblastic leukemia is discussed.

  15. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic strokes complicating early therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Priest, J R; Ramsay, N K; Latchaw, R E; Lockman, L A; Hasegawa, D K; Coates, T D; Coccia, P F; Edson, J R; Nesbit, M E; Krivit, W

    1980-10-01

    Sudden cerebrovascular insults occurred during or immediately following remission induction therapy in 4 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In 3, cerebral infarction was due to thrombosis. In the fourth, an intracerebral hematoma developed representing either frank hemorrhaging or a hemorrhagic infarction. None of the patients had central nervous system leukemia or extreme leukocytosis at the time of diagnosis. Symptoms were obtundation, hemiparesis, seizures, and headache. The induction chemotherapy included L-asparaginase which causes deficiencies of antithrombin, plasminogen, fibrinogen, and factors IX and XI. These hemostatic abnormalities may explain the thromboses and bleeding observed in these children.

  16. Long-term results of the Japanese Childhood Cancer and Leukemia Study Group studies 811, 841, 874 and 911 on childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tsurusawa, M; Shimomura, Y; Asami, K; Kikuta, A; Watanabe, A; Horikoshi, Y; Matsushita, T; Kanegane, H; Ohta, S; Iwai, A; Mugishima, H; Koizumi, S

    2010-02-01

    We analyzed the long-term outcomes of 1021 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), enrolled in four successive clinical trials (ALL811, ALL841, ALL874 and ALL911) between 1981 and 1993. All patients received risk-adopted therapy according to leukocyte count and age at the time of diagnosis. The median follow-up durations of the four studies were 17.8 years in ALL811, 15.5 years in ALL841, 11.9 years in ALL874 and 15.8 years in ALL911. Patients' event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates at 12 years were 41.0 and 54.3% in ALL811, 50.2 and 60.2% in ALL841, 57.3 and 64.7% in ALL874, and 63.4 and 71.7% in ALL911, respectively. Thus, cure can become a reality for about 70% of children with ALL. There is, however, still a significant difference in survival outcomes according to risk group. Late effects were observed in 70 patients out of 834 (8.4%); hepatitis and short stature were most commonly reported. Reduction of late adverse effects for all patients and development of new treatment strategies for very-high-risk patients are major issues for upcoming trials to address.

  17. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  18. Long-term outcomes of myeloablation and autologous transplantation of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia in second remission: a British Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry study.

    PubMed

    Chantry, Andrew D; Snowden, John A; Craddock, Charles; Peggs, Karl; Roddie, Claire; Craig, Jenny I O; Orchard, Kim; Towlson, Keiren E; Pearce, Rachel M; Marks, David I

    2006-12-01

    Relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults has a poor prognosis if treated with chemotherapy alone. Case series have previously supported the role of myeloablation and autologous transplantation as a potentially curative treatment. This study aimed to use the large numbers and extended follow-up data in the British Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BSBMT) registry database to establish long-term outcomes and relate these to biological and procedural factors. The BSBMT registry database was used to retrospectively identify 152 adult patients (age, 16-69 years) with AML in second remission treated with autologous transplantation in 1982-2003. Cytogenetic data were available for 68% of the patients; of these, at diagnosis, 42% had good risk features, 57% had standard risk features, and 1% had poor risk features. Conditioning regimens varied; autologous rescue was provided with bone marrow (BM) (71%), peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) (18%), or both (11%), which were harvested during first complete remission (CR1) and/or second CR (CR2). Median follow-up was 84 months (range, 2-200 months). At 10 years, actuarial overall survival (OS) was 32%, progression-free survival (PFS) was 28%, and relapse rate (RR) was 57%. The 100-day nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was 7%, rising to 11% at 1 year and to 14% at 10 years. OS was significantly related to M3 subtype (5-year OS, 66%; P = .005), patient age at diagnosis (P = .005) and transplantation (P = .026), and length of CR1, with greatest significance if the patient was dichotomized at CR1 duration of < 8 months or > or = 8 months (P = .0001). There was no difference in OS between regimens containing total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy alone (P = .7). In relation to the nature of autologous graft material, there was improved OS (P = .025) and PFS (P = .009) with the use of cells harvested entirely in CR1 compared with cells harvested in CR2 or in both CR1 and CR2. Engraftment times were significantly

  19. Efficacy and Toxicity of Intrathecal Liposomal Cytarabine in First-line Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Levinsen, Mette; Harila-Saari, Arja; Grell, Kathrine; Jonsson, Olafur Gisli; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Vettenranta, Kim; Åsberg, Ann; Risteli, Juha; Heldrup, Jesper; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-11-01

    We investigated efficacy and toxicity of replacing conventional triple (cytarabine, methotrexate, and hydrocortisone) intrathecal therapy (TIT) with liposomal cytarabine during maintenance therapy among 40 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Twenty-eight of 29 patients in the TIT arm received TIT and 9/11 in the liposomal cytarabine arm received liposomal cytarabine. Arachnoiditis occurred in all initial 5 patients given liposomal cytarabine and intrathecal prednisolone succinate. Subsequently liposomal cytarabine was given with systemic dexamethasone. Neurotoxicity occurred at 6/27 liposomal cytarabine administrations with concomitant dexamethasone (22%). More liposomal cytarabine-treated patients experienced neurotoxicity in relation to intrathecal therapy during at least 1 cycle compared with TIT-treated patients (6/9 [67%] vs. 3/28 [11%], P=0.002). Apart from intermittent lower extremity sensory pain in 1 liposomal cytarabine-treated patient, no permanent adverse neurological sequelae were observed. In intention-to-treat analysis, projected 5-year event-free survival (pEFS-5y) was borderline higher for patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm compared with the TIT arm (1.0 vs. 0.69, P=0.046). However, pEFS-5y and projected 5-year relapse-free survival did not differ signficantly between patients treated with liposomal cytarabine or TIT (1.0 vs. 0.73, P=0.10; 1.0 vs. 0.76, P=0.12). Larger prospective trials are needed to explore whether liposomal cytarabine should be used as first-line prevention of relapse.

  20. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-31

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Hyperglycemia during induction therapy is associated with increased infectious complications in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are at high risk for developing hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemic adult ALL patients have shorter remissions, more infections, and increased mortality. No corresponding data are available in children. We hypothesized that children with ALL who become hypergl...

  2. Educational Implications of the Subtle Late Effects of Childhood Leukemia Medical Treatment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavach, John F.; Hart, Juliet E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a four-year longitudinal case study of a nine-year-old student when he was diagnosed with leukemia. Cognitive, neuropsychological, and affective functioning both pre and post chemotherapy treatment were assessed. Full neuropsychological evaluation revealed difficulties with processing speed, concentration, and organization…

  3. The CPI Subscales as Predictors of Parental Coping with Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupst, Mary Jo; Schulman, Jerome L.

    1981-01-01

    Determined the role of the California Psychological Inventory (CPI) in prediction of parental coping with leukemia. None of the standard CPI subscales was a significant predictor of coping. Coping with the specific situation may be a better predictor of later coping with a similar situation than more global assessments. (Author)

  4. Emotional Aspects of Childhood Cancer and Leukemia: A Handbook for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinetta, John J.; And Others

    Written for parents of children with cancer and leukemia, the booklet considers the psychosocial aspect of the conditions as well as the effects on the family and child. Part I reviews emotions experienced by parents at the time of the initial diagnosis and through the course of the illness. Marriage strain, support sources, and relatives are…

  5. School: The Normalizing Factor for Children with Childhood Leukemia. Perspectives of Young Survivors and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Nanci A.; Fulmer, Deborah L.; Zigmond, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    A study of 8 children (ages 5-7) with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia found returning to school was a major milestone and that school serves as the mechanism by which young survivors approach the process of living each day. Attendance obstacles are discussed, along with guidelines for maintaining school as a priority. (Contains references.) (CR)

  6. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Long-term Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated on Contemporary Treatment Protocols: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Krull, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    The intensified administration of chemotherapeutic drugs has gradually replaced cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While CRT is often implicated in neurocognitive impairment in ALL survivors, there is a paucity of literature that evaluates the persistence of neurocognitive deficits in long-term survivors of pediatric ALL who were treated with contemporary chemotherapy-only protocols. Results from this systematic review concurred to the probable cognitive-sparing effect of chemotherapy-based protocols over CRT in long-term survivors. However, coupled with multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors, survivors who received chemotherapy treatment still suffered from apparent cognitive impairment, particularly in the attention and executive function domains. Notably, there is evidence to suggest that the late neurotoxic effect of methotrexate on survivors’ neurocognitive performance may be dose-related. This review also recommends future pharmacokinetic, neuroimaging and genetic studies to illuminate the multifactorial nature of this subject matter and discusses the potential value of neurochemical, physiological, inflammatory and genetic markers for the prediction of susceptibility to neurocognitive impairment in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. PMID:25857254

  7. Breastfeeding and nutrition to 2 years of age and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Greenop, Kathryn R; Bailey, Helen D; Miller, Margaret; Scott, Rodney J; Attia, John; Ashton, Lesley J; Downie, Peter; Armstrong, Bruce K; Milne, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and childhood brain tumors (CBT) are 2 of the most common forms of childhood cancer, but little is known of their etiology. In 2 nationwide case-control studies we investigated whether breastfeeding, age of food introduction, or early diet are associated with the risk of these cancers. Cases aged 0-14 years were identified from Australian pediatric oncology units between 2003 and 2007 (ALL) and 2005 and 2010 (CBT) and population-based controls through nationwide random-digit dialing. Mothers completed questionnaires giving details of infant feeding up to the age of 2 yr. Data from 322 ALL cases, 679 ALL controls, 299 CBT cases, and 733 CBT controls were analysed using unconditional logistic regression. Breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of ALL [odds ratio (OR) = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32, 0.84), regardless of duration. Introduction of artificial formula within 14 days of birth was positively associated with ALL (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.37), as was exclusive formula feeding to 6 mo (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.05). No associations were seen between breastfeeding or formula use and risk of CBT. Our results suggest that breastfeeding and delayed introduction of artificial formula may reduce the risk of ALL but not CBT.

  8. A childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome-wide association study identifies novel sex-specific risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep K.; Lupo, Philip J.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Saxena, Anshul; Kennedy, Amy E.; Ibrahimou, Boubakari; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; Mills, Ken I.; McCauley, Jacob L.; Okcu, Mehmet Fatih; Dorak, Mehmet Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs more frequently in males. Reasons behind sex differences in childhood ALL risk are unknown. In the present genome-wide association study (GWAS), we explored the genetic basis of sex differences by comparing genotype frequencies between male and female cases in a case-only study to assess effect-modification by sex. The case-only design included 236 incident cases of childhood ALL consecutively recruited at the Texas Children's Cancer Center in Houston, Texas from 2007 to 2012. All cases were non-Hispanic whites, aged 1 to 10 years, and diagnosed with confirmed B-cell precursor ALL. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina HumanCoreExome BeadChip on the Illumina Infinium platform. Besides the top 100 statistically most significant results, results were also analyzed by the top 100 highest effect size with a nominal statistical significance (P <0.05). The statistically most significant sex-specific association (P = 4 × 10−6) was with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4813720 (RASSF2), an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for RASSF2 in peripheral blood. rs4813720 is also a strong methylation QTL (meQTL) for a CpG site (cg22485289) within RASSF2 in pregnancy, at birth, childhood, and adolescence. cg22485289 is one of the hypomethylated CpG sites in ALL compared with pre-B cells. Two missense SNPs, rs12722042 and 12722039, in the HLA-DQA1 gene yielded the highest effect sizes (odds ratio [OR] ∼ 14; P <0.01) for sex-specific results. The HLA-DQA1 SNPs belong to DQA1∗01 and confirmed the previously reported male-specific association with DQA1∗01. This finding supports the proposed infection-related etiology in childhood ALL risk for males. Further analyses revealed that most SNPs (either direct effect or through linkage disequilibrium) were within active enhancers or active promoter regions and had regulatory effects on gene expression levels. Cumulative data suggested that

  9. A childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome-wide association study identifies novel sex-specific risk variants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sandeep K; Lupo, Philip J; Scheurer, Michael E; Saxena, Anshul; Kennedy, Amy E; Ibrahimou, Boubakari; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; Mills, Ken I; McCauley, Jacob L; Okcu, Mehmet Fatih; Dorak, Mehmet Tevfik

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs more frequently in males. Reasons behind sex differences in childhood ALL risk are unknown. In the present genome-wide association study (GWAS), we explored the genetic basis of sex differences by comparing genotype frequencies between male and female cases in a case-only study to assess effect-modification by sex.The case-only design included 236 incident cases of childhood ALL consecutively recruited at the Texas Children's Cancer Center in Houston, Texas from 2007 to 2012. All cases were non-Hispanic whites, aged 1 to 10 years, and diagnosed with confirmed B-cell precursor ALL. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina HumanCoreExome BeadChip on the Illumina Infinium platform. Besides the top 100 statistically most significant results, results were also analyzed by the top 100 highest effect size with a nominal statistical significance (P <0.05).The statistically most significant sex-specific association (P = 4 × 10) was with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4813720 (RASSF2), an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) for RASSF2 in peripheral blood. rs4813720 is also a strong methylation QTL (meQTL) for a CpG site (cg22485289) within RASSF2 in pregnancy, at birth, childhood, and adolescence. cg22485289 is one of the hypomethylated CpG sites in ALL compared with pre-B cells. Two missense SNPs, rs12722042 and 12722039, in the HLA-DQA1 gene yielded the highest effect sizes (odds ratio [OR] ∼ 14; P <0.01) for sex-specific results. The HLA-DQA1 SNPs belong to DQA1*01 and confirmed the previously reported male-specific association with DQA1*01. This finding supports the proposed infection-related etiology in childhood ALL risk for males. Further analyses revealed that most SNPs (either direct effect or through linkage disequilibrium) were within active enhancers or active promoter regions and had regulatory effects on gene expression levels.Cumulative data suggested that RASSF2 rs4813720

  10. Childhood Cancer Genomics (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genomics of childhood cancer. The summary describes the molecular subtypes for specific pediatric cancers and their associated clinical characteristics, the recurring genomic alterations that characterize each subtype at diagnosis or relapse, and the therapeutic and prognostic significance of the genomic alterations. The genomic alterations associated with brain tumors, kidney tumors, leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and other cancers are discussed.

  11. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. Isolated extramedullary cutaneous relapse despite concomitant severe graft-vs.-host disease and tissue chimerism analysis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, Bulent; Bekoz, Huseyin Saffet; Ogret, Yeliz Duvarci; Cakir, Asli; Kivanc, Demet; Oguz, Fatma Savran; Sargin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The curative potential of allo-HSCT for ALL is, in part, due to the graft-vs.-leukemia (GVL) effect, in addition to the intensive conditioning chemo-radiotherapy. However, relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure following allo-HSCT for ALL. In the allo-HSCT setting, testing for genetic markers of hematopoietic chimerism has become a part of the routine diagnostic program. Routine chimerism analysis is usually performed in peripheral blood or bone marrow; in fact, little is known about the value of tissue chimerism in patients with extramedullary relapse (EMR) after the allo-HSCT setting. The present study reports on, a case of a patient with ALL who experienced isolated cutaneous EMR despite ongoing graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD), and the results of peripheral blood and skin tissue chimerism studies using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of short tandem repeats (STR-PCR). The present case demonstrates that, although complete remission and/or chimerism may be achieved in the bone marrow, chimerism achieved at the tissue level, and the subsequent GVL effect, may be limited, despite concomitant severe GVHD following allo-HSCT. Our tissue chimerism analysis results provide a good example of how skin tissue may be a ‘sanctuary’ site for effector cells of GVL, despite active GVHD and complete hematopoetic chimerism. PMID:28105353

  13. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. 3-AP and Fludarabine in Treating Patients With Myeloproliferative Disorders, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Accelerated Phase or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-16

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Primary Myelofibrosis; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  16. Cytoreductive treatment with clofarabine/ara-C combined with reduced-intensity conditioning and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk, relapsed, or refractory acute myeloid leukemia and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Stefanie; Dammann, Elke; Stadler, Michael; Krauter, Juergen; Beutel, Gernot; Trummer, Arne; Eder, Matthias; Ganser, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    The combination of cytoreductive chemotherapy with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) is a highly effective antileukemic therapy. Purpose of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the antileukemic efficacy and toxicity of clofarabine-based chemotherapy followed by RIC and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) for high-risk, relapsed, or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). From May 2007 until October 2009, a total of 27 patients underwent allogeneic SCT after treatment with clofarabine and ara-C for 5d and RIC (4Gy TBI/cyclophosphamide/ATG). Prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) consisted of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Unmanipulated G-CSF mobilized PBSC (n=26) or bone marrow cells (n=1) were transplanted from unrelated (n=21) or matched related (n=6) donors. Non-hematological toxicities of this regimen mainly affected liver and skin and were all reversible. Seven patients relapsed within a median time of 5.7 months. The overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival rates were 56% and 52% at 2 yr, respectively. In this cohort of patients, cytoreduction with clofarabine/ara-C (ClAraC) followed by RIC allogeneic SCT was well tolerated and showed good antileukemic efficacy even in patients with high-risk AML or MDS, with engraftment and GvHD-incidence comparable to other RIC regimens.

  17. Symptomatic osteonecrosis in childhood leukemia survivors: prevalence, risk factors and impact on quality of life in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Girard, Pauline; Auquier, Pascal; Barlogis, Vincent; Contet, Audrey; Poiree, Maryline; Demeocq, François; Berbis, Julie; Herrmann, Iris; Villes, Virginie; Sirvent, Nicolas; Kanold, Justyna; Chastagner, Pascal; Chambost, Hervé; Plantaz, Dominique; Michel, Gérard

    2013-07-01

    Corticosteroid can induce osteonecrosis in children with leukemia. Few studies have been designed to assess the influence of a wide range of cumulative steroid dose on this side effect. Prevalence, risk factors of symptomatic osteonecrosis and its impact on adults' Quality of Life were assessed in 943 patients enrolled in the French "Leucémies de l'Enfant et de l'Adolescent" (LEA) cohort of childhood leukemia survivors. During each medical visit, data on previous osteonecrosis diagnosis were retrospectively collected. Patients without a history but with suggestive symptoms were investigated with magnetic resonance imaging. The total steroid dose in equivalent of prednisone was calculated for each patient and its effect on osteonecrosis occurrence was studied in multivariate models. Cumulative incidence was 1.4% after chemotherapy alone versus 6.8% after transplantation (P<0.001). A higher cumulative steroid dose, age over ten years at diagnosis, and treatment with transplantation significantly increased the risk of osteonecrosis. A higher post-transplant steroid dose and age over ten years at time of transplantation were significant factors in the transplanted group. With patients grouped according to steroid dose quartile, cumulative incidence of osteonecrosis reached 3.8% in the chemotherapy group for a dose beyond 5835 mg/m(2) and 23.8% after transplantation for a post-transplant dose higher than 2055 mg/m(2). Mean physical composite score of Quality of Life was 44.3 in patients with osteonecrosis versus 54.8% in patients without (P<0.001). We conclude that total and post-transplant cumulative steroid dose may predict the risk of osteonecrosis, a rare late effect with a strong negative impact on physical domains of Quality of Life.

  18. Candidate gene association studies and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Houlston, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of candidate gene association studies to the understanding of genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies (January 1996–July 2009). Studies had to meet the following criteria: be case-control design, be studied by two or more studies, not be focused on HLA antigen genetic markers and be published in English. We identified 47 studies of polymorphic variation in 16 genes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. To clarify the impact of individual polymorphisms on risk, pooled analyses were performed. Of the 25 polymorphic variants studied, significant associations (P<0.05) were seen in pooled analyses for eight variants: GSTM1 (OR =1.16; 95%CI: 1.04–1.30), MTRR A66G (OR=0.73, 95%CI:0.59–0.91), SHMT1 C1420T (OR=0.79, 95%CI: 0.65–0.98), RFC1 G80A (OR=1.37, 95%CI: 1.11–1.69), CYP1A1*2A (OR=1.36, 95%CI:1.11–1.66), CYP2E1*5B (OR=1.99, 95%CI:1.32–3.00) NQO1 C609T (OR=1.24, 95%CI:1.02–1.50) and XRCC1 G28152A (OR=1.78, 95%CI:1.32–2.42). These findings should, however, be interpreted with caution as the estimated false-positive report probabilities (FPRP) for each association were not noteworthy (i.e. FPRP>0.2). While candidate gene analyses are complementary to genome-wide association studies, future analyses should be based on sample sizes commensurate with the detection of small effects and attention needs to be paid to study design. PMID:20511665

  19. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients With Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma

  20. Gonadal function after 12-Gy testicular irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, L.A.; Craft, A.W.; Kernahan, J.; Evans, R.G.; Aynsley-Green, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Gonadal function was assessed in 15 boys with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who had received testicular irradiation. The dose to the testes was 12 Gy in 12, 15 Gy in 1, and 24 Gy in 2 cases. All of those who had received 12 or 15 Gy had normal Leydig cell function, although high levels of gonadotropins suggest subclinical Leydig cell damage. The 2 who had 24 Gy had Leydig cell failure. All who were old enough to produce a semen specimen were azoospermic.

  1. Prevalence of gene rearrangements in Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population study-report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Rangel-López, Angélica; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010-2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  2. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  3. Early lymphocyte recovery at 28 d post-transplant is predictive of reduced risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia transplanted with peripheral blood stem cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Messner, Hans A; Loach, David; Uhm, Jieun; Gupta, Vikas; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Seftel, Matthew D; Kuruvilla, John; Kim, Dennis D

    2014-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is potentially curative for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Impact of lymphocyte recovery on post-transplant outcomes has been suggested but reports are conflicting. We evaluated the impact of lymphocyte recovery at 28 d post-HCT in 191 AML patients using peripheral blood stem cells as graft. Patients were divided into those with absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) ≥ 0.5 × 10(9) /L (n = 111, 58%; high ALC group) and those with ALC < 0.5 × 10(9) /L (n = 80, 42%; low ALC group), at day 28 post-transplant. With a median follow-up of 49 months, overall survival (OS) was significantly improved in the high ALC group (59% at 3 yr) vs. patients with low ALC (40% at 3 yr, P = 0.03). Cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) was significantly lower in the high ALC group (16% at 3 yr) vs. low ALC group (36% at 3 yr, P = 0.001). Multivariable analysis for CIR demonstrated high ALC group as an independent factor decreasing relapse risk (P = 0.03, HR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.26-0.92). Multivariable analysis for OS and non-relapse mortality did not demonstrate ALC ≥ 0.5 × 10(9) /L at 28 d post-transplant to be predictive. We conclude that lymphocyte recovery with ALC ≥ 0.5 × 10(9) /L at day 28 post-transplant is associated with less relapse in AML patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood HCT, but without survival benefit.

  4. Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with azacitidine and donor lymphocyte infusions--a retrospective multicenter analysis from the German Cooperative Transplant Study Group.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Thomas; Rachlis, Elena; Bug, Gesine; Stelljes, Matthias; Klein, Stefan; Steckel, Nina Kristin; Wolf, Dominik; Ringhoffer, Mark; Czibere, Akos; Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Dienst, Ariane; Kondakci, Mustafa; Stadler, Michael; Platzbecker, Uwe; Uharek, Lutz; Luft, Thomas; Fenk, Roland; Germing, Ulrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Kröger, Nicolaus; Beelen, Dietrich W; Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido

    2015-04-01

    To expand the current knowledge about azacitidine (Aza) and donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) as salvage therapy for relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and to identify predictors for response and survival, we retrospectively analyzed data of 154 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 124), myelodysplastic (MDS, n = 28), or myeloproliferative syndrome (n = 2). All patients received a median number of 4 courses of Aza (range, 4 to 14) and DLI were administered to 105 patients (68%; median number of DLI, 2; range, 1 to 7). Complete and partial remission rates were 27% and 6%, respectively, resulting in an overall response rate of 33%. Multivariate analysis identified molecular-only relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 9.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 to 43.5; P = .004) and diagnosis of MDS (HR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.4 to 12.2; P = .011) as predictors for complete remission. Overall survival (OS) at 2 years was 29% ± 4%. Molecular-only relapse (HR, .14; 95% CI, .03 to .59; P = .007), diagnosis of MDS (HR, .33; 95% CI, .16 to .67; P = .002), and bone marrow blasts <13% (HR, .54; 95% CI, .32 to .91; P = .021) were associated with better OS. Accordingly, 2-year OS rate was higher in MDS patients (66% ± 10%, P = .001) and correlated with disease burden in patients with AML. In summary, Aza and DLI is an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for patients with relapse after allo-HSCT, in particular those with MDS or AML and low disease burden. The latter finding emphasizes the importance of stringent disease monitoring and early intervention.

  5. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting from articles published inreputable journals from1994 to date and experiments newly performed by our group, a comprehensive review is written about ABCA2 and its role in MDR regarding childhood ALL. ABCA2 transports drugs from the cytoplasm into the lysosomal compartment, where they may become degraded and exported from the cell. The aforementioned mechanism may contribute to MDR. It has been reported that ABCA2 may induce resistance to mitoxantrone, estrogen derivatives and estramustine. It is resistant to the aforementioned compounds. Furthermore, the overexpression ofABCA2 in methotrexate, vinblastine and/or doxorubicin treated Jurkat cells are observed in several publications. The recent study of our group showsthatthe overexpression ofABCA2 gene in children with ALL increases the risk of MDR by 15 times. ABCA2 is the second identified member of the ABCA; ABC transporters' subfamily. ABCA2 gene expression profile is suggested to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in ALL treatment. Better understanding of the MDR mechanisms and the factors involved may improve the therapeutic outcome of ALL by modifying the treatment protocols.

  6. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting from articles published inreputable journals from1994 to date and experiments newly performed by our group, a comprehensive review is written about ABCA2 and its role in MDR regarding childhood ALL. ABCA2 transports drugs from the cytoplasm into the lysosomal compartment, where they may become degraded and exported from the cell. The aforementioned mechanism may contribute to MDR. It has been reported that ABCA2 may induce resistance to mitoxantrone, estrogen derivatives and estramustine. It is resistant to the aforementioned compounds. Furthermore, the overexpression ofABCA2 in methotrexate, vinblastine and/or doxorubicin treated Jurkat cells are observed in several publications. The recent study of our group showsthatthe overexpression ofABCA2 gene in children with ALL increases the risk of MDR by 15 times. ABCA2 is the second identified member of the ABCA; ABC transporters' subfamily. ABCA2 gene expression profile is suggested to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in ALL treatment. Better understanding of the MDR mechanisms and the factors involved may improve the therapeutic outcome of ALL by modifying the treatment protocols. PMID:25254091

  7. Longitudinal Assessment of Neurocognitive Outcomes in Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated on a Contemporary Chemotherapy Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Kevin R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Reddick, Wilburn E.; Conklin, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with CNS-directed chemotherapy are at risk for neurocognitive deficits. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the neurodevelopmental trajectory in this vulnerable population. Methods Patients enrolled in the St. Jude Total Therapy Study XV, which omitted prophylactic cranial radiation therapy in all patients, completed comprehensive neuropsychological assessments at induction (n = 142), end of maintenance (n = 243), and 2 years after completion of therapy (n = 211). We report on longitudinal change in neurocognitive function and predictors of neurocognitive outcomes 2 years after completing therapy. Results Neurocognitive function was largely age appropriate 2 years after completing therapy; however, the overall group demonstrated significant attention deficits and a significantly greater frequency of learning problems as compared with national normative data (all P ≤ .005). Higher-intensity CNS-directed chemotherapy conferred elevated risk for difficulties in attention, processing speed, and academics (all P ≤ .01). The rate and direction of change in performance and caregiver-reported attention difficulties differed significantly by age at diagnosis and sex. End-of-therapy attention problems predicted lower academic scores 2 years later, with small to moderate effect sizes (│r│= 0.17 to 0.25, all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Two years after chemotherapy-only treatment, neurocognitive function is largely age appropriate. Nonetheless, survivors remain at elevated risk for attention problems that impact real-world functioning. Attention problems at the end of therapy predicted decreased academics 2 years later, suggesting an amplified functional impact of discrete neurocognitive difficulties. Age at diagnosis and patient sex may alter neurocognitive development in survivors of childhood ALL treated with chemotherapy-only protocols. PMID:26858334

  8. Insulin Resistance and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Victor, Ronald G.; Church, Timothy S.; Snell, Peter G.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Eshelman-Kent, Debra A.; Ross, Robert; Janiszewski, Peter M.; Turoff, Alicia J.; Brooks, Sandra; Vega, Gloria Lena

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of insulin resistance and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional evaluation of 118 survivors of childhood ALL (median age, 23.0 years; range, 18 to 37 years), insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostasis model for assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Sex-specific comparisons were made with a cohort of 30- to 37-year-old individuals from the same region participating in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS, N = 782). ALL survivors were stratified by treatment with and without cranial radiotherapy (CRT). Results Female ALL survivors had a significantly higher HOMA-IR (CRT, mean 4.6, 95% CI, 3.6 to 5.7; no CRT, mean 3.3, 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.8) in comparison with DHS women (mean 2.4, 95% CI, 2.2 to 2.7). Eighty percent of women treated with CRT had at least three of six CVD risk factors, and they were significantly more likely to have three or more risk factors compared with DHS women (odds ratio [OR], 5.96; 95% CI, 2.15 to 16.47). Male ALL survivors had a significantly higher HOMA-IR (CRT, mean 4.0, 95% CI, 2.8 to 5.6; no CRT, mean 3.4, 95% CI, 2.9 to 3.9) in comparison with DHS men (mean 2.3, 95% CI, 2.1 to 2.6), but were not more likely to have multiple CVD risk factors. Conclusion ALL survivors had an increased prevalence of insulin resistance in comparison with a cohort of older individuals from the same community. Importantly, women treated with CRT seem to have an increased prevalence of multiple CVD risk factors, warranting close monitoring and risk-reducing strategies. PMID:19564534

  9. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells refractory/resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors are genetically unstable and may cause relapse and malignant progression to the terminal disease state.

    PubMed

    Skorski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    BCR-ABL1 kinase-induced chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) usually responds to treatment with ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib. In most patients TKIs reduce the leukemia cell load substantially, but some leukemia cells, for example leukemia stem cells (LSCs), are intrinsically refractory to TKIs. In addition, some patients who respond initially may later become resistant to TKIs due to accumulation of point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. LSCs or their progeny, leukemia progenitor cells (LPCs), at some stage may acquire additional genetic changes that cause the leukemia to transform further to a more advanced blast phase (CML-BP), which responds poorly to treatment and is usually fatal. We postulate that LSCs and/or LPCs refractory or resistant to TKIs may be 'ticking time-bombs' accumulating additional genetic aberrations and eventually 'exploding' to generate additional TKI-resistant clones and CML-BP clones with complex karyotypes.

  10. The Genomic Landscape of Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tiffany Y.; Gelston, Laura C.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Mazor, Tali; Esquivel, Emilio; Yu, Ariel; Seepo, Sara; Olsen, Scott; Rosenberg, Mara; Archambeault, Sophie L.; Abusin, Ghada; Beckman, Kyle; Brown, Patrick A.; Briones, Michael; Carcamo, Benjamin; Cooper, Todd; Dahl, Gary V.; Emanuel, Peter D.; Fluchel, Mark N.; Goyal, Rakesh K.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hitzler, Johann; Hugge, Christopher; Liu, Y. Lucy; Messinger, Yoav H.; Mahoney, Donald H.; Monteleone, Philip; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Roehrs, Philip A.; Schore, Reuven J.; Stine, Kimo C.; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Costello, Joseph F.; Olshen, Adam B.; Stewart, Chip; Li, Yongjin; Ma, Jing; Gerbing, Robert B.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Getz, Gad; Gruber, Tanja; Golub, Todd; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Loh, Mignon L.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) of childhood with a poor prognosis. Mutations in NF1, NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11 and CBL occur in 85% of patients, yet there are currently no risk stratification algorithms capable of predicting which patients will be refractory to conventional treatment and therefore be candidates for experimental therapies. In addition, there have been few other molecular pathways identified aside from the Ras/MAPK pathway to serve as the basis for such novel therapeutic strategies. We therefore sought to genomically characterize serial samples from patients at diagnosis through relapse and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia in order to expand our knowledge of the mutational spectrum in JMML. We identified recurrent mutations in genes involved in signal transduction, gene splicing, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and transcription. Importantly, the number of somatic alterations present at diagnosis appears to be the major determinant of outcome. PMID:26457647

  11. The genomic landscape of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Elliot; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N; Chang, Tiffany Y; Gelston, Laura C; Wang, Yong-Dong; Mazor, Tali; Esquivel, Emilio; Yu, Ariel; Seepo, Sara; Olsen, Scott R; Rosenberg, Mara; Archambeault, Sophie L; Abusin, Ghada; Beckman, Kyle; Brown, Patrick A; Briones, Michael; Carcamo, Benjamin; Cooper, Todd; Dahl, Gary V; Emanuel, Peter D; Fluchel, Mark N; Goyal, Rakesh K; Hayashi, Robert J; Hitzler, Johann; Hugge, Christopher; Liu, Y Lucy; Messinger, Yoav H; Mahoney, Donald H; Monteleone, Philip; Nemecek, Eneida R; Roehrs, Philip A; Schore, Reuven J; Stine, Kimo C; Takemoto, Clifford M; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Costello, Joseph F; Olshen, Adam B; Stewart, Chip; Li, Yongjin; Ma, Jing; Gerbing, Robert B; Alonzo, Todd A; Getz, Gad; Gruber, Tanja A; Golub, Todd R; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Loh, Mignon L

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) of childhood with a poor prognosis. Mutations in NF1, NRAS, KRAS, PTPN11 or CBL occur in 85% of patients, yet there are currently no risk stratification algorithms capable of predicting which patients will be refractory to conventional treatment and could therefore be candidates for experimental therapies. In addition, few molecular pathways aside from the RAS-MAPK pathway have been identified that could serve as the basis for such novel therapeutic strategies. We therefore sought to genomically characterize serial samples from patients at diagnosis through relapse and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia to expand knowledge of the mutational spectrum in JMML. We identified recurrent mutations in genes involved in signal transduction, splicing, Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and transcription. Notably, the number of somatic alterations present at diagnosis appears to be the major determinant of outcome.

  12. Acute leukemia in children: A review of the current Indian data

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ramandeep Singh; Arora, Brijesh

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemias are the most common diagnostic group of childhood cancer. This review summarizes the published literature on reported current outcomes of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from India. Overall survival in ALL ranged from 45% to 81% (commonly >60%) and event-free survival ranged from 41% to 70% (commonly >50%). Outcome data for AML was patchy with varying duration of follow-up, but it can be inferred that 50–80% of treated patients had experienced an event (toxic death, refractory disease or relapse). It is imperative that going forward focus should be on collaborative efforts, which promote treatment of patients on risk-stratified adapted protocols based on local infrastructure, improvement in supportive care and encourage prospective multi-center clinical trials. PMID:27606304

  13. Adverse neuropsychological effects associated with cumulative doses of corticosteroids to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Pépin, A J; Cloutier-Bergeron, A; Malboeuf-Hurtubise, C; Achille, M; Krajinovic, M; Laverdière, C; Lippé, S; Marcoux, S; Sinnett, D; Sultan, S

    2016-11-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) are an essential component of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatments (cALL). Although there is evidence that daily doses of CS can have neuropsychological effects, few studies have investigated the role of cumulative doses of CS in short- and long-term neuropsychological effects in cALL. The aims of this review were to identify the measures used for documenting adverse neuropsychological effects (ANEs) of CS treatment and to study the association between cumulative doses of CS and the presence of ANEs. Twenty-two articles met the inclusion criteria. A variety of measures were used to evaluate outcomes in the domains of emotion, behaviour, neurocognition, and fatigue/sleep. The results suggest that we cannot conclude in favour of an association between the cumulative dosage of CS and ANEs. Yet, several factors including the heterogeneity of measures used to evaluate outcomes and reporting biases may limit the scope of the results. We offer several recommendations that could help improve the future published evidence on ANEs in relation to CS treatment in cALL.

  14. Early evaluation of immune reconstitution following allogeneic CD3/CD19-depleted grafts from alternative donors in childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, A; González-Vicent, M; Valentín, J; Aleo, E; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J; Vicario, J L; Ramírez, M; Díaz, M A

    2012-11-01

    Graft engineering procedures for hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) may improve the chance of success in matched unrelated donor (MUD) and haploidentical donor transplantations. Successful donor immune reconstitution is important to mediate GVL effects in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) HSCT. We prospectively investigated early immune reconstitution and clinical outcome in 30 CD3/CD19-depleted MUD (n=15) or HP (n=15) HSCTs for high-risk childhood leukemia using a fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy. The graft consisted of a mean of 10.5 × 10(6)/kg CD34+, 77 × 10(3)/kg CD3+ and 39 × 10(6)/kg CD56+ cells. After transplantation, 86% of the patients engrafted. In all, 13% of patients had >grade 3 acute GVHD. Natural killer (NK) cell, DC and T-cell recovery achieved normal values within the first 60 days after transplantation. DC recovery was dominated by the DC2(-) subset. NK-cell phenotype was altered and cytotoxicity was lower compared with their donors. EFS was 50±9% (73±11% for those in CR1 and 26±11% for those with advanced disease). Faster DC2(-) recovery was associated with better outcome, especially in the MUD setting. In summary, CD3/CD19-depleted HSCT with fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy resulted in favorable patient survival, and rapid NK, DC and T-cell recovery.

  15. Absolute lymphocyte count at the end of induction therapy is a prognostic factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hirase, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Takahashi, Hironobu; Moriwaki, Kensuke; Saito, Atsuro; Kozaki, Aiko; Ishida, Toshiaki; Yanai, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Kubokawa, Ikuko; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have reported that the absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) during induction therapy is predictive of treatment outcome in de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL); however, the significance of ALC on outcomes remains controversial. In the present study, we assessed the significance of ALC at day 29 (ALC-29), the end of induction therapy, on outcomes in our Japanese cohort. The outcomes of 141 patients aged ≤18 years with newly diagnosed ALL who were enrolled on the JACLS ALL-02 at our hospitals were analyzed in terms of ALC-29. Patients with ALC-29 ≥750/μL (n = 81) had a superior 5-year EFS (95.2 ± 2.7 vs 84.3 ± 4.8 %, P = 0.016) and OS (100 vs 87.0 ± 4.7 %, P = 0.0062). A multivariate analysis identified ALC-29 ≥750/μL as a significant predictor of improved EFS and OS after controlling for confounding factors. A multiple linear regression model revealed a significant inverse relationship between the percentage of blasts in bone marrow on day 15 and ALC-29 (P = 0.005). These results indicate that ALC is a simple prognostic factor in childhood ALL, and, thus, has the potential to refine current risk algorithms.

  16. Specific expression of novel long non-coding RNAs in high-hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Mathieu; Drouin, Simon; Caron, Maxime; St-Onge, Pascal; Ouimet, Manon; Gioia, Romain; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Vidal, Ramon; Richer, Chantal; Oualkacha, Karim; Droit, Arnaud; Sinnett, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Pre-B cell childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B cALL) is a heterogeneous disease involving many subtypes typically stratified using a combination of cytogenetic and molecular-based assays. These methods, although widely used, rely on the presence of known chromosomal translocations, which is a limiting factor. There is therefore a need for robust, sensitive, and specific molecular biomarkers unaffected by such limitations that would allow better risk stratification and consequently better clinical outcome. In this study we performed a transcriptome analysis of 56 pre-B cALL patients to identify expression signatures in different subtypes. In both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), we identified subtype-specific gene signatures distinguishing pre-B cALL subtypes, particularly in t(12;21) and hyperdiploid cases. The genes up-regulated in pre-B cALL subtypes were enriched in bivalent chromatin marks in their promoters. LncRNAs is a new and under-studied class of transcripts. The subtype-specific nature of lncRNAs suggests they may be suitable clinical biomarkers to guide risk stratification and targeted therapies in pre-B cALL patients.

  17. Specific expression of novel long non-coding RNAs in high-hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Drouin, Simon; Caron, Maxime; St-Onge, Pascal; Gioia, Romain; Richer, Chantal; Oualkacha, Karim; Droit, Arnaud; Sinnett, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Pre-B cell childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B cALL) is a heterogeneous disease involving many subtypes typically stratified using a combination of cytogenetic and molecular-based assays. These methods, although widely used, rely on the presence of known chromosomal translocations, which is a limiting factor. There is therefore a need for robust, sensitive, and specific molecular biomarkers unaffected by such limitations that would allow better risk stratification and consequently better clinical outcome. In this study we performed a transcriptome analysis of 56 pre-B cALL patients to identify expression signatures in different subtypes. In both protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), we identified subtype-specific gene signatures distinguishing pre-B cALL subtypes, particularly in t(12;21) and hyperdiploid cases. The genes up-regulated in pre-B cALL subtypes were enriched in bivalent chromatin marks in their promoters. LncRNAs is a new and under-studied class of transcripts. The subtype-specific nature of lncRNAs suggests they may be suitable clinical biomarkers to guide risk stratification and targeted therapies in pre-B cALL patients. PMID:28346506

  18. Health status of childhood leukemia survivors who received hematopoietic cell transplantation after BU or TBI: an LEA study.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Auquier, P; Herrmann, I; Contet, A; Poiree, M; Demeocq, F; Plantaz, D; Galambrun, C; Barlogis, V; Berbis, J; Garnier, F; Sirvent, N; Kanold, J; Chastagner, P; Chambost, H; Michel, G

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this multicenter study was to compare the long-term impact of a preparative regimen with either BUBU or TBI on health status and quality of life (QoL) in childhood acute leukemia survivors treated with hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). Two-hundred and forty patients were included. Sixty-six had received BU, while 174 had received TBI. Median follow-up from HSCT was 10.1 years. Multivariate analyses were performed to assess the occurrence of late effects according to treatment. QoL was assessed in 130 adults using SF-36 questionnaires. Patients developed fewer late complications after BU (2.35 vs 3.01, P=0.03) while the risk to present with at least one complication was equivalent in both groups (87.9% after BU and 93.1% after TBI, P=0.66). Detailed multivariate analyses revealed a lower risk of height growth failure (OR=0.2), cataract (OR=0.1) and iron overload (OR=0.2) after BU, and an increased risk of overweight (OR=3.9) and alopecia (OR=11.2). SF-36 mental and physical composite scores were similar in both treatment groups and proved significantly lower than French norms. Late effects induced by BU might differ from those experienced after TBI. Although less frequent, they are still of considerable importance and may affect patients' QoL.

  19. The CDK inhibitor AT7519M in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma. A Phase II study of the Canadian Cancer Trials Group.

    PubMed

    Seftel, Matthew D; Kuruvilla, John; Kouroukis, Tom; Banerji, Versha; Fraser, Graeme; Crump, Michael; Kumar, Rajat; Chalchal, Haji I; Salim, Muhammad; Laister, Rob C; Crocker, Susan; Gibson, Spencer B; Toguchi, Marcia; Lyons, John F; Xu, Hao; Powers, Jean; Sederias, Joana; Seymour, Lesley; Hay, Annette E

    2017-06-01

    AT7519M is a small molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 9 with in vitro activity against lymphoid malignancies. In two concurrent Phase II trials, we evaluated AT7519M in relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) using the recommended Phase II dosing of 27 mg/m(2) twice weekly for 2 of every 3 weeks. Primary objective was objective response rate (ORR). Nineteen patients were accrued (7 CLL, 12 MCL). Four CLL patients achieved stable disease (SD). Two MCL patients achieved partial response (PR), and 6 had SD. One additional MCL patient with SD subsequently achieved PR 9 months after completion of AT7519M. Tumor lysis syndrome was not reported. In conclusion, AT7519M was safely administered to patients with relapsed/refractory CLL and MCL. In CLL, some patients had tumor reductions, but the ORR was low. In MCL, activity was noted with ORR of 27%.

  20. Safety and efficacy of different lenalidomide starting doses in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia: results of an international multicenter double-blinded randomized phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Wendtner, Clemens M; Hallek, Michael; Fraser, Graeme A M; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Hillmen, Peter; Dürig, Jan; Kalaycio, Matt; Gribben, John G; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Buhler, Andreas; Kipps, Thomas J; Purse, Brendan; Zhang, Jennie; De Bedout, Sabine; Mei, Jay; Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of different lenalidomide starting doses in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CLL patients were randomized to receive lenalidomide at initial doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/d (N = 103). Doses were escalated by 5 mg every 28-d up to a maximum of 25 mg/d; dose reductions in up to 5 mg decrements were permitted. The most common grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Ten patients died during therapy (four deaths considered as related to lenalidomide); 12 patients experienced second primary malignancies. The most common cause for treatment discontinuation was AEs. Overall response rates were similar across arms. Progression-free survival and overall survival rates were longer in patients who escalated treatment (to 15 or 20 mg/d) versus those who did not. Lower starting doses allowed subsequent dose escalation of lenalidomide while maintaining an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL.

  1. Radiation-induced World Health Organization grade II meningiomas in young patients following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood. Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Oda, Keiko; Sato, Taku; Watanabe, Tadashi; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Ito, Eiji; Matsumoto, Yuka; Ando, Hitoshi; Sakuma, Jun; Kikuta, Atsushi; Hojo, Hiroshi; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Current chemotherapeutic regimens have been used to successfully treat many children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but have resulted in an increased risk of late central nervous system tumors, most commonly meningioma, particularly in patients who have received cranial irradiation. We treated 3 young patients with World Health Organization grade II meningiomas who had previously received cranial irradiation for the treatment of childhood ALL: a cerebellopontine angle tumor in a 19-year-old woman, a petroclival tumor in a 28-year-old man, and a frontal parasagittal tumor in a 19-year-old woman. These cases were difficult to treat due to the aggressive and invasive biology of the tumors. Therefore, we recommend systematic cranial imaging and long follow-up periods for leukemia survivors to detect brain tumors before progression.

  2. Distribution of common genetic subgroups in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in four developing countries.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rubina; Nancy, Nirmala; Naing, Win P; Ali, Sarah; Dar, Lalit; Khan, Baldip K; Padua, Rose A; Carr, Robert

    2010-07-15

    An international project was conducted to identify the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-specific fusion genes (ETV6-RUNX1,MLL-AF4,TCF3-PBX1, and BCR-ABL1) in developing countries to provide additional prognostic information at diagnosis. A total of 181 children with newly diagnosed ALL were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction at laboratories in India, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Sudan, following a common protocol. To our knowledge, this report is novel in its report from these countries, except India. Across the four countries, the ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion gene was present in only 5% of cases. All the positive samples were from children aged 1 to 10 years, in whom the prevalence of this fusion gene, which is associated with good prognosis, was 7.4% (9 out of 121 samples), a much lower rate than reported from Western populations. In the 18 ALL cases tested in Sudan, a notable excess of MLL-AF4 (17%) and BCR-ABL1 (22%) fusion genes was found. This study highlights the need for wider international surveys of the molecular epidemiology of ALL.

  3. Promoter DNA Methylation Pattern Identifies Prognostic Subgroups in Childhood T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Borssén, Magnus; Palmqvist, Lars; Karrman, Kristina; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Behrendtz, Mikael; Heldrup, Jesper; Forestier, Erik; Roos, Göran; Degerman, Sofie

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) has improved, but there is a considerable fraction of patients experiencing a poor outcome. There is a need for better prognostic markers and aberrant DNA methylation is a candidate in other malignancies, but its potential prognostic significance in T-ALL is hitherto undecided. Design and Methods Genome wide promoter DNA methylation analysis was performed in pediatric T-ALL samples (n = 43) using arrays covering >27000 CpG sites. Clinical outcome was evaluated in relation to methylation status and compared with a contemporary T-ALL group not tested for methylation (n = 32). Results Based on CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), T-ALL samples were subgrouped as CIMP+ (high methylation) and CIMP− (low methylation). CIMP− T-ALL patients had significantly worse overall and event free survival (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively) compared to CIMP+ cases. CIMP status was an independent factor for survival in multivariate analysis including age, gender and white blood cell count. Analysis of differently methylated genes in the CIMP subgroups showed an overrepresentation of transcription factors, ligands and polycomb target genes. Conclusions We identified global promoter methylation profiling as being of relevance for subgrouping and prognostication of pediatric T-ALL. PMID:23762353

  4. Coping Strategies and Locus of Control in Childhood Leukemia: A Multi-Center Research

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Concetta; Fontana, Valentina; Perricone, Giovanna; D’Angelo, Paolo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Taormina, Calogero; Nichelli, Francesca; Burgio, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a very distressing experience for children and requires a special effort of adjustment. Therefore, it seems to be crucial to explore coping resources for the experienced risk condition. In this sense, the study focuses on coping strategies and locus of control in children with ALL during the treatment phase, and on their possible relation. The correlation between children and maternal coping strategies is also investigated. The participants involved were an experimental group of 40 children with ALL and their mothers, and 30 healthy children as the control group. The tools used were: the Child Behavioral Style Scale and the Monitor-Blunter Style Scale to assess the coping strategies of children and mothers; the locus of Control Scale for Children to analyze the children’s perception of controlling the events. Both children with ALL and their mothers resorted to monitoring coping strategies with a statistically significant rate of occurrence (children: M=17.8, SD=3.8; mothers: M=10.48, SD=3.4). The data concerning the locus of control show this tendency towards internal causes (M=53.1, SD=4.7). There were statistically significant correlations between monitoring coping strategies and external locus of control (r=0.400, P<0.05). The results gained from the control group are almost equivalent. The outcomes show several interesting resources of the psychological functioning of children as well as of their mothers. PMID:26266029

  5. Mechanisms of Idelalisib-Associated Diarrhea in Patients With Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Indolent Non-hodgkin Lymphoma, or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Absence of Signs or Symptoms; B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Digestive System Signs and Symptoms; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Probability estimates for the unique childhood leukemia cluster in Fallon, Nevada, and risks near other U.S. Military aviation facilities.

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Lu, Meng; Todd, Randall L; Smith, Allan H

    2004-01-01

    A unique cluster of childhood leukemia has recently occurred around the city of Fallon in Churchill County, Nevada. From 1999 to 2001, 11 cases were diagnosed in this county of 23,982 people. Exposures related to a nearby naval air station such as jet fuel or an infectious agent carried by naval aviators have been hypothesized as potential causes. The possibility that the cluster could be attributed to chance was also considered. We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) to examine the likelihood that chance could explain this cluster. We also used SEER and California Cancer Registry data to evaluate rates of childhood leukemia in other U.S. counties with military aviation facilities. The age-standardized rate ratio (RR) in Churchill County was 12.0 [95% confidence interval (CI), 6.0-21.4; p = 4.3 times symbol 10(-9)]. A cluster of this magnitude would be expected to occur in the United States by chance about once every 22,000 years. The age-standardized RR for the five cases diagnosed after the cluster was first reported was 11.2 (95% CI, 3.6-26.3). In contrast, the incidence rate was not increased in all other U.S. counties with military aviation bases (RR = 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.12) or in the subset of rural counties with military aviation bases (RR = 0.72; 95% CI, 0.48-1.08). These findings suggest that the Churchill County cluster was unlikely due to chance, but no general increase in childhood leukemia was found in other U.S. counties with military aviation bases. PMID:15121523

  7. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Development of secondary anaplastic oligoastrocytoma after matched unrelated bone marrow transplantation in a child with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Soumya; Das, Mayukh; Stagler, Dalia; Konstantini, Shlomi; Gmori, Moshe; Slavin, Shimon; Nagler, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    The growing incidences of secondary malignancies in long-term survivors of childhood leukemia following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT) are increasingly being reported. Among the late complications of conventional myeloablative alloBMT, the occurrence of secondary malignant solid tumors is of major concern. Secondary malignant and benign brain tumors such as astrocytoma, meningioma and glioblastoma have been described in long-term survivors of conventional myeloablative alloBMT. Here we report a case of secondary anaplastic oligoastrocytoma that developed 7 years after matched unrelated alloBMT for relapsing childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CNS involvement. Although isolated CNS relapse of primary leukemia following alloBMT is not uncommon, it is important to identify and define potential risk factors that may lead to the development of secondary brain tumors in children who received high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation prior to alloBMT presenting with progressive neurological symptoms and to differentiate them from leukemia relapse with CNS involvement.

  9. Integration of high-resolution methylome and transcriptome analyses to dissect epigenomic changes in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Busche, Stephan; Ge, Bing; Vidal, Ramon; Spinella, Jean-François; Saillour, Virginie; Richer, Chantal; Healy, Jasmine; Chen, Shu-Huang; Droit, Arnaud; Sinnett, Daniel; Pastinen, Tomi

    2013-07-15

    B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. Although the genetic determinants underlying disease onset remain unclear, epigenetic modifications including DNA methylation are suggested to contribute significantly to leukemogenesis. Using the Illumina 450K array, we assessed DNA methylation in matched tumor-normal samples of 46 childhood patients with pre-B ALL, extending single CpG-site resolution analysis of the pre-B ALL methylome beyond CpG-islands (CGI). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of CpG-site neighborhood, gene, or microRNA (miRNA) gene-associated methylation levels separated the tumor cohort according to major pre-B ALL subtypes, and methylation in CGIs, CGI shores, and in regions around the transcription start site was found to significantly correlate with transcript expression. Focusing on samples carrying the t(12;21) ETV6-RUNX1 fusion, we identified 119 subtype-specific high-confidence marker CpG-loci. Pathway analyses linked the CpG-loci-associated genes with hematopoiesis and cancer. Further integration with whole-transcriptome data showed the effects of methylation on expression of 17 potential drivers of leukemogenesis. Independent validation of array methylation and sequencing-derived transcript expression with Sequenom Epityper technology and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR, respectively, indicates more than 80% empirical accuracy of our genome-wide findings. In summary, genome-wide DNA methylation profiling enabled us to separate pre-B ALL according to major subtypes, to map epigenetic biomarkers specific for the t(12;21) subtype, and through a combined methylome and transcriptome approach to identify downstream effects on candidate drivers of leukemogenesis.

  10. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: clinical facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-10-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug dosing. Because of significant interindividual and intraindividual variations in drug disposition and pharmacodynamics, vigorous dose adjustments are needed to obtain a target degree of myelosuppression. As the normal white blood cell counts vary by patients' ages and ethnicity, and also within age groups, identical white blood cell levels for 2 patients may not reflect the same treatment intensity. Measurements of intracellular levels of cytotoxic metabolites of 6MP and MTX can identify nonadherent patients, but therapeutic target levels remains to be established. A rise in serum aminotransferase levels during maintenance therapy is common and often related to high levels of methylated 6MP metabolites. However, except for episodes of hypoglycemia, serious liver dysfunction is rare, the risk of permanent liver damage is low, and aminotransferase levels usually normalize within a few weeks after discontinuation of therapy. 6MP and MTX dose increments should lead to either leukopenia or a rise in aminotransferases, and if neither is experienced, poor treatment adherence should be considered. The many genetic polymorphisms that determine 6MP and MTX disposition, efficacy, and toxicity have precluded implementation of pharmacogenomics into treatment, the sole exception being dramatic 6MP dose reductions in patients who are homozygous deficient for thiopurine methyltransferase, the enzyme that methylates 6MP and several of its metabolites. In conclusion, maintenance