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Sample records for children cochlear implant

  1. Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenstab, M. Suzanne; Laughton, Joan

    1991-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in children with profound bilateral hearing loss is discussed, focusing on how a cochlear implant works; steps in a cochlear implant program (evaluation, surgery, programing, and training); and rehabilitation procedures involved in auditory development and speech development. (JDD)

  2. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Educational Challenges for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Patricia M.; Nevins, Mary Ellen

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses educational challenges for children with severe to profound hearing loss who receive cochlear implants. Despite the implants, these children face acoustic challenges, academic challenges, attention challenges, associative challenges, and adjustment challenges. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  4. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Cochlear Malformation.

    PubMed

    Saikawa, Etsuko; Takano, Kenichi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Tsubomatsu, Chieko; Takahashi, Nozomi; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) has proven to be an effective treatment for severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Inner ear malformation is a rare anomaly and occurs in approximately 20% of cases with congenital SNHL. In cases with cochlear malformation, CI can be successfully performed in nearly all patients, the exceptions being those with complete labyrinthine and cochlear aplasia. It is important to evaluate the severity of inner ear deformity and other associated anomalies during the preimplantation radiological assessment in order to identify any complication that may potentially occur during the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  5. Peer Relationships of Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bat-Chava, Yael; Deignan, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of interviews with parents of children with cochlear implants found that, although implants have the potential to improve deaf children's relationships with hearing peers, these children still face communication obstacles which impede their social relationships. Results are discussed from the viewpoints of…

  6. Auditory Learning in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Srikanta K.; Boddupally, Shiva P.; Rayapati, Deeksha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine and characterize the training-induced changes in speech-in-noise perception in children with congenital deafness who have cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Twenty-seven children with congenital deafness who have CIs were studied. Eleven children with CIs were trained on a speech-in-noise task,…

  7. Auditory Learning in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Srikanta K.; Boddupally, Shiva P.; Rayapati, Deeksha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine and characterize the training-induced changes in speech-in-noise perception in children with congenital deafness who have cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Twenty-seven children with congenital deafness who have CIs were studied. Eleven children with CIs were trained on a speech-in-noise task,…

  8. Educational Management of Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moog, Jean S.; Geers, Ann E.

    1991-01-01

    This article outlines procedures for maximizing the benefits that profoundly deaf children can achieve through cochlear implants. The history of such implants and practical aspects in their use are described. Factors in development of speech perception skills, auditory training objectives and activities, and spoken language acquisition are…

  9. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with cochlear malformations.

    PubMed

    Bille, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke; Ovesen, Therese

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was the evaluation of outcomes of cochlear implantation (CI) in children with cochlear malformations. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in a tertiary referral centre. The patients were children with inner ear malformation judged by high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging treated with uni- or bilateral CI and a follow-up period of at least 3 years. They were matched with a control group of children operated for other reasons. The patients were operated by one of two surgeons using similar techniques including a standard perimodiolar electrode in all cases. The intervention was therapeutic and rehabilitative. The main outcome measures were category of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). Eighteen children were diagnosed with cochlear malformations (12 % of children receiving CI). No statistical differences regarding CAP and SIR scores were found between the two groups. Only one child was diagnosed with a common cavity and performed below average. Children with auditory neuropathy performed beyond average. Children with cochlear malformations performed equally to children without malformation in the long term. Standard perimodiolar electrodes can be used despite cochlear malformations. The most important factors determining the outcome is the age of the child at the time of implantation and duration of hearing loss before CI. Awareness towards an increased risk of complications in case of inner ear malformations is recommended.

  10. Cochlear implants in children implanted in Jordan: A parental overview.

    PubMed

    Alkhamra, Rana A

    2015-07-01

    Exploring the perspective of parents on the cochlear implant process in Jordan. Sixty parents of deaf children were surveyed on the information gathering process prior to cochlear implant surgery, and their implant outcome expectations post-surgery. Whether child or parent characteristics may impact parents' post-surgical expectations was explored. Although parents used a variety of information sources when considering a cochlear implant, the ear, nose and throat doctor comprised their major source of information (60%). Parents received a range of information prior to cochlear implant but agreed (93.3%) on the need for a multidisciplinary team approach. Post-surgically, parents' expected major developments in the areas of spoken language (97%), and auditory skills (100%). Receiving education in mainstream schools (92%) was expected too. Parents perceived the cochlear implant decision as the best decision they can make for their child (98.3%). A significant correlation was found between parents contentment with the cochlear implant decision and expecting developments in the area of reading and writing (r=0.7). Child's age at implantation and age at hearing loss diagnosis significantly affected parents' post-implant outcome expectations (p<0.05). Despite the general satisfaction from the information quantity and quality prior to cochlear implant, parents agree on the need for a comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Parents' education about cochlear implants prior to the surgery can affect their post-surgical outcome expectations. The parental perspective presented in this study can help professionals develop better understanding of parents' needs and expectations and henceforth improve their services and support during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Interviews with Deaf Children about Their Experiences Using Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preisler, G.; Tvingstedt, A. -L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of a longitudinal study of deaf children with cochlear implants, 11 children with implants were interviewed. The objective was to shed light on what it is like for a child to use a cochlear implant, based on these children's own experience with implants, which ranged from 5.0 to 7.5 years. Six of the children were in schools…

  12. Interviews with Deaf Children about Their Experiences Using Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preisler, G.; Tvingstedt, A. -L.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of a longitudinal study of deaf children with cochlear implants, 11 children with implants were interviewed. The objective was to shed light on what it is like for a child to use a cochlear implant, based on these children's own experience with implants, which ranged from 5.0 to 7.5 years. Six of the children were in schools…

  13. Word Learning in Children following Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Derek M.; Carter, Allyson K.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler; Ying, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed to investigate word-learning skills of children who use cochlear implants (CIs). Using interactive play scenarios, 2- to 5-year olds were presented with sets of objects (Beanie Baby stuffed animals) and words for their names that corresponded to salient perceptual attributes (e.g., "horns" for a goat). Their…

  14. Word Learning in Children following Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Derek M.; Carter, Allyson K.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler; Ying, Elizabeth A.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed to investigate word-learning skills of children who use cochlear implants (CIs). Using interactive play scenarios, 2- to 5-year olds were presented with sets of objects (Beanie Baby stuffed animals) and words for their names that corresponded to salient perceptual attributes (e.g., "horns" for a goat). Their…

  15. Cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Phillip M; Sharma, Anu; Dorman, Michael F

    2008-11-06

    Congenital deafness leads to atypical organization of the auditory nervous system. However, the extent to which auditory pathways reorganize during deafness is not well understood. We recorded cortical auditory evoked potentials in normal hearing children and in congenitally deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. High-density EEG and source modeling revealed principal activity from auditory cortex in normal hearing and early implanted children. However, children implanted after a critical period of seven years revealed activity from parietotemporal cortex in response to auditory stimulation, demonstrating reorganized cortical pathways. Reorganization of central auditory pathways is limited by the age at which implantation occurs, and may help explain the benefits and limitations of implantation in congenitally deaf children.

  16. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... normal ear, ear with hearing loss, and cochlear implant procedure Welcome to the Food and Drug Administration ( ...

  17. Changing expectations for children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Moog, Jean Sachar

    2002-05-01

    Seventeen students with cochlear implants who were between 5 and 11 years of age and attended the Moog Center for Deaf Education school program were tested just before exiting the program. The Moog program is an intensive oral program that provides very focused instruction in spoken language and reading. Children leave the program when they are ready for a mainstream setting or when they are 11 years of age, whichever comes first. All of the children demonstrated open-set speech perception ranging from 36% to 100%. On a test of speech intelligibility, all students scored 90% or better. On language and reading tests, compared with the performance of normal-hearing children their age, more than 65% scored within the average range for language and more than 70% scored within the average range for reading. These data demonstrate what is possible for deaf children who benefit from a combination of a cochlear implant and a highly focused oral education program.

  18. Taxonomic Knowledge of Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Emily; Dinsmoor, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the taxonomic vocabulary knowledge and organization of children with cochlear implants to (a) children with normal hearing matched for age, and (b) children matched for vocabulary development. Method: Ten children with cochlear implants, 10 age-matched children with normal hearing, and 10…

  19. Taxonomic Knowledge of Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Emily; Dinsmoor, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the taxonomic vocabulary knowledge and organization of children with cochlear implants to (a) children with normal hearing matched for age, and (b) children matched for vocabulary development. Method: Ten children with cochlear implants, 10 age-matched children with normal hearing, and 10…

  20. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  1. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  2. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  3. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  4. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  5. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods: The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal…

  6. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants: Effects on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on CI in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of five congenitally deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2…

  7. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants: Effects on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on CI in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of five congenitally deafblind children who received cochlear implants between 2.2 and 4.2…

  8. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods: The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal…

  9. Cochlear implantation in children: socioeconomic family characteristics.

    PubMed

    Brkic, Fuad; Piric, Lejla; Salihovic, Nevzeta; Kabil, Jasmina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse the socioeconomic status of implanted children families, candidates for implantation families and families of deaf children whose parents elicit not to proceed with cochlear implantation and to find out if the socioeconomic status has an influence on parental decision-making process. The following variables describe the socioeconomic status: place of living (urban/rural area), parental educational level and household monthly income (in Euro). Forty children divided in two groups were included in the study: Group 1 (23 implanted children and 7 candidates for implantation) and Group 2 (10 deaf children whose parents elicit not to proceed). Data were obtained from parents of children by phone. It was not possible to establish the contact with parents of three children. As for the place of living, 20 families were from urban area, 17 families were from rural area and the place of living of 3 families was unknown. Average number of completed school grades by parents was respectively: Group 1- 5.92 and Group 2 - 5.33. Concerning the place of living, parental educational level and household monthly income no differences can be seen between groups. Therefore, the authors concluded that socioeconomic status has no influence on making decision process.

  10. Including Children with Cochlear Implants in General Education Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Joanna L.; Drasgow, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Cochlear implants can provide partial hearing to individuals with substantial hearing loss. Because of improvements in early identification and intervention, more children with cochlear implants will be included in elementary school general education classrooms. Thus, general education teachers should be prepared for teaching children with…

  11. Hearing: A Second Language for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaussi, Kyle R.

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses training of hearing-impaired children who have received cochlear implants from a "hearing as a second language" point of view. It compares cochlear implants to hearing aids. A project involving 7 children, ages 5 to 12, is detailed, noting efforts to provide a rich auditory environment and encouraging both manual and oral…

  12. Cochlear Implantation in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Adrien A; Nazarian, Ronen; Telischi, Fred F; Martinez, Diane; Hodges, Annelle; Velandia, Sandra; Cejas-Cruz, Ivette; Balkany, Thomas J; Lo, Kaming; Lang, Dustin

    2015-09-01

    To assess the outcome of cochlear implantation in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Retrospective case review and survey. Tertiary referral center. Children who meet criteria for cochlear implantation and diagnosis of ASD. Receptive and expressive language scores and parental survey data. Fifteen patients with history of ASD and cochlear implantation were analyzed and compared with 15 patients who received cochlear implant and have no other disability. Postoperatively, more than 67% of children with ASD significantly improved their speech perception skills, and 60% significantly improved their speech expression skills, whereas all patients in the control group showed significant improvement in both aspects. The top 3 reported improvements after cochlear implantation were name recognition, response to verbal requests, and enjoyment of music. Of all behavioral aspects, the use of eye contact was the least improved. Survey results in regard to improvements in patient interaction were more subtle when compared with those related to sound and speech perception. The most improved aspects in the ASD patients' lives after cochlear implantation seemed to be attending to other people's requests and conforming to family routines. Of note, awareness of the child's environment is the most highly ranked improvement attributed to the cochlear implant. Cochlear implants are effective and beneficial for hearing impaired members of the ASD population, although development of language may lag behind that of implanted children with no additional disabilities. Significant speech perception and overall behavior improvement are noted.

  13. Multidisciplinary Training for Rural Outreach to Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schery, Teris K.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    The number of deaf children with surgically implanted cochlear devices has been increasing since the device was approved in 1989. In rural communities, there may be no one who is knowledgeable about the care of cochlear implants, what to expect of the child's communication abilities, and how to maximize the child's progress. A federally funded…

  14. Motor Development of Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gheysen, Freja; Loots, Gerrit; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a cochlear implant (CI) on the motor development of deaf children. The study involved 36 mainstreamed deaf children (15 boys, 21 girls; 4- to 12-years old) without any developmental problems. Of these children, 20 had been implanted. Forty-three hearing children constituted a comparison…

  15. Parental perspectives of children using cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Stefanini, Marcela Roselin; Morettin, Marina; Zabeu, Julia Speranza; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the parents' perspective with regard to evolution of their child with cochlear implant (CI). This was a cross-sectional prospective study conducted at the Centro de Pesquisas Audiológicas of Hospital de Reabilitação de Anomalias Craniofaciais of Universidade de São Paulo. The selection of the sample was performed from the spontaneous demand, among the months from July to December 2011. The final sample comprised 50 parents or guardians of children using CI, with minimum 1 year and maximum of 3 years of device use. The translated and adapted to Brazilian Portuguese version of the questionnaire "Perspectives of parents of children with cochlear implants" was applied. This instrument consists of 74 questions and allows quantification of the parents' perspective on subscales that illustrate the situation of the child and family. Each question has five options scored from one to five responses. The Spearman test for comparison of results between the subscales was applied. The social relationships, self-sufficiency, and communication subscales showed the highest mean score, whereas the worst score was for child support subscale, reflecting the independence and autonomy of the patients. The correlation between the child subscales was realized, and the results showed themselves significant and positive for communication subscale of communication with all others subscales. The family subscales also had a positive correlation with the communication, education, and self-sufficiency. These results demonstrate that parents have good expectations regarding communication, independence, and social participation of children after CI surgery, and this questionnaire is a useful tool for use in clinical practice.

  16. From hearing screening to cochlear implantation: cochlear implants in children under 3 years of age.

    PubMed

    Profant, Milan; Kabátová, Zuzana; Simková, Ludovika

    2008-04-01

    Universal hearing screening gives a deaf child earlier diagnosis and intervention with a better chance for successful management of hearing and speech development. Universal newborn hearing screening has a major impact on early identification of deafness in children. This study evaluated the outcome of cochlear implantation in screened and non-screened deaf children. Group 1 comprised 9 deaf children diagnosed by screening; group 2 comprised 21 children diagnosed by traditional methods. The following parameters were evaluated: age at the time of diagnosis, age at the time of the first hearing aid fitting, age at the time of cochlear implantation. In children who had been using a cochlear implant for more than 2 years the results of audiological tests, category of auditory performance (CAP), and development and quality of speech were also evaluated. Hearing screening significantly reduced the age at the time of diagnosis (6.9 months vs 15.4 months) as well as the age at the time of the first hearing aid fitting (9.3 months vs 17 months) and age at the time of cochlear implantation (26 months vs 32 months). Children from the screening program had better results in speech audiometry (95% discrimination vs 84%), monosyllabic tests (62% vs 34%), CAP (level 6 vs level 5), evaluation of spontaneous speech (level 6 vs level 5), and intelligibility of speech (level 5 vs level 3.5). According to the statistical evaluation (Fisher's test) the functional results did not show significant difference.

  17. The mathematical abilities of children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Alexandra; Edwards, Lindsey; Langdon, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that cochlear implants give rise to improvements in speech recognition and production in children with profound hearing loss but very few studies have explored mathematical abilities in these children. The current study compared the mathematical abilities of 24 children with cochlear implants (mean age 10 years 1 month) to a control group of 22 hearing children (mean age 9 years 8 months). The math questions were categorized into questions that tapped into arithmetic or geometrical reasoning. It was predicted that the cochlear implant group would perform below the hearing group on the arithmetic questions but not the geometrical reasoning questions. Unexpectedly, the results showed that the cochlear implant group performed significantly below the hearing group on both types of math questions, but that this difference was mediated by language skill as assessed by vocabulary knowledge. The clinical implications of these results and possible future research results are considered.

  18. Theory of Mind and Language in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmel, Ethan; Peters, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Thirty children with cochlear implants (CI children), age range 3-12 years, and 30 children with normal hearing (NH children), age range 4-6 years, were tested on theory of mind and language measures. The CI children showed little to no delay on either theory of mind, relative to the NH children, or spoken language, relative to hearing norms. The…

  19. Theory of Mind and Language in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmel, Ethan; Peters, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Thirty children with cochlear implants (CI children), age range 3-12 years, and 30 children with normal hearing (NH children), age range 4-6 years, were tested on theory of mind and language measures. The CI children showed little to no delay on either theory of mind, relative to the NH children, or spoken language, relative to hearing norms. The…

  20. Cochlear implantation in autistic children with profound sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lachowska, Magdalena; Pastuszka, Agnieszka; Łukaszewicz-Moszyńska, Zuzanna; Mikołajewska, Lidia; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2016-11-19

    Cochlear implants have become the method of choice for the treatment of severe-to-profound hearing loss in both children and adults. Its benefits are well documented in the pediatric and adult population. Also deaf children with additional needs, including autism, have been covered by this treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits from cochlear implantation in deafened children with autism as the only additional disability. This study analyzes data of six children. The follow-up time was at least 43 months. The following data were analyzed: medical history, reaction to music and sound, Ling's six sounds test, onomatopoeic word test, reaction to spoken child's name, response to requests, questionnaire given to parents, sound processor fitting sessions and data. After cochlear implantation each child presented other communication skills. In some children, the symptoms of speech understanding were observed. No increased hyperactivity associated with daily use cochlear implant was observed. The study showed that in autistic children the perception is very important for a child's sense of security and makes contact with parents easier. Our study showed that oral communication is not likely to be a realistic goal in children with cochlear implants and autism. The implantation results showed benefits that varied among those children. The traditional methods of evaluating the results of cochlear implantation in children with autism are usually insufficient to fully assess the functional benefits. These benefits should be assessed in a more comprehensive manner taking into account the limitations of communication resulting from the essence of autism. It is important that we share knowledge about these complex children with cochlear implants. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Bilateral Cochlear Implantation in Children: Experiences and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnert, Andrea; Spitzlei, Vera; Lippert, Karl L.; Keilmann, Annerose

    2006-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2006, the University Clinic for Ear Nose and Throat and Communication Disorders in Mainz, Germany, performed 41 bilateral cochlear implantations in children. This article addresses some of the factors to be considered in a decision to bilaterally implant a child, including the age of the child at the first implant, the length of…

  2. Connected speech intelligibility of children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Chin, Steven B; Tsai, Patrick L; Gao, Sujuan

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the connected speech intelligibility of children who use cochlear implants with that of children who have normal hearing. Previous research has shown that speech intelligibility improves from before cochlear implantation to after implantation and that the speech intelligibility of children who use cochlear implants compares favorably with that of children who use conventional hearing aids. However, no research has yet addressed the question of how the speech intelligibility of children who use cochlear implants compares to that of children with normal hearing. In the current study, archival data on connected speech intelligibility from 51 children with cochlear implants were compared with newly collected data from 47 children with normal hearing. Results showed that for children with cochlear implants, greater intelligibility was associated with both increased chronological age and increased duration of cochlear implant use. Consistent with previous studies, children with normal hearing achieved adult-like or near-adult-like intelligibility around the age of 4 years, but a similar peak in intelligibility was not observed for the children who used cochlear implants. On the whole, children with cochlear implants were significantly less intelligible than children with normal hearing, when controlling both for chronological age and for length of auditory experience. These results have implications for the socialization and education of children with cochlear implants, particularly with respect to on-time placement in mainstream educational environments with age peers.

  3. Cochlear Implantation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Adrien A.; Nazarian, Ronen; Telischi, Fred F.; Martinez, Diane; Hodges, Annelle; Velandia, Sandra; Cejas-Cruz, Ivette; Balkany, Thomas J.; Lo, Kaming; Lang, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the outcome of cochlear implantation in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Study Design Retrospective case review and survey Setting Tertiary referral center Patients Children who meet criteria for cochlear implantation and diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder Main Outcome Measures Receptive and expressive language scores and parental survey data. Results 15 patients with history of ASD and cochlear implantation were analyzed and compared to 15 patients who received cochlear implant and have no other disability. Post-operatively, more than 67% of children with ASD significantly improved their speech perception skills and 60% significantly improved their speech expression skills while all patients in the control group showed significant improvement in both aspects. The top three reported improvements after cochlear implantation were name recognition, response to verbal requests, and enjoyment of music. Of all behavioral aspects, the use of eye contact was the least improved. Survey results in regards to improvements in patient interaction were more subtle when compared to those related to sound and speech perception. The most improved aspects in the ASD patients’ lives after cochlear implantation appeared to be attending to other people’s requests and conforming to family routines. Of note, awareness of the child’s environment is the most highly ranked improvement attributed to the cochlear implant. Conclusions Cochlear implants are effective and beneficial for hearing impaired members of the ASD population even though development of language may lag behind that of implanted children with no additional disabilities. Significant speech perception and overall behavior improvement are noted. PMID:25899551

  4. Speech development after cochlear implantation in children from bilingual homes.

    PubMed

    Teschendorf, Melanie; Janeschik, Sandra; Bagus, Heike; Lang, Stephan; Arweiler-Harbeck, Diana

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to a second language in bilingual families influences the spoken German skills after cochlear implantation. A further question was how many children with migration background are bilingual. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center; cochlear implant program. Ninety-three profoundly hearing-impaired children; 52 of these children reside in bilingual and 41 in monolingual homes. Cochlear implantation before the age of 6 years, speech and language skills assessments. Standard speech perception and receptive and expressive language measures. Data on used primary and secondary languages were obtained by questionnaire. Children growing up in bilingual homes performed worse than children from monolingual homes in all performed speech tests. Almost all children with bilingual parents indicated German as their main language. In some cases, the second language is used actively, but in most children, the use is limited to single words and expressions. However, some children from bilingual homes achieve high skill level in German language and, furthermore, develop competency in second spoken language. Advanced language skills including the learning of a second spoken language are possible for children with cochlear implant living in bilingual homes, but that is the exception rather than the rule. It seems that other factors, such as spoken German language skills of the parents, integration of the family, and compliance with the rehabilitation program, play an important role. Therefore, a special support for children with cochlear implants from bilingual homes is needed.

  5. Word Learning Processes in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; McGregor, Karla K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether 3 aspects of the word learning process--fast mapping, retention, and extension--are problematic for children with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: The authors compared responses of 24 children with CIs, 24 age-matched hearing children, and 23 vocabulary-matched hearing children to a novel object noun training episode.…

  6. Word Learning Processes in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; McGregor, Karla K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether 3 aspects of the word learning process--fast mapping, retention, and extension--are problematic for children with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: The authors compared responses of 24 children with CIs, 24 age-matched hearing children, and 23 vocabulary-matched hearing children to a novel object noun training episode.…

  7. Reading Comprehension of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Anneke M.; van Bon, Wim; Schreuder, Rob; Knoors, Harry; Snik, Ad

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (CI) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was expected to surpass that in deaf children without…

  8. Reading Comprehension of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Anneke M.; van Bon, Wim; Schreuder, Rob; Knoors, Harry; Snik, Ad

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (CI) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was expected to surpass that in deaf children without…

  9. Cochlear implant considerations in children with additional disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Corrales, C. Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Early identification and management of disabilities in children are essential to reduce long-term developmental sequelae. Many of the causes of hearing loss also produce cognitive delays resulting in a large number of children with both deafness and developmental disabilities. Children who have hearing loss and additional disabilities require complex, individualized therapy to maximize their long-term quality of life. Hearing loss is often detected early because of widespread newborn hearing screening programs and the decision for cochlear implantation in children presenting with multiple medical and developmental disorders is still evolving. This article will review the literature regarding cochlear implant considerations in children with additional developmental disabilities in areas of family perception, speech and language development, cognitive development including adaptive behavior and intelligence, communication and functional skills, auditory outcomes, quality of life outcomes, predictors of outcomes and realistic expectations after cochlear implantation. PMID:23772353

  10. Picture Naming and Verbal Fluency in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler-Kashi, Deena; Schwartz, Richard G.; Cleary, Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, the authors examined lexical naming in children with cochlear implants (CIs). The goal was to determine whether children with CIs have deficits in lexical access and organization as revealed through reaction time in picture-naming and verbal fluency (VF) experiments. Method: Children with CIs (n = 20, ages 7-10) were…

  11. Phonological Awareness in Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah; Rajput, Kaukab; Brown, Tracey; Sirimanna, Tony; Brinton, Julie; Goswami, Usha

    2005-01-01

    A short-term longitudinal study was conducted to investigate possible benefits of cochlear implant (CI) use on the development of phonological awareness in deaf children. Nineteen CI users were tested on 2 occasions. Two groups of deaf children using hearing aids were tested once: 11 profoundly deaf and 10 severely deaf children. A battery of…

  12. Picture Naming and Verbal Fluency in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler-Kashi, Deena; Schwartz, Richard G.; Cleary, Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, the authors examined lexical naming in children with cochlear implants (CIs). The goal was to determine whether children with CIs have deficits in lexical access and organization as revealed through reaction time in picture-naming and verbal fluency (VF) experiments. Method: Children with CIs (n = 20, ages 7-10) were…

  13. Phonological Awareness in Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah; Rajput, Kaukab; Brown, Tracey; Sirimanna, Tony; Brinton, Julie; Goswami, Usha

    2005-01-01

    A short-term longitudinal study was conducted to investigate possible benefits of cochlear implant (CI) use on the development of phonological awareness in deaf children. Nineteen CI users were tested on 2 occasions. Two groups of deaf children using hearing aids were tested once: 11 profoundly deaf and 10 severely deaf children. A battery of…

  14. Use of Acoustic Cues by Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giezen, Marcel R.; Escudero, Paola; Baker, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the use of different acoustic cues in auditory perception of consonant and vowel contrasts by profoundly deaf children with a cochlear implant (CI) in comparison to age-matched children and young adults with normal hearing. Method: A speech sound categorization task in an XAB format was administered to 15 children ages…

  15. Audiological and Medical Considerations for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Richard M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Candidate selection, postoperative management, and support factors involved in the use of cochlear implants for deaf children are outlined. The paper discusses audiological, medical, and educational factors in selecting a candidate for implantation; the surgical process itself; interaction with educational agencies; and initial stimulation and…

  16. Technological Innovations and Intervention Practices for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertmer, David J.

    2002-01-01

    This epilogue to a forum on children with hearing impairments who have cochlear implants discusses innovation in implant technology and considers intervention issues. Key factors influencing outcomes are discussed, including educational programming, amount and length of communication intervention, and the targeting of both developmental and…

  17. Behavior problems in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Chao, Wei-Chieh; Lee, Li-Ang; Liu, Tien-Chen; Tsou, Yung-Ting; Chan, Kai-Chieh; Wu, Che-Ming

    2015-05-01

    (1) To examine behavior problems in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs); (2) to investigate the associated factors of problem behaviors; (3) to understand the relationships between behavior problems and parenting stress. Sixty patients (25 boys, 35 girls) aged 6-18 years (mean=12.2±3.2) who used CIs for a mean duration of eight years participated in the study. Behavior problems were assessed by Achenbach's child behavior checklist (CBCL). Categorical auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) scales were utilized to investigate auditory performance and speech production intelligibility. Parenting stress index (PSI) was filled out by parents to measure parenting stress level. Significantly more CI subjects had problems with 'Withdrawn/Depressed' (p=0.010), 'Social Problems' (p<0.001), 'Thought Problems' (p<0.001), 'Attention Problems' (p<0.001), 'Aggressive Behavior' (p=0.010) and 'Overall Behavior' (p=0.001) than the normative sample did. 'Social Problems' was the most common problem and could be independently associated with gender, socioeconomic status and CAP (R(2)=0.361). CAP score was also associated with Overall Behaviors (R(2)=0.081). The results of PSI had a significant positive correlation with almost all CBCL subscales (p<0.05). The CI subjects still exhibit social and attention problems, which may in turn increase parenting stress. Good family support as well as aural-verbal rehabilitation are of particular importance in determining behavioral outcomes in CI children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cochlear implant assessment and candidacy for children with partial hearing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Katherine; Ambler, Marette; Hanvey, Kate; Jenkins, Marsha; Jiang, Dan; Maggs, Justine; Tzifa, Konstance

    2016-04-01

    Children who have partial hearing (PH) in the low frequencies and profound sensorineural hearing loss in the high frequencies can present a challenge to cochlear implant (CI) teams in terms of referral, assessment, and candidacy. Neither clinical criteria nor optimal timing for implantation has been explored in the literature. Data from both the Hearing Implant Centres of Birmingham Children's Hospital and St Thomas' Hospital indicate that it is clinically appropriate to implant children with PH; they perform better with CIs than with hearing aids, even if their hearing is not fully preserved. We have also found that children need early access to high frequency sound in order to reach their full potential.

  19. Balance Performance of Deaf Children With and Without Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Amir-Abbas; Movallali, Guita; Jamshidi, Ali-Ashraf; Haghgoo, Hojjat Allah; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2016-11-01

     The aim of this study was to compare the static and dynamic balance performance of deaf children with and without cochlear implants. This is a cross-sectional study of 145 school children, aged between 7 and 12 years comprising 85 children with congenital or early acquired bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss (the hearing loss group) and 60 normal hearing aged-matched control counterparts were assessed using the balance subtest of Bruininks-Oseretsky test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP). The hearing loss group, 50 without cochlear implants (the non-implant group) and 35 of them with unilateral cochlear implants (the implant group) were recruited from schools for the deaf and normal hearing children (the control group) randomly selected from two randomly selected elementary schools of Tehran city. The scores were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The total score of deaf children especially the implant group were significantly lower than the control group )P<0.001). The balance performance of the control group was better than the implant group in all of the items as well as the non-implant group except the fourth tested item (walking forward on a line) (P<0.05). The balance score of the implant group was significantly lower than the non-implant group except for the third tested item (standing on the preferred leg on a balance beam with eyes closed). The findings suggested that deaf children, specifically those with cochlear implants are at risk for motor and balance deficits. Thus, vestibular and motor evaluations, as well as interventions to improve balance and motor skills, should be prioritized for this population.

  20. Relational Learning in Children with Deafness and Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida-Verdu, Ana Claudia; Huziwara, Edson M.; de Souza, Deisy G.; de Rose, Julio C.; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecilia; Lopes, Jair, Jr.; Alves, Cristiane O.; McIlvane, William J.

    2008-01-01

    This four-experiment series sought to evaluate the potential of children with neurosensory deafness and cochlear implants to exhibit auditory-visual and visual-visual stimulus equivalence relations within a matching-to-sample format. Twelve children who became deaf prior to acquiring language (prelingual) and four who became deaf afterwards…

  1. Acoustic and Semantic Enhancements for Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiljanic, Rajka; Sladen, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined how signal clarity interacts with the use of sentence context information in determining speech-in-noise recognition for children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing. Method: One hundred and twenty sentences in which the final word varied in predictability (high vs. low semantic…

  2. Single Word and Sentence Intelligibility in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khwaileh, Fadwa A.; Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of speech produced by 17 children (aged 4-11 years) with cochlear implants. Stimulus items included sentences from the Beginners' Intelligibility Test (BIT) and words from the Children Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM). Naive listeners responded by writing sentences heard or with two types of responses…

  3. Single Word and Sentence Intelligibility in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khwaileh, Fadwa A.; Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the intelligibility of speech produced by 17 children (aged 4-11 years) with cochlear implants. Stimulus items included sentences from the Beginners' Intelligibility Test (BIT) and words from the Children Speech Intelligibility Measure (CSIM). Naive listeners responded by writing sentences heard or with two types of responses…

  4. Acoustic and Semantic Enhancements for Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiljanic, Rajka; Sladen, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined how signal clarity interacts with the use of sentence context information in determining speech-in-noise recognition for children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing. Method: One hundred and twenty sentences in which the final word varied in predictability (high vs. low semantic…

  5. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    PubMed

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a partially implanted electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound and support speech to severely to profoundly hearing impaired patients. It is constituted by an external portion, that usually sits behind the ear and an internal portion surgically placed under the skin. The external components include a microphone connected to a speech processor that selects and arranges sounds pucked up by the microphone. This is connected to a transmitter coil, worn on the side of the head, which transmits data to an internal receiver coil placed under the skin. The received data are delivered to an array of electrodes that are surgically implanted within the cochlea. The primary neural targets of the electrodes are the spiral ganglion cells which innervate fibers of the auditory nerve. When the electrodes are activated by the signal, they send a current along the auditory nerve and auditory pathways to the auditory cortex. Children and adults who are profoundly or severely hearing impaired can be fitted with cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 188,000 people worldwide have received implants. In Italy it is extimated that there are about 6-7000 implanted patients, with an average of 700 CI surgeries per year. Cochlear implantation, followed by intensive postimplantation speech therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, and social skills. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of CI. With regard to the results after cochlear implantation in relation to early implantation, better linguistic results are reported in children implanted before 12 months of life, even if no sufficient data exist regarding the relation between this advantage and the duration of implant use and how long

  6. Hearing Experience and Receptive Vocabulary Development in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Mary K.; Pisoni, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. "Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third…

  7. Hearing Experience and Receptive Vocabulary Development in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Mary K.; Pisoni, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6-14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. "Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third…

  8. Cochlear implantation in children under 12 months of age.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Samantha

    2017-10-01

    Children with congenital hearing loss are being identified earlier, leading to earlier intervention. Current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria states a child must be 12 months or older for cochlear implantation. The purpose of this article is to review recent publications regarding the benefits of implanting infants under 12 months of age. Topics include: safety and efficacy of surgery, speech and language acquisition outcomes, audiologic components, and limitations. Since the early 1990s, the candidacy criteria evolved drastically. However, the FDA criteria for cochlear implantation in children has remained at 12 months of age or older since 2000. Recent research indicates implanting below 12 months of age a safe and effective procedure. Speech and language outcomes showed better speech and language advantages. In addition, infants implanted earlier showed normal auditory skills as early as 3 months post cochlear implant activation. This article will also address recent findings on the limitations of earlier implantation. Recent research demonstrates positive outcomes in children implanted under 12 months of age. Developing research on earlier implantation could lead to a change in the current FDA criteria allowing infants to reach their speech and hearing potential faster.

  9. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bilateral cochlear implantation: a review. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2007;15(5):315-318. PMID: 17823546. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  10. Production of Consonants by Prelinguistically Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve Gaul; Le Normand, Marie-Therese; Cohen, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Consonant production following the sensory restoration of audition was investigated in 22 prelinguistically deaf French children who received cochlear implants. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded at 6, 12, and 18 months post-surgery and consonant inventories were derived from both glossable and non-glossable phones using two acquisition…

  11. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to…

  12. Fricatives, Affricates, and Vowels in Croatian Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildner, Vesna; Liker, Marko

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the research was to analyse the speech of children with cochlear implants over approximately a 46-month period, and compare it with the speech of hearing controls. It focused on three categories of sounds in Croatian: vowels (F1 and F2 of /i/, /e/, /a/, /o/ and /u/), fricatives /s/ and /[esh]/ (spectral differences expressed in terms of…

  13. Speech Perception in Noise by Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Amanda; Nittrouer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Common wisdom suggests that listening in noise poses disproportionately greater difficulty for listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) than for peers with normal hearing (NH). The purpose of this study was to examine phonological, language, and cognitive skills that might help explain speech-in-noise abilities for children with CIs.…

  14. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to…

  15. Production of Consonants by Prelinguistically Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve Gaul; Le Normand, Marie-Therese; Cohen, Henri

    2007-01-01

    Consonant production following the sensory restoration of audition was investigated in 22 prelinguistically deaf French children who received cochlear implants. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded at 6, 12, and 18 months post-surgery and consonant inventories were derived from both glossable and non-glossable phones using two acquisition…

  16. Strategies for Working with Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn; Prause-Weber, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 23,000 individuals in the United States, including 10,000 children, have a cochlear implant. This biomedical electronic device has been a breakthrough in the auditory rehabilitation of individuals diagnosed with severe or profound sensorineural hearing losses who…

  17. Strategies for Working with Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn; Prause-Weber, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 23,000 individuals in the United States, including 10,000 children, have a cochlear implant. This biomedical electronic device has been a breakthrough in the auditory rehabilitation of individuals diagnosed with severe or profound sensorineural hearing losses who…

  18. Speech Perception in Noise by Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Amanda; Nittrouer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Common wisdom suggests that listening in noise poses disproportionately greater difficulty for listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) than for peers with normal hearing (NH). The purpose of this study was to examine phonological, language, and cognitive skills that might help explain speech-in-noise abilities for children with CIs.…

  19. Developing Meaningful Auditory Integration in Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Amy McConkey

    1990-01-01

    This article presents a framework for modifying traditional auditory therapy techniques to address the needs of hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants. Emphasis is on activities that encourage carry-over of skills from structured to unstructured settings resembling listening in a natural environment. (DB)

  20. Intelligibility of Conversational Speech Produced by Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.; Colvard, Lana G.

    2006-01-01

    The intelligibility of conversational speech produced by six children fitted with cochlear implants before age 3 years was measured longitudinally. Samples were obtained every 3 months during periods of 12-21 months. Intelligibility was measured using both an utterance-by-utterance approach and an approach to the sample as a whole. Statistically…

  1. Cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sarah S; Balkany, Thomas J

    2006-08-01

    Cochlear implants are cost-effective auditory prostheses that safely provide a high-quality sensation of hearing to adults who are severely or profoundly deaf. In the past 5 years, progress has been made in hardware and software design, candidate selection, surgical techniques, device programming, education and rehabilitation,and, most importantly, outcomes. Cochlear implantation in the elderly is well tolerated and provides marked improvement in auditory performance and psychosocial functioning.

  2. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Sanja; Djoković, Sanja; Radić-šestić, Marina; Nikolić, Mina; Mikić, Branka; Mirić, Danica

    2015-08-01

    Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP) of cochlear implanted (Cl) children. Special attention was focused on the influence of the duration and intensity of rehabilitation and hearing age on further development of communication skills. A group of 30 CI children (13 boys and 17 girls) aged 2 to 5 years was enrolled in the study. All of the children had average intelligence and no other developmental disorder. They lived in families and attended rehabilitative seances 3 to 5 times a week. Their parents/caregivers answered structured questionnaire about functioning after pediatric cochlear implantation (FAPCI) and the results were the subject of detailed statistical analysis. Analysis of variance did not show any difference between the boys and the girls regarding FAPCI achievements (F(1, 28) = 2.909; p = 0.099) and age aberration in CP score (F(1,28) = 0.114, p = 0.738). Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant difference in FAPCI scores related to hearing age and duration of rehabilitation. Regression analysis (enter method) showed that model consisting of indipendent variables significantly contributed to prediction of overall FAPCI scores and Adjusted R2 value could explain 32% difference in communication skills of participants in this study. Communication skills of CI children evaluated by FAPCI are falling behind normatives for normal hearing children 18.6 months on the average. Hearing age, duration and intensity of rehabilitation have positive predictive value for communication skills development. Later identification of hearing loss and later cochlear implantation lead to delayed development of communication

  3. [Present state of cochlear implant treatment in adults and children].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J

    2009-07-01

    The technique of cochlear implantation was the first method which allowed replacement of a sense organ by a (partially) implantable electronic prosthesis. By this method the cells of the spiral ganglion of the cochlea are directly stimulated by the electrodes introduced into the cochlea, bypassing the functions of the outer and middle ear as well as the cochlea. Treatment with a cochlear implant (CI) has been established over the last 20-30 years as a reliable method for restoring hearing in adults and children with severe hearing disorders and is now a routine method in many centers. For optimal results in understanding speech and for children in the speech development phase, rehabilitation must be an integral part of the total treatment and follow soon after implantation. To achieve this early diagnosis of hearing difficulties or deafness is necessary, which is simplified by a consistent hearing screening of newborns, now a statutory procedure in Germany.

  4. A Longitudinal Study in Children with Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Time Course for the Second Implanted Ear and Bilateral Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Ruth M.; Firszt, Jill B.; Cadieux, Jamie H.; Strube, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Whether, and if so when, a second-ear cochlear implant should be provided to older, unilaterally implanted children is an ongoing clinical question. This study evaluated rate of speech recognition progress for the second implanted ear and with bilateral cochlear implants in older sequentially implanted children and evaluated localization…

  5. A Longitudinal Study in Children with Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Time Course for the Second Implanted Ear and Bilateral Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Ruth M.; Firszt, Jill B.; Cadieux, Jamie H.; Strube, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Whether, and if so when, a second-ear cochlear implant should be provided to older, unilaterally implanted children is an ongoing clinical question. This study evaluated rate of speech recognition progress for the second implanted ear and with bilateral cochlear implants in older sequentially implanted children and evaluated localization…

  6. Spoken language development in children following cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Tobey, Emily A; Thal, Donna J; Eisenberg, Laurie S; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Quittner, Alexandra L; Fink, Nancy E

    2010-04-21

    Cochlear implantation is a surgical alternative to traditional amplification (hearing aids) that can facilitate spoken language development in young children with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). To prospectively assess spoken language acquisition following cochlear implantation in young children. Prospective, longitudinal, and multidimensional assessment of spoken language development over a 3-year period in children who underwent cochlear implantation before 5 years of age (n = 188) from 6 US centers and hearing children of similar ages (n = 97) from 2 preschools recruited between November 2002 and December 2004. Follow-up completed between November 2005 and May 2008. Performance on measures of spoken language comprehension and expression (Reynell Developmental Language Scales). Children undergoing cochlear implantation showed greater improvement in spoken language performance (10.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.6-11.2 points per year in comprehension; 8.4; 95% CI, 7.8-9.0 in expression) than would be predicted by their preimplantation baseline scores (5.4; 95% CI, 4.1-6.7, comprehension; 5.8; 95% CI, 4.6-7.0, expression), although mean scores were not restored to age-appropriate levels after 3 years. Younger age at cochlear implantation was associated with significantly steeper rate increases in comprehension (1.1; 95% CI, 0.5-1.7 points per year younger) and expression (1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.5 points per year younger). Similarly, each 1-year shorter history of hearing deficit was associated with steeper rate increases in comprehension (0.8; 95% CI, 0.2-1.2 points per year shorter) and expression (0.6; 95% CI, 0.2-1.0 points per year shorter). In multivariable analyses, greater residual hearing prior to cochlear implantation, higher ratings of parent-child interactions, and higher socioeconomic status were associated with greater rates of improvement in comprehension and expression. The use of cochlear implants in young children was

  7. Cochlear implantation outcomes in children with Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amirsalari, Susan; Ajallouyean, Mohammad; Saburi, Amin; Haddadi Fard, Adel; Abed, Maryam; Ghazavi, Yasaman

    2012-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disease, characterized by dystopia canthorum, hyperplasia of the eyebrows, heterochromia iridis, white forelock, and congenital sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of cochlear implantation in children with WS and compare it with children with pure SNHL. In a prospective study we evaluated 336 cochlear implanted children from 2008 to 2010. The WS was diagnosed by its established criteria and for control group children without any dysmorphic features, anatomical, behavioral, and developmental disorders were also enrolled. We evaluated children of both groups 1 year after cochlear implantation by categories of auditory performance (CAP) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) tests. Eighty-one children out of the total 336 who had SNHL were included in study. Out of these 75 (22.3%) were healthy and six (1.78%) had WS. Of the 75 healthy children 40 (53.3%) were girls, while of the six children with WS, three (50%) were girls. There was a significant difference in SIR between WS and cases with pure SNHL (2.67 ± 1.03 vs. 3.79 ± 1.11, p = 021) however, the difference was not significant in CAP (4 ± 1.26 vs. 5.13 ± 1.13, p = 0.082). Prevalence of WS was 1.78% at Baqiyatallah Cochlear Implant Center. One year after implantation there was no significant difference in auditory outcome; however, the difference in speech outcome was significant between WS and cases with pure SNHL.

  8. Reading comprehension of deaf children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Anneke M; van Bon, Wim; Schreuder, Rob; Knoors, Harry; Snik, Ad

    2007-01-01

    The reading comprehension and visual word recognition in 50 deaf children and adolescents with at least 3 years of cochlear implant (CI) use were evaluated. Their skills were contrasted with reference data of 500 deaf children without CIs. The reading comprehension level in children with CIs was expected to surpass that in deaf children without implants, partly via improved visual word recognition. Reading comprehension scores of children with implants were significantly better than those of deaf children without implants, although the performance in implant users was substantially lagging behind that in hearing children. Visual word recognition was better in children with CIs than in children without implants, in secondary education only. No difference in visual word recognition was found between the children with CIs and the hearing children, whereas the deaf children without implants showed a slightly poorer performance. The difference in reading comprehension performance of the deaf children with and without CIs remained present when visual word recognition was controlled for. This indicates that other reading-related skills were also contributing to the improved reading comprehension skills of deaf children with CIs.

  9. Examining Speech Sound Acquisition for Children with Cochlear Implants Using the GFTA-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines use of the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-Second Edition (GFTA-2) with children who use cochlear implants to evaluate whether or not it would be appropriate to use this test with this population. Participants included 15 children with cochlear implants who ranged in age of implantation and amount of implant experience.…

  10. Examining Speech Sound Acquisition for Children with Cochlear Implants Using the GFTA-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines use of the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-Second Edition (GFTA-2) with children who use cochlear implants to evaluate whether or not it would be appropriate to use this test with this population. Participants included 15 children with cochlear implants who ranged in age of implantation and amount of implant experience.…

  11. Behavioral Assessment of Prelingually Deaf Children Before Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David L.; Pisoni, David B.; Sanders, Mary; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To determine whether scores from a behavioral assessment of prelingually deafened children who present for cochlear implant surgery are predictive of audiological outcomes Study Design Retrospective review of longitudinal data collected from 42 children with prelingual hearing loss who presented for a cochlear implant before age 5 years. Methods The Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS) was administered during the preimplant workup. Standardized scores reflect daily living skills, socialization, and motor development compared with a normative sample. Regression analyses were conducted to determine whether any subject variables were related to VABS scores. Mixed-model analyses were computed to determine whether preimplant VABS scores were predictive of longitudinal spoken-language data obtained after cochlear implant surgery. Results Motor scores tended to be higher than nonmotor scores. Nonmotor scores were significantly lower than the normative mean and decreased with testing age. Children with acquired deafness demonstrated lower motor scores than children with congenital causes. Children with higher motor scores demonstrated significantly higher performance on language, vocabulary, and word recognition tests than children with lower motor scores. Nonmotor domains were not as robustly related to spoken-language measures, although similar trends were observed Conclusion Profound deafness and language delay may confound the assessment of daily living skills and socialization in the population studied. Motor development appears to proceed normally in prelingually deafened children and is a preimplant predictor of spoken-language outcome in young infants and children with cochlear implants, a finding consistent with the large body of work establishing links between perceptual-motor and language development. PMID:16148703

  12. Effects of cochlear implants on children's reading and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Marschark, Marc; Rhoten, Cathy; Fabich, Megan

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a critical analysis of empirical studies assessing literacy and other domains of academic achievement among children with cochlear implants. A variety of recent studies have demonstrated benefits to hearing, language, and speech from implants, leading to assumptions that early implantation and longer periods of implant should be associated with higher reading and academic achievement. This review, however, reveals that although there are clear benefits of cochlear implantation to achievement in young deaf children, empirical results have been somewhat variable. Examination of the literature with regard to reading achievement suggests that the lack of consistent findings might be the result of frequent failures to control potentially confounding variables such as age of implantation, language skills prior to implantation, reading ability prior to implantation, and consistency of implant use. Studies of academic achievement beyond reading are relatively rare, and the extent to which performance in such domains is mediated by reading abilities or directly influenced by hearing, language, and speech remains unclear. Considerations of methodological shortcomings in existing research as well as theoretical and practical questions yet to be addressed provide direction for future research.

  13. Phonological awareness of Cantonese-speaking pre-school children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Tse, Wing Ting; So, Lydia K H

    2012-02-01

    The study investigated the phonological awareness abilities of Cantonese-speaking pre-schoolers with cochlear implants. Participants were 15 Cantonese-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs) aged 3.08-6.10, chronological-age-matched with 15 children with normal hearing. Each participant performed 10 tasks evaluating different levels of phonological awareness abilities and phonological knowledge. The results showed that pre-schoolers with cochlear implants and their normal hearing peers had similar levels of syllable awareness, phoneme awareness and rhyme awareness. However, cochlear implant users showed significantly poorer performance on tone awareness and phonological knowledge tasks than their normal hearing peers. Cantonese-speaking pre-schoolers with cochlear implants were able to develop phonological awareness. However, the cochlear implants might not provide enough tonal information for children with hearing impairment for tonal lexical comprehension. Incomplete speech and language stimulation may affect phonological knowledge development in Cantonese-speaking pre-schoolers with cochlear implants.

  14. Relational Learning in Children with Deafness and Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Verdu, Ana Claudia; Huziwara, Edson M; de Souza, Deisy G; de Rose, Julio C; Bevilacqua, Maria CecÍlia; Lopes, Jair; Alves, Cristiane O; McIlvane, William J

    2008-01-01

    This four-experiment series sought to evaluate the potential of children with neurosensory deafness and cochlear implants to exhibit auditory–visual and visual–visual stimulus equivalence relations within a matching-to-sample format. Twelve children who became deaf prior to acquiring language (prelingual) and four who became deaf afterwards (postlingual) were studied. All children learned auditory–visual conditional discriminations and nearly all showed emergent equivalence relations. Naming tests, conducted with a subset of the children, showed no consistent relationship to the equivalence-test outcomes. This study makes several contributions to the literature on stimulus equivalence. First, it demonstrates that both pre- and postlingually deaf children can acquire auditory–visual equivalence relations after cochlear implantation, thus demonstrating symbolic functioning. Second, it directs attention to a population that may be especially interesting for researchers seeking to analyze the relationship between speaker and listener repertoires. Third, it demonstrates the feasibility of conducting experimental studies of stimulus control processes within the limitations of a hospital, which these children must visit routinely for the maintenance of their cochlear implants. PMID:18540222

  15. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  16. [Do children with cochlear implants read or write differently?: literacy acquisition after cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Fiori, A; Reichmuth, K; Matulat, P; Schmidt, C-M; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, A

    2010-09-01

    Despite the fact that literacy acquisition in hearing impaired children is frequently hampered, reading and writing competences continue not to be regularly evaluated and documented in children fitted with cochlear implants (CI). In this 2-year longitudinal study literacy acquisition in children fitted with CI was investigated. In total, 18 pre- and primary school children fitted with CI who had suffered prelingual deafness were examined. Subjects' ages at CI fitting ranged from 0.9 to 5.9 years; they were raised orally and monolingual German and showed normal intellectual achievement. Familial risk of developing dyslexia was ruled out. To assess subjects' literacy acquisition precursor and partial abilities in reading and writing according to dual route and developmental models were examined three times within 2 years. Precursor abilities included development of vocabulary and phonological awareness. Partial abilities were mastery in sublexical and lexical word processing in reading and writing as well as auditory and visual working memory. Subjects showed a broad range in performance regarding vocabulary development as well as literacy. Discrepant results in terms of age equivalent visual and underachievement in auditory working memory as well as good achievement in implicit phonological awareness and weakness in explicit demands on phoneme analysis and manipulation of phonemes can be described. Indications were that subjects tended towards lip reading the instructor's item presentation. Performance in the administered writing test reveals a preference for lexical word processing, whereas sublexical word processing seems to make relatively higher demands on subjects. Easier processing of visual information in partial and precursor abilities are consistent with a tendency to prefer a visual-lexical processing strategy. The presented study stresses the importance of generally assessing reading and writing skills when evaluating language development in children

  17. Comparison of reading skills between children with cochlear implants and children with typical hearing in Iran.

    PubMed

    Weisi, Farzad; Rezaei, Mohammad; Rashedi, Vahid; Heidari, Atta; Valadbeigi, Ayoub; Ebrahimi-Pour, Mona

    2013-08-01

    Cochlear implantation has significant effects on language abilities and reading skills. The current study compared the reading performance of children with cochlear implants with that of typically developing children in second and third grades. This descriptive-analytic study was performed including 24 children with cochlear implants and 24 typically developing peers. The grade range of the participants was second and third grades. All of students were selected from Tehran city elementary schools. The reading performance of children was assessed by the "Nama" reading test. The results showed that the means of reading scores of typically developed children were significantly greater than the children with cochlear implants (P < 0.01) and there was a significant relationship between reading skills and age of surgery (P < 0.05). Also, there was a significant relationship between reading skills and the period of cochlear implantation (P < 0.05). Children with cochlear implants showed a weak performance in reading skills in comparison to typically developing children due to lower accessibility to phonological information. However, this limitation can be compensated for partly by early surgery. Parents should refer their deaf children for cochlear implantation before the age of language learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Vowel perception in prelingually deafened children with multichannel cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, A J; el-Kholy, W; Tyler, R S

    1998-06-01

    Vowel perception ability for 16 prelingually deafened children using Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implants was studied at 12, 24, and 36 months postimplantation. Information transmission analysis was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the implants in conveying the essential cues required for accurate vowel identification and whether the cues used varied with experience or device use. Individual vowel identification varied widely with mean scores significantly improving between 12 and 24 months but not between 24 and 36 months. Information transmission scores for all vowel features (fronting, height, duration, and diphthongization) increased dramatically between 12 and 36 months. Results indicated that vowel height and vowel fronting were the most salient features for the subject group. There were no differences in the pattern of confusions made across test sessions or across groups when divided into "poor" and "good" users. However, there was evidence that the "good" users made better use of higher frequency formant information than the "poor" users. The results of the present study add to the accumulation of evidence pointing to the great benefit that cochlear implantation can provide to prelingually deafened children. Overall performance for the vowel recognition test used in this study was quite high and analysis of the childrens' errors suggested that their cochlear implants were reasonably effective at conveying the most essential spectral information required for vowel discrimination.

  19. Cochlear implanted children present vocal parameters within normal standards.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lourdes Bernadete Rocha; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Brasolotto, Alcione Ghedini; Coelho, Ana Cristina

    2012-08-01

    to compare acoustic and perceptual parameters regarding the voice of cochlear implanted children, with normal hearing children. this is a cross-sectional, quantitative and qualitative study. Thirty six cochlear implanted children aged between 3 y and 3 m to 5 y and 9 m and 25 children with normal hearing, aged between 3 y and 11 m and 6 y and 6 m, participated in this study. The recordings and the acoustics analysis of the sustained vowel/a/and spontaneous speech were performed using the PRAAT program. The parameters analyzed for the sustained vowel were the mean of the fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer and harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR). For the spontaneous speech, the minimum and maximum frequencies and the number of semitones were extracted. The perceptual analysis of the speech material was analyzed using visual-analogical scales of 100 points, composing the aspects related to the overall severity of the vocal deviation, roughness, breathiness, strain, pitch, loudness and resonance deviation, and instability. This last parameter was only analyzed for the sustained vowel. The results demonstrated that the majority of the vocal parameters analyzed in the samples of the implanted children disclosed values similar to those obtained by the group of children with normal hearing. implanted children who participate in a (re) habilitation and follow-up program, can present vocal characteristics similar to those vocal characteristics of children with normal hearing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Auditory plasticity in deaf children with bilateral cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2005-04-01

    Human children with cochlear implants represent a unique population of individuals who have undergone variable amounts of auditory deprivation prior to being able to hear. Even more unique are children who received bilateral cochlear implants (BICIs), in sequential surgical procedures, several years apart. Auditory deprivation in these individuals consists of a two-stage process, whereby complete deafness is experienced initially, followed by deafness in one ear. We studied the effects of post-implant experience on the ability of deaf children to localize sounds and to understand speech in noise. These are two of the most important functions that are known to depend on binaural hearing. Children were tested at time intervals ranging from 3-months to 24-months following implantation of the second ear, while listening with either implant alone or bilaterally. Our findings suggest that the period during which plasticity occurs in human binaural system is protracted, extending into middle-to-late childhood. The rate at which benefits from bilateral hearing abilities are attained following deprivation is faster for speech intelligibility in noise compared with sound localization. Finally, the age at which the second implant was received may play an important role in the acquisition of binaural abilities. [Work supported by NIH-NIDCD.

  1. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children and the impact of the inter-implant interval.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Marc J W; Venekamp, Roderick P; Grolman, Wilko; van der Heijden, Geert J M G

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of simultaneous versus sequential bilateral cochlear implantation on postoperative outcomes in children with bilateral deafness and to evaluate the impact of the inter-implant interval and age at second implantation on postoperative outcomes in children who already received their first cochlear implant. PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. All studies comparing the effects of simultaneous with sequential bilateral cochlear implantation on postoperative outcomes and those evaluating the impact of the inter-implant interval and age at second implantation were retrieved. Four studies compared the effects of simultaneous with sequential bilateral cochlear implantation. All studies lacked randomization. Of these, three reported better speech perception and expressive language development at one year of bilateral experience for simultaneous cochlear implantation. Of the nineteen publications on the impact of the inter-implant interval on postoperative outcomes, the risk of bias was low-moderate for seven studies which were derived from five different study populations. In two of these populations no impact of the inter-implant interval was found, while in three a longer inter-implant interval was associated with poorer speech and language development. Observational studies suggest that simultaneous implantation in children may be associated with improved speech and language development, and that a prolonged inter-implant interval between both implantations may have a negative impact on these postoperative outcomes. Randomized trials are, however, needed to demonstrate whether simultaneous implantation indeed is superior to sequential bilateral implantation in children with bilateral deafness. NA. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Educational Interpreters: Meeting the Communication Needs of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Julie; Higbee, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved cochlear implants for deaf and hard of hearing children, the number of children who have cochlear implants has increased in mainstream settings. Recent research suggests that these students, like their deaf and hard of hearing peers without implants who use sign language,…

  3. Hearing performance and voice acoustics of cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana Cristina; Brasolotto, Alcione Ghedino; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Moret, Adriane Lima Mortari; Bahmad Júnior, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    The voice of hearing-impaired individuals has been described extensively, and exhibits abnormalities in quality, articulation and resonance. Having an understanding of the aspects that may have an impact on voice characteristics of cochlear implant users is important for users and for professionals in this field. To verify the existence of correlation between age, time of device use, voice detection threshold, hearing category score and language category score with acoustic data of voices of cochlear implanted children. Retrospective study. Fifty-one children ranging in age from 3 years to 5 years and 11 months who unilaterally used cochlear implants participated. Acoustic analysis of the sustained vowel/a/, sequential speech and spontaneous speech was performed. The results were correlated with demographic data and hearing test results. Children with worse voice detection threshold showed higher frequency in the sustained vowel (p≤0.001) and in the spontaneous speech (p≤0.005). There was a correlation between the voice detection threshold and the frequency values of the sustained vowel and spontaneous speech of the studied population. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  5. Vowel acquisition by prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Marie-Eve; Le Normand, Marie-Thérèse; Ménard, Lucie; Goud, Marilyne; Cohen, Henri

    2004-05-01

    Phonetic transcriptions (study 1) and acoustic analysis (study 2) were used to clarify the nature and rhythm of vowel acquisition following the cochlear implantation of prelingually deaf children. In the first study, seven children were divided according to their degree of hearing loss (DHL): DHL I: 90-100 dB of hearing loss, 1 children; DHL II: 100-110 dB, 3 children; and DHL III: over 110 dB, 3 children. Spontaneous speech productions were recorded and videotaped 6 and 12 months postsurgery and vowel inventories were obtained by listing all vowels that occurred at least twice in the child's repertoire at the time of recording. Results showed that degree of hearing loss and age at implantation have a significant impact on vowel acquisition. Indeed, DHL I and II children demonstrated more diversified as well as more typical pattern of acquisition. In the second study, the values of the first and second formants were extracted. The results suggest evolving use of the acoustic space, reflecting the use of auditory feedback to produce the three phonological features exploited to contrast French vowels (height, place of articulation, and rounding). The possible influence of visual feedback before cochlear implant is discussed.

  6. Cyborgization: Deaf Education for Young Children in the Cochlear Implantation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Joseph Michael

    2011-01-01

    The author, who was raised oral deaf himself, recounts a visit to a school for young deaf children and discovers that young d/Deaf children and their rights are subverted by the cochlear implantation empire. The hypercapitalist, techno-manic times of cochlear implantation has wreaked havoc to the lives of not only young children with deafness but…

  7. Cyborgization: Deaf Education for Young Children in the Cochlear Implantation Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Joseph Michael

    2011-01-01

    The author, who was raised oral deaf himself, recounts a visit to a school for young deaf children and discovers that young d/Deaf children and their rights are subverted by the cochlear implantation empire. The hypercapitalist, techno-manic times of cochlear implantation has wreaked havoc to the lives of not only young children with deafness but…

  8. Visual Attention in Children with Normal Hearing, Children with Hearing Aids, and Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharpe, Anne Marie; Ashmead, Daniel H.; Rothpletz, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    This study compared visual attention in 18 prelingually deaf children (half with cochlear implants and half with hearing aids) and 10 normal hearing children. Unlike previous studies, children in all three groups performed similarly on a continuous-performance visual attention task and on a letter cancellation task. Only age and nonverbal…

  9. Brazilian adaptation of the Functioning after Pediatric Cochlear Implantation (FAPCI): comparison between normal hearing and cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Trissia M F; Cordeiro, Mara L

    2015-01-01

    Enabling development of the ability to communicate effectively is the principal objective of cochlear implantation (CI) in children. However, objective and effective metrics of communication for cochlear-implanted Brazilian children are lacking. The Functioning after Pediatric Cochlear Implantation (FAPCI), a parent/caregiver reporting instrument developed in the United States, is the first communicative performance scale for evaluation of real-world verbal communicative performance of 2-5-year-old children with cochlear implants. The primary aim was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the FAPCI. The secondary aim was to conduct a trial of the adapted Brazilian-Portuguese FAPCI (FAPCI-BP) in normal hearing (NH) and CI children. The American-English FAPCI was translated by a rigorous forward-backward process. The FAPCI-BP was then applied to the parents of children with NH (n=131) and CI (n=13), 2-9 years of age. Test-retest reliability was verified. The FAPCI-BP was confirmed to have excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.90). The CI group had lower FAPCI scores (58.38 ± 22.6) than the NH group (100.38 ± 15.2; p<0.001, Wilcoxon test). The present results indicate that the FAPCI-BP is a reliable instrument. It can be used to evaluate verbal communicative performance in children with and without CI. The FAPCI is currently the only psychometrically-validated instrument that allows such measures in cochlear-implanted children. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Articulation skills in Turkish speaking children with cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Sevinc, Sebnem; Ozcebe, Esra; Atas, Ahmet; Buyukozturk, Sener

    2009-10-01

    The benefits of using cochlear implant (CI) on speech perception and production have been documented. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of age of cochlear implantation performed and length of auditory experience with CI on the development of articulation skills in prelingual children with CI. For this purpose, 14 children with CI were administered through the standardized articulation test named AAT (Ankara Articulation Test). In order to evaluate the development of articulation skills, AAT was applied to each child with CI at the first and the fourth years of CI. The test group was selected among those congenitally hearing impaired children who had used hearing aids bilaterally before the age of one and a half, and received intervention after fitting hearing aids. The test group was divided into two subgroups: Group 1 consisted of the children implanted at and below the age of 3 and Group 2 consisted of the children implanted after the age of 3. Evaluations of articulation skills between groups and within groups were performed in the first and fourth years of implantation. In the study, nonparametric statistics have been used to compare the test scores. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon test have been used in the comparisons made between groups and within groups, respectively. While there has not been observed any statistically significant difference between the first year articulation skills of children with CI at and below the age of three and children with CI above the age of 3, for the fourth year this difference has been found to be statistically significant. The results demonstrate the importance of the early application of CI and length of auditory experience with CI in the development of articulation skills.

  11. Speech feature discrimination in deaf children following cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Tonya R.; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2002-05-01

    Speech feature discrimination is a fundamental perceptual skill that is often assumed to underlie word recognition and sentence comprehension performance. To investigate the development of speech feature discrimination in deaf children with cochlear implants, we conducted a retrospective analysis of results from the Minimal Pairs Test (Robbins et al., 1988) selected from patients enrolled in a longitudinal study of speech perception and language development. The MP test uses a 2AFC procedure in which children hear a word and select one of two pictures (bat-pat). All 43 children were prelingually deafened, received a cochlear implant before 6 years of age or between ages 6 and 9, and used either oral or total communication. Children were tested once every 6 months to 1 year for 7 years; not all children were tested at each interval. By 2 years postimplant, the majority of these children achieved near-ceiling levels of discrimination performance for vowel height, vowel place, and consonant manner. Most of the children also achieved plateaus but did not reach ceiling performance for consonant place and voicing. The relationship between speech feature discrimination, spoken word recognition, and sentence comprehension will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD Research Grant No. R01DC00064 and NIH/NIDCD Training Grant No. T32DC00012.

  12. Implicit Sequence Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Christopher M.; Pisoni, David B.; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Henning, Shirley C.

    2010-01-01

    Deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) represent an intriguing opportunity to study neurocognitive plasticity and reorganization when sound is introduced following a period of auditory deprivation early in development. Although it is common to consider deafness as affecting hearing alone, it may be the case that auditory deprivation leads to more global changes in neurocognitive function. In this paper, we investigate implicit sequence learning abilities in deaf children with CIs using a novel task that measured learning through improvement to immediate serial recall for statistically-consistent visual sequences. The results demonstrated two key findings. First, the deaf children with CIs showed disturbances in their visual sequence learning abilities relative to the typically-developing normal-hearing children. Second, sequence learning was significantly correlated with a standardized measure of language outcome in the CI children. These findings suggest that a period of auditory deprivation has secondary effects related to general sequencing deficits, and that disturbances in sequence learning may at least partially explain why some deaf children still struggle with language following cochlear implantation. PMID:21159089

  13. The Needs of Parents of Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Zaidman-Zait, Anat

    2001-01-01

    This study surveyed 35 mothers of cochlear implant (CI) candidates or current users on the relative importance of various topics in a parent-targeted intervention program preceding and/or following cochlear implantation. Suggestions for an optimal intervention include use of a multidisciplinary team, information on many topics and services, and…

  14. Phonological Awareness and Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Fey, Marc E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether preschool-age children with cochlear implants have age-appropriate phonological awareness and print knowledge and to examine the relationships of these skills with related speech and language abilities. Method: The sample comprised 24 children with cochlear implants (CIs) and 23 peers with normal hearing (NH), ages 36…

  15. A World of Difference. Parental Perspectives on Cochlear Implantation in Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isarin, Jet; van Zadelhoff, Ilse; Wolters-Leermakers, Nina; Speksnijder-Bregman, Marjon; Hannink, Mariën; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of deaf children with additional disabilities receive a cochlear implant (CI). International studies on cochlear implantation in deaf children with additional disabilities show less and slower speech and language gains, but improvement in overall quality of life. In order to qualify the concept of quality of life this study…

  16. Children with Cochlear Implants and Developmental Disabilities: A Language Skills Study with Developmentally Matched Hearing Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    The number of children receiving cochlear implants (CIs) with significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. Unfortunately, children with additional disabilities receiving CIs have largely been excluded from studies on cochlear implant outcomes. Thus limited data exists on outcomes in this population to guide…

  17. Cochlear Implantation for Children with Hearing Loss and Multiple Disabilities: An Evaluation from an Educator's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Bodo

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, parents of children with hearing loss and various additional disabilities have shown increasing interest in cochlear implants. This article describes how the program in Hanover, Germany is attempting to respond to this interest. It discusses the selection process for children who receive cochlear implants who have multiple…

  18. Spelling in Written Stories by School-Age Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straley, Sara G.; Werfel, Krystal L.; Hendricks, Alison Eisel

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the spelling of 3rd to 6th grade children with cochlear implants in written stories. Spelling was analysed using traditional correct/incorrect scoring as well as the Spelling Sensitivity Score, which provides linguistic information about spelling attempts. Children with cochlear implants spelled 86 per cent of words in stories…

  19. Spelling in Written Stories by School-Age Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straley, Sara G.; Werfel, Krystal L.; Hendricks, Alison Eisel

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the spelling of 3rd to 6th grade children with cochlear implants in written stories. Spelling was analysed using traditional correct/incorrect scoring as well as the Spelling Sensitivity Score, which provides linguistic information about spelling attempts. Children with cochlear implants spelled 86 per cent of words in stories…

  20. Children with Cochlear Implants and Developmental Disabilities: A Language Skills Study with Developmentally Matched Hearing Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    The number of children receiving cochlear implants (CIs) with significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. Unfortunately, children with additional disabilities receiving CIs have largely been excluded from studies on cochlear implant outcomes. Thus limited data exists on outcomes in this population to guide…

  1. Persistent Language Delay versus Late Language Emergence in Children with Early Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geers, Ann E.; Nicholas, Johanna; Tobey, Emily; Davidson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation is to differentiate children using cochlear implants (CIs) who did or did not achieve age-appropriate language scores by mid-elementary grades and to identify risk factors for persistent language delay following early cochlear implantation. Materials and Method: Children receiving unilateral CIs at…

  2. Children with Cochlear Implants in Australia: Educational Settings, Supports, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Renee; Hyde, Merv

    2010-01-01

    This Australian study examined the communication, academic, and social outcomes of pediatric cochlear implantation from the perspectives of teachers working with children with cochlear implants. The children were aged from 1 to 18 years and attended a range of educational settings in early intervention, primary, and secondary schooling. One…

  3. Phonological Awareness and Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Fey, Marc E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether preschool-age children with cochlear implants have age-appropriate phonological awareness and print knowledge and to examine the relationships of these skills with related speech and language abilities. Method: The sample comprised 24 children with cochlear implants (CIs) and 23 peers with normal hearing (NH), ages 36…

  4. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  5. Children with Cochlear Implants in Australia: Educational Settings, Supports, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Renee; Hyde, Merv

    2010-01-01

    This Australian study examined the communication, academic, and social outcomes of pediatric cochlear implantation from the perspectives of teachers working with children with cochlear implants. The children were aged from 1 to 18 years and attended a range of educational settings in early intervention, primary, and secondary schooling. One…

  6. A World of Difference. Parental Perspectives on Cochlear Implantation in Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isarin, Jet; van Zadelhoff, Ilse; Wolters-Leermakers, Nina; Speksnijder-Bregman, Marjon; Hannink, Mariën; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of deaf children with additional disabilities receive a cochlear implant (CI). International studies on cochlear implantation in deaf children with additional disabilities show less and slower speech and language gains, but improvement in overall quality of life. In order to qualify the concept of quality of life this study…

  7. Persistent Language Delay versus Late Language Emergence in Children with Early Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geers, Ann E.; Nicholas, Johanna; Tobey, Emily; Davidson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation is to differentiate children using cochlear implants (CIs) who did or did not achieve age-appropriate language scores by mid-elementary grades and to identify risk factors for persistent language delay following early cochlear implantation. Materials and Method: Children receiving unilateral CIs at…

  8. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  9. Analogic and Symbolic Comparison of Numerosity in Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arfe, Barbara; Lucangeli, Daniela; Genovese, Elisabetta; Monzani, Daniele; Gubernale, Marco; Trevisi, Patrizia; Santarelli, Rosamaria

    2011-01-01

    This study explores how preschoolers with cochlear implants process numerical comparisons from two different inputs: a) nonverbal (analogical) and b) verbal (symbolic). Preschool cochlear-implanted children (CI) ranging in age from 4;3 to 6;1 were compared with 99 age-matched hearing children (HC) in three numerical tasks: verbal counting, a digit…

  10. Acquisition of Speech by Children Who Have Prolonged Cochlear Implant Experience

    PubMed Central

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spencer, Linda; Woodworth, George G.

    2011-01-01

    The four purposes of this investigation were to assess whether children acquire intelligible speech following prolonged cochlear-implant experience and examine their speech error patterns, to examine how age at implantation influences speech acquisition, to assess how speech production and speech perception skills relate, and to determine whether cochlear implant recipients who formerly used simultaneous communication (speech and manually coded English) begin to use speech without sign to communicate. Twenty-eight prelinguistically deafened children who use a Nucleus cochlear implant were assigned to one of three age groups, according to age at implantation: 2–5 yrs (N = 12), 5–8 yrs (N = 9), and 8–15 yrs (N = 7). All subjects had worn a cochlear implant for at least 24 mos, and an average of 36 mos. All subjects used simultaneous communication at the time of implantation. Subjects performed both imitative and structured spontaneous sampling speech tasks. The results permit the following conclusions: (a) children who have used a cochlear implant for at least 2 yrs acquire some intelligible speech; (b) children who receive a cochlear implant before the age of 5 yrs appear to show greater benefit in their speech production skills than children who are older, at least after a minimum of 2 yrs of use; (c) children who recognize more speech while wearing their cochlear implants are likely to speak more intelligibly; and, (d) signing does not disappear from a child's communication mode following implantation. PMID:7596098

  11. Cochlear implantation in children with complex needs - outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Amy; Martin, Jane; Strachan, David; Raine, Chris

    2013-03-01

    Prospective review of the assessment and outcomes of children with complex needs receiving cochlear implants (CIs) at the Yorkshire Cochlear Implant Service (YCIS). Nineteen children with complex needs were assessed pre-implant and 12 months post-implant switch-on using appropriate developmental-related audiology, categories of auditory performance (CAP), meaningful auditory information scale (MAIS), listening progress score (LiP), and meaningful use of speech scale (MUSS). Outcomes were compared with 230 children at the YCIS without complex needs. Average CAP scores improved from 0.4 to 3.0, compared with 4.2 in the control group. MAIS scores as completed by parent and teacher improved to 62 and 57%, respectively, compared with the control group who achieved 82 and 70% at 12 months. LiP scores improved from 11 to 65% compared with the control which increased from 22 to 81%. MUSS scores as assessed by parent and teacher improved to 35 and 31%, respectively, at 12 months compared with 52 and 51% in the control group. CIs in children have been shown to be cost effective and provide benefits in auditory and speech perception; however, there are few reports specifically relating to outcomes in children with complex needs. Improvement was seen across all outcome measures although less than in children without additional needs. Consideration should be given to the use of quality-of-life measurements as the development of oral communication may not be a realistic goal or accurately reflect benefits gained by the use of CIs in this patient group.

  12. Programming characteristics of cochlear implants in children: effects of aetiology and age at implantation.

    PubMed

    Incerti, Paola V; Ching, Teresa Y C; Hou, Sanna; Van Buynder, Patricia; Flynn, Christopher; Cowan, Robert

    2017-09-08

    We investigated effects of aetiology and age at implantation on changes in threshold (T) levels, comfortable (C) levels and dynamic range (DR) for cochlear implants (CIs) in children over the first five years of life. Information was collected at 6 months post-activation of CIs, and at 3 and 5 years of age. One hundred and sixty-one children participating in the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study. Children with neural and structural cochlear lesions had higher T-levels and C-levels as compared to those without these conditions. Parameter settings varied from manufacturer's defaults more often in the former than in the latter group. Investigation of the effect of age at implantation for children without neural and structural cochlear lesions showed that those implanted at ≤12 months of age had higher T-levels and narrower DR at 6 months post-activation, as compared to the later-implanted group. For both early- and later-implanted groups, the C-levels at 6 months post-activation were lower than those at age 3 and 5 years. There were no significant differences in T-levels, C-levels, or DR between age 3 and 5 years. Aetiology and age at implantation had significant effects on T-levels and C-levels.

  13. Use of acoustic cues by children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Giezen, Marcel R; Escudero, Paola; Baker, Anne

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the use of different acoustic cues in auditory perception of consonant and vowel contrasts by profoundly deaf children with a cochlear implant (CI) in comparison to age-matched children and young adults with normal hearing. A speech sound categorization task in an XAB format was administered to 15 children ages 5-6 with a CI (mean age at implant: 1;8 [years;months]), 20 normal-hearing age-matched children, and 21 normal-hearing adults. Four contrasts were examined: //-/a/, /i/-/i/, /bu/-/pu/, and /fu/-/su/. Measures included phoneme endpoint identification, individual cue reliance, cue weighting, and classification slope. The children with a CI used the spectral cues in the /fu/-/su/ contrast less effectively than the children with normal hearing, resulting in poorer phoneme endpoint identification and a shallower classification slope. Performance on the other 3 contrasts did not differ significantly. Adults consistently showed steeper classification slopes than the children, but similar cue-weighting patterns were observed in all 3 groups. Despite their different auditory input, children with a CI appear to be able to use many acoustic cues effectively in speech perception. Most importantly, children with a CI and normal-hearing children were observed to use similar cue-weighting patterns.

  14. Long-term outcome after cochlear implantation in children with additional developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Wakil, Nathalie; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M; Olds, Janet; Schramm, David; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2014-09-01

    Candidacy criteria for cochlear implants have expanded to include children with complex developmental disabilities. The aim of this study was to determine the long-term benefits of cochlear implantation for this clinical population. The study involved a retrospective chart review. The review identified 21 children with complex disabilities who had received cochlear implants in a pediatric center prior to 2004. Length of cochlear implant use was between 7.3 and 19.0 years. Long-term functional auditory abilities were assessed pre and post-operatively using measures appropriate to the child's level of functioning. Cognitive assessments and developmental data were also available for the children. Children's long-term speech recognition outcomes depended highly on their developmental status. Children with severe developmental delay showed no open-set speech recognition abilities while children with mild to moderate delays achieved open-set scores ranging from 48 to 94% on open-set word testing. Five of 13 (38%) children with complex needs had discontinued use of their cochlear implant. Long-term speech recognition abilities following cochlear implantation for children with complex developmental issues seem to be highly related to their developmental profile. Developmental status is an important consideration in counselling families as part of the cochlear implant decision process.

  15. Some aspects of language development in normal-hearing children and children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Szagun, G

    1997-11-01

    This article presents some important processes of normal child language acquisition and applies them to language acquisition data of children with cochlear implants. Modern studies of language acquisition, covering various languages, have demonstrated a close link between linguistic and cognitive development. Sensorimotor intelligence provides a construction of reality on which the first grammatical structures are built, encoding a number of relations which hold between objects, persons, events, and localizations. When acquiring the more complex morphological and syntactic aspects of their mother-tongue, children use a number of characteristic information processing strategies which make some formal markings easier to learn than others. There is considerable variability across children with respect to rate of acquisition, the use of imitation, and analytic versus holistic processing strategies. Caregivers' language input can facilitate language acquisition, notably the use of expansions and reformulations, and a generally accepting style. EMPIRICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH COCHLEAR IMPLANTS: Language acquisition data from two children with cochlear implants show great differences with respect to rate of acquisition, construction of the German case system, and syntax. Whereas one child discovers the regularities of the case inflectional system quickly, the other child appears to prefer holistic and rote learning processes and uses a sequential strategy for combining words. It is suggested that variability between children with cochlear implants may be due to different frequencies of actually processed linguistic items. Future research should compare language development in children with cochlear implants and those with normal hearing making use of psycholinguistic methods of research design and analysis.

  16. Early vocabulary development in children with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Välimaa, Taina; Kunnari, Sari; Laukkanen-Nevala, Päivi; Lonka, Eila

    2017-06-16

    Children with unilateral cochlear implants (CIs) may have delayed vocabulary development for an extended period after implantation. Bilateral cochlear implantation is reported to be associated with improved sound localization and enhanced speech perception in noise. This study proposed that bilateral implantation might also promote early vocabulary development. Knowledge regarding vocabulary growth and composition in children with bilateral CIs and factors associated with it may lead to improvements in the content of early speech and language intervention and family counselling. To analyse the growth of early vocabulary and its composition during the first year after CI activation and to investigate factors associated with vocabulary growth. The participants were 20 children with bilateral CIs (12 boys; eight girls; mean age at CI activation = 12.9 months). Vocabulary size was assessed with the Finnish version of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) Infant Form and compared with normative data. Vocabulary composition was analysed in relation to vocabulary size. Growth curve modelling was implemented using a linear mixed model to analyse the effects of the following variables on early vocabulary growth: time, gender, maternal education, residual hearing with hearing aids, age at first hearing aid fitting and age at CI activation. Despite clear vocabulary growth over time, children with bilateral CIs lagged behind their age norms in receptive vocabulary during the first 12 months after CI activation. In expressive vocabulary, 35% of the children were able to catch up with their age norms, but 55% of the children lagged behind them. In receptive and expressive vocabularies of 1-20 words, analysis of different semantic categories indicated that social terms constituted the highest proportion. Nouns constituted the highest proportion in vocabularies of 101-400 words. The proportion of verbs remained below 20% and the proportion of function words and

  17. Use of Narrative-Based Language Intervention with Children who have Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Ellie C.; Swanson, Lori A.; Buebler, Velvet

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the use of narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) with 3 children who have cochlear implants. Findings reveal that NBLI is effective intervention to increase the narrative skills of children with specific language impairment.

  18. Use of Narrative-Based Language Intervention with Children who have Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Ellie C.; Swanson, Lori A.; Buebler, Velvet

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the use of narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) with 3 children who have cochlear implants. Findings reveal that NBLI is effective intervention to increase the narrative skills of children with specific language impairment.

  19. Programming, Care, and Troubleshooting of Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedley-Williams, Andrea J.; Sladen, Douglas P.; Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current cochlear implant technology, programming strategies, troubleshooting, and care techniques. It considers: device components, initial stimulation, speech coding strategies, use and care, troubleshooting, and the classroom environment. (Contains references.) (DB)

  20. Management of Children Using Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Psarros, Colleen; Incerti, Paula; Hill, Mandy

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies identify six factors affecting successful use of a hearing aid with a cochlear implant: duration of hearing aid use prior to implantation, amount of residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, educational and listening demands, cosmetic issues, hearing aid rejection, and extended period of non-use of hearing aid. (Contains…

  1. Management of Children Using Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Teresa Y. C.; Psarros, Colleen; Incerti, Paula; Hill, Mandy

    2001-01-01

    Four case studies identify six factors affecting successful use of a hearing aid with a cochlear implant: duration of hearing aid use prior to implantation, amount of residual hearing in the non-implanted ear, educational and listening demands, cosmetic issues, hearing aid rejection, and extended period of non-use of hearing aid. (Contains…

  2. Auditory training improves auditory performance in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Roman, Stephane; Rochette, Françoise; Triglia, Jean-Michel; Schön, Daniele; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    While the positive benefits of pediatric cochlear implantation on language perception skills are now proven, the heterogeneity of outcomes remains high. The understanding of this heterogeneity and possible strategies to minimize it is of utmost importance. Our scope here is to test the effects of an auditory training strategy, "sound in Hands", using playful tasks grounded on the theoretical and empirical findings of cognitive sciences. Indeed, several basic auditory operations, such as auditory scene analysis (ASA) are not trained in the usual therapeutic interventions in deaf children. However, as they constitute a fundamental basis in auditory cognition, their development should imply general benefit in auditory processing and in turn enhance speech perception. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether cochlear implanted children could improve auditory performances in trained tasks and whether they could develop a transfer of learning to a phonetic discrimination test. Nineteen prelingually unilateral cochlear implanted children without additional handicap (4-10 year-olds) were recruited. The four main auditory cognitive processing (identification, discrimination, ASA and auditory memory) were stimulated and trained in the Experimental Group (EG) using Sound in Hands. The EG followed 20 training weekly sessions of 30 min and the untrained group was the control group (CG). Two measures were taken for both groups: before training (T1) and after training (T2). EG showed a significant improvement in the identification, discrimination and auditory memory tasks. The improvement in the ASA task did not reach significance. CG did not show any significant improvement in any of the tasks assessed. Most importantly, improvement was visible in the phonetic discrimination test for EG only. Moreover, younger children benefited more from the auditory training program to develop their phonetic abilities compared to older children, supporting the idea that

  3. Comparative analysis of vocabulary in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marina Santos; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de; Caldas, Fernanda Ferreira; Serra, Lucieny Silva Martin; Cardoso, Carolina Costa; Deperon, Tatiana Medeiros; Bahmad, Fayez

    2014-01-01

    The use of tests assessing the speech of patients who underwent cochlear implant (CI) surgery is warranted to increase knowledge on the development of these patients' language skills. The ABFW Child Language Test evaluates vocabulary, phonology, fluency, and pragmatics and can be administered to these children. To evaluate the vocabulary of children using CI. This study included 16 children who underwent CI surgery between 1-4 years and 11 months old. Patients were divided into five groups according to age upon CI activation. In comparison with the age of brain's auditory development vs. chronological age of hearing children, all children using CI performed better. The comparison between children using unilateral CI and bilateral CI showed that those using bilateral CI had better results. When we compared children's performance considering the chronological age of deaf and hearing children, hearing children performed better. However, there were similar results when patients effectively used their CI and attended auditory rehabilitation sessions. In our study, the vocabulary of children using CI is similar to the vocabulary of hearing children.

  4. Word learning processes in children with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; McGregor, Karla K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether three aspects of the word learning process—fast mapping, retention, and extension—are problematic for children with cochlear implants (CIs). Method We compared responses of 24 children with CIs, 24 age-matched hearing children and 23 vocabulary-matched hearing children to a novel object noun training episode. Comprehension and production were measured immediately following training (fast mapping) as well as one day later (retention). Extension was measured in terms of the ability of the participants to identify new (untrained) exemplars. Results Compared to their hearing age-mates, children with CIs performed marginally more poorly on fast mapping as measured by the comprehension probe and more poorly on retention as measured by comprehension and production probes. The age-mates improved over the retention interval but the children with CIs did not. Most of the children with CIs performed similarly to their age-mates on extension but two children underextended and five failed to understand the task. Compared to younger vocabulary-matched peers, children with CIs did not differ at fast mapping, retention, or extension. Conclusions Children with CIs demonstrated deficits in word learning, with retention being especially problematic. Their learning did not differ from that of younger children with similarly sized vocabularies. PMID:22896047

  5. Picture naming and verbal fluency in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Wechsler-Kashi, Deena; Schwartz, Richard G; Cleary, Miranda

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors examined lexical naming in children with cochlear implants (CIs). The goal was to determine whether children with CIs have deficits in lexical access and organization as revealed through reaction time in picture-naming and verbal fluency (VF) experiments. Children with CIs (n = 20, ages 7-10) were compared with 20 children with normal hearing (NH) matched for age and nonverbal IQ. Lexical abilities were examined using two naming tasks: a timed picture-naming task and a phonological and semantic VF naming task. Picture naming taps into lexical access capabilities and the VF task elucidates lexical organization. No group differences were found between children with CIs and children with NH on the timed picture-naming task. Children with CIs generated significantly fewer words than the children with NH on the VF tasks. Larger group differences were found for the phonological VF task compared with the semantic VF task. Limited early linguistic and auditory experiences may affect lexical representations and organization (lexical-semantic connections) in school-age children with hearing loss who use CIs. Further analyses and studies should continue to examine these underlying linguistic deficits. The present results suggest a need to emphasize not only increasing the size of children's vocabularies during therapy, but also expanding and increasing the semantic and phonological richness of their lexical representations.

  6. Working memory in Farsi-speaking children with normal development and cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Soleymani, Zahra; Amidfar, Meysam; Dadgar, Hooshang; Jalaie, Shohre

    2014-04-01

    Working memory has an important role in language acquisition and development of cognition skills. The ability of encoding, storage and retrieval of phonological codes, as activities of working memory, acquired by audition sense. Children with cochlear implant experience a period that they are not able to perceive sounds. In order to assess the effect of hearing on working memory, we investigated working memory as a cognition skill in children with normal development and cochlear implant. Fifty students with normal hearing and 50 students with cochlear implant aged 5-7 years participated in this study. Children educated in the preschool, the first and second grades. Children with normal development were matched based on age, gender, and grade of education with cochlear implant. Two components of working memory including phonological loop and central executive were compared between two groups. Phonological loop assessed by nonword repetition task and forward digit span. To assess central executive component backward digit span was used. The developmental trend was studied in children with normal development and cochlear implant as well. The effect of age at implantation in children with cochlear implants on components of working memory was investigated. There are significant differences between children with normal development and cochlear implant in all tasks that assess working memory (p < 0.001). The children's age at implantation was negatively correlated with all tasks (p < 0.001). In contrast, duration of usage of cochlear implant set was positively correlated with all tasks (p < 0.001). The comparison of working memory between different grades showed significant differences both in children with normal development and in children with cochlear implant (p < 0.05). These results implied that children with cochlear implant may experience difficulties in working memory. Therefore, these children have problems in encoding, practicing, and repeating phonological

  7. Perception of Suprasegmental Features of Speech by Children with Cochlear Implants and Children with Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Peled, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed perception of suprasegmental features of speech by 30 prelingual children with sensorineural hearing loss. Ten children had cochlear implants (CIs), and 20 children wore hearing aids (HA): 10 with severe hearing loss and 10 with profound hearing loss. Perception of intonation, syllable stress, word emphasis, and word pattern…

  8. Speech Perception of Children with Cochlear Implants and Children with Traditional Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildner, Vesna; Sindija, Branka; Zrinski, Karolina Vrban

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse speech perception of children with cochlear implants (N=29) and children fitted with traditional hearing aids (N=20). One- and two-syllable words were presented auditorily in a forced choice minimal-pair discrimination task. The children repeated the word and pointed to the appropriate picture presented on…

  9. Functional performance among children with cochlear implants and additional disabilities.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I

    2013-09-01

    To assess daily functional skills among young cochlear implant (CI) recipients with additional disabilities. Children with CI and developmental disabilities and a hearing control group containing similar ages and similar disabilities were enrolled in a cross-sectional study of language and functional skills. Daily functional skills were measured using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI), which provides standard and scaled scores in Self-Care, Mobility, and Social Functioning domains. Language was assessed using the Preschool Language Scales, 4th edition which provides standard scores and age equivalents. Fourteen children with CIs and seven hearing controls were included in this analysis. Most children in this study (90.5%) had cognitive disabilities and 57% had motor disabilities. Compared with the hearing controls, children with CIs were less likely to have functional independence in any PEDI domain. Children with CI had significantly lower median social functioning standard scores compared with controls (17.3 vs. 27.5, P = 0.009). After controlling for nonverbal cognitive abilities and language level, the difference was no longer significant (19.1 vs. 24, P = 0.3). Among children with CI, age at implant and duration with device were not associated (P > 0.4) with PEDI scores. Although children with CI and developmental disabilities had similar functional skills as hearing children with similar disabilities regarding the PEDI domains of Self-Care and Mobility, they had lower Social Function standard scores. This lower social functioning among children with implants may be related to lower language levels and possible language deficits seen in the CI group. Regular assessments of functional abilities coupled with language abilities are essential in providing every child with the opportunity for maximizing the potential for independence.

  10. Long latency auditory evoked potentials in children with cochlear implants: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Matas, Carla Gentile; Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho de

    2013-11-25

    The aim of this study was to analyze the findings on Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in children with cochlear implant through a systematic literature review. After formulation of research question and search of studies in four data bases with the following descriptors: electrophysiology (eletrofisiologia), cochlear implantation (implante coclear), child (criança), neuronal plasticity (plasticidade neuronal) and audiology (audiologia), were selected articles (original and complete) published between 2002 and 2013 in Brazilian Portuguese or English. A total of 208 studies were found; however, only 13 contemplated the established criteria and were further analyzed; was made data extraction for analysis of methodology and content of the studies. The results described suggest rapid changes in P1 component of Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in children with cochlear implants. Although there are few studies on the theme, cochlear implant has been shown to produce effective changes in central auditory path ways especially in children implanted before 3 years and 6 months of age.

  11. Communication development in children who receive a cochlear implant by 12 months of age.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Jaime; Dettman, Shani; Dowell, Richard; Briggs, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Describe the long-term benefits of early cochlear implantation. Provide a comprehensive description of outcomes, including: language, speech production, and speech perception. Compare the communication outcomes for the early implanted children to those of normally hearing children and children who received a cochlear implant at a comparatively older age. Retrospective review of the communication development of 35 children implanted between 6 and 12 months of age and 85 children implanted between 13 and 24 months of age. Audiologic assessments included unaided and aided audiograms, auditory brainstem response (ABR), auditory steady state response (ASSR), and otoacoustic emissons (OAEs). Formal language, speech production, and speech perception measures were administered, preimplant and at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years postimplant. The children who received their cochlear implant by 12 months of age demonstrated language growth rates equivalent to their normally hearing peers and achieved age appropriate receptive language scores 3 years postimplant. The children who received their cochlear implant between 13 and 24 months demonstrated a significant language delay at 3 years postimplant. Speech production development followed a similar pattern to that of normal-hearing children, although was delayed, for both groups of children. Mean open-set speech perception scores were comparable with previous reports for children and adults who use cochlear implants. Children implanted by 12 months of age demonstrate better language development compared with children who receive their cochlear implant between 13 and 24 months. This supports the provision of a cochlear implant within the first year of life to enhance the likelihood that a child with severe-to-profound hearing impairment will commence elementary school with age-appropriate language skills.

  12. Spoken Language Development in Children Following Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Niparko, John K.; Tobey, Emily A.; Thal, Donna J.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Fink, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    Context Cochlear implantation (CI) is a surgical alternative to traditional amplification (hearing aids) that can facilitate spoken language development in young children with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Objective To prospectively assess spoken language acquisition following CI in young children with adjustment of co-variates. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective, longitudinal, and multidimensional assessment of spoken language growth over a 3-year period following CI. Prospective cohort study of children who underwent CI before 5 years of age (n=188) from 6 US centers and hearing children of similar ages (n=97) from 2 preschools recruited between November, 2002 and December, 2004. Follow-up completed between November, 2005 and May, 2008. Main Outcome Measures Performance on measures of spoken language comprehension and expression. Results Children undergoing CI showed greater growth in spoken language performance (10.4;[95% confidence interval: 9.6–11.2] points/year in comprehension; 8.4;[7.8–9.0] in expression) than would be predicted by their pre-CI baseline scores (5.4;[4.1–6.7] comprehension; 5.8;[4.6–7.0] expression). Although mean scores were not restored to age-appropriate levels after 3 years, significantly greater annual rates of language acquisition were observed in children who were younger at CI (1.1;[0.5–1.7] points in comprehension per year younger; 1.0;[0.6–1.5] in expression), and in children with shorter histories of hearing deficit (0.8;[0.2,1.2] points in comprehension per year shorter; 0.6;[0.2–1.0] for expression). In multivariable analyses, greater residual hearing prior to CI, higher ratings of parent-child interactions, and higher SES associated with greater rates of growth in comprehension and expression. Conclusions The use of cochlear implants in young children was associated with better spoken language learning than would be predicted from their pre-implantation scores. However

  13. Cochlear implants in forty-eight children with cochlear and/or vestibular abnormality.

    PubMed

    Dettman, Shani; Sadeghi-Barzalighi, Ana; Ambett, Ranjeeta; Dowell, Richard; Trotter, Matthew; Briggs, Robert

    2011-01-01

    CT and MRI scans for 48 children with cochlear and/or vestibular abnormality were classified in decreasing severity; common cavity, Mondini plus enlarged vestibular aqueduct, Mondini dysplasia alone and enlarged vestibular aqueduct alone. No significant relationship between degree of cochlea abnormality and surgical issues (cerebrospinal fluid gusher, depth of insertion, number of electrodes) or speech perception/language outcomes was found. A significant relationship was observed between cerebrospinal fluid gusher and partial electrode insertion, fewer active electrodes and poorer sentence understanding. Optimum language outcomes were associated with younger age at implant.

  14. Language performance in children with cochlear implants and additional disabilities.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I

    2010-02-01

    Quantify post-cochlear implant (CI) language among children with disabilities and determine the role of nonverbal cognitive quotients (NVCQ) in predicting language. Small cohort study in pediatric tertiary care center. Children (n = 20) with CIs and developmental disabilities were enrolled. Receptive and expressive language was reported as language quotients (LQs). Pre- and post-CI LQs were compared using the signed-rank test. Multiple regression models analyzed language while controlling for possible confounders. Five subjects had symptomatic cytomegalovirus, and four subjects had CHARGE syndrome with hearing loss etiology. Seventy-five percent had cognitive deficits, and 55% had motor delays. Median age of CI was 24 months; median CI duration was 27.7 months. The range of NVCQs for the study cohort was 27 to 115. Fifteen subjects had NVCQs <80. Age at implantation, income, and number of siblings were not correlated with language. Although children had significant increases in language age pre- to post-CI, median LQs did not significantly change after implantation. NVCQ, age at hearing loss diagnosis, implant duration, and number of different therapies attended were significant in models. NVCQ contributed the most unique variance (67%; P = .0003). Pre-CI language performance did not predict post-CI performance. This study is the first step in addressing the effects of CIs on language among children with disabilities. Progress in language skills occurred for all participants, although rates of progress were slow and highly variable. NVCQ was the strongest predictor of language, although cognition is not always sufficient for good language development. Adapting therapeutic strategies may be essential to impact greater language progress in these complex children.

  15. Early intervention and assessment of speech and language development in young children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    May-Mederake, Birgit

    2012-07-01

    Age is one of the most important determinants of the benefit achieved in the cochlear implantation of pre-lingually deafened children. Earlier age at implantation increases the exposure of children with a hearing impairment to auditory stimuli. Earlier auditory stimulation enables children to better understand spoken language and to use spoken language themselves. Furthermore, there appears to be critical period under 2 years of age during which access to spoken language is essential in order for language development to proceed appropriately. The present study aimed to assess the impact of cochlear implantation under 2 years of age on subsequent speech and language development. 28 children implanted with a cochlear implant prior to 2 years of age were included in this study and the effects of age at implantation were determined using a reception of grammar test, active vocabulary test and speech development test. Demographic features were described using descriptive statistics and data were compared to the normative values (T-values) of their hearing peers by t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test. The present data indicates that overall children with a hearing impairment implanted at less than 2 years of age perform as well as or better than their hearing peers in speech and grammar development. Word Comprehension was significantly greater in children with a cochlear implant compared to their normative peers (p=0.003), whereas Phonological Working Memory for Nonsense Words was poorer (p=0.031). An effect of age on grammatical and speech development could be found for younger implanted children (<12 months), who reached higher scores than children implanted after 12 months of age. The data suggests that early hearing loss intervention via cochlear implantation in children benefits the speech and language development of children. A potential sensitive period exists for implantation before 12 months of age. These outcomes support the recent trend toward early cochlear

  16. Emotional Perception of Music in Children with Unilateral Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shirvani, Sareh; Jafari, Zahra; Sheibanizadeh, Abdolreza; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Jalaie, Shohre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cochlear implantation (CI) improves language skills among children with hearing loss. However, children with CIs still fall short of fulfilling some other needs, including musical perception. This is often attributed to the biological, technological, and acoustic limitations of CIs. Emotions play a key role in the understanding and enjoyment of music. The present study aimed to investigate the emotional perception of music in children with bilaterally severe-to-profound hearing loss and unilateral CIs. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five children with congenital severe-to-profound hearing loss and unilateral CIs and 30 children with normal hearing participated in the study. The children’s emotional perceptions of music, as defined by Peretz (1998), were measured. Children were instructed to indicate happy or sad feelings fostered in them by the music by pointing to pictures of faces showing these emotions. Results: Children with CI obtained significantly lower scores than children with normal hearing, for both happy and sad items of music as well as in overall test scores (P<0.001). Furthermore, both in CI group (P=0.49) and the control one (P<0.001), the happy items were more often recognized correctly than the sad items. Conclusion: Hearing-impaired children with CIs had poorer emotional perception of music than their normal peers. Due to the importance of music in the development of language, cognitive and social interaction skills, aural rehabilitation programs for children with CIs should focus particularly on music. Furthermore, it is essential to enhance the quality of musical perception by improving the quality of implant prostheses. PMID:25320700

  17. Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, and Reading in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carol; Goswami, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the phonological awareness skills of deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) and relationships with vocabulary and reading development. Method: Forty-three deaf children with implants who were between 5 and 15 years of age were tested; 21 had been implanted at around 2.5 years of age (Early CI group), and 22 had been…

  18. Speech Perception in Noise by Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Amanda; Nittrouer, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Common wisdom suggests that listening in noise poses disproportionately greater difficulty for listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) than for peers with normal hearing (NH). The purpose of this study was to examine phonological, language, and cognitive skills that might help explain speech-in-noise abilities for children with CIs. Method Three groups of kindergartners (NH, hearing aid wearers, and CI users) were tested on speech recognition in quiet and noise and on tasks thought to underlie the abilities that fit into the domains of phonological awareness, general language, and cognitive skills. These last measures were used as predictor variables in regression analyses with speech-in-noise scores as dependent variables. Results Compared to children with NH, children with CIs did not perform as well on speech recognition in noise or on most other measures, including recognition in quiet. Two surprising results were that (a) noise effects were consistent across groups and (b) scores on other measures did not explain any group differences in speech recognition. Conclusions Limitations of implant processing take their primary toll on recognition in quiet and account for poor speech recognition and language/phonological deficits in children with CIs. Implications are that teachers/clinicians need to teach language/phonology directly and maximize signal-to-noise levels in the classroom. PMID:22744138

  19. [Cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Lehnhardt, E; Battmer, R D; Nakahodo, K; Laszig, R

    1986-07-01

    Since the middle of 1984, the HNO-Klinik der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover has provided deaf adults with a 22-channel cochlear implant (CI) device of Clark-NUCLEUS. The digital working system consists of an implantable stimulator/receiver and an externally worn speech processor. Energy and signals are transmitted transcutaneously via a transmitter coil. During the prevailing 26 operations (April 1986) the electrode array could be inserted at least 17 mm into the cochlea. The threshold and comfort levels of all patients were adjusted very quickly; the dynamic range usually grows during the first postoperative weeks. The individual rehabilitation results vary greatly, but all patients show a significant increase of vowel and consonant comprehension while using the speech processor and an improvement of words understood per minute in speech tracking from lip-reading alone to lip-reading with speech processor. Four months after surgery seven of 17 patients (group I) are able to understand on average 42.7 words per minute by speech tracking without lip-reading. Six patients (group II) recognise 69.2% of vowels and 42.5% of consonants by speech processor alone. Four patients (group III) can correctly repeat only vowels (52.3%) without lip-reading, but using the speech processor together with lip reading they have an improvement in consonant understanding of 37.9% and under freefield conditions they are able to understand up to 17.8% numbers of the Freiburg speech test.

  20. Sensory integration functions of children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Koester, AnjaLi Carrasco; Mailloux, Zoe; Coleman, Gina Geppert; Mori, Annie Baltazar; Paul, Steven M; Blanche, Erna; Muhs, Jill A; Lim, Deborah; Cermak, Sharon A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We investigated sensory integration (SI) function in children with cochlear implants (CIs). METHOD. We analyzed deidentified records from 49 children ages 7 mo to 83 mo with CIs. Records included Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests (SIPT), Sensory Processing Measure (SPM), Sensory Profile (SP), Developmental Profile 3 (DP-3), and Peabody Developmental Motor Scales (PDMS), with scores depending on participants' ages. We compared scores with normative population mean scores and with previously identified patterns of SI dysfunction. RESULTS. One-sample t tests revealed significant differences between children with CIs and the normative population on the majority of the SIPT items associated with the vestibular and proprioceptive bilateral integration and sequencing (VPBIS) pattern. Available scores for children with CIs on the SPM, SP, DP-3, and PDMS indicated generally typical ratings. CONCLUSION. SIPT scores in a sample of children with CIs reflected the VPBIS pattern of SI dysfunction, demonstrating the need for further examination of SI functions in children with CIs during occupational therapy assessment and intervention planning.

  1. Children with cochlear implants in Australia: educational settings, supports, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Punch, Renée; Hyde, Merv

    2010-01-01

    This Australian study examined the communication, academic, and social outcomes of pediatric cochlear implantation from the perspectives of teachers working with children with cochlear implants. The children were aged from 1 to 18 years and attended a range of educational settings in early intervention, primary, and secondary schooling. One hundred and fifty-one teachers completed a survey on one child with a cochlear implant and 15 of these teachers were interviewed. Teachers reported their perceptions of children's functional outcomes in a range of communication, academic, social, independence, and identity areas. Reported achievements in literacy, numeracy, and social development were below class levels. Implications for educational authorities and professionals working with children with cochlear implants are discussed.

  2. A test of static and dynamic balance function in children with cochlear implants: the vestibular olympics.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Sharon L; Chia, Ruth; James, Adrian L; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    To determine the incidence of static and dynamic balance dysfunction in a group of children with profound sensorineural hearing loss receiving a cochlear implant and to assess the impact of cochlear implant activation on equilibrium. Observational cross-sectional study of children with single-sided implants, tested under 2 conditions: (1) implant on and (2) implant off in a random order. Ambulatory setting within an academic, tertiary care children's hospital. Forty-one children (ages 4-17 years) with cochlear implants comprised the study group. Fourteen children with normal hearing served as controls. All participants performed a standardized test of static and dynamic balance function (Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2 [BOT2], balance subset). Children with implants performed the BOT2 under the 2 randomized conditions. Overall performance on the balance subset of the BOT2 and the influence of implant activation on performance. The mean (SD) age-adjusted scale score for our control group was 17 (5) points (95% confidence interval [CI], 14-20), which was not significantly different (P = .15) from the published age-adjusted mean for the BOT2 balance subset (15 [5] points). The group that had undergone implantation, however, performed significantly more poorly (12 [ 6] points; 95% CI, 10-14) than either the control group or the published test mean (P = .004). Children with implants performed better with their implants on than with their implants off (mean [SD] difference, 1.3 [2.7] points; 95% CI, 0.3-2.3; P = .01). Large differences exist in the balance ability of children with sensorineural hearing loss requiring cochlear implantation compared with age-matched controls. Implant activation, however, conferred a slight advantage in accomplishing balance-related tasks. These results substantiate the need to further quantify the baseline vestibular dysfunction of our study population of children with cochlear implants, as well as the impact of implant

  3. Bioethics and medical/legal considerations on cochlear implants in children.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Ivan Dieb; Miziara, Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego; Tsuji, Robson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2012-06-01

    Cochlear implants are the best treatment for congenital profound deafness. Pediatric candidates to implantation are seen as vulnerable citizens, and the decision of implanting cochlear devices is ultimately in the hands of their parents/guardians. The Brazilian Penal Code dictates that deaf people may enjoy diminished criminal capacity. Many are the bioethical controversies around cochlear implants, as representatives from the deaf community have seen in them a means of decimating their culture and intrinsic values. This paper aims to discuss, in bioethical terms, the validity of implanting cochlear hearing aids in children by analyzing their vulnerability and the social/cultural implications of the procedure itself, aside from looking into the medical/legal aspects connected to their criminal capacity. The topic was searched on databases Medline and Lilacs; ethical analysis was done based on principialist bioethics. Cochlear implants are the best therapeutic option for people with profound deafness and are morally justified. The level of criminal capacity attributed to deaf people requires careful analysis of the subject's degree of understanding and determination when carrying out the acts for which he/she has been charged. Cochlear implants are morally valid. Implantations must be analyzed on an each case basis. ENT physicians bear the ethical responsibility for indicating cochlear implants and must properly inform the child's parents/guardians and get their written consent before performing the procedure.

  4. The conversational skills of school-aged children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Toe, Dianne M; Paatsch, Louise E

    2013-03-01

    Children with cochlear implants have been shown to have language skills on a par with children with severe hearing losses who have hearing aids. Earlier implants, bilateral implantation, and focused intervention programmes may result in some children with cochlear implants displaying similar language skills to their hearing peers. The development of pragmatic skills is central to communication competence and underpins the development of friendships. Although some studies of pragmatic skills in children with cochlear implants have been reported, most have used a contrived referential communication task rather than free conversation. This study investigated the conversational skills of 20 children with cochlear implants, aged between 9 and 12 years, in free conversation with their hearing peers. The pragmatic skills of these 20 deaf/hearing pairs or dyads were compared with the pragmatic skills of 20 hearing/hearing dyads. Pragmatic skills were analysed in terms of conversational balance, conversational turn types, and conversational maintenance. The impact of the participants' level of speech intelligibility was also investigated. Children with cochlear implants tend to dominate conversations with their hearing peers. They initiated more topics, took longer turns, asked more questions, and tended to make more personal comments while their hearing friends tended to use more conversational devices and minimal answers. In contrast, pairs of matched hearing children were very balanced in all of these aspects of conversation. Speech intelligibility did not appear to impact consistently on the pragmatic skills of the children with cochlear implants but all children had a relatively high level of speech intelligibility. Rather than being characterized by frequent conversational breakdown as in older studies, children with cochlear implants had a strong grasp of basic conversational rules. They conversed in a similar way to some deaf adults who also have been shown to take

  5. Song recognition by children and adolescents with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Vongpaisal, Tara; Trehub, Sandra E; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2006-10-01

    To assess song recognition and pitch perception in prelingually deaf individuals with cochlear implants (CIs). Fifteen hearing children (5-8 years) and 15 adults heard different versions of familiar popular songs-original (vocal + instrumental), original instrumental, and synthesized melody versions-and identified the song in a closed-set task (Experiment 1). Ten CI users (8-18 years) and age-matched hearing listeners performed the same task (Experiment 2). Ten CI users (8-19 years) and 10 hearing 8-years-olds were required to detect pitch changes in repeating-tone contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, 8 CI users (6-19 years) and 13 hearing 5-year-olds were required to detect subtle pitch changes in a more challenging melodic context (Experiment 4). CI users performed more poorly than hearing listeners in all conditions. They succeeded in identifying the original and instrumental versions of familiar recorded songs, and they evaluated them favorably, but they could not identify the melody versions. Although CI users could detect a 0.5-semitone change in the simple context, they failed to detect a 1-semitone change in the more difficult melodic context. Current implant processors provide insufficient spectral detail for some aspects of music perception, but they do not preclude young implant users' enjoyment of music.

  6. Peer Relationships of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Predictors of Peer Entry and Peer Interaction Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Daniela; Bat-Chava, Yael; Lalwani, Anil; Waltzman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated factors that affect the development of positive peer relationships among deaf children with cochlear implants. Ten 5- to 6-year-old deaf children with implants were observed under conditions varying peer context difficulty in a Peer Entry task. Results revealed better outcomes for deaf children interacting in one-on-one…

  7. Peer Relationships of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Predictors of Peer Entry and Peer Interaction Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Daniela; Bat-Chava, Yael; Lalwani, Anil; Waltzman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated factors that affect the development of positive peer relationships among deaf children with cochlear implants. Ten 5- to 6-year-old deaf children with implants were observed under conditions varying peer context difficulty in a Peer Entry task. Results revealed better outcomes for deaf children interacting in one-on-one…

  8. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  9. Parent versus child assessment of quality of life in children using cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Loy, Betty; Roland, Peter S.; Tong, Liyue; Tobey, Emily A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants have lower quality of life (QoL) in social situations and lower self-esteem than hearing peers. The child’s QoL has been assessed primarily by asking the parent rather than asking the child. This poses a problem because parents have difficulty judging less observable aspects like self-esteem and socio-emotional functioning, the domains most affected by hearing loss. Methods This case-control study evaluated QoL in 50 preschoolers using a cochlear implant and their parents with the Kiddy KINDLR, an established QoL measure. Children’s responses were compared to a hearing control group and correlated with demographic variables. We used a questionnaire for parents and a face-to-face interview with children. T-tests were used to compare (a) paired parent-child ratings and (b) children with cochlear implants versus normal hearing. Spearman rank correlations were used to compare QoL with demographic variables. Results Children using cochlear implants rated overall QoL significantly more positively than their parents (MD = 4.22, p=.03). Child rating of QoL did not differ significantly by auditory status (cochlear implant (82.8) vs. hearing (80.8), p=0.42). Overall QoL correlated inversely with cochlear implant experience and chronologic age, but did not correlate with implantation age. Conclusions Preschool children using cochlear implants can assess adequately their own QoL, but parents afford valuable complementary perspective on the child’s socio-emotional and physical well-being. Preschool children using cochlear implants rate overall QoL measures similar to hearing peers. A constellation of QoL measures should be collected to yield a better understanding of general QoL as well as specific domains centered on hearing loss. PMID:19674798

  10. Nursing diagnoses and interventions in children submitted to cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia Juliana Santos; Souza, Natália Fernanda Higa de; Almeida, Raissa Janine de; Menezes, Daiane Cabrera; Bom, Gesiane Cristina; Trettene, Armando Dos Santos

    2017-06-12

    Identifying the main nursing diagnoses and interventions in children submitted to cochlear implant in the immediate postoperative period. A cross-sectional study conducted between February and April 2016, considering nursing history (anamnesis and physical examination) and nursing diagnoses (NANDA - International) with their respective interventions (Nursing Intervention Classification - NIC). Descriptive statistical analysis was used to construct the results. A total of 19 children participated in this study. The main nursing diagnoses listed were: impaired verbal communication, impaired skin integrity, risk for infection, risk for falls, and risk for bleeding (n=19; 100%). Regarding the nursing interventions, the following prevailed: Improvement in communication: auditory deficit, Skin surveillance, Protection against infection, Prevention of falls and Precautions against bleeding (n=19; 100%). Nursing diagnoses and interventions related to the cochlear implant postoperative period were related to communication, bleeding control, surgical wound care, infection prevention, comfort and well-being. Identificar os principais diagnósticos e intervenções de enfermagem em crianças submetidas a implante coclear em pós-operatório imediato. Estudo transversal realizado entre fevereiro e abril de 2016. Foram considerados o histórico de enfermagem (anamnese e exame físico) e os diagnósticos de enfermagem (NANDA - Internacional) com suas respectivas intervenções (Nursing Intervention Classification - NIC). Para construção dos resultados utilizou-se da análise estatística descritiva. Participaram do presente estudo 19 crianças. Os principais diagnósticos de enfermagem elencados foram: Comunicação verbal prejudicada, Integridade da pele prejudicada, Risco de infecção, Risco de queda e Risco de sangramento (n=19; 100%). Quanto às intervenções de enfermagem, prevaleceram: Melhora na comunicação: deficit auditivo, Supervisão da pele, Proteção contra

  11. Minimization of cochlear implant artifact in cortical auditory evoked potentials in children.

    PubMed

    Bakhos, D; Roux, S; Robier, A; Bonnet-Brilhault, F; Lescanne, E; Bruneau, N

    2012-11-01

    In congenitally deaf children fit with a cochlear implant, little is known about the maturation of the auditory cortex. Cortical auditory evoked potentials are a useful methodology to study the auditory cortical system of children with cochlear implants. Nevertheless, these recordings are contaminated by a cochlear implant artifact. The objective of this study was to use independent component analysis to minimize the artifact of the cochlear implant to study cortical auditory evoked potentials. Prospective study. A total of 5 children ranging in age from 21 to 49 months who were fitted with a cochlear implant for at least 6 months were included in this study. The stimuli were pure tones (750 Hz, 200 ms duration, 70 dB SPL) presented with an irregular interstimulus interval (1000-2000 ms) via loud speakers. The cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded from 17 Ag-AgCl electrodes referenced to the nose. The peak latency and amplitude of each deflection culminating at the fronto-central and temporal sites were analyzed. The P100-N250 peak latencies and amplitudes of the cortical auditory evoked potentials recorded from children fitted with cochlear implants. Scalp map potentials distributions were done for each child for the N250 wave. The use of independent component analysis permitted to minimize the cochlear implant artifact for the five children. Cortical auditory evoked potentials were recorded at fronto-central and temporal sites. Scalp map potentials distributions for the N2 wave showed activation of temporal generators contralateral at the CI for the five children. This preliminary electrophysiological study confirms the value and the limits of independent component analysis. It could allow longitudinal studies in cochlear implant users to examine the maturation of auditory cortex. It could also be used to identify objective cortical electrophysiological measures to help the fitting of CIs in children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Communication benefits of bilateral cochlear implantation. Retrospective study in 12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Jiménez, Gloria; Viera Artiles, Jaime; Mateos, Mar; González Aguado, Rocío; Falcón González, Juan Carlos; Borkoski Barreiro, Silvia; Ramos Macías, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Some studies suggest that simultaneous or sequential cochlear implantation in a short period of time offers additional benefits. There is controversy regarding the existence of an age limit after which a second implantation offers less benefit for the acquisition of communication skills. The objectives of this study were to confirm that sequential cochlear implantation offers benefits compared to unilateral implantation and to study whether, at 12 years of age, there are significant differences regarding the age at the time of the second implantation. Descriptive and observational study of a population of 12-year-old children carrying cochlear implants (n=69). A liminal pure tone audiometry and an open-field verbal discrimination test (disyllables, common phrases in an open context, with and without noise) were conducted to evaluate audiological benefits. Verbal discrimination results were better among patients who had been implanted before the age of 2 years, although the differences were not statistically significant (P>.5). Children who had received bilateral cochlear implants before the age of 2 years and with a period less than 4 years between both implants presented better verbal discrimination percentages (P<.05). In our sample, early cochlear implantation with a short period between both implants provided significant benefits regarding intelligibility. There seem to be a specific age and interimplant period, after which the auditory benefit on the first implant becomes reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Predictor of auditory performance in mandarin chinese children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan-Mai; Liu, Chu-Jung; Liu, Shu-Yu; Huang, Kuo-You; Kuo, Yu-Ching

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to analyze auditory performance among Mandarin-speaking school-aged children with cochlear implants from their parents' perspective and to derive predictive factors of the performance. Parental perspective survey of cochlear implant outcome was developed, and factor analysis of auditory performance was performed by analysis of variance. Categorical regression and Pratt measure of relative importance were approached to derive predictive factors of the performance. Chung Shan Medical University, School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology, and 7 major cochlear implant hospitals in Taiwan. A total of 177 parents of school-aged children with cochlear implants, with a mean age of 11.36 years (range, 6.75-18.75 yr), were included as participants from 7 major cochlear implant centers nationally. All children received unilateral multichannel cochlear implants for a 1-year experience. The CAPR was the measure of auditory performance, and 31 variables from 5 parts of the recipients' information were explored as independent variables. Of all children with implants, 63.8% reached the level of telephone use. Analysis of variance showed that 9 variables correlated significantly with auditory performance (F = 14.04, p < 0.001; multiple R = 0.79, R = 0.63). Categorical regression demonstrated that 5 factors, namely, "no additional disabilities," "oral/aural communication mode at home" and "at school," "educational placement," and "perception of implantation decision" predicted auditory performance. Parental perspective survey demonstrated the level of auditory performance among 177 school-aged children with implant. Five factors were found to predict the auditory performance of these children, suggesting the recipient's participation in the environments, oral/aural communication mode, and without additional disabilities significantly contributing auditory performance. The parent's view of cochlear implantation provides not only an

  14. Study of phonological awareness of preschool and school aged children with cochlear implant and normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Rastegarianzadeh, Niloufar; Shahbodaghi, Mohammadrahim; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2014-09-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess whether very early access to speech sounds provided by the cochlear implant enables children to develop age-appropriate phonological awareness abilities in their preschool and school years. A secondary purpose of this study was to examine whether children who had cochlear implantation before 18 months of age will develop better skills in phonological awareness than children who had cochlear implants in 18-36 months of age. A third purpose of this study was to examine whether some factors like the child's age or sex would have any effects on developing of age-appropriate phonological awareness abilities. 48 children with 70 to 95 months of age who had been utilizing their cochlear implant(s) before 36 months of age (CI group) and 30 normal hearing peers (NH group) were enrolled in this study. Child's age had a significant effect on phonological awareness, but sex had absolutely no effect in each group. Children in the cochlear implanted group were outperformed by their normal hearing peers in the area of phonological awareness, especially in phonemic awareness. The age of implantation was another significant variable. Although children with a younger age at implantation got better scores in phonological awareness test, they were outperformed by their normal hearing peers in this area.

  15. Communication, Psychosocial, and Educational Outcomes of Children with Cochlear Implants and Challenges Remaining for Professionals and Parents

    PubMed Central

    Punch, Renée; Hyde, Merv B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and a synthesis of the findings of a large, multifaceted study investigating outcomes from paediatric cochlear implantation. The study included children implanted at several Australian implant clinics and attending a variety of early intervention and educational settings across a range of locations in eastern Australia. It investigated three major aspects of childhood cochlear implantation: (1) parental expectations of their children's implantation, (2) families' decision-making processes, and (3) the communication, social, and educational outcomes of cochlear implantation for deaf children. It employed a mixed-methods approach in which quantitative survey data were gathered from 247 parents and 151 teachers, and qualitative data from semistructured interviews with 27 parents, 15 teachers, and 11 children and adolescents with cochlear implants. The summarised findings highlight several areas where challenges remain for implant clinics, parents, and educators if children with cochlear implants are to reach their full potential personally, educationally, and socially. PMID:21904554

  16. Cochlear implantation in children with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome: outcomes in three cases.

    PubMed

    Barker, Elizabeth J; Briggs, Robert Js

    2009-09-01

    Three children with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome received cochlear implants at the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital. KID syndrome is a rare genodermatosis associated with mutation of the connexin-26 gene with characteristics affecting skin, hair, vision and hearing. Ichthyotic involvement of the ear canal epithelium and associated non-erosive keratosis obturans complicate hearing assessment and aid fitting. The tendency to eczematous dermatitis and otitis media is an additional problem with cochlear implantation. All cases have required additional medical management, however the outcomes show that the cochlear implant can be effective in these patients.

  17. Cognitive outcomes and familial stress after cochlear implantation in deaf children with and without developmental delays.

    PubMed

    Oghalai, John S; Caudle, Susan E; Bentley, Barbara; Abaya, Homer; Lin, Jerry; Baker, Dian; Emery, Claudia; Bortfeld, Heather; Winzelberg, Jody

    2012-08-01

    The benefits of cochlear implantation for children with developmental delays (DD) often are unclear. We compared cognition, adaptive behavior, familial stress, and communication in children with and without DD. Retrospective review. Two tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Two hundred four children who underwent cochlear implantation assessed before and more than 1 year after implantation. The Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL), vineland adaptive behavior scales (VABS), Parental Stress Index, and Preschool Language Scale. We developed a specific definition of DD for hearing-impaired children based upon diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition, criteria for mental retardation; 60 children met the criteria for DD, and 144 children did not. Before implantation, multiple linear regression demonstrated that children with DD had lower scores in every domain of the MSEL and VABS (p < 0.05), but no differences in any domains of the parental stress index and preschool language scale (p > 0.1) compared with children without DD. After implantation, children without DD demonstrated significant improvements in intelligence as measured by the MSEL and age-appropriate improvements in adaptive behavior as evaluated by the VABS, and their familial stress levels were not increased after cochlear implantation. In contrast, children with DD underwent implantation at a later age and demonstrated less comprehensive developmental improvements after cochlear implantation and higher stress levels. However, when the age differences were taken into account using multiple linear regression analyses, the differences between the 2 cohorts were reduced. These data indicate that our definition of DD is a reliable method of stratifying deaf children. Although children with DD have a normal developmental rate of adaptive behavior after cochlear implantation, their developmental rate of intelligence is lower, and they have higher stress levels than children without DD

  18. Cognitive outcomes and familial stress after cochlear implantation in deaf children with and without developmental delays

    PubMed Central

    Oghalai, John S.; Caudle, Susan E.; Bentley, Barbara; Abaya, Homer; Lin, Jerry; Baker, Dian; Emery, Claudia; Bortfeld, Heather; Winzelberg, Jody

    2012-01-01

    Objective The benefits of cochlear implantation for children with developmental delays (DD) are often unclear. We compared cognition, adaptive behavior, familial stress, and communication in children with and without DD. Study Design Retrospective review Setting Two tertiary care pediatric hospitals Patients 204 children who underwent cochlear implantation assessed before and >1 year after implantation Main Outcome Measures The Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL), Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), Parental Stress Index (PSI), and Preschool Language Scale (PLS). Results We developed a specific definition of DD for hearing-impaired children based upon DSM-IV criteria for mental retardation; 60 children met the criteria for DD and 144 children did not. Prior to implantation, multiple linear regression demonstrated that children with DD had lower scores in every domain of the MSEL and VABS (p<0.05) but no differences in any domains of the PSI and PLS (p>0.1) compared to children without DD. After implantation, children without DD demonstrated significant improvements in intelligence as measured by the MSEL, age-appropriate improvements in adaptive behavior as evaluated by the VABS, and their familial stress levels were not increased after cochlear implantation. In contrast, children with DD underwent implantation at a later age and demonstrated less comprehensive developmental improvements after cochlear implantation and higher stress levels. However, when the age differences were taken into account using multiple linear regression analyses, the differences between two cohorts were reduced. Conclusions These data indicate that our definition of DD is a reliable method of stratifying deaf children. While children with DD have a normal developmental rate of adaptive behavior after cochlear implantation, their developmental rate of intelligence is lower and they have higher stress levels than children without DD. However, our data suggest that if children with

  19. Perception of Binaural Cues Develops in Children Who Are Deaf through Bilateral Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Karen A.; Deighton, Michael R.; Abbasalipour, Parvaneh; Papsin, Blake C.

    2014-01-01

    There are significant challenges to restoring binaural hearing to children who have been deaf from an early age. The uncoordinated and poor temporal information available from cochlear implants distorts perception of interaural timing differences normally important for sound localization and listening in noise. Moreover, binaural development can be compromised by bilateral and unilateral auditory deprivation. Here, we studied perception of both interaural level and timing differences in 79 children/adolescents using bilateral cochlear implants and 16 peers with normal hearing. They were asked on which side of their head they heard unilaterally or bilaterally presented click- or electrical pulse- trains. Interaural level cues were identified by most participants including adolescents with long periods of unilateral cochlear implant use and little bilateral implant experience. Interaural timing cues were not detected by new bilateral adolescent users, consistent with previous evidence. Evidence of binaural timing detection was, for the first time, found in children who had much longer implant experience but it was marked by poorer than normal sensitivity and abnormally strong dependence on current level differences between implants. In addition, children with prior unilateral implant use showed a higher proportion of responses to their first implanted sides than children implanted simultaneously. These data indicate that there are functional repercussions of developing binaural hearing through bilateral cochlear implants, particularly when provided sequentially; nonetheless, children have an opportunity to use these devices to hear better in noise and gain spatial hearing. PMID:25531107

  20. Age or Experience? The Influence of Age at Implantation and Social and Linguistic Environment on Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Stumper, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the influence of social environmental variables and age at implantation on language development in children with cochlear implants. Method: Participants were 25 children with cochlear implants and their parents. Age at implantation ranged from 6 months to 42 months (M[subscript age] = 20.4 months, SD = 22.0…

  1. Age or Experience? The Influence of Age at Implantation and Social and Linguistic Environment on Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Stumper, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the influence of social environmental variables and age at implantation on language development in children with cochlear implants. Method: Participants were 25 children with cochlear implants and their parents. Age at implantation ranged from 6 months to 42 months (M[subscript age] = 20.4 months, SD = 22.0…

  2. Language acquisition after cochlear implantation of congenitally deaf children: Effect of age at implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirsky, Mario; Holt, Rachael

    2005-04-01

    Evidence shows that early implantation of congenitally deaf children is beneficial. However, infants as young as 6 months of age have started to receive cochlear implants (CIs) in the USA. Such early implantation may be associated with higher risks, including anesthetic risk as well as the increased possibility of a false positive in the diagnosis of profound deafness. On the other hand, delaying implantation may be associated with the risk of missing windows of opportunity or sensitive periods for the development of communication skills. In this study, speech perception and language skills in children who received CIs in the first, second, third, or fourth year of life were compared. Participants were tested at regular 6-month intervals after implantation. The effects of several potential confounds were considered. In general, children implanted earlier outperformed those implanted later, with one exception: infants implanted at 6-12 months showed similar outcomes to children implanted at 12-24 months, at least through 2 to 2-1/2 years of age. This preliminary result may be associated with the difficulty of choosing appropriate stimulation parameters for infants, and its potential influence on the quality of the stimulation patterns delivered by the CI.

  3. Spelling of Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Heather; Kessler, Brett; Treiman, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The spellings of 39 profoundly deaf users of cochlear implants, aged 6 to 12 years, were compared with those of 39 hearing peers. When controlled for age and reading ability, the error rates of the 2 groups were not significantly different. Both groups evinced phonological spelling strategies, performing better on words with more typical…

  4. Spelling of Deaf Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Heather; Kessler, Brett; Treiman, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The spellings of 39 profoundly deaf users of cochlear implants, aged 6 to 12 years, were compared with those of 39 hearing peers. When controlled for age and reading ability, the error rates of the 2 groups were not significantly different. Both groups evinced phonological spelling strategies, performing better on words with more typical…

  5. Evaluation on health-related quality of life in deaf children with cochlear implant in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Kang, Hou-Yong; Gu, Zheng; Hong, Su-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that deaf children benefit considerably from cochlear implants. These improvements are found in areas such as speech perception, speech production, and audiology-verbal performance. Despite the increasing prevalence of cochlear implants in China, few studies have reported on health-related quality of life in children with cochlear implants. The main objective of this study was to explore health-related quality of life on children with cochlear implants in South-west China. A retrospective observational study of 213 CI users in Southwest China between 2010 and 2013. Participants were 213 individuals with bilateral severe-to-profound hearing loss who wore unilateral cochlear implants. The Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire and Health Utility Index Mark III were used pre-implantation and 1 year post-implantation. Additionally, 1-year postoperative scores for Mandarin speech perception were compared with preoperative scores. Health-related quality of life improved post-operation with scores on the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire improving significantly in all subdomains, and the Health Utility Index 3 showing a significant improvement in the utility score and the subdomains of ''hearing," ''speech," and "emotion". Additionally, a significant improvement in speech recognition scores was found. No significant correlation was found between increased in quality of life and speech perception scores. Health-related quality of life and speech recognition in prelingual deaf children significantly improved post-operation. The lack of correlation between quality of life and speech perception suggests that when evaluating performance post-implantation in prelingual deaf children and adolescents, measures of both speech perception and quality of life should be used. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. The Development of Falling Intonation in Young Children with Cochlear Implants: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of intonation in 12 cochlear implant (CI) recipients. In a previously reported study of the first year of CI use, children who were implanted late (after 24 months) acquired intonation more rapidly than the younger participants. The older children's advantage is plausibly owing to their greater maturity.…

  7. The Development of Falling Intonation in Young Children with Cochlear Implants: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of intonation in 12 cochlear implant (CI) recipients. In a previously reported study of the first year of CI use, children who were implanted late (after 24 months) acquired intonation more rapidly than the younger participants. The older children's advantage is plausibly owing to their greater maturity.…

  8. Expressive Spoken Language Development in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants Who Are Beginning Formal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inscoe, Jayne Ramirez; Odell, Amanda; Archbold, Susan; Nikolopoulos, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses the expressive spoken grammar skills of young deaf children using cochlear implants who are beginning formal education, compares it with that achieved by normally hearing children and considers possible implications for educational management. Spoken language grammar was assessed, three years after implantation, in 45 children…

  9. Children's Development of Intonation during the First Year of Cochlear Implant Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the longitudinal development of intonation in 18 deaf children who received cochlear implants (CIs) before the age of 3 years and 12 infants with typical development (TD) who served as controls. At the time their implants were activated, the children with CIs ranged in age from 9 to 36 months. Cross-group comparisons were…

  10. Prelinguistic communication and subsequent language acquisition in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kane, Mary O'Leary; Schopmeyer, Betty; Mellon, Nancy K; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Niparko, John K

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between prelinguistic communication behaviors and subsequent language development after cochlear implantation in deaf children. Evaluative tools with predictive validity for language potential in very young deaf children remain elusive. A tertiary care cochlear implant center and a preschool setting of spoken language immersion in which oral language development is emphasized through auditory and oral motor subskill practice. Eighteen prelingually deaf children who underwent unilateral implantation at an average age of 15 months also underwent testing with the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales (CSBS) before device activation and with the Reynell Developmental Language Scales (RDLS) at an average of 20 months after cochlear implantation. A prospective study correlated preoperative communication behavior assessments of 18 children who were candidates for cochlear implantation. We examined the value of prelinguistic behavioral testing with the CSBS in predicting later language level after cochlear implantation as reflected in RDLS scores. We found positive, though weak, correlations between prelinguistic communication skills (CSBS scores) and language learning after cochlear implantation (RDLS scores). Linear correlation between test results failed to reach statistical significance (receptive comparisons, P =.17; expressive comparisons, P =.13). Evaluating the quality of prelinguistic communication behaviors potentially adds important predictive information to profiles of children who are candidates for cochlear implantation. Correlative analysis suggests that early CSBS testing may provide useful clinical information. Poor CSBS scores may serve as a precaution: if children lack an appropriate prelinguistic behavioral repertoire, the emergence of age-appropriate formal language may be at risk. Observations suggest that symbolic prelinguistic behaviors are necessary, but not sufficient, for the development of strong linguistic

  11. Comparison of intelligence quotients of first- and second-generation deaf children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Amraei, K; Amirsalari, S; Ajalloueyan, M

    2017-01-01

    Hearing impairment is a common type of sensory loss in children. Studies indicate that children with hearing impairment are deficient in social, cognitive and communication skills. This study compared the intelligence quotients of first- and second-generation deaf children with cochlear implants. This research is causal-comparative. All 15 deaf children investigated had deaf parents and were selected from Baqiyatallah Cochlear Implant Center. The 15 children with cochlear implants were paired with similar children with hearing parents using purposive sampling. The findings show that the Hotelling trace of multivariate analysis of variance (F = 6.78, p < 0.01, ηP(2) = 0.73) was significant. The tests of between-subjects effects for second-generation children was significantly higher than for first-generation children for all intelligence scales except knowledge. It can be assumed that second-generation children joined their family in the use of sign language as the primary experience before a cochlear implant. The use of sign language before cochlear implants is recommended.

  12. An Analysis of Phonological Process Use in Young Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buhler, Helen C.; DeThomasis, Betty; Chute, Pat; DeCora, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Phonological process use was investigated in five children who used Nucleus 24 cochlear implants (CIs). All participants were less than 3 years of age at the time of cochlear implantation and ranged from 4;2 to 4;7 years of age at onset of study. Speech samples obtained from the GFTA-2 were analyzed using the KLPA-2 to evaluate participants'…

  13. Visual Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Visual cross-modal re-organization is a neurophysiological process that occurs in deafness. The intact sensory modality of vision recruits cortical areas from the deprived sensory modality of audition. Such compensatory plasticity is documented in deaf adults and animals, and is related to deficits in speech perception performance in cochlear-implanted adults. However, it is unclear whether visual cross-modal re-organization takes place in cochlear-implanted children and whether it may be a source of variability contributing to speech and language outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if visual cross-modal re-organization occurs in cochlear-implanted children, and whether it is related to deficits in speech perception performance. Methods Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded via high-density EEG in 41 normal hearing children and 14 cochlear-implanted children, aged 5–15 years, in response to apparent motion and form change. Comparisons of VEP amplitude and latency, as well as source localization results, were conducted between the groups in order to view evidence of visual cross-modal re-organization. Finally, speech perception in background noise performance was correlated to the visual response in the implanted children. Results Distinct VEP morphological patterns were observed in both the normal hearing and cochlear-implanted children. However, the cochlear-implanted children demonstrated larger VEP amplitudes and earlier latency, concurrent with activation of right temporal cortex including auditory regions, suggestive of visual cross-modal re-organization. The VEP N1 latency was negatively related to speech perception in background noise for children with cochlear implants. Conclusion Our results are among the first to describe cross modal re-organization of auditory cortex by the visual modality in deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. Our findings suggest that, as a group, children with cochlear implants show

  14. Myths about Cochlear Implants: A Family Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luetke-Stahlman, B.

    1994-01-01

    A parent of two young children who received cochlear implant surgery addresses common myths about this procedure including "deaf people don't support the use of cochlear implants,""if you choose cochlear implant surgery, you are choosing the hearing world,""hearing parents are not qualified to decide," and "the deaf child him/herself should…

  15. Speech and language outcomes of cochlear implantation in children with isolated auditory neuropathy versus cochlear hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Budenz, Cameron L; Starr, Kelly; Arnedt, Caroline; Telian, Steven A; Arts, Henry Alexander; El-Kashlan, Hussam K; Zwolan, Terry A

    2013-12-01

    Children with auditory neuropathy (AN) have variable hearing on pure tone testing, and the presence of speech and language delays often play a major role in the decision to offer cochlear implantation (CI) in this population. Despite this fact, the speech and language outcomes in this group after CI are not well described. This study compares speech and language outcomes after CI in a subset of the pediatric AN population that does not have a confounding cognitive disorder with those of their peers with cochlear hearing loss (CoHL). Retrospective chart review. Tertiary referral center. Seventeen pediatric patients with AN who received a CI and a group of children with CoHL who received a CI were the subjects of this study. The 2 groups demonstrated similar ages at implant. Children with cognitive delays were excluded from each group. Cochlear implantation. All subjects were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with standardized age appropriate speech and language measures, including the Expressive Vocabulary Test (EVT), Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), and Preschool Language Scale (PLS). There was no significant difference between the groups on age of activation of the CI. Children with a diagnosis of AN had a significantly lower unaided pure tone average preoperatively as compared with children with cochlear hearing loss; however, there was no significant difference between the groups on either their preimplantation or postimplantation speech and language scores. Children with a diagnosis of AN without associated cognitive or developmental disorders have speech and language outcomes comparable to other children who received a CI.

  16. Spatial hearing of normally hearing and cochlear implanted children

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John; Summerfield, A. Quentin; O’Donoghue, Gerard M.; Moore, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Spatial hearing uses both monaural and binaural mechanisms that require sensitive hearing for normal function. Deaf children using either bilateral (BCI) or unilateral (UCI) cochlear implants would thus be expected to have poorer spatial hearing than normally hearing (NH) children. However, the relationship between spatial hearing in these various listener groups has not previously been extensively tested under ecologically valid conditions using a homogeneous group of children who are UCI users. We predicted that NH listeners would outperform BCI listeners who would, in turn, outperform UCI listeners. Methods We tested two methods of spatial hearing to provide norms for NH and UCI using children and preliminary data for BCI users. NH children (n = 40) were age matched (6–15 years) to UCI (n = 12) and BCI (n = 6) listeners. Testing used a horizontal ring of loudspeakers within a booth in a hospital outpatient clinic. In a ‘lateral release’ task, single nouns were presented frontally, and masking noises were presented frontally, or 90° left or right. In a ‘localization’ task, allowing head movements, nouns were presented from loudspeakers separated by 30°, 60° or 120° about the midline. Results Normally hearing children improved with age in speech detection in noise, but not in quiet or in lateral release. Implant users performed more poorly on all tasks. For frontal signals and noise, UCI and BCI listeners did not differ. For lateral noise, BCI listeners performed better on both sides (within ∼2 dB of NH), whereas UCI listeners benefited only when the noise was opposite the unimplanted ear. Both the BCI and, surprisingly, the UCI listeners performed better than chance at all loudspeaker separations on the ecologically valid, localization task. However, the BCI listeners performed about twice as well and, in two cases, approached the performance of NH children. Conclusion Children using either UCI or BCI have useful spatial hearing

  17. Speech, Vocabulary, and the Education of Children Using Cochlear Implants: Oral or Total Communication?.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Hieber, Sara; Arts, H. Alexander; Zwolan, Teresa A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the teaching method, oral or total communication, used at children's schools and children's consonant-production accuracy and vocabulary development over time. The children (N=147) had used cochlear implants for between 6 months and 10 years. Results indicated a complex relationship among children's…

  18. Non-Use of Cochlear Implants in Children: Child and Parent Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Linda M.; Gregory, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Five cases of non-use of cochlear implants by children were investigated through semi-structured interviews with the children and their carers. The children were interviewed at school by a researcher who is deaf, and the carers, all of whom were hearing, were interviewed at home by a hearing researcher when the children were not present. The…

  19. Picture-Elicited Written Narratives, Process and Product, in 18 Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asker-Arnason, Lena; Ibertsson, Tina; Wass, Malin; Wengelin, Asa; Sahlen, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the narrative writing of 18 children, ages 11 to 19, with severe and profound hearing impairment who had cochlear implants (CI), compared with the performance of hearing children. Nine of the 18 children had prelingual deafness and 9 children had postlingual deafness. The hearing impairment was progressive…

  20. Clinical outcomes of scala vestibuli cochlear implantation in children with partial labyrinthine ossification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Song

    2009-03-01

    Cochlear implantation via the scala vestibuli is a viable approach in those with ossification in the scala tympani. With extended cochlear implant experience, there is no significant difference in the mapping parameters and auditory performance between those implanted via scala vestibuli and via scala tympani. To assess the clinical outcomes of cochlear implantation via scala vestibuli. In a cohort follow-up study, 11 prelingually deafened children who received cochlear implantation between age 3 and 10 years through the scala vestibuli served as participants. The mapping parameters (i.e. comfortable level (C), threshold level (T), dynamic range) and auditory performance of each participant were evaluated following initial cochlear implant stimulation, then at 3 month intervals for 2 years, then semi-annually. The follow-up period lasted for 9 years 9 months on average, with a minimum of 8 years 3 months. The clinical results of the mapping parameters and auditory performance of children implanted via the scala vestibuli were comparative to those who were implanted via the scala tympani. No balance problem was reported by any of these patients. One child exhibited residual low frequency hearing after implantation.

  1. Narrative spoken language skills in severely hearing impaired school-aged children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2013-11-01

    Cochlear implants have a significant positive effect on spoken language development in severely hearing impaired children. Previous work in this population has focused mostly on the emergence of early-developing language skills, such as vocabulary. The current study aims at comparing narratives, which are more complex and later-developing spoken language skills, of a contemporary group of profoundly deaf school-aged children using cochlear implants (n=66, median age=8 years 3 months) with matched normal hearing peers. Results show that children with cochlear implants demonstrate good results on quantity and coherence of the utterances, but problematic outcomes on quality, content and efficiency of retold stories. However, for a subgroup (n=20, median age=8 years 1 month) of deaf children without additional disabilities who receive cochlear implantation before the age of 2 years, use two implants, and are raised with one spoken language, age-adequate spoken narrative skills at school-age are feasible. This is the first study to set the goals regarding spoken narrative skills for deaf children using cochlear implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The children speak: An examination of the quality of life of pediatric cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Betty; Warner-Czyz, Andrea D.; Tong, Liyue; Tobey, Emily A.; Roland, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the results of health-related quality of life questionnaire scores from profoundly deaf children fitted with at least one cochlear implant and compare responses to normal hearing age mates and to their parents. Study design Cross sectional study utilizing a generic quality of life questionnaire designed to be completed by both parents and children independently of each other. Setting Questionnaires completed at various summer camps designed for children with cochlear implants in Texas and Colorado. Subjects and Methods Eighty-eight families from 16 states were divided in to two subgroups by age of cochlear implantation: an 8–11 year old group and one 12–16 year old group. The KINDLR Questionnaire for Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents was distributed and participants completed the questionnaire independently from their participating family member. Results CI users in both age groups scored similarly to their normal hearing peers and their parents. Younger CI users scored their family domain lower than their normal hearing peers. Teen CI users scored the school domain lower than their parents. Among CI participants, earlier implantation and longer cochlear implant use resulted in higher Quality of Life scores. Conclusion Children with cochlear implants experience similar quality of life as normal hearing peers. Parents are reliable reporters on the status of their child’s overall quality of life. PMID:20115983

  3. Effects of a Word-Learning Training on Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants demonstrate vocabulary delays when compared to their peers without hearing loss. These delays may be a result of deficient word-learning abilities; children with cochlear implants perform more poorly on rapid word-learning tasks than children with normal hearing. This study explored the malleability of rapid word learning of preschoolers with cochlear implants by evaluating the effects of a word-learning training on rapid word learning. A single-subject, multiple probe design across participants measured the impact of the training on children’s rapid word-learning performance. Participants included 5 preschool children with cochlear implants who had an expressive lexicon of less than 150 words. An investigator guided children to identify, repeat, and learn about unknown sets of words in 2-weekly sessions across 10 weeks. The probe measure, a rapid word-learning task with a different set of words than those taught during training, was collected in the baseline, training, and maintenance conditions. All participants improved their receptive rapid word-learning performance in the training condition. The functional relation indicates that the receptive rapid word-learning performance of children with cochlear implants is malleable. PMID:23981321

  4. Nonverbal Cognition in Deaf Children Following Cochlear Implantation: Motor Sequencing Disturbances Mediate Language Delays

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Christopher M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Henning, Shirley C.; Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed profoundly deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) (N = 24) and age-matched normal-hearing children (N = 31) on several nonverbal cognition measures: motor sequencing, tactile discrimination, response inhibition, visual-motor integration, and visual-spatial processing. The results revealed that the children with CIs showed disturbances solely on motor sequencing and that performance on this task was significantly correlated with scores on the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, 4th Edition (CELF–4). These findings suggest that a period of auditory deprivation before cochlear implantation affects motor sequencing skills, which in turn may mediate the language delays displayed by some deaf children with CIs. PMID:21347923

  5. Nonverbal cognition in deaf children following cochlear implantation: motor sequencing disturbances mediate language delays.

    PubMed

    Conway, Christopher M; Karpicke, Jennifer; Anaya, Esperanza M; Henning, Shirley C; Kronenberger, William G; Pisoni, David B

    2011-01-01

    We assessed profoundly deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) (N = 24) and age-matched normal-hearing children (N = 31) on several nonverbal cognition measures: motor sequencing, tactile discrimination, response inhibition, visual-motor integration, and visual-spatial processing. The results revealed that the children with CIs showed disturbances solely on motor sequencing and that performance on this task was significantly correlated with scores on the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals, 4th Edition (CELF-4). These findings suggest that a period of auditory deprivation before cochlear implantation affects motor sequencing skills, which in turn may mediate the language delays displayed by some deaf children with CIs.

  6. Bilateral cochlear implantation: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Rose J; Buchman, Craig A

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the most recent literature exploring the indications, outcomes, and long-term benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation in children and adults. The indications for cochlear implantation have expanded, as many unilaterally implanted individuals are able to achieve open-set word recognition. Despite the benefits seen in unilateral implantation, many individuals have difficulty perceiving speech in noisy environments. Bilateral cochlear implantation has made great strides in providing individuals access to sound information from both ears, allowing improved speech perception in quiet and in noise, as well as sound localization. Recently, the House Cochlear Implant study group released a position statement in which the group strongly endorsed bilateral cochlear implantation. Improved speech perception in quiet has also been demonstrated by many groups with bilateral implantation. Improved sound localization abilities have been shown to be dependent on interaural level differences. The binaural benefits of head shadow and summation have been long shown in bilaterally implanted individuals. Recently, a growth in squelch has been seen in these individuals likely as a result of increased experience with both implants. This may indicate neural integration of the inputs over time. The literature supports the binaural benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation with demonstrated improved speech perception outcomes in quiet and in noise, sound localization data, and subjective benefits.

  7. Cochlear implantation in children and adults in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Brand, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Kompis, Martin; Dillier, Norbert; Allum, John H J

    2014-02-04

    The cochlear implant (CI) is one of the most successful neural prostheses developed to date. It offers artificial hearing to individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss and with insufficient benefit from conventional hearing aids. The first implants available some 30 years ago provided a limited sensation of sound. The benefit for users of these early systems was mostly a facilitation of lip-reading based communication rather than an understanding of speech. Considerable progress has been made since then. Modern, multichannel implant systems feature complex speech processing strategies, high stimulation rates and multiple sites of stimulation in the cochlea. Equipped with such a state-of-the-art system, the majority of recipients today can communicate orally without visual cues and can even use the telephone. The impact of CIs on deaf individuals and on the deaf community has thus been exceptional. To date, more than 300,000 patients worldwide have received CIs. In Switzerland, the first implantation was performed in 1977 and, as of 2012, over 2,000 systems have been implanted with a current rate of around 150 CIs per year. The primary purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary overview of cochlear implantation, emphasising the situation in Switzerland.

  8. Musical training software for children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, W; Schinaia, L; Anzivino, R; De Corso, E; Ciacciarelli, A; Paludetti, G

    2015-10-01

    Although the voice in a free field has an excellent recruitment by a cochlear implant (CI), the situation is different for music because it is a much more complex process, where perceiving the pitch discrimination becomes important to appreciate it. The aim of this study is to determine the music perception abilities among children with Cis and to verify the benefit of a training period for specific musical frequency discrimination. Our main goals were to prepare a computer tool for pitch discrimination training and to assess musical improvements. Ten children, aged between 5 and 12 years, with optimal phoneme recognition in quiet and with no disabilities associated with deafness, were selected to join the training. Each patient received, before training period, two types of exams: a pitch discrimination test, consisting of discovering if two notes were different or not; and a music test consisting of two identification tasks (melodic and full version) of one music-item among 5 popular childhood songs. After assessment, a music training software was designed and utilised individually at home for a period of six months. The results following complete training showed significantly higher performance in the task of frequency discrimination. After a proper musical training identification, frequency discrimination performance was significantly higher (p < 0.001). The same considerations can be made in the identification of the songs presented in their melodic (p = 0.0151) and full songs version (p = 0.0071). Cases where children did not reach the most difficult level may be due to insufficient time devoted to training (ideal time estimated at 2-3 hours per week). In conclusion, this study shows that is possible to assess musical enhancement and to achieve improvements in frequency discrimination, following pitch discrimination training.

  9. Phonological Abilities of Hearing-Impaired Cantonese-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Zoe W. Y.; So, Lydia K. H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonese-speaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Method: Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1…

  10. Speech Timing and Working Memory in Profoundly Deaf Children after Cochlear Implantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, Rose A.; Pisoni, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Compared speaking rates, digit span, and speech timing in profoundly deaf 8- and 9-year-olds with cochlear implants and normal-hearing children. Found that deaf children displayed longer sentence durations and pauses during recall and shorter digit spans than normal-hearing children. Articulation rates strongly correlated with immediate memory…

  11. Nonword Repetition by Children with Cochlear Implants: Accuracy Ratings from Normal-Hearing Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; Burkholder, Rose A.; Cleary, Miranda; Pisoni, David B.

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-six children with cochlear implants completed a nonword repetition task. The children were presented with 20 nonword auditory patterns over a loudspeaker and were asked to repeat them aloud to the experimenter. The children's responses were recorded on digital audiotape and then played back to normal-hearing adult listeners to obtain…

  12. A Longitudinal Study of Pragmatic Language Development in Three Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown how cochlear implants (CIs), in children with hearing impairments, have improved speech perception and production, but very little is known about the children's pragmatic language development. During a 4-year longitudinal study of three children with CIs, certain aspects of pragmatic language development were observed in free…

  13. An Investigation of Weak Syllable Processing in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titterington, Jill; Henry, Alison; Kramer, Martin; Toner, Joe G.; Stevenson, Mike

    2006-01-01

    In this study the influence of prosodic foot structure on the processing of weak syllables in children with cochlear implants (CI) was investigated. A battery of tests investigating processing of weak syllables in single and multiword utterances was carried out on four groups of children: 15 children with CI developing spoken language as expected…

  14. Phonological Awareness, Reading Skills, and Vocabulary Knowledge in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; de Jong, Kenneth; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    In hearing children, reading skills have been found to be closely related to phonological awareness. We used several standardized tests to investigate the reading and phonological awareness skills of 27 deaf school-age children who were experienced cochlear implant users. Approximately two-thirds of the children performed at or above the level of…

  15. Nonword Repetition by Children with Cochlear Implants: Accuracy Ratings from Normal-Hearing Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; Burkholder, Rose A.; Cleary, Miranda; Pisoni, David B.

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-six children with cochlear implants completed a nonword repetition task. The children were presented with 20 nonword auditory patterns over a loudspeaker and were asked to repeat them aloud to the experimenter. The children's responses were recorded on digital audiotape and then played back to normal-hearing adult listeners to obtain…

  16. Morpho-Syntactic Reading Comprehension in Children with Early and Late Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López-Higes, Ramón; Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, María Teresa; Melle, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This study explores morpho-syntactic reading comprehension in 19 Spanish children who received a cochlear implant (CI) before 24 months of age (early CI [e-CI]) and 19 Spanish children who received a CI after 24 months (late CI [l-CI]). They all were in primary school and were compared to a hearing control (HC) group of 19 children. Tests of…

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Pragmatic Language Development in Three Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown how cochlear implants (CIs), in children with hearing impairments, have improved speech perception and production, but very little is known about the children's pragmatic language development. During a 4-year longitudinal study of three children with CIs, certain aspects of pragmatic language development were observed in free…

  18. Development of Grammatical Accuracy in English-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ling-Yu; Spencer, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate the development of grammatical accuracy in English-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs) over a 3-year span. Method: Ten children who received CIs before age 30 months participated in this study at 3, 4, and 5 years postimplantation. For the purpose of comparison, 10 children each at ages 3, 4, and 5 years…

  19. Phonological Awareness, Reading Skills, and Vocabulary Knowledge in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; de Jong, Kenneth; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    In hearing children, reading skills have been found to be closely related to phonological awareness. We used several standardized tests to investigate the reading and phonological awareness skills of 27 deaf school-age children who were experienced cochlear implant users. Approximately two-thirds of the children performed at or above the level of…

  20. Morpho-Syntactic Reading Comprehension in Children with Early and Late Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López-Higes, Ramón; Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, María Teresa; Melle, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This study explores morpho-syntactic reading comprehension in 19 Spanish children who received a cochlear implant (CI) before 24 months of age (early CI [e-CI]) and 19 Spanish children who received a CI after 24 months (late CI [l-CI]). They all were in primary school and were compared to a hearing control (HC) group of 19 children. Tests of…

  1. Negative Intraoral Air Pressures of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Physiology, Phonology, and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Maureen B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of four children with deafness who had cochlear implants investigated the use of negative intraoral air pressure in articulation, from both the physiological and phonological perspectives. The study showed that the children used speech-production strategies that were different from hearing children and that deviant speech behaviors should…

  2. Parental mode of communication is essential for speech and language outcomes in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Breinegaard, Nina; Jensen, Jørgen Hedegaard

    2010-06-01

    The present study demonstrates a very strong effect of the parental communication mode on the auditory capabilities and speech/language outcome for cochlear implanted children. The children exposed to spoken language had higher odds of scoring high in all tests applied and the findings suggest a very clear benefit of spoken language communication with a cochlear implanted child. The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with speech and language outcomes for cochlear implanted children and also to estimate the effect-related odds ratio for each factor in relation to the children's speech and language performances. Data relate to 155 prelingually deafened children with cochlear implant (CI). A test battery consisting of six different speech and language tests/assessments was used. Seven different factors were considered, i.e. hearing age, implantation age, gender, educational placement, ear of implantation, CI center, and communication mode. Logistic regression models and proportional odds models were used to analyze the relationship between the considered factors and test responses. The communication mode at home proved essential to speech and language outcome, as children exposed to spoken language had markedly better odds of performing well in all tests, compared with children exposed to a mixture of spoken language and sign support, or sign language.

  3. Development of speech perception and production in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Taitelbaum, Riki; Muchnik, Chava; Gehtler, Inbal; Kronenberg, Jona; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to compare the hierarchy of perceived and produced significant speech pattern contrasts in children with cochlear implants, and 2) to compare this hierarchy to developmental data of children with normal hearing. The subjects included 35 prelingual hearing-impaired children with multichannel cochlear implants. The test materials were the Hebrew Speech Pattern Contrast (HeSPAC) test and the Hebrew Picture Speech Pattern Contrast (HePiSPAC) test for older and younger children, respectively. The results show that 1) auditory speech perception performance of children with cochlear implants reaches an asymptote at 76% (after correction for guessing) between 4 and 6 years of implant use; 2) all implant users perceived vowel place extremely well immediately after implantation; 3) most implanted children perceived initial voicing at chance level until 2 to 3 years after implantation, after which scores improved by 60% to 70% with implant use; 4) the hierarchy of phonetic-feature production paralleled that of perception: vowels first, voicing last, and manner and place of articulation in between; and 5) the hierarchy in speech pattern contrast perception and production was similar between the implanted and the normal-hearing children, with the exception of the vowels (possibly because of the interaction between the specific information provided by the implant device and the acoustics of the Hebrew language). The data reported here contribute to our current knowledge about the development of phonological contrasts in children who were deprived of sound in the first few years of their lives and then developed phonetic representations via cochlear implants. The data also provide additional insight into the interrelated skills of speech perception and production.

  4. Communication abilities of children with aided residual hearing: comparison with cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Laurie S; Kirk, Karen Iler; Martinez, Amy Schaefer; Ying, Elizabeth A; Miyamoto, Richard T

    2004-05-01

    To compare the communication outcomes between children with aided residual hearing and children with cochlear implants. Measures of speech recognition and language were administered to pediatric hearing aid users and cochlear implant users followed up longitudinally as part of an ongoing investigation on cochlear implant outcomes. The speech recognition measures included the Lexical Neighborhood Test, Phonetically Balanced-Kindergarten Word Lists, and the Hearing in Noise Test for Children presented in quiet and noise (+5 dB signal-to-noise ratio). Language measures included the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test: Third Edition (PPVT-III), the Reynell Developmental Language Scales, and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-Revised. Subjects The experimental group was composed of 39 pediatric hearing aid users with a mean unaided pure-tone average threshold of 78.2 dB HL (hearing level). The comparison group was composed of 117 pediatric cochlear implant users with a mean unaided pure-tone average threshold of 110.2 dB HL. On average, both groups lost their hearing at younger than 1 year and were fitted with their respective sensory aids at 2 to 2.6 years of age. Not every child was administered every test for a variety of reasons. Between-group performance was equivalent on most speech recognition and language measures. The primary difference found between groups was on the PPVT-III, in which the hearing aid group had a significantly higher receptive vocabulary language quotient than the cochlear implant group. Notably, the cochlear implant group was substantially younger than the hearing aid group and had less experience with their sensory devices on this measure. Data obtained from children with aided residual hearing can be useful in determining cochlear implant candidacy.

  5. Acoustic, aerodynamic, and perceptual analyses of the voice of cochlear-implanted children.

    PubMed

    Guerrero Lopez, Harold A; Mondain, Michel; Amy de la Bretèque, Benoit; Serrafero, Patrick; Trottier, Catherine; Barkat-Defradas, Melissa

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare, from an acoustic approach, the voice of cochlear-implanted children and the one of deaf children using conventional hearing aids (HA) to a control group; to characterize, from an aerodynamic approach, the voice of congenital/prelingual profound deaf children wearing cochlear implants for at least 3 years and implanted before 3 years old; and to classify, from a perceptual approach, the voice of implanted children, of fitted children with conventional HA, and of normal hearing (NH) children as "normal or dysphonic voices." We analyzed 78 voices of children aged 5-13 years using EVA 2 workstation: 38 children with NH, 40 deaf children wearing HA and cochlear implants for at least 3 years and being implanted before 3 years old. Acoustic parameters were measured from a sustained vowel /a/ and speech production and aerodynamic parameters from a set of 10 syllables /pa/. Perceptive assessment was performed by a jury of experienced listeners using G component of Hirano's GRBAS (Grade, Rough, Breathy, Asthenic, Strained) scale. Some acoustic parameters differ significantly between NH children and deaf children's groups with HA and cochlear implants, whereas other parameters are similar between control and cochlear-implanted groups. Analysis of aerodynamic parameters indicates that the phonatory physiological behavior of the implanted group is following an evolution within the norm. Finally, results of perceptual analysis reveal that the implanted group's voice samples can be classified in the first two grades (G0=9, G1=11, n=20) according to the G component (overall dysphonia) of the GRBAS scale. Cochlear implants may improve the majority of acoustic parameters of the voice better than HA for deaf children. Glottal and laryngeal efficiencies were significantly increased with the chronological age and the time of wearing an implant. Results suggest that voices of implanted children in our study do not reveal vocal characteristics

  6. Cochlear implantation in congenital cochlear abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R L; Lokman, S

    2005-08-01

    Many children have benefited from cochlear implant device including those with congenital malformation of the inner ear. The results reported in children with malformed cochlea are very encouraging. We describe 2 cases of Mondini's malformation with severe sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implantation was performed and both of them underwent post-implantation speech rehabilitation. Post-implantation, both of them were noted to respond to external sound. But the second case developed facial twitching a few months after the device was switched on. It is important to evaluate the severity of the inner ear deformity and the other associated anomalies in pre-implantation radiological assessment in order to identify the problem that may complicate the surgery and subsequent patient management.

  7. [Cochlear implant in adults].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Mosnier, I; Bernardeschi, D; Ferrary, E; Sterkers, O

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear implant in adults is a procedure, dedicated to rehabilitate severe to profound hearing loss. Because of technological progresses and their applications for signal strategies, new devices can improve hearing, even in noise conditions. Binaural stimulation, cochlear implant and hearing aid or bilateral cochlear implants are the best opportunities to access to better level of comprehension in all conditions and space localisation. By now minimally invasive surgery is possible to preserve residual hearing and use a double stimulation modality for the same ear: electrical for high frequencies and acoustic for low frequencies. In several conditions, cochlear implant is not possible due to cochlear nerve tumour or major malformations of the inner ear. In these cases, a brainstem implantation can be considered. Clinical data demonstrate that improvement in daily communication, for both cochlear and brainstem implants, is correlated with cerebral activation of auditory cortex.

  8. Outcome of cochlear implantation in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection or GJB2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takamichi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Naoko; Baba, Yoko; Suzuki, Yukie; Nomoto, Mika; Suzutani, Tatsuo; Inoue, Naoki; Omori, Koichi

    2012-06-01

    Outcomes following cochlear implantation in children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection were almost equivalent to those of children with GJB2 mutation-related sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Although our patients with developmental disorder showed poor auditory performance and speech and language skills after cochlear implantation, SNHL with developmental disorder should not be a contraindication for the procedure. Congenital CMV infection accounts for approximately 20% of all cases of neonatal hearing loss, while the GJB2 mutation accounts for 30-50% of all cases of profound nonsyndromic hearing loss. Here, outcomes for auditory behavior and speech and language skills were compared in children with congenital CMV infection or GJB2 mutation who received cochlear implantation for profound SNHL. Five children with asymptomatic congenital CMV infection and seven children with GJB2 mutation-related SNHL, with and without developmental disorder, underwent cochlear implantation. Hearing level and speech and language development were evaluated post-implantation using IT-MAIS, MUSS, and S-S method. The IT-MAIS and MUSS scores of the congenital CMV infection group and the GJB2 mutation group continued to increase for 4 years after implantation. The S-S method score in both groups gradually increased, although the scores for children with mental retardation were low.

  9. Peer relationships of deaf children with cochlear implants: predictors of peer entry and peer interaction success.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniela; Bat-Chava, Yael; Lalwani, Anil; Waltzman, Susan B

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated factors that affect the development of positive peer relationships among deaf children with cochlear implants. Ten 5- to 6-year-old deaf children with implants were observed under conditions varying peer context difficulty in a Peer Entry task. Results revealed better outcomes for deaf children interacting in one-on-one situations compared to interactions including two other hearing children and better performance among girls than boys. In addition, longer duration of implant use and higher self-esteem were associated with better performance on the Peer Task, which was in turn related to parental reports of children's social functioning outside the experimental situation. These findings contribute to the growing literature describing the benefits of cochlear implantation in the areas of communication and socialization, while pointing to interventions that may enhance deaf children's social competence.

  10. Productivity of lexical categories in French-speaking children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Le Normand, M-T; Ouellet, C; Cohen, H

    2003-11-01

    The productivity of lexical categories was studied longitudinally in a sample of 17 young hearing-impaired French-speaking children with cochlear implants. Age of implantation ranged from 22 months to 76 months. Spontaneous speech samples were collected at six-month intervals over a period of 36 months, starting at the one-word stage. Four general measures of their linguistic production (number of utterances, verbal fluency, vocabulary, and grammatical production) as well as 36 specific lexical categories, according to the CHILDES codes, were computed in terms of tokens, i.e., total number of words. Cochlear-implanted children (CI) were compared to a French database of normally hearing children aged 2-4 compiled by the first author. Follow-up results indicate that, at the two-year post-implantation follow-up, noun, and verb morphology was significantly impaired. At the three-year follow-up, the cochlear-implanted group had recovered on adjectives, determiners and nouns, main verbs, and auxiliaries. The two groups differed significantly in processing locative adverbs, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs (infinitive verb, modal, and modal lexical), but individual variability within the cochlear-implanted group was substantial. Results are discussed in terms of recovery and developmental trends and variability in the acquisition of lexical categories by French children two years and three years post-implantation.

  11. Cortical maturation in children with cochlear implants: Correlation between electrophysiological and behavioral measurement

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Magliaro, Fernanda C. L.; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2017-01-01

    Central auditory pathway maturation in children depends on auditory sensory stimulation. The objective of the present study was to monitor the cortical maturation of children with cochlear implants using electrophysiological and auditory skills measurements. The study was longitudinal and consisted of 30 subjects, 15 (8 girls and 7 boys) of whom had a cochlear implant, with a mean age at activation time of 36.4 months (minimum, 17 months; maximum, 66 months), and 15 of whom were normal-hearing children who were matched based on gender and chronological age. The auditory and speech skills of the children with cochlear implants were evaluated using GASP, IT-MAIS and MUSS measures. Both groups underwent electrophysiological evaluation using long-latency auditory evoked potentials. Each child was evaluated at three and nine months after cochlear implant activation, with the same time interval adopted for the hearing children. The results showed improvements in auditory and speech skills as measured by IT-MAIS and MUSS. Similarly, the long-latency auditory evoked potential evaluation revealed a decrease in P1 component latency; however, the latency remained significantly longer than that of the hearing children, even after nine months of cochlear implant use. It was observed that a shorter P1 latency corresponded to more evident development of auditory skills. Regarding auditory behavior, it was observed that children who could master the auditory skill of discrimination showed better results in other evaluations, both behavioral and electrophysiological, than those who had mastered only the speech-detection skill. Therefore, cochlear implant auditory stimulation facilitated auditory pathway maturation, which decreased the latency of the P1 component and advanced the development of auditory and speech skills. The analysis of the long-latency auditory evoked potentials revealed that the P1 component was an important biomarker of auditory development during the

  12. [Social integration of children with multichannel cochlear implant in the mainstream education system].

    PubMed

    Magierska-Krzysztoń, Magdalena; Szyfter, Witold

    2002-01-01

    This paper is a preliminary report concerning result of social integration of children after cochlear implantation in the mainstream education system. It has been proofed that the presence of hearing impaired child in the class has an influence on other children. These other became more sensitive, less selfish and able to see needs of other human being. The tests were conducted on the group of 34 children and adolescents implanted in Poznań, learning in schools in the mainstream education system.

  13. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  14. Theory-of-Mind Development in Oral Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants or Conventional Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the context of the established finding that theory-of-mind (ToM) growth is seriously delayed in late-signing deaf children, and some evidence of equivalent delays in those learning speech with conventional hearing aids, this study's novel contribution was to explore ToM development in deaf children with cochlear implants. Implants…

  15. Evaluating Phonological Processing Skills in Children with Prelingual Deafness Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Linda J.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological processing skills of 29 children with prelingual, profound hearing loss with 4 years of cochlear implant experience. Results were group matched with regard to word-reading ability and mother's educational level with the performance of 29 hearing children. Results revealed that it is possible to obtain a…

  16. Perception of Speech Features by French-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouton, Sophie; Serniclaes, Willy; Bertoncini, Josiane; Cole, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates the perception of phonological features in French-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs) compared with normal-hearing (NH) children matched for listening age. Method: Scores for discrimination and identification of minimal pairs for all features defining consonants (e.g., place, voicing, manner,…

  17. Validation of the Common Objects Token (COT) Test for Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ilona; Martin, Jane; Costa, Anne; Jamieson, Lyn; Bailey, Elspeth; Plant, Geoff; Pitterl, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Changes in selection criteria have meant that children are being provided with cochlear implants (CI) at increasingly younger ages. However, there is a paucity of measures that are appropriate for testing complex listening skills--most tests are too cognitively complex for such young children. The Common Objects Token (COT) Test was developed as a…

  18. Working Memory Training for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7-15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period.…

  19. Theory-of-Mind Development in Oral Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants or Conventional Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the context of the established finding that theory-of-mind (ToM) growth is seriously delayed in late-signing deaf children, and some evidence of equivalent delays in those learning speech with conventional hearing aids, this study's novel contribution was to explore ToM development in deaf children with cochlear implants. Implants…

  20. Use of the Nucleus 22 Channel Cochlear Implant System with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staller, Steven J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes components of the Nucleus 22 Channel Cochlear Implant System used with deaf children and adults. It discusses speech coding strategies, programming concepts, programming the device for children, trouble-shooting, and fitting an FM system to a speech processor. It reports data showing improved ability to use auditory…

  1. Word Learning in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Effects of Early Auditory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Derek M.; Stewart, Jessica; Moberly, Aaron; Hollich, George; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    Word-learning skills were tested in normal-hearing 12- to 40-month-olds and in deaf 22- to 40-month-olds 12 to 18 months after cochlear implantation. Using the Intermodal Preferential Looking Paradigm (IPLP), children were tested for their ability to learn two novel-word/novel-object pairings. Normal-hearing children demonstrated learning on this…

  2. Deaf Children with Complex Needs: Parental Experience of Access to Cochlear Implants and Ongoing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Wendy; Turner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of parents of deaf children with additional complex needs (ACN) in accessing cochlear implant (CI) services and achieving ongoing support. Of a total study group of fifty-one children with ACN, twelve had been fitted with a CI. The parental accounts provide a rich and varied picture of service access. For some…

  3. Changing Realities in the Classroom for Hearing-Impaired Children with Cochlear Implant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Anneke; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Snik, Ad

    2012-01-01

    Auditory perception with cochlear implants (CIs) enables the majority of deaf children with normal learning potential to develop (near) age-appropriate spoken language. As a consequence, a large proportion of children now attend mainstream education from an early stage. The acoustical environment in kindergartens and schools, however, might be…

  4. Executive Functioning Skills in Preschool-Age Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Jessica; Kronenberger, William G.; Castellanos, Irina; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Pisoni, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether deficits in executive functioning (EF) in children with cochlear implants (CIs) emerge as early as the preschool years. Method: Two groups of children ages 3 to 6 years participated in this cross-sectional study: 24 preschoolers who had CIs prior to 36 months of age and 21 preschoolers…

  5. Children with Cochlear Implants: A Review of Demographics and Communication Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzner, Kate A.; Seal, Brenda C.

    2009-01-01

    Children with severe to profound hearing loss in the United States are diverse in their racial-ethnic backgrounds, comorbid disabilities, socioeconomic levels, and communication modalities. The present article addresses demographic variables and communication outcomes of children with cochlear implants by means of a review of longitudinal studies…

  6. Maternal Involvement in the Home Literacy Environment: Supporting Literacy Skills in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Ambrose, Sophie E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the home literacy environment in a group of mothers and their early-school-age children with cochlear implants (N = 16). The goals of this investigation are to (a) describe the characteristics of the home literacy environment and (b) study the relationships between home literacy factors and children's reading skills. Mothers…

  7. Central Auditory Development: Evidence from CAEP Measurements in Children Fit with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Michael F.; Sharma, Anu; Gilley, Phillip; Martin, Kathryn; Roland, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In normal-hearing children the latency of the P1 component of the cortical evoked response to sound varies as a function of age and, thus, can be used as a biomarker for maturation of central auditory pathways. We assessed P1 latency in 245 congenitally deaf children fit with cochlear implants following various periods of auditory deprivation. If…

  8. Maternal Involvement in the Home Literacy Environment: Supporting Literacy Skills in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Ambrose, Sophie E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the home literacy environment in a group of mothers and their early-school-age children with cochlear implants (N = 16). The goals of this investigation are to (a) describe the characteristics of the home literacy environment and (b) study the relationships between home literacy factors and children's reading skills. Mothers…

  9. Children with Cochlear Implants: A Review of Demographics and Communication Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzner, Kate A.; Seal, Brenda C.

    2009-01-01

    Children with severe to profound hearing loss in the United States are diverse in their racial-ethnic backgrounds, comorbid disabilities, socioeconomic levels, and communication modalities. The present article addresses demographic variables and communication outcomes of children with cochlear implants by means of a review of longitudinal studies…

  10. Executive Functioning Skills in Preschool-Age Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, Jessica; Kronenberger, William G.; Castellanos, Irina; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Pisoni, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether deficits in executive functioning (EF) in children with cochlear implants (CIs) emerge as early as the preschool years. Method: Two groups of children ages 3 to 6 years participated in this cross-sectional study: 24 preschoolers who had CIs prior to 36 months of age and 21 preschoolers…

  11. Mothers' Speech to Hearing-Impaired Infants and Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeson, Tonya R.; Miller, Rachel J.; McCune, Kasi

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of age, hearing loss, and cochlear implantation on mothers' speech to infants and children. We recorded normal-hearing (NH) mothers speaking to their children as they typically would do at home and speaking to an adult experimenter. Nine infants (10-37 months) were hearing-impaired and had used a cochlear…

  12. Transcribing the Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teoh, Amy P.; Chin, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and nontarget speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic…

  13. Transcribing the Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teoh, Amy P.; Chin, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and nontarget speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic…

  14. Deaf Children with Complex Needs: Parental Experience of Access to Cochlear Implants and Ongoing Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Wendy; Turner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of parents of deaf children with additional complex needs (ACN) in accessing cochlear implant (CI) services and achieving ongoing support. Of a total study group of fifty-one children with ACN, twelve had been fitted with a CI. The parental accounts provide a rich and varied picture of service access. For some…

  15. Working Memory Training for Children with Cochlear Implants: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Hazzard, Lindsey M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the feasibility and efficacy of a working memory training program for improving memory and language skills in a sample of 9 children who are deaf (age 7-15 years) with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: All children completed the Cogmed Working Memory Training program on a home computer over a 5-week period.…

  16. Central Auditory Development: Evidence from CAEP Measurements in Children Fit with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Michael F.; Sharma, Anu; Gilley, Phillip; Martin, Kathryn; Roland, Peter

    2007-01-01

    In normal-hearing children the latency of the P1 component of the cortical evoked response to sound varies as a function of age and, thus, can be used as a biomarker for maturation of central auditory pathways. We assessed P1 latency in 245 congenitally deaf children fit with cochlear implants following various periods of auditory deprivation. If…

  17. Do Fourteenth Amendment considerations outweigh a potential state interest in mandating cochlear implantation for deaf children?

    PubMed

    Bender, Denise G

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the decision concerning pediatric cochlear implantation for children remains a personal choice for parents to make. Economic factors, educational outcomes, and societal attitudes concerning deafness could result in an increased governmental interest in this choice. This article examines case law related to the issue of parental autonomy to determine whether the state, acting in the role of parens patriae, could use economic and social reasons to mandate the provision of cochlear implants for all eligible children. The author uses previous cases as a framework to develop an opinion on whether a constitutional protection for parents may exist.

  18. The effect of early auditory experience on the spatial listening skills of children with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Killan, Catherine F; Royle, Nicola; Totten, Catherine L; Raine, Christopher H; Lovett, Rosemary E S

    2015-12-01

    Both electrophysiological and behavioural studies suggest that auditory deprivation during the first months and years of life can impair listening skills. Electrophysiological studies indicate that 3½ years may be a critical age for the development of symmetrical cortical responses in children using bilateral cochlear implants. This study aimed to examine the effect of auditory experience during the first 3½ years of life on the behavioural spatial listening abilities of children using bilateral cochlear implants, with reference to normally hearing children. Data collected during research and routine clinical testing were pooled to compare the listening skills of children with bilateral cochlear implants and different periods of auditory deprivation. Children aged 4-17 years with bilateral cochlear implants were classified into three groups. Children born profoundly deaf were in the congenital early bilateral group (received bilateral cochlear implants aged ≤3½ years, n=28) or congenital late bilateral group (received first implant aged ≤3½ years and second aged >3½ years, n=38). Children with some bilateral acoustic hearing until the age of 3½ years, who subsequently became profoundly deaf and received bilateral cochlear implants, were in the acquired/progressive group (n=16). There were 32 children in the normally hearing group. Children completed tests of sound-source localization and spatial release from masking (a measure of the ability to use both ears to understand speech in noise). The acquired/progressive group localized more accurately than both groups of congenitally deaf children (p<0.05). All three groups of children with cochlear implants showed similar spatial release from masking. The normally hearing group localized more accurately than all groups with bilateral cochlear implants and displayed more spatial release from masking than the congenitally deaf groups on average (p<0.05). Children with bilateral cochlear implants and early

  19. Breaking the sound barrier: exploring parents' decision-making process of cochlear implants for their children.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pamara F

    2017-08-01

    To understand the dynamic experiences of parents undergoing the decision-making process regarding cochlear implants for their child(ren). Thirty-three parents of d/Deaf children participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and coded using iterative and thematic coding. The results from this study reveal four salient topics related to parents' decision-making process regarding cochlear implantation: 1) factors parents considered when making the decision to get the cochlear implant for their child (e.g., desire to acculturate child into one community), 2) the extent to which parents' communities influence their decision-making (e.g., norms), 3) information sources parents seek and value when decision-making (e.g., parents value other parent's experiences the most compared to medical or online sources), and 4) personal experiences with stigma affecting their decision to not get the cochlear implant for their child. This study provides insights into values and perspectives that can be utilized to improve informed decision-making, when making risky medical decisions with long-term implications. With thorough information provisions, delineation of addressing parents' concerns and encompassing all aspects of the decision (i.e., medical, social and cultural), health professional teams could reduce the uncertainty and anxiety for parents in this decision-making process for cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A comparative historical and demographic study of the neuromodulation management techniques of deep brain stimulation for dystonia and cochlear implantation for sensorineural deafness in children.

    PubMed

    Hudson, V E; Elniel, A; Ughratdar, I; Zebian, B; Selway, R; Lin, J P

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear implants for sensorineural deafness in children is one of the most successful neuromodulation techniques known to relieve early chronic neurodisability, improving activity and participation. In 2012 there were 324,000 recipients of cochlear implants globally.

  1. Influence of DFNB1 status on expressive language in deaf children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Simon I; Suarez, Hamlet; Lopez, Alina; Balkany, Thomas J; Liu, Xue Z

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the language growth of children with connexin-related deafness (DFNB1) who received cochlear implants versus the language growth of implanted children with non-DFNB1 deafness. A prospective longitudinal observational study and analysis. Two tertiary referral centers. There were 37 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss who received cochlear implants before the age of 5 years. A standardized language measure, the section for expressive language of the Reynell Developmental Language Scale was used to assess expressive language skills at 2 times postimplantation (14 and 57 mo postimplantation). Molecular screening for DFNB1 gene variants. Language quotient (LQ) scores (i.e., age-equivalent score obtained on the Reynell Developmental Language Scale divided by the child's chronological age), results of genotyping. The mean language age at the second time interval (mean ± standard deviation, 51.8 ± 13 mo) was greater than at the first testing session (mean ± standard deviation, 19 ± 8 mo, p < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). When divided by genotype, DFNB1 children exhibited a higher LQ and less variability in scores than non-DFNB1 children at the second testing interval (Wilcoxon sign rank test, p = 0.0034). A regression analysis (linear-fit by least squares) conducted on 26 children with preimplantation audiometric data showed that DFNB1 status was the independent variable with greater predictive effect on LQ at the second testing interval, followed by age at implantation (R2 = 0.35, p = 0.0479). Deaf children who received cochlear implants before the age of 5 years and use oral communication show substantial improvement in language abilities. In this study, DFNB1 children who use cochlear implants show greater gains in expressive language than non-DFNB1 children, independent of residual hearing, age at implantation, and duration of implant use.

  2. Effect of age at cochlear implantation on auditory and speech development of children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuying; Dong, Ruijuan; Li, Yuling; Xu, Tianqiu; Li, Yongxin; Chen, Xueqing; Gong, Shusheng

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the auditory and speech abilities in children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) after cochlear implantation (CI) and determine the role of age at implantation. Ten children participated in this retrospective case series study. All children had evidence of ANSD. All subjects had no cochlear nerve deficiency on magnetic resonance imaging and had used the cochlear implants for a period of 12-84 months. We divided our children into two groups: children who underwent implantation before 24 months of age and children who underwent implantation after 24 months of age. Their auditory and speech abilities were evaluated using the following: behavioral audiometry, the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP), the Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (MAIS), the Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS), the Standard-Chinese version of the Monosyllabic Lexical Neighborhood Test (LNT), the Multisyllabic Lexical Neighborhood Test (MLNT), the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) and the Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS). All children showed progress in their auditory and language abilities. The 4-frequency average hearing level (HL) (500Hz, 1000Hz, 2000Hz and 4000Hz) of aided hearing thresholds ranged from 17.5 to 57.5dB HL. All children developed time-related auditory perception and speech skills. Scores of children with ANSD who received cochlear implants before 24 months tended to be better than those of children who received cochlear implants after 24 months. Seven children completed the Mandarin Lexical Neighborhood Test. Approximately half of the children showed improved open-set speech recognition. Cochlear implantation is helpful for children with ANSD and may be a good optional treatment for many ANSD children. In addition, children with ANSD fitted with cochlear implants before 24 months tended to acquire auditory and speech skills better than children fitted with cochlear implants after 24 months. Copyright © 2014

  3. Degradation of labial information modifies audiovisual speech perception in cochlear-implanted children.

    PubMed

    Huyse, Aurélie; Berthommier, Frédéric; Leybaert, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine audiovisual speech integration in cochlear-implanted children and in normally hearing children exposed to degraded auditory stimuli. Previous studies have shown that speech perception in cochlear-implanted users is biased toward the visual modality when audition and vision provide conflicting information. Our main question was whether an experimentally designed degradation of the visual speech cue would increase the importance of audition in the response pattern. The impact of auditory proficiency was also investigated. A group of 31 children with cochlear implants and a group of 31 normally hearing children matched for chronological age were recruited. All children with cochlear implants had profound congenital deafness and had used their implants for at least 2 years. Participants had to perform an /aCa/ consonant-identification task in which stimuli were presented randomly in three conditions: auditory only, visual only, and audiovisual (congruent and incongruent McGurk stimuli). In half of the experiment, the visual speech cue was normal; in the other half (visual reduction) a degraded visual signal was presented, aimed at preventing lipreading of good quality. The normally hearing children received a spectrally reduced speech signal (simulating the input delivered by the cochlear implant). First, performance in visual-only and in congruent audiovisual modalities were decreased, showing that the visual reduction technique used here was efficient at degrading lipreading. Second, in the incongruent audiovisual trials, visual reduction led to a major increase in the number of auditory based responses in both groups. Differences between proficient and nonproficient children were found in both groups, with nonproficient children's responses being more visual and less auditory than those of proficient children. Further analysis revealed that differences between visually clear and visually reduced conditions and between

  4. Hearing Experience and Receptive Vocabulary Development in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Pisoni, David B.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated receptive vocabulary delay in deaf children with cochlear implants. Participants were 23 children with profound hearing loss, ages 6–14 years, who received a cochlear implant between ages 1.4 and 6 years. Duration of cochlear implant use ranged from 3.7 to 11.8 years. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Third Edition (PPVT-III) data were analyzed first by examining children’s errors for evidence of difficulty in specific lexical content areas, and second by calculating standard scores with reference to hearing age (HA) (i.e., chronological age [CA] − age at implantation) rather than CA. Participants showed evidence of vocabulary understanding across all PPVT-III content categories with no strong evidence of disproportionate numbers of errors in any specific content area despite below-average mean standard scores. However, whereas mean standard scores were below the test mean established for hearing children when based on CA, they were within the average range for hearing children when calculated based on HA. Thus, children’s vocabulary knowledge was commensurate with years of cochlear implant experience, providing support for the role of spoken language experience in vocabulary acquisition. PMID:20130017

  5. Sequential bilateral cochlear implantation in children: parents' perspective and device use.

    PubMed

    Sparreboom, Marloes; Leeuw, A Rens; Snik, Ad F M; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to measure parental expectations before surgery of a sequentially placed second cochlear implant and compare these results with parental observations postoperatively and (2) to measure device use of the second cochlear implant and compare to unilateral implant use. Thirty prelingually deaf children with a unilateral cochlear implant (mean age at first implant 1.8 years) received a second implant at a mean age of 5.3 years. To measure parental expectations and observations, parents completed the Parents' Perspective before surgery of the second implant and after 12 and 24 months. The questionnaire included 1 additional question on sound localization. Device use of both the first and second implants was assessed retrospectively after 6, 12 and 24 months of implant use. Device use of the study group was also compared to a reference group of 30 unilateral implant users matched for age at second implantation. Parental expectations with regard to sound localization were significantly higher than the observed changes within the first year of bilateral implant use. The observed changes in communication, listening to speech without lipreading, and speech and language skills met or surpassed parental expectations. Irrespective of age at second implantation, the second implant was significantly less worn than the first implant. No significant difference was observed between the use of the second implant of the study group and device use of the reference group. Second implant use was significantly correlated with the difference in speech recognition between the 2 implants alone. Preoperative parental expectations were too high with regard to the observed localization skills within the first year of bilateral implant use. The study showed that several of these sequentially implanted children had more difficulties in wearing the second implant than in wearing the first implant during the rehabilitation period. The present results suggest that

  6. Phonological abilities of hearing-impaired Cantonese-speaking children with cochlear implants or hearing AIDS.

    PubMed

    Law, Zoe W Y; So, Lydia K H

    2006-12-01

    This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonese-speaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1 to 6;4 years. The participants were asked to name 57 pictures and retell 2 stories. Phonological abilities were described in terms of the participants' phonological units and the phonological processes used. The participants' perception of single words was assessed using a Cantonese phonology test that includes tonal, segmental, and semantic distracters. All except 1 participant had incomplete phonetic repertories. All participants showed complete vowel and tone inventories. The study group used both developmental rules and nondevelopmental phonological rules. For perception of single words, participants chose the target word most often. The cochlear implant users had a significantly higher percentage correct score for consonant production than hearing aid users. The prediction that Cantonese children wearing cochlear implants would have better phonological skills than children having hearing aids with a similar degree of hearing loss was confirmed. Cochlear implant usage appeared to promote consonant feature production development to a greater degree than did the use of a hearing aid.

  7. Benefits of short interimplant delays in children receiving bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Karen A; Papsin, Blake C

    2009-04-01

    To examine speech perception skills in quiet and noise in children using bilateral cochlear implants and to assess the influence of duration of bilateral deafness and interimplant delay. Prospective repeated measures. Tertiary academic referral center. Speech perception was assessed in 58 children with early-onset deafness; 51 received their first implant after less than 3 years of bilateral deafness and their second implant simultaneously or after a long (>2 yr) or short (6-12 mo) interimplant delay. Another seven children had longer periods of bilateral deafness (>3 yr) before the first implant and received their second after a long (>2 yr) interimplant delay. Mean (standard deviation) of bilateral implant use was 12.5 (7.9) months ranging from 6 to 36 months. Repeated measures in quiet were completed in three quiet and two noise (no spatial separation) conditions. In quiet, children listened with their right implant alone, left implant alone, and with both implants. In noise, children wore one implant in the experienced (or right for simultaneous group) ear and both implants. Speech perception scores were poorer in noise than in quiet, but significant improvements were found when bilateral rather than unilateral implants were worn. Improvements were greatest for children who were implanted with a short duration of bilateral deafness and a limited interimplant interval. Benefits of bilateral implantation in the short term are clearest in children with limited delays between implantation.

  8. Surgical outcomes with subperiosteal pocket technique for cochlear implantation in very young children.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael S; Ha, Austin Y; Kitsko, Dennis J; Chi, David H

    2014-09-01

    As data continue to emerge demonstrating improved hearing outcomes associated with younger age at time of cochlear implantation, more children aged 12 months or younger are undergoing this procedure. Drilling a well to house the cochlear implant receiver/stimulator (R/S) may carry an increased risk in this group of patients as the calvarium is thin and drilling an adequate well may require exposure of the underlying dura. Our group has employed a technique in this age group which involves securing the R/S in a subperiosteal pocket without creating a bony well. We report our experience with six infants 12 months of age or younger undergoing cochlear implantation with the subperiosteal pocket technique. Cases were identified by searching an IRB approved research registry. Charts were reviewed for demographics, surgical technique, and clinical outcomes. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Six patients 12 months of age or younger underwent cochlear implantation over a one year period. Simultaneous bilateral implantation was performed in all cases, for a total of 12 implanted ears. The average age at time of implantation was 9.8 months (SD 2.1 months). There were no postoperative wound complications. No evidence of device migration was noted in any patient as of the most recent follow-up appointment. There was one device hard failure at 32 months. Average length of follow-up was 28.4 months (SD 13.8 months). No wound complications or device migrations occurred in 12 cochlear implantations in six children aged 12 months or younger. Advantages of this technique include no risk to the dura in this location, smaller incisions, and shorter surgical time. A potential disadvantage is the increased device profile from the lack of a well. New thinner implant designs may minimize this concern. Further prospective study is justified to confirm our initial experience in this small group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vowel Production in Persian Deaf Children with Cochlear Implant: is the Age of Implantation an Important Factor?

    PubMed

    Zamani, Peyman; Rahmanirasa, Amir; Weisi, Farzad; Valadbeigi, Ayub; Farahani, Farhad; Rezaei, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Proper production of vowels has great significance in speech intelligibility. Evidence shows that cochlear implantation has a significant impact on language and reading abilities in some children immediately after the surgery. The aim of the present study is comparing the quality of 6 simple Persian vowels between two groups of cochlear-implanted children under and over 2 years old. This was a cross-sectional analytic study conducted on 70 children who were implanted under the age of 2, 70 children who were implanted over the age of 2 and 238 normal children as control group. For data analysis, the SFS win acoustic analysis was used. Result of this study showed that F2/i/, f1/e/, f2/e/, f2/∞/, f1/a/, F2/a/, f1/o/, F2/o/and F2/u/means had significant difference between three groups (P < 0.05). Children implanted under the age of 2 showed similar performance as normal children in vowel production. Early cochlear implantation (under the age of 2) affects the quality of simple Persian vowel production significantly as well as the increase of speech intelligibility.

  10. Perceptual Development of Nasal Consonants in Children with Normal Hearing and in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillot, Kathryn M.; Ohde, Ralph N.; Hedrick, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to determine whether the perceptions of nasal consonants in children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants were predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis. Methods: Four groups participated: 8 adults, 8 children with normal hearing (ages 5-7 years), 8 children with normal hearing (ages 3.5-4…

  11. Perceptual Development of Nasal Consonants in Children with Normal Hearing and in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillot, Kathryn M.; Ohde, Ralph N.; Hedrick, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to determine whether the perceptions of nasal consonants in children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants were predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis. Methods: Four groups participated: 8 adults, 8 children with normal hearing (ages 5-7 years), 8 children with normal hearing (ages 3.5-4…

  12. Neuroelectrical imaging study of music perception by children with unilateral and bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Pasquale; Scorpecci, Alessandro; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Colosimo, Alfredo; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Babiloni, Fabio

    2014-05-01

    To investigate by means of non-invasive neuroelectrical imaging the differences in the perceived pleasantness of music between children with cochlear implants (CI) and normal-hearing (NH) children. 5 NH children and 5 children who received a sequential bilateral CI were assessed by means of High-Resolution EEG with Source Reconstruction as they watched a musical cartoon. Implanted children were tested before and after the second implant. For each subject the scalp Power Spectral Density was calculated in order to investigate the EEG alpha asymmetry. The scalp topographic distribution of the EEG power spectrum in the alpha band was different in children using one CI as compared to NH children (see figure). With two CIs the cortical activation pattern changed significantly, becoming more similar to the one observed in NH children. The findings support the hypothesis that bilateral CI users have a closer-to-normal perception of the pleasantness of music than unilaterally implanted children.

  13. Effects of Parents’ Level of Education and Economic Status on the Age at Cochlear Implantation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jeddi, Zahra; Jafari, Zahra; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Cochlear implantation can facilitate the development of communication skills in children with profound hearing loss. The objectives of our study were to determine the average ages at suspicion and diagnosis of hearing loss, amplification, intervention, and performing the cochlear implantation and to investigate the effects of the parents’ level of education and economic circumstances on the age of the child at cochlear implantation. Materials and Methods: The parents of 96 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss who had received a cochlear implant at Amir-Alam Cochlear Implant Center between 2008 and 2010 were asked to complete a survey. The survey included demographic information, and birth, medical, and hearing loss history of their child. Study data were obtained through the patient database in the Cochlear Implant Center and interviews with the parents. Results: The mean times between the age of the children at diagnosis of hearing loss and amplification, beginning the rehabilitation program, and performing the cochlear implantation were 4.05 (±0.86), 2.59 (±0.9), and 25.43 (±1.45) months, respectively; delays that were statistically significant (P≤0.004). In 47.9 percent of cases, the parents were the first people to suspect the occurrence of hearing loss in their child. Statistical analysis indicated that the age at cochlear implantation decreases as the educational level of the parents increases (P≤0.003). There was also a significant difference between parents’ economic circumstances and the age of cochlear implantation (P<0.0001). Conclusion: There is still a remarkable delay between the diagnosis of hearing loss and aural rehabilitation in hearing-impaired children. Parents’ levels of education and economic circumstances have a noticeable effect on the age of cochlear implantation in hearing-impaired children. PMID:24303378

  14. Effects of parents' level of education and economic status on the age at cochlear implantation in children.

    PubMed

    Jeddi, Zahra; Jafari, Zahra; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implantation can facilitate the development of communication skills in children with profound hearing loss. The objectives of our study were to determine the average ages at suspicion and diagnosis of hearing loss, amplification, intervention, and performing the cochlear implantation and to investigate the effects of the parents' level of education and economic circumstances on the age of the child at cochlear implantation. The parents of 96 children with profound sensorineural hearing loss who had received a cochlear implant at Amir-Alam Cochlear Implant Center between 2008 and 2010 were asked to complete a survey. The survey included demographic information, and birth, medical, and hearing loss history of their child. Study data were obtained through the patient database in the Cochlear Implant Center and interviews with the parents. The mean times between the age of the children at diagnosis of hearing loss and amplification, beginning the rehabilitation program, and performing the cochlear implantation were 4.05 (±0.86), 2.59 (±0.9), and 25.43 (±1.45) months, respectively; delays that were statistically significant (P≤0.004). In 47.9 percent of cases, the parents were the first people to suspect the occurrence of hearing loss in their child. Statistical analysis indicated that the age at cochlear implantation decreases as the educational level of the parents increases (P≤0.003). There was also a significant difference between parents' economic circumstances and the age of cochlear implantation (P<0.0001). There is still a remarkable delay between the diagnosis of hearing loss and aural rehabilitation in hearing-impaired children. Parents' levels of education and economic circumstances have a noticeable effect on the age of cochlear implantation in hearing-impaired children.

  15. Transcribing the Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants: Clinical Application of Narrow Phonetic Transcriptions

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Amy; Chin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and non-target speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic transcriptions to evaluate speech production skills and to develop a plan of care. The purposes of this tutorial are (1) to identify issues associated with phonetic transcriptions of the speech of children with cochlear implants and (2) to discuss implications for assessment. Method Narrow transcription data from an ongoing, longitudinal research study were catalogued and reviewed. Study participants had at least 5 years of cochlear implant experience and used spoken American English as a primary means of communication. In this tutorial, selected phonetic symbols and phonetic phenomena are reviewed. Conclusions A set of principles for phonetic transcriptions is proposed. Narrow phonetic transcriptions that include all segment possibilities in the International Phonetic Alphabet and extensions for disordered speech are needed to capture the subtleties of the speech of children with cochlear implants. Narrow transcriptions also may play a key role in planning treatment. PMID:19880945

  16. Transcribing the speech of children with cochlear implants: clinical application of narrow phonetic transcriptions.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Amy P; Chin, Steven B

    2009-11-01

    The phonological systems of children with cochlear implants may include segment inventories that contain both target and nontarget speech sounds. These children may not consistently follow phonological rules of the target language. These issues present a challenge for the clinical speech-language pathologist who uses phonetic transcriptions to evaluate speech production skills and to develop a plan of care. The purposes of this tutorial are to (a) identify issues associated with phonetic transcriptions of the speech of children with cochlear implants and (b) discuss implications for assessment. Narrow transcription data from an ongoing, longitudinal research study were catalogued and reviewed. Study participants had at least 5 years of cochlear implant experience and used spoken American English as a primary means of communication. In this tutorial, selected phonetic symbols and phonetic phenomena are reviewed. A set of principles for phonetic transcriptions is proposed. Narrow phonetic transcriptions that include all segment possibilities in the International Phonetic Alphabet and extensions for disordered speech are needed to capture the subtleties of the speech of children with cochlear implants. Narrow transcriptions also may play a key role in planning treatment.

  17. Parental Involvement in the Habilitation Process Following Children's Cochlear Implantation: An Action Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has…

  18. Profiles of Verbal Working Memory Growth Predict Speech and Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Harris, Michael S.; Hoen, Helena M.; Xu, Huiping; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Verbal short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) skills predict speech and language outcomes in children with cochlear implants (CIs) even after conventional demographic, device, and medical factors are taken into account. However, prior research has focused on single end point outcomes as opposed to the longitudinal process of…

  19. The Ecological Transition to Auditory-Verbal Therapy: Experiences of Parents Whose Children Use Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuss, Deirdre

    2006-01-01

    This Canadian study reports on the experiences of parents whose children use cochlear implants and on their perspectives prior to and following the transition to Auditory-Verbal therapy. A qualitative case study design, framed in social-ecological theory, guided this research. Data collection procedures included a family information questionnaire,…

  20. Genetic Predisposition and Sensory Experience in Language Development: Evidence from Cochlear-Implanted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coene, Martine; Schauwers, Karen; Gillis, Steven; Rooryck, Johan; Govaerts, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent neurobiological studies have advanced the hypothesis that language development is not continuously plastic but is governed by biological constraints that may be modified by experience within a particular time window. This hypothesis is tested based on spontaneous speech data from deaf cochlear-implanted (CI) children with access to…

  1. Speech Recognition, Working Memory and Conversation in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibertsson, Tina; Hansson, Kristina; Asker-Arnason, Lena; Sahlen, Birgitta

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between speech recognition, working memory and conversational skills in a group of 13 children/adolescents with cochlear implants (CIs) between 11 and 19 years of age. Conversational skills were assessed in a referential communication task where the participants interacted with a hearing peer of the same age…

  2. The Influence of Word Characteristics on the Vocabulary of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Min Kyung; Storkel, Holly L.; Lee, Jaehoon; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of phonotactic probability, word length, word frequency, and neighborhood density on the words known by children with cochlear implants (CIs) varying in vocabulary outcomes in a retrospective analysis of a subset of data from a longitudinal study of hearing loss. Generalized linear mixed modeling…

  3. Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted.…

  4. Parental Involvement in the Habilitation Process Following Children's Cochlear Implantation: An Action Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has…

  5. Preparation and Perceptions of Speech-Language Pathologists Working with Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Mary V.; Tucker, Denise A.; Flynn, Perry F.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the level of preparedness of North Carolina speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who serve school-aged children with cochlear implants (CIs). A survey distributed to 190 school-based SLPs in North Carolina revealed that 79% of the participants felt they had little to no confidence in managing CI technology or in providing…

  6. Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted.…

  7. Song Recognition by Young Children with Cochlear Implants: Comparison between Unilateral, Bilateral, and Bimodal Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartov, Tamar; Most, Tova

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine song identification by preschoolers with normal hearing (NH) versus preschoolers with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Participants included 45 children ages 3;8-7;3 (years;months): 12 with NH and 33 with CIs, including 10 with unilateral CI, 14 with bilateral CIs, and 9 bimodal users (CI-HA) with unilateral CI and…

  8. Profiles of Verbal Working Memory Growth Predict Speech and Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Harris, Michael S.; Hoen, Helena M.; Xu, Huiping; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Verbal short-term memory (STM) and working memory (WM) skills predict speech and language outcomes in children with cochlear implants (CIs) even after conventional demographic, device, and medical factors are taken into account. However, prior research has focused on single end point outcomes as opposed to the longitudinal process of…

  9. Sentence Production after Listener and Echoic Training by Prelingual Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golfeto, Raquel M.; de Souza, Deisy G.

    2015-01-01

    Three children with neurosensory deafness who used cochlear implants were taught to match video clips to dictated sentences. We used matrix training with overlapping components and tested for recombinative generalization. Two 3?×?3 matrices generated 18 sentences. For each matrix, we taught 6 sentences and evaluated generalization with the…

  10. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Children with Cochlear Implants Using Electronic Storybooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messier, Jane; Wood, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The present intervention study explored the word learning of 18 children with cochlear implants in response to E-book instruction. Capitalizing on the multimedia options available in electronic storybooks, the intervention incorporated videos and definitions to provide a vocabulary intervention that includes evidence-based teaching strategies. The…

  11. The Influence of Word Characteristics on the Vocabulary of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Min Kyung; Storkel, Holly L.; Lee, Jaehoon; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of phonotactic probability, word length, word frequency, and neighborhood density on the words known by children with cochlear implants (CIs) varying in vocabulary outcomes in a retrospective analysis of a subset of data from a longitudinal study of hearing loss. Generalized linear mixed modeling…

  12. Song Recognition by Young Children with Cochlear Implants: Comparison between Unilateral, Bilateral, and Bimodal Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartov, Tamar; Most, Tova

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine song identification by preschoolers with normal hearing (NH) versus preschoolers with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Participants included 45 children ages 3;8-7;3 (years;months): 12 with NH and 33 with CIs, including 10 with unilateral CI, 14 with bilateral CIs, and 9 bimodal users (CI-HA) with unilateral CI and…

  13. Coming to a Decision about Cochlear Implantation: Parents Making Choices for their Deaf Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Merv; Punch, Renee; Komesaroff, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This study combined quantitative and qualitative methods in a sequential approach to investigate the experiences of parents making decisions about cochlear implants for their deaf children. Quantitative findings from a survey instrument completed by 247 parents were extended and elaborated by qualitative findings from in-depth interviews with 27…

  14. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Children with Cochlear Implants Using Electronic Storybooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messier, Jane; Wood, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The present intervention study explored the word learning of 18 children with cochlear implants in response to E-book instruction. Capitalizing on the multimedia options available in electronic storybooks, the intervention incorporated videos and definitions to provide a vocabulary intervention that includes evidence-based teaching strategies. The…

  15. Vocabulary Knowledge of Children with Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This article employs meta-analysis procedures to evaluate whether children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower spoken-language vocabulary knowledge than peers with normal hearing. Of the 754 articles screened and 52 articles coded, 12 articles met predetermined inclusion criteria (with an additional 5 included for one analysis). Effect sizes…

  16. Consonant Cluster Production in Children with Cochlear Implants: A Comparison with Normally Hearing Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faes, Jolien; Gillis, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In early word productions, the same types of errors are manifest in children with cochlear implants (CI) as in their normally hearing (NH) peers with respect to consonant clusters. However, the incidence of those types and their longitudinal development have not been examined or quantified in the literature thus far. Furthermore, studies on the…

  17. Coming to a Decision about Cochlear Implantation: Parents Making Choices for their Deaf Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Merv; Punch, Renee; Komesaroff, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This study combined quantitative and qualitative methods in a sequential approach to investigate the experiences of parents making decisions about cochlear implants for their deaf children. Quantitative findings from a survey instrument completed by 247 parents were extended and elaborated by qualitative findings from in-depth interviews with 27…

  18. Vocabulary Knowledge of Children with Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This article employs meta-analysis procedures to evaluate whether children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower spoken-language vocabulary knowledge than peers with normal hearing. Of the 754 articles screened and 52 articles coded, 12 articles met predetermined inclusion criteria (with an additional 5 included for one analysis). Effect sizes…

  19. Phonological Patterns in the Conversational Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.; Parker, Rhonda G.

    2008-01-01

    In this descriptive, longitudinal study, phonological patterns (i.e., natural phonological processes) were examined in a set of conversational speech samples obtained from six young children fitted with cochlear implants. Both developmental and non-developmental patterns were observed. This is consistent with findings from previous studies of the…

  20. Phonological Patterns in the Conversational Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flipsen, Peter, Jr.; Parker, Rhonda G.

    2008-01-01

    In this descriptive, longitudinal study, phonological patterns (i.e., natural phonological processes) were examined in a set of conversational speech samples obtained from six young children fitted with cochlear implants. Both developmental and non-developmental patterns were observed. This is consistent with findings from previous studies of the…

  1. Long-Term Predictors of Narrative Skill in Children with Early Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Kelsey E.; Wie, Ona Bø

    2015-01-01

    Narratives require the integration of many different linguistic skills and can be used as an ecologically valid measure of child language development. This study investigated the narrative skills of 18 six- to seven-year-old prelingually deaf children who received simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants (CI) between 5 and 18 months of age. No…

  2. Sentence Production after Listener and Echoic Training by Prelingual Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golfeto, Raquel M.; de Souza, Deisy G.

    2015-01-01

    Three children with neurosensory deafness who used cochlear implants were taught to match video clips to dictated sentences. We used matrix training with overlapping components and tested for recombinative generalization. Two 3?×?3 matrices generated 18 sentences. For each matrix, we taught 6 sentences and evaluated generalization with the…

  3. Long-Term Predictors of Narrative Skill in Children with Early Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Kelsey E.; Wie, Ona Bø

    2015-01-01

    Narratives require the integration of many different linguistic skills and can be used as an ecologically valid measure of child language development. This study investigated the narrative skills of 18 six- to seven-year-old prelingually deaf children who received simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants (CI) between 5 and 18 months of age. No…

  4. Genetic Predisposition and Sensory Experience in Language Development: Evidence from Cochlear-Implanted Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coene, Martine; Schauwers, Karen; Gillis, Steven; Rooryck, Johan; Govaerts, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent neurobiological studies have advanced the hypothesis that language development is not continuously plastic but is governed by biological constraints that may be modified by experience within a particular time window. This hypothesis is tested based on spontaneous speech data from deaf cochlear-implanted (CI) children with access to…

  5. Acoustic Analysis of the Speech of Children with Cochlear Implants: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liker, Marko; Mildner, Vesna; Sindija, Branka

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the speech of the children with cochlear implants, and compare it with the speech of hearing controls. We focused on three categories of Croatian sounds: vowels (F1 and F2 frequencies), fricatives (noise frequencies of /s/ and /[esh]/ ), and affricates (total duration and the pattern of stop-fricative components…

  6. Differences in Children's Sound Production When Speaking with a Cochlear Implant Turned On and Turned Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study compared the speech of 20 children with prelinguistic deafness who wore cochlear implants when the device was on and when the device had been off for several hours. On average, no differences in speaking conditions were found on such parameters as indices of vowel height, vowel place, initial consonant voicing, or final consonant…

  7. Vocabulary Knowledge of Children With Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article employs meta-analysis procedures to evaluate whether children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower spoken-language vocabulary knowledge than peers with normal hearing. Of the 754 articles screened and 52 articles coded, 12 articles met predetermined inclusion criteria (with an additional 5 included for one analysis). Effect sizes were calculated for relevant studies and forest plots were used to compare differences between groups of children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants. Weighted effect size averages for expressive vocabulary measures (g = −11.99; p < .001) and for receptive vocabulary measures (g = −20.33; p < .001) indicated that children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower vocabulary knowledge than children with normal hearing. Additional analyses confirmed the value of comparing vocabulary knowledge of children with hearing loss to a tightly matched (e.g., socioeconomic status-matched) sample. Age of implantation, duration of implantation, and chronological age at testing were not significantly related to magnitude of weighted effect size. Findings from this analysis represent a first step toward resolving discrepancies in the vocabulary knowledge literature. PMID:26712811

  8. Vocabulary Knowledge of Children With Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lund, Emily

    2016-04-01

    This article employs meta-analysis procedures to evaluate whether children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower spoken-language vocabulary knowledge than peers with normal hearing. Of the 754 articles screened and 52 articles coded, 12 articles met predetermined inclusion criteria (with an additional 5 included for one analysis). Effect sizes were calculated for relevant studies and forest plots were used to compare differences between groups of children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants. Weighted effect size averages for expressive vocabulary measures (g = -11.99; p < .001) and for receptive vocabulary measures (g = -20.33; p < .001) indicated that children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower vocabulary knowledge than children with normal hearing. Additional analyses confirmed the value of comparing vocabulary knowledge of children with hearing loss to a tightly matched (e.g., socioeconomic status-matched) sample. Age of implantation, duration of implantation, and chronological age at testing were not significantly related to magnitude of weighted effect size. Findings from this analysis represent a first step toward resolving discrepancies in the vocabulary knowledge literature.

  9. Cued speech for enhancing speech perception and first language development of children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; LaSasso, Carol J

    2010-06-01

    Nearly 300 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss. Hearing impairment, if not adequately managed, has strong socioeconomic and affective impact on individuals. Cochlear implants have become the most effective vehicle for helping profoundly deaf children and adults to understand spoken language, to be sensitive to environmental sounds, and, to some extent, to listen to music. The auditory information delivered by the cochlear implant remains non-optimal for speech perception because it delivers a spectrally degraded signal and lacks some of the fine temporal acoustic structure. In this article, we discuss research revealing the multimodal nature of speech perception in normally-hearing individuals, with important inter-subject variability in the weighting of auditory or visual information. We also discuss how audio-visual training, via Cued Speech, can improve speech perception in cochlear implantees, particularly in noisy contexts. Cued Speech is a system that makes use of visual information from speechreading combined with hand shapes positioned in different places around the face in order to deliver completely unambiguous information about the syllables and the phonemes of spoken language. We support our view that exposure to Cued Speech before or after the implantation could be important in the aural rehabilitation process of cochlear implantees. We describe five lines of research that are converging to support the view that Cued Speech can enhance speech perception in individuals with cochlear implants.

  10. Cued Speech for Enhancing Speech Perception and First Language Development of Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Leybaert, Jacqueline; LaSasso, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 300 million people worldwide have moderate to profound hearing loss. Hearing impairment, if not adequately managed, has strong socioeconomic and affective impact on individuals. Cochlear implants have become the most effective vehicle for helping profoundly deaf children and adults to understand spoken language, to be sensitive to environmental sounds, and, to some extent, to listen to music. The auditory information delivered by the cochlear implant remains non-optimal for speech perception because it delivers a spectrally degraded signal and lacks some of the fine temporal acoustic structure. In this article, we discuss research revealing the multimodal nature of speech perception in normally-hearing individuals, with important inter-subject variability in the weighting of auditory or visual information. We also discuss how audio-visual training, via Cued Speech, can improve speech perception in cochlear implantees, particularly in noisy contexts. Cued Speech is a system that makes use of visual information from speechreading combined with hand shapes positioned in different places around the face in order to deliver completely unambiguous information about the syllables and the phonemes of spoken language. We support our view that exposure to Cued Speech before or after the implantation could be important in the aural rehabilitation process of cochlear implantees. We describe five lines of research that are converging to support the view that Cued Speech can enhance speech perception in individuals with cochlear implants. PMID:20724357

  11. Cochlear implantation in children with anomalous cochleovestibular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, Michael N; Herrmann, Barbara S; Curtin, Hugh D; Van Beek-King, Jessica; Lee, Daniel J

    2012-02-01

    Our aim was to determine the influence of inner-ear anomalies on surgical difficulty and postoperative audiologic outcomes among pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients at our institution. We reviewed medical and audiologic records from 78 consecutive pediatric CI cases between 1985 and June 2009. Thirty patients had high-resolution temporal bone computed tomography imaging available for retrospective interpretation. Seven of these 30 patients (23%) had cochleovestibular dysplasia. Fifty percent of patients with severe dysplasia had a cerebrospinal fluid gusher intraoperatively, compared with 13% of patients with no dysplasia. Of patients with available audiologic outcome data, 17 of 26 patients with normal/mild/moderate dysplasia were able to complete CNC testing, whereas neither of the 2 patients with severe dysplasia could complete the open set test. Our experience suggests that surgical difficulty and audiologic outcomes in pediatric CI recipients may be affected by the presence and severity of a cochleovestibular anomaly.

  12. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  13. Speech Perception in Classroom Acoustics by Children With Cochlear Implants and With Typical Hearing.

    PubMed

    Iglehart, Frank

    2016-06-01

    This study measured speech perception ability in children with cochlear implants and children with typical hearing when listening across ranges of reverberation times (RTs) and speech-to-noise ratios. Participants listened in classroom RTs of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 s combined with a 21-dB range of speech-to-noise ratios. Subsets also listened in a low-reverberant audiological sound booth. Performance measures using the Bamford-Kowal-Bench Speech-in-Noise Test (Etymotic Research, Inc., 2005) were 50% correct word recognition across these acoustic conditions, with supplementary analyses of percent correct. Reduction in RT from 0.9 to 0.6 s benefited both groups of children. A further reduction in RT to 0.3 s provided additional benefit to the children with cochlear implants, with no further benefit or harm to those with typical hearing. Scores in the sound booth were significantly higher for the participants with implants than in the classroom. These results support the acoustic standards of 0.6 s RT for children with typical hearing and 0.3 s RT for children with auditory issues in learning spaces (≤283 m3) as specified in standards S12.60-2010/Part 1 of the American National Standards Institute /Acoustical Society of America (2010). In addition, speech perception testing in a low-reverberant booth overestimated classroom listening ability in children with cochlear implants.

  14. Real-World Verbal Communication Performance of Children Provided With Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Meister, Hartmut; Keilmann, Annerose; Leonhard, Katharina; Streicher, Barbara; Müller, Linda; Lang-Roth, Ruth

    2015-07-01

    To compare the real-world verbal communication performance of children provided with cochlear implants (CIs) with their peers with hearing aids (HAs). Cross-sectional study in university tertiary referral centers and at hearing aid dispensers. Verbal communication performance was assessed by the Functioning after Pediatric Cochlear Implantation (FAPCI) instrument. The FAPCI was administered to 38 parents of children using CIs and 62 parents of children with HAs. According to the WHO classification, children with HAs were categorized into three groups (mild-moderate-severe hearing loss). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the FAPCI scores, with study group, hearing age (i.e., device experience), and age at hearing intervention as sources of variation. ANOVA showed that hearing age and study group significantly contribute to the FAPCI outcome. In all study groups except the children with mild hearing loss, FAPCI scores increased alongside growing experience with the devices. Children with mild hearing loss using HAs showed higher scores than those with severe hearing loss or implanted children. There were no significant differences between the children with CIs and the children with moderate or severe hearing loss using HAs. Real-world verbal communication abilities of children with CIs are similar to those of children with moderate-to-severe hearing loss using amplification. Because hearing age significantly influences performance, children with moderate-to-severe hearing loss using HAs and implanted children catch up with children with mild hearing loss at a hearing age of approximately 3 years.

  15. Cochlear implantation updates: the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Emily A; Britt, Lana; Geers, Ann; Loizou, Philip; Loy, Betty; Roland, Peter; Warner-Czyz, Andrea; Wright, Charles G

    2012-06-01

    This report provides an overview of many research projects conducted by the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, a joint enterprise between the University of Texas at Dallas, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Children's Medical Center. The studies extend our knowledge of factors influencing communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. Multiple designs and statistical techniques are used in the studies described including both cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Sample sizes vary across the studies, and many of the samples represent large populations of children from North America. Multiple statistical techniques are used by the team to analyze outcomes. The team has provided critical information regarding electrode placement, signal processing, and communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. American Academy of Audiology.

  16. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Busi, Micol; Rosignoli, Monica; Castiglione, Alessandro; Minazzi, Federica; Trevisi, Patrizia; Aimoni, Claudia; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. Methods. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations) on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Results. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years). Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males) presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children) ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0). Conclusions. Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities, even if central

  17. Cochlear Implant Outcomes and Genetic Mutations in Children with Ear and Brain Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Busi, Micol; Rosignoli, Monica; Castiglione, Alessandro; Minazzi, Federica; Trevisi, Patrizia; Aimoni, Claudia; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Martini, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Specific clinical conditions could compromise cochlear implantation outcomes and drastically reduce the chance of an acceptable development of perceptual and linguistic capabilities. These conditions should certainly include the presence of inner ear malformations or brain abnormalities. The aims of this work were to study the diagnostic value of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with sensorineural hearing loss who were candidates for cochlear implants and to analyse the anatomic abnormalities of the ear and brain in patients who underwent cochlear implantation. We also analysed the effects of ear malformations and brain anomalies on the CI outcomes, speculating on their potential role in the management of language developmental disorders. The present study is a retrospective observational review of cochlear implant outcomes among hearing-impaired children who presented ear and/or brain anomalies at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. Furthermore, genetic results from molecular genetic investigations (GJB2/GJB6 and, additionally, in selected cases, SLC26A4 or mitochondrial-DNA mutations) on this study group were herein described. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis was conducted using statistical tests. Between January 1, 1996 and April 1, 2012, at the ENT-Audiology Department of the University Hospital of Ferrara, 620 cochlear implantations were performed. There were 426 implanted children at the time of the present study (who were <18 years). Among these, 143 patients (64 females and 79 males) presented ear and/or brain anomalies/lesions/malformations at neuroimaging investigations with MRI and HRCT. The age of the main study group (143 implanted children) ranged from 9 months and 16 years (average = 4.4; median = 3.0). Good outcomes with cochlear implants are possible in patients who present with inner ear or brain abnormalities, even if central nervous system anomalies represent a

  18. Children with cochlear implants: a review of demographics and communication outcomes.

    PubMed

    Belzner, Kate A; Seal, Brenda C

    2009-01-01

    Children with severe to profound hearing loss in the United States are diverse in their racial-ethnic backgrounds, comorbid disabilities, socioeconomic levels, and communication modalities. The present article addresses demographic variables and communication outcomes of children with cochlear implants by means of a review of longitudinal studies published from 2000 through 2007. Information gathered from these reports reflects several trends over the years. Chi-square testing, however, revealed that two large samples chosen from the review failed to conform to an expected population profile for demographic diversity. This literature review and synthesis provides a body of evidence that should be useful for cochlear implant educators, clinicians, and researchers in determining the relevance of previous outcomes to individuals and groups who differ from those reported, and in devising suggestions for increased efforts to represent children of diverse backgrounds in investigations of implant outcomes.

  19. Great expectations: perspectives on cochlear implantation of deaf children in Norway.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Eva; Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Hyde, Mervyn B; Hjulstad, Oddvar

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the use of cochlear implants with deaf children in Norway and examine how this intervention has raised new expectations and some tensions concerning the future of education for deaf students. They report on two studies of communication within school learning environments of young children with implants in Norwegian preschools and primary/elementary schools. These studies involved observations of classroom discourse and teaching activity and interviews with teachers, administrators, parents, and pupils. Results suggested varied patterns of use of Norwegian and of Norwegian Sign Language and several modes of communication, including speech alone, sign alone, and speech with sign. Conclusions are drawn regarding the reasons for the observed variations and the future impact of cochlear implantation on educational policies and services for deaf children and their families in Norway.

  20. Chorioretinal scars and visual deprivation are common in children with cochlear implants after congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Teär Fahnehjelm, Kristina; Olsson, Monica; Fahnehjelm, Cecilia; Lewensohn-Fuchs, Ilona; Karltorp, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare visual function and ocular characteristics in children with cochlear implants, due to severe hearing impairment caused by the congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, with control children fitted with cochlear implants due to connexin 26 mutations (Cx26), a genetic cause of hearing impairment. We carried out ophthalmological assessments, including visual acuity, ocular alignment, Ocular Motor Score, biomicroscopy and fundus photography, on 26 children with congenital CMV (median age 8.3 years, range 1.4-16.7) and 13 Cx26 controls (median age 5.6 years, range 1.7-12.5). We found unilateral chorioretinal macular scars that reduced best-corrected visual acuity ≤0.3 in five (19%) of the children with congenital CMV, but in none of the children with Cx26 (p = 0.15). Ocular motility problems were more common among children with congenital CMV, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.20). The vestibulo-ocular reflex was more frequently pathological in children with congenital CMV (p = 0.011). Ocular complications with central chorioretinal scars and ocular motility disturbances were common in children treated with cochlear implants due to severe hearing impairment caused by the congenital CMV infection. Ophthalmological assessments are advisable in such children for early identification, intervention and follow-up. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Typical Acquisition by Atypical Children: Initial Consonant Cluster Acquisition by Israeli Hebrew-Acquiring Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adi-Bensaid, Limor; Ben-David, Avivit

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the developmental stages of word initial consonant clusters (CCs) in the speech of six monolingual Israeli Hebrew (IH) acquiring hearing impaired children using cochlear implant (CI). Focusing on the patterns of cluster reduction, this study compares the CI children with typically-developing hearing children. All the CI…

  2. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  3. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  4. Comparative study between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation in children of 1 and 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Escorihuela García, Vicente; Pitarch Ribas, María Ignacia; Llópez Carratalá, Ignacio; Latorre Monteagudo, Emilia; Morant Ventura, Antonio; Marco Algarra, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The studies that have evaluated the effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implantation in children suggest an improvement in hearing about sound localization and speech discrimination. In this paper we show the differences in audio-linguistic achievements with early bilateral cochlear implantation versus unilateral, and differences between simultaneous and sequential bilateral implantation. We present 88 children with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss, treated with bilateral cochlear implantation in 32 cases and unilateral in 56 cases, during the first 12 months (27 children) of life and between 12 and 24 months (61 children). We conducted a statistical comparison of both groups in the audiometry, IT-Mais, Nottingham, LittlEars scales and verbal tests. No significant differences in hearing thresholds and questionnaires between unilateral and bilateral implantation were detected in either the first or second year. Verbal tests do show statistically significant differences: children with bilateral cochlear implant obtain 100% recognition of disyllabic and phrases within 2-3 years after implantation whilst children with one implant do not obtain those results at 5 years after surgery. No differences between simultaneous and sequential bilateral implantation were detected. We emphasize the importance of ensuring good early audiological screening, to carry out an early and bilateral cochlear implantation with the consequent development of audio-language skills similar to normal hearing children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  5. Perceptual development of nasal consonants in children with normal hearing and in children who use cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Kathryn M; Ohde, Ralph N; Hedrick, Mark

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether the perceptions of nasal consonants in children with normal hearing and children with cochlear implants were predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis. Methods Four groups participated: 8 adults, 8 children with normal hearing (ages 5-7 years), 8 children with normal hearing (ages 3.5-4 years), and 5 children with cochlear implants (ages 5-7 years). Stimuli were 128 nasal consonant + vowel (/m/ /n/ + /i/ /æ/ /u/ //) syllables produced by a male adult. Each syllable production was edited into 4 segment types: (a) 50-ms murmur, (b) 25-ms murmur + 25-ms transition, (c) 50-ms transition, and (d) full syllable. Developmental effects were observed across listener groups. The children performed better in the 25-ms murmur + 25-ms transition condition, which suggests that they benefit from an integrated perceptual cue. The children wearing cochlear implants performed poorer than children with normal hearing on all segments. Developmental differences in perception of nasal consonants were evident. Children wearing cochlear implants showed weaker integration and perception abilities compared to younger children with normal hearing. As predicted by the discontinuity hypothesis, the segment with the spectral discontinuity provided the strongest perceptual cues to place of articulation of nasals in children with normal hearing.

  6. Practitioners' perspectives on the functioning of school-age children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M; Olds, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The availability of cochlear implants has increased the number of children with profound deafness educated in classrooms alongside peers with normal hearing. The purpose of this research was to better understand the functioning of these children from the perspective of their service providers. Semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 28 practitioners to elicit their perceptions of children's abilities in oral communication, academic, and social functioning. Data were coded inductively and examined through content analysis. The central theme was that cochlear implantation has improved school functioning for children both in hearing and related spoken language abilities and beyond hearing in academic and social development. While these benefits were a consistent theme, a wide range of performance was identified across all areas of functioning. In particular, areas of concern included full participation in classroom activities and social interaction with peers. The findings provide insights into functioning for children with cochlear implants from the perspective of those who interact with them in everyday settings. These findings underscore the challenges for children in achieving full participation despite improvements in communication skills. Practitioners identified areas where intervention is required to facilitate the inclusion of children in school programs.

  7. Sources of Variability in Language Development of Children with Cochlear Implants: Age at Implantation, Parental Language, and Early Features of Children's Language Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Schramm, Satyam A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relative influence of age at implantation, parental expansions, and child language internal factors on grammatical progress in children with cochlear implants (CI). Data analyses used two longitudinal corpora of spontaneous speech samples, one with twenty-two and one with twenty-six children,…

  8. Sources of Variability in Language Development of Children with Cochlear Implants: Age at Implantation, Parental Language, and Early Features of Children's Language Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szagun, Gisela; Schramm, Satyam A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relative influence of age at implantation, parental expansions, and child language internal factors on grammatical progress in children with cochlear implants (CI). Data analyses used two longitudinal corpora of spontaneous speech samples, one with twenty-two and one with twenty-six children,…

  9. [Organization of pedagogical rehabilitation for the children with a cochlear implant].

    PubMed

    Shmatko, N D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the peculiarities oforganization of pedagogical rehabilitation for the children with a cochlear implant and to demonstrate the most effective forms of their upbringing and education. Special attention is given to the organization ofsuch work during the preschool period with reference to potential difficulties encountered in the education of the children suffering a delay in the speech development.

  10. Cochlear Implantation Updates: The Dallas Cochlear Implant Program

    PubMed Central

    Tobey, Emily A.; Britt, Lana; Geers, Ann; Loizou, Philip; Loy, Betty; Roland, Peter; Warner-Czyz, Andrea; Wright, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides an overview of many research projects conducted by the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, a joint enterprise between The University of Texas at Dallas, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Children’s Medical Center. The studies extend our knowledge of factors influencing communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. Multiple designs and statistical techniques are used in the studies described including both cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Sample sizes vary across the studies and many of the samples represent large populations of children from North America. Multiple statistical techniques are used by the team to analyze outcomes. The team has provided critical information regarding electrode placement, signal processing, and communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. PMID:22668764

  11. [Our experience with bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Carmel, Eldar; Taitelbaum-Swead, Ricky; Migirov, Lela; Hildesheimer, Minka; Kronenberg, Jona

    2008-03-01

    Cochlear implantation is a standard method of hearing rehabilitation among patients with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. In recent years there have been an increasing number of studies showing superior hearing with bilateral cochlear implantation in comparison with a unilateral procedure. In this study we present our experience with 15 patients, children and adults, who had bilateral cochlear implant surgery. Speech perception test results demonstrated a hearing benefit in bilateral cochlear implantation in comparison with a unilateral device, mainly by improvement in the identification of speech in noise tests.

  12. The music perception abilities of prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Stabej, Katja Kladnik; Smid, Lojze; Gros, Anton; Zargi, Miha; Kosir, Andrej; Vatovec, Jagoda

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the music perception abilities of prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants, in comparison to a group of normal-hearing children, and to consider the factors that contribute to music perception. The music perception abilities of 39 prelingually deaf children with unilateral cochlear implants were compared to the abilities of 39 normal hearing children. To assess the music listening abilities, the MuSIC perception test was adopted. The influence of the child's age, age at implantation, device experience and type of sound-processing strategy on the music perception were evaluated. The effects of auditory performance, nonverbal intellectual abilities, as well as the child's additional musical education on music perception were also considered. Children with cochlear implants and normal hearing children performed significantly differently with respect to rhythm discrimination (55% vs. 82%, p<0.001), instrument identification (57% vs. 88%, p<0.001) and emotion rating (p=0.022). However we found no significant difference in terms of melody discrimination and dissonance rating between the two groups. There was a positive correlation between auditory performance and melody discrimination (r=0.27; p=0.031), between auditory performance and instrument identification (r=0.20; p=0.059) and between the child's grade (mark) in school music classes and melody discrimination (r=0.34; p=0.030). In children with cochlear implant only, the music perception ability assessed by the emotion rating test was negatively correlated to the child's age (r(S)=-0.38; p=0.001), age at implantation (r(S)=-0.34; p=0.032), and device experience (r(S)=-0.38; p=0.019). The child's grade in school music classes showed a positive correlation to music perception abilities assessed by rhythm discrimination test (r(S)=0.46; p<0.001), melody discrimination test (r(S)=0.28; p=0.018), and instrument identification test (r(S)=0.23; p=0.05). As expected, there was a marked difference in

  13. Children with cochlear implants and developmental disabilities: a language skills study with developmentally matched hearing peers.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Grether, Sandra; Choo, Daniel I

    2011-01-01

    The number of children receiving cochlear implants (CIs) with significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. Unfortunately, children with additional disabilities receiving CIs have largely been excluded from studies on cochlear implant outcomes. Thus limited data exists on outcomes in this population to guide pre-implant counseling for anticipated benefits. The study objectives were: (1) evaluate differences in post-cochlear implant language skills between children with cochlear implants and developmental disabilities and age/cognitively matched controls; (2) quantify possible discrepancies between language level and cognitive level. Fifteen children with a developmental disability who received a CI were matched 1:1 on nonverbal cognitive ability and age to hearing controls. Language was evaluated using Preschool Language Scale-IV and reported as language quotients. Multivariable mixed models for matched pairs analyzed differences in language levels between groups. No significant differences were seen between CI and control groups regarding insurance, maternal education, or family income level. Results of the multivariable models indicated that compared to matched controls, the CI group had significantly lower mean receptive (24.6 points, p=0.002) and mean expressive (21.9 points, p=0.001) language quotients after controlling for confounders such as number of therapies and weekly hours in therapy. Significant discrepancies between language level and cognitive level were seen among CI participants only. Compared to age- and cognitively matched controls, children with CIs had significantly lower language levels with delays disproportionate to their cognitive potential. Mechanisms behind this performance-functional gap need to be understood to deliver appropriate intervention strategies for this special population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ethics for the pediatrician: the evolving ethics of cochlear implants in children.

    PubMed

    Lantos, John D

    2012-07-01

    The story of the ethical controversy over cochlear implants is unique in some ways and paradigmatic in others. It is unique in the ways that it was shaped by the history of deafness, and of cultural responses to deafness, in the United States. The story is paradigmatic in two ways. First, cochlear implantation was an innovative therapy that was introduced into practice without adequate study. Promising early trials led to FDA approval, although long-term outcome data from rigorous studies were lacking. In this respect, the story of cochlear implants is similar to the history of other innovations that were introduced without rigorous evaluation, innovations such as supplemental oxygen, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or corticosteroids for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Cochlear implants also are paradigmatic of a particular type of ethical dilemma in which advocacy groups claim to know better what is best for children than do the children's parents or doctors. This controversy happened during the Baby Doe debate in the 1980s, when advocacy groups claimed that doctors and parents were conspiring to discriminate against children with disabilities. Ultimately, the US Supreme Court invalidated that interpretation of disability rights. Instead, parents and doctors working together are given discretion to make decisions about what is best for children. With regard to cochlear implants for children, the NAD realizes that they are walking a fine line. As one NAD spokesperson said, "We don't say that hearing parents aren't qualified to make decisions about their deaf children. We say that they need to have contact with deaf people if they're going to make educated decisions". The same could be said for pediatricians. There are 4,000 to 8,000 infants born each year in the United States with severe hearing impairment. Their parents will have to make decisions about what is best. Pediatricians need to understand the options and be prepared to help parents sort through the

  15. Parent Perceptions of Audiology and Speech-Language Services and Support for Young Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Patrick Michael

    2013-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss are selecting cochlear implants at an increasing rate and when their children are very young. Audiologists and speech-language pathologists are typically involved in habilitation activities following implantation in an effort to increase children's access to listening…

  16. Parent Perceptions of Audiology and Speech-Language Services and Support for Young Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Patrick Michael

    2013-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss are selecting cochlear implants at an increasing rate and when their children are very young. Audiologists and speech-language pathologists are typically involved in habilitation activities following implantation in an effort to increase children's access to listening…

  17. A Comparison of the Speech and Language Skills of Children with Cochlear Implants and Children with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Efrat A.; Roth, Froma P.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the language skills of children with cochlear implants (CIs) compared to normal hearing (NH) peers. Standardized speech and language measures, including speech articulation, receptive and expressive vocabulary, syntax and morphology, and metalinguistics, were administered to 39 congenitally deaf children, ages 5 to 14, and a…

  18. The perception of stress and intonation in children with a cochlear implant and a hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Lauren; Faulkner, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated whether low frequency information from a hearing aid improved the perception of stress and intonation by English-speaking children with cochlear implants. As pitch information is limited for cochlear implant users, this study also investigated if users rely more on the cues of duration and amplitude to perceive stress and intonation. Nine children with bimodal stimulation (cochlear implant and hearing aid) participated in two experiments. The first measured the just audible change in F0 (pitch) and amplitude for a speech-like word 'baba'. The second experiment examined the children's ability to identify focus in natural and manipulated sentences. Overall, group results did not show a bimodal advantage in perceiving stress and intonation. However, the children were significantly better at perceiving focus in sentences with natural speech compared with manipulated speech in both the CI and bimodal conditions. The results suggest that in the absence of pitch cues, amplitude and duration cues are used to perceive stress and intonation. However, the majority of children only perceived amplitude changes greater than the changes typically found in speech, implying duration cues were the most valuable. Taken together the findings suggest that for children with cochlear implants, cues to F0 may not be essential for prosody perception and in the absence of cues to F0 and amplitude, duration may offer an alternative cue. Although a bimodal advantage was not demonstrated for all participants, it is recommended that if clinically appropriate, a contralateral hearing aid is fitted and trialled to exploit any residual hearing.

  19. Language outcomes for children with cochlear implants enrolled in different communication programs.

    PubMed

    Yanbay, Ennur; Hickson, Louise; Scarinci, Nerina; Constantinescu, Gabriella; Dettman, Shani J

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to (a) compare language outcomes in pediatric cochlear implant users enrolled in three different communication programs: sign and spoken language, auditory-oral, and auditory-verbal therapy, and (b) examine factors influencing language outcomes. Post-implant standard scores on language assessments of receptive vocabulary, auditory comprehension, and expressive communication were collected from files of 42 children with prelingual hearing loss who were implanted by 3;6 years of age. Early intervention history, device details, and demographic information were obtained for each child. Family involvement was evaluated using a rating scale. After adjusting for potential covariates, there were no significant differences in language outcomes across the three groups. Overall, there was a large degree of variability with some children achieving below average scores and others achieving above average scores. Age at diagnosis of hearing loss and family involvement were significantly associated with language outcomes. Regardless of the type of communication approach received, children diagnosed with hearing loss at an early age and children with a high level of family involvement had better post-implant language scores than children diagnosed later and with lower levels of family involvement. These findings emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and highlight the contribution families make to the language outcomes of children with cochlear implants.

  20. Cochlear implantation in healthy and otitis-prone children: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Luntz, M; Teszler, C B; Shpak, T; Feiglin, H; Farah-Sima'an, A

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the timing of surgery, intraoperative findings, and otitis media-related outcome of cochlear implantation in children who are otitis-prone with their counterparts who are not otitis-prone. Prospective. Children referred for cochlear implantation were assigned to a non-otitis-prone group (group A: normal otoscopy on their first visit after referral) or an otitis-prone group (group B: current or a recent history of otitis media at referral). Group B patients were managed using a structured protocol aimed at preimplantation otitis media control. The study reviewed pre-, intra-, and postoperative data. Of the 18 children studied, 8 were assigned to group A (mean age at referral, 40.6 mo) and 10 to group B (mean age at referral, 31.6 mo). For otitis media control, all otitis-prone children underwent ventilating tube insertion (various numbers of procedures before implantation). Only one otitis-prone child required cortical mastoidectomy also. Time from referral to implantation was similar in the two groups (mean, 6.6 mo). High-resolution computed tomography data showed mastoid pneumatization to be significantly smaller in the otitis-prone group, but the facial recess was not smaller in this group. During implantation, 10 children had inflamed middle ear mucosa. Seven of these belonged to group B. All of these seven children had a round window niche obliterated by the inflamed mucosa, which had to be removed for round window membrane identification. After implantation, only one child had drainage through the ventilating tube for more than 1 week. Two children in group B developed otitis media (1 year postimplantation) that was overcome within 1 week. There were no otitis media-related complications. If a structured protocol is used for the control of otitis media before cochlear implantation, otitis media should not require a delay in implantation. In otitis media-prone children, the round window niche is often obscured by inflamed mucosa. Its

  1. Speech perception of young children using nucleus 22-channel or CLARION cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Young, N M; Grohne, K M; Carrasco, V N; Brown, C

    1999-04-01

    This study compares the auditory perceptual skill development of 23 congenitally deaf children who received the Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant with the SPEAK speech coding strategy, and 20 children who received the CLARION Multi-Strategy Cochlear Implant with the Continuous Interleaved Sampler (CIS) speech coding strategy. All were under 5 years old at implantation. Preimplantation, there were no significant differences between the groups in age, length of hearing aid use, or communication mode. Auditory skills were assessed at 6 months and 12 months after implantation. Postimplantation, the mean scores on all speech perception tests were higher for the Clarion group. These differences were statistically significant for the pattern perception and monosyllable subtests of the Early Speech Perception battery at 6 months, and for the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure at 12 months. Multiple regression analysis revealed that device type accounted for the greatest variance in performance after 12 months of implant use. We conclude that children using the CIS strategy implemented in the Clarion implant may develop better auditory perceptual skills during the first year postimplantation than children using the SPEAK strategy with the Nucleus device.

  2. Cochlear Implants: The Young People's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Alexandra; Archbold, Sue; Gregory, Susan; Skipp, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is a relatively new procedure, which has already had significant impact on the lives of many profoundly deaf children and adults, in providing useful hearing to those unable to benefit significantly from hearing aids. After 16 years of cochlear implantation in the United Kingdom, there is now a body of evidence covering a…

  3. Speech, vocabulary, and the education of children using cochlear implants: oral or total communication?

    PubMed

    Connor, C M; Hieber, S; Arts, H A; Zwolan, T A

    2000-10-01

    This study examines the relationship between the teaching method, oral or total communication, used at children's schools and children's consonant-production accuracy and vocabulary development over time. Children who participated in the study (N = 147) demonstrated profound sensorineural hearing loss and had used cochlear implants for between 6 months and 10 years. Educational programs that used an oral communication (OC) approach focused on the development of spoken language, whereas educational programs that used a total communication (TC) approach focused on the development of language using both signed and spoken language. Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) we compared the consonant-production accuracy, receptive spoken vocabulary, and expressive spoken and/or signed vocabulary skills, over time, of children who were enrolled in schools that used either OC or TC approaches, while controlling for a number of variables. These variables included age at implantation, preoperative aided speech detection thresholds, type of cochlear implant device used, and whether a complete or incomplete active electrode array was implanted. The results of this study indicated that as they used their implants the children demonstrated improved consonant-production accuracy and expressive and receptive vocabulary over time, regardless of whether their school employed a TC or OC teaching method. Furthermore, there appeared to be a complex relationship among children's performance with the cochlear implant, age at implantation, and communication/teaching strategy employed by the school. Controlling for all variables, children in OC programs demonstrated, on average, superior consonant-production accuracy, with significantly greater rates of improvement in consonant-production accuracy scores over time compared to children in TC programs. However, there was no significant difference between OC and TC groups in performance or rate of growth in consonant-production accuracy when

  4. [Effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who use cochlear implants in conjunction with hearing aids in the opposite ears].

    PubMed

    Tian, Yanjing; Zhou, Huifang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Dong; Xu, Yi; Guo, Yuxi

    2012-10-01

    To compare the effect of rehabilitation of prelingual deaf children who used a cochlear implant (CI) in one ear and a hearing aids in the opposite ear while the hearing level of the opposite ears are different. Hearing ability, language ability and learning ability was included in the content. The aim of this research is to investigate better style of rehabilitation, and to offer the best help to the prelingual deaf children. Accord ing to the hearing level of the ear opposite to the one wearing a cochlear implant and whether the opposite ear wear a hearing aid or not, 30 prelingual deaf children were divided into three groups, including cochlear implant with opposite severe hearing loss and hearing aid ear (CI+SHA), cochlear implant with opposite profound hearing loss and hearing aid ear (CI+PHA), cochlear implant only (CI). The effect of rehabilitation was assessed in six different times (3,6,9,12,15 and 18 months after the cochlear implants and hearing aids began to work). The longer time the rehabilitation spends, the better the hearing ability,language ability and the learning ability were. The hearing ability of CI+SHA was better than those of CI+PHA (P<0.05) and CI (P<0.05). The language ability and learning ability of CI-SHA was nearly equal to those of the other two groups. The prelingual deaf children should take much more time on rehabilitation. The effect of rehabilitation for prelingual deaf children who used cochlear implant in one ear and hearing aid in the other depend on the residual hearing level of the other ear. If a prelingual deaf children still has any residual hearing level in the ear opposite to the cochlear implant ear, it is better for him/her to wear a hearing aid in the ear.

  5. Consonant-free words: evidence from Hebrew speaking children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Adi-Bensaid, Limor; Tubul-Lavy, Gila

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports on a rare phenomenon in language development-the production of words without consonants, and thus syllables without an onset. Such words, which are referred as Consonant-free words (CFWs), appeared for a short period in the early speech of hearing impaired Hebrew-speaking children, who produced words consisting of one or two vowels (where the latter were disyllabic). The quantitative data are drawn from the speech of six monolingual hearing-impaired Hebrew-speaking children using a cochlear implant device. Their age ranged from 1;5-2;8 years at their first recording session. The elicitation procedure was based on spontaneous speech and picture naming. Findings indicate that cochlear implant users produce CFWs at the initial stage of the prosodic word development. This study claims the CFWs characterize a transitional period between babbling and speech, which varies between different types of populations. The transitional period is rather short in typically developing children, who hardly ever produce CFWs, greater in cochlear implant children, and the greatest in developmental speech disorders such as dyspraxia. Clinical implications of these findings are also discussed.

  6. [Pedagogical rehabilitation of deaf pre-school children following cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Sataeva, A I

    2015-01-01

    This publication was designed to summarize the results of the long-term study with the purpose of developing a scientific and methodological approach to rehabilitation of the children having cochlear implants. The main emphasis is laid on the initial (launching) stage of rehabilitative measures aimed at the reconstruction of the sensory basis of communication and interaction with the surrounding hearing subjects taking into consideration peculiarities of the children who experienced the loss of hearing late in their life and deaf children with different levels of speech development. The main corrective measures are described to be taken at the initial stage of rehabilitation of the young and pre-school children unable to speak by the time of prescribed cochlear implantation. The markers of completion of the initial phase of the rehabilitative period are identified indicating transition of a child toward the normal development as a result of cochlear implantation. The author discusses the results of corrective pedagogical measures that can be achieved by their adequate organization and consistent implementation.

  7. Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, and Word Reading in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants: Does Age of Implantation Explain Individual Variability in Performance Outcomes and Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah; Rajput, Kaukab; Brinton, Julie; Goswami, Usha

    2008-01-01

    The phonological awareness (PA), vocabulary, and word reading abilities of 19 children with cochlear implants (CI) were assessed. Nine children had an implant early (between 2 and 3.6 years) and 10 had an implant later (between 5 and 7 years). Participants were tested twice over a 12-month period on syllable, rhyme, and phoneme awareness (see…

  8. Phonological Awareness, Vocabulary, and Word Reading in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants: Does Age of Implantation Explain Individual Variability in Performance Outcomes and Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah; Rajput, Kaukab; Brinton, Julie; Goswami, Usha

    2008-01-01

    The phonological awareness (PA), vocabulary, and word reading abilities of 19 children with cochlear implants (CI) were assessed. Nine children had an implant early (between 2 and 3.6 years) and 10 had an implant later (between 5 and 7 years). Participants were tested twice over a 12-month period on syllable, rhyme, and phoneme awareness (see…

  9. Telephone speech comprehension in children with multichannel cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Aronson, L; Estienne, P; Arauz, S L; Pallante, S A

    1997-11-01

    Telephone speech comprehension is being evaluated in six prelingually deaf children implanted with the Nucleus 22 prosthesis fitted with the Speak strategy. All of them have had at least 1.5 years of experience with their implant. When the tests began, they had already had at least 2 months' experience with the same map in their speech processor. The children were trained in the use of the telephone as part of the rehabilitation program. None of them used it regularly but as a game that they found very entertaining. A special battery, the Bate-fon (batería para teléfono = telephone battery), was designed for training and evaluation purposes. It includes the five Spanish vowels in isolation, diphthongs, onomatopoetic animal voices, two-syllable, and three-syllable words. The tests were administered 1.5-2 years after the switch-on of their speech processor. Standard acoustic telephone coupling was used. The speech material was presented to the child on colored cards. Stimuli were presented twice. Children were informed when the response was incorrect. Averaged results indicated that the percentages of correct responses for all the speech material increase in the second presentation. All children have shown some degree of telephone communication abilities. As a result of the training, some of the children are using the telephone to communicate with their families.

  10. Determination of Benefits of Cochlear Implantation in Children with Auditory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Fei; Li, Jianan; Hong, Mengdi; Chen, Aiting; Jiao, Qingshan; Sun, Li; Liang, Sichao; Yang, Shiming

    2015-01-01

    Background Auditory neuropathy (AN) is a recently recognized hearing disorder characterized by intact outer hair cell function, disrupted auditory nerve synchronization and poor speech perception and recognition. Cochlear implants (CIs) are currently the most promising intervention for improving hearing and speech in individuals with AN. Although previous studies have shown optimistic results, there was large variability concerning benefits of CIs among individuals with AN. The data indicate that different criteria are needed to evaluate the benefit of CIs in these children compared to those with sensorineural hearing loss. We hypothesized that a hierarchic assessment would be more appropriate to evaluate the benefits of cochlear implantation in AN individuals. Methods Eight prelingual children with AN who received unilateral CIs were included in this study. Hearing sensitivity and speech recognition were evaluated pre- and postoperatively within each subject. The efficacy of cochlear implantation was assessed using a stepwise hierarchic evaluation for achieving: (1) effective audibility, (2) improved speech recognition, (3) effective speech, and (4) effective communication. Results The postoperative hearing and speech performance varied among the subjects. According to the hierarchic assessment, all eight subjects approached the primary level of effective audibility, with an average implanted hearing threshold of 43.8 ± 10.2 dB HL. Five subjects (62.5%) attained the level of improved speech recognition, one (12.5%) reached the level of effective speech, and none of the subjects (0.0%) achieved effective communication. Conclusion CIs benefit prelingual children with AN to varying extents. A hierarchic evaluation provides a more suitable method to determine the benefits that AN individuals will likely receive from cochlear implantation. PMID:26010832

  11. A comparison of cochlear implant processing strategies in children using speech pattern audiometry.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Kate E; Verschuur, Carl

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use Speech Pattern Audiometry (SPA) to compare phoneme perception performance between SPEAK and ACE processing strategies with children using the Nucleus 24 cochlear implant. Listeners were evaluated in terms of ability to identify two synthetic word pairs, one signalling a voicing contrast and the other signalling a place of articulation contrast. For both word pairs, ACE was associated with more 'normal' phoneme boundaries than SPEAK. There was also a non-significant trend for better identification ability with ACE compared to SPEAK. The study suggests that there may be a place for SPA as part of the clinical battery of tests used for evaluation of cochlear implant speech processing strategies in children. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Theory-of-mind development in oral deaf children with cochlear implants or conventional hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Candida C

    2004-09-01

    In the context of the established finding that theory-of-mind (ToM) growth is seriously delayed in late-signing deaf children, and some evidence of equivalent delays in those learning speech with conventional hearing aids, this study's novel contribution was to explore ToM development in deaf children with cochlear implants. Implants can substantially boost auditory acuity and rates of language growth. Despite the implant, there are often problems socialising with hearing peers and some language difficulties, lending special theoretical interest to the present comparative design. A total of 52 children aged 4 to 12 years took a battery of false belief tests of ToM. There were 26 oral deaf children, half with implants and half with hearing aids, evenly divided between oral-only versus sign-plus-oral schools. Comparison groups of age-matched high-functioning children with autism and younger hearing children were also included. No significant ToM differences emerged between deaf children with implants and those with hearing aids, nor between those in oral-only versus sign-plus-oral schools. Nor did the deaf children perform any better on the ToM tasks than their age peers with autism. Hearing preschoolers scored significantly higher than all other groups. For the deaf and the autistic children, as well as the preschoolers, rate of language development and verbal maturity significantly predicted variability in ToM, over and above chronological age. The finding that deaf children with cochlear implants are as delayed in ToM development as children with autism and their deaf peers with hearing aids or late sign language highlights the likely significance of peer interaction and early fluent communication with peers and family, whether in sign or in speech, in order to optimally facilitate the growth of social cognition and language.

  13. Semantic and syntactic reading comprehension strategies used by deaf children with early and late cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, M Teresa; López-Higes, Ramón; Pisón, Guzmán

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students have traditionally exhibited reading comprehension difficulties. In recent years, these comprehension problems have been partially offset through cochlear implantation (CI), and the subsequent improvement in spoken language skills. However, the use of cochlear implants has not managed to fully bridge the gap in language and reading between normally hearing (NH) and deaf children, as its efficacy depends on variables such as the age at implant. This study compared the reading comprehension of sentences in 19 children who received a cochlear implant before 24 months of age (early-CI) and 19 who received it after 24 months (late-CI) with a control group of 19 NH children. The task involved completing sentences in which the last word had been omitted. To complete each sentence children had to choose a word from among several alternatives that included one syntactic and two semantic foils in addition to the target word. The results showed that deaf children with late-CI performed this task significantly worse than NH children, while those with early-CI exhibited no significant differences with NH children, except under more demanding processing conditions (long sentences with infrequent target words). Further, the error analysis revealed a preference of deaf students with early-CI for selecting the syntactic foil over a semantic one, which suggests that they draw upon syntactic cues during sentence processing in the same way as NH children do. In contrast, deaf children with late-CI do not appear to use a syntactic strategy, but neither a semantic strategy based on the use of key words, as the literature suggests. Rather, the numerous errors of both kinds that the late-CI group made seem to indicate an inconsistent and erratic response when faced with a lack of comprehension. These findings are discussed in relation to differences in receptive vocabulary and short-term memory and their implications for sentence reading comprehension. Copyright © 2015

  14. The effect of age of cochlear implantation on vocal characteristics in children.

    PubMed

    Knight, Kerry; Ducasse, Simone; Coetzee, Ashley; van der Linde, Jeannie; Louw, Anel

    2016-06-27

    Early cochlear implantation aids auditory feedback and supports better communication and self-monitoring of the voice. The objective of this study was to determine whether the age of cochlear implantation has an impact on vocal development in children implanted before age 4. The study consisted of 19 participants in total. All implant recipients (experimental group) were 3-5 years post-implantation, including four prelingual (0-2 years) and five perilingual (2-4 years) implant recipients. The control group consisted of 10 children whose hearing was within normal limits between the ages 3-6 years and 10 months, which was compared to the experimental group. Established paediatric norms were used for additional comparison. A questionnaire was used to gather information from each of the participant's caregivers to determine whether other personal and contextual factors had an impact on voice production. An acoustic analysis was conducted for each participant using the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program of the Computerized Speech Lab. When the experimental group and the control group were compared, similar results were yielded for fundamental frequency and short-term perturbation (jitter and shimmer). More variability was noted in long-term frequency and amplitude measures, with significantly higher differences, and therefore further outside the norms, in the prelingual group when compared to the perilingual and control groups. In this study, age of implantation did not impact vocal characteristics. Further research should include larger sample sizes, with participants that are age and gender matched.

  15. Spoken English Language Development Among Native Signing Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Bilingualism is common throughout the world, and bilingual children regularly develop into fluently bilingual adults. In contrast, children with cochlear implants (CIs) are frequently encouraged to focus on a spoken language to the exclusion of sign language. Here, we investigate the spoken English language skills of 5 children with CIs who also have deaf signing parents, and so receive exposure to a full natural sign language (American Sign Language, ASL) from birth, in addition to spoken English after implantation. We compare their language skills with hearing ASL/English bilingual children of deaf parents. Our results show comparable English scores for the CI and hearing groups on a variety of standardized language measures, exceeding previously reported scores for children with CIs with the same age of implantation and years of CI use. We conclude that natural sign language input does no harm and may mitigate negative effects of early auditory deprivation for spoken language development. PMID:24150489

  16. Identification of Effective Strategies to Promote Language in Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Marker, Craig; DesJardin, Jean L.

    2012-01-01

    Parental involvement and communication are essential for language development in young children. However, hearing parents of deaf children face challenges in providing language input to their children. This study utilized the largest national sample of deaf children receiving cochlear implants, with the aim of identifying effective facilitative language techniques. Ninety-three deaf children (≤ 2 years) were assessed at six implant centers prior to and for three years following implantation. All parent-child interactions were videotaped, transcribed and coded at each assessment. Analyses using bivariate latent difference score modeling indicated that higher versus lower-level strategies predicted growth in expressive language and word types predicted growth in receptive language over time. These effective, higher-level strategies could be used in early intervention programs. PMID:23002910

  17. Cochlear implantations in children with Waardenburg syndrome: an electrophysiological and psychophysical review.

    PubMed

    Pau, Henry; Gibson, William P R; Gardner-Berry, Kirsty; Sanli, Halit

    2006-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome presents with dystopia canthorum, pigmentary abnormalities of hair, iris and skin (often a white forelock and heterochromia iridis) and sensorineural deafness. The authors review the electrophysiological and psychophysical findings of implanted children with Waardenburg syndrome at the Sydney Cochlear Implant Centre. Twenty children with Waardenburg syndrome received cochlear implants between 1985 and 2001. Electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) was performed in all of these patients intra-operatively as part of the routine investigations. Only 13 of these patients were assessed one year or more post-operatively by means of the Melbourne Categories (0-7). Four patients (20%) were found to have abnormal EABR recordings. The mode of Melbourne Categories in this group (n = 3) was 1 at one year post-operation. The other 16 patients were found to have normal EABR and the mode of Melbourne Categories in this group (n = 10) was 7. A poor outcome after cochlear implantation was associated with abnormal EABR recordings (a 'true' auditory neuropathy) and was found in a significant proportion of patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

  18. Cochlear Implants in Children Diagnosed with CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Carolina Costa; Sales de Meneses, Michelle; Silva, Isabella Monteiro de Castro; Alves, Angela Maria Vaccaro Silva

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The CHARGE association (coloboma of the eyes; heart disease; atresia of the choanae; retarded growth and development; genital hypoplasia/genitourinary anomalies; ear anomalies and/or hearing loss) was first described in 1979 by Hall, and among its main features is hearing loss. This study presents a case aiming to establish relationships between performance on Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS) and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS) tests and the analysis of hearing and language categories of a patient diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome, before and after cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Case Report A 7-year-old girl was diagnosed with CHARGE. She had severe sensorineural hearing loss and was a prelingual unilateral CI user. We analyzed data from the patient's medical records regarding therapies and video recordings. Results The patient showed positive results in all evaluations after CI. IT-MAIS rose from 5 to 90% following the use of CI. MUSS also rose, from 75 to 72.5%, after use of CI. Classification of Auditory Skills changed from category 1 before use of CI to category 6 after use of CI. Classification of Language Skills changed from category 1 before use of CI to category 3 after use of CI. The CI is an aid but there are many factors in the therapeutic process, and great heterogeneity in individuals diagnosed with CHARGE should be investigated. Conclusion The development of listening and language skills after CI use was demonstrated by IT-MAIS and MUSS tests, and categorization of speech and hearing in this child with a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome shows that CI can be an effective technological resource to provide information on hearing as one source for language construction. PMID:25992052

  19. A comparison of vowel production by children with multichannel cochlear implants or tactile aids: perceptual evidence.

    PubMed

    Ertmer, D J; Kirk, K I; Sehgal, S T; Riley, A I; Osberger, M J

    1997-08-01

    To examine changes in perceived vowel production accuracy over time in prelingually deafened children who use a multichannel cochlear implant (Nucleus 22 channel) or a multichannel tactile aid (Tactaid 7) and to compare the levels of perceived vowel production accuracy attained by the two device groups. The subjects were participants in longitudinal studies of the effects of sensory aids on the development of perceptual, speech, and language skills. As part of these studies, imitative vowel productions were elicited and transcribed before each child received their sensory aid and at 6 mo intervals thereafter. Data for the current study was obtained from the predevice interval and a later interval (postdevice) that was an average of 1.8 yr after the subjects received their respective devices. The subjects' vowel productions were judged for accuracy in matching an imitative model and for correctness of vowel features (height and place). Within-group analyses were completed to determine if vowel production scores improved over the course of the study for each device group. Between group comparisons were performed to examine differences in mean scores at each interval. Before receiving their multichannel devices, the two groups of subjects demonstrated similar imitative vowel production skills. After an average of 1.8 yr of device use, the cochlear implant subjects demonstrated significantly improved production of diphthongs and all vowel categories except low vowels. The Tactaid 7 subjects demonstrated significant improvement only in the production of diphthongs. Thus, cochlear implant recipients' vowel production skills were found to be significantly better than those of the Tactaid 7 users after a comparable amount of device experience. The vowel production gains of the cochlear implant subjects were similar in amount to those noted in other studies of children who use the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant and further confirm the potential of this device for

  20. Longitudinal Analysis of the Absence of Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry in Children using Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Moura, Amanda Christina Gomes de; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Couto, Maria Ines Vieira; Brito, Rubens; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria; Matas, Carla Gentile; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-10-01

    Introduction Currently the cochlear implant allows access to sounds in individuals with profound hearing loss. The objective methods used to verify the integrity of the cochlear device and the electrophysiologic response of users have noted these improvements. Objective To establish whether the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve can appear after electrical stimulation when it is absent intraoperatively. Methods The clinical records of children implanted with the Nucleus Freedom (Cochlear Ltd., Australia) (CI24RE) cochlear implant between January 2009 and January 2010 with at least 6 months of use were evaluated. The neural response telemetry (NRT) thresholds of electrodes 1, 6, 11, 16, and 22 during surgery and after at least 3 months of implant use were analyzed and correlated with etiology, length of auditory deprivation, and chronological age. These data were compared between a group of children exhibiting responses in all of the tested electrodes and a group of children who had at least one absent response. Results The sample was composed of clinical records of 51 children. From these, 21% (11) showed no NRT in at least one of the tested electrodes. After an average of 4.9 months of stimulation, the number of individuals exhibiting absent responses decreased from 21 to 11% (n = 6). Conclusion It is feasible that absent responses present after a period of electrical stimulation. In our sample, 45% (n = 5) of the patients with intraoperative absence exhibited a positive response after an average of 4.9 months of continued electrical stimulation.

  1. Longitudinal Analysis of the Absence of Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry in Children using Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Amanda Christina Gomes de; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Couto, Maria Ines Vieira; Brito, Rubens; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria; Matas, Carla Gentile; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Currently the cochlear implant allows access to sounds in individuals with profound hearing loss. The objective methods used to verify the integrity of the cochlear device and the electrophysiologic response of users have noted these improvements. Objective To establish whether the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve can appear after electrical stimulation when it is absent intraoperatively. Methods The clinical records of children implanted with the Nucleus Freedom (Cochlear Ltd., Australia) (CI24RE) cochlear implant between January 2009 and January 2010 with at least 6 months of use were evaluated. The neural response telemetry (NRT) thresholds of electrodes 1, 6, 11, 16, and 22 during surgery and after at least 3 months of implant use were analyzed and correlated with etiology, length of auditory deprivation, and chronological age. These data were compared between a group of children exhibiting responses in all of the tested electrodes and a group of children who had at least one absent response. Results The sample was composed of clinical records of 51 children. From these, 21% (11) showed no NRT in at least one of the tested electrodes. After an average of 4.9 months of stimulation, the number of individuals exhibiting absent responses decreased from 21 to 11% (n = 6). Conclusion It is feasible that absent responses present after a period of electrical stimulation. In our sample, 45% (n = 5) of the patients with intraoperative absence exhibited a positive response after an average of 4.9 months of continued electrical stimulation. PMID:25992123

  2. Spatial unmasking and binaural advantage for children with normal hearing, a cochlear implant and a hearing aid, and bilateral implants.

    PubMed

    Mok, Mansze; Galvin, Karyn L; Dowell, Richard C; McKay, Colette M

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) determine if spatial unmasking existed and differed for children with normal hearing, a hearing aid and a cochlear implant (CIHA), and bilateral implants (BICI); (2) determine if binaural advantage and headshadow effect differed between children with CIHA and BICI. Results indicated that most of the CIHA and BICI children demonstrated spatial unmasking, though to a lesser degree than children with normal hearing. Results also indicated that the children with BICI demonstrated greater headshadow effect than those with CIHA. The CIHA and BICI children also differed in binaural advantage, which could be due to the differences in headshadow effect and in detection abilities with the hearing aid versus the second implant.

  3. Word learning in deaf children with cochlear implants: effects of early auditory experience

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Derek M.; Stewart, Jessica; Moberly, Aaron; Hollich, George; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Word-learning skills were tested in normal-hearing 12- to 40-month-olds and in deaf 22- to 40-month-olds 12 to 18 months after cochlear implantation. Using the Intermodal Preferential Looking Paradigm (IPLP), children were tested for their ability to learn two novel-word/novel-object pairings. Normal-hearing children demonstrated learning on this task at approximately 18 months of age and older. For deaf children, performance on this task was significantly correlated with early auditory experience: Children whose cochlear implants were switched on by 14 months of age or who had relatively more hearing before implantation demonstrated learning in this task, but later implanted profoundly deaf children did not. Performance on this task also correlated with later measures of vocabulary size. Taken together, these findings suggest that early auditory experience facilitates word learning and that the IPLP may be useful for identifying children who may be at high risk for poor vocabulary development. PMID:22490184

  4. Speech Intelligibility in Persian Hearing Impaired Children with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Emadi, Maryam; Zamani, Peyman; Farahani, Farhad; Lotfi, Gohar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of present study is to evaluate and compare speech intelligibility in hearing impaired children with cochlear implants (CI) and hearing aid (HA) users and children with normal hearing (NH). The sample consisted of 45 Persian-speaking children aged 3 to 5-years-old. They were divided into three groups, and each group had 15, children, children with CI and children using hearing aids in Hamadan. Participants was evaluated by the test of speech intelligibility level. Results of ANOVA on speech intelligibility test showed that NH children had significantly better reading performance than hearing impaired children with CI and HA. Post-hoc analysis, using Scheffe test, indicated that the mean score of speech intelligibility of normal children was higher than the HA and CI groups; but the difference was not significant between mean of speech intelligibility in children with hearing loss that use cochlear implant and those using HA. It is clear that even with remarkabkle advances in HA technology, many hearing impaired children continue to find speech production a challenging problem. Given that speech intelligibility is a key element in proper communication and social interaction, consequently, educational and rehabilitation programs are essential to improve speech intelligibility of children with hearing loss.

  5. Spanish and English language performance in bilingual children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Yim, Dongsun

    2012-01-01

    To document the factors that influence oral language performance in Spanish and English bilingual children with a cochlear implant. Using a repeated measures paradigm within a child, correlation and regression were used to analyze 4 factors that influence both Spanish and English receptive and expressive vocabulary, overall language skills, and articulation accuracy. The factors were age, duration of implantation, communication mode (total versus oral), and the amount of Spanish spoken at home. Twelve children between the ages of 49 and 106 months who had received a cochlear implant before 36 months. All subjects scored within the normal range of the nonverbal IQ Leiter test. Spanish and English, receptive and expressive vocabulary, semantic and syntactic language skills, and articulation skills were measured using standardized tests, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-IV, the Test de Vocabulario en Imagenes Peabody, the Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test and Preschool Language Scale-IV, and the Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation-2. The amount of Spanish spoken at home was obtained via parental questionnaire. The raw scores of English language skills increased with increasing age and duration of implantation. Spanish skills were higher for higher Spanish spoken scores, and this effect was stronger when children were using oral communication mode. Lastly, oral communication mode had a positive effect on articulation accuracy. Age, duration of implantation, the amount of home language use, and communication mode influenced the overall language skills for Spanish and English bilingual children.

  6. Classification of voice disorder in children with cochlear implantation and hearing aid using multiple classifier fusion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Speech production and speech phonetic features gradually improve in children by obtaining audio feedback after cochlear implantation or using hearing aids. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate automated classification of voice disorder in children with cochlear implantation and hearing aids. Methods We considered 4 disorder categories in children's voice using the following definitions: Level_1: Children who produce spontaneous phonation and use words spontaneously and imitatively. Level_2: Children, who produce spontaneous phonation, use words spontaneously and make short sentences imitatively. Level_3: Children, who produce spontaneous phonations, use words and arbitrary sentences spontaneously. Level_4: Normal children without any hearing loss background. Thirty Persian children participated in the study, including six children in each level from one to three and 12 children in level four. Voice samples of five isolated Persian words "mashin", "mar", "moosh", "gav" and "mouz" were analyzed. Four levels of the voice quality were considered, the higher the level the less significant the speech disorder. "Frame-based" and "word-based" features were extracted from voice signals. The frame-based features include intensity, fundamental frequency, formants, nasality and approximate entropy and word-based features include phase space features and wavelet coefficients. For frame-based features, hidden Markov models were used as classifiers and for word-based features, neural network was used. Results After Classifiers fusion with three methods: Majority Voting Rule, Linear Combination and Stacked fusion, the best classification rates were obtained using frame-based and word-based features with MVR rule (level 1:100%, level 2: 93.75%, level 3: 100%, level 4: 94%). Conclusions Result of this study may help speech pathologists follow up voice disorder recovery in children with cochlear implantation or hearing aid who are in the same age range. PMID

  7. Reading skills in Persian deaf children with cochlear implants and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad; Rashedi, Vahid; Morasae, Esmaeil Khedmati

    2016-10-01

    Reading skills are necessary for educational development in children. Many studies have shown that children with hearing loss often experience delays in reading. This study aimed to examine reading skills of Persian deaf children with cochlear implant and hearing aid and compare them with normal hearing counterparts. The sample consisted of 72 s and third grade Persian-speaking children aged 8-12 years. They were divided into three equal groups including 24 children with cochlear implant (CI), 24 children with hearing aid (HA), and 24 children with normal hearing (NH). Reading performance of participants was evaluated by the "Nama" reading test. "Nama" provides normative data for hearing and deaf children and consists of 10 subtests and the sum of the scores is regarded as reading performance score. Results of ANOVA on reading test showed that NH children had significantly better reading performance than deaf children with CI and HA in both grades (P < 0.001). Post-hoc analysis, using Tukey test, indicated that there was no significant difference between HA and CI groups in terms of non-word reading, word reading, and word comprehension skills (respectively, P = 0.976, P = 0.988, P = 0.998). Considering the findings, cochlear implantation is not significantly more effective than hearing aid for improvement of reading abilities. It is clear that even with considerable advances in hearing aid technology, many deaf children continue to find literacy a challenging struggle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Number processing and arithmetic skills in children with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Pixner, Silvia; Leyrer, Martin; Moeller, Korbinian

    2014-01-01

    Though previous findings report that hearing impaired children exhibit impaired language and arithmetic skills, our current understanding of how hearing and the associated language impairments may influence the development of arithmetic skills is still limited. In the current study numerical/arithmetic performance of 45 children with a cochlea implant were compared to that of controls matched for hearing age, intelligence and sex. Our main results were twofold disclosing that children with CI show general as well as specific numerical/arithmetic impairments. On the one hand, we found an increased percentage of children with CI with an indication of dyscalculia symptoms, a general slowing in multiplication and subtraction as well as less accurate number line estimations. On the other hand, however, children with CI exhibited very circumscribed difficulties associated with place-value processing. Performance declined specifically when subtraction required a borrow procedure and number line estimation required the integration of units, tens, and hundreds instead of only units and tens. Thus, it seems that despite initially atypical language development, children with CI are able to acquire arithmetic skills in a qualitatively similar fashion as their normal hearing peers. Nonetheless, when demands on place-value understanding, which has only recently been proposed to be language mediated, hearing impaired children experience specific difficulties. PMID:25566152

  9. Number processing and arithmetic skills in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Pixner, Silvia; Leyrer, Martin; Moeller, Korbinian

    2014-01-01

    Though previous findings report that hearing impaired children exhibit impaired language and arithmetic skills, our current understanding of how hearing and the associated language impairments may influence the development of arithmetic skills is still limited. In the current study numerical/arithmetic performance of 45 children with a cochlea implant were compared to that of controls matched for hearing age, intelligence and sex. Our main results were twofold disclosing that children with CI show general as well as specific numerical/arithmetic impairments. On the one hand, we found an increased percentage of children with CI with an indication of dyscalculia symptoms, a general slowing in multiplication and subtraction as well as less accurate number line estimations. On the other hand, however, children with CI exhibited very circumscribed difficulties associated with place-value processing. Performance declined specifically when subtraction required a borrow procedure and number line estimation required the integration of units, tens, and hundreds instead of only units and tens. Thus, it seems that despite initially atypical language development, children with CI are able to acquire arithmetic skills in a qualitatively similar fashion as their normal hearing peers. Nonetheless, when demands on place-value understanding, which has only recently been proposed to be language mediated, hearing impaired children experience specific difficulties.

  10. Accessibility to cochlear implants in Belgium: State of the art on selection, reimbursement, habilitation, and outcomes in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    De Raeve, Leo; Wouters, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    Belgium, and especially the northern region called Flanders, has been a center of expertise in cochlear implants and early hearing screening for many years. Some of their surgeons and engineers were pioneers in the development of cochlear implants and in 1998 Flanders was the first region in Europe to implement a universal hearing screening program for all neonates. The Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance has reimbursed cochlear implants in children and adults since 1994 and bilateral implantation in children under the age of 12 years since February 2010. These deaf children, screened and implanted early, achieve higher auditory, speech and language outcomes and increasing numbers are going to regular schools using fewer interpreters. In 2010, 93% of severe-to-profound deaf preschool children in Flanders had received cochlear implants and 25% had bilateral implants. Although on average twice as many adults as children are implanted a year in Belgium, we have less research data available from this adult population. Also very little is published about the growth curves and minimal rehabilitation requirements (intensity, duration etc.) after implantation for both children and adults. So, there still remain many challenges for the future. PMID:23453148

  11. The modes of communication used by children with cochlear implants and the role of sign in their lives.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Merv; Punch, Renée

    2011-01-01

    In a mixed-methods study, which included surveys of 247 parents and 151 teachers, the researchers investigated the modes of communication used by children with cochlear implants and the role of signed communication in the children's lives. Findings indicated that 15%-20% of the children in the parent surveys and approximately 30% of the children in the teacher surveys were using some form of signed communication. Qualitative findings from interviews with parents, teachers, and children with cochlear implants elaborated on the quantitative findings. While the development of spoken-language communication was the main aim of their children's cochlear implantation for the large majority of parents, many valued the use of either Signed English or Australian Sign Language, which they felt supported their children's personal, social, and academic development. Young people who used sign switched comfortably between communication modes according to their communication partners, topics, and settings.

  12. Children Using Cochlear Implants Capitalize on Acoustical Hearing for Music Perception

    PubMed Central

    Hopyan, Talar; Peretz, Isabelle; Chan, Lisa P.; Papsin, Blake C.; Gordon, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) electrically stimulate the auditory nerve providing children who are deaf with access to speech and music. Because of device limitations, it was hypothesized that children using CIs develop abnormal perception of musical cues. Perception of pitch and rhythm as well as memory for music was measured by the children’s version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) in 23 unilateral CI users and 22 age-matched children with normal hearing. Children with CIs were less accurate than their normal hearing peers (p < 0.05). CI users were best able to discern rhythm changes (p < 0.01) and to remember musical pieces (p < 0.01). Contrary to expectations, abilities to hear cues in music improved as the age at implantation increased (p < 0.01). Because the children implanted at older ages also had better low frequency hearing prior to cochlear implantation and were able to use this hearing by wearing hearing aids. Access to early acoustical hearing in the lower frequency ranges appears to establish a base for music perception, which can be accessed with later electrical CI hearing. PMID:23133430

  13. Voice quality of children with cochlear implants acquired at early and later ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Melanie M.; Hanstein, Stefanie; Ney, Christina

    2005-09-01

    The speech gains of children with cochlear implants (CIs) are well documented, but the literature on voice quality is sparse. It has reported atypical measures/ratings of voice pitch, pleasantness, timing, and acoustic features [Higgins et al. (2003); Perrin et al. (1998)]. Is voice quality now improving in children implanted very early? This pilot study compared the voice quality of (a) children with early acquired CIs and children with normal hearing and (b) the voice quality of children implanted later and earlier in life. Children aged 6 to 10 years, with early acquired CIs, and participants with normal hearing, age-matched to them, audio recorded sentences, vowels, and conversation. PERCI pressure measures were also performed. PERCI Differential and Oral Pressure values and Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) and Visipitch measures of voice-onset time and fundamental frequency were analyzed comparing the values from the hearing and the early implanted children and values gleaned from the study of Higgins et al. of children with later-acquired implants. CSL and Visipitch measures of intonation contour, intensity, and jitter were analyzed to compare the hearing and the early implanted participants. Ratings on the Wilson Voice Scale were correlated with measures of jitter, fundamental frequency, and intonation contour.

  14. Point Vowel Duration in Children with Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants at 4 and 5 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandam, Mark; Ide-Helvie, Dana; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the developmental aspects of the duration of point vowels in children with normal hearing compared with those with hearing aids and cochlear implants at 4 and 5 years of age. Younger children produced longer vowels than older children, and children with hearing loss (HL) produced longer and more variable vowels than their…

  15. Literacy Skills in Children with Cochlear Implants: The Importance of Early Oral Language and Joint Storybook Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DesJardin, Jean L.; Ambrose, Sophie E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to longitudinally examine relationships between early factors (child and mother) that may influence children's phonological awareness and reading skills 3 years later in a group of young children with cochlear implants (N = 16). Mothers and children were videotaped during two storybook interactions, and children's oral…

  16. Point Vowel Duration in Children with Hearing Aids and Cochlear Implants at 4 and 5 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandam, Mark; Ide-Helvie, Dana; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the developmental aspects of the duration of point vowels in children with normal hearing compared with those with hearing aids and cochlear implants at 4 and 5 years of age. Younger children produced longer vowels than older children, and children with hearing loss (HL) produced longer and more variable vowels than their…

  17. The acquisition of grammatical and lexical structures in children with cochlear implants: a developmental psycholinguistic approach.

    PubMed

    Szagun, G

    2000-01-01

    The acquisition of grammatical and lexical structures was studied in a sample of 10 young German-speaking children with cochlear implants (mean implantation age 2 years 3 months). Spontaneous speech samples were collected covering the first 18 months after first tune-up. At the end of this period, 8 children were able to produce two- or multi-word utterances. Furthermore, 8 children had acquired plural inflections on nouns, and 5 children had acquired a substantial portion of verb inflectional morphology. Children did less well acquiring case-marked articles, forms of the copula and modal verbs. Articles were acquired better when they functioned as pronouns. Children had good vocabularies (type/token ratios >/=0.25), and all but one child started language with a preference for content words as opposed to function words. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Parents' Stress and Coping Related to Children's Use of a Cochlear Implant: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Anmyr, Lena; Larsson, Kjerstin; Olsson, Mariann

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to increase understanding of parents' experiences of having a child with a cochlear implant (CI) and to explore how these related to children's use of CI. Twelve parents of children, full-time users or limited users of CIs, participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis showed that the parents of children who used their CI differed from the parents with limited users in how they handled stressors. Support from health care professionals was seen as insufficient. Parents need to get involved in dynamic processes in which health care resources promote parental coping.

  19. Social participation of children and adolescents with cochlear implants: a qualitative analysis of parent, teacher, and child interviews.

    PubMed

    Punch, Renée; Hyde, Merv

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial factors, including socioemotional well-being, peer relationships, and social inclusion with hearing and deaf peers, are increasingly becoming a focus of research investigating children with cochlear implants. The study reported here extends the largely quantitative findings of previous research through a qualitative analysis of interviews with parents, teachers, and pediatric cochlear implant users themselves in three eastern states of Australia. We interviewed 24 parents, 15 teachers, and 11 children and adolescents. The findings displayed commonalities across the three groups of participants, indicating positive experiences around the children's psychosocial development with their cochlear implants, but also ongoing difficulties communicating in groups of people and problems related to social skills. Some children had little contact with other deaf children (with or without cochlear implants) despite parents and teachers perceiving such contact beneficial. Children attending schools where there were other deaf children valued friendships with both deaf and hearing peers. Adolescence was a particularly difficult time for some as they struggled with feelings of self-consciousness about their deafness and external cochlear implant equipment and worries around friendships, dating, and their future place in the world. Recommendations for practice and further research are made.

  20. Early speech perception in Mandarin-speaking children at one-year post cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Wong, Lena L N; Zhu, Shufeng; Xi, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The aim in this study was to examine early speech perception outcomes in Mandarin-speaking children during the first year of cochlear implant (CI) use. A hierarchical early speech perception battery was administered to 80 children before and 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. Demographic information was obtained to evaluate its relationship with these outcomes. Regardless of dialect exposure and whether a hearing aid was trialed before implantation, implant recipients were able to attain similar pre-lingual auditory skills after 12 months of CI use. Children speaking Mandarin developed early Mandarin speech perception faster than those with greater exposure to other Chinese dialects. In addition, children with better pre-implant hearing levels and younger age at implantation attained significantly better speech perception scores after 12 months of CI use. Better pre-implant hearing levels and higher maternal education level were also associated with a significantly steeper growth in early speech perception ability. Mandarin-speaking children with CIs are able to attain early speech perception results comparable to those of their English-speaking counterparts. In addition, consistent single language input via CI probably enhances early speech perception development at least during the first-year of CI use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Perception of Stress Pattern in Young Cochlear Implanted Children: An EEG Study.

    PubMed

    Vavatzanidis, Niki K; Mürbe, Dirk; Friederici, Angela D; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (re)gain hearing with a cochlear implant-a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-) long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9-50 months; mean: 22 months) during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable "baba," which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern). A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls. Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not for trochaic

  2. Some ethical dimensions of cochlear implantation for deaf children and their families.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Merv; Power, Des

    2006-01-01

    A major source of controversy between Deaf people and those who support a "social/cultural" view of Deafness as "a life to be lived" and those who see deafness within a "medical model" as a "condition to be cured" has been over the cochlear implantation of young deaf children. Recent research has shown that there are noticeable inequities in access to such procedures in western countries; inequities that give rise to the need for informed public policy discussions. It has also found that parents of newly diagnosed deaf children are not provided with access to all the possibilities for their children-including that of a "Deaf life." How this information can be provided to parents and the public via widespread discussions in the media and elsewhere and involving Deaf people in the implantation counseling process is an issue that needs to be addressed by those responsible for implantation programs.

  3. Nasalance and nasality in children with cochlear implants and children with hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Baudonck, N; Van Lierde, K; D'haeseleer, E; Dhooge, I

    2015-04-01

    In prelingually deaf children, many speech production aspects including resonance, are known to be problematic. This study aimed to investigate nasality and nasalance in two groups of prelingually hearing impaired children, namely deaf children with a cochlear implant (CI) and moderate-to-severely hearing impaired hearing aid (HA) users. The results of both groups are compared with the results of normal hearing children. Besides, the impact of the degree of hearing loss was determined. 36 CI children (mean age: 9;0y), 25 HA children (mean age: 9;1y) and 26 NH children (mean age: 9;3y) were assessed using objective assessment techniques and perceptual evaluations in order to investigate the nasal resonance of the three groups. Ten HA children had thresholds above 70dB (range: 91dB-105dB) and fifteen below 70dB (range: 58dB-68dB). The Nasometer was used for registration of the nasalance values and nasality was perceptually evaluated by two experienced speech therapists using a nominal rating scale (consensus evaluation). For nasal stimuli, both CI children and HA children showed lower nasalance values in comparison with NH children. The opposite was observed for the oral stimuli. In both hearing impaired groups, cul-de-sac-resonance was observed on a significantly larger scale than in the NH group, and the HA children were judged to be significantly more hypernasal in comparison with NH children. Despite the fact that a substantial number of the CI and HA children demonstrate normal (nasal) resonance quality, this aspect of speech production is still at risk for hearing impaired children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Comparison of Language Achievement in Children With Cochlear Implants and Children Using Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Spencer, Linda; Flock, Sarah; Tyler, Rich; Gantz, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    English language achievement of 29 prelingually deaf children with 3 or more years of cochlear implant (CI) experience was compared to the achievement levels of prelingually deaf children who did not have such CI experience. Language achievement was measured by the Rhode Island Test of Language Structure (RITLS), a measure of signed and spoken sentence comprehension, and the Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn), a measure of expressive (signed and spoken) English grammar. When the CI users were compared with their deaf age mates who contributed to the norms of the RITLS, it was found that CI users achieved significantly better scores. Likewise, we found that CI users performed better than 29 deaf children who used hearing aids (HAs) with respect to English grammar achievement as indexed by the IPSyn. Additionally, we found that chronological age highly correlated with IPSyn levels only among the non-CI users, whereas length of CI experience was significantly correlated with IPSyn scores for CI users. Finally, clear differences between those with and without CI experience were found by 2 years of post-implant experience. These data provide evidence that children who receive CIs benefit in the form of improved English language comprehension and production. PMID:10229463

  5. Phonological Awareness at 5 years of age in Children who use Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Teresa Y.C.; Cupples, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Children with hearing loss typically underachieve in reading, possibly as a result of their underdeveloped phonological skills. This study addressed the questions of whether the development of phonological awareness (PA) is influenced by 1) the degree of hearing loss; and 2) whether performance of children with severe-profound hearing loss differed according to the hearing devices used. Drawing on data collected as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI, www.outcomes.nal.gov.au) study, the authors found that sound-matching scores of children with hearing loss ranging from mild to profound degrees were, on average, within the normal range. The degree of hearing loss did not have a significant impact on scores, but there was a non-significant tendency for the proportion of children who achieved zero scores to increase with increase in hearing loss. For children with severe hearing loss, there was no significant group difference in scores among children who used bilateral hearing aids, bimodal fitting (a cochlear implant and a hearing aid in contralateral ears), and bilateral cochlear implants. Although there is a need for further prospective research, professionals have an important role in targeting PA skills for rehabilitation of young children with hearing loss. PMID:26929789

  6. Phonological Awareness at 5 years of age in Children who use Hearing Aids or Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Ching, Teresa Y C; Cupples, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Children with hearing loss typically underachieve in reading, possibly as a result of their underdeveloped phonological skills. This study addressed the questions of whether the development of phonological awareness (PA) is influenced by 1) the degree of hearing loss; and 2) whether performance of children with severe-profound hearing loss differed according to the hearing devices used. Drawing on data collected as part of the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI, www. nal.gov.au) study, the authors found that sound-matching scores of children with hearing loss ranging from mild to profound degrees were, on average, within the normal range. The degree of hearing loss did not have a significant impact on scores, but there was a non-significant tendency for the proportion of children who achieved zero scores to increase with increase in hearing loss. For children with severe hearing loss, there was no significant group difference in scores among children who used bilateral hearing aids, bimodal fitting (a cochlear implant and a hearing aid in contralateral ears), and bilateral cochlear implants. Although there is a need for further prospective research, professionals have an important role in targeting PA skills for rehabilitation of young children with hearing loss.

  7. Cochlear implants in Belgium: Prevalence in paediatric and adult cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    De Raeve, L

    2016-06-01

    Belgium, and especially the northern region called Flanders, has been a centre of expertise in cochlear implants and early hearing screening for many years. Cochlear implants are reimbursed by the Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability (BNIHD) Insurance in adults and in children since October 1994. More than 20 years later, we would like to measure the prevalence of cochlear implants in adults and in children till now. Based on scientific research data on the prevalence of severe to profound hearing loss in adults and in children and on the number of implantations from the data of the BNIHD, we could measure the percentages of paediatric and adult CI users in comparing to the number of CI candidates. The degree of utilisation of cochlear implantation varies considerably between the paediatric and the adult population. On average, 78% of deaf children are receiving cochlear implants, but in adults only 6.6% of CI candidates are receiving one. There are big differences in Belgium in utilisation of cochlear implants between adults and children. Because of the underutilisation of cochlear implants, especially in adults, we have to work on raising the general awareness of the benefits of cochlear implants, and its improvement in quality of life, based on cost-effectiveness data and on guidelines for good clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Speech perception benefit for children with a cochlear implant and a hearing aid in opposite ears and children with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Mok, Mansze; Galvin, Karyn L; Dowell, Richard C; McKay, Colette M

    2010-01-01

    The aims of the present study are to investigate: (1) the effect of using a hearing aid (HA) or a second cochlear implant (2nd CI) on speech recognition in noise for children; (2) the ability to perceive phoneme groups of different frequencies when using a CI and an HA in opposite ears (bimodal fitting) and when using a CI in each ear (bilateral implant fitting), and (3) the relationship between aided thresholds in the HA ear and bimodal advantage. Thirteen school-age children who consistently used a bimodal or bilateral implant fitting participated. Perception was evaluated using consonant-nucleus-consonantwords presented from in front with noise from either side. Significant bimodal or bilateral CI advantage in speech perception was demonstrated by most subjects in at least 1 noise condition. Comparisons indicated that the bimodal advantage obtained by the bimodal subjects was greater than the bilateral CI advantage obtained by the bilateral-implant subjects in the noise front condition, but also suggested that the 2nd CI may provide more functional advantage in real life. The mechanisms underlying the advantage provided by the second device appear to be different in the bimodal and bilateral groups. Information transmission analysis did not show a clear difference between the groups in the pattern of advantage across phoneme groups. For the bimodal subjects, those with better aided thresholds at low frequencies and poorer aided thresholds at 4 kHz demonstrated greater bimodal advantage. Overall, these findings encourage the use of bimodal and bilateral implant fittings for children, provide insight into the individual variability in bimodal outcome, and enhance understanding of the differences between an HA and a 2nd CI when used together with an implant in the opposite ear.

  9. Nonword repetition as a predictor of long-term speech and language skills in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Casserly, Elizabeth D; Pisoni, David B

    2013-04-01

    The rapid phonological processing skills of children with cochlear implants early in life (ages 8-10), as measured by nonword repetition performance, will predict their language development 8 years later (ages 16-18). This core processing ability will also correlate with concurrent measures of language at both ages of testing. Understanding the causes of the wide range of performance in pediatric cochlear implant users currently constitutes a major barrier to clinical and research progress in the field. Research into children's neurocognitive abilities such as working memory capacity and verbal rehearsal speed, in addition to conventional demographic variables, has shown that these foundational skills play a key role in determining outcomes. Here, we investigate the impact of rapid phonological processing, an ability which is critical in spoken language use, for children with cochlear implants. Fifty-two deaf children with cochlear implants completed a battery of 14 clinical and research measures of language, neurocognitive, and nonword repetition skills in 2 testing sessions 8 years apart. Performance on the nonword repetition task at both testing sessions correlated significantly with concurrent language abilities. Importantly, nonword repetition accuracy at age 8 to 10 also significantly predicted performance on measures of language ability at age 16 to 18 in a wide range of domains, from speech intelligibility to sentence recognition in noise. These relations were significant even when other neurocognitive measures were controlled. Early nonword repetition performance in children with cochlear implants predicts later language development and, therefore, may identify those children at high risk for poor outcomes.

  10. The Perception of Stress Pattern in Young Cochlear Implanted Children: An EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Vavatzanidis, Niki K.; Mürbe, Dirk; Friederici, Angela D.; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (re)gain hearing with a cochlear implant—a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-) long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9–50 months; mean: 22 months) during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable “baba,” which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern). A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls. Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not for

  11. Early auditory preverbal skills development in Mandarin speaking children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihong; Jin, Xin; Li, Jing; Liu, Lulu; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Wentong; Ni, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of auditory preverbal skills in Mandarin speaking infants/toddlers with cochlear implants (CIs). Participants were recruited from the Pediatric Audiology Center of Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University. A total of 33 children with severe-to-profound hearing loss who received CIs participated in the study. The evaluation tools were LittlEARS(®) Auditory Questionnaire (LEAQ) and self-designed demographic information questionnaire. Evaluations were administrated immediately after the CI was switched on (0-month), and at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24-month intervals of CI use. The mean total scores of the LEAQ in 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24-month were 1, 5, 10, 15, 21, 24, 30, and 33 points, respectively. The developmental trajectory of early auditory preverbal skills in the CI children was consistent with the published norm data of the LEAQ, and the expected value even slightly higher than the norms. Analysis showed that the parents' level of education and age of implantation influenced the final LEAQ score significantly (ANOVA, p<0.0001). Auditory preverbal skills improved dramatically after cochlear implantation in the first 2 years of implant use. Early implanted children exhibited a steeper and faster improvement in auditory preverbal developmental compared to the later implanted peers. This study described the developmental trajectories of preverbal auditory skills and confirmed the effectiveness of early implantation on the development of auditory preverbal skills. The results could provide guidance for auditory/speech rehabilitation in Mandarin speaking infants/toddlers who received CIs in their early age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Instruments to assess the oral language of children fitted with a cochlear implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mariane Perin da; Comerlatto Junior, Ademir Antonio; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Lopes-Herrera, Simone Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The oral language development depends on the effective development of the hearing system. In cases of children presenting with hearing loss, a cochlear implant is an electronic device indicated to (re)habilitate the hearing function. Thus, it is of paramount importance to assess and follow the oral language development of children fitted with a cochlear implant (CI) to measure the effectiveness of the electronic device and support the therapeutic planning of these children. Questions are currently being raised about the instruments to assess the oral language of children using a CI, and, seeking the answers, this systematic review aimed at surveying these instruments. Searches were performed in three different databases utilizing six different descriptors to select articles published from 2004 to 2009 that performed an oral language assessment of children with a CI. Initially, 373 articles were found, and, after the application of inclusion criteria, 47 articles were analyzed, resulting in a survey of 74 instruments for oral language assessment, including tests, questionnaires and inventories. In analyzing the articles, it was realized that the studies included in this systematic review presented varied methodologies and low levels of evidence, with a greater concentration of instruments assessing receptive and expressive language, emphasizing the survey of the child's vocabulary and questionnaires. Thus, it can be verified that other linguistic skills, such as morphosyntactic, semantic, and narrative-pragmatic ones that are important in structuring speech and language for the effectiveness of the child's speech, are not being focused on. Just one of the instruments cited, a questionnaire, was specific for the oral language assessment of children with cochlear implants.

  13. Instruments to assess the oral language of children fitted with a cochlear implant: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Mariane Perin; COMERLATTO, Ademir Antonio; BEVILACQUA, Maria Cecília; LOPES-HERRERA, Simone Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The oral language development depends on the effective development of the hearing system. In cases of children presenting with hearing loss, a cochlear implant is an electronic device indicated to (re)habilitate the hearing function. Thus, it is of paramount importance to assess and follow the oral language development of children fitted with a cochlear implant (CI) to measure the effectiveness of the electronic device and support the therapeutic planning of these children. Questions are currently being raised about the instruments to assess the oral language of children using a CI, and, seeking the answers, this systematic review aimed at surveying these instruments. Searches were performed in three different databases utilizing six different descriptors to select articles published from 2004 to 2009 that performed an oral language assessment of children with a CI. Initially, 373 articles were found, and, after the application of inclusion criteria, 47 articles were analyzed, resulting in a survey of 74 instruments for oral language assessment, including tests, questionnaires and inventories. In analyzing the articles, it was realized that the studies included in this systematic review presented varied methodologies and low levels of evidence, with a greater concentration of instruments assessing receptive and expressive language, emphasizing the survey of the child's vocabulary and questionnaires. Thus, it can be verified that other linguistic skills, such as morphosyntactic, semantic, and narrative-pragmatic ones that are important in structuring speech and language for the effectiveness of the child's speech, are not being focused on. Just one of the instruments cited, a questionnaire, was specific for the oral language assessment of children with cochlear implants. PMID:22230986

  14. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  15. Acoustic properties of vowel production in prelingually deafened Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Brown, Emily; Fox, Robert A; Xu, Li

    2015-11-01

    The present study examined the acoustic features of vowel production in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). The subjects included 14 native Mandarin-speaking, prelingually deafened children with CIs (2.9-8.3 yr old) and 60 age-matched, normal-hearing (NH) children (3.1-9.0 years old). Each subject produced a list of monosyllables containing seven Mandarin vowels: [i, a, u, y, ɤ, ʅ, ɿ]. Midpoint F1 and F2 of each vowel token were extracted and normalized to eliminate the effects of different vocal tract sizes. Results showed that the CI children produced significantly longer vowels and less compact vowel categories than the NH children did. The CI children's acoustic vowel space was reduced due to a retracted production of the vowel [i]. The vowel space area showed a strong negative correlation with age at implantation (r = -0.80). The analysis of acoustic distance showed that the CI children produced corner vowels [a, u] similarly to the NH children, but other vowels (e.g., [ʅ, ɿ]) differently from the NH children, which suggests that CI children generally follow a similar developmental path of vowel acquisition as NH children. These findings highlight the importance of early implantation and have implications in clinical aural habilitation in young children with CIs.

  16. Acoustic properties of vowel production in prelingually deafened Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Brown, Emily; Fox, Robert A.; Xu, Li

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the acoustic features of vowel production in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). The subjects included 14 native Mandarin-speaking, prelingually deafened children with CIs (2.9–8.3 yr old) and 60 age-matched, normal-hearing (NH) children (3.1–9.0 years old). Each subject produced a list of monosyllables containing seven Mandarin vowels: [i, a, u, y, ɤ, ʅ, ɿ]. Midpoint F1 and F2 of each vowel token were extracted and normalized to eliminate the effects of different vocal tract sizes. Results showed that the CI children produced significantly longer vowels and less compact vowel categories than the NH children did. The CI children's acoustic vowel space was reduced due to a retracted production of the vowel [i]. The vowel space area showed a strong negative correlation with age at implantation (r = −0.80). The analysis of acoustic distance showed that the CI children produced corner vowels [a, u] similarly to the NH children, but other vowels (e.g., [ʅ, ɿ]) differently from the NH children, which suggests that CI children generally follow a similar developmental path of vowel acquisition as NH children. These findings highlight the importance of early implantation and have implications in clinical aural habilitation in young children with CIs. PMID:26627755

  17. Effects of Clinician-Guided Emergent Literacy Intervention Using Interactive Tablet Technology for Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwer, Kyle; Downing, Hannah; Westhoff, Sara; Wait, Ryann; Entwisle, Lavin K.; Messersmith, Jessica J.; Hanson, Elizabeth K.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if intervention based on a mobile application would improve the print knowledge and vocabulary of preschool children with and without hearing loss. This was a multiple baseline study that included four preschool children. Two of the children had hearing loss and utilized cochlear implants, while the…

  18. The Modes of Communication Used by Children with Cochlear Implants and the Role of Sign in Their Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Merv; Punch, Renee

    2011-01-01

    In a mixed-methods study, which included surveys of 247 parents and 151 teachers, the researchers investigated the modes of communication used by children with cochlear implants and the role of signed communication in the children's lives. Findings indicated that 15%-20% of the children in the parent surveys and approximately 30% of the children…

  19. The Modes of Communication Used by Children with Cochlear Implants and the Role of Sign in Their Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Merv; Punch, Renee

    2011-01-01

    In a mixed-methods study, which included surveys of 247 parents and 151 teachers, the researchers investigated the modes of communication used by children with cochlear implants and the role of signed communication in the children's lives. Findings indicated that 15%-20% of the children in the parent surveys and approximately 30% of the children…

  20. Are Young Children with Cochlear Implants Sensitive to the Statistics of Words in the Ambient Spoken Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ling-Yu; McGregor, Karla K.; Spencer, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether children with cochlear implants (CIs) are sensitive to statistical characteristics of words in the ambient spoken language, whether that sensitivity changes in expected ways as their spoken lexicon grows, and whether that sensitivity varies with unilateral or bilateral implantation.…

  1. Vowel intelligibility in children with cochlear implants: An acoustic and articulatory study.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Christine; Trudeau-Fisette, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Ménard, Lucie

    2017-10-01

    In child cochlear implant (CI) users, early implantation generally results in highly intelligible speech. However, for some children developing a high level of speech intelligibility may be problematic. Studies of speech production in CI users have principally been based on perceptual judgment and acoustic measures. Articulatory measures, such as those collected using ultrasound provide the opportunity to more precisely evaluate what makes child CI users more intelligible. This study investigates speech production and intelligibility in children with CI using acoustic and articulatory measures. Ten children with unilateral or bilateral CIs and 13 children with normal hearing (NH) participated in the study. Participants repeated five English vowels (/a/, /e/, /i/, /o/, /u/) with and without auditory feedback. Ultrasound was used to capture tongue positions and acoustic signals were recorded simultaneously. The results showed that, despite quite similar acoustic results, the two speaker groups made different use of the tongue to implement vowel contrasts. Indeed, the tongue position was lower in the feedback OFF condition than the feedback ON condition for all participants, but the magnitude of this difference was larger for CI users than for their NH peers. This difference led to diminished intelligibility scores for CI users. This study shows the limitation of acoustic measurements alone and demonstrates how the use of articulatory measurements can explain intelligibility patterns. Moreover, our results show that when cochlear implantation occurs early in life and auditory feedback is available, CI users' intelligibility is comparable to that of their NH peers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional outcome of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation in young children: 36 months postoperative results.

    PubMed

    Scherf, Fanny Wilhelmina Adriana Cornelia; van Deun, Lieselot; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan; Desloovere, Christian; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Offeciers, Erwin; Deggouj, Naïma; De Raeve, Leo; De Bodt, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul Henry

    2009-05-01

    To examine the effects of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation (CI) on the life of young children after 36 months of bilateral implant use. Thirty-five children were assessed prior to and 3 until 36 months after activation of the second CI. Main outcome measures were: the Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP), Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR), communication mode, classroom placement, parent reports and the Würzburg questionnaire. Results were analysed separately for children younger and older than 6 years at the time of the second implantation. At the 3-year test interval, 80% of the younger children attended mainstream schools and were comprehensible for all listeners. They all used oral communication and almost 70% of them could have a conversation over the telephone. After 3 years of bilateral implant use less than 50% of the older children obtained the highest score on the SIR and CAP. Approximately 70% of them was integrated in mainstream schools and used oral communication. All parents reported a more natural communication and an improved quality of life. Sequential bilateral implantation seems to offer a wide range of participation benefits to all children and facilitates the social intercourse with their hearing environment.

  3. Cochlear Implants in Children with Hearing Loss: Maternal Expectations and Impact on the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Most, Tova

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate evaluations of cochlear implant candidates and to promote (re)habilitation efficacy and collaboration with families, this study examined the expectations of 35 mothers with typical hearing and their beliefs and difficulties related to their child's hearing loss and current or future cochlear implantation. Questionnaires measured…

  4. Performance of hearing skills in children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder using cochlear implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Nayara Freitas; Morettin, Marina; Yamaguti, Elisabete Honda; Costa, Orozimbo Alves; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there are no doubts about the benefits of cochlear implants for the development of children with severe or profound hearing loss. However, there is still no consensus among researchers and professionals regarding the benefits for the improvement of hearing skills in children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder using cochlear implants. Review the available evidence in the literature to answer the following: "What is the performance of hearing skills in children with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder using cochlear implants?" Systematic review of the literature through electronic database consultation, considering publications in the period 2002-2013. Twenty-two studies met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. The analyzed studies demonstrated that after cochlear implant surgery, individuals with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder improved their performance of hearing skills and had similar performance to that of children with sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implant. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. The benefits of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation for hearing-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Thomas; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Strutz, Jürgen; Aschendorff, Antje; Klenzner, Thomas; Rühl, Stephanie; Voss, Bettina; Wesarg, Thomas; Laszig, Roland; Lenarz, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Sequential bilateral implantation offers listening advantages demonstrable on speech recognition in noise and for lateralization. Whilst the trend was for shorter inter-implant intervals and longer implant experience to positively impact binaural advantage, we observed no contraindications for binaural advantage. To evaluate the benefits of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation over unilateral implantation in a multicentre study evaluating speech recognition in noise and lateralization of sound. Twenty children, implanted bilaterally in sequential procedures, had the following characteristics: they were native German-speaking, were3 years or older and had a minimum of 1 year inter-implant interval and had between 2 months and 4 years 7 months binaural listening experience. Binaural advantage was assessed including speech recognition in noise using the Regensburg modification of the Oldenburger Kinder-Reimtest (OLKI) and lateralization of broadband stimuli from three speakers. A significant binaural advantage of 37% was observed for speech recognition in noise. Binaural lateralization ability was statistically superior for the first and second implanted ear (p = 0.009, p = 0.001, respectively). Binaural experience was shown to correlate moderately with absolute binaural speech recognition scores, with binaural advantage for speech recognition and with binaural lateralization ability. The time interval between implants correlated in an inverse direction with binaural advantage for speech recognition.

  6. Quality of Life for Children with Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Efrat A.; Roth, Froma P.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined children's self-reported quality of life with a cochlear implant as related to children's actual perceptions of speech and the emotional information conveyed by sound. Effects of age at amplification with hearing aids and fitting of cochlear implants on perceived quality of life were also investigated. Method: A…

  7. Quality of Life for Children with Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Efrat A.; Roth, Froma P.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined children's self-reported quality of life with a cochlear implant as related to children's actual perceptions of speech and the emotional information conveyed by sound. Effects of age at amplification with hearing aids and fitting of cochlear implants on perceived quality of life were also investigated. Method: A…

  8. A Prospective, Longitudinal Study of US Children Unable to Achieve Open-Set Speech Recognition Five Years after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, JM; Fisher, LM; Johnson, KC; Eisenberg, LS; Wang, NY; Quittner, AL; Carson, CM; Niparko, JK

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics associated with inability to progress to open-set speech recognition in children who are 5 years post cochlear implantation. Study Design Prospective, longitudinal and multidimensional assessment of auditory development over 5 years. Setting Six tertiary cochlear implant (CI) referral centers in the US. Patients Children with severe-to-profound hearing loss who underwent implantation before age 5 years enrolled in the Childhood Development after Cochlear Implant (CDaCI) study, categorized by level of speech recognition ability. Intervention(s) Cochlear implantation prior to 5 years of age and annual assessment of emergent speech recognition skills. Main outcome measure(s) Progression to open-set speech recognition by 5 years after implantation. Results Less functional hearing prior to implantation, older age at onset of amplification, lower maternal sensitivity to communication needs, minority status, and complicated perinatal history were associated with inability to obtain open set speech recognition by 5 years. Conclusions Characteristics of a subpopulation of children with CIs that were associated with an inability to achieve open-set speech recognition after 5 years of CI experience were investigated. These data distinguish pediatric CI recipients at risk for poor auditory development and highlight areas for future interventions to enhance support of early implantation. PMID:25700015

  9. Parents' narratives on cochlear implantation: reconstructing the experience of having a child with cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Peñaranda, Augusto; Suárez, Roberto M; Niño, Natalia M; Aparicio, Maria Leonor; García, Juan Manuel; Barón, Clemencia

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses parents' narratives on cochlear implantation in Bogotá, Colombia using a qualitative approach. The main research objective was to identify how parents perceived the processes of diagnosis of their child's hearing loss, making the decision for cochlear implantation and the post-surgery period. All participants were hearing couples (n = 13) with similar socio-cultural backgrounds whose children had undergone cochlear implant surgery. Results show why cochlear implants are a very highly valued technological device with great symbolic power for parents. The study also deals with how perceptions about oral/sign language and disability, as well as social expectations for their children's lifetime opportunities, determine how the parents themselves have experienced their journey through the process of their children's cochlear implantation.

  10. Persistent Language Delay Versus Late Language Emergence in Children With Early Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Johanna; Tobey, Emily; Davidson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present investigation is to differentiate children using cochlear implants (CIs) who did or did not achieve age-appropriate language scores by midelementary grades and to identify risk factors for persistent language delay following early cochlear implantation. Materials and Method Children receiving unilateral CIs at young ages (12–38 months) were tested longitudinally and classified with normal language emergence (n = 19), late language emergence (n = 22), or persistent language delay (n = 19) on the basis of their test scores at 4.5 and 10.5 years of age. Relative effects of demographic, audiological, linguistic, and academic characteristics on language emergence were determined. Results Age at CI was associated with normal language emergence but did not differentiate late emergence from persistent delay. Children with persistent delay were more likely to use left-ear implants and older speech processor technology. They experienced higher aided thresholds and lower speech perception scores. Persistent delay was foreshadowed by low morphosyntactic and phonological diversity in preschool. Logistic regression analysis predicted normal language emergence with 84% accuracy and persistent language delay with 74% accuracy. Conclusion CI characteristics had a strong effect on persistent versus resolving language delay, suggesting that right-ear (or bilateral) devices, technology upgrades, and improved audibility may positively influence long-term language outcomes. PMID:26501740

  11. Assessment of early language development in Turkish children with a cochlear implant using the TEDIL test.

    PubMed

    Koşaner, Julie; Deniz, Hüseyin; Uruk, Deniz; Deniz, Murat; Kara, Eyup; Amann, Edda

    2017-05-01

    To analyse language development of children with a cochlear implant (CI) in relation to length of CI use and age at implantation and to examine the suitability of the TEDIL as an assessment tool for measuring early language development in Turkish children. A total of 119 children implanted with a CI before 5 years of age were assessed acutely on sound field thresholds, speech recognition thresholds, open-set and closed-set monosyllabic word tests, the TEDIL, categories of auditory performance (CAP), and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). The outcome scores were analysed in relation to length of CI use (3, 4, and 5 years) and age at implantation (<24 months vs. >24 months). The TEDIL scores were compared to all other outcome measures. Scores significantly increased with CI experience. CAP and SIR were significantly higher in the younger implanted group. No significant difference was observed between the younger and older implanted group on the closed-set and open-set monosyllabic tests and the TEDIL. The TEDIL scores significantly correlated with CAP, SIR, and the closed-set and open-set word scores. The mean TEDIL standard score was close to average. Performance of CI users improves with increased CI experience. CI users implanted <24 months tend to have better auditory skills and clearer speech than CI users implanted >24 months. CI users implanted between 24 months and 60 months tend to develop language similarly to CI users implanted <24 months. The TEDIL is a suitable tool for assessing early receptive and expressive language development in Turkish children.

  12. Phonological awareness and print knowledge of preschool children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Sophie E; Fey, Marc E; Eisenberg, Laurie S

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether preschool-age children with cochlear implants have age-appropriate phonological awareness and print knowledge and to examine the relationships of these skills with related speech and language abilities. The sample comprised 24 children with cochlear implants (CIs) and 23 peers with normal hearing (NH), ages 36 to 60 months. Children's print knowledge, phonological awareness, language, speech production, and speech perception abilities were assessed. For phonological awareness, the CI group's mean score fell within one standard deviation of the Test of Preschool Early Literacy's (Lonigan, Wagner, Torgesen, & Rashotte, 2007) normative sample mean but was more than one standard deviation below the NH group mean. The CI group's performance did not differ significantly from that of the NH group for print knowledge. For the CI group, phonological awareness and print knowledge were significantly correlated with language, speech production, and speech perception. Together these predictor variables accounted for 34% of variance in the CI group's phonological awareness but no significant variance in their print knowledge. Children with CIs have the potential to develop age-appropriate early literacy skills by preschool age but are likely to lag behind their NH peers in phonological awareness. Intervention programs serving these children should target these skills with instruction and by facilitating speech and language development.

  13. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Children With Cochlear Implants Using Electronic Storybooks.

    PubMed

    Messier, Jane; Wood, Carla

    2015-10-01

    The present intervention study explored the word learning of 18 children with cochlear implants in response to E-book instruction. Capitalizing on the multimedia options available in electronic storybooks, the intervention incorporated videos and definitions to provide a vocabulary intervention that includes evidence-based teaching strategies. The extent of the children's word learning was assessed using three assessment tasks: receptive pointing, expressively labeling, and word defining. Children demonstrated greater immediate expressive labeling gains and definition generation gains for words taught in the treatment condition compared to those in the comparison condition. In addition, the children's performance on delayed posttest vocabulary assessments indicated better retention across the expressive vocabulary task for words taught within the treatment condition as compared to the comparison condition. Findings suggest that children with cochlear implants with functional speech perception can benefit from an oral-only multimedia-enhanced intensive vocabulary instruction. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Parental involvement in the habilitation process following children's cochlear implantation: an action theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Young, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Action theory and the qualitative action-project method are used in this study to address and illustrate the complexity of parenting children who have received cochlear implants (CIs) as well as the intentionality of parents engaged in that process. "Action" refers to individual and joint goal-directed and intentional behaviors. Action theory has the advantage of using the perspectives provided by manifest behavior, internal processes, and social meaning in the analysis of action. Two cases are used to describe the individual and joint actions and projects, as related to parents' involvement in the habilitation process of children's postcochlear implantation. These joint projects are described at the levels of meanings/goals, functional processes, behaviors, structural support, and resources. From the rich descriptions and analysis of the cases, we draw potentially illuminative implications for the "current thinking" in relation to parenting children with CIs.

  15. Review of recent work on spatial hearing skills in children with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2011-05-01

    Review of recent studies on spatial-hearing abilities in children who use bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs); compare performance of children who use BiCIs with children who have normal hearing. Results from recent studies are reviewed in two categories. First, studies measured spatial hearing by using sound localization or identification methods, thereby focusing on localization accuracy. Second, studies that measured the ability of children to discriminate between sound source positions in the horizontal plane, thereby focusing on localization acuity where performance was quantified using the minimum audible angle (MAA). Children with BiCIs have localization errors that vary widely. There is evidence that for many children errors are smaller when using two vs. one implant. In the bilateral condition, some children's performance falls within the range of errors seen in children with normal hearing (less than 30° root mean square), but most children have errors that are significantly greater than those of children with normal hearing. On MAA tasks, performance is generally significantly better (lower MAAs) when children are tested in the bilateral listening mode than in the unilateral listening mode. However, MAAs are generally higher than those measured in children with normal hearing. Results are discussed in the context of auditory experience, and also with regard to the lack of availability of binaural cues presented through the CI speech processors when the children are using their processors in everyday listening situations. The potential roles of interaural timing vs. level cues are discussed.

  16. Parenting stress in parents of children with cochlear implants: relationships among parent stress, child language, and unilateral versus bilateral implants.

    PubMed

    Sarant, Julia; Garrard, Philippa

    2014-01-01

    Little attention has been focused on stress levels of parents of children with cochlear implants (CIs). This study examined the stress experience of 70 parents of children with CIs by comparing stress levels in this group of parents to those in parents of children without disabilities, identifying primary stressors, examining the relationship between parent stress and child language, and comparing stress in parents of children with bilateral and unilateral CIs. Parents completed a parent stress questionnaire, and the receptive vocabulary and language abilities of the children were evaluated. Results indicated that these parents had a higher incidence of stress than the normative population. Parent stress levels and child language outcomes were negatively correlated. Child behavior and lack of spousal and social support were the prime causes of parent stress. Parents of children with bilateral CIs were significantly less stressed than were parents of children with unilateral CIs.

  17. Analysis of electrically evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve in children with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Fernanda Ferreira; Cardoso, Carolina Costa; Barreto, Monique Antunes de Souza Chelminski; Teixeira, Marina Santos; Hilgenberg, Anacléia Melo da Silva; Serra, Lucieny Silva Martins; Bahmad Junior, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    The cochlear implant device has the capacity to measure the electrically evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve. The neural response telemetry is used in order to measure the electrically evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve. To analyze the electrically evoked compound action potential, through the neural response telemetry, in children with bilateral cochlear implants. This is an analytical, prospective, longitudinal, historical cohort study. Six children, aged 1-4 years, with bilateral cochlear implant were assessed at five different intervals during their first year of cochlear implant use. There were significant differences in follow-up time (p=0.0082) and electrode position (p=0.0019) in the T-NRT measure. There was a significant difference in the interaction between time of follow-up and electrode position (p=0.0143) when measuring the N1-P1 wave amplitude between the three electrodes at each time of follow-up. The electrically evoked compound action potential measurement using neural response telemetry in children with bilateral cochlear implants during the first year of follow-up was effective in demonstrating the synchronized bilateral development of the peripheral auditory pathways in the studied population. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Voice emotion recognition by cochlear-implanted children and their normally-hearing peers

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Monita; Zion, Danielle; Deroche, Mickael L.; Burianek, Brooke; Limb, Charles; Goren, Alison; Kulkarni, Aditya M.; Christensen, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their remarkable success in bringing spoken language to hearing impaired listeners, the signal transmitted through cochlear implants (CIs) remains impoverished in spectro-temporal fine structure. As a consequence, pitch-dominant information such as voice emotion, is diminished. For young children, the ability to correctly identify the mood/intent of the speaker (which may not always be visible in their facial expression) is an important aspect of social and linguistic development. Previous work in the field has shown that children with cochlear implants (cCI) have significant deficits in voice emotion recognition relative to their normally hearing peers (cNH). Here, we report on voice emotion recognition by a cohort of 36 school-aged cCI. Additionally, we provide for the first time, a comparison of their performance to that of cNH and NH adults (aNH) listening to CI simulations of the same stimuli. We also provide comparisons to the performance of adult listeners with CIs (aCI), most of whom learned language primarily through normal acoustic hearing. Results indicate that, despite strong variability, on average, cCI perform similarly to their adult counterparts; that both groups’ mean performance is similar to aNHs’ performance with 8-channel noise-vocoded speech; that cNH achieve excellent scores in voice emotion recognition with full-spectrum speech, but on average, show significantly poorer scores than aNH with 8-channel noise-vocoded speech. A strong developmental effect was observed in the cNH with noise-vocoded speech in this task. These results point to the considerable benefit obtained by cochlear-implanted children from their devices, but also underscore the need for further research and development in this important and neglected area. PMID:25448167

  19. Voice emotion recognition by cochlear-implanted children and their normally-hearing peers.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Monita; Zion, Danielle J; Deroche, Mickael L; Burianek, Brooke A; Limb, Charles J; Goren, Alison P; Kulkarni, Aditya M; Christensen, Julie A

    2015-04-01

    Despite their remarkable success in bringing spoken language to hearing impaired listeners, the signal transmitted through cochlear implants (CIs) remains impoverished in spectro-temporal fine structure. As a consequence, pitch-dominant information such as voice emotion, is diminished. For young children, the ability to correctly identify the mood/intent of the speaker (which may not always be visible in their facial expression) is an important aspect of social and linguistic development. Previous work in the field has shown that children with cochlear implants (cCI) have significant deficits in voice emotion recognition relative to their normally hearing peers (cNH). Here, we report on voice emotion recognition by a cohort of 36 school-aged cCI. Additionally, we provide for the first time, a comparison of their performance to that of cNH and NH adults (aNH) listening to CI simulations of the same stimuli. We also provide comparisons to the performance of adult listeners with CIs (aCI), most of whom learned language primarily through normal acoustic hearing. Results indicate that, despite strong variability, on average, cCI perform similarly to their adult counterparts; that both groups' mean performance is similar to aNHs' performance with 8-channel noise-vocoded speech; that cNH achieve excellent scores in voice emotion recognition with full-spectrum speech, but on average, show significantly poorer scores than aNH with 8-channel noise-vocoded speech. A strong developmental effect was observed in the cNH with noise-vocoded speech in this task. These results point to the considerable benefit obtained by cochlear-implanted children from their devices, but also underscore the need for further research and development in this important and neglected area. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phonological Awareness and Print Knowledge of Preschool Children with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Fey, Marc E.; Eisenberg, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether preschool-age children with cochlear implants have age-appropriate phonological awareness and print knowledge and to examine the relationships of these skills with related speech and language abilities. Method 24 children with cochlear implants (CIs) and 23 peers with normal hearing (NH), ages 36 to 60 months, participated. Children’s print knowledge, phonological awareness, language, speech production, and speech perception abilities were assessed. Results For phonological awareness, the CI group’s mean score fell within 1 standard deviation of the TOPEL’s normative sample mean but was more than 1 standard deviation below our NH group mean. The CI group’s performance did not differ significantly from that of the NH group for print knowledge. For the CI group, phonological awareness and print knowledge were significantly correlated with language, speech production, and speech perception. Together, these predictor variables accounted for 34% of variance in the CI group’s phonological awareness but no significant variance in their print knowledge. Conclusions Children with CIs have the potential to develop age-appropriate early literacy skills by preschool-age but are likely to lag behind their NH peers in phonological awareness. Intervention programs serving these children should target these skills with instruction and by facilitating speech and language development. PMID:22223887

  1. Reading instead of reasoning? Predictors of arithmetic skills in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maria; Kipman, Ulrike; Pletzer, Belinda

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the arithmetic achievement of children with cochlear implants (CI) was lower or comparable to that of their normal hearing peers and to identify predictors of arithmetic achievement in children with CI. In particular we related the arithmetic achievement of children with CI to nonverbal IQ, reading skills and hearing variables. 23 children with CI (onset of hearing loss in the first 24 months, cochlear implantation in the first 60 months of life, atleast 3 years of hearing experience with the first CI) and 23 normal hearing peers matched by age, gender, and social background participated in this case control study. All attended grades two to four in primary schools. To assess their arithmetic achievement, all children completed the "Arithmetic Operations" part of the "Heidelberger Rechentest" (HRT), a German arithmetic test. To assess reading skills and nonverbal intelligence as potential predictors of arithmetic achievement, all children completed the "Salzburger Lesetest" (SLS), a German reading screening, and the Culture Fair Intelligence Test (CFIT), a nonverbal intelligence test. Children with CI did not differ significantly from hearing children in their arithmetic achievement. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that in children with CI, arithmetic achievement was significantly (positively) related to reading skills, but not to nonverbal IQ. Reading skills and nonverbal IQ were not related to each other. In normal hearing children, arithmetic achievement was significantly (positively) related to nonverbal IQ, but not to reading skills. Reading skills and nonverbal IQ were positively correlated. Hearing variables were not related to arithmetic achievement. Children with CI do not show lower performance in non-verbal arithmetic tasks, compared to normal hearing peers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Influence of Voice Similarity on Talker Discrimination in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Miranda; Pisoni, David B.; Kirk, Karen Iler

    2012-01-01

    The perception of voice similarity was examined in 5-year-old children with normal hearing sensitivity and in pediatric cochlear implant users, 5–12 years of age. Recorded sentences were manipulated to form a continuum of similar-sounding voices. An adaptive procedure was then used to determine how acoustically different, in terms of average fundamental and formant frequencies, 2 sentences needed to be for a child to categorize the sentences as spoken by 2 different talkers. The average spectral characteristics of 2 utterances (including their fundamental frequencies) needed to differ by at least 11%–16% (2–2.5 semitones) for normal-hearing children to perceive the voices as belonging to different talkers. Introducing differences in the linguistic content of the 2 sentences to be compared did not change performance. Although several children with cochlear implants performed similarly to normal-hearing children, most found the task very difficult. Pediatric cochlear implant users who scored above the group mean of 64% of words correct on a monosyllabic open-set word identification task categorized the voices more like children with normal hearing sensitivity. PMID:15938065

  3. Evaluation of phoneme perception based on the digitalized phoneme test in children with cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieler, Olgierd; Sekula, Alicja

    2009-01-01

    Early diagnosis of congenital defect of hearing poses new challenges for a multidisciplinary team of pedoaudiologists, ENT (ear-nose-throat) specialists and speech therapists. This study assessed the perception of phonemes in children with a cochlear implant and the possibilities of applying acoustical solutions in the audiologic evaluation. The participants were 17 implanted children, aged 5-9 years, who received a cochlear implant when they were from 18 months to 3 years old. Detection thresholds and discrimination score were assessed. This study also aimed at verifying the possibilities of applying the digital audioprocessing algorithm in clinical practice. The test based on the phonemes aa, uu, ii, ss, sh (Ling 5 sound test) was used. The test was modified in the frequency domain - the main aim of this modification was to improve the precision of the reconstruction of the audible threshold. The results indicated significant correlations between pure tone audiometry results and thresholds of phoneme detection [dB SPL]. The identification score in this group was 95-100% for sound pressure level 65 dB SPL.

  4. Initial Stop Voicing in Bilingual Children with Cochlear Implants and Their Typically Developing Peers with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunta, Ferenc; Goodin-Mayeda, C. Elizabeth; Procter, Amanda; Hernandez, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study focuses on stop voicing differentiation in bilingual children with normal hearing (NH) and their bilingual peers with hearing loss who use cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Twenty-two bilingual children participated in our study (11 with NH, "M" age = 5;1 [years;months], and 11 with CIs, "M" hearing age =…

  5. Dual Language versus English-Only Support for Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunta, Ferenc; Douglas, Michael; Dickson, Hanna; Cantu, Amy; Wickesberg, Jennifer; Gifford, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need to understand better speech and language development in bilingual children learning two spoken languages who use cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs). The paucity of knowledge in this area poses a significant barrier to providing maximal communicative outcomes to a growing number of children who have…

  6. Longitudinal Improvements in Communication and Socialization of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids: Evidence from Parental Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bat-Chava, Yael; Martin, Daniela; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Research has shown that the cochlear implant may improve deaf children's speech and communication skills. However, little is known about its effect on children's ability to socialize with hearing peers. Methods: Using a standardized psychological measure completed by parents and a longitudinal design, this study examined the…

  7. Language Achievement in Children Who Received Cochlear Implants between 1 and 2 Years of Age: Group Trends and Individual Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchesne, Louise; Sutton, Ann; Bergeron, Francois

    2009-01-01

    This study examined receptive and expressive vocabulary and grammar achievement of French-speaking children (n = 27) who received a cochlear implant (CI) between the age of 1 and 2. Standardized measures of language achievement were administered and the language levels attained by children with CIs were compared with that of the normative sample…

  8. Dual Language versus English-Only Support for Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunta, Ferenc; Douglas, Michael; Dickson, Hanna; Cantu, Amy; Wickesberg, Jennifer; Gifford, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need to understand better speech and language development in bilingual children learning two spoken languages who use cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs). The paucity of knowledge in this area poses a significant barrier to providing maximal communicative outcomes to a growing number of children who have…

  9. Initial Stop Voicing in Bilingual Children with Cochlear Implants and Their Typically Developing Peers with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunta, Ferenc; Goodin-Mayeda, C. Elizabeth; Procter, Amanda; Hernandez, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study focuses on stop voicing differentiation in bilingual children with normal hearing (NH) and their bilingual peers with hearing loss who use cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Twenty-two bilingual children participated in our study (11 with NH, "M" age = 5;1 [years;months], and 11 with CIs, "M" hearing age =…

  10. Phonological awareness, reading skills, and vocabulary knowledge in children who use cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Caitlin M; de Jong, Kenneth; Pisoni, David B

    2012-01-01

    In hearing children, reading skills have been found to be closely related to phonological awareness. We used several standardized tests to investigate the reading and phonological awareness skills of 27 deaf school-age children who were experienced cochlear implant users. Approximately two-thirds of the children performed at or above the level of their hearing peers on the phonological awareness and reading tasks. Reading scores were found to be strongly correlated with measures of phonological awareness. These correlations remained the same when we statistically controlled for potentially confounding demographic variables such as age at testing and speech perception skills. However, these correlations decreased even after we statistically controlled for vocabulary size. This finding suggests that lexicon size is a mediating factor in the relationship between the children's phonological awareness and reading skills, a finding that has also been reported for typically developing hearing children.

  11. Vocabulary development in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants and its relationship with speech perception abilities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Wong, Lena L N; Zhu, Shufeng; Xi, Xin

    2017-01-01

    China has the largest population of children with hearing impairments and cochlear implantation is gaining popularity there. However, the vocabulary development in this population is largely unexplored. This study examined early vocabulary outcomes, factors influencing early vocabulary development and the relationship between speech perception and vocabulary development in Mandarin-speaking children during the first year of cochlear implant use. A battery of vocabulary tests was administered to 80 children before implantation and 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. Demographic information was obtained to evaluate their relationships with vocabulary outcomes. The Mandarin-speaking children, who received their cochlear implants before 3 years of age, developed vocabulary at a rate faster than that of their same-aged peers with normal hearing. Better pre-implant hearing levels, younger age at implantation, and higher maternal education level contributed to the early vocabulary development. The trajectories of speech perception development highly correlated with those of vocabulary development during 3 to 12 months of CI use. and Implications: These findings imply that the vocabulary development of children implanted before 3 years of age may catch up with that of their hearing peers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Early Bimodal Stimulation Benefits Language Acquisition for Children With Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Moberly, Aaron C; Lowenstein, Joanna H; Nittrouer, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Adding a low-frequency acoustic signal to the cochlear implant (CI) signal (i.e., bimodal stimulation) for a period of time early in life improves language acquisition. Children must acquire sensitivity to the phonemic units of language to develop most language-related skills, including expressive vocabulary, working memory, and reading. Acquiring sensitivity to phonemic structure depends largely on having refined spectral (frequency) representations available in the signal, which does not happen with CIs alone. Combining the low-frequency acoustic signal available through hearing aids with the CI signal can enhance signal quality. A period with this bimodal stimulation has been shown to improve language skills in very young children. This study examined whether these benefits persist into childhood. Data were examined for 48 children with CIs implanted under age 3 years, participating in a longitudinal study. All children wore hearing aids before receiving a CI, but upon receiving a first CI, 24 children had at least 1 year of bimodal stimulation (Bimodal group), and 24 children had only electric stimulation subsequent to implantation (CI-only group). Measures of phonemic awareness were obtained at second and fourth grades, along with measures of expressive vocabulary, working memory, and reading. Children in the Bimodal group generally performed better on measures of phonemic awareness, and that advantage was reflected in other language measures. Having even a brief period of time early in life with combined electric-acoustic input provides benefits to language learning into childhood, likely because of the enhancement in spectral representations provided.

  13. The impact of cochlear implants on young deaf children: new methods to assess cognitive and behavioral development.

    PubMed

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Leibach, Pamela; Marciel, Kristen

    2004-05-01

    Much evidence suggests that, early in life, auditory input and communication are essential for the normal development of language, cognition, and behavior. Thus, deaf children, who experience significant disruptions in auditory input, are likely to show delays not only in the production of oral language but in other important aspects of development such as visual attention and behavioral control. Cochlear implants have shown tremendous promise in restoring auditory information to deaf children and concomitant improvements in speech recognition and production. However, little is known about how cochlear implants affect psychological variables. In this multisite trial, we assess the effects of cochlear implants on a range of developmental outcomes, including visual attention, problem-solving skills, symbolic play, and social adjustment. Measuring these constructs in young children, primarily younger than 2 years, has presented a number of unique challenges. In this article, we describe the methods used to assess these variables in young children and present preliminary findings comparing joint attention and symbolic play skills in a small sample of age-matched deaf and hearing children. As expected, deaf children performed more poorly than hearing children on measures of attention and symbolic play. As auditory input is restored via a cochlear implant, we predict that significant improvements in these variables will be observed.

  14. Syntagmatic and paradigmatic development of cochlear implanted children in comparison with normally hearing peers up to age 7.

    PubMed

    Faes, Jolien; Gillis, Joris; Gillis, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Grammatical development is shown to be delayed in CI children. However, the literature has focussed mainly on one aspect of grammatical development, either morphology or syntax, and on standard tests instead of spontaneous speech. The aim of the present study was to compare grammatical development in the spontaneous speech of Dutch-speaking children with cochlear implants and normally hearing peers. Both syntagmatic and paradigmatic development will be assessed and compared with each other. Nine children with cochlear implants were followed yearly between ages 2 and 7. There was a cross-sectional control group of 10 normally hearing peers at each age. Syntactic development is measured by means of Mean Length of Utterance (MLU), morphological development by means of Mean Size of Paradigm (MSP). This last measure is relatively new in child language research. MLU and MSP of children with cochlear implants lag behind that of their normally hearing peers up to age 4 and up to age 6 respectively. By age 5, CI children catch up on MSP and by age 7 they caught up on MLU. Children with cochlear implants catch up with their normally hearing peers for both measures of syntax and morphology. However, it is shown that inflection is earlier age-appropriate than sentence length in CI children. Possible explanations for this difference in developmental pace are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Speech intelligibility, speaking rate, and vowel formant characteristics in Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiu-Feng; Yang, Cheng-Chieh; Chi, Lin-Yang; Weismer, Gary; Wang, Yu-Tsai

    2012-04-01

    The effects of the use of cochlear implant (CI) on speech intelligibility, speaking rate, and vowel formant characteristics and the relationships between speech intelligibility, speaking rate, and vowel formant characteristics for children are clinically important. The purposes of this study were to report on the comparisons for speaking rate and vowel space area, and their relationship with speech intelligibility, between 24 Mandarin-speaking children with CI and 24 age-sex-education level matched normal hearing (NH) controls. Participants were audio recorded as they read a designed Mandarin intelligibility test, repeated prolongation of each of the three point vowels /i/, /a/, and /u/ five times, and repeated each of three sentences carrying one point vowel five times. Compared to the NH group, the CI group exhibited: (1) mild-to-moderate speech intelligibility impairment; (2) significantly reduced speaking rate mainly due to significantly longer inter-word pauses and larger pause proportion; and (3) significantly less vowel reduction in the horizontal dimension in sustained vowel phonation. The limitations of speech intelligibility development in children after cochlear implantation were related to atypical patterns and to a smaller degree in vowel reduction and slower speaking rate resulting from less efficient articulatory movement transition.

  16. Parental Expectation from Children with Cochlear Implants in Indian Context: a Questionnaire Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prawin; Sanju, Himanshu Kumar; Mishra, Rajkishor; Singh, Varun; Mohan, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Parental support is important in the habilitation/rehabilitation of children using cochlear implant devices. Hence, it is important for families to know the realistic expectations regarding outcomes from CIs. Objective The objective of the present study is to know the parents' expectation from children using CIs. Methods For this study, we recruited 23 parents of children using CIs. We administered 15 questions translated in to Hindi related to communication abilities, social skills, academic achievement, change in future life, rehabilitation demand, and stress due to hearing impairment. Results The response of the questions (5-point rating scale) related to communication abilities showed that parents were expecting children using CIs to use the telephone (95%), to be able to detect soft sounds (99%), to listen in crowds (86%), to be able to easily understand others (76%), and to show improvement in communication skills (78%). Similarly, for questions related to social skills showed 90% of the parents expecting that their children with CIs should be able to easily make friends with normal hearing peers, and 80% of the parents were expecting the children to achieve high standards in their reading and writing skills. Questions related to change in future life showed 86% of the parents expecting their children with CIs to act like normal hearing children. Further, 78% parents showed positive response regarding importance of intensive training. However, 70% of the parents reported stress in the family due to the existence of the hearing impaired child. Conclusion Overall, the existing questionnaire-based study showed that parents have high expectations from their children with cochlear implant.

  17. Congenital malformations of the ear and cochlear implantation in children: review and temporal bone report of common cavity.

    PubMed

    Graham, J M; Phelps, P D; Michaels, L

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this review is to analyze aspects of congenital malformation of the ear in relation to cochlear implantation in children. Having briefly described the in utero development of the ear and the classification of types of external, middle and inner ear malformation, five practical aspects of these malformations are discussed. It seems likely that the combination of bilateral profound sensorineural deafness with bilateral microtia severe enough to make a surgical approach to the cochlea difficult will be extremely uncommon. No such cases have been reported, although Klippel-Feil deformity seems the syndrome most likely to produce this set of circumstances. Abnormalities in the intratympanic course of the facial nerve have been associated with cochlear malformation, emphasizing the benefit of intra-operative facial nerve monitoring, and a technique suggested for safely avoiding an abnormally placed nerve. Fistulae of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and perilymph can complicate surgery and are relatively common in common cavity and Mondini malformations. Strategies for facilitating surgery in the presence of 'gushers', for measuring the pressure of a gusher and for placement of the cochlear implant electrode array are reviewed, with reports of fluctuating levels of electric current when implants lie in dysplastic cochleas. The relationship of implant performance to VIIIth nerve tissue in malformed cochleas is discussed, with a description of the histological findings in a common cavity cochlea. Techniques for identifying the absence of the cochlear nerve are reviewed. Stimulation of the facial nerve by cochlear implants has been described in cases of congenital malformation of the labyrinth but is relatively uncommon. Case reports of the benefit received by implanted children with congenital cochlear malformation have appeared since 1988. Most cases reported have not yet been followed for long enough to establish a clear picture of the outcome following

  18. Speech perception and communication ability over the telephone by Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Che-Ming; Liu, Tien-Chen; Wang, Nan-Mai; Chao, Wei-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    (1) To understand speech perception and communication ability through real telephone calls by Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants and compare them to live-voice perception, (2) to report the general condition of telephone use of this population, and (3) to investigate the factors that correlate with telephone speech perception performance. Fifty-six children with over 4 years of implant use (aged 6.8-13.6 years, mean duration 8.0 years) took three speech perception tests administered using telephone and live voice to examine sentence, monosyllabic-word and Mandarin tone perception. The children also filled out a questionnaire survey investigating everyday telephone use. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the scores between live-voice and telephone tests, and Pearson's test to examine the correlation between them. The mean scores were 86.4%, 69.8% and 70.5% respectively for sentence, word and tone recognition over the telephone. The corresponding live-voice mean scores were 94.3%, 84.0% and 70.8%. Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed the sentence and word scores were significantly different between telephone and live voice test, while the tone recognition scores were not, indicating tone perception was less worsened by telephone transmission than words and sentences. Spearman's test showed that chronological age and duration of implant use were weakly correlated with the perception test scores. The questionnaire survey showed 78% of the children could initiate phone calls and 59% could use the telephone 2 years after implantation. Implanted children are potentially capable of using the telephone 2 years after implantation, and communication ability over the telephone becomes satisfactory 4 years after implantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phonological Awareness, Reading Skills, and Vocabulary Knowledge in Children Who Use Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; de Jong, Kenneth; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    In hearing children, reading skills have been found to be closely related to phonological awareness. We used several standardized tests to investigate the reading and phonological awareness skills of 27 deaf school-age children who were experienced cochlear implant users. Approximately two-thirds of the children performed at or above the level of their hearing peers on the phonological awareness and reading tasks. Reading scores were found to be strongly correlated with measures of phonological awareness. These correlations remained the same when we statistically controlled for potentially confounding demographic variables such as age at testing and speech perception skills. However, these correlations decreased even after we statistically controlled for vocabulary size. This finding suggests that lexicon size is a mediating factor in the relationship between the children’s phonological awareness and reading skills, a finding that has also been reported for typically developing hearing children. PMID:22057983

  20. Visual attention, behavioral inhibition and speech/language outcomes in deaf children with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David L.; Davisa, Rebecca A.O.; Pisoni, David B.; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relations between sustained visual attention, behavioral inhibition skills, and speech–language outcomes in prelingually deaf children who use cochlear implants (CIs) using two computerized continuous performance tasks (CPTs). One test measured their ability to sustain visual attention to a string of numbers and another test measured their ability to delay a behavioral response. Performance on latter task was related to postimplant scores on tests of vocabulary knowledge, language skills, and speech intelligibility. We conclude that behavioral inhibition skills of prelingually deaf children are related to several audiological outcome measures in deaf children with CIs. Our findings suggest that further investigation is warranted into executive functions and subvocal rehearsal skills of deaf children with CIs. PMID:23100855

  1. Cognitive development in children with cochlear implants: relations to reading and communication.

    PubMed

    Lyxell, Björn; Sahlén, Birgitta; Wass, Malin; Ibertsson, Tina; Larsby, Birgitta; Hällgren, Mathias; Mäki-Torkko, Elina

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of the present article is to present an overview of a set of studies conducted in our own laboratory on cognitive and communicative development in children with cochlear implants (CI). The results demonstrate that children with CIs perform at significantly lower levels on the majority of the cognitive tasks. The exceptions to this trend are tasks with relatively lower demands on phonological processing. A fairly high proportion of the children can reach a level of reading comprehension that matches hearing children, despite the fact that they have relatively poor phonological skills. General working memory capacity is further correlated with the type of questions asked in a referential communication task. The results are discussed with respect to issues related to education and rehabilitation.

  2. New expectations: pediatric cochlear implantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Janette

    2013-03-01

    FUNDING FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANTS: The Japanese health-care system provides universal health coverage for the entire 127 million population of Japan. This includes all aspects of cochlear implantation, from diagnosis to implantation to mapping and habilitation aftercare. Japan has the third largest developed economy; however, the uptake rate for cochlear implants is lower than that of countries with similar economic status. Japan has an uptake rate of approximately 1% of potentially suitable subjects of all ages, compared with 5.6% in the USA. In Japan, about 55% of cochlear implant recipients are children of less than 18 years of age. This represents an increase of 20% in the last 10 years, with a relative increase in the numbers of children receiving implants compared with the numbers of adults. However, only 3-4% of children under the age of 3 years are being implanted at less than 18 months of age. This is in accordance with the Japanese ENT Academy's guidelines, which currently puts the minimum age limit for implants in children at 18 months. For hearing loss was first piloted nationally in Japan in 2000. Funding for screening subsequently stopped in 2005, though the national treasury provided a further 2 years' funding. Since 2007 local government organizations have been given responsibility to support these screening programs, but there remains considerable variation in funding between different prefectures. In one prefecture, Okayama, 95% of babies were screened and followed up for 2 years. However, the support system for children who need further diagnostic testing after screening remains insufficient. When diagnosed, children with hearing loss are referred for counselling, hearing aids and habilitation. The responsibility for these is divided between the Ministry of Health and Welfare (including surgery, device programming, and therapy) and the Ministry of Education. Schools for the deaf and preschool hearing impaired education centers have had most of the

  3. Deficits in the pitch sensitivity of cochlear-implanted children speaking English or Mandarin

    PubMed Central

    Deroche, Mickael L. D.; Lu, Hui-Ping; Limb, Charles J.; Lin, Yung-Song; Chatterjee, Monita

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity to complex pitch is notoriously poor in adults with cochlear implants (CIs), but it is unclear whether this is true for children with CIs. Many are implanted today at a very young age, and factors related to brain plasticity (age at implantation, duration of CI experience, and speaking a tonal language) might have strong influences on pitch sensitivity. School-aged children participated, speaking English or Mandarin, having normal hearing (NH) or wearing a CI, using their clinically assigned settings with envelope-based coding strategies. Percent correct was measured in three-interval three-alternative forced choice tasks, for the discrimination of fundamental frequency (F0) of broadband harmonic complexes, and for the discrimination of sinusoidal amplitude modulation rate (AMR) of broadband noise, with reference frequencies at 100 and 200 Hz to focus on voice pitch processing. Data were fitted using a maximum-likelihood technique. CI children displayed higher thresholds and shallower slopes than NH children in F0 discrimination, regardless of linguistic background. Thresholds and slopes were more similar between NH and CI children in AMR discrimination. Once the effect of chronological age was extracted from the variance, the aforementioned factors related to brain plasticity did not contribute significantly to the CI children's sensitivity to pitch. Unless different strategies attempt to encode fine structure information, potential benefits of plasticity may be missed. PMID:25249932

  4. Perceptual weighting strategies of children with cochlear implants and normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Nittrouer, Susan; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda; Moberly, Aaron C; Lowenstein, Joanna H

    2014-01-01

    This study compared perceptual weighting strategies of children with cochlear implants (CIs) and children with normal hearing (NH), and asked if strategies are explained solely by degraded spectral representations, or if diminished language experience accounts for some of the effect. Relationships between weighting strategies and other language skills were examined. One hundred 8-year-olds (49 with NH and 51 with CIs) were tested on four measures: (1) labeling of cop-cob and sa-sha stimuli; (2) discrimination of the acoustic cues to the cop-cob decision; (3) phonemic awareness; and (4) word recognition. No differences in weighting of cues to the cop-cob decision were observed between children with CIs and NH, suggesting that language experience was sufficient for the children with CIs. Differences in weighting of cues to the sa-sha decision were found, but were not entirely explained by auditory sensitivity. Weighting strategies were related to phonemic awareness and word recognition. More salient cues facilitate stronger weighting of those cues. Nonetheless, individuals differ in how salient cues need to be to capture perceptual attention. Familiarity with stimuli also affects how reliably children attend to acoustic cues. Training should help children with CIs learn to categorize speech sounds with less-salient cues. After reading this article, the learner should be able to: (1) recognize methods and motivations for studying perceptual weighting strategies in speech perception; (2) explain how signal quality and language experience affect the development of weighting strategies for children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing; and (3) summarize the importance of perceptual weighting strategies for other aspects of language functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hearing-related quality of life outcomes for Singaporean children using hearing aids or cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Looi, V; Lee, Z Z; Loo, J H Y

    2016-06-01

    The Children Using Hearing Devices Quality of Life Questionnaire (CuHDQOL) is a new parent-administered hearing-specific questionnaire for children fitted with hearing devices. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes for hearing-impaired children in Singapore using this measure, as well as to examine its applicability for use in a clinical setting. The CuHDQOL has 26 items, uses a recall period of 1 month, and is divided into three sections: parental perspectives and expectations (eight items), impact on the family (eight items) and hearing-related quality of life (QOL) of the child (10 items). Responses are made on a 5-point Likert scale, and transformed to a score from 0-100. Twenty-two parents of children with hearing aids and 14 parents of children with cochlear implants completed the CuHDQOL. The mean total CuHDQOL scores was 62/100 for the children using hearing aids and 53/100 for children with cochlear implants. Scores for the children using hearing aids were higher across all subscales, with a linear regression showing this to be significant for the parental perspectives and expectations subscale (B=-10.58, P=0.041). Analyses of Variance showed that both the 'Parent Perspective and Expectations' and the 'Hearing-related QOL' subscales were significantly higher than the 'Impact on Family' subscale for both groups (P≤0.003). The CuHDQOL was found to be a simple, efficient questionnaire that could easily be incorporated into clinical practice to provide a more holistic evaluation of a child's outcomes post intervention, and/or to monitor their progress over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Auditory and Visual Electrophysiology of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Implications for Cross-modal Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Corina, David P; Blau, Shane; LaMarr, Todd; Lawyer, Laurel A; Coffey-Corina, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children who receive a cochlear implant early in life and engage in intensive oral/aural therapy often make great strides in spoken language acquisition. However, despite clinicians' best efforts, there is a great deal of variability in language outcomes. One concern is that cortical regions which normally support auditory processing may become reorganized for visual function, leaving fewer available resources for auditory language acquisition. The conditions under which these changes occur are not well understood, but we may begin investigating this phenomenon by looking for interactions between auditory and visual evoked cortical potentials in deaf children. If children with abnormal auditory responses show increased sensitivity to visual stimuli, this may indicate the presence of maladaptive cortical plasticity. We recorded evoked potentials, using both auditory and visual paradigms, from 25 typical hearing children and 26 deaf children (ages 2-8 years) with cochlear implants. An auditory oddball paradigm was used (85% /ba/ syllables vs. 15% frequency modulated tone sweeps) to elicit an auditory P1 component. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded during presentation of an intermittent peripheral radial checkerboard while children watched a silent cartoon, eliciting a P1-N1 response. We observed reduced auditory P1 amplitudes and a lack of latency shift associated with normative aging in our deaf sample. We also observed shorter latencies in N1 VEPs to visual stimulus offset in deaf participants. While these data demonstrate cortical changes associated with auditory deprivation, we did not find evidence for a relationship between cortical auditory evoked potentials and the VEPs. This is consistent with descriptions of intra-modal plasticity within visual systems of deaf children, but do not provide evidence for cross-modal plasticity. In addition, we note that sign language experience had no effect on deaf children's early auditory and visual ERP

  7. Neural Correlates of Speech Processing in Prelingually Deafened Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Magdalene; Knief, Arne; Deuster, Dirk; Brinkheetker, Stephanie; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette am; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children with cochlear implants stand a good chance of developing satisfactory speech performance. Nevertheless, their eventual language performance is highly variable and not fully explainable by the duration of deafness and hearing experience. In this study, two groups of cochlear implant users (CI groups) with very good basic hearing abilities but non-overlapping speech performance (very good or very bad speech performance) were matched according to hearing age and age at implantation. We assessed whether these CI groups differed with regard to their phoneme discrimination ability and auditory sensory memory capacity, as suggested by earlier studies. These functions were measured behaviorally and with the Mismatch Negativity (MMN). Phoneme discrimination ability was comparable in the CI group of good performers and matched healthy controls, which were both better than the bad performers. Source analyses revealed larger MMN activity (155–225 ms) in good than in bad performers, which was generated in the frontal cortex and positively correlated with measures of working memory. For the bad performers, this was followed by an increased activation of left temporal regions from 225 to 250 ms with a focus on the auditory cortex. These results indicate that the two CI groups developed different auditory speech processing strategies and stress the role of phonological functions of auditory sensory memory and the prefrontal cortex in positively developing speech perception and production. PMID:23861784

  8. Optimization of programming parameters in children with the advanced bionics cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Baudhuin, Jacquelyn; Cadieux, Jamie; Firszt, Jill B; Reeder, Ruth M; Maxson, Jerrica L

    2012-05-01

    Cochlear implants provide access to soft intensity sounds and therefore improved audibility for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Speech processor programming parameters, such as threshold (or T-level), input dynamic range (IDR), and microphone sensitivity, contribute to the recipient's program and influence audibility. When soundfield thresholds obtained through the speech processor are elevated, programming parameters can be modified to improve soft sound detection. Adult recipients show improved detection for low-level sounds when T-levels are set at raised levels and show better speech understanding in quiet when wider IDRs are used. Little is known about the effects of parameter settings on detection and speech recognition in children using today's cochlear implant technology. The overall study aim was to assess optimal T-level, IDR, and sensitivity settings in pediatric recipients of the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant. Two experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 examined the effects of two T-level settings on soundfield thresholds and detection of the Ling 6 sounds. One program set T-levels at 10% of most comfortable levels (M-levels) and another at 10 current units (CUs) below the level judged as "soft." Experiment 2 examined the effects of IDR and sensitivity settings on speech recognition in quiet and noise. Participants were 11 children 7-17 yr of age (mean 11.3) implanted with the Advanced Bionics High Resolution 90K or CII cochlear implant system who had speech recognition scores of 20% or greater on a monosyllabic word test. Two T-level programs were compared for detection of the Ling sounds and frequency modulated (FM) tones. Differing IDR/sensitivity programs (50/0, 50/10, 70/0, 70/10) were compared using Ling and FM tone detection thresholds, CNC (consonant-vowel nucleus-consonant) words at 50 dB SPL, and Hearing in Noise Test for Children (HINT-C) sentences at 65 dB SPL in the presence of four-talker babble (+8 signal

  9. Auditory Skills Checklist: clinical tool for monitoring functional auditory skill development in young children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Creighton, Jodi; Choo, Daniel

    2007-11-01

    The Auditory Skills Checklist (ASC) was developed to address the need for tools to evaluate functional auditory skill progress in very young children with sensorineural hearing loss. We describe the development, validation, and utility of the ASC for use in young children with cochlear implants. Using the ASC, we measured auditory skills in 37 subjects who received cochlear implants at no more than 36 months of age. Repeated measures analysis was conducted to determine expected auditory skill development after implantation. Interrater reliability was tested on a small subset. The ASC was compared to the Infant-Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS) to determine its validity in measuring functional auditory skills. The ASC had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.98) and interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.99), and was highly correlated with the IT-MAIS (r = 0.90). According to the repeated measures analysis, children who received a cochlear implant at 36 months of age or earlier were expected to increase their ASC score by 8 points every 3 months (beta coefficient, 8.3; p < .001). The ASC is a clinically relevant and easily administered tool for assessing the functional auditory skills of young children with a cochlear implant. By assessing auditory skill development over time with the ASC, we can better realize expectations for a particular child based on his or her age, hearing loss level, and management strategies in place.

  10. Impaired Vestibular Function After Cochlear Implantation in Children: Role of Static Posturography.

    PubMed

    Nair, Satish; Gupta, Atul; Nilakantan, Ajith; Mittal, Ruchika; Dahiya, Ruchi; Saini, Sachin; Prasad, Rachana; Vajpayee, Deepika

    2017-06-01

    To identify vestibular dysfunction in children after cochlear implant surgery and to study the utility of static posturography in evaluating vestibular function in children. A prospective study was carried out on 25 children between 2 and 7 years of age with sensorineural hearing loss with no overt vestibular dysfunction. All children underwent static posturography using Synapsis Posturographic System (SPS) software (Version 3.0, REV C) using a static platform with foam. The centre of pressure (COP) shift was recorded as statokinesiogram on the software and the mean vestibular, visual and somesthetic scores were obtained. Cochlear implantation (CI) surgery was done with insertion of Med-El Pulsar standard cochlear implant with 12 twin electrodes. Children were evaluated again after 4 weeks of CI surgery (2 weeks after switch on) with static posturography on the same SPS software. The scores obtained were compared with pre op value and data analyzed statistically by paired t tests on SPSS 18 software. The mean age was 4.6 years with range 2-7 years. All the children in the study were able to complete the test with no difficulty and the mean time required for each child was 10.2 min. The mean pre op somesthetic score was 95.16 (SD 1.52) and post op score was 94.06 (SD 1.79). The mean pre op visual score was 86.64 (SD 2.24) and post op score was 82.55 (2.89). The mean pre op vestibular score was 84.11 (SD 2.20) and post op score was 73.66 (SD 4.25). Correlation and statistical analysis of the pre and post values of each score revealed statistically significant reduction in vestibular scores post CI. The vestibular system is at high risk of injury leading to vestibular dysfunction in children during CI. Our study found the static posturography as a simple, fast and efficient tool to screen children for vestibular dysfunction post CI. Identifying the dysfunction early can help in initiating early rehabilitation measures.

  11. Realization of Complex Onsets by Pediatric Users of Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Steven B.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined variations in English complex onset realizations by children who use cochlear implants. Data consisted of 227 productions of two-segment onset clusters from 12 children. In general, onset cluster realizations of children with cochlear implants did not differ markedly from those reported for children with normal hearing: null…

  12. Preoperative differences of cerebral metabolism relate to the outcome of cochlear implants in congenitally deaf children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kang, Eunjoo; Oh, Seung-Ha; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong-Sun

    2005-05-01

    In congenitally deaf children, chronological age is generally accepted as a critical factor that affects successful rehabilitation following cochlear implantation (CI). However, a wide variance among patients is known to exist regardless of the age at CI [Sarant, J.Z., Blamey, P.J., Dowell, R.C., Clark, G.M., Gibson, W.P., 2001. Variation in speech perception scores among children with cochlear implants. Ear Hear. 22, 18-28]. In a previous study, we reported that prelingually deaf children in the age range 5-7 years at implantation showed greatest outcome variability [Oh S.H., Kim C.S., Kang E.J., Lee D.S., Lee H.J., Chang S.O., Ahn S.H., Hwang C.H., Park H.J., Koo J.W., 2003. Speech perception after cochlear implantation over a 4-year time period. Acta Otolaryngol. 123, 148-153]. Eleven children who underwent CI between the age of 5 and 7 1/2 years were subdivided into a good (above 65%: GOOD) and a poor (below 45%: POOR) group based on the performance in a speech perception test given 2 years after CI. The preoperative (18)F-FDG-PET (F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) images were compared between the two groups in order to examine if regional glucose metabolic difference preexisted before the CI surgery. In the GOOD group, metabolic activity was greater in diverse fronto-parietal regions compared to the POOR group. In the POOR group, the regions related to the ventral visual pathway showed greater metabolic activity relative to the GOOD group. These findings suggest that the deaf children who had developed greater executive and visuospatial functions subserved by the prefrontal and parietal cortices might be successful in auditory language learning after CI. On the contrary, greater dependency on the visual function subserved by the occipito-temporal region due to auditory deprivation may interfere with acquisition of auditory language after CI.

  13. Individual Differences in Effectiveness of Cochlear Implants in Children Who Are Prelingually Deaf: New Process Measures of Performance

    PubMed Central

    Pisoni, David B.; Cleary, Miranda; Geers, Ann E.; Tobey, Emily A.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of cochlear implants in children who are deaf has been firmly established in the literature. However, the effectiveness of cochlear implants varies widely and is influenced by demographic and experiential factors. Several key findings suggest new directions for research on central auditory factors that underlie the effectiveness of cochlear implants. First, enormous individual differences have been observed in both adults and children on a wide range of audiological outcome measures. Some patients show large increases in speech perception scores after implantation, whereas others display only modest gains on standardized tests. Second, age of implantation and length of deafness affect all outcome measures. Children implanted at younger ages do better than children implanted at older ages, and children who have been deaf for shorter periods do better than children who have been deaf for longer periods. Third, communication mode affects outcome measures. Children from “oral-only” environments do much better on standardized tests that assess phonological processing skills than children who use Total Communication. Fourth, at the present time there are no preimplant predictors of outcome performance in young children. The underlying perceptual, cognitive, and linguistic abilities and skills emerge after implantation and improve over time. Finally, there are no significant differences in audiological outcome measures among current implant devices or processing strategies. This finding suggests that the major source of variance in outcome measures lies in the neural and cognitive information processing operations that the user applies to the signal provided by the implant. Taken together, this overall pattern of results suggests that higher-level central processes such as perception, attention, learning, and memory may play important roles in explaining the large individual differences observed among users of cochlear implants. Investigations of the

  14. Auditory and verbal memory predictors of spoken language skills in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, Brigitte E; Langereis, Margreet C; van Weerdenburg, Marjolijn; Keuning, Jos; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-10-01

    Large variability in individual spoken language outcomes remains a persistent finding in the group of children with cochlear implants (CIs), particularly in their grammatical development. In the present study, we examined the extent of delay in lexical and morphosyntactic spoken language levels of children with CIs as compared to those of a normative sample of age-matched children with normal hearing. Furthermore, the predictive value of auditory and verbal memory factors in the spoken language performance of implanted children was analyzed. Thirty-nine profoundly deaf children with CIs were assessed using a test battery including measures of lexical, grammatical, auditory and verbal memory tests. Furthermore, child-related demographic characteristics were taken into account. The majority of the children with CIs did not reach age-equivalent lexical and morphosyntactic language skills. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that lexical spoken language performance in children with CIs was best predicted by age at testing, phoneme perception, and auditory word closure. The morphosyntactic language outcomes of the CI group were best predicted by lexicon, auditory word closure, and auditory memory for words. Qualitatively good speech perception skills appear to be crucial for lexical and grammatical development in children with CIs. Furthermore, strongly developed vocabulary skills and verbal memory abilities predict morphosyntactic language skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Auditory skills, language development, and adaptive behavior of children with cochlear implants and additional disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Jessica; Harris, Michael S.; Kronenberger, William G.; Holt, Rachael Frush; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the development of functional auditory skills, language, and adaptive behavior in deaf children with cochlear implants (CI) who also have additional disabilities (AD). Design A two-group, pre-test versus post-test design was used. Study sample Comparisons were made between 23 children with CIs and ADs, and an age-matched comparison group of 23 children with CIs without ADs (No-AD). Assessments were obtained pre-CI and within 12 months post-CI. Results All but two deaf children with ADs improved in auditory skills using the IT-MAIS. Most deaf children in the AD group made progress in receptive but not expressive language using the Preschool Language Scale, but their language quotients were lower than the No-AD group. Five of eight children with ADs made progress in daily living skills and socialization skills; two made progress in motor skills. Children with ADs who did not make progress in language, did show progress in adaptive behavior. Conclusions Children with deafness and ADs made progress in functional auditory skills, receptive language, and adaptive behavior. Expanded assessment that includes adaptive functioning and multi-center collaboration is recommended to best determine benefits of implantation in areas of expected growth in this clinical population. PMID:22509948

  16. Relationship between Intelligence Quotient and Musical Ability in Children with Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Soleimanifar, Simin; Jafari, Zahra; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Asadi, Houman; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Children with cochlear implants (CIs) may experience few opportunities for positive musical experiences, and musical perception is therefore often not sufficiently developed. This paper investigates and discusses the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and musical ability in children with CIs compared with children with normal hearing. This was a comparative analytical study conducted in 48 children with unilateral CI and 48 normal-hearing children, 6-8 years of age, with 'normal' IQ and no formal music training. The average IQ score in the experimental and control groups were 105.41 and 106.31, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between Raven's IQ scores in both groups. Data were collected by administering Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices IQ Tests and the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Musical Abilities (MBEMA) Test, consisting of scale, contour, interval, rhythm, and memory sections. Mean total MBEMA score in the experimental and control groups was 58.93 and 72.16 (out of 100), respectively. Significant differences were evident between scores of children with CIs in comparison with their normal-hearing peers (P≤0.001). A remarkable direct correlation between IQ and musical scores in both the control (r≥0.38) and experimental (r≥0.37) groups was observed. IQ has a noticeable effect on music processing and facilitates the perception of various musical elements. With regard to the mutual relationship between IQ and musical skills, this study illustrates the advantage of determining music perception scores and highlights the importance of appropriate musical intervention in order to enhance auditory neural plasticity, especially in children with cochlear implantation.

  17. Auditory and Visual Electrophysiology of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Implications for Cross-modal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Corina, David P.; Blau, Shane; LaMarr, Todd; Lawyer, Laurel A.; Coffey-Corina, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Deaf children who receive a cochlear implant early in life and engage in intensive oral/aural therapy often make great strides in spoken language acquisition. However, despite clinicians’ best efforts, there is a great deal of variability in language outcomes. One concern is that cortical regions which normally support auditory processing may become reorganized for visual function, leaving fewer available resources for auditory language acquisition. The conditions under which these changes occur are not well understood, but we may begin investigating this phenomenon by looking for interactions between auditory and visual evoked cortical potentials in deaf children. If children with abnormal auditory responses show increased sensitivity to visual stimuli, this may indicate the presence of maladaptive cortical plasticity. We recorded evoked potentials, using both auditory and visual paradigms, from 25 typical hearing children and 26 deaf children (ages 2–8 years) with cochlear implants. An auditory oddball paradigm was used (85% /ba/ syllables vs. 15% frequency modulated tone sweeps) to elicit an auditory P1 component. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded during presentation of an intermittent peripheral radial checkerboard while children watched a silent cartoon, eliciting a P1–N1 response. We observed reduced auditory P1 amplitudes and a lack of latency shift associated with normative aging in our deaf sample. We also observed shorter latencies in N1 VEPs to visual stimulus offset in deaf participants. While these data demonstrate cortical changes associated with auditory deprivation, we did not find evidence for a relationship between cortical auditory evoked potentials and the VEPs. This is consistent with descriptions of intra-modal plasticity within visual systems of deaf children, but do not provide evidence for cross-modal plasticity. In addition, we note that sign language experience had no effect on deaf children’s early auditory and visual

  18. Relationship between Intelligence Quotient and Musical Ability in Children with Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanifar, Simin; Jafari, Zahra; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Asadi, Houman; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Children with cochlear implants (CIs) may experience few opportunities for positive musical experiences, and musical perception is therefore often not sufficiently developed. This paper investigates and discusses the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and musical ability in children with CIs compared with children with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: This was a comparative analytical study conducted in 48 children with unilateral CI and 48 normal-hearing children, 6–8 years of age, with ‘normal’ IQ and no formal music training. The average IQ score in the experimental and control groups were 105.41 and 106.31, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between Raven’s IQ scores in both groups. Data were collected by administering Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices IQ Tests and the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Musical Abilities (MBEMA) Test, consisting of scale, contour, interval, rhythm, and memory sections. Results: Mean total MBEMA score in the experimental and control groups was 58.93 and 72.16 (out of 100), respectively. Significant differences were evident between scores of children with CIs in comparison with their normal-hearing peers (P≤0.001). A remarkable direct correlation between IQ and musical scores in both the control (r≥0.38) and experimental (r≥0.37) groups was observed. Conclusion: IQ has a noticeable effect on music processing and facilitates the perception of various musical elements. With regard to the mutual relationship between IQ and musical skills, this study illustrates the advantage of determining music perception scores and highlights the importance of appropriate musical intervention in order to enhance auditory neural plasticity, especially in children with cochlear implantation. PMID:27738611

  19. [Oral language of children with five years of experience using [corrected] cochlear implant].

    PubMed

    Stuchi, Raquel Franco; Nascimento, Leandra Tabanez do; Bevilacqua, Maria Cecília; Brito Neto, Rubens Vuono de

    2007-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) in children. 1) to delineate a profile of receptive and expressive verbal language of children who have been using cochlear implant for five years and five years and eleven months; 2) to verify the influence of time of auditory sensorial privation in the receptive and expressive verbal language of these children. 19 children users of CI with auditory deficiency acquired before language development, who have been using CI for 5y - 5y11m and who have an average time of sensorial privation of 3y (standard deviation of 1 year). These children were assessed using the Reynell Developmental Scales (RDLS) (Reynell e Gruber, 1990) which is composed of: Comprehension Scale (C), Expression Scale (E) and its Structure Sub-Scales (Es), Vocabulary (Ev) and Content (Ec). The median values and the values found for quartile 75 and quartile 25 were: .44, 57 and 54 for C; 48, 60 and 55 for E; 20, 21 and 20 for Es; 15, 19 and 17 for Ev; 15, 22 and 18 for Ec; 96, 116 and 108 for the total score. A statistical correlation between the time of sensorial privation and the score obtained for C (p=- 0.62; R=0.0044) and Ec (p=-0.48; R=0.0348) was observed. Therefore the time of sensorial privation had an influence on the overall score (p=- 0.53; R=0.0174). The language profile of children who use CI for five years is devious and similar to that of five year old hearing children regarding Expression and to that of four year old hearing regarding Comprehension; time of sensorial privation was statistically significant for the score obtained in C--receptive language--and for the score obtained in the E section (Ec)--expressive language, as well as in the overall score of RDLS.

  20. Optimization of Programming Parameters in Children with the Advanced Bionics Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Baudhuin, Jacquelyn; Cadieux, Jamie; Firszt, Jill B.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Maxson, Jerrica L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cochlear implants provide access to soft intensity sounds and therefore improved audibility for children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Speech processor programming parameters, such as threshold or T-level, Input Dynamic Range (IDR) and microphone sensitivity, contribute to the recipient’s program and influence audibility. When soundfield thresholds obtained through the speech processor are elevated, programming parameters can be modified to improve soft sound detection. Adult recipients show improved detection for low-level sounds when T-levels are set at raised levels, and show better speech understanding in quiet when wider IDRs are used. Little is known about the effects of parameter settings on detection and speech recognition in children using today’s cochlear implant technology. Purpose The overall study aim was to assess optimal T-level, IDR and sensitivity settings in pediatric recipients of the Advanced Bionics cochlear implant. Research Design Two experiments were conducted. Experiment 1 examined the effects of two T-level settings on soundfield thresholds and detection of the Ling 6 Sounds. One program set Ts at 10% of M-levels and another at 10 current units (CUs) below the level judged as “soft”. Experiment 2 examined the effects of IDR and sensitivity settings on speech recognition in quiet and noise. Study Sample Participants were eleven children 7 to 17 years of age (mean 11.3) implanted with the Advanced Bionics High Resolution 90K or CII cochlear implant system and had speech recognition scores of 20% or greater on a monosyllabic word test. Data Collection and Analysis Two T-level programs were compared for detection of the Ling Sounds and frequency modulated (FM) tones. Differing IDR/sensitivity programs (50/0, 50/10, 70/0, 70/10) were compared using Ling and FM-tone detection thresholds, CNC words at 50 dB SPL, and HINT-C sentences at 65 dB SPL in the presence of four talker babble (+8 signal-to-noise ratio). Outcomes

  1. Lexical tone perception ability of profoundly hearing-impaired children: performance of cochlear implant and hearing aid users.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathy Y S; van Hasselt, Charles Andrew; Tong, Michael C F

    2010-09-01

    In tone languages such as Cantonese, a change in tone denotes a change in lexical meaning. The present study investigates the functional benefit of hearing devices in assisting tone perception among children with profound hearing impairment. Fifty-two children with profound hearing loss were categorized into two groups based on their primary type of hearing device - a hearing aid group and cochlear implant group. A 75-item tone identification test covering all 15 Cantonese tone contrast pairs was administered to each subject under two conditions - unaided (hearing devices turned off) and aided (devices turned on). The proportion of correct responses was computed as the total score for all items and subtotal contrast scores for each of the 15 tone contrasts. The results indicated no significant differences between the children wearing hearing aids and those with cochlear implants under the unaided or the aided condition (z = -0.91, p = 0.36; z = -0.40, p = 0.69, respectively). Regardless of the type of device used, the total scores under the aided condition were higher than those under the unaided condition (z = -3.55 for the hearing aid group; z = -4.87 for the cochlear implant group, both ps < 0.01). Children wearing hearing devices generally have a satisfactory functional gain in tone perception. No major observable difference was noted between children using cochlear implants and those using hearing aids. Tone contrast pairs with dissimilar fundamental frequency at onset and dissimilar tone contour patterns were more easily identified.

  2. Suprameatal approach for cochlear implantation in children: our experience with 320 cases.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Dagan, Elad; Kronenberg, Jona

    2010-06-01

    To summarize our experience with the 320 children who underwent cochlear implantation by the suprameatal approach (SMA). The SMA involves entering the middle ear by retroauricular tympanotomy. After drilling of the cochleostomy and of the suprameatal tunnel, the electrode is passed through the suprameatal tunnel underneath to the chorda tympani and lateral to the incus into the cochleostomy. The following implant-related complications required explantation with subsequent reimplantation: foreign body reaction (0.6%), allergy to implant (0.3%), and protrusion of the positioner (0.3%). Post-traumatically displaced magnets were reinserted in 3 (0.9%) children. All the vestibular (5.3%) and wound (3.1%) problems were considered as being patient-related and resolved spontaneously or were managed conservatively. There were no surgery-related complications and no cases of mastoiditis developed among the children implanted with the SMA. The SMA enables a decreasing the rate of surgery-related complications and safe electrode insertion.

  3. Benefits and detriments of unilateral cochlear implant use on bilateral auditory development in children who are deaf.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Karen A; Jiwani, Salima; Papsin, Blake C

    2013-10-16

    We have explored both the benefits and detriments of providing electrical input through a cochlear implant in one ear to the auditory system of young children. A cochlear implant delivers electrical pulses to stimulate the auditory nerve, providing children who are deaf with access to sound. The goals of implantation are to restrict reorganization of the deprived immature auditory brain and promote development of hearing and spoken language. It is clear that limiting the duration of deprivation is a key factor. Additional considerations are the onset, etiology, and use of residual hearing as each of these can have unique effects on auditory development in the pre-implant period. New findings show that many children receiving unilateral cochlear implants are developing mature-like brainstem and thalamo-cortical responses to sound with long term use despite these sources of variability; however, there remain considerable abnormalities in cortical function. The most apparent, determined by implanting the other ear and measuring responses to acute stimulation, is a loss of normal cortical response from the deprived ear. Recent data reveal that this can be avoided in children by early implantation of both ears simultaneously or with limited delay. We conclude that auditory development requires input early in development and from both ears.

  4. Benefits and detriments of unilateral cochlear implant use on bilateral auditory development in children who are deaf

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Karen A.; Jiwani, Salima; Papsin, Blake C.

    2013-01-01

    We have explored both the benefits and detriments of providing electrical input through a cochlear implant in one ear to the auditory system of young children. A cochlear implant delivers electrical pulses to stimulate the auditory nerve, providing children who are deaf with access to sound. The goals of implantation are to restrict reorganization of the deprived immature auditory brain and promote development of hearing and spoken language. It is clear that limiting the duration of deprivation is a key factor. Additional considerations are the onset, etiology, and use of residual hearing as each of these can have unique effects on auditory development in the pre-implant period. New findings show that many children receiving unilateral cochlear implants are developing mature-like brainstem and thalamo-cortical responses to sound with long term use despite these sources of variability; however, there remain considerable abnormalities in cortical function. The most apparent, determined by implanting the other ear and measuring responses to acute stimulation, is a loss of normal cortical response from the deprived ear. Recent data reveal that this can be avoided in children by early implantation of both ears simultaneously or with limited delay. We conclude that auditory development requires input early in development and from both ears. PMID:24137143

  5. The effect of cochlear implantation in development of intelligence quotient of 6-9 deaf children in comparison with normal hearing children (Iran, 2009-2011).

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Seyed Basir; Monshizadeh, Leila

    2012-06-01

    Before the introduction of cochlear implant (CI) in 1980, hearing aids were the only means by which profoundly deaf children had access to auditory stimuli. Nowadays, CI is firmly established as effective option in speech and language rehabilitation of deaf children, but much of the literature regarding outcomes for children after CI are focused on development of speech and less is known about language acquisition. So, the main aim of this study is the evaluation of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) of cochlear implanted children in comparison with normal children. 30 cochlear implanted and 30 normal hearing children with similar socio-economic level at the same age were compared by a revised version (in Persian) of WISC test (Wechsler, 1991). Then the data were analyzed through SPSS software 16. In spite of the fact that cochlear implanted children did well in different parameters of WISC test, the average scores of this group was less than normal hearing children. But in similarities (one of the parameters of WISC test) 2 group's performance was approximately the same. CI plays an important role in development of verbal IQ and language acquisition of deaf children. Different researches indicate that most of the cochlear implanted children show less language delay during the time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Auditory and speech performance in deaf children with deaf parents after cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Young; Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Eun Yeon; Chung, Eun-Wook; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chung, Won-Ho; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the auditory and speech outcome in deaf children with deaf parents (CDP) after cochlear implantation (CI), emphasizing both the presence of additional caregiver and patients' main communication mode. Retrospective case review. Cochlear implant center at a tertiary referral hospital. Fourteen CDP and 14 age- and sex-matched deaf children with normal-hearing parents (CNH). The Korean version of Ling's stage (K-Ling) and Category of Auditory Perception (CAP) were administered to the children to assess the speech production and auditory perception abilities, preoperatively and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after CI. To elucidate the effects of the additional caregiver and main communication mode of the implanted child, the patients were divided into the following groups: with additional caregiver(s) who have normal hearing (n = 11) versus without additional caregiver (n = 3); sign language plus oral communication (S+O) group (n = 9) versus oral communication only (O) group (n = 5). CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved remarkably in both CDP and CNH, and no significant differences were found between the 2 groups. Within the CDP group, CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved significantly in CDP with an additional caregiver than those without. Auditory perception and speech production performances in the S+O group were similar to those in the O group. CDP can develop similarly to CNH in auditory perception and speech production, if an additional caregiver with normal hearing provides sufficient support and speech input. In addition, using sign language in addition to oral language might not be harmful, and these children can be a communication bridge between their deaf parents and society.

  7. Deaf parents of cochlear-implanted children: beliefs on bimodal bilingualism.

    PubMed

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf (1) families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted. The majority of the Deaf families exhibited positive beliefs toward bimodal bilingualism, where they set high expectations for their children to become equally fluent in both languages. However, their perspectives about the purpose for each language differed; they viewed English as a "survival language" and ASL as a "cultural language" but supported the use of both languages at home as part of their children's lives. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cochlear implantation in children with "CHARGE syndrome": surgical options and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Giampietro; Trabalzini, Franco; Faralli, Mario; D'Ascanio, Luca; Cristi, Cristina; Molini, Egisto

    2014-03-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare, polymalformative disease, representing one of the major causes of associated blindness and deafness. Bilateral, severe-profound, sensorineural hearing loss is common in CHARGE children. Aim of this study is to present our results in children with "CHARGE syndrome" submitted to cochlear implantation (CI). The frequency of anatomic anomalies, possible variations in the surgical technique of CI, and the audiological/rehabilitative benefits attained in our patients are reported. we submitted 5 children affected by CHARGE syndrome with profound, bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss to CI. Otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem response, acoustic impedance testing, cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance were carried out preoperatively in all children. CI was performed using the mastoidotomy-posterior tympanotomy approach in two cases, and the suprameatal approach in three children. Infant toddler-meaningful auditory integration scale was used to evaluate kid's audiological performance before and after CI. Intra-operatory findings and postsurgical complications were evaluated. Among our patients, intraoperative anatomical malformations were cochlear hypoplasia (100 %), ossicles malformations (100 %), semicircular canals aplasia (100 %), oval window atresia (60 %), round window atresia (40 %), widening of the aqueduct of the vestibule (20 %), and aberrant course of the facial nerve (20 %). No intra- or postoperative complication was recorded in relation to implant positioning. After a follow-up ranging from 1 to 4.5 years, only 2/5 patients used oral language as the sole mean of communication, 1 started utilizing oral language as the main mean of communication, while 2 patients did not develop any linguistic ability. In conclusion, CI in patients with CHARGE association is feasible and, despite results variability, it should be carried out in CHARGE children with severe hearing loss as soon as possible. Although the selection of a

  9. Correlation of neurocognitive processing subtypes with language performance in young children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ulanet, Patricia Gates; Carson, Christine M; Mellon, Nancy K; Niparko, John K; Ouellette, Meredith

    2014-07-01

    Test data were used to explore the neurocognitive processing of a group of children with cochlear implants (CIs) whose language development is below expectations. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between neurocognitive processing, as assessed by the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition, and verbal language standard scores, assessed using either the Comprehensive Assessment of Spoken Language or the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals in 22 school-age children with CIs. Processing scores of CI recipients with language scores below expectations were compared to those of children meeting or exceeding language expectations. Multiple linear regression estimated the associations of simultaneous and sequential processing with language scores. Though simultaneous processing scores between the two groups were similar, the mean sequential processing score (91.2) in the below expectations group (n = 13) was significantly lower (P = 0.002) than that of children (n = 9) meeting expectations (110.8). After adjusting for age at implantation, a 10-point higher sequential processing score was associated with a 7.4 higher language score (P = 0.027). Simultaneous processing capacity was at least within the average range of cognitive performance, and was not associated with language performance in children with CIs. Conversely, reduced sequential processing capacity was significantly associated with lower language scores. Neurocognitive skills, specifically cognitive sequencing, serial ordering, and auditory-verbal memory may be targets for therapeutic intervention. Intensive cognitive and educational habilitation and in milieu intervention may improve language learning in children with CIs.

  10. Will They Catch Up? The Role of Age at Cochlear Implantation in the Spoken Language Development of Children with Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, Johanna Grant; Geers, Ann E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined the benefits of younger cochlear implantation, longer cochlear implant use, and greater pre-implant aided hearing to spoken language at 3.5 and 4.5 years of age. Method: Language samples were obtained at ages 3.5 and 4.5 years from 76 children who received an implant by their 3rd birthday. Hierarchical linear modeling…

  11. Will They Catch Up? The Role of Age at Cochlear Implantation in the Spoken Language Development of Children with Severe to Profound Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, Johanna Grant; Geers, Ann E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors examined the benefits of younger cochlear implantation, longer cochlear implant use, and greater pre-implant aided hearing to spoken language at 3.5 and 4.5 years of age. Method: Language samples were obtained at ages 3.5 and 4.5 years from 76 children who received an implant by their 3rd birthday. Hierarchical linear modeling…

  12. How Do Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants Manage to Read Sentences: The Key Word Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domínguez, Ana-Belén; Carrillo, María-Soledad; González, Virginia; Alegria, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms used by deaf children with and without cochlear implants (CIs) to read sentences and the linguistic bases (vocabulary and syntax) underlying those reading mechanisms. Previous studies have shown that deaf persons read sentences using the key word strategy (KWS), which consists of identifying some…

  13. Deaf Families with Children Who Have Cochlear Implants: Perspectives and Beliefs on Bilingualism in American Sign Language and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2012-01-01

    This study examines Deaf parents with children who have cochlear implants on their beliefs and perspectives of bilingualism in American Sign Language and English using complementary mixed methods through surveys and follow-up interviews. Seventeen families participated in the survey and eight families continued their participation in semi-formal…

  14. Language Processing in Children with Cochlear Implants: A Preliminary Report on Lexical Access for Production and Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Steinman, Susan; Ying, Elizabeth; Mystal, Elana Ying; Houston, Derek M.

    2013-01-01

    In this plenary paper, we present a review of language research in children with cochlear implants along with an outline of a 5-year project designed to examine the lexical access for production and recognition. The project will use auditory priming, picture naming with auditory or visual interfering stimuli (Picture-Word Interference and…

  15. Deaf Families with Children Who Have Cochlear Implants: Perspectives and Beliefs on Bilingualism in American Sign Language and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2012-01-01

    This study examines Deaf parents with children who have cochlear implants on their beliefs and perspectives of bilingualism in American Sign Language and English using complementary mixed methods through surveys and follow-up interviews. Seventeen families participated in the survey and eight families continued their participation in semi-formal…

  16. Reading and Reading-Related Skills in Children Using Cochlear Implants: Prospects for the Influence of Cued Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouton, Sophie; Bertoncini, Josiane; Serniclaes, Willy; Cole, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the reading and reading-related skills (phonemic awareness and phonological short-term memory) of deaf children fitted with cochlear implants (CI), either exposed to cued speech early (before 2 years old) (CS+) or never (CS-). Their performance was compared to that of 2 hearing control groups, 1 matched for reading level (RL), and 1…

  17. Efficacy of the Discreteness of Voicing Category (DOVC) Measure for Characterizing Voicing Errors in Children with Cochlear Implants: A Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bharadwaj, Sneha V.; Graves, Amanda G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation explored the utility of an acoustic measure, called the discreteness of voicing category (DOVC), in identifying voicing errors in stop consonants produced by children with cochlear implants. Another objective was to examine the perceptual relevance of the DOVC measure and 2 commonly used voice onset time (VOT)-based…

  18. Reading and Reading-Related Skills in Children Using Cochlear Implants: Prospects for the Influence of Cued Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouton, Sophie; Bertoncini, Josiane; Serniclaes, Willy; Cole, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the reading and reading-related skills (phonemic awareness and phonological short-term memory) of deaf children fitted with cochlear implants (CI), either exposed to cued speech early (before 2 years old) (CS+) or never (CS-). Their performance was compared to that of 2 hearing control groups, 1 matched for reading level (RL), and 1…

  19. Language Processing in Children with Cochlear Implants: A Preliminary Report on Lexical Access for Production and Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Steinman, Susan; Ying, Elizabeth; Mystal, Elana Ying; Houston, Derek M.

    2013-01-01

    In this plenary paper, we present a review of language research in children with cochlear implants along with an outline of a 5-year project designed to examine the lexical access for production and recognition. The project will use auditory priming, picture naming with auditory or visual interfering stimuli (Picture-Word Interference and…

  20. How Do Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants Manage to Read Sentences: The Key Word Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domínguez, Ana-Belén; Carrillo, María-Soledad; González, Virginia; Alegria, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms used by deaf children with and without cochlear implants (CIs) to read sentences and the linguistic bases (vocabulary and syntax) underlying those reading mechanisms. Previous studies have shown that deaf persons read sentences using the key word strategy (KWS), which consists of identifying some…

  1. Social Participation of Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants: A Qualitative Analysis of Parent, Teacher, and Child Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Renee; Hyde, Merv

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial factors, including socioemotional well-being, peer relationships, and social inclusion with hearing and deaf peers, are increasingly becoming a focus of research investigating children with cochlear implants. The study reported here extends the largely quantitative findings of previous research through a qualitative analysis of…

  2. Social Participation of Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants: A Qualitative Analysis of Parent, Teacher, and Child Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punch, Renee; Hyde, Merv

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial factors, including socioemotional well-being, peer relationships, and social inclusion with hearing and deaf peers, are increasingly becoming a focus of research investigating children with cochlear implants. The study reported here extends the largely quantitative findings of previous research through a qualitative analysis of…

  3. The Role of Sign Language for Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Good Practice in Sign Bilingual Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanwick, Ruth; Tsverik, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    A central feature of a sign bilingual approach is the use of sign language, and the associated role of deaf adults in deaf children's education. This project explores whether this approach is compatible with the goals of cochlear implantation, which are to maximise a deaf child's potential to hear and improve speech perception. There is no…

  4. Music Therapy for Preschool Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Kenworthy, Maura; Van Voorst, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides research and clinical information relevant to music therapy for preschool children who use cochlear implants (CI). It consolidates information from various disciplinary sources regarding (a) cochlear implantation of young prelingually-deaf children (~age 2-5), (b) patterns of auditory and speech-language development, and (c) research regarding music perception of children with CIs. This information serves as a foundation for the final portion of the article, which describes typical music therapy goals and examples of interventions suitable for preschool children. PMID:23904691

  5. Binaural fusion and listening effort in children who use bilateral cochlear implants: a psychoacoustic and pupillometric study.

    PubMed

    Steel, Morrison M; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants aim to provide hearing to both ears for children who are deaf and promote binaural/spatial hearing. Benefits are limited by mismatched devices and unilaterally-driven development which could compromise the normal integration of left and right ear input. We thus asked whether children hear a fused image (ie. 1 vs 2 sounds) from their bilateral implants and if this "binaural fusion" reduces listening effort. Binaural fusion was assessed by asking 25 deaf children with cochlear implants and 24 peers with normal hearing whether they heard one or two sounds when listening to bilaterally presented acoustic click-trains/electric pulses (250 Hz trains of 36 ms presented at 1 Hz). Reaction times and pupillary changes were recorded simultaneously to measure listening effort. Bilaterally implanted children heard one image of bilateral input less frequently than normal hearing peers, particularly when intensity levels on each side were balanced. Binaural fusion declined as brainstem asymmetries increased and age at implantation decreased. Children implanted later had access to acoustic input prior to implantation due to progressive deterioration of hearing. Increases in both pupil diameter and reaction time occurred as perception of binaural fusion decreased. Results indicate that, without binaural level cues, children have difficulty fusing input from their bilateral implants to perceive one sound which costs them increased listening effort. Brainstem asymmetries exacerbate this issue. By contrast, later implantation, reflecting longer access to bilateral acoustic hearing, may have supported development of auditory pathways underlying binaural fusion. Improved integration of bilateral cochlear implant signals for children is required to improve their binaural hearing.

  6. Binaural Fusion and Listening Effort in Children Who Use Bilateral Cochlear Implants: A Psychoacoustic and Pupillometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Morrison M.; Papsin, Blake C.; Gordon, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants aim to provide hearing to both ears for children who are deaf and promote binaural/spatial hearing. Benefits are limited by mismatched devices and unilaterally-driven development which could compromise the normal integration of left and right ear input. We thus asked whether children hear a fused image (ie. 1 vs 2 sounds) from their bilateral implants and if this “binaural fusion” reduces listening effort. Binaural fusion was assessed by asking 25 deaf children with cochlear implants and 24 peers with normal hearing whether they heard one or two sounds when listening to bilaterally presented acoustic click-trains/electric pulses (250 Hz trains of 36 ms presented at 1 Hz). Reaction times and pupillary changes were recorded simultaneously to measure listening effort. Bilaterally implanted children heard one image of bilateral input less frequently than normal hearing peers, particularly when intensity levels on each side were balanced. Binaural fusion declined as brainstem asymmetries increased and age at implantation decreased. Children implanted later had access to acoustic input prior to implantation due to progressive deterioration of hearing. Increases in both pupil diameter and reaction time occurred as perception of binaural fusion decreased. Results indicate that, without binaural level cues, children have difficulty fusing input from their bilateral implants to perceive one sound which costs them increased listening effort. Brainstem asymmetries exacerbate this issue. By contrast, later implantation, reflecting longer access to bilateral acoustic hearing, may have supported development of auditory pathways underlying binaural fusion. Improved integration of bilateral cochlear implant signals for children is required to improve their binaural hearing. PMID:25668423

  7. The Relation Between Child Versus Parent Report of Chronic Fatigue and Language/Literacy Skills in School-Age Children with Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Werfel, Krystal L; Hendricks, Alison Eisel

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that children with hearing loss experience elevated levels of chronic fatigue compared with children with normal hearing. Chronic fatigue is associated with decreased academic performance in many clinical populations. Children with cochlear implants as a group exhibit deficits in language and literacy skills; however, the relation between chronic fatigue and language and literacy skills for children with cochlear implants is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore subjective ratings of chronic fatigue by children with cochlear implants and their parents, as well as the relation between chronic fatigue and language and literacy skills in this population. Nineteen children with cochlear implants in grades 3 to 6 and one of their parents separately completed a subjective chronic fatigue scale, on which they rated how much the child experienced physical, sleep/rest, and cognitive fatigue over the past month. In addition, children completed an assessment battery that included measures of speech perception, oral language, word reading, and spelling. Children and parents reported different levels of chronic child physical and sleep/rest fatigue. In both cases, parents reported significantly less fatigue than did children. Children and parents did not report different levels of chronic child cognitive fatigue. Child report of physical fatigue was related to speech perception, language, reading, and spelling. Child report of sleep/rest and cognitive fatigue was related to speech perception and language but not to reading or spelling. Parent report of child fatigue was not related to children's language and literacy skills. Taken as a whole, results suggested that parents under-estimate the fatigue experienced by children with cochlear implants. Child report of physical fatigue was robustly related to language and literacy skills. Children with cochlear implants are likely more accurate at reporting physical fatigue than cognitive

  8. Identifying emotions in music through electrical hearing in deaf children using cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hopyan, T; Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C

    2011-02-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) devices are the choice of treatment for individuals with severe to profound hearing loss. The CI devices provide the opportunity for children who are deaf to perceive sound by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve, with the goal of optimizing oral communication. A natural benefit of acquiring hearing using CIs is the ability to hear, and perhaps enjoy, music. Music is a non-verbal auditory stimulus and a powerful tool for transmitting emotion. Identifying emotional cues is an important part of normal social development and communication and thus music may play an important role in establishing these skills during development. To date, it is not known whether children who use cochlear implants to hear can identify the emotional content carried in music. Our objective in the present study was to determine whether children who have been deaf from infancy and are experienced CI users have acquired the ability to identify emotion in musical phrases. Study participants were 18 CI users (ages 7-13 years) who received right unilateral CIs (mean age at CI activation of 2.9 years) and 18 age-and gender-matched controls. Participants were asked to judge 32 brief musical excerpts as happy or sad by pointing to simple graphics of a smiling or frowning face. Children using CIs were able to correctly distinguish happy versus sad music well above chance levels, but performed more poorly on this task than their peers with typical hearing. Age at CI activation and time since CI activation were both uncorrelated with outcome measures. Children with CIs show the ability to perceive emotion in music but do so less accurately than typically hearing peers.

  9. Visuomotor integration ability of pre-lingually deaf children predicts audiological outcome with a cochlear implant: a first report.

    PubMed

    Horn, David L; Davis, Rebecca A O; Pisoni, David B; Miyamoto, Richard T

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the predictive relations between pre-implant visuomotor integration ability and subsequent oral speech/language outcomes in prelingually deaf children who use cochlear implants (CIs). Prior to implantation, children were given a task that tested their accuracy in copying geometric forms. Performance on this task predicted speech perception, sentence comprehension, and speech intelligibility outcomes over 3 years of CI use. We conclude that individual differences in visuomotor integration ability are predictive of some audiological outcome measures in deaf children with CIs.

  10. Visuomotor integration ability of pre-lingually deaf children predicts audiological outcome with a cochlear implant: a first report

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David L.; Davis, Rebecca A.O.; Pisoni, David B.; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the predictive relations between pre-implant visuomotor integration ability and subsequent oral speech/language outcomes in prelingually deaf children who use cochlear implants (CIs). Prior to implantation, children were given a task that tested their accuracy in copying geometric forms. Performance on this task predicted speech perception, sentence comprehension, and speech intelligibility outcomes over 3 years of CI use. We conclude that individual differences in visuomotor integration ability are predictive of some audiological outcome measures in deaf children with CIs. PMID:23060686

  11. Speech timing and working memory in profoundly deaf children after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Rose A; Pisoni, David B

    2003-05-01

    Thirty-seven profoundly deaf children between 8- and 9-years-old with cochlear implants and a comparison group of normal-hearing children were studied to measure speaking rates, digit spans, and speech timing during digit span recall. The deaf children displayed longer sentence durations and pauses during recall and shorter digit spans compared to the normal-hearing children. Articulation rates, measured from sentence durations, were strongly correlated with immediate memory span in both normal-hearing and deaf children, indicating that both slower subvocal rehearsal and scanning processes may be factors that contribute to the deaf children's shorter digit spans. These findings demonstrate that subvocal verbal rehearsal speed and memory scanning processes are not only dependent on chronological age as suggested in earlier research by. Instead, in this clinical population the absence of early auditory experience and phonological processing activities before implantation appears to produce measurable effects on the working memory processes that rely on verbal rehearsal and serial scanning of phonological information in short-term memory.

  12. Speech intelligibility in deaf children after long-term cochlear implant use.

    PubMed

    Montag, Jessica L; AuBuchon, Angela M; Pisoni, David B; Kronenberger, William G

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated long-term speech intelligibility outcomes in 63 prelingually deaf children, adolescents, and young adults who received cochlear implants (CIs) before age 7 (M = 2;11 [years;months], range = 0;8-6;3) and used their implants for at least 7 years (M = 12;1, range = 7;0-22;5). Speech intelligibility was assessed using playback methods with naïve, normal-hearing listeners. Mean intelligibility scores were lower than scores obtained from an age- and nonverbal IQ-matched, normal-hearing control sample, although the majority of CI users scored within the range of the control sample. Our sample allowed us to investigate the contribution of several demographic and cognitive factors to speech intelligibility. CI users who used their implant for longer periods of time exhibited poorer speech intelligibility scores. Crucially, results from a hierarchical regression model suggested that this difference was due to more conservative candidacy criteria in CI users with more years of use. No other demographic variables accounted for significant variance in speech intelligibility scores beyond age of implantation and amount of spoken language experience (assessed by communication mode and family income measures). Many factors that have been found to contribute to individual differences in language outcomes in normal-hearing children also contribute to long-term CI users' ability to produce intelligible speech.

  13. Point vowel duration in children with hearing aids and cochlear implants at four and five years of age

    PubMed Central

    VanDam, Mark; Ide-Helvie, Dana; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates developmental aspects of the duration of point vowels in children with normal hearing compared to those with hearing aids and cochlear implants at four and five years of age. Younger children produced longer vowels than older children, and children with hearing loss produced longer and more variable vowels than their normal hearing peers. In the current study, children with hearing aids and cochlear implants did not perform differently from each other. Test age and hearing loss did not interact, indicating parallel but delayed development in children with hearing loss compared with their typically-developing peers. Variability was found to be concentrated among the high vowels /u, i/ but not in the low vowels /æ, /. The broad findings of the present work are consistent with previous reports and contribute a detailed description of point vowel duration not in the literature. PMID:21456950

  14. Auditory, speech and language development in young children with cochlear implants compared with children with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Bianka; Bohnert, Andrea; Keilmann, Annerose

    2010-07-01

    This study had two aims: (1) to document the auditory and lexical development of children who are deaf and received the first cochlear implant (CI) by the age of 16 months and the second CI by the age of 31 months and (2) to compare these children's results with those of children with normal hearing (NH). This longitudinal study included five children with NH and five with sensorineural deafness. All children of the second group were observed for 36 months after the first fitting of the device (cochlear implant). The auditory development of the CI group was documented every 3 months up to the age of two years in hearing age and chronological age and for the NH group in chronological age. The language development of each NH child was assessed at 12, 18, 24 and 36 months of chronological age. Children with CIs were examined at the same age intervals at chronological and hearing age. In both groups, children showed individual patterns of auditory and language development. The children with CIs developed differently in the amount of receptive and expressive vocabulary compared with the NH control group. Three children in the CI group needed almost 6 months to make gains in speech development that were consistent with what would be expected for their chronological age. Overall, the receptive and expressive development in all children of the implanted group increased with their hearing age. These results indicate that early identification and early implantation is advisable to give children with sensorineural hearing loss a realistic chance to develop satisfactory expressive and receptive vocabulary and also to develop stable phonological, morphological and syntactical skills for school life. On the basis of these longitudinal data, we will be able to develop new diagnostic tools that enable clinicians to assess child's progress in hearing and speech development. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  16. How Children with Normal Hearing and Children with a Cochlear Implant Use Mentalizing Vocabulary and Other Evaluative Expressions in Their Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Kerttu; Ryder, Nuala

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the use of mental state and emotion terms and other evaluative expressions in the story generation of 65 children (aged 2-8 years) with normal hearing (NH) and 11 children (aged 3-7 years) using a cochlear implant (CI). Children generated stories on the basis of sets of sequential pictures. The stories of the children with CI…

  17. How Children with Normal Hearing and Children with a Cochlear Implant Use Mentalizing Vocabulary and Other Evaluative Expressions in Their Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Kerttu; Ryder, Nuala

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the use of mental state and emotion terms and other evaluative expressions in the story generation of 65 children (aged 2-8 years) with normal hearing (NH) and 11 children (aged 3-7 years) using a cochlear implant (CI). Children generated stories on the basis of sets of sequential pictures. The stories of the children with CI…

  18. Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifang; Su, Yanjie; Yan, Song

    2016-01-01

    Facial expression recognition (FER) is an important aspect of effective interpersonal communication. In order to explore whether the development of FER was delayed in hearing impaired children, 44 child participants completed labeling, and matching tasks to identify four basic emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, and fear). Twenty-two participants had either a cochlear implant (CI) or a hearing aid (HA) while 22 had normal hearing and participants were matched across conditions by age and gender. The results showed that children with a CI or HA were developmentally delayed not only in their emotion-labeling (verbal) tasks but also in their emotion-matching (nonverbal) tasks. For all participants, the emotion-labeling task was more difficult than the emotion-matching task. Additionally, the relative difficulty of recognizing four different emotional expressions was similar between verbal and nonverbal tasks.

  19. Binaural squelch and head shadow effects in children with unilateral cochlear implants and contralateral hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Dincer D'Alessandro, H; Sennaroğlu, G; Yücel, E; Belgin, E; Mancini, P

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of binaural squelch effect (BSE) and head shadow effect (HSE) in children who use unilateral cochlear implants (CI) and contralateral hearing aids (HA). The study group consisted of 19 CI recipient children who consistently wore a contralateral HA. Speech sounds were used to evaluate speech perception performance in noise. Testing was performed in three listening conditions: (1) bimodal listening with noise source on HA side; (2) CI only with noise source contralaterally (HA off); (3) CI only with noise source on the CI side. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between the three listening conditions and post hoc tests indicated significant differences for all pairwise comparisons (p < 0.001). The average BSE and HSE were 11.8% and 17.1% respectively. The majority of bimodal CI users showed BSE and HSE with significant speech perception improvement in the presence of noise.

  20. Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifang; Su, Yanjie; Yan, Song

    2016-01-01

    Facial expression recognition (FER) is an important aspect of effective interpersonal communication. In order to explore whether the development of FER was delayed in hearing impaired children, 44 child participants completed labeling, and matching tasks to identify four basic emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, and fear). Twenty-two participants had either a cochlear implant (CI) or a hearing aid (HA) while 22 had normal hearing and participants were matched across conditions by age and gender. The results showed that children with a CI or HA were developmentally delayed not only in their emotion-labeling (verbal) tasks but also in their emotion-matching (nonverbal) tasks. For all participants, the emotion-labeling task was more difficult than the emotion-matching task. Additionally, the relative difficulty of recognizing four different emotional expressions was similar between verbal and nonverbal tasks. PMID:28066306