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Sample records for chimici dalla sovrapressione

  1. The Dallas Express

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Bill J.

    1972-01-01

    Dallas County Community College District, seven years old and the largest district in Texas, responds to its fast-moving metropolitan area by anticipating needs of employers, offering programs for underprivileged youth and combining top-notch professionals with excellent facilities. (MN)

  2. A Dallas Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Nolan

    The East Oak Cliff Subdistrict in Dallas has sought to improve its educational program through a commitment to making the pluralistic setting of the urban school an asset. The major goals of the district are to create a school and community climate which affirms education and multicultural experiences; to implement a more effective delivery system…

  3. Dallas's Nonprofit Foundation Founders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Dan

    1979-01-01

    Describes the scandals that have destroyed the Foundation for Quality Education, the foundation the Dallas (Texas) school district created to raise money for the schools through real estate management and the marketing of school-system-developed curriculum materials. (Author/IRT)

  4. Sixty Years Ago in Dallas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shermis, S. Samuel

    1987-01-01

    Several questions and issues addressed sixty years ago at the NCSS conference in Dallas are indistinguishable from present concerns, which focus on three concepts: citizenship, social studies/social science, and how to define social problems. Concludes that the social studies movement was predisposed to work at cross-purposes because of the…

  5. EPA Administrator Visits Childrens Health Group in Dallas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (April 10, 2015) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy recently visited health professionals working to address childhood asthma in the Dallas area. With 60,000 children in Dallas County diagnosed with asthm

  6. EPA Hosts Superfund Redevelopment Awards Ceremony in West Dallas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Nov. 10, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is presenting the Excellence in Site Reuse Award to the Dallas Housing Authority and Goodwill Industries of Dallas, Inc. for redeveloping portions of the RSR Corporation Superfu

  7. Dallas and Ft. Worth, Texas, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-85-032 (28 April-6 May 1991) --- A large portion of the Dallas - Fort Worth metropolitan area is seen in this 70mm frame, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Discovery. Hold photograph with the Dallas - Ft. Worth Airport directly above the center point of the picture so that north will be at the top. Compared with Apollo 6 pictures made 23 years earlier (April 1968), this photo indicates notable growth in the municipalities between Dallas and Ft. Worth as well as great outer growth of the two cities. (Most of the western portions of Ft. Worth did not make it into this frame). Easily recognizable bodies of water are Grapevine Lake and North Lake (both near the huge airport), Mountain Creek Lake (southwest of Dallas), Lake Arlington (southeast of Ft. Worth) and the Trinity River which flows southward to the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. 78 FR 4356 - Proposed Modification of the Dallas/Fort Worth Class B Airspace Area; TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) and Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL) within Class... ] and from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and Dallas Love Field Airport within Class B...

  9. EPA Recognizes Dallas Stars for Reducing Food Waste

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Jan. 29, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recognized the Dallas Stars of the National Hockey League for the team's achievements in reducing food waste. The Stars participated in EPA's Food Recovery Challenge, w

  10. EPA Administrator, Dallas Mayor, Toyota, and Wyland Foundation Celebrate Dallas Winning the National Mayors Water Challenge

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (April 9, 2015) Population growth, extreme weather patterns, drought and infrastructure all threaten access to a steady, sustainable water supply in the United States. Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina

  11. Solar-Heated Office Building -- Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar heating system designed to supply 87 percent of space heating and 100 percent of potable hot-water needs of large office building in Dallas, Texas. Unique feature of array serves as roofing over office lobby and gives building attractive triangular appearance. Report includes basic system drawings, test data, operating procedures, and maintenance instructions.

  12. The West Dallas Teacher Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Texas State Univ., Denton.

    The West Dallas Teacher Education Program is a competency-based program to better prepare teachers for service in inner-city schools. The program utilizes a field-based, professional semester format to directly relate didactic instruction and clinical practice. The project is staffed by three North Texas State University faculty members.…

  13. The Teacher Education Center: Dallas Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Robert L., Jr.; Savage, Keith D.

    1973-01-01

    The Dallas Independent School District and East Texas State University have teamed up to provide a training program for pre- and in-service teachers designed to teach them to use alternative learning strategies to meet the individual needs of students from multicultural backgrounds. (Editor)

  14. Dallas-Ft. Worth area as seen from Apollo 9

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-09

    AS09-21-3299 (3-13 March 1969) --- Dallas-Fort Worth area as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its Earth-orbital mission. The superhighways leading out of two cities are clearly visible. The largest body of water north of Dallas is the Garza-Little Elm Reservoir. Cedar Creek Reservoir is located to the southeast of Dallas. The City of Denton is near left center edge of picture at junction of two highways leading from Fort Worth and Dallas.

  15. 75 FR 16514 - Maxim Integrated Products, Formerly Known as Dallas Semiconductor, Dallas, TX; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... certification for workers of the subject firm. The workers produced integrated circuits (analog and mixed signal... shift in production of integrated circuits (analog and mixed ] signal) to Japan, Thailand and the... Employment and Training Administration Maxim Integrated Products, Formerly Known as Dallas Semiconductor...

  16. "Dallas": The Mythology of Crime and the Moral Occult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mander, Mary S.

    The mythic structure of the popular television melodrama, "Dallas," may be analyzed in order to shed light on the reasons underlying the program's wide appeal. First of all, "Dallas" combines the conventions of the crime formula in such a way as to create a new mythology of crime for television, one similar to that found in the…

  17. "Dallas": The Mythology of Crime and the Moral Occult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mander, Mary S.

    The mythic structure of the popular television melodrama, "Dallas," may be analyzed in order to shed light on the reasons underlying the program's wide appeal. First of all, "Dallas" combines the conventions of the crime formula in such a way as to create a new mythology of crime for television, one similar to that found in the…

  18. President Kennedy in Dallas: Dealey Plaza memorialized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    2007-07-01

    The assassination of US President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 transformed the US political landscape as well as the trajectory of subsequent world history. The venue of that tragic event in Dallas was Dealey Plaza, encompassing the "grassy knoll" and the adjacent book-depository and courthouse buildings. For the past forty years the site has undergone a series of conservation/preservation projects in order to make it more suitable for those visiting either in homage or out of curiosity. One such project concerned the deterioration of ironwork within the "Old Red Courthouse". The building architect noted that both stairway railings and floor-support trusses were corroding and deteriorating at accelerating rates. In most situations of this sort the iron would be sandblasted and repainted. However, in this instance sandblasting was inappropriate due to environmental concerns and logistical limitations. Furthermore, historical authenticity criteria dictated that the metal be preserved with its original unpainted finish. In order to avoid excessive floor loading (in this fragile old building) and the generation significant environmental air pollution (within urban Dallas) the general contractor (Avery Mays, Inc.) opted to evaluate photonic divestment. Both laser cleaning and laser glazing were assessed for efficacy and cost effectiveness. Xenon-flashlamp irradiation was evaluated both with and without citric acid augmentation. Citric acid matrix-assisted flashlamp treatment was selected for the preservation of the courthouse ironwork. This decision was based on three advantages over laser treatments: higher speed and cost effectiveness, preservation of the historic "Oliver Foundry" logo markings, and the chemical passivation and rust resistance of the final surface patina.

  19. Community-Oriented Primary Care in Action: A Dallas Story

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Sue; Boumbulian, Paul; Anderson, Ron J.; Ross, Samuel; Phillips, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Dallas County, Texas, is the site of the largest urban application of the community-oriented primary care (COPC) model in the United States. We summarize the development and implementation of Dallas’s Parkland Health & Hospital System COPC program. The complexities of implementing and managing this comprehensive community-based program are delineated in terms of Dallas County’s political environment and the components of COPC (assessment, prioritization, community collaboration, health care system, evaluation, and financing). Steps to be taken to ensure the future growth and development of the Dallas program are also considered. The COPC model, as implemented by Parkland, is replicable in other urban areas. PMID:12406794

  20. Medical City introduces new magazine for Dallas community.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Medical City, Dallas, launches a quarterly magazine titled, IN: Mind Body Life, as the final phase in its two-year branding campaign. In search of a unique style, the hospital worked with American Airlines' publishing house, AAP Custom.

  1. RadNet Air Data From Dallas, TX

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Dallas, TX from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  2. Level of acculturation and hypertension among Dallas County Hispanics: findings from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Patrice A C; Willett, Duwayne L

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether the prevalence of hypertension differs by acculturation status among Hispanics in Dallas County, Texas. The authors test the hypothesis that compared with those of low acculturation, those of mid- and high-level acculturation will be at greater risk for having hypertension. Conducted from July 2000 through October 2002, the Dallas Heart Study (DHS) is a general population cross-sectional study of cardiovascular risk factors among Dallas County residents. These analyses focus on the 1163 DHS participants who self-reported Hispanic ethnicity, completed a household interview, and had blood pressures measured. Acculturation was assessed with a validated 12-item scale that measured the following dimensions of cultural adaptation: language; media preference; social interaction; and ease of relationships with those of other ethnicities. The majority of participants were born in Mexico (57.5%) and ranged in age from 18 to 65 years (mean age 33 years). Women made up just under half of the sample (47.81%). The unadjusted prevalence of hypertension was 9.78%. When age-adjusted for the 2000 US Standard Population, the prevalence was 17.27%. The chi(2) analysis showed that those of low acculturation were significantly less likely to have hypertension (6.05%) than those of mid- and high-level acculturation (10.78% and 12.80%, respectively). After controlling for the effects of possible confounders (i.e., sociodemographic factors, health care access and utilization, health behaviors, and health status), logistic regression showed that when compared with Hispanics of low acculturation, those of middle and high acculturation were at greater risk of having hypertension (OR=3.04, 95% CI, 1.27, 7.29 and OR=2.62, 95% CI, 1.04, 6.59, respectively). These findings demonstrate that acculturation is significantly associated with hypertensive status.

  3. Iterated transportation simulations for Dallas and Portland

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Simon, P.; Rickert, M.; Esser, J.

    1998-09-02

    The goal of the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) is to combine the most important aspects of human decision-making related to transportation, from activities planning (sleep, work, eat, shop,...) via modal and route planning to driving, into a single, consistent methodological and software framework. This is meant to combine the functionalities of activities-based travel demand generation, modal choice and route assignment, and micro-simulation. TRANSIMS attempts to employ advanced methodologies in all these modules. Yet, it is probably the overall framework that is the most important part of this attempt. It is, for example, possible to replace the TRANSIMS microsimulation by another micro-simulation that uses the same input and generates the same output. TRANSIMS uses specific regions as examples in order to ensure that the technology is rooted in the real world. Until about the middle of 1997, an approximately five miles by five miles area in Dallas/Texas was used. Since then, TRANSIMS has moved to using data from Portland/Oregon; a case study for this region is planned to be completed by the end of the year 2000. In this paper the authors give short descriptions of these projects and give references to related publications.

  4. TOMORROW: USEPA Administrator and Dallas Mayor Dedicate Water Efficient Classroom and Student Garden

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (April 8, 2015) Dallas Independent School District, Toyota North America and the Wyland Foundation are teaming up with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for a ground breaking event to celebrate sustainability at Cochran Elementary Sc

  5. EPA Recognizes City of Dallas and Partners for Collaborating to Fight Asthma Triggers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Nov. 24, 2015) Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the City of Dallas and the Health and Wellness Alliance for Children for their collaboration to improve children's health in the Dallas area. The groups are br

  6. TOMORROW: EPA Recognizes City of Dallas and Partners for Collaborating to Fight Asthma Triggers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Nov. 23, 2015) Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will recognize the City of Dallas and the Health and Wellness Alliance for Children for their collaboration to improve children's health in the Dallas area. The groups ar

  7. 77 FR 25229 - Dallas, Garland & Northeastern Railroad Company-Discontinuance of Trackage Rights Exemption-in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ..., 75227, and 75217. \\1\\ The Line is owned by Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). DGNO acquired by assignment... & Northeastern Railroad, Inc.--Trackage Rights Exemption--Dallas Area Rapid Transit, FD 34248 (STB served Sept....--Acquisition & Operation Exemption--Lines of Dallas Area Rapid Transit, FD 34347 (STB served June 3, 2003...

  8. 78 FR 54795 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Dallas, Addison Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Dallas, Addison... (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to amend Class D airspace at Addison Airport, Dallas, TX. Changes... 71 by amending Class D airspace at Addison Airport, Dallas, TX. Adjustments to air traffic flows in...

  9. Dazzling Physics Gallery Opens in Dallas Art Deco Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifted Child Today (GCT), 1989

    1989-01-01

    The Dallas Science Place contains 55 interactive displays on observable phenomena, organized into 7 topic areas: motion, waves, matter, electromagnetism, energy, change, and entropy. Attempts were made to keep the exhibits' forms elemental, so that the underlying physical phenomena could be readily observed and experienced. (JDD)

  10. Literacy Librarian, Case Studies of Experiments in Dallas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Margaret

    1970-01-01

    The Dallas Public Library offers special services that take the form of separate collections of materials for adults beginning to read, and for adults beginning to read in English; tours of the library for groups of adult basic-education students; and special bookmobile services to adult basic-education classes. (MF)

  11. Transformational Leaders Wanted: Dallas Independent School District's Aspiring Principals Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parvin, Jennifer Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the development, implementation, and impact of the Dallas Independent School District's (ISD) Aspiring Principals Program. This study of principal preparation has relevance as a K-16 issue for two primary reasons. First, K-12 schools are focused on graduating students who are college and…

  12. Marketing Proposal for a Dallas Based MBA Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garin, Robert H.

    Universities offering the Masters of Business Administration (MBA) degree in Texas were compared, and students presently enrolled in graduate business courses at East Texas State University (ETSU), Dallas, were surveyed. In addition, a marketing proposal to increase student enrollment is proposed. The following seven universities that offer MBA…

  13. Dazzling Physics Gallery Opens in Dallas Art Deco Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifted Child Today (GCT), 1989

    1989-01-01

    The Dallas Science Place contains 55 interactive displays on observable phenomena, organized into 7 topic areas: motion, waves, matter, electromagnetism, energy, change, and entropy. Attempts were made to keep the exhibits' forms elemental, so that the underlying physical phenomena could be readily observed and experienced. (JDD)

  14. Staffing Levels in the Dallas Independent School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Board of Trustees of the Dallas Independent School District (DISD) asked the Council of the Great City Schools, the nation's primary coalition of large urban school systems, to examine the staffing levels of the school system and determine whether the numbers of staff members employed were appropriate for a district serving as many students as…

  15. Dallas Police Department Youth Services Program: Police Diversion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas Police Dept., TX.

    The Youth Section of the Dallas Police Department has instituted an innovative police diversion project entitled the Youth Services Program as an operational unit of the police department. Fourteen civilian counselors supervised by a police lieutenant function as a diversion unit for arrested juveniles between the ages of 10 and 16. Juveniles that…

  16. Increased cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes in Dallas County.

    PubMed

    Das, Sandeep R; Vaeth, Patrice A C; Stanek, Harold G; de Lemos, James A; Dobbins, Robert L; McGuire, Darren K

    2006-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health problem in the United States. We assess the prevalence of diabetes in Dallas County, quantify the association between diabetes and subclinical cardiovascular disease, and assess the use of evidence-based cardiovascular disease risk-modifying therapies. This study uses data from 3392 participants aged 30 to 65 years from the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based, multiethnic sample of residents living in Dallas County, Texas. Three primary outcomes were examined: (1) diabetes prevalence, (2) adjusted odds ratios for detectable coronary calcium stratified by diabetes diagnosis status, and (3) rates of use of evidence-based cardiovascular disease risk-modifying therapies among subjects with diabetes stratified by diabetes diagnosis status. The estimated prevalence of diabetes in Dallas County was 7.8%, with >40% of diabetic patients undiagnosed before participation in the Dallas Heart Study. Both previously diagnosed and previously undiagnosed diabetes were independently associated with the presence of coronary artery calcium (diagnosed: OR 3.55, 95% CI 1.56-8.05) (undiagnosed: OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.39-6.39). The rates of use of aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins were suboptimal, and blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets were rarely met, especially among subjects with previously undiagnosed diabetes. Diabetes is prevalent and is associated with subclinical cardiovascular disease; this association is present even at the time of diagnosis. Despite the cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes, evidence-based risk-modifying therapies continue to be underused, and therapeutic targets remain unmet, especially among people unaware of their diabetes diagnosis.

  17. Cochlear implantation updates: the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Emily A; Britt, Lana; Geers, Ann; Loizou, Philip; Loy, Betty; Roland, Peter; Warner-Czyz, Andrea; Wright, Charles G

    2012-06-01

    This report provides an overview of many research projects conducted by the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, a joint enterprise between the University of Texas at Dallas, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Children's Medical Center. The studies extend our knowledge of factors influencing communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. Multiple designs and statistical techniques are used in the studies described including both cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Sample sizes vary across the studies, and many of the samples represent large populations of children from North America. Multiple statistical techniques are used by the team to analyze outcomes. The team has provided critical information regarding electrode placement, signal processing, and communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. American Academy of Audiology.

  18. Cochlear Implantation Updates: The Dallas Cochlear Implant Program

    PubMed Central

    Tobey, Emily A.; Britt, Lana; Geers, Ann; Loizou, Philip; Loy, Betty; Roland, Peter; Warner-Czyz, Andrea; Wright, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides an overview of many research projects conducted by the Dallas Cochlear Implant Program, a joint enterprise between The University of Texas at Dallas, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Children’s Medical Center. The studies extend our knowledge of factors influencing communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. Multiple designs and statistical techniques are used in the studies described including both cross sectional and longitudinal analyses. Sample sizes vary across the studies and many of the samples represent large populations of children from North America. Multiple statistical techniques are used by the team to analyze outcomes. The team has provided critical information regarding electrode placement, signal processing, and communication outcomes in users of cochlear implants. PMID:22668764

  19. Case report: ophthalmomyiasis externa in Dallas County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Sigauke, Ellen; Beebe, Walter E; Gander, Rita M; Cavuoti, Dominick; Southern, Paul M

    2003-01-01

    Ophthalmomyiasis externa is an uncommon condition in North America. If not recognized and managed accordingly, it can be complicated by the potentially fatal condition ophthalmomyiasis interna. Ophthalmomyiasis externa is mainly caused by the sheep bot fly Oestrus ovis; thus, it is more common in farming communities. We report a case of ophthalmomyiasis externa in a young woman from Dallas County, Texas, who had no known history of contact with farm animals.

  20. STS-51-L Debris Aboard the USGS Cutter Dallas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    On January 28, 1986, the Space Shuttle Challenger and her seven-member crew were lost when a ruptured O-ring in the right Solid Rocket Booster caused an explosion soon after launch. With the help of the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy, search and recovery teams began retrieving pieces of the Shuttle from the Atlantic Ocean soon after the accident. Vessels brought the debris to the Trident Basin at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where they waited to be shipped to Kennedy Space Center for investigation. The USCG Cutter Dallas transported this fragment of exterior tiling.

  1. EPA Announces 2016 Climate Leadership Awards, Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport Among 17 Awardees Recognized for Climate Action

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March. 9, 2016) Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at the Climate Leadership Awards. The airport, among 17 winners nationwide, was honored for setting a target for reduc

  2. Putting College and Career Readiness at the Forefront of District Priorities in Dallas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Shane

    2013-01-01

    Dallas Independent School District's (ISD) efforts to develop a system of college readiness indicators began in 2008, when they received a Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation grant under the foundation's College-Ready Education initiative. With this grant, Dallas ISD's Performance Management and Analytics department developed a college readiness…

  3. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas is discussed. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  4. Threats of Violence in Schools: The Dallas Independent School District's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan-Arrendondo, Kim; Renouf, Kristin; Egyed, Carla; Doxey, Meredith; Dobbins, Maria; Sanchez, Serafin; Rakowitz, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the Dallas Public Schools' procedures for assessing the potential for violence among children who express intent to harm others. The Dallas Violence Risk Assessment (DVRA) was developed to evaluate students who have made threats of violence, and to assist school staff in determining appropriate intervention strategies. Describes the…

  5. Report from Dallas: The RASD Program (and) Business Reference Services Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freides, Thelma; Scanlan, Jean M.

    1979-01-01

    This report includes an account of the RASD program of the American Library Association at the 1979 Dallas Conference with an annotated bibliography on guidelines for information services, and a questionnaire distributed at the RASD Business Reference Services Committee meeting at Dallas, with tabulated results. (JD)

  6. Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    2000-11-07

    In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

  7. Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy facility located at the North Hampton Park Recreation and Health Center, Dallas, Texas is presented. The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The system's operation modes and performance data acquisition system are described. The system's performance during the months of June, July, August, September, and October of 1979 are presented and show a negative savings of energy. Experience to date indicates however that the system concept has promise of acceptable performance. It is concluded that if proper control and sequencing components was maintained, then the system performance would improve to an acceptable level.

  8. Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The solar energy facility located at the North Hampton Park Recreation and Health Center, Dallas, Texas is presented. The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The system's operation modes and performance data acquisition system are described. The system's performance during the months of June, July, August, September, and October of 1979 are presented and show a negative savings of energy. Experience to date indicates however that the system concept has promise of acceptable performance. It is concluded that if proper control and sequencing components was maintained, then the system performance would improve to an acceptable level.

  9. C-Band Radar Imagery, Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area in Texas is shown on this image collected by the C-band radar of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this radar image, smooth areas, such as lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark. Rougher features, such as buildings and trees, appear bright. Downtown Dallas is the bright area at the center of the image, alongside the dark linear floodway of the Trinity River. Dark linear runways of two airports are also seen: Love Field near downtown Dallas in the image center, and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in the upper left corner. The semi-circular terminal buildings of the international airport can also be seen in the area between the runways. Several large lakes, including Lake Ray Hubbard (upper right) and Joe Pool Lake (lower left) are also seen. Images like these, along with the SRTM topographic data, will be used by urban planners to study and monitor land use, and update maps and geographic information systems for the area. This image represents just 4 seconds of data collection time by the SRTM instrument. The overall diagonal linear pattern is a data processing artifact due to the quick turn-around browse nature of this image. These artifacts will be removed with further data processing.

    This radar image was obtained by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission as part of its mission to map the Earth's topography. The image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas, and consequently does not show topographic data but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover, and urbanization.

    This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  10. DFW (Dallas-Ft. Worth) microburst on August 2, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, T. T.

    1986-01-01

    The features of the microburst on August 2, 1985, related to the Delta 191 accident during the approach to Runway 17L of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Airport is described. Both radar and satellite data, along with ground-based measurements, were used in determining the characteristics of the parent cloud which spawned the most complicated microburst winds ever analyzed by the author. The detailed reconstruction of the airflow and the aircraft's maneuver were made possible by a series of computer analyses of the Digital Flight Data Recorder (DFDR) readout. Both measured and computed values in color diagrams that can be evaluated readily by meteorologists, pilots, structural engineers, and other interested persons in preventing microburst-related accidents in future years are presented.

  11. C-Band Radar Imagery, Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area in Texas is shown on this image collected by the C-band radar of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). On this radar image, smooth areas, such as lakes, roads and airport runways appear dark. Rougher features, such as buildings and trees, appear bright. Downtown Dallas is the bright area at the center of the image, alongside the dark linear floodway of the Trinity River. Dark linear runways of two airports are also seen: Love Field near downtown Dallas in the image center, and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in the upper left corner. The semi-circular terminal buildings of the international airport can also be seen in the area between the runways. Several large lakes, including Lake Ray Hubbard (upper right) and Joe Pool Lake (lower left) are also seen. Images like these, along with the SRTM topographic data, will be used by urban planners to study and monitor land use, and update maps and geographic information systems for the area. This image represents just 4 seconds of data collection time by the SRTM instrument. The overall diagonal linear pattern is a data processing artifact due to the quick turn-around browse nature of this image. These artifacts will be removed with further data processing.

    This radar image was obtained by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission as part of its mission to map the Earth's topography. The image was acquired by just one of SRTM's two antennas, and consequently does not show topographic data but only the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground. This signal, known as radar backscatter, provides insight into the nature of the surface, including its roughness, vegetation cover, and urbanization.

    This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  12. Diversions from Red River to Lake Dallas, Texas; and related channel losses, February and March 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, Pat H.

    1954-01-01

    During the period Feb. 10 to Mar. 3, 19541 the City of Dallas pumped 1,363 acre-feet of water from its Red River plant into Pecan Creek (a tributary of Elm Fork Trinity River) 3.5 miles above Gainesville; 1,272 acre-feet of this diversion reached the head of Lake Dallas. Discharge records were obtained at four points along the channels. This water was transported down the channels of Pecan Creek and Elm Fork Trinity River to Lake Dallas, a distance of about 31 miles.

  13. Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, General Electric Dallas operational test site, Dallas, Texas, October 1980 - March 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, P. E.

    1981-09-01

    The General Electric-Dallas site is a single family residence in Texas. The active solar energy system is a retrofit designed to supply 60% of the heating load, 75% of the hot water load, and 50% of the cooling load. The system is equipped with 365 square feet of evacuated tube collectors, 400 gallons of solar hot water storage, a three-ton heat pump for auxiliary heating and cooling, and a gas-fired, 40-gallon, domestic hot water heater. The solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance are given, as well as performance data for the collector, storage, domestic hot water, space heating and space cooling subsystems, solar operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions. Predicted performance data are given for comparison with the measured values.

  14. Hydrologic data for urban studies in the Dallas, Texas, metropolitan area, 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, C.M.; Butler, H.S.; Benton, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains rainfall and runoff data collected during the 1979 water year for drainage basins of Joes Creek, Bachman Branch, Turtle Creek, Coombs Creek, Cedar Creek, White Rock Creek, Elam Creek, Fivemile Creek, Whites Branch, Prairie Creek, Tenmile Creek, Buck Creek, and South Mesquite Creek in the Dallas metropolitan area. The information will be useful in determining the extent to which progressive urbanization will affect the yield and mode of occurrence of storm runoff. Rainfall-runoff computations are presented for eight storm periods during the 1979 water year. The report for the 1979 water year completes the Dallas urban project. Hydrologic data contained in this report and in all previous reports of the Dallas and Fort Worth metropolitan areas are being used to prepare an interpretive report entitled ' Effects of urbanization on floods in the Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas, metropolitan areas, ' which will be released in 1981. (USGS)

  15. 75 FR 30852 - Hydroelectric Power Development at Ridgway Dam, Dallas Creek Project, Colorado

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...-Federal development of environmentally sustainable hydropower potential on Federal water resource projects... sustainable, low impact, or small hydropower development that avoids, reduces, or minimizes environmental... Bureau of Reclamation Hydroelectric Power Development at Ridgway Dam, Dallas Creek Project,...

  16. EPA, NASA, USACE, Tuskegee Airman and Perot Museum Foster STEM in Dallas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Feb. 26, 2014) Students today learned about the importance of science and engineering education from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE)

  17. Prometheus unbound: A study of the Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport. [Socio-economic considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, J. D.; Brown, J.; Dominus, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    The history of the controversies in the development of the Dallas/Fort Worth Regional Airport is detailed. Present technological and organizational management problems are outlined. Maps and illustrations are included.

  18. Dallas-area School Districts Compete in EPAs Sixth Annual Energy Star Battle of the Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (July 22, 2015) Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the 2015 Energy Star Battle of the Buildings. In North Texas, the Carrollton-Farmers Branch, Mansfield and Frisco Independent School Districts are among 125 teams and

  19. Sodium azide poisoning at a restaurant - Dallas County, Texas, 2010.

    PubMed

    2012-06-29

    In April 2010, Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) staff members investigated reports of acute-onset dizziness among patrons in a local restaurant. Symptoms, which included fainting resulting from low blood pressure, occurred within minutes of consuming food from the restaurant and were consistent with chemical poisoning. Toxicologic and epidemiologic investigations were begun to determine the cause of the poisonings and identify potentially exposed persons. This report summarizes the results of those investigations, including a case-control study that identified iced tea as the likely contaminated food or drink (odds ratio [OR] = 65; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4-3,292). Approximately 5 months after the incident, extensive laboratory testing identified sodium azide (NaN3) and hydrazoic acid (formed when sodium azide contacts water) as the toxic agents in the iced tea. All five ill restaurant patrons recovered from their symptoms. For rapid-onset foodborne illnesses, chemical poisons should be considered as a potential cause, regardless of negative initial toxicologic screening tests. Although unusual chemicals can be challenging to detect, a multidisciplinary approach involving public health officials and forensic and medical toxicologists can lead to appropriate testing. In the absence of an identified agent, epidemiologic tools are valuable for active case-finding and confirming suspected contaminated food vehicles.

  20. Needs Assessment of Hurricane Katrina Evacuees Residing Temporarily in Dallas.

    PubMed

    King, Richard V; Polatin, Peter B; Hogan, David; Downs, Dana L; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the psychosocial needs of Hurricane Katrina evacuees temporarily residing in Dallas, TX, after sheltering but prior to their permanent resettlement. Common trauma exposures were physical exposure to flood water, seeing corpses, witnessing death, and loss of family, friends, or home. Fewer than 10 % met symptom criteria for disaster-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More than one-fourth met major depressive disorder (MDD) symptom criteria post-disaster but only 15 % had a new (incident) MDD episode after the disaster. Specific trauma exposures and some hurricane-related stressors contributed to risk for both Katrina-related PTSD symptom criteria and incident MDD, but other hurricane-related stressors were uniquely associated with incident MDD. Referral to mental health services was associated with meeting symptom criteria for PTSD and with incident MDD, but only about one-third of these individuals received a referral. Understanding the needs of disaster-exposed population requires assessing trauma exposures and identifying pre-disaster and post-disaster psychopathology.

  1. Water resources of Clark, Cleveland, and Dallas Counties, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plebuch, Raymond O.; Hines, Marion S.

    1969-01-01

    Clark, Cleveland, and Dallas counties constitute an area of 2,151 square miles in south-central Arkansas. The area is in two physiographic provinces--the Ouachita Mountains of the Ouachita province of the Interior Highlands, and the West Gulf Coastal Plain of the Coastal Plain province. The area is drained by the Ouachita, Saline, and Little Missouri Rivers and their tributaries. Although some of the streams in the project area can furnish dependable water supplies without storage, the amount of water available for use can be increased by the construction of reservoirs. The average surface-water yield in the area is about 1.4 cubic feet per second per square mile, or a total of about 3,000 cubic feet per second. Generally, the water quality is good; but water from some of the streams, particularly from the smaller tributaries, may require treatment for excessive iron content and high color. Ground-water yields in the project area vary considerably. The consolidated rocks in the Interior Highlands generally yield less than 10 gallons per minute to wells, precluding the development of large municipal or industrial groundwater supplies in that area. Of the 17 geologic units present in the Coastal Plain part of the project area, 12 yield water but in varying amounts. Among the formations of Cretaceous age, the Tokio yields good-quality water in the outcrop, but the quality deteriorates downdip; the Brownstown Marl yields small amounts of water for domestic purposes, mainly in the outcrop area ; the Ozan Formation yields a highly mineralized water that is generally unsuitable for most purposes; the Nacatoch Sand yields as much as 100 gallons per minute of good-quality water in and near the outcrop, but the water becomes very salty and corrosive at distances ranging from 2 miles downdip from the outcrop in northern Clark County to 17 miles downdip in the southern part of the county. The formations of Tertiary age offer the best possibilities for ground water

  2. Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas as seen from the Apollo 6 unmanned spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-04-06

    AS06-02-1462 (4 April 1968) --- View of the Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas, area as photographed from the unmanned Apollo 6 (Spacecraft 020/Saturn 502) space mission. The highway and expressway system in and around both cities is clearly visible. North is toward left side of picture. Grapevine Reservoir and Garza-Little Elm Reservoir are to the north-west of Dallas. The city of Denton can be seen in left center of picture at conjunction of highways leading to both Fort Worth and Dallas. The Brazos River is in lower right corner. This photograph was made three hours and nine minutes after liftoff of the Apollo 6 space flight.

  3. 78 FR 41911 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; CSI Calendering, Inc. (Rubber Coated Textile...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 39--Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; CSI Calendering, Inc. (Rubber Coated Textile Fabric); Arlington, Texas On March 4, 2013, the Dallas/Fort Worth International...

  4. Attitudes toward Videodisc Technology in the Dallas County Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Margot A.; And Others

    A study was conducted in the Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) in Texas to investigate the attitudes of students and professors toward the use of interactive videodisc technology in the classroom. In contrast to a videotape which must be wound and rewound to find a particular segment, videodisc technology allows the instructor to…

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Strains Detroit-1 and Dallas 1E.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Brian H; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Morrison, Shatavia S; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Winchell, Jonas M

    2017-02-02

    We report here the complete genome sequences of two of the earliest known strains of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Detroit-1 is serogroup 1 and was isolated from a lung biopsy specimen in 1977. Dallas 1E is serogroup 5 and was isolated in 1978 from a cooling tower.

  6. Modeling Fear of Crime in Dallas Neighborhoods: A Test of Social Capital Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Kristin M.; Mindel, Charles H.

    2007-01-01

    This study tested a model of the effects of different predictors on individuals' levels of fear of crime in Dallas neighborhoods. Given its dual focus on individual perceptions and community-level interactions, social capital theory was selected as the most appropriate framework to explore fear of crime within the neighborhood milieu. A structural…

  7. Disciplinary Practices in Dallas Contrasted with School Systems with Rules Against Violence Against Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagebak, Robert

    Corporal punishment and its implications are discussed in this speech in Dallas, where corporal punishment is officially sanctioned as a method of school discipline, and in many other parts of the country, the prevailing opinion is that corporal punishment is necessary, effective and harmless. But the effectiveness of such punishment is dubious…

  8. Spatial analysis of injury-related deaths in Dallas County using a geographic information system.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Adil; Gunst, Mark; Ghaemmaghami, Vafa; Gruszecki, Amy C; Urban, Jill; Barber, Robert C; Gentilello, Larry M; Shafi, Shahid

    2012-07-01

    This study applied a geographic information system (GIS) to identify clusters of injury-related deaths (IRDs) within a large urban county (26 cities; population, 2.4 million). All deaths due to injuries in Dallas County (Texas) in 2005 (N = 670) were studied, including the geographic location of the injury event. Out of 26 cities in Dallas County, IRDs were reported in 19 cities. Geospatial data were obtained from the local governments and entered into the GIS. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR, with 95% CI) were calculated for each city and the county using national age-adjusted rates. Dallas County had significantly more deaths due to homicides (SMR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.54-1.98) and IRDs as a result of gunshots (SMR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.09-1.37) than the US national rate. However, this increase was restricted to a single city (the city of Dallas) within the county, while the rest of the 25 cities in the county experienced IRD rates that were either similar to or better than the national rate, or experienced no IRDs. GIS mapping was able to depict high-risk geographic "hot spots" for IRDs. In conclusion, GIS spatial analysis identified geographic clusters of IRDs, which were restricted to only one of 26 cities in the county.

  9. Muncie Remembers that Day in Dallas, November 22, 1963. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    "Muncie Remembers That Day in Dallas" is an oral history project report of a study conducted by two academic U.S. history classes of 21 students at Muncie Southside High School (Indiana) during the 1993-94 school year. The occasion of the 30th anniversary of the assassination of President Kennedy, along with the movie "JFK,"…

  10. Local Government Regulation of the Movies: The Dallas System, 1966-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Examines what caused the decline and demise of the Dallas Motion Picture Classification Board (which rated films as to objectionable content) and with it the idea of the public ordering of motion picture content. Uses "Viva Maria" and "The Front Page" as case studies. (PA)

  11. 78 FR 57545 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Dallas, Addison Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Class D airspace ceiling at Addison Airport, Dallas, TX, is being withdrawn. Upon review, the FAA... 6, 2013, a NPRM was published in the Federal Register proposing to amend the Addison Airport Class...

  12. Dallas County Dental Society: a tradition of integrity and care since 1908.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Marissa; Niessen, Linda C

    2011-01-01

    The Dallas County Dental Society is approaching 100 years of service to dentists and patients. Begun with a focus on continuing education, the society now manages the large and successful Southwest Dental Convention. Member services, community programs, and leadership are among the hallmarks of the society. Its driving force has been a sustained effort on strategic planning and its implementation.

  13. Critiques of David Elliott's "Music Matters": The Dallas Papers of the MayDay Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, J. Terry

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a special issue of the "Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education." Presents the Dallas (Texas) papers of the MayDay Group, a loosely organized world-wide coalition of music education theorists and practitioners, that critique the book, "Music Matters" (David Elliott). (CMK)

  14. Experiences with a Simplified Microsimulation for the Dallas/Fort-Worth Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickert, M.; Nagel, K.

    We describe a simple framework for microsimulation of city traffic. A medium-sized excerpt of Dallas was used to examine different levels of simulation fidelity of a cellular automaton method for the traffic flow simulation and a simple intersection model. We point out problems arising with the granular structure of the underlying rules of motion.

  15. Spatial analysis of injury-related deaths in Dallas County using a geographic information system

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Adil; Gunst, Mark; Ghaemmaghami, Vafa; Gruszecki, Amy C.; Urban, Jill; Barber, Robert C.; Gentilello, Larry M.

    2012-01-01

    This study applied a geographic information system (GIS) to identify clusters of injury-related deaths (IRDs) within a large urban county (26 cities; population, 2.4 million). All deaths due to injuries in Dallas County (Texas) in 2005 (N = 670) were studied, including the geographic location of the injury event. Out of 26 cities in Dallas County, IRDs were reported in 19 cities. Geospatial data were obtained from the local governments and entered into the GIS. Standardized mortality ratios (SMR, with 95% CI) were calculated for each city and the county using national age-adjusted rates. Dallas County had significantly more deaths due to homicides (SMR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.54–1.98) and IRDs as a result of gunshots (SMR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.09–1.37) than the US national rate. However, this increase was restricted to a single city (the city of Dallas) within the county, while the rest of the 25 cities in the county experienced IRD rates that were either similar to or better than the national rate, or experienced no IRDs. GIS mapping was able to depict high-risk geographic “hot spots” for IRDs. In conclusion, GIS spatial analysis identified geographic clusters of IRDs, which were restricted to only one of 26 cities in the county. PMID:22754116

  16. Local Government Regulation of the Movies: The Dallas System, 1966-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Examines what caused the decline and demise of the Dallas Motion Picture Classification Board (which rated films as to objectionable content) and with it the idea of the public ordering of motion picture content. Uses "Viva Maria" and "The Front Page" as case studies. (PA)

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Strains Detroit-1 and Dallas 1E

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Brian H.; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequences of two of the earliest known strains of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri. Detroit-1 is serogroup 1 and was isolated from a lung biopsy specimen in 1977. Dallas 1E is serogroup 5 and was isolated in 1978 from a cooling tower. PMID:28153889

  18. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  19. Epidemiological placism in public health emergencies: Ebola in two Dallas neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2017-04-01

    Super-diverse cities face distinctive challenges during infectious disease outbreaks. For refugee and immigrant groups from epidemic source locations, identities of place blend with epidemiological logics in convoluted ways during these crises. This research investigated the relationships of place and stigma during the Dallas Ebola crisis. Ethnographic results illustrate how Africanness, more than neighborhood stigma, informed Dallas residents' experience of stigma. The problems of place-based stigma, the imprecision of epidemiological placism, and the cohesion of stigma to semiotically powerful levels of place - rather than to realistic risk categories - are discussed. Taking its authority from epidemiology, placism is an important source of potential stigma with critical implications for the success of public health messaging.

  20. Electroreflectance Experimentation in the VUV at the University of Texas at Dallas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfro, Timothy; Glosser, R.; Landon, Preston; Al-Kuhaili, Mohammad

    2002-03-01

    This discussion will include a variety of details and choice methods of a unique, ongoing electroreflectance experiment using a tabletop vacuum ultra violet system at the University of Texas at Dallas. This system has a spectral range of 2 to 10eV that allows the measuring of wide gap semiconductors as well as high order transitions. These capabilities prove to be valuable for supplying information on new materials being applied.

  1. Impact of Urbanization on Storm Response of White Rock Creek, Dallas, Texas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H.; Groening-Vicars, J.

    2005-12-01

    This study documents hydrological changes resulting from urbanization of the upper sub-basin of White Rock Creek watershed in Collin and Dallas counties, Texas. The 66.4 square mile watershed was transformed from 87% rural in 1961 to 95% urban in 2002, following construction of the Dallas suburbs of Richardson, Addison, Plano and Frisco. The objective of the study was to investigate changes in the storm response of White Rock Creek in terms of peak storm flow, storm flow volume and lag time. The approach employed to compare pre- and post-urbanization hydrology was to develop average unit hydrographs for each time period and use them to generate the creek's storm flow response to a set of six hypothetical precipitation events. The results suggest that substantial hydrological changes have occurred. The average infiltration capacity of the watershed was reduced by about 60%, so that storm flow was generated at lower precipitation intensities in the post-urbanization period. Storm flow peak discharge and volume were more than doubled for a hypothetical 10-year precipitation event. Average lag time was about 45 minutes faster in the post-urbanization period. It was concluded that urbanization has significantly impacted the storm response of the creek and increased the potential for flooding. It is anticipated that similar hydrological changes will occur in other rapidly urbanizing watersheds in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan region.

  2. Heat-related deaths -- Dallas, Wichita, and Cooke counties, Texas, and United States, 1996.

    PubMed

    1997-06-13

    During July 2-8, 1996, high maximum daily temperatures in Dallas County, Texas, ranged from 101 F (38.3 C) to 106 F (41.1 C), and high maximum daily heat indexes (a measure of the effect of combined elements [e.g., heat and humidity] on the body) ranged from 105 F (40.6 C) to 112 F (44.4 C). Although guidelines for issuing heat advisories or warnings vary by geographic location and climate, the National Weather Service generally suggests issuing a heat advisory when a daytime heat index reaches > or =105 F (> or =40.6 C), and a night time minimum ambient temperature of 80 F (26.7 C) persists for at least 48 hours. In Dallas County, the criterion used by the medical examiner's (ME's) office to designate a heat wave is > or =3 consecutive days of temperatures > or =100 F (37.8 C). This report describes four cases of heat-related death in Dallas, Wichita, and Cooke counties, Texas, in 1996; summarizes risk factors for this problem; and reviews measures to prevent heat-related morbidity and mortality. The findings in this report indicate that, although a large proportion of heat-related deaths occur during the summer and during heat waves, such deaths occur year-round.

  3. Blood lead levels and growth status among African-American and Hispanic children in Dallas, Texas--1980 and 2002: Dallas Lead Project II.

    PubMed

    Little, B B; Spalding, S; Walsh, B; Keyes, D C; Wainer, J; Pickens, S; Royster, M; Villanacci, J; Gratton, T

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to analyze childhood blood lead levels and growth status (ages 2-12) in Dallas, Texas lead smelter communities in the 1980s and 2002, where smelters operated from 1936 to 1990. A sample of convenience study design was used in two cohorts (n=360): 1980-1989 (n=191) and 2002 (n=169). Multivariate analysis of variance and covariance and tandem multiple regressions were used to evaluate the association between stature and blood lead level in two time periods. In 2002 average child blood lead level (1.6 microg/dL+/-0.2 SE) was significantly (p<0.001) lower compared to the 1980 cohort mean level (23.6 microg/dL+/-1.3 SE). Average height and weight in 2002 were 4.5 cm and 4.0 kg greater, respectively, than in 1980. Lowered blood lead level was associated with 3.9 cm, 3.5 kg and 1.1 units greater height, weight and body mass index (BMI), respectively. Cohort effect was associated with greater height (0.6 cm), weight (0.5 kg) and BMI (0.1). This investigation reports on child growth in a community before and after the transition from high to low blood lead levels over several decades. Using child growth as a proxy, health status of Dallas's lead smelter communities increased markedly over the past two decades, primarily because of lower blood lead levels, while the poverty rate was only marginally lower.

  4. Longitudinal changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Mirfakhraee, Sasan; Ayers, Colby R; McGuire, Darren K; Maalouf, Naim M

    2017-09-01

    While the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is well described in various populations, limited data are available regarding longitudinal variation in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations. To evaluate the temporal trends in serum 25(OH)D, prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and factors influencing these trends. Adults enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study, a longitudinal, probability-based, multiethnic, population study in Dallas, Texas, USA. Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and predictors of change in serum 25(OH)D. A total of 2045 participants had serum 25(OH)D measured on two occasions (2000-2002 and 2007-2009) at a median interval of 7 years. Serum 25(OH)D decreased (42.7-39.4 nmol/L, P<.001) and the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D <50 nmol/L] increased significantly (60.6%-66.4%, P<.0001) despite vitamin D supplementation increasing over the interval (7.2%-23.0%; P<.0001). In a multivariable model adjusting for sex, race, BMI, age, season of blood draw, smoking and exercise, a greater decline in serum 25(OH)D was noted in men compared with women (-8.0 vs -3.5 nmol/L, P<.0001), in participants of Hispanic ethnicity vs White and Black ethnicity (P<.0001), in nonobese vs obese participants (-7.2 vs -4.0 nmol/L, P=.005) and in nonusers vs users of vitamin D supplements (-5.7 vs -1.7 nmol/L, P=.032). Despite increased vitamin D supplementation, serum 25(OH)D decreased in an ethnically diverse cohort of Dallas County residents between 2000-2002 and 2007-2009. Features most predictive of a decline in serum 25(OH)D include male sex, Hispanic ethnicity and weight gain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. NASA Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) Dallas-Fort Worth Demonstration Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Evers, Carl; Esche, Jeff; Sleep, Benjamin; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Program Synthetic Vision System project conducted a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) flight test at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in October 2000. The RIPS research system includes advanced displays, airport surveillance system, data links, positioning system, and alerting algorithms to provide pilots with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warnings of runway incursions. This report describes the aircraft and ground based runway incursion alerting systems and traffic positioning systems (Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) and Traffic Information Service - Broadcast (TIS-B)). A performance analysis of these systems is also presented.

  6. Hydrologic data for urban studies in the Dallas, Texas, metropolitan area, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, B.B.; Wood, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains rainfall and runoff data collected during the 1978 water year for drainage basins of Joes Creek, Bachman Branch, Turtle Creek, Coombs Creek, Cedar Creek, White Rock Creek, Elam Creek, Fivemile Creek, Newton Creek, Whites Branch, Prairie Creek, Tenmile Creek, Duck Creek, and South Mesquite Creek in the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area. The information will be useful in determining the extent to which progressive urbanization will affect the yield and mode of occurrence of storm runoff. Detailed rainfall-runoff computations are presented for ten storm periods during the 1978 water year. (USGS)

  7. DCASR (Defense Contract Administration Services Region) Dallas Total Quality Management Implementation Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    N’L’ 89 10 6 00 4 Approved for pu~blic release(8 0 0"tIbut.°n Unh-te t. DCASR DALLAS TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN OPI DATE 1...Apr 89 concept of "internal-external customers". input from all 10 . Secure outline of cross-training plan used K/CO Mar 89 at DISC and evaluate for...demanded of workers, management, and the overall organization in the new economic age. We have taken several steps to keep our costs low: a. Over half of

  8. Hydrologic data for urban stormwater studies in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, 1992-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley; Raines, T.H.; Mansfield, B.L.; Sandlin, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents precipitation and waterquality data from analyses of 210 samples collected at 30 storm-sewer outfall stations in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, during February 1992-November 1994. The data were collected to fulfill requirements mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to the cities of Arlington, Dallas, Fort Worth, Garland, Irving, Mesquite, and Piano and to the Dallas and Fort Worth Districts of the Texas Department of Transportation to obtain a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit. Data were collected at storm-sewer outfall stations in drainage basins classified as singular land use, either residential, commercial, industrial, or highway. Also included are qualityassurance/quality-control data for samples collected in conjunction with the stormwater samples.

  9. Time-of-travel of solutes in the Trinity River from Dallas to Trinidad, Texas, May and August 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gain, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the city of Dallas, conducted a study of the time of travel of solutes during moderate flow conditions in a reach of the Trinity River from the outfall of the Dallas Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (DCWTP) to the USGS streamflow-gaging station 08062700, Trinity River at Trinidad, in May and August 1987.  Previous USGS time-of-travel studies of this reach of the river (Ollman, 1973; 1975) provided low- and moderate-flow data.  The data were included in the calibrartion of a mathematical water-quality model used by the city of Dallas and other public and private entities involved in water resources managemnt of the area.  The purpose of this study was to provide additional data to extend calibration of that model to include moderately higher streamflow conditions.

  10. Municipal Stormwater Monitoring Program, Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas: Summary of sampling, February 1997-February 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Stephanie J.; Raines, Timothy H.; Baldys, Stanley

    2000-01-01

    During 1992–94, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) collected stormwater runoff data for the cities and Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Districts in the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) area to meet the regulatory requirements of the application phase for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) stormwater permit. The Phase I permit requirements applied to cities with populations of 100,000 or greater and to TxDOT districts with population centers of 100,000 or greater (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1990). The following cities and districts in the DFW area met the population criteria: Arlington, Dallas, Fort Worth, Garland, Irving, Mesquite, Plano, TxDOT Dallas District, and TxDOT Fort Worth District. The permit applications were submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for approval.

  11. Evaluation of the Dallas Thompson Riverscreen Site on the Touchet River.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie

    2007-07-25

    Riverscreen irrigation pumps are a relatively new design in which the pump intake floats on the river surface, pulling water in only from the bottom side and surrounded by a self-cleaning screen. The Walla Walla County Conservation District recently started replacing old pump screens with the Riverscreen and was interested in whether the screens are protective of juvenile salmonids. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated approach velocities and operations at the Riverscreen installation on the Dallas Thompson property, approximately 3 mi. north of Touchet, Washington and 300 ft north of Hofer Dam, on June 18, 2007. Evaluation of this site consisted of underwater videography and water velocity measurements. The Dallas Thompson Riverscreen was pumping approximately 930 gpm during our evaluation, which is close to the maximum pumping rate for this model. Underwater videography showed only slow movement of water-borne particulates toward the pump intake, and the screen material was clean. All water velocity measurements were taken below the pump intake opening and between 3 to 6 in. from the screen face. All approach velocities (flow toward the screen and pump) were below National Marine Fisheries Service draft guidelines for juvenile fish screens.

  12. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at North Dallas High School. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This Document is the Final Technical Report of the Solar Energy System located at the North Dallas High School, Dallas, Texas. The system is designed as a retrofit in a three story with basement, concrete frame high school building. The building was air conditioned with an electric drive 300-ton chilled water central system in 1973. The building contains 126,000 square feet and the solar energy system will preheat 100 percent of domestic hot water and supply 47.5 percent of annual building heating requirements. During the building cooling seasons, the solar energy system will supply 100 percent of domestic hot water. The solar energy system consists of 4800 square feet (320 panels) Lennox/Honeywell flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 10,000 gallon steel tank storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 686.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/year (specified) building heating and domestic hot water heating. The start up date is December 4, 1979. Extracts from the site files, specification references for solar modification to existing building heating and domestic hot water systems, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are presented.

  13. Circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and abdominal aortic pathology: from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Grodin, Justin L; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Ayers, Colby R; Kumar, Darpan S; Rohatgi, Anand; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Das, Sandeep R

    2011-10-01

    Prior reports have associated increased circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an endopeptidase active in the extracellular matrix, with the formation and rupture of aortic aneurysms, raising the possibility that MMP-9 may be a useful diagnostic or therapeutic target for aortic pathology. However, associations between MMP-9 and pathological abdominal aortic phenotypes in the general population have not been reported. In the Dallas Heart Study, a population-based sample of Dallas County residents (n = 2304), we measured MMP-9 and performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdominal aorta, measuring aortic compliance, plaque, wall thickness and luminal diameter. After adjustment for traditional cardiac risk factors and body size, higher MMP-9 quartiles were independently associated with higher aortic wall thickness and larger luminal diameter (p < 0.0001 for each), but not abdominal aortic plaque (p = 0.08), coronary artery calcium (p = 0.20) or the aortic luminal diameter/aortic wall thickness ratio (p = 0.37), supporting the hypothesis that therapies targeting MMP-9 may affect the abdominal aortic wall and modify aortic pathology.

  14. Circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and abdominal aortic pathology: From the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Grodin, Justin L; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Ayers, Colby R; Kumar, Darpan S; Rohatgi, Anand; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Das, Sandeep R

    2012-01-01

    Prior reports have associated increased circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), an endopeptidase active in the extracellular matrix, with the formation and rupture of aortic aneurysms, raising the possibility that MMP-9 may be a useful diagnostic or therapeutic target for aortic pathology. However, associations between MMP-9 and pathological abdominal aortic phenotypes in the general population have not been reported. In the Dallas Heart Study, a population-based sample of Dallas County residents (n = 2304), we measured MMP-9 and performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdominal aorta, measuring aortic compliance, plaque, wall thickness and luminal diameter. After adjustment for traditional cardiac risk factors and body size, higher MMP-9 quartiles were independently associated with higher aortic wall thickness and larger luminal diameter (p < 0.0001 for each), but not abdominal aortic plaque (p = 0.08), coronary artery calcium (p = 0.20) or the aortic luminal diameter/aortic wall thickness ratio (p = 0.37), supporting the hypothesis that therapies targeting MMP-9 may affect the abdominal aortic wall and modify aortic pathology. PMID:22002999

  15. Minority Women in Research in Education. A Report of the Dallas Conference on Expanding the Role of Minority Women in Educational Research (Dallas, Texas, November 9-11, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosford, Philip L., Ed.

    Reporting on the 1977 Dallas Conference where 14 women representing 6 ethinc backgrounds explored the possibilities of expanding the role of minority women in educational research, this document includes 5 major sections (with individual summaries and recommendations), a bibliography, and an appendix. Major sections of this document present the…

  16. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) Stereoisomers in U.S. Food from Dallas, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, David T.; Miller, James; Gent, Tyra L.; Malik-Bass, Noor; Petersen, Malte; Paepke, Olaf; Colacino, Justin A.; Hynan, Linda S.; Harris, T. Robert; Malla, Sunitha; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used in polystyrene foams in thermal insulation and electrical equipment. The HBCD commercial mixture consists mainly of α, β, and γ stereoisomers. Health concerns of HBCD exposure include alterations in immune and reproductive systems, neurotoxic effects, and endocrine disruption. Stereoisomer-specific levels of HBCD have not been measured previously in U.S. food. Objectives: We measured HBCD stereoisomer levels in U.S. foods from Dallas, Texas, supermarkets. Methods: Convenience samples of commonly consumed foods were purchased from supermarkets in Dallas in 2009–2010. Food samples included a wide variety of lipid-rich foods: fish, peanut butter, poultry, pork, and beef. Thirty-six individual food samples were collected in 2010 and analyzed for α-, β-, and γ-HBCD stereoisomers using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Ten pooled food samples previously collected in 2009 for a study of total HBCD levels using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were reanalyzed for α-, β-, and γ-HBCD stereoisomers using LC-MS/MS. Results: Of the 36 measured individual foods, 15 (42%) had detectable levels of HBCD. Median (ranges) of α- and γ-HBCD concentrations were 0.003 (< 0.005–1.307) and 0.005 (< 0.010–0.143) ng/g wet weight (ww), respectively; β-HBCD was present in three samples with a median (range) of 0.003 (< 0.005–0.019) ng/g ww. Median levels (range) for α-, β-, and γ-HBCD, in pooled samples were 0.077 (0.010–0.310), 0.008 (< 0.002–0.070), and 0.024 (0.012–0.170) ng/g ww, respectively. Conclusions: α-HBCD was detected most frequently and at highest concentrations, followed by γ-, and then β-HBCD, in food samples from Dallas, Texas. Food may be a substantial contributor to the elevated α-HBCD levels observed in humans. These data suggest that larger and more representative sampling should be conducted. PMID:22647707

  17. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) stereoisomers in U.S. food from Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Szabo, David T; Miller, James; Gent, Tyra L; Malik-Bass, Noor; Petersen, Malte; Paepke, Olaf; Colacino, Justin A; Hynan, Linda S; Harris, T Robert; Malla, Sunitha; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2012-09-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used in polystyrene foams in thermal insulation and electrical equipment. The HBCD commercial mixture consists mainly of α, β, and γ stereoisomers. Health concerns of HBCD exposure include alterations in immune and reproductive systems, neurotoxic effects, and endocrine disruption. Stereoisomer-specific levels of HBCD have not been measured previously in U.S. food. We measured HBCD stereoisomer levels in U.S. foods from Dallas, Texas, supermarkets. Convenience samples of commonly consumed foods were purchased from supermarkets in Dallas in 2009-2010. Food samples included a wide variety of lipid-rich foods: fish, peanut butter, poultry, pork, and beef. Thirty-six individual food samples were collected in 2010 and analyzed for α-, β-, and γ-HBCD stereoisomers using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Ten pooled food samples previously collected in 2009 for a study of total HBCD levels using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were reanalyzed for α-, β-, and γ-HBCD stereoisomers using LC-MS/MS. Of the 36 measured individual foods, 15 (42%) had detectable levels of HBCD. Median (ranges) of α- and γ-HBCD concentrations were 0.003 (< 0.005-1.307) and 0.005 (< 0.010-0.143) ng/g wet weight (ww), respectively; β-HBCD was present in three samples with a median (range) of 0.003 (< 0.005-0.019) ng/g ww. Median levels (range) for α-, β-, and γ-HBCD, in pooled samples were 0.077 (0.010-0.310), 0.008 (< 0.002-0.070), and 0.024 (0.012-0.170) ng/g ww, respectively. α-HBCD was detected most frequently and at highest concentrations, followed by γ-, and then β-HBCD, in food samples from Dallas, Texas. Food may be a substantial contributor to the elevated α-HBCD levels observed in humans. These data suggest that larger and more representative sampling should be conducted.

  18. Spatial Analysis and Land Use Regression of VOCs and NO2 in Dallas, Texas during Two Seasons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive air sampling for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was conducted at 24 fire stations and a compliance monitoring site in Dallas, Texas, USA during summer 2006 and winter 2008. This ambient air monitoring network was established...

  19. 78 FR 18314 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... abroad include: synthetic rubber; natural rubber; woven industrial fabric (of synthetic staple fibers... Production Activity; CSI Calendering, Inc. (Rubber Coated Textile Fabric); Arlington, Texas The Dallas/Fort... able to choose the duty rate during customs entry procedures that applies to rubber coated,...

  20. FORUM ON INNOVATIVE HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES: DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL. Third, Dallas, Texas, June 11-13, 1991 - TECHNICAL PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On June 11 -13,1991, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Technology Innovation Office and Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory hosted an international conference in Dallas, TX, to exchange solutions to hazardous waste treatment problems. This conference, the Third Forum...

  1. 75 FR 55401 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request of release for permanent easement of airport property. SUMMARY: The...

  2. Rearranging Deck Chairs in Dallas: Contextual Constraints and Within-District Resource Allocation in Urban Texas School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to simultaneously explore resource allocation across schools within large urban school districts and across all schools within major metropolitan areas that include those urban districts in the state of Texas. This study uses a three-year panel, from 2005 to 2007, for Texas elementary schools in the Houston, Dallas,…

  3. Violence in America. Proceedings of the Southwest Regional Research Conference (Dallas, Texas, November 6-8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Annette Zimmern, Ed.; Sullivan, Jane C., Ed.

    The conference reported in this document consisted of three symposia and eight workshops each concerned with a different area of violence in America. The document includes an introduction by Annette Zimmern Reed and opening remarks by Dallas mayor Starke Taylor and his wife, Carolyn Taylor. Information from the three symposia is given in the areas…

  4. 78 FR 62583 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Lasko...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 39--Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Authorization of Production Activity; Lasko Products, Inc. (Household Electric Fans); Fort Worth, Texas On May 21, 2013, Lasko...

  5. 78 FR 9105 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, DFW Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request of Release for Permanent Easement of Airport Property. SUMMARY: The FAA...

  6. The Treatment of Jewish History in World Civilization Textbooks: A Report to the Dallas Independent School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Betty; And Others

    The paper discusses a study undertaken to evaluate how Jews and Jewish history are treated in three textbooks used in public high schools in Dallas. It also presents findings from the study, and recommends activities and supplementary materials which give a more realistic and comprehensive picture of Jewish history. Major objectives were to…

  7. Rearranging Deck Chairs in Dallas: Contextual Constraints and Within-District Resource Allocation in Urban Texas School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is to simultaneously explore resource allocation across schools within large urban school districts and across all schools within major metropolitan areas that include those urban districts in the state of Texas. This study uses a three-year panel, from 2005 to 2007, for Texas elementary schools in the Houston, Dallas,…

  8. A Partnership between the Dallas County Community College District and Texas Instruments: Using Total Quality Management to Reinvent Workforce Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, J. William

    1994-01-01

    Describes elements of a partnership between Dallas County Community College District and Texas Instruments that draws on the concepts and processes of Total Quality Management (TQM). Suggests that such partnerships have the net effect of significantly improving and reinventing cooperative efforts to prepare students for the workforce. (MAB)

  9. Spatial Analysis and Land Use Regression of VOCs and NO2 in Dallas, Texas during Two Seasons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive air sampling for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was conducted at 24 fire stations and a compliance monitoring site in Dallas, Texas, USA during summer 2006 and winter 2008. This ambient air monitoring network was established...

  10. Violence in America. Proceedings of the Southwest Regional Research Conference (Dallas, Texas, November 6-8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Annette Zimmern, Ed.; Sullivan, Jane C., Ed.

    The conference reported in this document consisted of three symposia and eight workshops each concerned with a different area of violence in America. The document includes an introduction by Annette Zimmern Reed and opening remarks by Dallas mayor Starke Taylor and his wife, Carolyn Taylor. Information from the three symposia is given in the areas…

  11. 76 FR 33333 - Use of Small Area Fair Market Rents for Project Base Vouchers in the Dallas TX Metropolitan Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Use of Small Area Fair Market Rents for Project Base Vouchers in the Dallas TX Metropolitan Area AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing, HUD. ACTION:...

  12. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    The solar hot water system installed in the Days Inns of America, Inc., Days Inn Motel (120 rooms), I-35/2276 Valley View Lane, Dallas, Texas is described. The solar system was designed by ILI Incorporated to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. The Solar Energy Products, model CU-30WW liquid (water) flat plate collector (1000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. This system is one of eleven systems planned. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers. The operation of this system was begun March 11, 1980. The solar components were partly funded ($15,000 of 30,000 cost) by a Department of Energy grant.

  13. Holocene Paleoglacier History of Glaciar Dalla Vedova, Cordillera DARWIN, Tierra del Fuego, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynhout, S.

    2015-12-01

    Southernmost South America is unique in its position immediately north of the present-day Antarctic Convergence, making it ideally suited for the evaluation of Antarctic influences on terrestrial paleoclimate. Here we present a glacial geomorphic interpretation of the paleoglacial history of Glaciar Dalla Vedova in Bahía Blanca, Cordillera Darwin, Chile (53°S). This interpretation is further constrained by radiocarbon dating, cosmogenic dating, dendrochronology, and historical photogrammetry. Preliminary field work suggests that Holocene glacier fluctuations have been constrained to within 3 km of the present glacier boundary, punctuated by rapid recent glacier retreat over the past century. By comparing the observed chronology with the record contained further north in Patagonia, we will evaluate possible mechanisms of regional climate variability over the Holocene across southernmost South America.

  14. Hydrologic data for urban studies in the Dallas, Texas metropolitan area, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, B.B.; Wood, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    This report contains rainfall and runoff data collected during the 1976 water year for drainage basins of Joes Creek, Bachman Branch, Turtle Creek, Coombs Creek, Cedar Creek, White Rock Creek, Elam Creek, Fivemile Creek, Newton Creek, Whites Branch, Prairie Creek, Tenmile Creek, Duck Creek, and South Mesquite Creek in the Dallas metropolitan area. The information will be useful in determining the extent to which progressive urbanization will affect the yield and mode of occurrence of storm runoff. Detailed rainfall-runoff computations, including hydrographs and mass curves, are presented for six storm periods during the 1976 water year. During the 1976 water year, one continuous stream-gaging station and two flood-hydrograph partial-record stations were added to the study area. These stations are located in the Prairie Creek basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Demonstration of Land and Hold Short Technology at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Paul V.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance system for assisting in Land and Hold Short operations was developed and then tested at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. This system displays deceleration advisory information on a head-up display (HUD) in front of the airline pilot during landing. The display includes runway edges, a trend vector, deceleration advisory, locations of the hold line and of the selected exit, and alphanumeric information about the progress of the aircraft. Deceleration guidance is provided to the hold short line or to a pilot selected exit prior to this line. Logic is provided to switch the display automatically to the next available exit. The report includes descriptions of the algorithms utilized in the displays, and a report on the techniques of HUD alignment, and results.

  16. Implementation of the first wellness-fitness evaluation for the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department

    PubMed Central

    Seals, Norman; Martin, JoAnn; Russell, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    More than 100 firefighters lose their lives in the line of duty each year; many of these deaths are caused by cardiovascular events and underlying coronary heart disease. In addition, firefighters are at higher-than-normal risk of developing certain types of cancer. To improve health and fitness among its firefighters, the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department developed and implemented an annual wellness-fitness program in 2008. The program detected and addressed medical issues including coronary disease, hypertension, high triglyceride levels, high cholesterol, high blood glucose levels, and hematuria. Prostate, thyroid, breast, kidney, and bladder cancers were also detected. By identifying these issues, engaging the firefighters' personal physicians, and recommending individualized treatment plans, this program may have extended lives and improved the quality of life for the firefighters. PMID:20671818

  17. HIV/STI risk among male Mexican immigrants in Dallas, Texas: findings from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kate S; Eggleston, Elizabeth; Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Garcia, Sandra G

    2010-12-01

    Rates of HIV and STIs are higher among Latinos than the general U.S. population. A number of factors place Latino immigrants at particularly high risk. 128 male Mexican immigrants in Dallas, Texas completed personal interviews. We measured the prevalence of HIV/STI risk factors and identified sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with higher risk. 9% of the total sample had 3 or more sexual partners in the past year. 5% had sex with a commercial sex worker (CSW). 11% had sex with another man. 11% had a previous STI diagnosis. Risk behaviors and STI history were more prevalent among men who had used illegal drugs or frequently consumed alcohol (18% of the sample) than among others. The overall prevalence of HIV/STI risk factors in this population was moderate. However, men who drank alcohol frequently and used illegal drugs were more likely than others to report engaging in behaviors that put them at risk for acquiring HIV/STI.

  18. An analysis of landing rates and separations at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Mark G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1996-01-01

    Advanced air traffic management systems such as the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) should yield a wide range of benefits, including reduced aircraft delays and controller workload. To determine the traffic-flow benefits achievable from future terminal airspace automation, live radar information was used to perform an analysis of current aircraft landing rates and separations at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Separation statistics that result when controllers balance complex control procedural constraints in order to maintain high landing rates are presented. In addition, the analysis estimates the potential for airport capacity improvements by determining the unused landing opportunities that occur during rush traffic periods. Results suggest a large potential for improving the accuracy and consistency of spacing between arrivals on final approach, and they support earlier simulation findings that improved air traffic management would increase capacity and reduce delays.

  19. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2013, Dallas.

    PubMed

    Ishimori, Naoki; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Yamada, Satoshi; Yokoshiki, Hisashi; Mitsuyama, Hirofumi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions were held in Dallas on November 16-20, 2013. The meeting is one of the most leading conferences of cardiology in the world, with over 18,000 professional attendees from more than 105 countries. There were 315 invited sessions and 443 abstract sessions, comprising more than 5,000 presentations. The sessions were expanded to 26 program tracks, which included and integrated basic, translational, clinical, and population science. In the series of late-breaking sessions, updates of results from 20 clinical trials were disclosed. Japanese scientists submitted the second most abstracts to the Scientific Sessions in 2013. We appreciate the significant contribution to the sessions by Japanese cardiologists as well as the Japanese Circulation Society.

  20. Seasonal abundance and mortality of Oebalus poecilus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in a hibernation refuge.

    PubMed

    Santos, R S S; Redaelli, L R; Diefenbach, L M G; Romanowski, H P; Prando, H F; Antochevis, R C

    2006-05-01

    Oebalus poecilus (Dallas) is an important pest affecting irrigated rice in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It hibernates during the coldest months of the year in refuges such as bamboo litter. This study examined O. poecilus hibernation to determine the causes of mortality during this period. The study was conducted in a 140 m(2) bamboo plantation located in a rice-growing area in Eldorado do Sul County (30 degrees 02 S and 51 degrees 23 W), RS. During June 2000 to April 2002, 63 samples of litter were taken in weekly or fortnightly intervals, and the number of bugs recorded in the laboratory. The arrival at the hibernation site (bamboo litter) began in the first fortnight of March, and was completed in the beginning of May. O. poecilus left this refuge from middle October to the end of December. Parasitism by tachinid flies and Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuill. fungus were the most important mortality factors.

  1. Chemical data for bottom sediment in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2002-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the former Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. The U.S. Geological Survey began studies of water, sediment, and biota in the reservoir in 1994 after a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation detected concentrations of organic chemicals on both facilities. Additional reservoir bottom sediment samples were collected during December 1999–January 2000 at the request of the Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command to further define the occurrence and distribution of selected constituents and to supplement available data. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory analyzed bottom-sediment samples from 16 box cores and 5 gravity cores for major and trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, grain size, and cesium-137.

  2. Runway Incursion Prevention System: Demonstration and Testing at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Quach, Cuong C.; Young, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using NASA s Boeing 757 research aircraft and a test van equipped to emulate an incurring aircraft. The system was also demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, DFW flight test activities, and quantitative and qualitative results of the testing.

  3. Development of Ultra-Wideband Pulsers at the University of Texas at Dallas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davanloo, Farzin; Collins, Carl B.; Agee, Forrest J.

    The generic concept for ultra-fast pulsers at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) employs a Blumlein based pulse forming system commutated by a fast switching device. Characterization studies of these pulsers have been extensively performed. The pulser design has been adapted to enable it to reliably produce powers as great as 100 MW, in nanosecond pulses with rise times on the order of 200 ps. These devices have compact line geometries and are commutated by an avalanche GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) triggered with a low power laser diode array. Significant lifetime improvements for PCSS have been achieved by advanced switch treatments with amorphic diamond coatings also developed at UTD. This report presents the progress in the development of these pulsers for the ultra-wideband (UWB) applications.

  4. The University of Texas at Dallas/Callier Center for Communication Disorders Doctor of Audiology Program.

    PubMed

    Roeser, Ross J; Thibodeau, Linda; Cokely, Carol

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the history and resources of the doctor of audiology (AuD) program at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD)/Callier Center for Communication Disorders, as well as to provide an overview of the program. Data from 1999, when the AuD program was approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Program, to the present were reviewed. The UTD/Callier Center AuD program includes more than 40 faculty members, spans 3 campuses, and has 8 research laboratories. Total enrollment is 32 students (8 students are admitted each year for the 4-year program). Students have access to extensive resources and learning opportunities. The clinical and research programs at the UTD/Callier Center are actively involved in providing high-quality, in-depth education to future doctors of audiology.

  5. Quaternary geologic map of the Dallas 4° x 6° quadrangle, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    State compilations by Luza, Kenneth V.; Jensen, Kathryn M.; Fishman, W.D.; Wermund, E.G.; Richmond, Gerald Martin; edited and integrated by Richmond, Gerald Martin; Christiansen, Ann Coe; Digital edition by Bush, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    The Quaternary Geologic Map of the Dallas 4° x 6° Quadrangle was mapped as part of the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States. The atlas was begun as an effort to depict the areal distribution of surficial geologic deposits and other materials that accumulated or formed during the past 2+ million years, the period that includes all activities of the human species. These materials are at the surface of the Earth. They make up the ground on which we walk, the dirt in which we dig foundations, and the soil in which we grow crops. Most of our human activity is related in one way or another to these surface materials that are referred to collectively by many geologists as regolith, the mantle of fragmental and generally unconsolidated material that overlies the bedrock foundation of the continent. The maps were compiled at 1:1,000,000 scale.

  6. Relationship between perceptions about neighborhood environment and prevalent obesity: data from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Ayers, Colby R; de Lemos, James A; Lakoski, Susan G; Vega, Gloria L; Grundy, Scott; Das, Sandeep R; Banks-Richard, Kamakki; Albert, Michelle A

    2013-01-01

    Although psychosocial stress can result in adverse health outcomes, little is known about how perceptions of neighborhood conditions, a measure of environment-derived stress, may impact obesity. The association between perceptions of neighborhood environment and obesity (defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m(2) ) among 5,907 participants in the Dallas Heart Study, a multi-ethnic, probability-based sample of Dallas County residents was examined. Participants were asked to respond to 18 questions about perceptions of their neighborhood. Factor analysis was used to identify three factors associated with neighborhood perceptions: neighborhood violence, physical environment, and social cohesion. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between each factor (higher quintile = more unfavorable perceptions) and the odds of obesity. Decreasing age, income, and education associated with unfavorable overall neighborhood perceptions and unfavorable perceptions about specific neighborhood factors (P trend <0.05 for all). Increasing BMI was associated with unfavorable perceptions about physical environment (P trend <0.05) but not violence or social cohesion. After adjustment for race, age, sex, income, education, and length of residence, physical environment perception score in the highest quintile remained associated with a 25% greater odds of obesity (OR 1.25, [95% CI 1.03-1.50]). Predictors of obesity related to environmental perceptions included heavy traffic (OR 1.39, [1.17-1.64]), trash/litter in neighborhood (OR 1.27, [1.01-1.46]), lack of recreational areas (OR 1.21, [1.01-1.46]), and lack of sidewalks (OR 1.25, [95% CI 1.04-1.51]). Thus, unfavorable perceptions of environmental physical conditions are related to increased obesity. Efforts to improve the physical characteristics of neighborhoods, or the perceptions of those characteristics, may assist in the prevention of obesity in this community. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity

  7. Change in Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Weight Gain: Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Cooper-McCann, Rebecca; Ayers, Colby; Berrigan, David; Lian, Min; McClurkin, Michael; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Das, Sandeep R; Hoehner, Christine M; Leonard, Tammy

    2015-07-01

    Despite a proposed connection between neighborhood environment and obesity, few longitudinal studies have examined the relationship between change in neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation, as defined by moving between neighborhoods, and change in body weight. The purpose of this study is to examine the longitudinal relationship between moving to more socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods and weight gain as a cardiovascular risk factor. Weight (kilograms) was measured in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), a multiethnic cohort aged 18-65 years, at baseline (2000-2002) and 7-year follow-up (2007-2009, N=1,835). Data were analyzed in 2013-2014. Geocoded addresses were linked to Dallas County, TX, census block groups. A block group-level neighborhood deprivation index (NDI) was created. Multilevel difference-in-difference models with random effects and a Heckman correction factor (HCF) determined weight change relative to NDI change. Forty-nine percent of the DHS population moved (263 to higher NDI, 586 to lower NDI, 47 within same NDI), with blacks more likely to move than whites or Hispanics (p<0.01), but similar baseline BMI and waist circumference were observed in movers versus non-movers (p>0.05). Adjusting for HCF, sex, race, and time-varying covariates, those who moved to areas of higher NDI gained more weight compared to those remaining in the same or moving to a lower NDI (0.64 kg per 1-unit NDI increase, 95% CI=0.09, 1.19). Impact of NDI change on weight gain increased with time (p=0.03). Moving to more-socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods was associated with weight gain among DHS participants. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Community-Based Participatory Approach to Reduce Breast Cancer Disparities in South Dallas

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Kathryn; Jackson, Rachael; Martin, Marcus; Linnear, Kim; Lopez, Roy; Senteio, Charles; Weaver, Preston; Hill, Anna; Banda, Jesse; Epperson-Brown, Marva; Morrison, Janet; Parrish, Deborah; Newton, JR; Royster, Marcene; Haley, Sheila; Lafayette, Camille; Harris, Phyllis; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.; Johnson, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Background South Dallas experiences significant disparities in breast cancer mortality, with a high proportion of stage III and IV diagnoses. To address these rates, the Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Research Coalition created an educational intervention to promote breast health and early detection efforts. Objectives The goals of the intervention were to increase (a) knowledge regarding the chief contributing factors for breast cancer, (b) awareness of the importance of screening for early detection, and (c) the proportion of women who have engaged in appropriate breast cancer screening practices. Methods Eligibility criteria for this nonrandomized, controlled trial included women age 40 and older, English-speaking, and having no personal history of cancer. Control participants received written breast health educational materials. Intervention participants attended 8 weekly sessions that included interactive educational materials, cooking demonstrations, and discussions emphasizing primary and secondary breast cancer prevention. All study participants completed a 1-hour survey at baseline and 4 months later. Results There were 59 women were enrolled in the intervention and 60 in the control group. At follow-up, after controlling for baseline mammography status, women in the intervention group were 10.4 times more likely (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9–36.4) to have received a screening mammogram in the last year compared with the control group. Intervention participants demonstrated statistically significantly higher rates of breast self-examination (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% CI, 1.0–8.6) and breast cancer knowledge (p = .003). Conclusion Lessons learned from this community-based participatory research (CBPR) study can be used to create sustainable cancer disparity reduction models that can be replicated in similar communities. PMID:22616205

  9. Developing an ST-elevation myocardial infarction system of care in Dallas County.

    PubMed

    DelliFraine, Jami; Langabeer, James; Segrest, Wendy; Fowler, Raymond; King, Richard; Moyer, Peter; Henry, Timothy D; Koenig, William; Warner, John; Stuart, Leilani; Griffin, Russell; Fathiamini, Safa; Emert, Jamie; Roettig, Mayme Lou; Jollis, James

    2013-06-01

    The American Heart Association Caruth Initiative (AHACI) is a multiyear project to increase the speed of coronary reperfusion and create an integrated system of care for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this study was to determine if the AHACI improved key performance metrics, that is, door-to-balloon (D2B) and symptom-onset-to-balloon times, for nontransfer patients with STEMI. Hospital patient data were obtained through the National Cardiovascular Data Registry Action Registry-Get With The Guidelines, and prehospital data came from emergency medical services (EMS) agencies through their electronic Patient Care Record systems. Initial D2B and symptom-onset-to-balloon times for nontransfer primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) STEMI care were explored using descriptive statistics, generalized linear models, and logistic regression. Data were collected by 15 PCI-capable Dallas hospitals and 24 EMS agencies. In the first 18 months, there were 3,853 cases of myocardial infarction, of which 926 (24%) were nontransfer patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI. D2B time decreased significantly (P < .001), from a median time of 74 to 64 minutes. Symptom-onset-to-balloon time decreased significantly (P < .001), from a median time of 195 to 162 minutes. The AHACI has improved the system of STEMI care for one of the largest counties in the United States, and it demonstrates the benefits of integrating EMS and hospital data, implementing standardized training and protocols, and providing benchmarking data to hospitals and EMS agencies. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Community-based participatory approach to reduce breast cancer disparities in south Dallas.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Kathryn; Jackson, Rachael; Martin, Marcus; Linnear, Kim; Lopez, Roy; Senteio, Charles; Weaver, Preston; Hill, Anna; Banda, Jesse; Epperson-Brown, Marva; Morrison, Janet; Parrish, Deborah; Newton, J R; Royster, Marcene; Haley, Sheila; Lafayette, Camille; Harris, Phyllis; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Johnson, Eric S

    2011-01-01

    South Dallas experiences significant disparities in breast cancer mortality, with a high proportion of stage III and IV diagnoses. To address these rates, the Dallas Cancer Disparities Community Research Coalition created an educational intervention to promote breast health and early detection efforts. The goals of the intervention were to increase (a) knowledge regarding the chief contributing factors for breast cancer, (b) awareness of the importance of screening for early detection, and (c) the proportion of women who have engaged in appropriate breast cancer screening practices. Eligibility criteria for this nonrandomized, controlled trial included women age 40 and older, English-speaking, and having no personal history of cancer. Control participants received written breast health educational materials. Intervention participants attended 8 weekly sessions that included interactive educational materials, cooking demonstrations, and discussions emphasizing primary and secondary breast cancer prevention. All study participants completed a 1-hour survey at baseline and 4 months later. There were 59 women were enrolled in the intervention and 60 in the control group. At follow-up, after controlling for baseline mammography status, women in the intervention group were 10.4 times more likely (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-36.4) to have received a screening mammogram in the last year compared with the control group. Intervention participants demonstrated statistically significantly higher rates of breast self-examination (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% CI, 1.0-8.6) and breast cancer knowledge (p=.003). Lessons learned from this community-based participatory research (CBPR) study can be used to create sustainable cancer disparity reduction models that can be replicated in similar communities.

  11. Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Janet L.; Hess, Jeremy J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To investigate relationships between ambient temperatures and violent crimes to determine whether those relationships are consistent across different crime categories and whether they are best described as increasing linear functions, or as curvilinear functions that decrease beyond some temperature threshold. A secondary objective was to consider the implications of the observed relationships for injuries and deaths from violent crimes in the context of a warming climate. To address these questions, we examined the relationship between daily ambient temperatures and daily incidents of violent crime in Dallas, Texas from 1993–1999. Methods We analyzed the relationships between daily fluctuations in ambient temperature, other meteorological and temporal variables, and rates of daily violent crime using time series piece-wise regression and plots of daily data. Violent crimes, including aggravated assault, homicide, and sexual assault, were analyzed. Results We found that daily mean ambient temperature is related in a curvilinear fashion to daily rates of violent crime with a positive and increasing relationship between temperature and aggravated crime that moderates beyond temperatures of 80°F and then turns negative beyond 90°F. Conclusion While some have characterized the relationship between temperature and violent crime as a continually increasing linear function, leaving open the possibility that aggravated crime will increase in a warmer climate, we conclude that the relationship in Dallas is not linear, but moderates and turns negative at high ambient temperatures. We posit that higher temperatures may encourage people to seek shelter in cooler indoor spaces, and that street crime and other crimes of opportunity are subsequently decreased. This finding suggests that the higher ambient temperatures expected with climate change may result in marginal shifts in violent crime in the short term, but are not likely to be accompanied by markedly

  12. The CASA Dallas Fort Worth Remote Sensing Network ICT for Urban Disaster Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam; Chen, Haonan; Philips, Brenda; Seo, Dong-jun; Junyent, Francesc; Bajaj, Apoorva; Zink, Mike; Mcenery, John; Sukheswalla, Zubin; Cannon, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Westbrook, David

    2013-04-01

    The dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has shown great advantages for observing and prediction of hazardous weather events in the lower atmosphere (1-3 km above ground level). The network is operating though a scanning methodology called DCAS, distributed collaborative adaptive sensing, which is designed to focus on particular interesting regions of the atmosphere and disseminate information for decision-making to multiple end-users, such as emergency managers and policy analysts. Since spring 2012, CASA and the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG) have embarked the development of Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network, including 8-node of dual-polarization X-band radars, in the populous DFW Metroplex (pop. 6.3 million in 2010). The main goal of CASA DFW urban demonstration network is to protect the safety and prosperity of humans and ecosystems through research activities that include: 1) to demonstrate the DCAS operation paradigm developed by CASA; 2) to create high-resolution, three-dimensional mapping of the meteorological conditions; 3) to help the local emergency managers issue impacts-based warnings and forecasts for severe wind, tornado, hail, and flash flood hazards. The products of this radar network will include single and multi-radar data, vector wind retrieval, quantitative precipitation estimation and nowcasting, and numerical weather predictions. In addition, the high spatial and temporal resolution rainfall products from CASA can serve as a reliable data input for distributed hydrological models in urban area. This paper presents the information and communication link between radars, rainfall product generation, hydrologic model link and end user community in the Dallas Fort Worth Urban Network. Specific details of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) between the various

  13. Floods on White Rock Creek above White Rock Lake at Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, Clarence R.

    1963-01-01

    The White Rock Creek watershed within the city limits of Dallas , Texas, presents problems not unique in the rapid residential and industrial development encountered by many cities throughout the United States. The advantages of full development of the existing area within a city before expanding city boundaries, are related to both economics and civic pride. The expansion of city boundaries usually results in higher per capital costs for the operation of city governments. Certainly no responsible city official would oppose reasonable development of watersheds and flood plains and thus sacrifice an increase in tax revenue. Within the words "reasonable development" lies the problem faced by these officials. They are aware that the natural function of a stream channel, and its associated flood plain is to carry away excess water in time of flood. They are also aware that failure to recognize this has often led to haphazard development on flood plains with a consequent increase in flood damages. In the absence of factual data defining the risk involved in occupying flood plains, stringent corrective and preventative measures must be taken to regulate man's activities on flood plains to a point beyond normal precaution. Flood-flow characteristics in the reach of White Rock Creek that lies between the northern city boundary of Dallas and Northwest Highway (Loop 12) at the upper end of White Rock Lake, are presented in this report. Hydrologic data shown include history and magnitude of floods, flood profiles, outlines of areas inundated by three floods, and estimates of mean velocities of flow at selected points. Approximate areas inundated by floods of April 1942 and July 1962 along White Rock Creek and by the flood of October 1962 along Cottonwood Creek, Floyd Branch, and Jackson Branch, are delineated on maps. Greater floods have undoubtedly occurred in the past but no attempt is made to show their probable overflow limits because basic data on such floods could not

  14. Characterization of stormwater runoff from the Naval Air Station and Naval Wepons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, T.H.; Baldys, Stanley; Lizarraga, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Median event-mean concentrations computed for 12 selected constituents in samples from NAS and NWIRP fixed sites were compared to median event-mean concentrations for residential, commercial, industrial, and highway land uses within the Dallas-Fort Worth area computed from data collected for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System program. NAS and NWIRP median event-mean concentrations also were compared to those for residential and commercial land uses from the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program.

  15. Geo-social and health disparities among persons with disabilities living in Monterrey, Nuevo Leon and Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Silviya P; Small, Eusebius; Campillo, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    In low and high income countries alike, disability exacerbates social, economic, and health disparities, in spite of their differences. This study seeks to identify factors that predict the circumstances people with disabilities face, including poverty. A cross-sectional study design was employed using census track level data for the cities of Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, and Dallas, Texas, from Mexico 2010 and USA 2000 census data collections. Two methods, spatial autocorrelation and geographically weighted regression were used to identify spatial patterns of disability and to explore the relation between disability and context-specific socio-demographic factors. Results indicated that people with disabilities living below the poverty line experience high segregation levels in the semi-central zones of Dallas. In Monterrey, people with disabilities clustered in central areas of the city. A Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) from both data analyses reported high goodness of fit (R ≥ 0.8 for Dallas data and R ≥ 0.7 for Monterrey data, respectively) and predictability of disability prevalence when social disadvantage factors such as unemployment, housing insecurity, household living conditions, and lack of education were present. The divergent and sometimes conflicting trends in practices and policies addressing disability in low and high income environments renders a reexamination of the framework of disability. An understanding of local characteristics joins a grounded socio-cultural understanding of the various contexts that shape location-based social networks and political decisions in providing such an analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A review of genus Nysius Dallas in Argentina (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Orsillidae).

    PubMed

    Pall, José Luis; Kihn, Romina Gisela; Diez, Fernando

    2016-06-29

    The orsillid genus Nysius Dallas is a complex and large genus with more than 100 described species worldwide, and includes many species of agricultural importance, one such example is N. simulans (Stål) from Argentina. Three species of Nysius are found in this country: N. simulans (Stål), N. irroratus (Spinola) and N. puberulus Berg. The material available for the present study, consisting of over 610 specimens, was collected by sweep-net, G-Vac and light trap in the provinces of Chubut (42° to 46°S; 63.5° to 72° W), La Pampa (35º to 39º south; 63º to 68º West), Neuquén (36° to 41° S; 68° to 71°W) and Río Negro (37° to 42°S; 62° to 71°W), in the central region of Argentina, during the years 2010-2014. Although the species N. simulans is frequently recorded as a pest of soybean crop, there exist no detailed description but only a brief general diagnosis. In the present contribution, therefore, we provide a detailed redescription as well as an updated distribution of N. simulans and N. irroratus, and a key for species of genus Nysius present in Argentina.

  17. Flight Test Comparison of Synthetic Vision Display Concepts at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Trey; Parrish, Russell V.; Barry, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Limited visibility is the single most critical factor affecting the safety and capacity of worldwide aviation operations. Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) technology can solve this visibility problem with a visibility solution. These displays employ computer-generated terrain imagery to present 3D, perspective out-the-window scenes with sufficient information and realism to enable operations equivalent to those of a bright, clear day, regardless of weather conditions. To introduce SVS display technology into as many existing aircraft as possible, a retrofit approach was defined that employs existing HDD display capabilities for glass cockpits and HUD capabilities for the other aircraft. This retrofit approach was evaluated for typical nighttime airline operations at a major international airport. Overall, 6 evaluation pilots performed 75 research approaches, accumulating 18 hours flight time evaluating SVS display concepts that used the NASA LaRC's Boeing B-757-200 aircraft at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Results from this flight test establish the SVS retrofit concept, regardless of display size, as viable for tested conditions. Future assessments need to extend evaluation of the approach to operations in an appropriate, terrain-challenged environment with daytime test conditions.

  18. Neighborhood stressors and cardiovascular health: crime and C-reactive protein in Dallas, USA.

    PubMed

    Browning, Christopher R; Cagney, Kathleen A; Iveniuk, James

    2012-10-01

    We apply neighborhood-based theories of social organization and environmental stress to examine variation in a key indicator of inflammation-related cardiovascular risk-C-reactive protein (CRP). Specifically, we emphasize the potentially health-compromising role of rapid increases in the crime rate or "crime spikes" (focusing on a particularly fear-inducing crime - burglary). We also consider the extent to which the magnitude and significance of the association between burglary rate change and inflammatory processes varies by gender. Data on CRP, neighborhood of residence, and individual-level characteristics for adult women and men ages 30-65 are drawn from the 2000-2002 Dallas Heart Study. Results from neighborhood fixed effects models using piecewise linear splines to estimate short-term burglary rate change effects offer support for the hypothesis that crime spikes are associated with CRP. Specifically, we find that short-term burglary rate change is independently associated with CRP for men. Short-term burglary rate change was not associated with CRP for women. These findings shed light on the contextual processes that influence cardiovascular health and point to the potentially important role of short-term changes in environmental stressors in shaping health outcomes. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. The link between bond forfeiture and pretrial release mechanism: The case of Dallas County, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Robert G.; Russell-Kaplan, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of four pretrial jail release mechanisms (i.e., bond types) commonly used during the pretrial phase of the criminal justice process in terms of their ability to discriminate between defendants failing to appear in court (i.e., bond forfeiture). These include attorney bonds, cash bonds, commercial bail bonds, and release via a pretrial services agency. Methods A multi-treatment propensity score matching protocol was employed to assess between-release-mechanism differences in the conditional probability of failure to appear/bond forfeiture. Data were culled from archival state justice records comprising all defendants booked into the Dallas County, Texas jail during 2008 (n = 29,416). Results The results suggest that defendants released via commercial bail bonds were less likely to experience failure to appear leading to the bond forfeiture process compared to equivalent defendants released via cash, attorney, and pretrial services bonds. This finding held across different offense categories. The study frames these differences within a discussion encompassing procedural variation within and between each release mechanism, thereby setting the stage for further research and dialog regarding potential justice reform. PMID:28817579

  20. Landfill emission measurement using Tier 2: The Dallas/Fortworth experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, M.; Thomas, J.; Hill, S.

    1996-07-01

    Landfill owners and operators are finding that today`s operational challenges are growing in direct proportion to society`s increasing environmental awareness. The obvious concerns of society are reflected in the strict requirements of recent federal and state regulations, such as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act`s Subtitle D, which were passed to ensure the best available technology is utilized for environmental protection. This article describes the efforts of a group of Dallas/Fort Worth municipal landfill owners to comply with one state requirement for assessing the potentially harmful gaseous emissions from landfills. Several attempts were made by the group to acquire accurate site-specific landfill emission data to determine whether gas collection and control systems (GCCSs) were necessary. For most of the group members, the potential existed for saving millions of dollars, making the frustrating and difficult task worthwhile. The lessons learned by the group may assist other landfill owners in complying with the upcoming federal New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Emission Guidelines (EG).

  1. Phytophagy of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) fed on prey and Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Grigolli, J F J; Grigolli, M M Kubota; Ramalho, D G; Martins, A L; Vacari, A M; De Bortoli, S A

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the development and reproduction of the zoophytophagous predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) fed kale, broccoli and cabbage affects its. Nymphs and adults of this predator were fed on larvae of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) as prey with kale, cabbage, or broccoli. In the nymph period, the duration and prey consumption were similar with all the Brassicacea cultivar. However, nymph viability was higher for predators with broccoli leaves. The mean weight of 5th-instar nymphs, newly emerged females and the sex ratio were similar among the Brassicacea cultivars, while newly emerged males were heavier with kale and broccoli leaves. The supply of broccoli leaves resulted in greater oviposition, higher number of eggs per egg mass and longer longevity of P. nigrispinus males and females. Furthermore, the consumption of P. xylostella larvae by adult predators was higher with these cultivars. The net reproductive rate (R0) and mean generation time (T) were highest for predators with prey and broccoli leaves. The reproductive parameters of P. nigrispinus were enhanced when fed on P. xylostella larvae with and broccoli leaves, which can be an alternative diet in laboratory rearing of this predator.

  2. The quantitative precipitation estimation system for Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haonan; Chandrasekar, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) urban radar network consists of a combination of high resolution X band radars and a standard National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) system operating at S band frequency. High spatiotemporal-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the important applications of such a network. This paper presents a real-time QPE system developed by the Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) Engineering Research Center for the DFW urban region using both the high resolution X band radar network and the NWS S band radar observations. The specific dual-polarization radar rainfall algorithms at different frequencies (i.e., S- and X-band) and the fusion methodology combining observations at different temporal resolution are described. Radar and rain gauge observations from four rainfall events in 2013 that are characterized by different meteorological phenomena are used to compare the rainfall estimation products of the CASA DFW QPE system to conventional radar products from the national radar network provided by NWS. This high-resolution QPE system is used for urban flash flood mitigations when coupled with hydrological models.

  3. Borehole geophysical logs at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braun, Christopher L.; Anaya, Roberto; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2000-01-01

    A shallow alluvial aquifer at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant near Dallas, Texas, has been contaminated by organic solvents used in the fabrication and assembly of aircraft and aircraft parts. Natural gamma-ray and electromagnetic-induction borehole geophysical logs were obtained from 162 poly vinyl-chloride-cased wells at the plant and were integrated with existing lithologic data to improve site characterization of the subsurface alluvium. Software was developed for filtering and classifying the log data and for processing, analyzing, and creating graphical output of the digital data. The alluvium consists of mostly fine-grained low-permeability sediments; however for this study, the alluvium was classified into low, intermediate, and high clay-content sediments on the basis of the gamma-ray logs. The low clay-content sediments were interpreted as being relatively permeable, whereas the high clay-content sediments were interpreted as being relatively impermeable. Simple statistics were used to identify zones of potentially contaminated sediments on the basis of the gamma-ray log classifications and the electromagnetic-induction log conductivity data.

  4. Service learning in auditory rehabilitation courses: the University of Texas at Dallas.

    PubMed

    Cokely, Carol G; Thibodeau, Linda M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this work was to review service learning (SL) principles and its implementation into the auditory rehabilitation (AR) curriculum at the University of Texas at Dallas and to evaluate the courses to determine whether potential benefits of SL are worth the substantial time commitment and course restructuring. Via retrospective review, student outcomes for 25 students from 3 cohorts who completed the adult AR course prior to implementation of SL curriculum (pre-SL) were compared with those of 28 students from 3 SL cohorts. Data included final examination grades, ratings for overall course content, amount learned, clarity of responsibility, workload, relevance, and course comments. Student journals from the SL group and mentor surveys also were reviewed. The majority of student outcomes were comparable for pre-SL and SL cohorts. Clarity of responsibility and workload were rated lower for SL courses than for pre-SL classes, with medium and small to medium effect sizes, respectively. Mentors rated the projects and process of high value and benefit, and several projects remain in use beyond the end of the course. Continued use of an SL approach is supported, but additional guidance for students is needed for reflection and project analysis.

  5. The association between plasma caspase-3, atherosclerosis, and vascular function in the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Matulevicius, Susan; Rohatgi, Anand; Khera, Amit; Das, Sandeep R; Owens, Andrew; Ayers, Colby R; Timaran, Carlos H; Rosero, Eric B; Drazner, Mark H; Peshock, Ronald M; de Lemos, James A

    2008-10-01

    Caspase-3, an apoptosis protease, is expressed in atherosclerotic plaques. We examined the relationship between plasma caspase-3 levels, aortic compliance, and atherosclerosis. Caspase-3 was measured in 3,221 subjects from the Dallas Heart Study. Electron beam computed tomography measures of coronary calcium (CAC) (n = 2,404) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of abdominal aortic wall thickness (AWT) (n = 2,208) and aortic compliance (AC) (n = 2,328) were obtained. Multivariate analyses were performed, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiac medications. In univariable analysis, caspase-3 associated with CAC (P < 0.0001), AWT (P = 0.002), and AC (P < 0.0001). After multivariable adjustment, 4th quartile caspase-3 (compared to 1st quartile) was significantly associated with CAC (P = 0.004), AWT (P = 0.02), and AC (P < 0.0001) with similar findings for caspase-3 as a continuous variable. Caspase-3 independently associates with CAC, AWT, and AC, suggesting a link between apoptosis and atherosclerosis.

  6. The link between bond forfeiture and pretrial release mechanism: The case of Dallas County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Clipper, Stephen J; Morris, Robert G; Russell-Kaplan, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of four pretrial jail release mechanisms (i.e., bond types) commonly used during the pretrial phase of the criminal justice process in terms of their ability to discriminate between defendants failing to appear in court (i.e., bond forfeiture). These include attorney bonds, cash bonds, commercial bail bonds, and release via a pretrial services agency. A multi-treatment propensity score matching protocol was employed to assess between-release-mechanism differences in the conditional probability of failure to appear/bond forfeiture. Data were culled from archival state justice records comprising all defendants booked into the Dallas County, Texas jail during 2008 (n = 29,416). The results suggest that defendants released via commercial bail bonds were less likely to experience failure to appear leading to the bond forfeiture process compared to equivalent defendants released via cash, attorney, and pretrial services bonds. This finding held across different offense categories. The study frames these differences within a discussion encompassing procedural variation within and between each release mechanism, thereby setting the stage for further research and dialog regarding potential justice reform.

  7. Level One Validation Concept for GPM over Dallas - Fort Worth Urban Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Chen, H.; Le, M.; Biswas, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory was launched on February 27, 2014. The two advanced instruments onboard GPM, namely, Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), can provide measurement of rainfall, snowfall, ice and other precipitation over most of the globe. As an integral part of all satellite precipitation missions, ground validation helps to quantify precipitation measurement uncertainty and provide insight into the physical and statistical basis of retrieval algorithms. Among various validation instruments, ground-based dual-polarization radar (at S, C and X band frequencies) has been shown to be a powerful tool to estimate surface rainfall. This paper will present the concept of level one validation of GPM using high resolution precipitation observations from DFW network. The area of interest in this study is Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which hosts a network of six high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radars operated by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) and the NWS WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar). The DFW network QPE product has been shown to be of excellent quality, in terms of accuracy as well as space time resolution (Chen and Chandrasekar, Journal of Hydrology, May (2015)). Detailed comparisons will be conducted between GPM based rainfall estimates and ground radar observations collected during the GPM satellite overpasses over DFW region. Dual-polarization based raindrop size distribution (DSD) retrieval, quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), and hydrometeor classifications will be presented in detail.

  8. Oxidation-reduction processes in ground water at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Braun, Christopher L.; Lee, Roger W.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of trichloroethene in ground water at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in Dallas, Texas, indicate three source areas of chlorinated solvents?building 1, building 6, and an off-site source west of the facility. The presence of daughter products of reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene, which were not used at the facility, south and southwest of the source areas are evidence that reductive dechlorination is occurring. In places south of the source areas, dissolved oxygen concentrations indicated that reduction of oxygen could be the dominant process, particularly south of building 6; but elevated dissolved oxygen concentrations south of building 6 might be caused by a leaking water or sewer pipe. The nitrite data indicate that denitrification is occurring in places; however, dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that iron reduction is the dominant process south of building 6. The distributions of ferrous iron indicate that iron reduction is occurring in places south-southwest of buildings 6 and 1; dissolved hydrogen concentrations generally support the interpretation that iron reduction is the dominant process in those places. The generally low concentrations of sulfide indicate that sulfate reduction is not a key process in most sampled areas, an interpretation that is supported by dissolved hydrogen concentrations. Ferrous iron and dissolved hydrogen concentrations indicate that ferric iron reduction is the primary oxidation-reduction process. Application of mean first-order decay rates in iron-reducing conditions for trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride yielded half-lives for those solvents of 231, 347, and 2.67 days, respectively. Decay rates, and thus half-lives, at the facility are expected to be similar to those computed. A weighted scoring method to indicate sites where reductive dechlorination might be likely to occur indicated strong evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents at six sites

  9. Long-term sodium and chloride surface water exports from the Dallas/Fort Worth region.

    PubMed

    Steele, M K; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J A

    2011-07-15

    Sodium and chloride in surface water are typically related to urbanization and population density and can have a significant impact on drinking water sources and the subsequent salinity of aquatic ecosystems. While the majority of research has focused on the impact of deicing salts on urban surface waters in colder climates, the effect of urbanization on sodium and chloride concentrations has been found to occur in warmer climates. This study investigated long-term exports of sodium and chloride from watersheds with increasing urbanization in the humid subtropical Dallas-Fort Worth region. We compared exports to characteristics of urbanization: urban land cover, impervious surface area, and calculated contributions from wastewater discharges. Long-term data (1980-2008) were obtained from five USGS gages located in and around the cities. Exports were calculated by regression analysis between concentrations and discharge and normalized for time and the watershed area. Grab samples were collected from June 2009 to May 2010 and sodium and chloride concentrations quantified. Our results show a strong positive relationship between the mean annual sodium and chloride exports from each watershed and the percent urban land cover and impervious surface area. Long-term increases in sodium and chloride fluxes were found for the three watersheds with the highest percentage of urban land cover. The single largest contributor was wastewater effluent that was estimated to contribute approximately half of the total loads in the three urbanized watersheds. Atmospheric deposition and deicing salts accounted for small amounts of the total export for urbanized watersheds. The source of the remaining salt load is still unknown and may be a combination of non-point sources. Estimates of urban salt exports were similar to estimates from northern watersheds affected by deicing salts.

  10. Modeling of potential power plant plume impacts on Dallas-Fort Worth visibility.

    PubMed

    Seigneur, C; Pai, P; Tombach, I; McDade, C; Saxena, P; Mueller, P

    2000-05-01

    During wintertime, haze episodes occur in the Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) urban area. Such episodes are characterized by substantial light scattering by particles and relatively low absorption, leading to so-called "white haze." The objective of this work was to assess whether reductions in the emissions of SO2 from specific coal-fired power plants located over 100 km from DFW could lead to a discernible change in the DFW white haze. To that end, the transport, dispersion, deposition, and chemistry of the plume of a major power plant were simulated using a reactive plume model (ROME). The realism of the plume model simulations was tested by comparing model calculations of plume concentrations with aircraft data of SF6 tracer concentrations and ozone concentrations. A second-order closure dispersion algorithm was shown to perform better than a first-order closure algorithm and the empirical Pasquill-Gifford-Turner algorithm. For plume impact assessment, three actual scenarios were simulated, two with clear-sky conditions and one with the presence of fog prior to the haze. The largest amount of sulfate formation was obtained for the fog episode. Therefore, a hypothetical scenario was constructed using the meteorological conditions of the fog episode with input data values adjusted to be more conducive to sulfate formation. The results of the simulations suggest that reductions in the power plant emissions lead to less than proportional reductions in sulfate concentrations in DFW for the fog scenario. Calculations of the associated effects on light scattering using Mie theory suggest that reduction in total (plume + ambient) light extinction of less than 13% would be obtained with a 44% reduction in emissions of SO2 from the modeled power plant.

  11. Target organ complications and prognostic significance of alerting reaction: analysis from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Alejandro; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R; de Lemos, James A; Khera, Amit; Victor, Ronald G; Kaplan, Norman M; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive blood pressure (BP) measurement often triggers a transient rise in BP, known as an alerting reaction. However, the prevalence and prognostic significance of the alerting reaction has never been assessed in the general population. We evaluated the association between the alerting reaction and left ventricular mass by MRI and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the Dallas Heart Study, a large population sample of 3069 individuals. Participants were categorized into four groups based on levels of consecutive BP: first, normal first BP and average third to fifth (avg3-5) BP of less than 140/90 mmHg (control group); second, high first BP of at least 140/90 mmHg and normal (avg3-5) BP (alerting reaction group); third, normal first BP and high (avg3-5) BP; and fourth, high first to fifth BP. Then, associations between BP categories with incident cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and cardiovascular death) over a median follow-up period of 9.4 years were assessed. The sample-weighted prevalence of isolated hypertension during the first BP measurement was 9.6%. Presence of an alerting reaction was independently associated with increased left ventricular mass, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, cardiovascular events after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and baseline BP (adjusted hazard ratio 1.24, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.43). Our study indicated that the alerting reaction is independently associated with increased cardiovascular and renal complications.

  12. Defining coronary artery calcium concordance and repeatability - Implications for development and change: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Paixao, Andre R M; Neeland, Ian J; Ayers, Colby R; Xing, Frank; Berry, Jarett D; de Lemos, James A; Abbara, Suhny; Peshock, Ronald M; Khera, Amit

    2017-07-03

    Development and change of coronary artery calcium (CAC) are associated with coronary heart disease. Interpretation of serial CAC measurements will require better understanding of changes in CAC beyond the variability in the test itself. Dallas Heart Study participants (2888) with duplicate CAC scans obtained minutes apart were analyzed to determine interscan concordance and 95% confidence bounds (ie: repeatability limits) for each discrete CAC value. These data derived cutoffs were then used to define change above measurement variation and determine the frequency of CAC development and change among 1779 subjects with follow up CAC scans performed 6.9 years later. Binary concordance (0 vs. >0) was 91%. The value of CAC denoting true development of CAC by exceeding the 95% confidence bounds for a single score of 0 was 2.7 Agatston units (AU). Among those with scores >0, the 95% confidence bounds for CAC change were determined by the following formulas: for CAC≤100AU: 5.6√CAC + 0.3*CAC - 3.1; for CAC>100AU: 12.4√CAC - 67.7. Using these parameters, CAC development occurred in 15.0% and CAC change occurred in 48.9%. Although 225 individuals (24.9%) had a decrease in CAC over follow up, only 1 (0.1%) crossed the lower confidence bound. Compared with prior reported definition of CAC development (ie: >0), the novel threshold of 2.7AU resulted in better measures of model performance. In contrast, for CAC change, no consistent differences in performance metrics were observed compared with previously reported definitions. There is significant interscan variability in CAC measurement, including around scores of 0. Incorporating repeatability estimates may help discern true differences from those due to measurement variability, an approach that may enhance determination of CAC development and change. Copyright © 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perfluorinated Compounds, Polychlorinated Biphenyls, and Organochlorine Pesticide Contamination in Composite Food Samples from Dallas, Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, Arnold; Colacino, Justin; Haffner, Darrah; Patel, Keyur; Opel, Matthias; Päpke, Olaf; Birnbaum, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this article is to extend our previous studies of persistent organic pollutant (POP) contamination of U.S. food by measuring perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in composite food samples. This study is part of a larger study reported in two articles, the other of which reports levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane brominated flame retardants in these composite foods [Schecter et al. 2010. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclodecane (HBCD) in composite U.S. food samples, Environ Health Perspect 118:357–362]. Methods In this study we measured concentrations of 32 organochlorine pesticides, 7 PCBs, and 11 PFCs in composite samples of 31 different types of food (310 individual food samples) purchased from supermarkets in Dallas, Texas (USA), in 2009. Dietary intake of these chemicals was calculated for an average American. Results Contamination varied greatly among chemical and food types. The highest level of pesticide contamination was from the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolite p,p′- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, which ranged from 0.028 ng/g wet weight (ww) in whole milk yogurt to 2.3 ng/g ww in catfish fillets. We found PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, and 180) primarily in fish, with highest levels in salmon (PCB-153, 1.2 ng/g ww; PCB-138, 0.93 ng/g ww). For PFCs, we detected perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in 17 of 31 samples, ranging from 0.07 ng/g in potatoes to 1.80 ng/g in olive oil. In terms of dietary intake, DDT and DDT metabolites, endosulfans, aldrin, PCBs, and PFOA were consumed at the highest levels. Conclusion Despite product bans, we found POPs in U.S. food, and mixtures of these chemicals are consumed by the American public at varying levels. This suggests the need to expand testing of food for chemical contaminants. PMID:20146964

  14. Target Organ Complications and Prognostic Significance of Alerting Reaction: Analysis from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Alejandro; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R.; de Lemos, James A.; Khera, Amit; Victor, Ronald G.; Kaplan, Norman M.; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Noninvasive BP measurement often triggers a transient rise in BP, known as an alerting reaction. However, the prevalence and prognostic significance of the alerting reaction has never been assessed in the general population. Methods We evaluated the association between the alerting reaction and left ventricular mass (LVM) by magnetic resonance imaging and urinary-albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in the Dallas Heart Study, a large population sample of 3,069 subjects. Participants were categorized into 4 groups based on levels of consecutive BP: 1.normal 1st BP and average 3rd to 5th (avg3-5) BP of <140/90 mmHg (control group), 2.high 1st BP of ≥140/90 mmHg and normal (avg3-5) BP (HN), 3.normal 1st BP and high (avg3-5) BP, and 4.high 1st to 5th BP. Then, associations between BP categories with incident cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and cardiovascular death) over a median follow-up period of 9.4 years were assessed. Results The sample-weighted prevalence of isolated hypertension during the first BP measurement was 9.6%. Presence of an alerting reaction was independently associated with increased LVM, UACR, cardiovascular events after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and baseline BP (adjusted HR 1.24, 95%CI 1.07-1.43). Conclusions Our study indicated that the alerting reaction is independently associated with increased cardiovascular and renal complications. PMID:26485459

  15. Evaluation of coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on risk categories: The Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mahesh J.; de Lemos, James A.; McGuire, Darren K.; See, Raphael; Lindsey, Jason B.; Murphy, Sabina A.; Grundy, Scott M.; Khera, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Background A strategy using coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening to refine coronary heart disease risk assessment in moderately high risk (MHR) subjects (10-year risk 10%–20%) has been suggested. The potential impact of this strategy is unknown. Methods Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects were modeled in 2,610 subjects aged 30 to 65 years undergoing Framingham risk scoring and CAC assessment in the Dallas Heart Study. The proportions of subjects eligible for imaging and reclassified from MHR to high risk (HR) (10-year risk >20%) based upon CAC scores were determined. Results Only 1.0% of women and 15.4% of men were at MHR by Framingham risk scoring and thus eligible for imaging, and <0.1% and 1.1% respectively, changed from MHR to HR using a CAC threshold ≥400. Coronary artery calcium imaging targeting MHR subjects was also relatively inefficient (>100 women, 14.3 men scanned per subject reclassified). Restricting to an older age range (45–65 years) or expanding the MHR group to 6% to 20% risk had virtually no impact on risk assessment in women. In a secondary analysis, a proposed imaging strategy targeting promotion of subjects from lower risk to MHR was more efficient and had greater yield than current recommendations targeting promotion from MHR to HR. Conclusions Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects will have a negligible impact on risk assessment in women and a modest impact in men. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of CAC screening as an adjunct to coronary heart disease risk assessment, especially for women and those at seemingly lower risk. PMID:19464410

  16. Evaluation of coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on risk categories: the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mahesh J; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K; See, Raphael; Lindsey, Jason B; Murphy, Sabina A; Grundy, Scott M; Khera, Amit

    2009-06-01

    A strategy using coronary artery calcium (CAC) screening to refine coronary heart disease risk assessment in moderately high risk (MHR) subjects (10-year risk 10%-20%) has been suggested. The potential impact of this strategy is unknown. Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects were modeled in 2,610 subjects aged 30 to 65 years undergoing Framingham risk scoring and CAC assessment in the Dallas Heart Study. The proportions of subjects eligible for imaging and reclassified from MHR to high risk (HR) (10-year risk >20%) based upon CAC scores were determined. Only 1.0% of women and 15.4% of men were at MHR by Framingham risk scoring and thus eligible for imaging, and <0.1% and 1.1% respectively, changed from MHR to HR using a CAC threshold > or = 400. Coronary artery calcium imaging targeting MHR subjects was also relatively inefficient (>100 women, 14.3 men scanned per subject reclassified). Restricting to an older age range (45-65 years) or expanding the MHR group to 6% to 20% risk had virtually no impact on risk assessment in women. In a secondary analysis, a proposed imaging strategy targeting promotion of subjects from lower risk to MHR was more efficient and had greater yield than current recommendations targeting promotion from MHR to HR. Coronary artery calcium screening strategies focused on MHR subjects will have a negligible impact on risk assessment in women and a modest impact in men. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of CAC screening as an adjunct to coronary heart disease risk assessment, especially for women and those at seemingly lower risk.

  17. Plasma Leptin Levels and Risk of Incident Cancer: Results from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Herman, Yehuda; Ayers, Colby; Beg, Muhammad S; Lakoski, Susan G; Abdullah, Shuaib M; Johnson, David H; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Leptin dysregulation has been postulated to affect cancer risk through its effects on obesity and inflammation. Epidemiological data evaluating this relationship are conflicting and studies in non-white cohorts is lacking. Therefore, we examined the association of leptin with the risk of incident cancer in the multiethnic Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Participants enrolled in the DHS without prevalent cancer and with baseline leptin measurements were included. Incident cancer cases were identified through a systematic linkage of the DHS and the Texas Cancer Registry. Leptin was evaluated both as a continuous variable and in sex-specific quartiles. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was performed to examine the association between leptin levels with incident cancer after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, alcohol use, family history of malignancy, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus and C-reactive protein. Among 2,919 participants (median age 44 years; 54% women; 70% nonwhite; median BMI 29.4 kg/m2), 190 (6.5%) developed cancer after median follow- up of 12 years. Median leptin levels were 12.9 (interquartile range [IQR] 5.8-29.5) ng/ml in the incident cancer group vs. 12.3 (IQR 5.4-26.4) ng/ml those without an incident cancer (p = 0.34). Leptin was not associated with cancer incidence in multivariable analysis (unit standard deviation increase in log-transformed leptin, hazard ratio 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.16; p = 0.60). No association was observed in analyses stratified by sex, race/ethnicity, diabetes, or obesity status. In this study of a predominantly minority population, no association between premorbid leptin levels and cancer incidence was demonstrated. Despite preclinical rationale and positive findings in other studies, this association may not replicate across all racial/ethnic populations.

  18. Homoarginine and cardiovascular outcome in the population-based Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Atzler, Dorothee; Gore, M Odette; Ayers, Colby R; Choe, Chi-un; Böger, Rainer H; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K; Schwedhelm, Edzard

    2014-11-01

    The nonproteinogenic amino acid homoarginine has been postulated to have antiatherosclerotic effects as a weak substrate of nitric oxide synthase. This investigation in the population-based Dallas Heart Study (DHS) aimed to evaluate the association of homoarginine with clinical and subclinical cardiovascular outcomes. Plasma homoarginine was measured in 3514 participants of the DHS using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Associations between homoarginine and major adverse cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors. Linear regression was used to assess cross-sectional associations between homoarginine and subclinical cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery calcium measured by electron beam-computed tomography, and aortic plaque burden and aortic wall thickness by MRI. Median age was 43 (interquartile range, 36-52) years, with 56% women and 52% black participants. Median follow-up was 9.4 (9.0-9.8) years. Median plasma homoarginine was 2.80 (2.14-3.54) μmol/L. In multivariable models, higher homoarginine was associated with lower rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.98) and lower all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.82; 0.73-0.92; per 1 log SD increase in homoarginine). Homoarginine was inversely and independently associated with aortic wall thickness (β-estimate, -0.04; P<0.01) but not with aortic plaque burden and coronary artery calcium. Homoarginine is inversely associated with subclinical vascular disease and with risk for cardiovascular disease events. Additional studies are needed to evaluate whether the regulation of plasma homoarginine could emerge as a novel therapeutic option to improve outcomes in cardiovascular disease. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Symmetrical dimethylarginine predicts mortality in the general population: observations from the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Gore, M Odette; Lüneburg, Nicole; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Ayers, Colby R; Anderssohn, Maike; Khera, Amit; Atzler, Dorothee; de Lemos, James A; Grant, Peter J; McGuire, Darren K; Böger, Rainer H

    2013-11-01

    Increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), a NO synthase inhibitor, and its congener symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA), predict cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in at-risk populations. Their prognostic value in the general population remains uncertain. We investigated the correlations of SDMA and ADMA with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular/all-cause mortality in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic probability-based cohort aged 30 to 65 years. SDMA and ADMA were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass-spectrometry (n=3523), coronary artery calcium by electron-beam computed tomography, and abdominal aortic wall thickness by MRI. In unadjusted analyses, categories of increasing SDMA and ADMA were associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, increased risk markers, and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (median follow-up, 7.4 years). After adjustment for age, sex, and race, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and renal function, SDMA and ADMA analyzed as continuous variables were associated with coronary artery calcium >10, but only SDMA was associated with abdominal aortic wall thickness. SDMA, but not ADMA, was associated with cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio per log unit change, 3.36 [95% confidence interval, 1.49-7.59]; P=0.004). SDMA and ADMA were both associated with all-cause mortality, but after further adjustment for N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, only SDMA was associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per log unit change, 1.86 [95% confidence interval, 1.04-3.30]; P=0.01). SDMA, but not ADMA, was an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a large multiethnic population-based cohort.

  20. Perceived lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease (from the Dallas Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Petr, Elisabeth Joye; Ayers, Colby R; Pandey, Ambarish; de Lemos, James A; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Khera, Amit; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Berry, Jarett D

    2014-07-01

    Lifetime risk estimation for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been proposed as a useful strategy to improve risk communication in the primary prevention setting. However, the perception of lifetime risk for CVD is unknown. We included 2,998 subjects from the Dallas Heart Study. Lifetime risk for developing CVD was classified as high (≥39%) versus low (<39%) according to risk factor burden as described in our previously published algorithm. Perception of lifetime risk for myocardial infarction was assessed by way of a 5-point scale. Baseline characteristics were compared across levels of perceived lifetime risk. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the association of participant characteristics with level of perceived lifetime risk for CVD and with correctness of perceptions. Of the 2,998 participants, 64.8% (n = 1,942) were classified as having high predicted lifetime risk for CVD. There was significant discordance between perceived and predicted lifetime risk. After multivariable adjustment, family history of premature myocardial infarction, high self-reported stress, and low perceived health were all strongly associated with high perceived lifetime risk (odds ratio [OR] 2.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.72 to 3.27; OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.66 to 2.83; and OR 2.71, 95% CI 2.09 to 3.53; respectively). However, the association between traditional CVD risk factors and high perceived lifetime risk was more modest. In conclusion, misperception of lifetime risk for CVD is common and frequently reflects the influence of factors other than traditional risk factor levels. These findings highlight the importance of effectively communicating the significance of traditional risk factors in determining the lifetime risk for CVD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association between number of live births and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Sanghavi, Monika; Kulinski, Jacquelyn; Ayers, Colby R; Nelson, David; Stewart, Robert; Parikh, Nisha; de Lemos, James A; Khera, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Higher parity has been associated with increased maternal risk of cardiovascular disease, but the mechanism is not well delineated. Whether the number of live births is associated with coronary and aortic subclinical atherosclerosis has not been fully evaluated. Women from the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic population-based cohort of subjects aged 30-65 years, were included if they had data on self-reported live births and coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured by computed tomography or aortic wall thickness (AWT) by MRI. Coronary artery calcium was positive if >10 Agatston units, and aortic wall thickness if greater than the 75(th) percentile reference point for age and gender. Among the 1644 women included in the study, the mean age was 45 years and 55% were Black. Sequential multivariable models were done adjusting for age, race, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, body mass index, income, education, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptives, and physical activity. Using women with 2-3 live births as the reference, those with four or more live births had an increased prevalence of elevated coronary artery calcium (odds ratio (OR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-3.65) and aortic wall thickness (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.04-2.41). Women with 0-1 live births also had increased coronary artery calcium (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.16-3.03) and aortic wall thickness (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.05-2.09) after multivariable adjustment. The number of live births is associated with subclinical coronary and aortic atherosclerosis, with an apparent U-shaped relationship. Further studies are needed to confirm this association and explore the biological underpinnings of these findings. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  2. Perceived Lifetime Risk for Cardiovascular Disease (From the Dallas Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Elisabeth Joye; Ayers, Colby; Pandey, Ambarish; de Lemos, James; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Khera, Amit; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Berry, Jarett D.

    2014-01-01

    Lifetime risk estimation for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been proposed as a useful strategy to improve risk communication in the primary prevention setting. However, the perception of lifetime risk for CVD is unknown. We included 2,998 individuals from the Dallas Heart Study. Lifetime risk for developing CVD was classified as high (≥39%) vs. low (<39%) according to risk factor burden as described in our previously published algorithm. Perception of lifetime risk for myocardial infarction was assessed via a 5-point scale. Baseline characteristics were compared across levels of perceived lifetime risk. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the association of participant characteristics with level of perceived lifetime risk for CVD and with correctness of perceptions. 64.8% (1942/2998) of participants were classified as high predicted lifetime risk for CVD. There was significant discordance between perceived and predicted lifetime risk. After multivariable adjustment, family history of premature MI, high self-reported stress, and low perceived health were all strongly associated with high perceived lifetime risk (OR [95% CI]: 2.37 [1.72–3.27], 2.17 [1.66–2.83], and 2.71 [2.09–3.53]). However, the association between traditional CVD risk factors and high perceived lifetime risk was more modest. In conclusion, misperception of lifetime risk for CVD is common and frequently reflects the influence of factors other than traditional risk factor levels. These findings highlight the importance of effectively communicating the significance of traditional risk factors in determining the lifetime risk for CVD. PMID:24834788

  3. Perfluorinated compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticide contamination in composite food samples from Dallas, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Colacino, Justin; Haffner, Darrah; Patel, Keyur; Opel, Matthias; Päpke, Olaf; Birnbaum, Linda

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this article is to extend our previous studies of persistent organic pollutant (POP) contamination of U.S. food by measuring perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in composite food samples. This study is part of a larger study reported in two articles, the other of which reports levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and hexabromocyclododecane brominated flame retardants in these composite foods [Schecter et al. 2010. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclodecane (HBCD) in composite U.S. food samples, Environ Health Perspect 118:357-362]. In this study we measured concentrations of 32 organochlorine pesticides, 7 PCBs, and 11 PFCs in composite samples of 31 different types of food (310 individual food samples) purchased from supermarkets in Dallas, Texas (USA), in 2009. Dietary intake of these chemicals was calculated for an average American. Contamination varied greatly among chemical and food types. The highest level of pesticide contamination was from the dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) metabolite p,p -dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, which ranged from 0.028 ng/g wet weight (ww) in whole milk yogurt to 2.3 ng/g ww in catfish fillets. We found PCB congeners (28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153, and 180) primarily in fish, with highest levels in salmon (PCB-153, 1.2 ng/g ww; PCB-138, 0.93 ng/g ww). For PFCs, we detected perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in 17 of 31 samples, ranging from 0.07 ng/g in potatoes to 1.80 ng/g in olive oil. In terms of dietary intake, DDT and DDT metabolites, endosulfans, aldrin, PCBs, and PFOA were consumed at the highest levels. Despite product bans, we found POPs in U.S. food, and mixtures of these chemicals are consumed by the American public at varying levels. This suggests the need to expand testing of food for chemical contaminants.

  4. Abdominal aortic atherosclerosis at MR imaging is associated with cardiovascular events: the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Maroules, Christopher D; Rosero, Eric; Ayers, Colby; Peshock, Ronald M; Khera, Amit

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of two abdominal aortic atherosclerosis measurements at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for predicting future cardiovascular events. This study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA regulations. The study consisted of 2122 participants from the multiethnic, population-based Dallas Heart Study who underwent abdominal aortic MR imaging at 1.5 T. Aortic atherosclerosis was measured by quantifying mean aortic wall thickness (MAWT) and aortic plaque burden. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, nonfatal cardiac events, and nonfatal extracardiac vascular events over a mean period of 7.8 years ± 1.5 (standard deviation [SD]). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess independent associations of aortic atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Increasing MAWT was positively associated with male sex (odds ratio, 3.66; P < .0001), current smoking (odds ratio, 2.53; P < .0001), 10-year increase in age (odds ratio, 2.24; P < .0001), and hypertension (odds ratio, 1.66; P = .0001). A total of 143 participants (6.7%) experienced a cardiovascular event. MAWT conferred an increased risk for composite events (hazard ratio, 1.28 per 1 SD; P = .001). Aortic plaque was not associated with increased risk for composite events. Increasing MAWT and aortic plaque burden both conferred an increased risk for nonfatal extracardiac events (hazard ratio of 1.52 per 1 SD [P < .001] and hazard ratio of 1.46 per 1 SD [P = .03], respectively). MR imaging measures of aortic atherosclerosis are predictive of future adverse cardiovascular events. © RSNA, 2013.

  5. Independent associations between metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Karen; Lindsey, Jason B; Khera, Amit; De Lemos, James A; Ayers, Colby R; Goyal, Abhinav; Vega, Gloria L; Murphy, Sabina A; Grundy, Scott M; McGuire, Darren K

    2008-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been termed a "coronary disease equivalent", yet data suggest that only those DM subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at increased coronary risk. Using data from the Dallas Heart Study, a large, probability-based population study, we assessed the individual and joint associations between MetS, DM and atherosclerosis, defined as coronary artery calcium (CAC) detected by electron-beam computerised tomography (EBCT) and abdominal aortic plaque (AAP) detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Among 2,735 participants, the median age was 44 years; 1,863 (68%) were non-white; 1,509 (55%) were women; 697 (25.5%) had MetS without DM; 53 (1.9%) had DM without MetS; and 246 (9.0%) had both DM and MetS. The prevalence of CAC increased from those with neither MetS nor DM (16.6%) to MetS only (24.0%) to DM only (30.2%) to both MetS and DM (44.7%) (ptrend <0.0001). The prevalence of CAC was higher in those with both DM and MetS versus either alone (p<0.0001). After adjustment, MetS and DM were each independently associated with CAC (odds ratio [OR] 1.4, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.1-1.8; OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.5, respectively). Compared with the group without DM or MetS, those with both MetS and DM had the most CAC (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.6-3.2). All analyses of AAP yielded qualitatively similar results. In conclusion, both MetS and DM are independently associated with an increased prevalence of atherosclerosis, with the highest observed prevalence in subjects with both DM and MetS.

  6. Inducible clindamycin resistance and molecular epidemiologic trends of pediatric community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Bueno, Susana; Bozdogan, Bülent; Katz, Kathy; Bowlware, Karen L; Cushion, Nancy; Cavuoti, Dominick; Ahmad, Naveed; McCracken, George H; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2005-06-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection occurs commonly in children. Clindamycin resistance may be inducible or constitutive, and the rates of inducible resistance in CA-MRSA that could produce clindamycin treatment failures vary worldwide. The double-disk test was performed in 197 erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-susceptible CA-MRSA strains from children in Dallas, Texas, from 1999 to 2002 to determine inducible clindamycin resistance. Resistance mechanisms were studied by PCR; epidemiologic trends were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Inducible resistance was demonstrated in 28 (93%+/-6%) of 30 tested isolates in 1999, 21 (64%, +/-11%) of 33 in 2000, 12 (23%+/-7%) of 52 in 2001, and 6 (7%+/-3%) of 82 in 2002. All noninducible strains had the msr(A) gene. Among inducible resistant strains, 31 had erm(B), 24 had erm(C), and 12 had erm(A) genes. Two distinct pulsed types were the most prevalent; one of them was the most common pulsed type in 1999, whereas in 2002 a different pulsed type was prevalent. MLST analyses determined that ST-8 was the most common type, with 76%+/-5% found in 2002. All but one of these clindamycin-susceptible, erythromycin-resistant ST-8 strains showed no induction of clindamycin resistance. We conclude that, among erythromycin-resistant, clindamycin-susceptible CA-MRSA strains isolated from children in Dallas, inducible methylase resistance became less common from 1999 to 2002 (P<0.001). The phenotype of strains was associated with their sequence type. Our results demonstrate a clonal shift in CA-MRSA in Dallas children from 1999 to 2002.

  7. Ethnic differences in the frequency of ENPP1/PC1 121Q genetic variant in the Dallas Heart Study cohort.

    PubMed

    Chandalia, Manisha; Grundy, Scott M; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Abate, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility modulates the impact of obesity on the risk for type 2 diabetes. One candidate gene predisposing to type 2 diabetes is ENPP1/PC1. A common polymorphism in this protein, K121Q, is associated with insulin resistance and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in Caucasian, Afro-Caribbean, and South Asian populations. The goal of this study was to evaluate differences in the prevalence of the ENPP1 121Q variant in the Caucasian, African-American, and Hispanic populations in Dallas county and to establish a population-based estimate of gene variant prevalence for future investigations. We also evaluated the association between the ENPP1 121Q variant and diabetes. The Dallas Heart Study (DHS) is a multiethnic probability-based sample of the Dallas county population in which African-Americans were systematically oversampled so that the final sample was 50% African-Americans. We performed ENPP1/PC1 genotyping in 1038 non-Hispanic Whites (544 women, 494 men), 1815 African-Americans (1052 women and 763 men), and 597 Hispanics (347 women, 250 men). The frequency of ENPP1/PC1 K121Q was higher in both African-Americans (78.5%) and Hispanics (21.9%) than in the non-Hispanic White group (13.2%). The former two groups also have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes (African-Americans, 14.1%, and Hispanics, 11.7%) compared to non-Hispanic Whites (6.8%). Logistic regression analysis revealed significant interactions between the ENPP1 genotype, age, and body mass index within each ethnic group. After adjustment for these variables and their interactions, ENPP1 Q allele predicted diabetes when a recessive model was tested. Ethnic differences in ENPP1 121Q allele frequency may contribute to the increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes observed in US minority groups.

  8. Inducible Clindamycin Resistance and Molecular Epidemiologic Trends of Pediatric Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Dallas, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Bueno, Susana; Bozdogan, Bülent; Katz, Kathy; Bowlware, Karen L.; Cushion, Nancy; Cavuoti, Dominick; Ahmad, Naveed; McCracken, George H.; Appelbaum, Peter C.

    2005-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection occurs commonly in children. Clindamycin resistance may be inducible or constitutive, and the rates of inducible resistance in CA-MRSA that could produce clindamycin treatment failures vary worldwide. The double-disk test was performed in 197 erythromycin-resistant and clindamycin-susceptible CA-MRSA strains from children in Dallas, Texas, from 1999 to 2002 to determine inducible clindamycin resistance. Resistance mechanisms were studied by PCR; epidemiologic trends were studied by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Inducible resistance was demonstrated in 28 (93% ±6%) of 30 tested isolates in 1999, 21 (64%, ±11%) of 33 in 2000, 12 (23% ±7%) of 52 in 2001, and 6 (7% ±3%) of 82 in 2002. All noninducible strains had the msr(A) gene. Among inducible resistant strains, 31 had erm(B), 24 had erm(C), and 12 had erm(A) genes. Two distinct pulsed types were the most prevalent; one of them was the most common pulsed type in 1999, whereas in 2002 a different pulsed type was prevalent. MLST analyses determined that ST-8 was the most common type, with 76% ±5% found in 2002. All but one of these clindamycin-susceptible, erythromycin-resistant ST-8 strains showed no induction of clindamycin resistance. We conclude that, among erythromycin-resistant, clindamycin-susceptible CA-MRSA strains isolated from children in Dallas, inducible methylase resistance became less common from 1999 to 2002 (P < 0.001). The phenotype of strains was associated with their sequence type. Our results demonstrate a clonal shift in CA-MRSA in Dallas children from 1999 to 2002. PMID:15917522

  9. Impacts of cool cities on air quality: A preliminary modeling assessment for Nashville TN, Dallas TX and Atlanta GA

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Haider

    1998-06-15

    Previous atmospheric modeling efforts that concentrated on the Los Angeles Basin suggested beneficial and significant air quality impacts from cool cities strategies. This paper discusses an extension of similar modeling efforts to three regions, Atlanta GA, Dallas - Ft. Worth TX, and Nashville TN, that experience smog and air quality problems. According to the older ozone air quality standard (120 ppb), these regions were classified as serious, moderate, and marginal, respectively, but may be out of compliance with respect to the newer, 80-ppb/8-hours standard. Results from this exploratory modeling work suggest a range of possible impacts on meteorological and air quality conditions. For example, peak ozone concentrations during each region's respective episode could be decreased by 1-6 ppb (conservative and optimistic scenarios, respectively) in Nashville, 5-15 ppb in Dallas - Fort Worth, and 5-12 ppb in Atlanta following implementation of cool cities. The reductions are generally smaller than those obtained from simulating the Los Angeles Basin but are still significant. In all regions, the simulations suggest, the net, domain-wide effects of cool cities are reductions in ozone mass and improvements in air quality. In Atlanta, Nashville, and Dallas, urban areas benefiting from reduced smog reach up to 8460, 7350, and 12870 km{sup 2} in area, respectively. Results presented in this paper should be taken as exploratory and preliminary. These will most likely change during a more comprehensive modeling study to be started soon with the support of the US Environmental Protection Agency. The main purpose of the present project was to obtain the initial data (emission inventories) for these regions, simulate meteorological conditions, and perform preliminary sensitivity analysis. In the future, additional regions will be simulated to assess the potential of cool cities in improving urban air quality.

  10. The CASA Dallas-Fort Worth Urban Remote Sensing Network: Recent Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, Venkatachalam; Seo, Dong-jun; Philips, Brenda; Chen, Haonan; Junyent, Francesc; Lyons, Eric; Bajaj, Apoorva; Brotzge, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    Since spring 2012, the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has been transformed from a research to operational demonstration emphasis, and has started the development of Dallas-Fort worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network. The main goal of this network is to demonstrate the operational feasibility of the dense radar network in a metropolitan environment. The DFW network consists of 8 dual-polarization X-band weather radars covering the greater DFW metropolitan area, the 4th largest Metroplex in the nation. The major issued to be addressed include urban flash flood mitigation, severe weather warning and demonstration of network-of-network concept. It is also expected to be an ideal development platform for multi-Doppler wind retrieval, quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), quantitative precipitation forecast (QPF), and accurate hydrologic response. The real-time weather information will then be disseminated to public and private stakeholders for decision-making and evaluation as severe weather events occur in the Metroplex. In addition, multi-sensor products will be generated as well from combining the existing remote sensors such as KFWS radar (a WSR-88DP radar), TDWR, and local rainfall gauges. This paper will first present a brief overview of the current development of CASA DFW urban radar network. Then, the Kdp-based QPE methodology for CASA X-band radars will be described and evaluated in depth. The composite rainfall products produced by combining the S-band WSR-88DP and X-band radar observations will also be presented. To demonstrate and evaluate the QPE products, local rainfall gauges are used for cross comparison between the radar rainfall measurements and gauge observations. In addition, the prototype flash flood forecasting system under development for the City of Fort Worth will also be described in this paper, which utilizes the high spatial and

  11. Coronary artery calcification and family history of myocardial infarction in the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Paixao, Andre R M; Berry, Jarett D; Neeland, Ian J; Ayers, Colby R; Rohatgi, Anand; de Lemos, James A; Khera, Amit

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the independent and joint associations between family history of myocardial infarction (FH) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) with incident coronary heart disease (CHD). FH and CAC are associated with each other and with incident CHD. It is not known whether FH retains its predictive value after CAC results are accounted for. Among 2,390 participants without cardiovascular disease enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study, we assessed FH (myocardial infarction in a first-degree relative) and prevalent CAC by electron-beam computed tomography. The primary outcome, a composite of CHD-related death, myocardial infarction, and percutaneous or surgical coronary revascularization, was assessed over a mean follow-up of 8.0 ± 1.2 years. The individual and joint associations with the CHD composite outcome were determined for FH and CAC. The mean age of the population was 44 ± 9 years; 32% had FH and 47% had a CAC score of 0. In multivariate models adjusted for traditional risk factors, FH was independently associated with CHD (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.6 to 4.2; p < 0.001). Further adjustment for prevalent CAC did not diminish this association (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.6 to 4.2; p < 0.001). FH and CAC were additive: CHD event rates in those with both FH and CAC were 8.8% vs. 3.3% in those with prevalent CAC alone (p < 0.001). CHD rates were 1.9% in those with FH alone compared with 0.4% in those with neither FH nor CAC (p < 0.017). Among subjects without CAC, FH characterized a group with a more unfavorable cardiometabolic profile. FH provided prognostic information that was independent of and additive to CAC. Among those with CAC, FH identified subjects at particularly high short-term risk, and, among those without it, selected a group with an adverse risk-factor profile. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiovascular outcome associations among cardiovascular magnetic resonance measures of arterial stiffness: the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Maroules, Christopher D; Khera, Amit; Ayers, Colby; Goel, Akshay; Peshock, Ronald M; Abbara, Suhny; King, Kevin S

    2014-05-14

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated for the noninvasive assessment of total arterial compliance and aortic stiffness, but their associations with cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations of CMR measures of total arterial compliance and two CMR measures of aortic stiffness with respect to future cardiovascular events. The study consisted of 2122 Dallas Heart Study participants without cardiovascular disease who underwent CMR at 1.5 Tesla. Aortic stiffness was measured by CMR-derived ascending aortic distensibility and aortic arch pulse wave velocity. Total arterial compliance was calculated by dividing left ventricular stroke volume by pulse pressure. Participants were monitored for cardiovascular death, non-fatal cardiac events, and non-fatal extra-cardiac vascular events over 7.8 ± 1.5 years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess for associations between CMR measures and cardiovascular events. Age, systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate were independently associated with changes in ascending aortic distensibility, arch pulse wave velocity, and total arterial compliance (all p < .0001). A total of 153 participants (6.9%) experienced a cardiovascular event. After adjusting for traditional risk factors, total arterial compliance was modestly associated with increased risk for composite events (HR 1.07 per 1SD, p = 0.03) while the association between ascending aortic distensibility and composite events trended towards significance (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0.08). Total arterial compliance and aortic distensibility were independently associated with nonfatal cardiac events (HR 1.11 per 1SD, p = 0.001 and HR 1.45 per 1SD, p = 0.0005, respectively), but not with cardiovascular death or nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events. Arch pulse wave velocity was independently associated with nonfatal extra-cardiac vascular events (HR 1.18 per 1SD, p = 0

  13. Regional Fat Distribution and Blood Pressure Level and Variability: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Ayers, Colby; Turer, Aslan; Chandra, Alvin; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Greenland, Philip; de Lemos, James A; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the associations of regional fat distribution with home and office blood pressure (BP) levels and variability. Participants in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic cohort, underwent 5 BP measurements on 3 occasions during 5 months (2 in home and 1 in office) and quantification of visceral adipose tissue, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, and liver fat by magnetic resonance imaging, and lower body subcutaneous fat by dual x-ray absorptiometry. The relation of regional adiposity with short-term (within-visit) and long-term (overall visits) mean BP and average real variability was assessed with multivariable linear regression. We have included 2595 participants with a mean age of 44 years (54% women; 48% black), and mean body mass index was 29 kg/m(2) Mean systolic BP/diastolic BP was 127/79 mm Hg and average real variability systolic BP was 9.8 mm Hg during 3 visits. In multivariable-adjusted models, higher amount of visceral adipose tissue was associated with higher short-term (both home and office) and long-term mean systolic BP (β[SE]: 1.9[0.5], 2.7[0.5], and 2.1[0.5], respectively; all P<0.001) and with lower long-term average real variability systolic BP (β[SE]: -0.5[0.2]; P<0.05). In contrast, lower body fat was associated with lower short-term home and long-term mean BP (β[SE]: -0.30[0.13] and -0.24[0.1], respectively; both P<0.05). Neither subcutaneous adipose tissue or liver fat was associated with BP levels or variability. In conclusion, excess visceral fat was associated with persistently higher short- and long-term mean BP levels and with lower long-term BP variability, whereas lower body fat was associated with lower short- and long-term mean BP. Persistently elevated BP, coupled with lower variability, may partially explain increased risk for cardiac hypertrophy and failure related to visceral adiposity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Factors associated with hypertension awareness, treatment, and control in Dallas County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Victor, Ronald G; Leonard, David; Hess, Paul; Bhat, Deepa G; Jones, Jennifer; Vaeth, Patrice A C; Ravenell, Joseph; Freeman, Anne; Wilson, Ruth P; Haley, Robert W

    2008-06-23

    Hypertension (HTN) control rates in the United States remain lower in black than white persons, particularly before 65 years of age. Potential sociocultural factors have not been sufficiently addressed. We analyzed data from structured interviews and blood pressure measurements in a population-based sample of 1514 hypertensive (1194 non-Hispanic black and 320 non-Hispanic white) subjects aged 18 to 64 years in Dallas County, Texas, from 2000 to 2002 to identify sociocultural factors associated with low rates of HTN control. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multivariate logistic regression. Awareness, treatment, and control of HTN were negatively associated with a common perception of good health, with aORs (95% CIs) of 0.37 (0.27-0.50) for awareness, 0.47 (0.36-0.62) for treatment, and 0.66 (0.51-0.86) for control. They were positively associated with having a regular physician, with aORs (95% CIs) of 3.81 (2.86-5.07) for awareness, 8.36 (5.95-11.74) for treatment, and 5.23 (3.30-8.29) for control. Among untreated hypertensive subjects, lack of perceived need for a regular physician was associated with perceived good health (aOR [95% CI], 2.2 [1.2-4.0]), male gender (aOR [95% CI], 2.4 [1.4-4.1]), and black race/ethnicity (aOR [95% CI], 2.1 [1.0-4.4]). The HTN outcomes were unrelated to perceived racism or lay beliefs about the causes, consequences, and treatment of HTN. Among young to middle-aged hypertensive subjects, a perception of good health and the lack of perceived need for a regular physician remain major factors associated with untreated and uncontrolled HTN at the community level-particularly among black men. These factors merit greater emphasis in professional education and public health programs on HTN.

  15. Churches as targets for cardiovascular disease prevention: comparison of genes, nutrition, exercise, wellness and spiritual growth (GoodNEWS) and Dallas County populations

    PubMed Central

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Banks-Richard, Kamakki; Williams-King, Elicia; Tong, Liyue; Ayers, Colby R.; de Lemos, James A.; Gimpel, Nora; Lee, Jenny J.; DeHaven, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (CVRFs) of community-based participatory research (CBPR) participants with the community population to better understand how CBPR participants relate to the population as a whole. Methods GoodNEWS participants in 20 African-American churches in Dallas, Texas were compared with age/sex-matched African-Americans in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), a probability-based sample of Dallas County residents. DHS characteristics were sample-weight adjusted to represent the Dallas County population. Results Despite having more education (college education: 75 versus 51%, P< 0.0001), GoodNEWS participants were more obese (mean body mass index: 34 versus 31 kg/m2, P< 0.001) and had more diabetes (23 versus 12%, P< 0.001) and hyperlipidemia (53 versus 14%, P< 0.001) compared with African-Americans in Dallas County. GoodNEWS participants had higher rates of treatment and control of most CVRFs (treated hyperlipidemia: 95 versus 64%, P< 0.001; controlled diabetes: 95 versus 21%, P< 0.001; controlled hypertension: 70 versus 52%, P= 0.003), were more physically active (233 versus 177 metabolic equivalent units-min/week, P< 0.0001) and less likely to smoke (10 versus 30%, P< 0.001). Conclusions Compared with African-Americans in Dallas County, CBPR participants in church congregations were more educated, physically active and had more treatment and control of most CVRFs. Surprisingly, this motivated population had a greater obesity burden, identifying them as a prime target for CBPR-focused obesity treatment. PMID:22811446

  16. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp. (Testudines: Testudinidae), from the Dallas Zoo.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; Roberts, David T

    2014-02-01

    During January 1994, feces from a captive juvenile Galápagos tortoise, Chelonoidis sp., from the Dallas Zoo, Dallas County, Texas was examined for coccidia. The tortoise was found to harbor an eimerian which is described as new. Sporulated oocysts of Eimeria iversoni n. sp. were ovoidal with a smooth, single-layered wall (∼ 0.5-0.8) that measured (L × W) 13.5 × 10.3 μm, with a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.3; micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule(s) were all absent; 2 conical projections were present on 1 end of oocyst and measured 1.0-1.5. Sporocysts were elongate-ellipsoidal and measured 8.3 × 4.5 μm, with L/W of 1.8; a Stieda body (∼ 0.5 high) was present, but substieda and parastieda bodies were absent; a sporocyst residuum was composed of 2-5 granules in a compact mass between sporozoites; sporozoites were banana-shaped and measured 9.5 × 2.5 in situ, with an ellipsoidal posterior refractile body and a spheroidal anterior refractile body. This is only the second time an eimerian has been reported from Galápagos tortoises.

  17. Spatial analysis and land use regression of VOCs and NO2 in Dallas, Texas during two seasons.

    PubMed

    Smith, Luther A; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Chung, Kuenja C; Afghani, Jim

    2011-04-01

    Passive air sampling for nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was conducted at 24 fire stations and a compliance monitoring site in Dallas, Texas, USA during summer 2006 and winter 2008. This ambient air monitoring network was established to assess intra-urban gradients of air pollutants to evaluate the impact of traffic and urban emissions on air quality. Ambient air monitoring and GIS data from spatially representative fire station sites were collected to assess spatial variability. Pairwise comparisons were conducted on the ambient data from the selected sites based on city section. These weeklong samples yielded NO(2) and benzene levels that were generally higher during the winter than the summer. With respect to the location within the city, the central section of Dallas was generally higher for NO(2) and benzene than north and south. Land use regression (LUR) results revealed spatial gradients in NO(2) and selected VOCs in the central and some northern areas. The process used to select spatially representative sites for air sampling and the results of analyses of coarse- and fine-scale spatial variability of air pollutants on a seasonal basis provide insights to guide future ambient air exposure studies in assessing intra-urban gradients and traffic impacts.

  18. Incidence of West Nile virus infection in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area during the 2012 epidemic.

    PubMed

    Williamson, P C; Custer, B; Biggerstaff, B J; Lanciotti, R S; Sayers, M H; Eason, S J; Dixon, M R; Winkelman, V; Lanteri, M C; Petersen, L R; Busch, M P

    2017-09-01

    The 2012 West Nile virus (WNV) epidemic was the largest since 2003 and the North Texas region was the most heavily impacted. We conducted a serosurvey of blood donors from four counties in the Dallas-Fort Worth area to characterize the epidemic. Blood donor specimens collected in November 2012 were tested for WNV-specific antibodies. Donors positive for WNV-specific IgG, IgM, and neutralizing antibodies were considered to have been infected in 2012. This number was adjusted using a multi-step process that accounted for timing of IgM seroreversion determined from previous longitudinal studies of WNV-infected donors. Of 4971 donations screened, 139 (2·8%) were confirmed WNV IgG positive, and 69 (1·4%) had IgM indicating infection in 2012. After adjusting for timing of sampling and potential seroreversion, we estimated that 1·8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·5-2·2] of the adult population in the Dallas-Fort Worth area were infected during 2012. The resulting overall estimate for the ratio of infections to reported WNV neuroinvasive disease (WNND) cases was 238:1 (95% CI 192-290), with significantly increased risk of WNND in older age groups. These findings were very similar to previous estimates of infections per WNND case, indicating no change in virulence as WNV evolved into an endemic infection in the United States.

  19. Chemical quality of water, sediment, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Jones, S.A.; Moring, J. Bruce; Mahler, B.J.; Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence, trends, and sources of numerous inorganic and organic contaminants were evaluated in Mountain Creek Lake, a reservoir in Dallas, Texas. The study, done in cooperation with the Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command, was prompted by the Navy’s concern for potential off-site migration of contaminants from two facilities on the shore of Mountain Creek Lake, the Naval Air Station Dallas and the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant. Sampling of stormwater (including suspended sediment), lake water, bottom sediment (including streambed sediment), and fish was primarily in Mountain Creek Lake but also was in stormwater outfalls from the Navy facilities, nearby urban streams, and small streams draining the Air Station.Volatile organic compounds, predominantly solvents from the Reserve Plant and fuel-related compounds from the Air Station, were detected in stormwater from both Navy facilities. Fuel-related compounds also were detected in Mountain Creek Lake at two locations, one near the Air Station inlet where stormwater from a part of the Air Station enters the lake and one at the center of the lake. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds at the two lake sites were small, all less than 5 micrograms per liter.Elevated concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, silver, and zinc, from 2 to 4 times concentrations at background sites and urban reference sites, were detected in surficial bottom sediments in Cottonwood Bay, near stormwater outfalls from the Reserve Plant. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls, compared to background and urban reference sites, were detected in surficial sediments in Cottonwood Bay. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, indicative of urban sources, also were detected in Cottonwood Creek, which drains an urbanized area apart from the Navy facilities. Elevated concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls were

  20. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  1. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  2. The Lifetime Value of a Loyal Customer: What Can a Child Care Director Learn from Domino's Pizza and a Cadillac Dealer in Dallas?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Margaret Leitch; Gimilaro, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In "The Service Profit Chain," Harvard Business School professors James Heskett, Earl Sasser, and Leonard Schlesinger (1997) offer two anecdotes--from Domino's Pizza and a Dallas Cadillac dealership--that illuminate the concept of valuing a lifetime customer. Experts estimate that the lifetime value of a loyal Domino's Pizza customer is $4,000 and…

  3. Magnet Schools: Legal and Practical Implications. Magnet School Conference Series Number 1. Annual International Conference on Magnet Schools (1st, Dallas, Texas, March 9-12, 1977)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Nolan, Ed.; Waldrip, Donald R., Ed.

    This book consists of nine papers that were originally delivered at the First Annual International Conference on Magnet Schools, which was held in Dallas in March 1977. In addition to discussing the rationale for magnet schools and the history of their development, the various papers examine how to initiate and plan a magnet schools program, how…

  4. Report on a Comparative Study of Two Years' Operation of the Dallas Teacher Center Professional Semester Program. Research on Elementary Teacher Preparation Monograph No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earp, N. Wesley; Tanner, Fred W.

    This report presents comparative data collected from 122 North Texas State University elementary education students enrolled in the Dallas Teacher Center Professional Semester (DTCPS) program during the 1972-73 and 1973-74 academic years. Three instruments--One Word Sentence Completion, Self Report Inventory, and Directed Imagination Test--were…

  5. The Lifetime Value of a Loyal Customer: What Can a Child Care Director Learn from Domino's Pizza and a Cadillac Dealer in Dallas?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Margaret Leitch; Gimilaro, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In "The Service Profit Chain," Harvard Business School professors James Heskett, Earl Sasser, and Leonard Schlesinger (1997) offer two anecdotes--from Domino's Pizza and a Dallas Cadillac dealership--that illuminate the concept of valuing a lifetime customer. Experts estimate that the lifetime value of a loyal Domino's Pizza customer is $4,000 and…

  6. Community Needs Assessments for the Texas Metropolitan Areas of Dallas-Ft. Worth and Houston: A Follow-up Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schacht, Robert M.; Vanderbilt, Rebecca

    This report summarizes the results of a needs assessment of American Indians with disabilities living in the Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth (Texas) metropolitan areas. In 1996, 97 American Indians with disabilities were interviewed, and results were compared with those of a similar needs assessment conducted in 1992; 21 of the interviewees had…

  7. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (25th, Dallas, Texas, 2002). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    For the twenty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Dallas, TX. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two volumes.…

  8. Magnet Schools: Legal and Practical Implications. Magnet School Conference Series Number 1. Annual International Conference on Magnet Schools (1st, Dallas, Texas, March 9-12, 1977)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Nolan, Ed.; Waldrip, Donald R., Ed.

    This book consists of nine papers that were originally delivered at the First Annual International Conference on Magnet Schools, which was held in Dallas in March 1977. In addition to discussing the rationale for magnet schools and the history of their development, the various papers examine how to initiate and plan a magnet schools program, how…

  9. Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston in Top 10 of EPAs List of Cities with the Most Energy Star Certified Buildings, Austin also makes top 25

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March 29, 2016) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced three Texas cities made the eighth-annual Top Cities list, which ranks the 25 U.S. metropolitan areas with the most Energy Star certified buildings and superior ene

  10. Positioning System Accuracy Assessment for the Runway Incursion Prevention System Flight Test at the Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA/Langley Research Center collaborated with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The RIPS combines airborne and ground sensor data with various cockpit displays to improve pilots' awareness of traffic conditions on the airport surface. The systems tested at DFW involved surface radar and data systems that gather and send surface traffic information to a research aircraft outfitted with the RIPS software, cockpit displays, and data link transceivers. The data sent to the airborne systems contained identification and GPS location of traffic. This information was compared with the own-ship location from airborne GPS receivers to generate incursion alerts. A total of 93 test tracks were flown while operating RIPS. This report compares the accuracy of the airborne GPS systems that gave the own-ship position of the research aircraft for the 93 test tracks.

  11. Quality assurance and quality control data validation procedures used for the Love Canal and Dallas lead soil monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, K W; Black, S C

    1983-06-01

    Public awareness of soils contamination has increased in recent years due in part to the notoriety associated with the indiscriminate release, packaging, transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. In 1980, and again in 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was responsible for designing, implementing and conducting environmental monitoring programs at Love Canal in Niagara Falls, New York, and in Dallas, Texas, that dealt with suspected contaminated soils. Both of these monitoring programs were conducted over a relatively short time with the collection and analysis of over 4000 soil samples. The methods employed by the Environmental Protection Agency for providing soil data that was scientifically valid and of defensible quality for each of these monitoring programs are presented. Also, methods for identifying data bias, its precision and its uncertainty are identified.

  12. Runway Incursion Prevention System ADS-B and DGPS Data Link Analysis Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, J.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas - Ft. Worth International Airport in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. Rockwell Collins provided and supported a prototype Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) system using 1090 MHz and a prototype Differential GPS (DGPS) system onboard the NASA Boeing 757 research aircraft. This report describes the Rockwell Collins contributions to the RIPS flight test, summarizes the development process, and analyzes both ADS-B and DGPS data collected during the flight test. In addition, results are report on interoperability tests conducted between the NASA Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) ADS-B flight test system and the NASA Boeing 757 ADS-B system.

  13. Effective Collaboration Between Scientists and Local Governments to Improve Scientific Communication for Public Safety in Dallas and Irving, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanpied, M. L.; Perry, S. C.; Carriere, J.; DeShon, H. R.; Oden, K.; Vaz, R.; Williams, R. A.; Stump, B. W.; Hayward, C.; Choy, G. L.; Hoover, S. M.; Mueller, C. S.; LaGrassa, N.; Miller, G.; Osburn, M.

    2016-12-01

    Felt earthquakes have occurred in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Irving area since 2008, raising concern about seismic risks and potential links to petroleum industry activities - and leading to a productive, long-standing interaction between earthquake scientists and local government officials. City staff, including emergency managers, formed the Dallas Irving Earthquake Working Group (DIEWG) in early 2015 to share information, learn about their new hazard, and coordinate public messages and response planning. The DIEWG has held regular meetings that included academic and government experts including scientists from Southern Methodist University (SMU) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). SMU apprised DIEWG of monitoring and research results, and responded to media inquiries. USGS provided information about seismic hazard and the likelihood of damaging earthquakes, and worked with FEMA Regions VI & VIII to provide impact planning scenarios for plausible earthquakes of M4.8 and M5.6. USGS briefed DIEWG before the release of an assessment of the likelihood of damage from natural and induced earthquakes, as local officials needed to understand the information and its implications in order to translate for their constituents. DIEWG has now asked USGS to help to develop tabletop response exercises. Through these interactions, local officials and scientists increased understanding of each other's roles, capabilities and limitations. The interactions have also improved DIEWG members' understanding of earthquake risk and impact, supported hazard mitigation planning, influenced infrastructure and building code decisions, and informed conversations with residents and media. Input from DIEWG has improved scientists' translation of complex information for use in planning, and identified persistent misunderstandings about concepts and terminology that are relevant to many earthquake information products. A key aspect of this success has been the repeated personal interaction over time.

  14. An Analysis of Individual Body Fat Depots and Risk of Developing Cancer: Insights From the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arjun; Pandey, Ambarish; Ayers, Colby; Beg, Muhammad S; Lakoski, Susan G; Vega, Gloria L; Grundy, Scott M; Johnson, David H; Neeland, Ian J

    2017-04-01

    To examine the association between specific adipose tissue depots and the risk of incident cancer in the Dallas Heart Study. Individuals without prevalent cancer in the Dallas Heart Study underwent quantification of adipose depots: visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue, and liver fat by magnetic resonance imaging, and subcutaneous lower-body fat (LBF) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2002, and were observed for the development of cancer for up to 12 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was performed to examine the association between fat depots and cancer. Of 2627 participants (median age, 43 years; 69% nonwhite race), 167 (6.4%) developed cancer. The most common primary sites of cancer were the breast (in women) and the prostate (in men). In multivariable models adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol use, family history of malignancy, and body mass index, a 1-SD increase in VAT was not associated with increased risk of cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94; 95% CI, 0.77-1.14). In contrast, each 1-SD increase in LBF was associated with a reduced incidence of cancer (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.92) in the fully adjusted model. In this study, adiposity-associated cancer risk was heterogeneous and varied by fat depot: VAT was not independently associated with incident cancer, and LBF seemed to protect against cancer development. Further studies of the adiposity-cancer relationship, including serial assessments, are needed to better elucidate this relationship. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Obama Administration Partnering with Dallas,TX, and Other Communities to Boost Local Foods, Neighborhood Revitalization, Local Foods, Local Places encourages creative economic development in rural and urban communities in 22 states

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Jan. 26, 2016) Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined together to announce 27 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places (LFLP), a federal initiative helping people create walka

  16. Turbulence Climatology at Dallas/Ft.Worth (DFW) Airport: Implications for a Departure Wake Vortex Spacing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perras, G. H.; Dasey, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    Potential adaptive wake vortex spacing systems may need to rely on wake vortex decay rather than wake vortex transport in reducing wake separations. A wake vortex takeoff-spacing system in particular will need to rely on wake decay. Ambient turbulence is the primary influence on wake decay away from the ground. This study evaluated 18 months of ambient turbulence measurements at Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW) Airport. The measurements show minor variation in the turbulence levels at various times of the year or times of the day for time periods when a departure system could be used. Arrival system operation was also examined, and a slightly lower overall turbulence level was found as compared to departure system benefit periods. The Sarpkaya model, a validated model of wake vortex behavior, was applied to various turbulence levels and compared to the DFW turbulence statistics. The results show that wake vortices from heavy aircraft on takeoff should dissipate within one minute for the majority of the time and will rarely last two minutes. These results will need to be verified by wake vortex measurements on departure.

  17. A Terminal Area Analysis of Continuous Ascent Departure Fuel Use at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Keenan; Robinson, John E., III

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft departing from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) encounter vertical restrictions that prevent continuous ascent operations. The result of these restrictions are temporary level-offs at 10,000 feet. A combination of flow direction, specific Area Navigation (RNAV) route geometry, and arrival streams have been found to be the biggest factors in the duration and frequency of a temporary level-offs. In total, 20% of DFW departures are affected by these level-offs, which have an average duration of just over 100 seconds. The use of continuous descent approaches at DFW are shown to lessen the impact arrivals have on the departures and allow more continuous ascents. The fuel used in a continuous ascent and an ascent with a temporary level-off have been calculated using a fuel burn rate model created from a combination of actual aircraft track data, aircraft manufacturer flight operations manuals, and Eurocontrol's Base of Aircraft Data (BADA) simulation tool. This model represents the average aggregate burn rates for the current fleet mix at DFW. Continuous ascents would save approximately seven gallons of fuel out of 450 gallons used to climb to a cruise altitude of 31,000ft per departure.

  18. Interactions Between Bt-Bioinsecticides and Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), a Predator of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    PubMed

    Magalhães, G O; Vacari, A M; DE Bortoli, C P; Pomari, A F; DE Bortoli, S A; Polanczyk, R A

    2015-10-01

    Bioinsecticides are being increasingly used to protect vegetable crops against herbivores, but data on the side effects of such strategy on the third trophic level are still required. We investigated the influence of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1 strain and of the commercial bioinsecticide Agree® on the biological aspects of the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) when feeding on Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)-infected larvae. On average, infected larvae were consumed more often than the non-infected larvae throughout the predator nymphal development, and no effect on nymph survival was observed. Population growth parameters (R 0, r m, and λ) resulting from the fertility life tables did not differ among treatments. The results led to the conclusion that P. nigrispinus can be used in combination with the product Agree® or the strain HD-1 for the control of P. xylostella. The combined use of these control agents helps to maintain the balance of the ecosystem and contributes for the production of food for healthy human consumption.

  19. A land-use and water-quality history of White Rock Lake Reservoir, Dallas, Texas, based on paleolimnological analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.; Van Metre, P.C.

    1997-01-01

    White Rock Lake reservoir in Dallas, Texas contains a 150-cm sediment record of silty clay that documents land-use changes since its construction in 1912. Pollen analysis corroborates historical evidence that between 1912 and 1950 the watershed was primarily agricultural. Land disturbance by plowing coupled with strong and variable spring precipitation caused large amounts of sediment to enter the lake during this period. Diatoms were not preserved at this time probably because of low productivity compared to diatom dissolution by warm, alkaline water prior to burial in the sediments. After 1956, the watershed became progressively urbanized. Erosion decreased, land stabilized, and pollen of riparian trees increased as the lake water became somewhat less turbid. By 1986 the sediment record indicates that diatom productivity had increased beyond rates of diatom destruction. Neither increased nutrients nor reduced pesticides can account for increased diatom productivity, but grain size studies imply that before 1986 diatoms were light limited by high levels of turbidity. This study documents how reservoirs may relate to land-use practices and how watershed management could extend reservoir life and improve water quality.

  20. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  1. School-based management of chronic asthma among inner-city African-American schoolchildren in Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    McEwen, M; Johnson, P; Neatherlin, J; Millard, M W; Lawrence, G

    1998-05-01

    Asthma, a chronic disease of the respiratory tract, affects approximately five percent of the U.S. population, including almost five million children. Childhood asthma has been identified as the leading cause of school absences. This study was to examined efficacy of a school-based program to prevent exacerbation of asthma symptoms and manage asthma in school children using measured doses of an inhaled anti-inflammatory medication. The sample consisted of 22 African-American children in one inner-city elementary school in Dallas, Texas, ages 5-12 years with confirmed diagnoses of asthma. For three months, each child came to the school clinic two times per day for medication administration and measurement of respiratory peak flow rates. Data were collected for a number of variables including bronchodilator use, school absences, self-report of asthma symptoms, and number of visits to the physician. During the study, mean peak flow rates improved approximately 15%, and bronchodilator use decreased 66%. Improvement also was evident in several other areas.

  2. Technique for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.; Schroeder, Elmer E.; Hampton, B.B.

    1982-01-01

    Equations for predicting the magnitude and frequency of floods in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area were developed from recorded data from streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 1.25 to 66.4 square miles. The U. S. Geological Survey urban rainfall-runoff model was used to generate long-term flood-discharge record for gaged streams in the area. Simulated and recorded annual-peak data were subjected independently to log Pearson III frequency analyses. The results were weighted to determine appropriate discharges for selected 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence intervals. These T-year values were then used as the dependent variables in a multiple regression analysis. The independent variable determined to be statistically significant and retained in the resulting equations were drainage area and an urbanization index that expresses the degree of urban development. Analysis of the results shows that a land-use change from rural to fully urbanized is accompanied by a 180% increase in discharge of a flood with a 5-year recurrence interval and about 100% increase in discharge of a flood with a 100-year recurrence interval. 

  3. Prevalence of antibody to Trypanosoma cruzi in Hispanic-surnamed patients seen at Parkland Health & Hospital System, Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    Arena, Roberto; Mathews, Christine E; Kim, Anne Y; Lenz, Tim E; Southern, Paul M

    2011-04-29

    Chagas disease constitutes an important public health threat in terms of morbidity and mortality in the areas in the United States where immigrant populations from Latin America are conspicuous. We conducted a survey to assess the prevalence of anti-T. cruzi antibody in Hispanic-surnamed patients seen at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas, Texas. Five hundred serum specimens from Hispanic-surnamed patients were tested by a preliminary ELISA method. On a subset of 50 sera confirmatory testing was also performed using an alternative ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence, and TESA immunoblot. For 274 of 500 Hispanic-surnamed patients, we were able to ascertain immigration status upon medical chart review. Of the 274 sera analyzed, one sample tested as positive for anti-T. cruzi antibody by the preliminary ELISA, and by the three confirmatory methods. The goal of this study is to increase the awareness of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease in areas where the Latin American immigrant communities are growing. Our study highlights the importance of testing for Chagas disease in the populations most at risk, and the need for current data on the actual seroprevalence in areas where such immigrant populations are conspicuous. Larger-scale epidemiologic surveys on Chagas disease in the immigrant communities from Latin America are warranted.

  4. Association between circulating soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products and atherosclerosis: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Jason B; de Lemos, James A; Cipollone, Francesco; Ayers, Colby R; Rohatgi, Anand; Morrow, David A; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K

    2009-07-01

    To determine the association between circulating soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) and coronary atherosclerosis. Using data from the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based population sample, the association between plasma levels of sRAGE and coronary artery calcium (CAC) was assessed among 2,571 subjects with complete imaging and sRAGE data. An inverse graded association was observed between sRAGE quartiles and CAC, with CAC prevalence of 28.5% in quartile 1 compared with 15.7% in quartile 4 (P < 0.0001). After multivariable adjustment, the associations between sRAGE levels in the first and second quartiles (versus fourth quartile) and CAC remained statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio 1.71 [95% CI 1.2-2.4] and 1.5 [1.0-2.1], respectively). sRAGE is a novel biomarker that is inversely associated with coronary atherosclerosis. The role of sRAGE in the pathobiology of atherosclerosis and its potential prognostic and therapeutic implications warrant further investigation.

  5. Association of 3.0-T brain magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers with cognitive function in the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mohit; King, Kevin S; Srinivasa, Rajiv; Weiner, Myron F; Hulsey, Keith; Ayers, Colby R; Whittemore, Anthony; McColl, Roderick W; Rossetti, Heidi C; Peshock, Ronald M

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the relationships between age-related changes in brain structure and cognitive function has been limited by inconsistent methods for assessing brain imaging, small sample sizes, and racially/ethnically homogeneous cohorts with biased selection based on risk factors. These limitations have prevented the generalizability of results from brain morphology studies. To determine the association of 3.0-T structural brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements with cognitive function in the multiracial/multiethnic, population-based Dallas Heart Study. Whole-brain, 2-dimensional, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and 3-dimensional, magnetization-prepared, rapid acquisition with gradient echo MR imaging at 3.0 T was performed in 1645 Dallas Heart Study participants (mean [SD] age, 49.9 [10.5] years; age range, 19-85 years) who received both brain MR imaging and cognitive screening with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment between September 18, 2007, and December 28, 2009. Measurements were obtained for white matter hyperintensity volume, total brain volume, gray matter volume, white matter volume, cerebrospinal fluid volume, and hippocampal volume. Linear regression and a best predictive model were developed to determine the association of MR imaging biomarkers with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment total score and domain-specific questions. High-resolution anatomical MR imaging was used to quantify brain volumes. Scores on the screening Montreal Cognitive Assessment were used for cognitive assessment in participants. After adjustment for demographic variables, total brain volume (P < .0001, standardized estimate [SE] = .1069), gray matter volume (P < .0001, SE = .1156), white matter volume (P = .008, SE = .0687), cerebrospinal fluid volume (P = .012, SE = -.0667), and hippocampal volume (P < .0001) were significantly associated with cognitive performance. A best predictive model identified gray matter volume (P

  6. Influence of race/ethnicity on cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome, the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alice Y; Oshiro, June; Ayers, Colby; Auchus, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is estimated to affect up to 20% of women. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the impact of race/ethnicity on the prevalence of CV risk factors and subclinical predictors of CV events. Cross-sectional analysis of data collected by the Dallas Heart Study, an urban, population-based cohort oversampled for blacks. A previously described cohort of women with PCOS and control subjects of the same racial/ethnic group, matched for age and body mass index. Hormonal and clinical measures associated with PCOS and CV risk factors. The study included 117 women with PCOS and 204 controls. Women with PCOS had significant differences across racial/ethnic groups in the prevalence of hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and impaired fasting glucose (P < 0·05). Controls showed significant racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of hypertension and impaired fasting glucose (P < 0·05). The odds of hypertension were significantly greater among women with PCOS than controls after adjusting for race/ethnicity (odds ratio, 1·50 [95% CI, 1·03-2·30]; P = 0·04). However, we did not see an interaction of race/ethnicity that significantly changed CV risk factor prevalence between PCOS and controls. In addition, subclinical measures of CV disease were not different between women with PCOS vs controls, even among hypertensive women. Race/ethnicity affects the prevalence of CV risk factors for women with and without PCOS. However, race/ethnicity does not interact with PCOS to additionally increase CV risk factor prevalence or subclinical CV disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The association between HDL particle concentration and incident metabolic syndrome in the multi-ethnic Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Mani, Preethi; Ren, Hao-Yu; Neeland, Ian J; McGuire, Darren K; Ayers, Colby R; Khera, Amit; Rohatgi, Anand

    2016-12-12

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) increases atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is a diagnostic criterion of MetS and a major ASCVD risk factor. HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) associates with incident ASCVD independent of HDL-C, but its association with incident MetS has not been studied. We hypothesized that HDL-P would be inversely associated with incident metabolic syndrome independent of HDL-C and markers of adiposity and insulin resistance. HDL-P was measured by NMR and visceral fat by MRI in participants of the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based population sample of adults age 30-65. Participants with prevalent MetS, DM, CVD, and any systemic illlness were excluded. Incident MetS as defined by NCEP ATPIII criteria was determined in all participants after median follow-up period of 7.0 years. Among 1120 participants without DM or MetS at baseline (57% women, 45% Black, mean age 43), 22.8% had incident MetS at follow-up. HDL-P and HDL-C were modestly correlated (r=0.54, p<0.0001). In models adjusted for traditional risk factors and MetS risk factors including visceral fat, HS-CRP, triglyceride to HDL-C ratio, and HOMA-IR, the lowest quartile of HDL-P was associated with a 2-fold increased risk of incident MetS (OR 2.1, 95%CI 1.4-3.1; p=0.0003). Low HDL-P is independently associated with incident MetS after adjustment for traditional risk factors, lipid parameters, adiposity, inflammation, and markers of insulin resistance. Further studies are warranted to validate these findings and elucidate the mechanisms underpinning this association. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Race-Specific Associations of Myeloperoxidase with Atherosclerosis in a Population-Based Sample: The Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Rohatgi, Anand; Ayers, Colby R.; Das, Sandeep R.; Khera, Amit; Berry, Jarett D.; McGuire, Darren K.; de Lemos, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a leukocyte-derived enzyme that appears to be directly involved in atherosclerosis development. We evaluated the association of circulating MPO with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in a large, multiethnic population. Methods and Results Plasma levels of MPO were measured in 3294 subjects participating in the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based population sample. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was measured by EBCT, and abdominal aorta plaque prevalence (AP) and burden (APB), as well as abdominal aorta wall thickness (AWT) were determined by MRI. Associations between MPO and atherosclerosis phenotypes were assessed in multivariable analyses adjusting for traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. MPO levels in the 4th compared with 1st quartile independently associated with prevalent AP (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.08–1.84), APB (beta coefficient 0.23, p=0.02), and AWT (beta coefficient 0.04, p=0.03), but not with prevalent CAC (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.61–1.17). MPO remained associated with aortic atherosclerosis phenotypes but not coronary calcification after adjustment for other inflammatory biomarkers. A significant interaction was observed between race/ethnicity, MPO and AP (pinteraction=0.038), such that MPO levels in the 4th vs 1st quartile associated with prevalent AP in African Americans, (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.23–2.65) but not in White or Hispanic participants (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.68–1.44). Conclusion Higher levels of MPO associated with aortic but not coronary atherosclerosis, with significant associations limited to African American participants. These findings suggest that MPO might be a novel risk factor contributing to racial disparities in peripheral vascular disease. PMID:21917261

  9. Use of borehole geophysical logs for improved site characterization at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anaya, Roberto; Braun, Christopher L.; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2000-01-01

    A shallow alluvial aquifer at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant near Dallas, Texas, has been contaminated by organic solvents used in the fabrication and assembly of aircraft and aircraft parts. Natural gamma-ray and electromagnetic-induction log data collected during 1997 from 162 wells were integrated with existing lithologic and cone-penetrometer test log data to improve characterization of the subsurface alluvium at the site. The alluvium, consisting of mostly fine-grained, low-permeability sediments, was classified into low, intermediate, and high clay-content sediments on the basis of the gamma-ray logs. Low clay-content sediments were interpreted as being relatively permeable, whereas high clay-content sediments were interpreted as being relatively impermeable. Gamma-ray logs, cone-penetrometer test logs, and electromagnetic-induction logs were used to develop a series of intersecting sections to delineate the spatial distribution of low, intermediate, and high clay-content sediments and to delineate zones of potentially contaminated sediments. The sections indicate three major sedimentary units in the shallow alluvial aquifer at NWIRP. The lower unit consists of relatively permeable, low clay-content sediments and is absent over the southeastern and northwestern part of the site. Permeable zones in the complex, discontinuous middle unit are present mostly in the western part of the site. In the eastern and southeastern part of the site, the upper unit has been eroded away and replaced by fill material. Zones of potentially contaminated sediments are generally within the uppermost clay layer or fill material. In addition, the zones tend to be local occurrences.

  10. Anthropometric measures, presence of metabolic syndrome, and adherence to physical activity guidelines among African American church members, Dallas, Texas, 2008.

    PubMed

    Shuval, Kerem; DeVahl, Julie; Tong, Liyue; Gimpel, Nora; Lee, Jenny J; DeHaven, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence of physical activity among African Americans and high risk of cardiovascular disease lends urgency to assessing the association between metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, and adherence to current physical activity guidelines. Few studies have examined this association among African American adults. We examined the association between demographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and metabolic syndrome and adherence to the 2008 Department of Health and Human Services guidelines for moderate and vigorous physical activity. Participants were 392 African American church members from congregations in Dallas, Texas. Physical activity levels were assessed via a validated questionnaire (7-Day Physical Activity Recall), and metabolic syndrome was determined on the basis of the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute diagnostic criteria. We used bivariate and multinomial logistic regression to examine the associations. Meeting guidelines for vigorous physical activity was significantly and independently associated with the absence of metabolic syndrome among women (odds ratio, 4.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.63-13.14; P = .003), after adjusting for covariates. No association was found between meeting moderate or vigorous physical activity guidelines and metabolic syndrome among men. Meeting physical activity guidelines was not associated with body mass index or waist circumference among this sample of predominantly overweight and obese African American church members. Results indicate that meeting the 2008 guidelines for vigorous physical activity is associated with the absence of metabolic syndrome among African American women. This finding might suggest the need to integrate vigorous physical activity into interventions for African American women as a preventive therapy for cardiovascular risk. 

  11. Cardiovascular lifetime risk predicts incidence of coronary calcification in individuals with low short-term risk: the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Paixao, Andre R M; Ayers, Colby R; Rohatgi, Anand; Das, Sandeep R; de Lemos, James A; Khera, Amit; Lloyd-Jones, Donald; Berry, Jarett D

    2014-11-25

    The absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in middle age is associated with very low short-term risk for coronary events. However, the long-term implications of a CAC score of 0 are uncertain, particularly among individuals with high cardiovascular lifetime risk. We sought to characterize the association between predicted lifetime risk and incident CAC among individuals with low short-term risk. We included 754 Dallas Heart Study participants with serial CAC scans (6.9 years apart) and both low short-term risk and baseline CAC=0. Lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease was estimated according to risk factor burden. Among this group, 365 individuals (48.4%) were at low lifetime risk and 389 (51.6%) at high lifetime risk. High lifetime risk was associated with higher annualized CAC incidence (4.2% versus 2.7%; P < 0.001). Similarly, mean follow-up CAC scores were higher among participants with high lifetime risk (7.8 versus 2.4 Agatston units). After adjustment for age, sex, and race, high lifetime risk remained independently associated with incident CAC (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.12 to 2.27; P=0.01). When assessing risk factor burden at the follow-up visit, 66.7% of CAC incidence observed in the low lifetime risk group occurred among individuals reclassified to a higher short- or long-term risk category. Among individuals with low short-term risk and CAC scores of 0, high lifetime risk is associated with a higher incidence of CAC. These findings highlight the importance of lifetime risk even among individuals with very low short-term risk. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. The relationship of body mass and fat distribution with incident hypertension: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J; Berry, Jarett D; Ayers, Colby R; Rohatgi, Anand; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Turer, Aslan T

    2014-09-09

    Obesity has been linked to the development of hypertension, but whether total adiposity or site-specific fat accumulation underpins this relationship is unclear. This study sought to determine the relationship between adipose tissue distribution and incident hypertension. Normotensive participants enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study were followed for a median of 7 years for the development of hypertension (systolic blood pressure [SBP] ≥140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg, or initiation of blood pressure medications). Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) was quantified by magnetic resonance imaging and proton-spectroscopic imaging, and lower body fat (LBF) was imaged by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Multivariable relative risk regression was performed to test the association between individual fat depots and incident hypertension, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetes, smoking, SBP, and body mass index (BMI). Among 903 participants (median age, 40 years; 57% women; 60% nonwhite; median BMI 27.5 kg/m(2)), 230 (25%) developed incident hypertension. In multivariable analyses, higher BMI was significantly associated with incident hypertension (relative risk: 1.24; 95% confidence interval: 1.12 to 1.36, per 1-SD increase). However, when VAT, SAT, and LBF were added to the model, only VAT remained independently associated with incident hypertension (relative risk: 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.39, per 1-SD increase). Increased visceral adiposity, but not total or subcutaneous adiposity, was robustly associated with incident hypertension. Additional studies will be needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind this association. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Race and Sex on Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Levels: Observations from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Brilakis, Emmanouil S.; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K.; See, Raphael; Banerjee, Subhash; Murphy, Sabina A.; de Lemos, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Aims Most lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) studies included mainly white men. We sought to determine whether Lp-PLA2 levels differ according to race and sex. Methods Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were measured in 3,332 subjects age 30 to 65 participating in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic, population-based, probability sample. Lp-PLA2 levels were compared between different race and sex groups. Results Mean age was 45 ± 9 years and 44% were men; 30% were white, 17% hispanic, and 53% black. Mean Lp-PLA2 activity and mass were 146 ± 40 nmol/min/mL and 191 ± 60 ng/mL, respectively. Lp-PLA2 activity was lower in women compared with men (134 ± 35 vs. 161 ± 40, p=0.001) and was lowest in black (136 ± 38), intermediate in hispanic (151 ± 36), and highest in white subjects (161 ± 39) (trend p=0.0001). In multivariable linear regression models, after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), Lp-PLA2 activity was 19 nmol/min/mL higher in men vs. women (p<0.001); compared with black subjects, adjusted Lp-PLA2 activity was 11 and 20 nmol/min/mL higher in white and hispanic subjects, respectively (both p<0.001). Similar race and sex differences were observed for Lp-PLA2 mass. Conclusion Race and sex independently influence Lp-PLA2 activity and mass. Thresholds to define Lp-PLA2 elevation may need to be sex and race specific. PMID:18061193

  14. Cardiovascular Lifetime Risk Predicts Incidence of Coronary Calcification in Individuals With Low Short‐Term Risk: The Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Paixao, Andre R. M.; Ayers, Colby R.; Rohatgi, Anand; Das, Sandeep R.; de Lemos, James A.; Khera, Amit; Lloyd‐Jones, Donald; Berry, Jarett D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The absence of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in middle age is associated with very low short‐term risk for coronary events. However, the long‐term implications of a CAC score of 0 are uncertain, particularly among individuals with high cardiovascular lifetime risk. We sought to characterize the association between predicted lifetime risk and incident CAC among individuals with low short‐term risk. Methods and Results We included 754 Dallas Heart Study participants with serial CAC scans (6.9 years apart) and both low short‐term risk and baseline CAC=0. Lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease was estimated according to risk factor burden. Among this group, 365 individuals (48.4%) were at low lifetime risk and 389 (51.6%) at high lifetime risk. High lifetime risk was associated with higher annualized CAC incidence (4.2% versus 2.7%; P < 0.001). Similarly, mean follow‐up CAC scores were higher among participants with high lifetime risk (7.8 versus 2.4 Agatston units). After adjustment for age, sex, and race, high lifetime risk remained independently associated with incident CAC (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.12 to 2.27; P=0.01). When assessing risk factor burden at the follow‐up visit, 66.7% of CAC incidence observed in the low lifetime risk group occurred among individuals reclassified to a higher short‐ or long‐term risk category. Conclusion Among individuals with low short‐term risk and CAC scores of 0, high lifetime risk is associated with a higher incidence of CAC. These findings highlight the importance of lifetime risk even among individuals with very low short‐term risk. PMID:25424574

  15. Adiponectin as an independent predictor of the presence and degree of hepatic steatosis in the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Turer, Aslan T; Browning, Jeffrey D; Ayers, Colby R; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; Vega, Gloria L; Grundy, Scott M; Scherer, Philipp E

    2012-06-01

    Previous small case-control studies have suggested an inverse relationship between adiponectin and hepatic steatosis, but whether this finding is independent of insulin sensitivity and other intraabdominal fat depots is unclear. OBJECTIVES AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The objective of this study was to establish whether an independent relationship exists between serum adiponectin concentrations and liver fat. Adiponectin levels were compared with hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC) as assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 2215 participants from the Dallas Heart Study. Multivariate modeling was performed to control for the effects of intraabdominal fat, insulin sensitivity, and other baseline factors. In unadjusted analysis, adiponectin levels displayed inverse correlations with the amount of intraabdominal fat and HTGC. After multivariate adjustment, including individual intraabdominal fat depots and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, HTGC remained significantly associated with adiponectin levels (β = -1.46, P < 0.0001 for women; β = -1.81, P < 0.0001 for men). Race- and gender-specific models demonstrated that this association was consistent across groups, except for Hispanic men. The adjusted odds ratio for hepatic steatosis (HTGC > 5.5%) per 1-sd increase in adiponectin concentrations was 0.64 (95% confidence interval = 0.52-0.78) for women and 0.61 (95% confidence interval = 0.51-0.74) for men. Data from a large, multiethnic population-based cohort show adiponectin levels are inversely associated with hepatic steatosis even after controlling for measures of insulin sensitivity, extrahepatic abdominal adiposity, and ethnicity. The mechanistic underpinnings of this association warrant further exploration.

  16. Race-specific associations of myeloperoxidase with atherosclerosis in a population-based sample: the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu Q; Rohatgi, Anand; Ayers, Colby R; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; Berry, Jarett D; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A

    2011-12-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a leukocyte-derived enzyme that appears to be directly involved in atherosclerosis development. We evaluated the association of circulating MPO with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis in a large, multiethnic population. Plasma levels of MPO were measured in 3294 subjects participating in the Dallas Heart Study, a probability-based population sample. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) was measured by EBCT, and abdominal aorta plaque prevalence (AP) and burden (APB), as well as abdominal aorta wall thickness (AWT) were determined by MRI. Associations between MPO and atherosclerosis phenotypes were assessed in multivariable analyses adjusting for traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. MPO levels in the 4th compared with 1st quartile independently associated with prevalent AP (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.08-1.84), APB (beta coefficient 0.23, p = 0.02), and AWT (beta coefficient 0.04, p = 0.03), but not with prevalent CAC (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.61-1.17). MPO remained associated with aortic atherosclerosis phenotypes but not coronary calcification after adjustment for other inflammatory biomarkers. A significant interaction was observed between race/ethnicity, MPO and AP (p(interaction) = 0.038), such that MPO levels in the 4th vs 1st quartile associated with prevalent AP in African Americans, (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.23-2.65) but not in White or Hispanic participants (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.68-1.44). Higher levels of MPO associated with aortic but not coronary atherosclerosis, with significant associations limited to African American participants. These findings suggest that MPO might be a novel risk factor contributing to racial disparities in peripheral vascular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of race and sex on lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 levels: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; See, Raphael; Banerjee, Subhash; Murphy, Sabina A; de Lemos, James A

    2008-07-01

    Most lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) studies included mainly white men. We sought to determine whether Lp-PLA2 levels differ according to race and sex. Lp-PLA2 mass and activity were measured in 3332 subjects age 30-65 participating in the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic, population-based, probability sample. Lp-PLA2 levels were compared between different race and sex groups. Mean age was 45+/-9 years and 44% were men; 30% were white, 17% hispanic, and 53% black. Mean Lp-PLA2 activity and mass were 146+/-40 nmol/min/mL and 191+/-60 ng/mL, respectively. Lp-PLA2 activity was lower in women compared with men (134+/-35 vs. 161+/-40, p=0.001) and was lowest in black (136+/-38), intermediate in hispanic (151+/-36), and highest in white subjects (161+/-39) (trend p=0.0001). In multivariable linear regression models, after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), Lp-PLA2 activity was 19 nmol/min/mL higher in men vs. women (p<0.001); compared with black subjects, adjusted Lp-PLA2 activity was 11 and 20 nmol/min/mL higher in white and hispanic subjects, respectively (both p<0.001). Similar race and sex differences were observed for Lp-PLA2 mass. Race and sex independently influence Lp-PLA2 activity and mass. Thresholds to define Lp-PLA2 elevation may need to be sex and race specific.

  18. Delivering digital health and well-being at scale: lessons learned during the implementation of the dallas program in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Alison M; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; O’Donnell, Catherine A; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Agbakoba, Ruth; O’Connor, Siobhan; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Wyke, Sally; Watson, Nicholas; Browne, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify implementation lessons from the United Kingdom Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) program—a large-scale, national technology program that aims to deliver a broad range of digital services and products to the public to promote health and well-being. Materials and Methods Prospective, longitudinal qualitative research study investigating implementation processes. Qualitative data collected includes semi-structured e-Health Implementation Toolkit–led interviews at baseline/mid-point (n = 38), quarterly evaluation, quarterly technical and barrier and solutions reports, observational logs, quarterly evaluation alignment interviews with project leads, observational data collected during meetings, and ethnographic data from dallas events (n > 200 distinct pieces of qualitative data). Data analysis was guided by Normalization Process Theory, a sociological theory that aids conceptualization of implementation issues in complex healthcare settings. Results Five key challenges were identified: 1) The challenge of establishing and maintaining large heterogeneous, multi-agency partnerships to deliver new models of healthcare; 2) The need for resilience in the face of barriers and set-backs including the backdrop of continually changing external environments; 3) The inherent tension between embracing innovative co-design and achieving delivery at pace and at scale; 4) The effects of branding and marketing issues in consumer healthcare settings; and 5) The challenge of interoperability and information governance, when commercial proprietary models are dominant. Conclusions The magnitude and ambition of the dallas program provides a unique opportunity to investigate the macro level implementation challenges faced when designing and delivering digital health and wellness services at scale. Flexibility, adaptability, and resilience are key implementation facilitators when shifting to new digitally enabled models of care. PMID:26254480

  19. Delivering digital health and well-being at scale: lessons learned during the implementation of the dallas program in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Alison M; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Agbakoba, Ruth; O'Connor, Siobhan; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Wyke, Sally; Watson, Nicholas; Browne, Susan; Mair, Frances S

    2016-01-01

    To identify implementation lessons from the United Kingdom Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) program-a large-scale, national technology program that aims to deliver a broad range of digital services and products to the public to promote health and well-being. Prospective, longitudinal qualitative research study investigating implementation processes. Qualitative data collected includes semi-structured e-Health Implementation Toolkit-led interviews at baseline/mid-point (n = 38), quarterly evaluation, quarterly technical and barrier and solutions reports, observational logs, quarterly evaluation alignment interviews with project leads, observational data collected during meetings, and ethnographic data from dallas events (n > 200 distinct pieces of qualitative data). Data analysis was guided by Normalization Process Theory, a sociological theory that aids conceptualization of implementation issues in complex healthcare settings. Five key challenges were identified: 1) The challenge of establishing and maintaining large heterogeneous, multi-agency partnerships to deliver new models of healthcare; 2) The need for resilience in the face of barriers and set-backs including the backdrop of continually changing external environments; 3) The inherent tension between embracing innovative co-design and achieving delivery at pace and at scale; 4) The effects of branding and marketing issues in consumer healthcare settings; and 5) The challenge of interoperability and information governance, when commercial proprietary models are dominant. The magnitude and ambition of the dallas program provides a unique opportunity to investigate the macro level implementation challenges faced when designing and delivering digital health and wellness services at scale. Flexibility, adaptability, and resilience are key implementation facilitators when shifting to new digitally enabled models of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  20. Interrelationships of breed type, USDA quality grade, cooking method, and degree of doneness on consumer evaluations of beef in Dallas and San Antonio, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D R; Lorenzen, C L; Pollok, K D; Morgan, W W; Mies, W L; Harris, J J; Murphy, R; McAdams, M; Hale, D S; Savell, J W

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the consumer controlled factors of cooking method and degree of doneness on top loin steaks from different USDA quality grades (Low Choice, High Select or Low Select) and breed-types (English, Continental European Cross or Brahman Cross). In addition, cities within the same region were evaluated for differences in consumer controlled factors and palatability responses. The in-home product test was conducted in Dallas and San Antonio, Texas, USA. Consumers (n=173) evaluated steaks for overall like (OSAT), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), and flavor (FLAV) using 23-point hedonic scales. Respondents in Dallas cooked their steaks to higher degrees of doneness than did those in San Antonio. Outdoor grilling was the most frequently used method of cookery for steaks in both cities. Generally, consumers in San Antonio gave higher palatability ratings to Choice steaks and Dallas consumers gave higher ratings to Select steaks. The interactions of city×cooking method, breed-type×cooking method, and degree of doneness×cooking method were significant for all palatability attributes. In addition, the interaction of cooking method×quality grade was significant for TEND, JUIC, and FLAV. Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force was determined on a steak from each strip loin. Steaks from Continental European Cross cattle and Low Choice carcasses had the lowest WBS values. Differences in consumer preparation of beef top loin steaks present very unique challenges for the beef industry. Consumer information programs may serve a valuable role in connecting consumer perceptions with the preparation techniques needed to consistently achieve satisfaction.

  1. Impact of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Dallas, TX, children from 1999 through 2005.

    PubMed

    Messina, Allison F; Katz-Gaynor, Kathy; Barton, Theresa; Ahmad, Naveed; Ghaffar, Faryal; Rasko, David; McCracken, George H

    2007-06-01

    Because the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has reduced vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children, a greater proportion of IPD is now caused by nonvaccine (NVT) serotypes. We analyzed the serotypes, antimicrobial resistance profiles and genetic relatedness of Streptococcus pneumoniae responsible for IPD at Children's Medical Center of Dallas. S. pneumoniae isolates were collected from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2005. Incidence of IPD was calculated using inpatient and emergency center admissions to Children's Medical Center of Dallas as the denominator. Isolates were serotyped, and their penicillin and cefotaxime susceptibility determined. The 19A isolates were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and determination of penicillin-binding proteins and mef and erm genes. The incidence of IPD decreased from 93.6 cases/100,000 patients in 1999 to a nadir of 41 cases/100,000 patients in 2003 (P < 0.001). The number of IPD cases caused by serotype 19A increased, accounting for 40% of the cases of IPD in 2005. Penicillin and cefotaxime susceptibility of IPD isolates did not change from 1999 through 2005 (P = 0.687). There was a decrease in penicillin (P < 0.001) and cefotaxime (P = 0.034) susceptibility in NVT serotypes from 1999 to 2005. Molecular characterization of 19A isolates revealed a predominance of ST-199 (62%). Several highly penicillin-resistant and intermediately cefotaxime-resistant strains emerged in 2004 and 2005. In Dallas, heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine reduced the incidence of IPD from 1999 to 2005 by reducing the incidence of vaccine-type disease. NVT serotypes, particularly 19A, were prevalent and more resistant to antimicrobials in 2004 and 2005.

  2. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban streams as assessed using semipermeable membrane devices, Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this fact sheet are to summarize the occurrence of water-borne PAHs in three urban streams in the Dallas- Fort Worth metropolitan area and to assess the use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as PAH samplers. One site on each of three streams was selected for monitoring the occurrence of PAHs (fig. 1). The sites were chosen to reflect varied urban land uses and the influences of point- and nonpointsource pollution. The monitoring was done using SPMDs during a 30-day period in late May and June 1994.

  3. Chemical data for bottom sediment, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish in Mountain Creek Lake, Dallas, Texas, 1994-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Van Metre, P.C.; Moring, J.B.; Braun, C.L.; Wilson, J.T.; Mahler, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Mountain Creek Lake is a reservoir adjacent to two U.S. Department of the Navy facilities, the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant and the Naval Air Station in Dallas, Texas. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation found ground-water plumes containing chlorinated solvents on both facilities. These findings led to a U.S. Geological Survey study of Mountain Creek Lake adjacent to both facilities between June 1994 and August 1996. Bottom sediments, lake water, bottom-sediment pore water, and fish were collected for chemical analysis.

  4. [First occurrence of Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) preying on defoliating caterpillars of oil palm in the State of Pará, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rafael C; Lemos, Walkymário P; Bernardino, Aline S; Buecke, Joel; Müller, Antonio A

    2010-01-01

    The oil palm Elaeis guineensis is usually attacked by pests, particularly, defoliating caterpillars. Between 2004 and 2006 a stinkbug predator (Asopinae) was registered preying on caterpillars of Brassolis sophorae L., Opsiphanes invirae Hübner (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and Sibine spp. (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae), reducing their populations in commercial oil palm plantations in the State of Pará, Brazil. Specimens of the natural enemy were collected, mounted, and identified as Alcaeorrhynchus grandis (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), corresponding to the first report of the occurrence of this stinkbug attacking defoliating caterpillars of oil palm in Brazil.

  5. High-resolution Rainfall Mapping in Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Urban Network of Radars at Multiple Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Chandrasekar V.; Chen*, Haonan

    2015-04-01

    Urban flash flood is one of the most commonly encountered hazardous weather phenomena. Unfortunately, the rapid urbanization has made the densely populated areas even more vulnerable to flood risks. Hence, accurate and timely monitoring of rainfall at high spatiotemporal resolution is critical to severe weather warning and civil defense, especially in urban areas. However, it is still challenging to produce high-resolution products based on the large S-band National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), due to the sampling limitations and Earth curvature effect. Since 2012, the U.S. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has initiated the development of Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) radar remote sensing network for urban weather hazards mitigation. The DFW urban radar network consists of a combination of high-resolution X-band radars and a standard NWS NEXRAD radar operating at S-band frequency. High-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the major research goals in the deployment of this urban radar network. It has been shown in the literature that the dual-polarization radar techniques can improve the QPE accuracy over traditional single-polarization radars by rendering more measurements to enhance the data quality, providing more information about rain drop size distribution (DSD), and implying more characteristics of different hydrometeor types. This paper will present the real-time dual-polarization CASA DFW QPE system, which is developed via fusion of observations from both the high-resolution X band radar network and the S-band NWS radar. The specific dual-polarization rainfall algorithms at different frequencies (i.e., S- and X-band) will be described in details. In addition, the fusion methodology combining observations at different temporal resolution will be presented. In order to demonstrate the capability of rainfall

  6. Target Organ Complications and Cardiovascular Events Associated with Masked Hypertension and White Coat Hypertension: Analysis from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Tientcheu, Danielle; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R.; McGuire, Darren K.; de Lemos, James A.; Khera, Amit; Kaplan, Norman; Victor, Ronald; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple epidemiological studies from Europe and Asia have demonstrated increased cardiovascular risks associated with isolated elevation of home blood pressure (BP) or masked hypertension (MH). Previous studies have not addressed cardiovascular outcomes associated with MH and white coat hypertension (WCH) in the general population in the United States. Objectives The goal of this study was to determine hypertensive target organ damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes associated with WCH (high clinic BP ≥140/90 mm Hg, normal home BP of <135/85 mm Hg), MH (high home BP ≥135/85 mm Hg, normal clinic BP <140/90 mm Hg), and sustained hypertension (SH, high home and clinic BP) in the Dallas Heart Study, a large, multiethnic probability-based population cohort. Methods We evaluated associations between WCH, MH, SH and aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV) by magnetic resonance imaging; urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR); and cystatin C at study baseline. Then, associations between WCH and MH with incident cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and cardiovascular death) over a median follow-up period of 9 years were assessed. Results The study cohort comprised 3,027 subjects (50% African Americans). The sample-weighted prevalence of WCH and MH were 3.3% and 17.8%, respectively. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased APWV, cystatin C, and UACR. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with higher cardiovascular events compared with the NT group, even after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors (adjusted HR: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.05 to 4.15 and adjusted HR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.36 to 3.03, respectively). Conclusions In a multiethnic U.S. population, both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased aortic stiffness, renal injury, and incident cardiovascular events. Because MH is common and associated with an adverse cardiovascular profile, home BP

  7. A Terminal Area PBL Prediction System at Dallas-Fort Worth and Its Application in Simulating Diurnal PBL Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Charney, Joseph J.; Pfeiffer, Karl D.; Ensley, Darrell B.; Decroix, David S.; Weglarz, Ronald P.

    2000-09-01

    A state-of-the-science meso-b-scale numerical weather prediction model is being employed in a prototype forecast system for potential operational use at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW). The numerical model is part of a unique operational forecasting system being developed to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terminal Area Productivity Program. This operational forecasting system will focus on meso-b-scale aviation weather problems involving planetary boundary layer (PBL) turbulence, and is named the Terminal Area PBL Prediction System (TAPPS). TAPPS (version 1) is being tested and developed for NASA in an effort to improve 1-6-h terminal area forecasts of wind, vertical wind shear, temperature, and turbulence within both stable and convective PBLs at major airport terminal areas. This is being done to enhance terminal area productivity, that is, aircraft arrival and departure throughput, by using the weather forecasts as part of the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS is dependent upon nowcasts or short-period forecasts of wind, temperature, and eddy dissipation rate so that the drift and dissipation of wake vortices can be anticipated for safe airport operation. This AVOSS system will be demonstrated during calendar year 2000 at DFW.This paper describes the numerical modeling system, which has three basic components: the numerical model, the initial data stream, and the postprocessing system. Also included are the results of several case study simulations with the numerical model from a field program that occurred in September 1997 at DFW. During this field program, detailed local measurements throughout the troposphere, with special emphasis on the PBL, were taken at and surrounding DFW in an effort to verify the numerical model simulations. Comparisons indicate that the numerical model is capable of an accurate simulation of the vertical wind shear structure during the diurnal evolution of the PBL when

  8. Relation of Adiponectin to All-Cause Mortality, Cardiovascular Mortality, and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (from the Dallas Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Witberg, Guy; Ayers, Colby R; Turer, Aslan T; Lev, Eli; Kornowski, Ran; de Lemos, James; Neeland, Ian J

    2016-02-15

    Adiponectin is a key component in multiple metabolic pathways. Studies evaluating associations of adiponectin with clinical outcomes in older adults have reported conflicting results. We investigated the association of adiponectin with mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity in a young, multiethnic adult population. We analyzed data from participants in the Dallas Heart Study without baseline CVD who underwent assessment of total adiponectin from 2000 to 2002. The primary outcome of all-cause mortality was assessed over median 10.4 years of follow-up using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Secondary outcomes included CVD mortality, major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), and heart failure (HF). The study cohort included 3,263 participants, mean age 43.4 years, 44% women, and 50% black. There were 184 deaths (63 CVD), 207 MACCE, and 46 HF events. In multivariable models adjusted for age, gender, race, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-C, hyperlipidemia, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and body mass index, increasing adiponectin quartiles were positively associated with all-cause mortality Q4 versus Q1 (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.47, 3.50); CVD mortality Q4 versus Q1 (HR = 2.43; 95% CI 1.15, 5.15); MACCE Q4 versus Q1 (HR = 1.71; 95% CI 1.13, 2.60); and HF Q4 versus Q1 (HR = 2.95; 95% CI 1.14, 7.67). Findings were similar with adiponectin as a continuous variable and consistent across subgroups defined by age, gender, race, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, or elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. In conclusion, higher adiponectin was associated with increased mortality and CVD morbidity in a young, multiethnic population. These findings may have implications for strategies aimed at lowering adiponectin to prevent adverse outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Left ventricular hypertrophy, aortic wall thickness, and lifetime predicted risk of cardiovascular disease:the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Berry, Jarett D; Ayers, Colby R; Peshock, Ronald M; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; Patel, Parag C; Markham, David W; Drazner, Mark H

    2010-06-01

    To examine whether individuals with low short-term risk of coronary heart disease but high lifetime predicted risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have greater prevalence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and increased aortic wall thickness (AWT) than those with low short-term and low lifetime risk. Lifetime risk prediction can be used for stratifying individuals younger than 50 years of age into 2 groups: low short-term/high lifetime and low short-term/low lifetime predicted risk of CVD. Individuals with low short-term/high lifetime risk have a greater burden of subclinical atherosclerosis as measured by coronary artery calcium and carotid intima-media thickness. However, >75% of individuals with low short-term/high lifetime risk do not have detectable coronary artery calcium, suggesting the presence of alternative subclinical abnormalities. We stratified 1,804 Dallas Heart Study subjects between the ages of 30 and 50 years who had cardiac magnetic resonance into 3 groups: low short-term (<10% 10-year risk of coronary heart disease)/low lifetime predicted risk (<39% lifetime risk of CVD), low short-term (<10%)/high lifetime risk (> or =39%), and high short-term risk (> or =10%, prevalent diabetes, or previous stroke, or myocardial infarction). In those with low short-term risk, we compared measures of LV hypertrophy and AWT between those with low versus high lifetime risk. Subjects with low short-term/high lifetime risk compared with those with low short-term/low lifetime risk had increased LV mass (men: 95 +/- 17 g/m(2) vs. 90 +/- 12 g/m(2) and women: 75 +/- 14 g/m(2) vs. 71 +/- 10 g/m(2), respectively; p < 0.001 for both). LV concentricity (mass/volume), wall thickness, and AWT were also significantly greater in those with high lifetime risk in this comparison (p < 0.001 for all), but LV end-diastolic volume was not (p > 0.3). These associations persisted among participants without detectable coronary artery calcium. Among individuals 30 to 50 years of age

  10. Neighborhood-Level Socioeconomic Deprivation Predicts Weight Gain in a Multi-Ethnic Population: Longitudinal Data from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Ayers, Colby; Agyemang, Priscilla; Leonard, Tammy; Berrigan, David; Barbash, Rachel Ballard; Lian, Min; Das, Sandeep R.; Hoehner, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine relationship between neighborhood-level socioeconomic deprivation and weight change in a multi-ethnic cohort from Dallas County, Texas and whether behavioral/psychosocial factors attenuate the relationship. Methods Non-movers (those in the same neighborhood throughout the study period) aged 18–65 (N=939) in Dallas Heart Study (DHS) underwent weight measurements between 2000–2009 (median 7-year follow-up). Geocoded home addresses defined block groups; a neighborhood deprivation index (NDI) was created (higher NDI=greater deprivation). Multi-level modeling determined weight change relative to NDI. Model fit improvement was examined with adding physical activity and neighborhood environment perceptions (higher score=more unfavorable perceptions) as covariates. A significant interaction between residence length and NDI was found (p-interaction=0.04); results were stratified by median residence length (11 years). Results Adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, education/income, those who lived in neighborhood>11 years gained 1.0 kilograms (kg) per one-unit increment of NDI (p=0.03), or 6 kg for those in highest NDI tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Physical activity improved model fit; NDI remained associated with weight gain after adjustment for physical activity and neighborhood environment perceptions. There was no significant relationship between NDI and weight change for those in their neighborhood≤11 years. Conclusions Living in more socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods over a longer time period was associated with weight gain in DHS. PMID:24875231

  11. NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS - COLLABORATING FOR RESULTS, U.S. EPA ETV AND SBIR PROGRAMS REGIONAL WORKSHOP; MAY 8, 2007, U.S. EPA REGION 6, DALLAS, TEXAS, MEETING SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Envirnomental Technology Verification (ETV) and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program hosted a workshop on May 8, 2007, at the EPA Region 6 office in Dallas, Texas. One goal of the workshop was to provide information about new innovative technologies to ...

  12. NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS - COLLABORATING FOR RESULTS, U.S. EPA ETV AND SBIR PROGRAMS REGIONAL WORKSHOP; MAY 8, 2007, U.S. EPA REGION 6, DALLAS, TEXAS, MEETING SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Envirnomental Technology Verification (ETV) and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program hosted a workshop on May 8, 2007, at the EPA Region 6 office in Dallas, Texas. One goal of the workshop was to provide information about new innovative technologies to ...

  13. Epidemiology and evolution of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by multidrug resistant serotypes of 19A in the 8 years after implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine immunization in Dallas, Texas.

    PubMed

    Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Messina, Allison F; Katz, Kathy; Ahmad, Naveed; Huang, Rong; McCracken, George H

    2010-04-01

    The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has significantly reduced vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children. An increasing percentage of IPD cases are now caused by nonvaccine serotypes. The purpose of our observational study was to define the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease in Dallas, TX children for 8 years after implementation of PCV7 immunization. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from normally sterile sites were collected at Children's Medical Center of Dallas from January 1, 1999 to December 31, 2008. Incidence of IPD was calculated using inpatient and emergency center admissions to Children's Medical Center of Dallas as the denominator. Isolates were serotyped and penicillin and cefotaxime susceptibilities were determined. Serotype 19A isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing. Compared with the prevaccine period of 1999-2000, there was a significant reduction in the incidence of IPD from 2002 to 2008 (P < 0.05), although a significant increase in IPD incidence was observed from 2006 to 2008 (P = 0.038). The number of IPD cases caused by serotype 19A increased from 1999 to 2008 (P < 0.001). There were significant increases in penicillin and cefotaxime nonsusceptible 19A isolates during this 10-year period (P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively). The most common sequence type (ST) of the 19A isolates was ST-199 (42.7%). Clonal complex (cc-156) and cc-320 emerged in the period of 2005-2008 as penicillin and cefotaxime resistant 19A strains. In Dallas, PCV7 immunization reduced significantly the incidence of IPD caused by vaccine-type strains. A significant increase in IPD caused by serotype 19A was observed. The penicillin and cefotaxime nonsusceptible STs, not previously identified in Dallas, have recently become an important cause of IPD.

  14. Occurrence and concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices and clams in three urban streams of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J.B.; Rose, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and Asiatic clams, Corbicula fluminea (MuLLER), were deployed at stream sites in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area to assess the presence of bioavailable, dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twenty-four PAHs were detected in SPMDs, 20 of which occurred at all sites. Only three PAHs were detected in the co-deployed clams. Throughout all sites, non-alkylated PAHs were found at greater levels in SPMDs than alkylated forms. Nine of 16 Priority Pollutant PAHs were detected in SPMDs. Estimated concentrations of PAHs in water were generally two to three orders of magnitude less than standard minimum analytical reporting levels; however, for bent (a) anthracene, benzo (a) pyrene, and chrysene, estimated concentrations in water exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's human health criteria for these carcinogens in water and aquatic organisms.

  15. Thermal Testing of Dallas/Maxim iButton Temperature Logger, Model DS1922L, for Flight Qualification on Captive Flight Test Unit?1B (CFTU-1B)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G

    2005-06-20

    This report documents the flight qualification testing of the Dallas/Maxim iButton temperature logger, model DS1922L, for internal mounting to the W80 Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). A single thermal test was performed utilizing a Thermotron Model S-1.2V, S/N 20330-S, Environmental Chamber, an Agilent 34970A Data Acquisition/Switch unit, S/N MY44002670, with a Agilent 34901A 20 channel multiplexer, S/N MY41038424, and a single J type thermocouple. Start, stop, chamber temperature and temperature profile control of the Themotron was accomplished using a custom LabView VI. Additional chamber thermal data from the Agilent unit, for comparison with the Thermtron thermocouple, was captured using Agilent BenchLink software. The thermal test was performed in Building 131, Room 2273, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. One hundred twenty eight (128) DS1922L temperature loggers were setup and tested simultaneously.

  16. Vibration Testing of Dallas/Maxim iButton Temperature Logger, Model DS1999L, for Flight Qualification on Captive Flight Test Unit?B (CFTU-B)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G; Lavietes, A

    2005-06-20

    This report documents the flight qualification testing of the Dallas/Maxim iButton temperature logger, model DS1922L, for internal mounting to the W80 Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). A single test was performed utilizing a Labworks Inc. LW-140-110 electro-dynamic vibration system in Building 131, Room 2272, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. Two DS1922L temperature loggers were tested simultaneously, one horizontally and one vertically. The test consisted of random excitation in the vertical axis for 5-hours. The test spectrum used is a shaped random spectrum defined by the Boeing Company for flight qualification of all modifications flown on ALCM flight tests. The spectrum is defined from 10 to 2000 Hz with a 8.52 g RMS magnitude. The spectrum is given in Table 1 and shown graphically in Figure 1.1.

  17. Neighborhood-level socioeconomic deprivation predicts weight gain in a multi-ethnic population: longitudinal data from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Ayers, Colby; Agyemang, Priscilla; Leonard, Tammy; Berrigan, David; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Lian, Min; Das, Sandeep R; Hoehner, Christine M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to examine a relationship between neighborhood-level socioeconomic deprivation and weight change in a multi-ethnic cohort from Dallas County, Texas and whether behavioral/psychosocial factors attenuate the relationship. Non-movers (those in the same neighborhood throughout the study period) aged 18-65 (N=939) in Dallas Heart Study (DHS) underwent weight measurements between 2000 and 2009 (median 7-year follow-up). Geocoded home addresses defined block groups; a neighborhood deprivation index (NDI) was created (higher NDI=greater deprivation). Multi-level modeling determined weight change relative to NDI. Model fit improvement was examined with adding physical activity and neighborhood environment perceptions (higher score=more unfavorable perceptions) as covariates. A significant interaction between residence length and NDI was found (p-interaction=0.04); results were stratified by median residence length (11 years). Adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, and education/income, those who lived in neighborhood >11 years gained 1.0 kg per one-unit increment of NDI (p=0.03), or 6 kg for those in highest NDI tertile compared with those in the lowest tertile. Physical activity improved model fit; NDI remained associated with weight gain after adjustment for physical activity and neighborhood environment perceptions. There was no significant relationship between NDI and weight change for those in their neighborhood ≤11 years. Living in more socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods over a longer time period was associated with weight gain in DHS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Cost analysis of tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube test for tuberculosis screening in a correctional setting in Dallas, Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, Ank E; Iroh, Princess A; Brown, Larry S; Winetsky, Daniel; Porsa, Esmaeil

    2016-10-12

    Tuberculosis (TB) disproportionately affects immigrants, HIV-infected individuals, and those living in crowded settings such as homeless shelters and correctional facilities. Although the majority of jails and prisons use a tuberculin skin test (TST) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) screening, limited data exist on the clinical performance and costs of the TST compared to interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) in this setting. A prospective pilot study comparing cost between TST and an IGRA (QuantiFERON Gold In-tube, QFT-GIT) for the detection of LTBI in a convenience sample of inmates entering the Dallas County Jail (DCJ) was conducted June-October 2014. Participants completed a risk questionnaire, TST placement, QFT-GIT testing, and were offered opt-out HIV-Ab testing. LTBI prevalence based on TST and QFT-GIT results, an evaluation of discordant results and a cost analysis are presented. A total of 529 subjects were enrolled. The majority were male (75 %), and 46 % were Black, 29 % White, and 24 % Hispanic. Most (85 %) had been previously incarcerated. Over 28 % of participants were released prior to TST reading, with paired QFT-GIT and TST results available for 351 subjects. Of these, nine (2.6 %) tested positive by TST and 47 (13.4 %) tested positive by QFT-GIT. It costs $23.27 more per inmate per year to screen with QFT-GIT than TST in this population, though the cost per LTBI case detected was nearly three times higher for TST than QFT-GIT ($1247 v $460). We found a substantially higher rate of QFT-GIT positivity compared to TST in this sample of individuals entering the Dallas County Jail. Although no gold standard exists, this finding may indicate under-recognized LTBI in this setting. QFT-GIT as an initial screening tool was more time-efficient, had four-fold fewer labor costs and provided results on more individuals when compared with the TST. The overall cost of QFT-GIT was $23.27 more per inmate per year, though the cost per LTBI case

  19. Relation of black race between high density lipoprotein cholesterol content, high density lipoprotein particles and coronary events (from the Dallas Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; Turer, Aslan T; Ayers, Colby R; McGuire, Darren K; Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-04-01

    Therapies targeting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol content (HDL-C) have not improved coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. High-density lipoprotein particle concentration (HDL-P) may better predict CHD. However, the impact of race/ethnicity on the relations between HDL-P and subclinical atherosclerosis and incident CHD events has not been described. Participants from the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), a multiethnic, probability-based, population cohort of Dallas County adults, underwent the following baseline measurements: HDL-C, HDL-P by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, and coronary artery calcium by electron-beam computed tomography. Participants were followed for a median of 9.3 years for incident CHD events (composite of first myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or cardiovascular death). The study comprised 1,977 participants free of CHD (51% women, 46% black). In adjusted models, HDL-C was not associated with prevalent coronary artery calcium (p = 0.13) or incident CHD overall (hazard ratio [HR] per 1 SD 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76 to 1.05). However, HDL-C was inversely associated with incident CHD among nonblack (adjusted HR per 1 SD 0.67, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.97) but not black participants (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.13, pinteraction = 0.05). Conversely, HDL-P, adjusted for risk factors and HDL-C, was inversely associated with prevalent coronary artery calcium (p = 0.009) and with incident CHD overall (adjusted HR per 1 SD 0.73, 95% CI 0.62 to 0.86), with no interaction by black race/ethnicity (pinteraction = 0.57). In conclusion, in contrast to HDL-C, the inverse relation between HDL-P and incident CHD events is consistent across ethnicities. These findings suggest that HDL-P is superior to HDL-C in predicting prevalent atherosclerosis as well as incident CHD events across a diverse population and should be considered as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Relation of Black Race between High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Content, High Density Lipoprotein Particles and Coronary Events (From the Dallas Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Alvin; Neeland, Ian J.; Das, Sandeep R.; Khera, Amit; Turer, Aslan T.; Ayers, Colby R.; McGuire, Darren K.; Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Therapies targeting high density lipoprotein cholesterol content (HDL-C) have not improved coronary heart disease (CHD) outcomes. HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) may better predict CHD. However, the impact of race/ethnicity on the relations between HDL-P and subclinical atherosclerosis/ incident CHD events has not been described. Participants from the Dallas Heart Study, a multiethnic, probability-based, population cohort of Dallas County adults had the following baseline measurements: HDL-C, HDL-P by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR), and coronary artery calcium (CAC) by electron beam computed tomography. Participants were followed for a median of 9.3 years for incident CHD events (composite of first myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary revascularization, or cardiovascular death). The study comprised 1977 participants free from CHD (51% women, 46% Black). In adjusted models, HDL-C was not associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.13) or incident CHD overall (HR per 1SD: 0.89, 95% CI 0.76–1.05). However, HDL-C was inversely associated with incident CHD among non-Black (adjusted HR per 1SD 0.67, 95% CI 0.46–0.97) but not Black participants (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78–1.13, pinteraction = 0.05). Conversely, HDL-P, adjusted for risk factors and HDL-C, was inversely associated with prevalent CAC (p=0.009) and with incident CHD overall (adjusted HR per 1SD: 0.73, 95% CI 0.62–0.86) with no interaction by Black race/ethnicity (pinteraction = 0.57). In conclusion, in contrast to HDL-C, the inverse relationship between HDL-P and incident CHD events is consistent across ethnicities. These findings suggest that HDL-P is superior to HDL-C in predicting both prevalent atherosclerosis as well as incident CHD events across a diverse population and should be considered as a therapeutic target. PMID:25661572

  1. Activity and emissions associated with highway construction projects: Case studies in Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. Research report September 1996--February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.A.

    1998-04-01

    An assessment of highway construction project emissions was performed at five study sites in Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. Four large scale, multi-year construction projects and one small pavement maintenance project were observed. Several types of information were collected from field trucks, materials trucks, and construction equipment. Vehicles were classified according to MOBILE definitions, and the remaining equipment was classified according to AP-42 definitions. Engine starts and stops were recorded from field trucks, as well as the fuel type used and the initial odometer reading. Materials trucks and construction equipment were observed and their activities recorded. The activity measures recorded were engine starts, operating hours, and the frequency and duration of throttles (transient events). Activity from field trucks, materials trucks, and construction equipment was used to estimate the emissions produced at each study site. These emissions estimates were then placed in perspective by comparing their equivalent vehicle miles of travel (VMT) for the general vehicle fleet in the region. An additional comparison was made by expanding the highway construction activity and resulting emissions over the two-county region and comparing this to the emissions generated from on-road mobile sources.

  2. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Data During the Period January 1, 1998 Through January 31, 1999 at the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. Volume 1; Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The quality of the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) is critically dependent on representative wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer. These winds observed from a number of sensor systems around the Dallas-Fort Worth airport were combined into single vertical wind profiles by an algorithm developed and implemented by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. This process, called the AVOSS Winds Analysis System (AWAS), is used by AVOSS for wake corridor predictions. During times when AWAS solutions were available, the quality of the resultant wind profiles and variance was judged from a series of plots combining all sensor observations and AWAS profiles during the period 1200 to 0400 UTC daily. First, input data was evaluated for continuity and consistency from criteria established. Next, the degree of agreement among all wind sensor systems was noted and cases of disagreement identified. Finally, the resultant AWAS solution was compared to the quality-assessed input data. When profiles differed by a specified amount from valid sensor consensus winds, times and altitudes were flagged. Volume one documents the process and quality of input sensor data. Volume two documents the data processing/sorting process and provides the resultant flagged files.

  3. Impacts of aircraft deicer and anti-icer runoff on receiving waters from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Harwell, Glenn R; Geis, Steven W; Bergman, Daniel

    2006-11-01

    From October 2002 to April 2004, data were collected from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport (TX, U.S.A.) outfalls and receiving waters (Trigg Lake and Big Bear Creek) to document the magnitude and potential effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on water quality. Glycol concentrations at outfalls ranged from less than 18 to 23,800 mg/L, whereas concentrations in Big Bear Creek were less because of dilution, dispersion, and degradation, ranging from less than 18 to 230 mg/L. Annual loading results indicate that 10 and 35% of what was applied to aircraft was discharged to Big Bear Creek in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Glycol that entered Trigg Lake was diluted and degraded before reaching the lake outlet. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations at airport outfalls sometimes were low (<2.0 mg/L) but typical of what was measured in an urban reference stream. In comparison, the DO concentration at Trigg Lake monitoring sites was consistently greater than 5.5 mg/L during the monitoring period, probably because of the installation of aerators in the lake by DFW personnel. The DO concentration in Big Bear Creek was very similar at sites upstream and downstream of airport influence (>5.0 mg/L). Results of toxicity tests indicate that effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Selanastrum capricornutum are influenced by type IV ADAF (anti-icer), not just type I ADAF (deicer) as is more commonly assumed.

  4. Impacts of aircraft deicer and anti-icer runoff on receiving waters from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Harwell, G.R.; Geis, S.W.; Bergman, D.

    2006-01-01

    From October 2002 to April 2004, data were collected from Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport (TX, USA) outfalls and receiving waters (Trigg Lake and Big Bear Creek) to document the magnitude and potential effects of aircraft deicer and anti-icer fluid (ADAF) runoff on water quality. Glycol concentrations at outfalls ranged from less than 18 to 23,800 mg/L, whereas concentrations in Big Bear Creek were less because of dilution, dispersion, and degradation, ranging from less than 18 to 230 mg/L. Annual loading results indicate that 10 and 35% of what was applied to aircraft was discharged to Big Bear Creek in 2003 and 2004, respectively. Glycol that entered Trigg Lake was diluted and degraded before reaching the lake outlet. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations at airport outfalls sometimes were low (5.0 mg/L). Results of toxicity tests indicate that effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, and Selanastrum capricornutum are influenced by type IV ADAF (anti-icer), not just type I ADAF (deicer) as is more commonly assumed. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  5. Performance consequences of food mixing in two passion vine leaf-footed bugs, Holymenia clavigera (Herbst, 1784) and Anisoscelis foliacea marginella (Dallas, 1852) (Hemiptera; Coreidae).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, D; Duarte, L S; Moreira, G R P

    2007-02-01

    Holymenia clavigera (Herbst) and Anisoscelis foliacea marginella (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Coreidae: Anisoscelini) are distributed in southern Brazil and use various passion vine species (Passifloraceae) as host-plants. Preliminary observations indicate a high coexistence of these species in terms of host-plant use; in addition, there is a strong similarity regarding egg and nymph morphology. In this study, the most suitable feeding sites for nymph performance on wild (Passiflora suberosa Linnaeus and Passiflora misera Humbold, Bonpland et Kunth) and cultivated (Passiflora edulis Sims) hosts were determined by rearing them on each host and on the combination of hosts. Performance was determined by evaluating nymph development and survivorship, and adult size at emergence. Plant parts used were also recorded. For both species, P. suberosa was the most suitable host plant. First instar nymphs of both species fed on terminal buds more frequently when compared to other plant parts. Second instar nymphs switched to green fruits, whose behavior was more pronounced for H. clavigera. Thus, H. clavigera and A. foliacea marginella immatures are extremely similar in terms of host-plant use and consequences for performance, in addition to their morphological similarity. We suggest that these coreids may have evolved through several processes, including parsimony between the immature stages after speciation, evolutionary convergence, mimicry or genetic drift.

  6. The effects of a community-based partnership, Project Access Dallas (PAD), on emergency department utilization and costs among the uninsured.

    PubMed

    DeHaven, M; Kitzman-Ulrich, H; Gimpel, N; Culica, D; O'Neil, L; Marcee, A; Foster, B; Biggs, M; Walton, J

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 19% of non-elderly adults are without health insurance. The uninsured frequently lack a source of primary care and are more likely to use the emergency department (ED) for routine care. Improving access to primary care for the uninsured is one strategy to reduce ED overutilization and related costs. A comparison group quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate a broad-based community partnership that provided access to care for the uninsured-Project Access Dallas (PAD)-on ED utilization and related costs. Eligible uninsured patients seen in the ED were enrolled in PAD (n = 265) with similar patients not enrolled in PAD (n = 309) serving as controls. Study patients were aged 18-65 years, <200% of the federal poverty level and uninsured. Outcome measures include the number of ED visits, hospital days and direct and indirect costs. PAD program enrollees had significantly fewer ED visits (0.93 vs. 1.44; P < 0.01) and fewer inpatient hospital days (0.37 vs. 1.07; P < 0.05) than controls. Direct hospital costs were ∼60% less ($1188 vs. $446; P < 0.01) and indirect costs were 50% less ($313 vs. $692; P < 0.01). A broad-based community partnership program can significantly reduce ED utilization and related costs among the uninsured.

  7. Benefits of continuous deflection profile analysis: a case study of runway 17R-35L at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport using the rolling dynamic deflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turen, Tracy A.; Dossey, Terry; McCullough, B. F.

    1998-03-01

    A research project was undertaken by the The University of Texas at Austin's Center for Transportation Research to assess the condition and remaining life of a large section of Runway (RW) 17R-35L and taxiway L at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Concrete fatigue was determined from fatigue testing of RW core samples and from deflection data obtained from an experimental testing device called the Rolling Dynamic Deflectometer (RDD). The RDD is a truck-mounted device that measures continuous deflection profiles of pavements. The RDD appears to be a very promising device for use in pavement performance analysis. The RDD gives much more comprehensive deflection data than devices currently in use such as the Falling Weight Deflectometer and the Dynaflect and the data collection procedure is quicker and more efficient. Additionally, continuous deflection profiles provide more ways of assessing the in-place structural adequacy of pavements. For this research, RDD data from one section approximately 305 m (1000 ft.) was selected to illustrate several possible ways to analyze the data. Due to the large amount of data collected by sampling every 152 mm (6 in.) on a runway over a mile in length, a program called RDD3 was developed to perform the analysis. Results of this analysis are presented here.

  8. Land-Cover and Imperviousness Data for Regional Areas near Denver, Colorado; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; and Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin - 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falcone, James A.; Pearson, Daniel K.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the processing and results of land-cover and impervious surface derivation for parts of three metropolitan areas being studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems (EUSE). The data were derived primarily from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery from the period 1999-2002, and are provided as 30-meter resolution raster datasets. Data were produced to a standard consistent with data being produced as part of the USGS National Land Cover Database 2001 (NLCD01) Program, and were derived in cooperation with, and assistance from, NLCD01 personnel. The data were intended as surrogates for NLCD01 data because of the EUSE Program's time-critical need for updated land-cover for parts of the United States that would not be available in time from the NLCD01 Program. Six datasets are described in this report: separate land-cover (15-class categorical data) and imperviousness (0-100 percent continuous data) raster datasets for parts of the general Denver, Colorado area (South Platte River Basin), Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas area (Trinity River Basin), and Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin area (Western Lake Michigan Drainages).

  9. The Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Urban Radar Network: Enhancing Resilience in the Presence of Floods, Tornadoes, Hail and High Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra*, Chandrasekar V.; the full DFW Team

    2015-04-01

    Currently, the National Weather Service (NWS) Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) provides observations updated every five-six minutes across the United States. However, at the maximum NEXRAD operating range of 230 km, the 0.5 degree radar beam (lowest tilt) height is about 5.4 km above ground level (AGL) because of the effect of Earth curvature. Consequently, much of the lower atmosphere (1-3 km AGL) cannot be observed by the NEXRAD. To overcome the fundamental coverage limitations of today's weather surveillance radars, and improve the spatial and temporal resolution issues, at urban scale, the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center (NSF-ERC) for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) has embarked the development of Dallas-Fort worth (DFW) urban remote sensing network to conduct high-resolution sensing in the lower atmosphere for a metropolitan environment, communicate high resolution observations and nowcasting of severe weather including flash floods, hail storms and high wind events. Being one of the largest inland metropolitan areas in the U.S., the DFW Metroplex is home to over 6.5 million people by 2012 according to the North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG). It experiences a wide range of natural weather hazards, including urban flash flood, high wind, tornado, and hail, etc. Successful monitoring of the rapid changing meteorological conditions in such a region is necessary for emergency management and decision making. Therefore, it is an ideal location to investigate the impacts of hazardous weather phenomena, to enhance resilience in an urban setting and demonstrate the CASA concept in a densely populated urban environment. The DFW radar network consists of 8 dual-polarization X-band weather radars and standard NEXRAD S-band radar, covering the greater DFW metropolitan region. This paper will present high resolution observation of tornado, urban flood, hail storm and damaging wind event all within the

  10. Associations of four circulating chemokines with multiple atherosclerosis phenotypes in a large population-based sample: results from the dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Leticia; Rohatgi, Anand; Ayers, Colby R; Owens, Andrew W; Das, Sandeep R; Khera, Amit; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A

    2010-05-01

    Specific chemokines contribute to vascular inflammation and may be useful biomarkers to detect atherosclerosis. The chemokines CXCL1 and CCL11 have previously been studied in animal or human models of atherosclerosis, while CXCL2 and CCL23 have not. Among 2,454 subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study, a multi-ethnic population-based sample, we measured plasma CCL11, CCL23, CXCL1, and CXCL2, and associated levels with coronary artery calcium (CAC) by computed tomography, and aortic wall thickness, plaque burden, and compliance by magnetic resonance imaging. Elevated chemokine levels were defined as greater than or equal to the median for CCL11 and CCL23 and greater than or equal to the upper detection limit for CXCL1 and CXCL2. Elevated CCL23 (P < 0.01) and CXCL1 (P = 0.01), but not CCL11 and CXCL2, associated with CAC in univariable analyses. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, elevated CCL23 remained associated with CAC (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.7; P = 0.02), while the association with CXCL1 was modestly attenuated (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1; P = 0.06). CCL23 also associated with aortic wall thickness, plaque, and compliance in univariable analyses (P < 0.05 for each), but these associations were attenuated after multivariable adjustment. The novel chemotactic protein, CCL23, which has not been previously studied in atherosclerosis, is independently associated with coronary atherosclerosis, suggesting that this chemokine merits further study in animal and human models.

  11. Comparison of visceral fat mass measurement by dual-X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in a multiethnic cohort: the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Neeland, I J; Grundy, S M; Li, X; Adams-Huet, B; Vega, G L

    2016-07-18

    Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass, a risk factor for cardiometabolic complications of obesity, is usually measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but this method is not practical in a clinical setting. In contrast, measurement of VAT by dual-x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) appears to circumvent the limitations of MRI. In this study, we compared measurements of VAT mass by MRI and DXA in the large, multiethnic cohort of the Dallas Heart Study (DHS). About 2689 DHS participants underwent paired measurement of VAT by MRI and DXA. Sex-stratified analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation and agreement between DXA and MRI. Model validation was performed using bootstrapping and inter-reader variability was assessed. Mean age of the cohort was 44 years, with 55% female, 48% Black and 75% overweight/obese participants. Regression analysis showed a linear relationship between DXA and MRI with R(2)=0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81-0.84) for females and R(2)=0.86 (95% CI 0.85-0.88) for males. Mean difference between methods was 0.01 kg for females and 0.09 kg for males. Bland-Altman analysis showed that DXA tended to modestly underestimate VAT compared with MRI at lower VAT levels and overestimate it compared with MRI at higher VAT levels. Results were consistent in analyses stratified by race, body mass index status, waist girth and body fat. Inter-individual reader correlation among 50 randomly selected scans was excellent (inter-class correlation coefficient=0.997). VAT mass quantification by DXA was both accurate and valid among a large, multiethnic cohort within a wide range of body fatness. Further studies including repeat assessments over time will help determine its long-term applicability.

  12. Comparison of visceral fat mass measurement by dual-X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging in a multiethnic cohort: the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Neeland, I J; Grundy, S M; Li, X; Adams-Huet, B; Vega, G L

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass, a risk factor for cardiometabolic complications of obesity, is usually measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but this method is not practical in a clinical setting. In contrast, measurement of VAT by dual-x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) appears to circumvent the limitations of MRI. In this study, we compared measurements of VAT mass by MRI and DXA in the large, multiethnic cohort of the Dallas Heart Study (DHS). Subjects/Methods: About 2689 DHS participants underwent paired measurement of VAT by MRI and DXA. Sex-stratified analyses were performed to evaluate the correlation and agreement between DXA and MRI. Model validation was performed using bootstrapping and inter-reader variability was assessed. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 44 years, with 55% female, 48% Black and 75% overweight/obese participants. Regression analysis showed a linear relationship between DXA and MRI with R2=0.82 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81–0.84) for females and R2=0.86 (95% CI 0.85–0.88) for males. Mean difference between methods was 0.01 kg for females and 0.09 kg for males. Bland–Altman analysis showed that DXA tended to modestly underestimate VAT compared with MRI at lower VAT levels and overestimate it compared with MRI at higher VAT levels. Results were consistent in analyses stratified by race, body mass index status, waist girth and body fat. Inter-individual reader correlation among 50 randomly selected scans was excellent (inter-class correlation coefficient=0.997). Conclusions: VAT mass quantification by DXA was both accurate and valid among a large, multiethnic cohort within a wide range of body fatness. Further studies including repeat assessments over time will help determine its long-term applicability. PMID:27428873

  13. West Nile virus infection in kidney and pancreas transplant recipients in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex during the 2012 Texas epidemic.

    PubMed

    Yango, Angelito F; Fischbach, Bernard V; Levy, Marlon; Chandrakantan, Arun; Tan, Valerie; Spak, Cedric; Melton, Larry; Rice, Kim; Barri, Yousri; Rajagopal, Arthi; Klintmalm, Goran

    2014-05-15

    In 2012, the United States experienced one of its worst West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics, reporting 5,387 human cases and final death toll of 243. Texas was at the epicenter of the outbreak, with 1,875 reported cases and 89 deaths that year. The Texas outbreak centered mainly in the Dallas-Fort Worth area where 30 deaths were reported. We report three cases of severe WNV infection complicated by meningoencephalitis in our organ transplant population. Clinical data were collected from chart review. Therapy and outcomes on three identified patients were reviewed and compared with previously reported cases of WNV infection in kidney/pancreas transplant recipients and the general population. Two recipients of kidney and one recipient of a combined kidney and pancreas transplant were treated at our center for WNV infection. All three patients presented with a rapid decline in mental status within 24 hours of admission consistent with meningoencephalitis. Diagnosis was made based on detection of WNV IgM in the serum. All patients received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy at 400 mg/kg × 3 to 4 doses. As a result, two patients had a full recovery, and one patient died. Transplant recipients have a higher risk of neurologic complications from WNV infection. In areas where WNV is endemic, clinicians must have a high index of suspicion when treating patients presenting with fever, headache, and confusion. Full recovery in two of three patients suggests a potential role of IVIG therapy in controlling active WNV infection, particularly in immunosuppressed patients.

  14. MR imaging of hippocampal asymmetry at 3T in a multiethnic, population-based sample: results from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, R T; Peshock, R M; McColl, R; Hulsey, K; Ayers, C; Whittemore, A R; King, K S

    2013-04-01

    Asymmetry of the hippocampus is regarded as an important clinical finding, but limited data on hippocampal asymmetry are available for the general population. Here we present hippocampal asymmetry data from the Dallas Heart Study determined by automated methods and its relationship to age, sex, and ethnicity. 3D magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo MR imaging was performed in 2082 DHS-2 participants. The MR images were analyzed by using 2 standard automated brain-segmentation programs, FSL-FIRST and FreeSurfer. Individuals with imaging errors, self-reported stroke, or major structural abnormalities were excluded. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the significance of the findings across age, sex, and ethnicity. At the 90th percentile, FSL-FIRST demonstrated hippocampal asymmetry of 9.8% (95% CI, 9.3%-10.5%). The 90th percentile of hippocampal asymmetry, measured by the difference in right and left hippocampi volume and the larger hippocampus, was 17.9% (95% CI, 17.0%-19.1%). Hippocampal asymmetry increases with age (P=.0216), men have greater asymmetry than women as shown by FSL-FIRST (P=.0036), but ethnicity is not significantly correlated with asymmetry. To confirm these findings, we used FreeSurfer. FreeSurfer showed asymmetry of 4.4% (95% CI, 4.3%-4.7%) normalized to total volume and 8.5% (95% CI, 8.3%-9.0%) normalized by difference/larger hippocampus. FreeSurfer also showed that hippocampal asymmetry increases with age (P=.0024) and that men had greater asymmetry than women (P=.03). There is a significant degree of hippocampal asymmetry in the population. The data provided will aid in the research, diagnosis, and treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy and other neurologic disease.

  15. Potential of electron beam computed tomography for coronary artery calcium screening to evaluate fatty liver: comparison with 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Matulevicius, Susan; Huff, Laura C; Szczepaniak, Lidia S; Ayers, Colby R; Budoff, Matthew; McColl, Roderick; Khera, Amit; Peshock, Ronald M

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) for coronary artery calcification can potentially evaluate liver fat, another marker of cardiovascular risk. We compared quantitative estimates of hepatic steatosis measured by EBCT with those obtained by a well-validated, accurate-measure, magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS). EBCT and (1)H MRS were performed in 2159 subjects from the Dallas Heart Study. Forty subjects were randomly selected from each of 5 subgroups of liver fat percent by (1)H MRS (n = 200). EBCT average liver attenuation (HU) was determined in a 1- to 2-cm circular region of interest over the liver lobes. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. Using a previously defined (1)H MRS hepatic steatosis cut point (>5.5%), an optimized EBCT liver attenuation cut point was determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. (1)H MRS liver fat content and EBCT average right lobe liver attenuation were moderately negatively correlated (r = -0.64, P < 0.0001) in all subjects and in those with (1)H MRS hepatic steatosis (r = -0.71, P < 0.0001). This correlation did not improve with attenuation correction of the EBCT data using a standard calcium phantom or statistical transformation. Using an optimized receiver operating characteristic EBCT cut point (64.5 HU), sensitivity was 78% and specificity was 72% for detecting (1)H MRS hepatic steatosis, with a high false negative rate. Risk factors for hepatic steatosis (obesity, diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome) were more strongly correlated with (1)H MRS than EBCT liver fat measures. Liver attenuation on EBCT acquired for coronary artery calcification screening correlates modestly with (1)H MRS measures of liver fat content, with a high false negative rate.

  16. West Nile Virus Infection in Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Recipients in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex During the 2012 Texas Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Yango, Angelito F; Fischbach, Bernard V; Levy, Marlon; Chandrakantan, Arun; Tan, Valerie; Spak, Cedric; Melton, Larry; Rice, Kim; Barri, Yousri; Rajagopal, Arthi; Klintmalm, Goran

    2014-01-08

    In 2012, the United States experienced one of its worst West Nile virus (WNV) epidemics, reporting 5,387 human cases and final death toll of 243. Texas was at the epicenter of the outbreak, with 1,875 reported cases and 89 deaths that year. The Texas outbreak centered mainly in the Dallas-Fort Worth area where 30 deaths were reported. We report three cases of severe WNV infection complicated by meningoencephalitis in our organ transplant population. Clinical data were collected from chart review. Therapy and outcomes on three identified patients were reviewed and compared with previously reported cases of WNV infection in kidney/pancreas transplant recipients and the general population. Two recipients of kidney and one recipient of a combined kidney and pancreas transplant were treated at our center for WNV infection. All three patients presented with a rapid decline in mental status within 24 hours of admission consistent with meningoencephalitis. Diagnosis was made based on detection of WNV IgM in the serum. All patients received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy at 400 mg/kg × 3 to 4 doses. As a result, two patients had a full recovery, and one patient died. Transplant recipients have a higher risk of neurologic complications from WNV infection. In areas where WNV is endemic, clinicians must have a high index of suspicion when treating patients presenting with fever, headache, and confusion. Full recovery in two of three patients suggests a potential role of IVIG therapy in controlling active WNV infection, particularly in immunosuppressed patients.

  17. Greigite (Fe3S4) as an indicator of drought - The 1912-1994 sediment magnetic record from White Rock Lake, Dallas, Texas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Van Metre, P.; Tuttle, M.; Callender, E.; Goldin, A.

    1999-01-01

    Combined magnetic and geochemical studies were conducted on sediments from White Rock Lake, a reservoir in suburban Dallas (USA), to investigate how land use has affected sediment and water quality since the reservoir was filled in 1912. The chronology of a 167-cm-long core is constrained by the recognition of the pre-reservoir surface and by 137Cs results. In the reservoir sediments, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) are largely carried by detrital titanomagnetite that originally formed in igneous rocks. Titanomagnetite and associated hematite are the dominant iron oxides in a sample from the surficial deposit in the watershed but are absent in the underlying Austin Chalk. Therefore, these minerals were transported by wind into the watershed. After about 1960, systematic decreases in Ti, Fe, and Al suggest diminished input of detrital Fe-Ti oxides from the surficial deposits. MS and IRM remain constant over this interval, however, implying compensation by an increase in strongly magnetic material derived from human activity. Anthropogenic magnetite in rust and ferrite spherules (from fly ash?) are more common in sediment deposited after about 1970 than before and may account for the constant magnetization despite the implied decrease in detrital Fe-Ti oxides. An unexpected finding is the presence of authigenic greigite (Fe3S4), the abundance of which is at least partly controlled by climate. Greigite is common in sediments that predate about 1975, with zones of concentration indicated by relatively high IRM/MS. High greigite contents in sediment deposited during the early to mid-1950s and during the mid-1930s correspond to several-year periods of below-average precipitation and drought from historical records. Relatively long water-residence times in the reservoir during these periods may have led to elevated levels of sulfate available for bacterial sulfate reduction. The sulfate was probably derived via the oxidation of

  18. Water-quality trends in White Rock Creek Basin from 1912-1994 identified using sediment cores from White Rock Lake Reservoir, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Callender, E.

    1997-01-01

    Historical trends in selected water-quality variables from 1912 to 1994 in White Rock Creek Basin were identified by dated sediment cores from White Rock Lake. White Rock Lake is a 4.4-km2 reservoir filled in 1912 and located on the north side of Dallas, Texas, with a drainage area of 259 km2. Agriculture dominated land use in White Rock Creek Basin before about 1950. By 1990, 72% of the basin was urban. Sediment cores were dated using cesium-137 and core lithology. Major element concentrations changed, and sedimentation rates and percentage of clay-sized particles in sediments decreased beginning in about 1952 in response to the change in land use. Lead concentrations, normalized with respect to aluminum, were six times larger in sediment deposited in about 1978 than in pre-1952 sediment. Following the introduction of unleaded gasoline in the 1970s, normalized lead concentrations in sediment declined and stabilized at about two and one-half times the pre-1952 level. Normalized zinc and arsenic concentrations increased 66 and 76%, respectively, from before 1952 to 1994. No organochlorine compounds were detected in sediments deposited prior to about 1940. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and DDE (a metabolite of DDT) increased rapidly beginning in the 1940s and peaked in the 1960s at 21 and 20 ??g kg-1, respectively, which is coincident with their peak use in the United States. Concentrations of both declined about an order of magnitude from the 1960s to the 1990s to 3.0 and 2.0 ??g kg-1, respectively. Chlordane and dieldrin concentrations increased during the 1970s and 1980s. The largest chlordane concentration was 8.0 ??g kg-1 and occurred in a sediment sample deposited in about 1990. The largest dieldrin concentration was 0.7 ??g kg-1 and occurred in the most recent sample deposited in the early 1990s. Agricultural use of chlordane and dieldrin was restricted in the 1970s; however, both were used as termiticides, and urban use of chlordane

  19. Association of prediabetes by fasting glucose and/or haemoglobin A1c levels with subclinical atherosclerosis and impaired renal function: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Frank Y F; Neeland, Ian J; Gore, M Odette; Ayers, Colby R; Paixao, Andre R M; Turer, Aslan T; Berry, Jarett D; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K

    2014-01-01

    Prediabetes defined by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) predicts incident diabetes, but their individual and joint associations with micro- and macro-vascular risk remain poorly defined. FPG, HbA1c, coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid wall thickness, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were measured in adults free from prior diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Dallas Heart Study 2 (DHS-2), a population-based cohort study. Prediabetes was defined by FPG 100-125 mg/dL and/or HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse associations of HbA1c and/or FPG in the prediabetes range with subclinical atherosclerosis and renal measures. The study comprised 2340 participants, median age = 49 years; 60% women and 50% black. Those with prediabetes were older (52 vs 48 years), more often men (63% vs 53%), black (53% vs 47%) and obese (58% vs 40%; p < 0.001 for each). Prediabetes was captured by FPG alone (43%), HbA1c alone (30%) or both (27%). Those with prediabetes by HbA1c or FPG versus normal HbA1c/FPG had more CAC [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.2], higher carotid wall thickness (1.32 vs 1.29 mm, p < 0.001), eGFR < 60 mL/min [OR = 1.6 (95% CI = 1.1-2.4)], UACR > 30 mg/dL [OR = 1.8 (95% CI = 1.2-2.7)] and a higher odds for the composite eGFR + UACR [chronic kidney disease (CKD) ≥ 2] [OR = 1.9 (95% CI = 1.5-2.6)]. After multivariable adjustment, none of these associations remained significant. Prediabetes defined by HbA1c and/or FPG criteria is crudely associated with markers of diabetic macro- and micro-vascular disease, but not after statistical adjustment, suggesting the relationships are attributable to other characteristics of the prediabetes population.

  20. Hemodynamic and Mechanical Properties of the Proximal Aorta in Young and Middle-Aged Adults With Isolated Systolic Hypertension: The Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Neeland, Ian J; Ayers, Colby; Peshock, Ronald; Berry, Jarett D; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Greenland, Philip; Mitchell, Gary F; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess characteristic impedance (Zc) of the proximal aorta in young and middle-aged individuals with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH). Zc is an index of aortic stiffness relative to aortic size. In the Dallas Heart Study, 2001 untreated participants 18 to 64 years of age (mean age: 42.3 years; 44% black race) were divided into the following groups based on office blood pressure (BP) measurements: (1) optimal BP (systolic BP [SBP] <120 mm Hg and diastolic BP [DBP] <80 mm Hg; n=837); (2) prehypertension (SBP 120-139 mm Hg and DBP 80-89 mm Hg; n=821); (3) ISH (SBP ≥140 mm Hg and DBP <90 mm Hg; n=121); (4) isolated diastolic hypertension (SBP <140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg; n=44); and (5) systolic-diastolic hypertension (SBP ≥140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg; n=178). Zc, aortic arch pulse wave velocity, and minimum ascending aortic size were quantified using cardiovascular magnetic resonance. In multivariable-adjusted linear models, Zc was highest in the ISH group compared with the optimal BP, isolated diastolic hypertension, or systolic-diastolic hypertension groups (103.2±4.0 versus 68.3±2.1, 75.4±6.0, and 88.9±4.8 dyne*seconds/cm(5), respectively; all P<0.05). The Zc-ISH association did not differ by race. Aortic pulse wave velocity was highest in the ISH group compared with the optimal BP, isolated diastolic hypertension, or systolic-diastolic hypertension groups (6.3±0.3 versus 4.3±0.1, 4.4±0.4 and 5.5±0.3 m/s, respectively; all P<0.05), whereas aortic size was similar across groups (all P>0.2). Results were similar in a subgroup of 1551 participants 18 to 49 years of age. In a multiracial population-based sample, we found evidence of a mismatch between proximal aortic stiffness and diameter in young and middle-aged adults with ISH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Target Organ Complications and Cardiovascular Events Associated With Masked Hypertension and White-Coat Hypertension: Analysis From the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Tientcheu, Danielle; Ayers, Colby; Das, Sandeep R; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A; Khera, Amit; Kaplan, Norman; Victor, Ronald; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-11-17

    Multiple epidemiological studies from Europe and Asia have demonstrated increased cardiovascular risks associated with isolated elevation of home blood pressure (BP) or masked hypertension (MH). Previous studies have not addressed cardiovascular outcomes associated with MH and white-coat hypertension (WCH) in the general population in the United States. The goal of this study was to determine hypertensive target organ damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes associated with WCH (high clinic BP, ≥140/90 mm Hg; normal home BP, <135/85 mm Hg), MH (high home BP, ≥135/85 mm Hg; normal clinic BP, <140/90 mm Hg), and sustained hypertension (high home and clinic BP) in the DHS (Dallas Heart Study), a large, multiethnic, probability-based population cohort. Associations among WCH, MH, sustained hypertension, and aortic pulsed wave velocity by magnetic resonance imaging; urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio; and cystatin C were evaluated at study baseline. Then, associations between WCH and MH with incident cardiovascular outcomes (coronary heart disease, stroke, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and cardiovascular death) over a median follow-up period of 9 years were assessed. The study cohort comprised 3,027 subjects (50% African Americans). The sample-weighted prevalence rates of WCH and MH were 3.3% and 17.8%, respectively. Both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased aortic pulsed wave velocity, cystatin C, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Both WCH (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.09; 95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 4.15) and MH (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.36 to 3.03) were independently associated with higher cardiovascular events compared with the normotensive group, even after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. In a multiethnic U.S. population, both WCH and MH were independently associated with increased aortic stiffness, renal injury, and incident cardiovascular events. Because MH is

  2. Association of Growth Differentiation Factor-15 with Coronary Atherosclerosis and Mortality in a Young, Multiethnic Population: Observations from the Dallas Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Anand; Patel, Parag; Das, Sandeep R.; Ayers, Colby R.; Khera, Amit; Martinez-Rumayor, Abelardo; Berry, Jarett D.; McGuire, Darren K.; de Lemos, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is produced by cardiomyocytes and atherosclerotic lesions under stress conditions. Although higher circulating GDF-15 concentrations are associated with mortality across a spectrum of cardiovascular conditions, the relationship of GDF-15 with atherosclerosis and mortality in the general population remains undefined. Methods We measured plasma GDF-15 in 3219 participants of the Dallas Heart Study, a population sample of adults ages 30–65 years (55% women, 49% black). GDF-15 was analyzed in prespecified categories (<1200; 1200–1799; and ≥1800 ng/L) and continuously. End points included prevalent coronary artery calcium (CAC >10 Agatston units), increased CAC (CAC ≥100 Agatston units) by electron beam computed tomography, and mortality through a median 7.3 years of follow-up (120 deaths, 48 cardiovascular deaths). Results Increasing GDF-15 associated with older age, black race, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, left ventricular (LV) mass/body surface area, and worse renal function (P < 0.0001 for each). In multivariable models adjusted for traditional risk factors, renal function, and LV mass/body surface area, GDF-15 ≥1800 ng/L was associated with CAC >10 (odds ratio 2.1; 95% CI 1.2–3.7; P = 0.01), CAC ≥100 (odds ratio 2.6; 95% CI 1.4–4.9; P = 0.002), all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.5; 95% CI 2.1–5.9, P < 0.0001), and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio 2.5; 95% CI 1.1–5.8, P = 0.03). Adding log GDF-15 to fully adjusted models modestly improved the c statistic (P = 0.025), the integrated discrimination index (0.028; P < 0.0001) and the category-less net reclassification index (0.42; P = 0.002). These findings remained significant with further adjustment for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide, and cardiac troponin T. Conclusions GDF-15 is independently associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and mortality, and its potential role for

  3. Association of growth differentiation factor-15 with coronary atherosclerosis and mortality in a young, multiethnic population: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Anand; Patel, Parag; Das, Sandeep R; Ayers, Colby R; Khera, Amit; Martinez-Rumayor, Abelardo; Berry, Jarett D; McGuire, Darren K; de Lemos, James A

    2012-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is produced by cardiomyocytes and atherosclerotic lesions under stress conditions. Although higher circulating GDF-15 concentrations are associated with mortality across a spectrum of cardiovascular conditions, the relationship of GDF-15 with atherosclerosis and mortality in the general population remains undefined. We measured plasma GDF-15 in 3219 participants of the Dallas Heart Study, a population sample of adults ages 30-65 years (55% women, 49% black). GDF-15 was analyzed in prespecified categories (<1200; 1200-1799; and ≥1800 ng/L) and continuously. End points included prevalent coronary artery calcium (CAC>10 Agatston units), increased CAC (CAC≥100 Agatston units) by electron beam computed tomography, and mortality through a median 7.3 years of follow-up (120 deaths, 48 cardiovascular deaths). Increasing GDF-15 associated with older age, black race, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, left ventricular (LV) mass/body surface area, and worse renal function (P<0.0001 for each). In multivariable models adjusted for traditional risk factors, renal function, and LV mass/body surface area, GDF-15≥1800 ng/L was associated with CAC>10 (odds ratio 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.7; P=0.01), CAC≥100 (odds ratio 2.6; 95% CI 1.4-4.9; P=0.002), all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.5; 95% CI 2.1-5.9, P<0.0001), and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio 2.5; 95% CI 1.1-5.8, P=0.03). Adding log GDF-15 to fully adjusted models modestly improved the c statistic (P=0.025), the integrated discrimination index (0.028; P<0.0001) and the category-less net reclassification index (0.42; P=0.002). These findings remained significant with further adjustment for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and cardiac troponin T. GDF-15 is independently associated with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and mortality, and its potential role for risk stratification in the general population merits further evaluation.

  4. Integration of contributed data with HEC-RAS hydrodynamic model for flood inundation and damage assessment: 2015 Dallas Texas Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, E.; Thornton, J. C.; Kalyanapu, A. J.; Cervone, G.

    2016-12-01

    Transportation infrastructure networks in urban areas are highly sensitive to natural disasters, yet are a very critical source for the success of rescue, recovery, and renovation operations. Therefore, prompt restoration of such networks is of high importance for disaster relief services. Satellite and aerial images provide data with high spatial and temporal resolution and are a powerful tool for monitoring the environment and mapping the spatio-temporal variability of the Earth's surface. They provide a synoptic overview and give useful environmental information for a wide range of scales, from entire continents to urban areas, with spatial pixel resolutions ranging from kilometers to centimeters. However, sensor limitations are often a serious drawback since no single sensor offers the optimal spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution at the same time. Specific data may not be collected in the time and space most urgently required and/or may it contain gaps as a result of the satellite revisit time, atmospheric opacity, or other obstructions. In this study, the feasibility of integrating multiple sources of contributed data including remotely sensed datasets and open-source geospatial datasets, into hydrodynamic models for flood inundation simulations is assessed. The 2015 Dallas floods that caused up to $61 million dollars in damage was selected for this study. A Hydraulic Engineering Center - River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) model was developed for the study area, using reservoir surcharge releases and geometry provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District. The simulated flood inundation is compared with the "contributed data" for the location (such as Civil Air Patrol data and WorldView 3 dataset) which indicated the model's lack of representing lateral inflows near the upstream section. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model is developed that used local precipitation and discharge values in the vicinity to estimate the lateral flows

  5. Public Forum Before the Committee on Urban Indians in L.A., Calif. (Dec. 16-17, 1968); Dallas, Tex. (Feb. 13-14, 1969); Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. (Mar. 18-19, 1969); San Francisco, Calif. (Apr. 11-12, 1968); Phoenix, Ariz. (Apr. 17-18, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Indian Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of public forums of the National Council of Indian Opportunity are recorded in these 5 documents. These forums were designed to gain information on the condition of urban American Indians living in Los Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, San Francisco, Dallas, and Phoenix. Included in each of the documents are discussions on such…

  6. Successful practices in title III implementation. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Technical Assistance Bulletin. Cameron County, Texas; Bucks County, Pennsylvania; Harford County, Maryland; Dallas County, Texas. Series 6, Number 7

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This is another in a series of bulletins EPA is issuing to provide examples of implementation programs and strategies of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, known as Title III, that are innovative or have proven effective. The purpose of these bulletins is to share information on successful practices with Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs), State Emergency Response Commissions (SERCs), fire departments, and other Title III implementing agencies throughout the country in the hope that such information will prove useful to other SERCs and LEPCs as their programs develop and evolve. The bulletin discusses Title III implementation for Cameron County in Texas, Bucks County in Pennsylvania, Harford County in Maryland, and Dallas County in Texas.

  7. Do neighborhood demographics, crime rates, and alcohol outlet density predict incidence, severity, and outcome of hospitalization for traumatic injury? A cross-sectional study of Dallas County, Texas, 2010.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alan; Gonzalez, Jennifer Reingle; Balasubramanian, Bijal A

    2014-12-01

    Unintentional injury leads all other causes of death for those 1 to 45 years old. The expense of medical care for injured people is estimated to exceed $406 billion annually. Given this burden on the population, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention consistently refers to injury prevention as a national priority. We postulated that exposure to crime and the density of alcohol outlets in one's neighborhood will be positively associated with the incidence of hospitalization for and mortality from traumatic injuries, independent of other neighborhood characteristics. We conducted a cross-sectional study with ecological and individual analyses. Patient-level data for traumatic injury, injury severity, and hospital mortality due to traumatic injury in 2010 were gathered from the Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council Foundation. Each case of traumatic injury or death was geospatially linked with neighborhood of origin information from the 2010 U.S. Census within Dallas County, Texas. This information was subsequently linked with crime data gathered from 20 local police departments and the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission alcohol outlet dataset. The crime data are the Part One crimes reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The proportion of persons 65 years old or older was the strongest predictor of the incidence of hospitalization for traumatic injury (b = 12.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.73 to 16.55). In turn, the incidence of traumatic injury most strongly predicted the severity of traumatic injury (b = 0.008, 95% CI 0.0003 - 0.0012). The tract-level unemployment rate was associated with a 5% increase in the odds of hospital mortality among hospitalized trauma patients. Several neighborhood characteristics were associated with the incidence, severity, and hospital mortality from traumatic injury. However, crime rates and alcohol outlet density carried no such association. Prevention efforts should focus on neighborhood characteristics such

  8. Accelerating best care at baylor dallas.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Ziad; Cox, Marsha; Stafford, Pam; Rodriguez, Vera; Ballard, David J

    2009-10-01

    A culture of quality improvement (QI) is needed to bridge the gap between possible STEEEP (safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered) care and actual usual care. Baylor Health Care System (BHCS) developed Accelerating Best Care at Baylor (ABC Baylor), an innovative educational program that teaches health care leaders the theory and techniques of rapid-cycle QI. Course participants learn general principles of continuous QI, as well as health care-specific QI techniques, and finish the course by designing and implementing their own QI project. ABC Baylor has been employed in a variety of settings and has spread its success to other organizations, especially small and rural hospitals. These hospitals, like BHCS, have demonstrated sustained improvements that are due in part to the use of ABC Baylor and its reliance on specific modules that focus on health care safety, service, equity, and chronic disease management. The role of ABC Baylor training and consulting is part of the overall culture and infrastructure that have allowed BHCS to achieve success in its improvement journey, including the receipt of several national awards and the achievement of high reliability in compliance with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services core measures of processes of care related to heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, community-acquired pneumonia, and surgical care. The culture of rapid-cycle QI facilitated by ABC Baylor serves to link BHCS's vision and goals to practical execution.

  9. Occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria, and physical and chemical indicators of water quality in streams receiving discharge from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and vicinity, North-Central Texas, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwell, Glenn R.; Mobley, Craig A.

    2009-01-01

    This report, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with Dallas/Fort Worth International (DFW) Airport in 2008, describes the occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliform and Escherichia [E.] coli), and the physical and chemical indicators of water quality (relative to Texas Surface Water Quality Standards), in streams receiving discharge from DFW Airport and vicinity. At sampling sites in the lower West Fork Trinity River watershed during low-flow conditions, geometric mean E. coli counts for five of the eight West Fork Trinity River watershed sampling sites exceeded the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality E. coli criterion, thus not fully supporting contact recreation. Two of the five sites with geometric means that exceeded the contact recreation criterion are airport discharge sites, which here means that the major fraction of discharge at those sites is from DFW Airport. At sampling sites in the Elm Fork Trinity River watershed during low-flow conditions, geometric mean E. coli counts exceeded the geometric mean contact recreation criterion for seven (four airport, three non-airport) of 13 sampling sites. Under low-flow conditions in the lower West Fork Trinity River watershed, E. coli counts for airport discharge sites were significantly different from (lower than) E. coli counts for non-airport sites. Under low-flow conditions in the Elm Fork Trinity River watershed, there was no significant difference between E. coli counts for airport sites and non-airport sites. During stormflow conditions, fecal indicator bacteria counts at the most downstream (integrator) sites in each watershed were considerably higher than counts at those two sites during low-flow conditions. When stormflow sample counts are included with low-flow sample counts to compute a geometric mean for each site, classification changes from fully supporting to not fully supporting contact recreation on the basis of the geometric mean contact

  10. 78 FR 34121 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Dallas Water Utilities, Dallas, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    .... indicates that the remains are of Native American ancestry. Radiocarbon dating of the bone attributes the burials to the early Late Archaic Period, between 1380-1130 B.C. and 1120-930 B.C. Radiocarbon dating of... associated funerary objects to the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. Radiocarbon dates, obtained with...

  11. Solar Space and Water Heating for School -- Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    90 page report gives overview of retrofitted solar space-heating and hot-water system installation for 61-year-old high school. Description, specifications, modifications, plan drawings for roof, three floors, basement, correspondence, and documents are part of report.

  12. Green Infrastructure Barriers and Opportunities in Dallas, Texas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report will assist other municipalities with recognizing barriers and inconsistencies in municipal codes and ordinances which may be impeding the implementation of green infrastructure practices in their communities.

  13. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  14. Meeting in Dallas: Emerging Environmental Contaminants: What's New

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientific meeting presentation. Much has been achieved in the way of environmental protection over the last 30 years. However, as we learn more, new concerns arise (including potential adverse health effects, bioaccumulation, and widespread distribution). This presentation will...

  15. Meeting in Dallas: Emerging Environmental Contaminants: What's New

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientific meeting presentation. Much has been achieved in the way of environmental protection over the last 30 years. However, as we learn more, new concerns arise (including potential adverse health effects, bioaccumulation, and widespread distribution). This presentation will...

  16. Motel solar-hot-water system--Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes system which meets 64 percent of hot water requirements of 120 room motel. Key system components include 1,000 square foot, roof-mounted collector array, 1,000 gallon storage tank, tube-in-shell heat exchanger, and three domestic hot-water tanks. Report contains calibration instructions for differential temperature controllers, shutdown procedures, and operation guidelines, performance analysis, and manufacturers' maintenance literature.

  17. EPA Recognizes Excellence in Site Reuse in West Dallas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Through EPA's Superfund Redevelopment Initiative, our cleanups have helped communities across the country return over 850 of the nation's worst hazardous waste sites to safe and productive uses, said Mathy Stanislaus, EPA's assistant administrator of the

  18. Effects of urbanization on the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of small blackland prairie dtreams in and near the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas: Chapter C in Effects of urbanization on stream ecosystems in six metropolitan areas of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program began a series of studies in the contiguous United States to examine the effects of urbanization on the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of streams. Small streams in the Texas Blackland Prairie level III ecoregion in and near the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area were the focus of one of the studies. The principal objectives of the study, based on data collected in 2003-04 from 28 subbasins of the Trinity River Basin, were to (1) define a gradient of urbanization for small Blackland Prairie streams in the Trinity River Basin on the basis of a range of urban intensity indexes (UIIs) calculated using land-use/land-cover, infrastructure, and socioeconomic characteristics; (2) assess the relation between this gradient of urbanization and the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of these streams; and (3) evaluate the type of relation (that is, linear or nonlinear, and whether there was a threshold response) of the chemical, physical, and biological characteristics of these streams to the gradient of urbanization. Of 94 water-chemistry variables and one measure of potential toxicity from a bioassay, the concentrations of two pesticides (diazinon and sima-zine) and one measure of potential toxicity (P450RGS assay) from compounds sequestered in semipermeable membrane devices were significantly positively correlated with the UII. No threshold responses to the UII for diazinon and simazine concentrations were observed over the entire range of the UII scores. The linear correlation for diazinon with the UII was significant, but the linear correlation for simazine with the UII was not. No statistically significant relations between the UII and concentrations of suspended sediment, total nitrogen, total phosphorous, or any major ions were indicated. Eleven of 59 physical variables from streamflow were significantly correlated with the UII. Temperature was not

  19. Viscous flow drag reduction; Symposium, Dallas, Tex., November 7, 8, 1979, Technical Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium focused on laminar boundary layers, boundary layer stability analysis of a natural laminar flow glove on the F-111 TACT aircraft, drag reduction of an oscillating flat plate with an interface film, electromagnetic precipitation and ducting of particles in turbulent boundary layers, large eddy breakup scheme for turbulent viscous drag reduction, blowing and suction, polymer additives, and compliant surfaces. Topics included influence of environment in laminar boundary layer control, generation rate of turbulent patches in the laminar boundary layer of a submersible, drag reduction of small amplitude rigid surface waves, and hydrodynamic drag and surface deformations generated by liquid flows over flexible surfaces.

  20. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar heating on cooling system is described which is designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1,596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glyco water solution through the collectors into a hot water system exchanger. The water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2,300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described.

  1. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  2. Space, our next frontier; Proceedings of the conference, Dallas, TX, June 7, 8, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, G.

    1985-01-01

    The present conference on space development encompasses space commercialization, legislative, legal, and insurance-related factors in current space programs, political aspects of space militarization and governmental control, the military future uses of space and their consequences, command and control issues arising in space, economic influences on space policy, and recent developments in space solar power generation concepts. Attention is given to public opinion surveys concerning the scientific, military, and economic uses of space, the Leasecraft orbital industrial infrastructure concept, capitalism and democracy in space development, the current status of space law on commercialization topics, the nature of Ballistic Missile Defense, the Soviet Space threat, the High Frontier concept for space defense, lunar solar power systems, solar power satellites, and the utilization of lunar resources for the reduction of lunar base construction costs. Such specific technical issues as microgravity crystal growth and directional solidification, electrophoresis operations for pharmaceuticals, and technical barriers to commercial access to space, are also noted.

  3. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Forrest Lane)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. The liquid flat plate (water) collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank located in the mechanical room when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the storage tank to DHW tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and the heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make DHW tank standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  4. Symposium on Education (4th, Dallas, Texas, January 15-20, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA.

    The theme of this symposium was "Opening the Doors to the Future: Education in the Classroom and Beyond." Presentations, both oral and poster, are devoted to both K-12 and university educational issues in meteorological and oceanographic education. Oral presentations include: (1) "The Bachelor's Degree in Atmospheric Science-Revision of the 1987…

  5. Organic compounds downstream from a treated-wastewater discharge near Dallas, Texas, March 1987

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buszka, P.M.; Barber, L.B.; Schroeder, M.P.; Becker, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of instantaneous flux values of selected organic compounds in water from downstream sites indicates: (1) the formation of chloroform in the stream following the discharge of the treated effluent, and that (2) instream biodegradation may be decreasing concentrations of linear alkylbenzene compounds in water. The relative persistence of many of the selected organic compounds in Rowlett Creek downstream from the municipal wastewater-treatment plant indicates that they could be transported into Lake Ray Hubbard, a source of municipal water supply.

  6. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - U.S. POSTAL SERVICE BULK MAIL CENTER, DALLAS, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Postal Service (USPS) in cooperation with EPA’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is engaged in an effort to integrate waste prevention and recycling activities into the waste management programs at Postal facilities. This report describ...

  7. Solar hot water system installed at Day's Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Valley View)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total domestic hot water (DHW) demand. A liquid (water) flat plate collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank when the solar pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the DHW tanks through a shell and tube heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make up standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature controllers.

  8. Solar hot water system installed at Days Inn Motel, Dallas, Texas (Forrest Lane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 65 percent of the total Domestic Hot Water (DHW) demand. The liquid flat plate (water) collector (1,000 square feet) system automatically drains into the 1,000 gallon steel storage tank located in the mechanical room when the pump is not running. Heat is transferred from the storage tank to DHW tanks through a tube and shell heat exchanger. A circulating pump between the DHW tanks and the heat exchanger enables solar heated water to help make DHW tank standby losses. All pumps are controlled by differential temperature.

  9. AIAA Dynamics Specialists Conference, Dallas, TX, Apr. 16, 17, 1992, Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This conference presents papers in the fields of spacecraft dynamics, the control of structures, the active flexible wing, flutter characteristics, and rotary-wing aeroelasticity. Also considered are control-structure interaction, unsteady aerodynamics, fixed-wing aeroelasticity, structural dynamics systems, and CSI-sensors and actuators.

  10. Enrollment and Facilities Projection Program: General Description and Users Guide. Project SIMU-School: Dallas Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattis, William D.; Dunklau, M. William

    This booklet describes the Enrollment and Facilities Projection Program, a computer program package developed as one part of a family of educational management systems. The program consists of three parts, including a means of projecting enrollment, a means of converting enrollment to teacher and facilities requirements, and a means of reporting…

  11. Case Studies Every Day. Using "The Dallas Morning News" in Law-Related Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Judith; Yarbro, Judy

    Intended to help teachers of law-related education direct student's critical thinking by examining case studies in everyday newspapers, this booklet contains seven activities suitable for use with intermediate and secondary students. By examining daily newspapers and participating in the activities, students (1) determine ways in which the law…

  12. Ichnology and paleosubstrates of Austin Chalk (Cretaceous) outcrops: Southern Dallas and Ellis Counties, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.C. ); Reaser, D.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Ichnofossils are abundant in outcrops of the Austin Chalk near Waxahachie, Texas (designated site of the Super-Conducting Super Collider). The abundance and diversity of ichnofossils in Austin strata contrast with the paucity of other macrofossils, except large inoceramids. The lower Austin Chalk (Coniacian) disconformably overlies the Eagle Ford Shale (Turonian). Planolites, Thalassinoides, and Chondrites are conspicuous in the lower Austin. Some lower Austin strata contain well-preserved burrows having menicus fillings. However, most lower Austin ichnofossils are poorly preserved and have compacted. The middle Austin Marl and upper Austin Chalk (Santonain) contain Planolites, Chondrites, Thalassinoides, and Pseudobilobites. Several thin, intensely burrowed, Fe-stained, horizons within the middle Austin represent omission surfaces having postomission Thalassinoides. The upper Austin disconformably underlies the Taylor Marl (Campanian). The Austin-Taylor contact is a Rhizocorallium-infested omission surface overlain by a condensed bed of phosphatic and pyritic bioclasts. Upper Austin occurrences of Rhizocorallium and Pseudobilobites are unique for North American Cretaceous chalks. Based on cross-cutting relationships and differences in morphology, diameter, and burrow-filling sediments, numerous ichnospecies of Thalassinoides are discernable throughout the Austin. Variations in preservation quality exhibited by successive generations of ichnofossils record progressive changes in substrate consistency. Earliest formed burrows have diffuse outlines representing an initial thixotropic (softground) Austin substrate. Subsequent generations of burrows have more distinct outlines recording a gradual increase in substrate firmness. Paleo-firmgrounds are common in Austin outcrops; evidence of hardgrounds is lacking. The Thalassinoides-dominated Austin ichnoassemblage represents an inner shelf paleoenvironment.

  13. National Educational Computing Conference Proceedings (9th, Dallas, Texas, June 15-17, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, William C., Ed.

    The more than 200 papers and panel, project, and special session reports represented in this collection focus on innovations, trends, and research on the use of computers in a variety of educational settings. Of these, the full text is provided for 37 presentations and abstracts for 182. The topics discussed include: computer applications in…

  14. The Toqua site, 40MR6: A late Mississippian, Dallas phase town

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, J.; Polhemus, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Archaeological work in the Little Tennessee River Valley was very much affected by the fluctuations in the Tellico Reservoir scheduling and funding. Stated project goals were: ''Questions regarding Cherokee origins, culture change and acculturation, and the length of time during which the valley was inhabited by man will be among the major ones to be considered.'' From the project inception, the principal research commitment was to the eighteenth century Overhill Cherokee occupation of the valley. By 1967, the inundation date was set for 1971. Four main research problems were identified: (1) a complete survey of the reservoir area to locate all prehistoric and historic sites that will be inundated; (2) a thorough testing of the eighteenth century Cherokee towns to determine the effects of acculturation; (3) to determine how long the Overhill Cherokee have occupied the Little Tennessee Valley by excavating a late prehistoric Mississippian village or an early Historic Cherokee village to discover by (sic) continuities between the prehistoric Mississippian complexes and the Historic Cherokee; and (4) to test intensively occupied sites in depth to find earlier Woodland and Archaic complexes in stratigraphic succession (Guthe, 1967). This report describes the results of these investigations.

  15. Surface roughness studies with DALLAS-detector array for laser light angular scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Teague, E. C.; Scire, F. E.; Mclay, M. J.; Gilsinn, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a better mathematical description of optical scattering phenomena, in order to construct an optical scattering apparatus for reliable and routine measurements of roughness parameters without resorting to comparator standards. After a brief outline of optical scattering theory, a description is presented of an experimental instrument for measuring surface roughness which incorporates optical scattering principles. The instrument has a He-Ne laser which illuminates the test surface at a variable angle of incidence. Scattered light distribution is detected by an array of 87 fiber-optic sensors positioned in a rotating semicircular yoke. The output from the detector is digitized and analyzed in a laboratory computer. For a comparison with experimental data, theoretical distributions are calculated by substituting the roughness profiles into the operand of and integral equation for electromagnetic scattering developed by Beckmann and Spizzichino (1963). A schematic diagram of the instrument is provided and the general implications of the experimental results are discussed.

  16. Gaseous Electronics Conference (35th) Held at Dallas, Texas, 19-22 October 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    Hz LTE arcs con- taining mrury and metal halide additives such as Nal and Sc13 . , Using a well defined cylindrical arc vessel and a known mercury ...termination of the high pressure mercury arc will be presented. 1 F.E. Irons, J.Quant.Spect.Radiat.Transfer 22,1,(1979). 41IBLANK I- CA-3 Time Dependent...High pressure mercury lamps were. operated on a perioically pulsed supply voltage. From optically thin mercury line emission the variation of the axial

  17. Sound Financial Management: A National Conference (Dallas, Texas, August 26-28, 2002). Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heveron, John F., Jr.; Shible, Frank; Jones, Darrell Lynn; Buppapong, Raweewan; Langbehn, Kristy; George, Carri; Petty, Richard; Heinsohn, Dawn

    The participant's manual contains training materials for a national conference on sound financial management for agencies concerned with promoting independent living for people with disabilities. Preliminary materials include the conference agenda, background information about the trainers, and organizational information on Independent Living…

  18. Make It New: The Queens Library for Teens and Dallas's Bookmarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Maureen; Kenney, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Each weekday when school let out, the Queens Library at Far Rockaway--a branch of the Queens Library in New York City--would fill with nearly 100 teens. Drawn by the public-use computers, many others, who had dropped out of school, would also crowd in. To invoke a cliche, the situation was both an opportunity and a challenge. The popularity of the…

  19. Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Initial 1997 System Deployment at Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW) Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasey, T. J.; Cole, R. E.; Heinrichs, R. M.; Matthews, M. P.; Perras, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    The potential hazard of aircraft encounters with the wake turbulence of preceding aircraft requires the use of minimum separations on landing that are significant constraint on airport arrival capacity during instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley research Center has been researching the development of the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) which would dynamically change aircraft arrival separations based on the forecasted weather conditions and vortex behavior.

  20. Recreational Appendix Report, Elm Fork Flood Control Project, Dallas and Denton Counties, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-05-01

    to be expanded both upstream and downstream along the meanders of the River extending from California Crossing Road downstream to the Wildflower ...Plan for Wildflower Meadow ........ ....... 62 11 Small Trail Side Museum and Rest Area . . . . ....... 63 12 Large Trail Side Museum...64 13 Plan - Trail Side Museum Area ..... .............. 65 14 Motorcycle Barrier and Control Gate. . . . ......... 67 15 California Crossing

  1. Dalla A alla Z: l'alfabeto dei bambini (From A to Z: The Children's Alphabet).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palandra, Maria; Cardone, Romolo

    This Italian alphabet book designed for kindergarten and first grade students presents each letter in upper and lower case form accompanied by an illustration and a single sentence caption. The sentence contains two or more words that begin with the letter in question. The book has a teacher's introduction and is illustrated by pen-and-ink…

  2. Selective sequestration of milkweed (Asclepias sp.) cardenolides inOncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae).

    PubMed

    Moore, L V; Scudder, G G

    1985-05-01

    The cardenolide content of the gut, wings, and fat body ofOncopeltus fasciatus was examined. The female fat body contained 4-5% of the total cardenolide content of the insect. The cardenolide content of male fat body, and gut and wings of both sexes was below the detection limit of the cardenolide assay. Thin-layer chromatography was used to determine the cardenolide array of various tissues and secretions ofO. fasciatus reared on seeds of a single species of milkweed (A. Speciosa) and adult extracts and dorsolateral space fluid ofO. fasciatus reared on seeds of two species of milkweed with different cardenolide arrays (A. speciosa andA. syriaca). Our results indicate that cardenolides are not sequestered in the insect simply on the basis of polarity and that metabolism and differential excretion of cardenolides are involved in the sequestration of cardenolides inO. fasciatus. The similarities in the cardenolide profiles ofO. fasciatus reared on different food sources, and tissues ofO. fasciatus reared on a single food source indicates that there is regulation of the cardenolide array inO. Fasciatus.

  3. A resolution congratulating the Dallas Mavericks on winning the 2011 National Basketball Association Championship.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Hutchison, Kay Bailey [R-TX

    2011-06-16

    06/16/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Make It New: The Queens Library for Teens and Dallas's Bookmarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Maureen; Kenney, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Each weekday when school let out, the Queens Library at Far Rockaway--a branch of the Queens Library in New York City--would fill with nearly 100 teens. Drawn by the public-use computers, many others, who had dropped out of school, would also crowd in. To invoke a cliche, the situation was both an opportunity and a challenge. The popularity of the…

  5. Floods on White Rock Creek at Dallas, Texas in 1962 and 1964

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggles, F.H.; Gilbert, Carter R.

    1967-01-01

    The greatest flood since at least 1892 on Cottonwood Creek and Floyd Branch occurred June 14, 1949. The storm of October 8, 1962, caused flood heights at Forest Lane to be comparable to those of June 14, 1949, on Cottonwood Creek and about 1 foot lower on Floyd Branch. The greatest flood since at least 1917 on Spanky Branch was that of September 21, 1964. Greater floods than those delineated are possible.

  6. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - U.S. POSTAL SERVICE BULK MAIL CENTER, DALLAS, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Postal Service (USPS) in cooperation with EPA’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is engaged in an effort to integrate waste prevention and recycling activities into the waste management programs at Postal facilities. This report describ...

  7. A resolution congratulating the Dallas Mavericks on winning the 2011 National Basketball Association Championship.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Hutchison, Kay Bailey [R-TX

    2011-06-16

    06/16/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3902; text as passed Senate: CR S3902; text of measure as introduced: CR S3897-3898) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. THE PASSIVE OZONE NETWORK IN DALLAS (POND CONCEPT) - A MODELING OPPORTUNITY WITH COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite tremendous efforts towards regulating and controlling tropospheric ozone (O3) formation, over 70 million people currently live in U.S. counties which exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) set for 03. These high 03 concentrations alone cost the U.S. ap...

  9. Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The solar energy system includes a 238 single glazed flat plate, 3650 sq ft area collector subsystem, a 6000 gallon hot water storage subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat subsystem, an absorption chiller subsystem with a 2000 gallon tank chilled water storage subsystem. The auxiliary back up system is a gas-fired boiler and a conventional 100 gallon natural gas water heater provides any additional energy to satisfy hot water load requirements. A summary of project information, project chronology, project costs, the five modes of system operation, description of the Site Data Acquisition System, system performance summary, experience recommendations, system operational verification, drawings and major component manufacturers information are provided.

  10. Using Microsimulation Feedback For Trip Adaptation For Realistic Traffic In Dallas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Kai; Barrett, Christopher L.

    This paper presents a day-to-day re-routing relaxation approach for traffic simulations. Starting from an initial planset for the routes, the route- based microsimulation is executed. The result of the microsimulation is fed into a re-router, which re-routes a certain percentage of all trips. This approach makes the traffic patterns in the microsimulation much more reasonable. Further, it is shown that the method described in this paper can lead to strong oscillations in the solutions.

  11. A Blueprint for School-Based Services. School of the Future: Dallas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iscoe, Louise

    The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health created the School of the Future (SoF) project to enable selected Texas schools to coordinate and implement school-based social and health services on their campuses and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method of service delivery by evaluating the project. At each of four urban sites consisting of a…

  12. High School Influences on College Enrollment and College Graduation of Dallas Independent School District 2002 Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    The overarching goal for American education under President Barack Obama has been to increase college enrollment and completion rates. The pressure to achieve this goal has been keenly felt in the postsecondary community, especially as federal and state funding have become increasingly tied to achieving higher college completion rates. Yet the…

  13. Comparison between three different traffic micro-simulations and reality in Dallas

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Pieck, M.; Simon, P.M.; Rickert, M.

    1998-06-18

    It is certainly desirable that transportation forecasting models are correct in the sense that the traffic patterns they predict correspond to what would happen in reality under the circumstances assumed in the forecasting model. Unfortunately, it is notoriously difficult to transform the above common sense statement into a technical specification. Since one cannot run controlled experiments in socio-economic systems, it is usually impossible to check the forecasts. The authors describe three traffic microsimulations which operate at different levels of fidelity. They are used to iteratively generate a self-consistent route-set based upon microsimulation feedback. They compare the simulation results of all three simulations to aggregated turn count data of actual field measurements.

  14. Proceedings of the 1975 Dallas-SPRE Institute. A Progressive Approach to Park and Recreation Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiskopf, Donald C., Ed.

    This report is divided into three parts. The first part is the opening address. It argues for the importance of constructive leisure as a human need. The essay suggests that recreation educators need to learn from such humanistic psychologists as Abraham Maslow, who have studied what man needs to achieve self-actualization. The second part of the…

  15. Judicial Management of School Desegregation Cases: Dallas, St. Louis, Wilmington, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Pasadena, Denver. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirp, David L.; And Others

    This report attempts to illustrate how courts have undertaken the task of relating the constitutional mandate for equal educational opportunity to the political and institutional issues posed in specific school desegregation cases since the Supreme Court's Brown decision. The first section of the report is an introduction to legalism and politics…

  16. High School Influences on College Enrollment and College Graduation of Dallas Independent School District 2002 Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    The overarching goal for American education under President Barack Obama has been to increase college enrollment and completion rates. The pressure to achieve this goal has been keenly felt in the postsecondary community, especially as federal and state funding have become increasingly tied to achieving higher college completion rates. Yet the…

  17. National Educational Computing Conference Proceedings (9th, Dallas, Texas, June 15-17, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, William C., Ed.

    The more than 200 papers and panel, project, and special session reports represented in this collection focus on innovations, trends, and research on the use of computers in a variety of educational settings. Of these, the full text is provided for 37 presentations and abstracts for 182. The topics discussed include: computer applications in…

  18. Viscous flow drag reduction; Symposium, Dallas, Tex., November 7, 8, 1979, Technical Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The symposium focused on laminar boundary layers, boundary layer stability analysis of a natural laminar flow glove on the F-111 TACT aircraft, drag reduction of an oscillating flat plate with an interface film, electromagnetic precipitation and ducting of particles in turbulent boundary layers, large eddy breakup scheme for turbulent viscous drag reduction, blowing and suction, polymer additives, and compliant surfaces. Topics included influence of environment in laminar boundary layer control, generation rate of turbulent patches in the laminar boundary layer of a submersible, drag reduction of small amplitude rigid surface waves, and hydrodynamic drag and surface deformations generated by liquid flows over flexible surfaces.

  19. Clinical features of West Nile virus epidemic in Dallas, Texas, 2012.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori; Gander, Rita; Chung, Wendy; Southern, Paul; Le, Jade; Beal, Stacy; Lee, Francesca; Cavuoti, Dominick; Reisch, Joan; Alatoom, Adnan

    2014-02-01

    In 2012, Texas has reported the highest number of West Nile virus (WNV) cases in the United States to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this report, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 57 patients with WNV disease and analyzed the clinical features of these patients. Our results revealed that 25 (44%) patients were diagnosed with West Nile fever and 32 (56%) with West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). The median age for patients with WNND was 54.5 years, and those with encephalitis were more likely to be >60 years old. Pre-existing conditions such as hypertension and diabetes were more frequent in patients with WNND. Testing both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for antibodies diagnosed more cases of WNND than just testing serum or CSF alone. The increasing number of WNV cases during this epidemic highlights the need to increase efforts to control mosquito populations and educate the general public. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Environmental Assessment: Disposal and Reuse of NAS Dallas Family Housing in Duncanville, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Carya illinoensis ), cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia), willows (Salix spp.), Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and American elm {Ulmus americand). A...protection as a result of the proposed action. The proposed action would be a positive impact to the City’s parklands. No impact on cultural resources...Utilities 3-9 3.3.9 Transportation 3-10 Vll 3.3.10 Education 3.3.11 Government 3.3.12 Police and Fire Protection 3.3.13 Recreation 3.4 Cultural

  1. Financial Projection Program: General Description and Users Guide. Project SIMU-School: Dallas Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkinson, William Dane; Bishop, Terry L.

    This booklet describes the Financial Projection Program, a computer program package developed as one part of a family of educational management systems. The program projects personnel by type, forecasts salaries, applies state funding formulas, and projects revenues, expenditures, and related financial data. Its purpose is to produce a projected…

  2. A Leisure Reading Interests Survey of Lake Dallas Junior High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Barbara Glynn

    A survey questionnaire, based on 88 titles identified elsewhere as popular adolescent reading, was given to 172 students with the intent of determining whether there were observable sex differences in the students' choice of books. Information sought included: (1) whether girls and boys enjoy reading for pleasure; (2) what books are enjoyed by…

  3. A resolution congratulating the Dallas Mavericks on winning the 2011 National Basketball Association Championship.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Hutchison, Kay Bailey [R-TX

    2011-06-16

    Senate - 06/16/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Agreed to in SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. THE PASSIVE OZONE NETWORK IN DALLAS (POND CONCEPT) - A MODELING OPPORTUNITY WITH COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite tremendous efforts towards regulating and controlling tropospheric ozone (O3) formation, over 70 million people currently live in U.S. counties which exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) set for 03. These high 03 concentrations alone cost the U.S. ap...

  5. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    A solar heating on cooling system is described which is designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1,596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glyco water solution through the collectors into a hot water system exchanger. The water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2,300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described.

  6. Annual ASEET (Ada Software Engineering Education and Training) Symposium (SLIDES) Held in Dallas, TX. on 9-11 June 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-11

    WHY Ada) In [Evans et al 1985] reasons against Ada: comp lexi," size lack of compilers lack textbooks. Prevealing reason complexity . ,. ... In the...principles and techniques. Ada is a very rich and complex language whose wealth of features can overwhelm any well experienced programmer. We had to...a student who attributes his or her difficulties directly to the complexity of the language. - The attrition rate using Ada in the core programming

  7. Proceedings of a Seminar on Attaining Water Quality Goals through Water Management Procedures, 17-18 February 1982, Dallas, Texas,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    causing factors associated with the construction and operation of a proposed project. Information should be based on specific features of the alternative...These references were identified through the conduction of computer- based literature searches based on selected descriptor words (Canter, 1980...Specific data bases which were searched included National Technical Information Service, Pollution Abstracts, Compendex (Engineering Index), and Biosis

  8. 78 FR 7429 - Adequacy Status of the Dallas-Fort Worth, TX Reasonable Further Progress 8-Hour Ozone Motor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Vehicle Emission Budgets for Transportation Conformity Purposes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes. As a result of EPA's finding, the DFW area must use these budgets for future conformity determinations....

  9. 75 FR 29310 - Opportunity for Designation in the Columbus, OH; Dallas, TX; and Decatur, IN Areas; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ...) authorizes GIPSA's Administrator to designate a qualified applicant to provide official services in a... Shelby County line; Bounded on the South by the southern Shelby, Rusk, Smith, Henderson, Navarro, Hill...

  10. 78 FR 32238 - Foreign-Trade Zone 168-Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas Application for Reorganization/Expansion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... with the FTZ Board's regulations, Camille Evans of the FTZ Staff is designated examiner to evaluate and.../ftz . For further information, contact Camille Evans at Camille.Evans@trade.gov or at (202) 482-2350. ] Dated: May 23, 2013. Andrew McGilvray, Executive Secretary. BILLING CODE 3510-DS-P ...

  11. 78 FR 57618 - Foreign-Trade Zone 39-Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas; Application for Reorganization (Expansion of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... Board's regulations, Camille Evans of the FTZ Staff is designated examiner to evaluate and analyze the.../ftz . For further information, contact Camille Evans at Camille.Evans@trade.gov or (202) 482-2350. Dated: September 13, 2013. Andrew McGilvray, Executive Secretary. BILLING CODE 3510-DS-P ...

  12. DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Start-Up Experience (Alternative Fuel Transit Buses Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Battelle

    2000-06-30

    This report, based on interviews and site visits conducted in October 1999, describes the start-up activities of the DART liquefied natural gas program, identifying problem areas, highlighting successes, and capturing the lessons learned in DART's ongoing efforts to remain at the forefront of the transit industry.

  13. 78 FR 33808 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 39-Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2013-13319] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-54-2013] Foreign-Trade..., grills, pedestal assemblies, blades); electric motors; electronic transmitters; electrical cords and... Secretary, Foreign-Trade Zones Board, Room 21013, U.S. Department of Commerce, 1401 Constitution Avenue NW...

  14. 78 FR 58380 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dallas/Fort Worth...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... develop, operate and maintain the Airport. Any person may inspect the request in person at the FAA office... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the...

  15. ANTEC 90; Proceedings of the 48th SPE Annual Technical Conference, Dallas, TX, May 7-11, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on plastics discusses color and appearance, extrusion, injection molding, electronics, thermoforming, engineering properties and structure, as well as vinyl plastics, thermoplastic materials, blow molding, plastics analysis, moldmaking and mold design, medical plastics, polymer modifiers and additives, and advanced polymer composites. Attention is given to the effects of ultraviolet light and pigments on the physical properties of polycarbonate, drive systems for extrusion, verification of flow analysis software, a liquid crystal polymer for dimensional control, and relaxations in sulfonated polystyrene ionomers. Also discussed are recent developments in the plasticized flame retardant polyvinyl chloride, novel foamable polypropylene polymers, and total quick mold change. Topics addressed include the use of polybutene to improve impact properties of polypropylene film, compression kink band analysis of high-performance fibers, and dynamic wetting aspects of melt impregnation of fiber mats.

  16. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roger Kaplan, Acting Director, Audits and Self-Inspection, Office of Field Operations, at 202-325-4543 or by e-mail at Roger.Kaplan@dhs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  17. 75 FR 47746 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ... rulemaking for this reclassification, pursuant to section 182(b)(3)(A) of the Act. DATES: Comments must be...'' before submitting comments. E-mail: Mr. Guy Donaldson at donaldson.guy@epa.gov . Please also send a copy... nonattainment area. Section 181(b)(2)(A) of the Act requires that EPA determine, based on the area's...

  18. National Forum on Issues in Vocational Assessment (2nd, Dallas, Texas, March 13-15, 1986). The Issues Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Ronald R., Ed.

    These 43 papers focus on changes in vocational assessment and evaluation. Selected titles include "Review of the Needs of Physically Handicapped Persons in the Vocational Counseling Process and a Possible Solution" (Ranson); "Vocational Assessment in the Management of the Chronic Pain Patient" (Dutton); "Vocational Evaluation of the Individual…

  19. Changing Educational Scene: Annual National Vocational and Technical Teacher Education Seminar Proceedings (7th, Dallas, Oct. 22-25, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Anna M., Ed.; And Others

    The seminar was attended by 310 educational leaders. The two keynote speakers, Robert E. Taylor and Felix C. Robb, addressed the topic of changes in society and in education, the seminar's first objective, and reflected on changes that need to emerge on the educational scene. The Changing Content: Impact on Programs, Strategies of Teaching, and…

  20. Effects of gamma radiation on nymphal development and reproductive capacity of the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (Hemiptera - Lygaeidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Moursy, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    Gamma radiation adversely affected important fitness components of Oncopeltus fasciatus, particularly as expressed by nymphal development, subsequent reproductive capacity, mating competitiveness and longevity. Early treated 5th instar nymphs are about 2X more sensitive to gamma radiation than late treated 5th instar nymphs based upon LD50 values. The extremes in sensitivity were 5.01 kilorads (krad) for early treated males and 13.09 krad for females treated late in the 5th instar. Wing deformities resulted from doses in the same range as those for mortality. Fifty percent of early treated males had wing deformities at a dose of 10.81 krad while a dose of 12.5 and 12.89 krad was necessary for 50% wing deformities in males and females, respectively, when treated late in the 5th instar. Fecundity and fertility were affected at lower dosages of radiation than for mortality. The treatment of both sexes produced the greatest effect. Fecundity was reduced by 50% at 1.22 krad, while 50% reduction in fertility occurred at about half that dose, or 0.66 krad. Somewhat greater doses were required when females alone were treated and mated with untreated males. In this case a 50% reduction occurred with 1.87 and 1.07 krad for fecundity and fertility, respectively. When males alone were treated, ED50 values were 2.24 and 1.58 krad for fecundity and fertility, respectively.

  1. Grasping the Momentum of the Information Age. Proceedings of the CAUSE Annual Conference (Dallas, Texas, December 1-4, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Planners and presenters at this conference organized by CAUSE, the professional association of the development, use and management of information technology in higher education, all focused on giving participants practical "handles" for grasping the momentum of the current information era. An opening section provides summaries of the…

  2. Trade and Industrial Education Research Committee. Proceedings of the Carrousel Session, American Vocational Association (Dallas, Texas, December 8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the texts of five research reports that were presented at a conference dealing with trade and industrial education. The following papers are included: "A Survey of Teacher Attitudes and Beliefs Related to the Use of Microcomputers in Vocational Education," by Steve Chi-Yin Yuen; "Retraining for Robotics and Other Forms of…

  3. Integrity of production wells and confining unit at the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Sonya A.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    1997-01-01

    The results of borehole geophysical log analysis indicate that two of the production wells could have vertically connected intervals where cement bonding in the well annulus is poor. The other production wells have overall good bonding. Temperature logs do not indicate flow behind casing except in the screened interval of one well. Geophysical logs show the Eagle Ford Shale ranges from 147 to 185 feet thick at the site. The Eagle Ford Shale has low permeability and a high plasticity index. These physical characteristics make the Eagle Ford Shale an excellent confining unit.

  4. 78 FR 17281 - Notice To Rescind a Notice of lntent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement: Dallas and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... conduct a feasibility study to determine a new direction for this transportation corridor. As a result... and change in the regional growth projections in the study area, it was determined that the...

  5. Techniques for Estimating the Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    The climate is humid and subtrupical with hot summers and mild winters. The yearly mean temperature for 1941-70 was 65.50 F (U.S. Department of Com...merce, 1973). Monthly mean temperatures for 1941-70 ranged from 44.8°F in Jan- uary to 84.9°F in August. During the study period 1961-78, the lowest...recorded temperature was 40 F and the highest was 109°F. The climate is continental, characterized by a wide range in annual- temperature extremes and an

  6. 77 FR 65360 - Foreign-Trade Zone 168-Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... Production Activity, Richemont North America, Inc. dba Cartier (Eyewear Assembly/Kitting), Grand Prairie, TX...), located in Grand Prairie, Texas. The notification conforming to the requirements of the regulations of...

  7. 78 FR 11816 - Foreign-Trade Zone 168-Dallas/Ft. Worth, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Richemont...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Activity, Richemont North America, Inc. dba Cartier (Eyewear Assembly/Kitting), Grand Prairie, TX On... North America, Inc. dba Cartier, within FTZ 168--Site 4, in Grand Prairie, Texas. ] The notification...

  8. Absence of ribosomal DNA amplification in the meroistic (telotrophic) ovary of the large milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Lygaeidae)

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    In the typical meroistic insect ovary, the oocyte nucleus synthesizes little if any RNA. Nurse cells or trophocytes actively synthesize ribosomes which are transported to and accumulated by the oocyte. In the telotrophic ovary a morphological separation exists, the nurse cells being localized at the apical end of each ovariole and communicating with the ooocytes via nutritive cords. In order to determine whether the genes coding for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) are amplified in the telotrophic ovary of the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, the percentages of the genome coding for ribosomal RNA in somatic cells, spermatogenic cells, ovarian follicles, and nurse cells were compared. The oocytes and most of the nurse cells of O. fasciatus are uninucleolate. DNA hybridizing with ribosomal RNA is localized in a satellite DNA, the density of which is 1.712 g/cm(-3). The density of main-band DNA is 1.694 g/cm(-3). The ribosomal DNA satellite accounts for approximately 0.2% of the DNA in somatic and gametogenic tissues of both males and females. RNA-DNA hybridization analysis demonstrates that approximately 0.03% of the DNA in somatic tissues, testis, ovarian follicles, and isolated nurse cells hybridizes with ribosomal RNA. The fact that the percentage of DNA hybridizing with rRNA is the same in somatic and in male and female gametogenic tissues indicates that amplification of ribosomal DNA does not occur in nurse cells and that if it occurs in oocytes, it represents less than a 50- fold increase in ribosomal DNA. An increase in total genome DNA accounted by polyploidization appears to provide for increasing the amount of ribosomal DNA in the nurse cells. PMID:1158969

  9. Food Management System--Daily Production Reports: General Description and Users Guide. Project SIMU-School: Dallas Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronshey, Raymond W.; Dunklau, M. William

    This booklet describes the Daily Production Reports subsystem of the School Food Management System, a computer program package developed as one part of a family of educational management systems. The Daily Production Reports system produces two major types of reports on a daily basis. Business Analysis Reports display all food service costs, as…

  10. 75 FR 79302 - Determination of Nonattainment and Reclassification of the Dallas/Fort Worth 1997 8-Hour Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ...-Hour Ozone Nonattainment Area; Texas AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule... nonattainment area failed to attain the 1997 8-hour ozone national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS or... Federal Regulations (CFR) for moderate nonattainment areas. This final determination is based on...

  11. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Dallas Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Dallas Public Schools. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  13. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Dallas Public Schools. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  14. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2013 Trial Urban District Snapshot Report. Dallas Public Schools. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), in partnership with the National Assessment Governing Board and the Council of the Great City Schools (CGCS), created the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in 2002 to support the improvement of student achievement in the nation's large urban districts. NAEP TUDA results in mathematics…

  15. Usability Evaluation of Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) Concept in Dallas/Fort Worth Airport Tower Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Hoang, Ty; Jung, Yoon C.; Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is a proposed decision-support tool for air traffic control tower controllers for reducing taxi delay and optimizing the departure sequence. In the present study, the tool's usability was evaluated to ensure that its claimed performance benefits are not being realized at the cost of increasing the work burden on controllers. For the evaluation, workload ratings and questionnaire responses collected during a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment were analyzed to assess the SARDA advisories' effects on the controllers' ratings on cognitive resources (e.g., workload, spare attention) and satisfaction. The results showed that SARDA reduced the controllers' workload and increased their spare attention. It also made workload and attention levels less susceptible to the effects of increases in the traffic load. The questionnaire responses suggested that the controllers generally were satisfied with the ease of use of the tool and the objectives of the SARDA concept, but with some caution. To gain more trust from controllers, the the reasoning behind advisories may need to be made more transparent to them.

  16. School-based Management of Chronic Asthma Among Inner-city African-American Schoolchildren in Dallas, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Melanie; Johnson, Pauline; Neatherlin, Jacque; Millard, Mark W.; Lawrence, Gretchen

    1998-01-01

    Examined the efficacy of a school-based asthma management program to prevent exacerbation of symptoms in inner-city, African-American students. Students visited the school clinic twice daily for treatment with inhaled anti-inflammatory medication and measurement of respiratory peak flow rates. Regular use of inhaled anti-inflammatory medication…

  17. Trade and Industrial Education Research Committee. Proceedings of the Carrousel Session, American Vocational Association (Dallas, Texas, December 8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the texts of five research reports that were presented at a conference dealing with trade and industrial education. The following papers are included: "A Survey of Teacher Attitudes and Beliefs Related to the Use of Microcomputers in Vocational Education," by Steve Chi-Yin Yuen; "Retraining for Robotics and Other Forms of…

  18. School-based Management of Chronic Asthma Among Inner-city African-American Schoolchildren in Dallas, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Melanie; Johnson, Pauline; Neatherlin, Jacque; Millard, Mark W.; Lawrence, Gretchen

    1998-01-01

    Examined the efficacy of a school-based asthma management program to prevent exacerbation of symptoms in inner-city, African-American students. Students visited the school clinic twice daily for treatment with inhaled anti-inflammatory medication and measurement of respiratory peak flow rates. Regular use of inhaled anti-inflammatory medication…

  19. A 4-tiered classification of left ventricular hypertrophy based on left ventricular geometry: the Dallas heart study.

    PubMed

    Khouri, Michel G; Peshock, Ronald M; Ayers, Colby R; de Lemos, James A; Drazner, Mark H

    2010-03-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric, based on the ratio of LV wall thickness to chamber dimension. We propose a 4-tiered LVH classification based on LV concentricity(0.67) (mass/end-diastolic volume(0.67)) and indexed LV end-diastolic volume (EDV). Cardiac MRI was performed in 2803 subjects and LVH (n=895) was defined by increased LV mass/height(2.7). Increased concentricity(0.67) and indexed EDV were defined at the 97.5th percentile of a healthy subpopulation. Four geometric patterns resulted: increased concentricity without increased EDV ("thick hypertrophy," n=361); increased EDV without increased concentricity ("dilated hypertrophy," n=53); increased concentricity with increased EDV ("both thick and dilated hypertrophy," n=13); and neither increased concentricity nor increased EDV ("indeterminate hypertrophy," n=468). Compared with subjects with isolated thick hypertrophy, those with both thick and dilated hypertrophy had a lower LV ejection fraction and higher NT-pro-BNP and BNP levels (P

  20. Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes in a University Setting: The Case of the University of Texas at Dallas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsobrook, Metta

    2010-01-01

    All institutions of higher learning in America must have national accreditation in order to receive government funding. One of the main requirements from the national accreditation commissions is that the institution must have a process for assessing student learning outcomes (SLO). The reason for the new requirement is that the federal government…

  1. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 6): RSR Corporation Superfund Site, operable unit 2, Dallas, TX, May 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) presents its decision in this Record of Decision (ROD) that no further action will be required at Operable Unit No. 2 (OU No. 2) of the RSR Corporation Superfund Site (RSR Site). DHA`s demolition and removal action activities at OU No. 2 consisted of removal and offsite disposal of approximately 24,000 cubic yards of lead or arsenic contaminated soils, demolition of 167 buildings and offsite disposal of the demolition debris, and removal and offsite disposal of lead contaminated roofs. All contaminated soils and building debris removed from the site were disposed of at permitted offsite facilities authorized to receive such wastes.

  2. ABCA-Expanding into New Horizons; Proceedings of the Southwest ABCA Spring Conference (Dallas, Texas, March 8-10, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Sam J., Ed.

    The 17 conference papers in this collection are arranged under six headings: consulting in business communication; techniques for teaching business communication; research activities in business communication; organizational communication; psychology, parapsychology, and communication; and current issues in communication. Specific topics covered…

  3. Resurvey and Intensive Testing of Archaeological Sites at Saylorville Lake, Polk and Dallas Counties, Iowa. Volume 1. Site Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    Valley were impounded by the construction of Saylorvill.e Dam, approximately 7 miles upstream from the city of Des Moines. The lake thus created extends...upstream for a S distance of 17 miles to a point near the city of Madrid. In its lower reaches, the floodplain of the Des Moines River is relatively...conducted in the Downstream Corridor, between Saylorville * Dam and the City of Des Moines - see Benn & Bettis 1981, Benn & Harris 1982.) This information

  4. Academic Advising: Transition and Continuity. Proceedings of the National Academic Advising Association Annual Region VII Conference (5th, Dallas, Texas, May 21-23, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrave, O. T., Ed.

    Papers from the conference proceedings of the National Academic Advising Association are as follows: "Advising, Writing Centers, and Academic Services: Applications and Extensions of Student Developmental Theories" (M. Brooks and C. Murphy); "Development of an Expert System for Student Advisement" (J. Sullivan et al.); "Evaluating Advising: The…

  5. Computer-model analysis of ground-water flow and simulated effects of contaminant remediation at Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant, Dallas, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Rene A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2000-01-01

    In June 1993, the Department of the Navy, Southern Division Naval Facilities Engineering Command (SOUTHDIV), began a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) of the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant (NWIRP) in north-central Texas. The RFI has found trichloroethene, dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, as well as chromium, lead, and other metallic residuum in the shallow alluvial aquifer underlying NWIRP. These findings and the possibility of on-site or off-site migration of contaminants prompted the need for a ground-water-flow model of the NWIRP area. The resulting U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) model: (1) defines aquifer properties, (2) computes water budgets, (3) delineates major flowpaths, and (4) simulates hydrologic effects of remediation activity. In addition to assisting with particle-tracking analyses, the calibrated model could support solute-transport modeling as well as help evaluate the effects of potential corrective action. The USGS model simulates steadystate and transient conditions of ground-water flow within a single model layer.The alluvial aquifer is within fluvial terrace deposits of Pleistocene age, which unconformably overlie the relatively impermeable Eagle Ford Shale of Late Cretaceous age. Over small distances and short periods, finer grained parts of the aquifer are separated hydraulically; however, most of the aquifer is connected circuitously through randomly distributed coarser grained sediments. The top of the underlying Eagle Ford Shale, a regional confining unit, is assumed to be the effective lower limit of ground-water circulation and chemical contamination.The calibrated steady-state model reproduces long-term average water levels within +5.1 or –3.5 feet of those observed; the standard error of the estimate is 1.07 feet with a mean residual of 0.02 foot. Hydraulic conductivity values range from 0.75 to 7.5 feet per day, and average about 4 feet per day. Specific yield values range from 0.005 to 0.15 and average about 0.08. Simulated infiltration rates range from 0 to 2.5 inches per year, depending mostly on local patterns of ground cover.Computer simulation indicates that, as of December 31, 1998, remediation systems at NWIRP were removing 7,375 cubic feet of water per day from the alluvial aquifer, with 3,050 cubic feet per day coming from aquifer storage. The resulting drawdown prevented 1,800 cubic feet per day of ground water from discharging into Cottonwood Bay, as well as inducing another 1,325 cubic feet per day into the aquifer from the bay. An additional 1,200 cubic feet of water per day (compared to pre-remediation conditions) was prevented from discharging into the west lagoon, east lagoon, Mountain Creek Lake, and Mountain Creek swale.Particle-tracking simulations, assuming an aquifer porosity of 0.15, were made to delineate flowpath patterns, or contaminant “capture zones,” resulting from 2.5- and 5-year periods of remediation activity at NWIRP. The resulting flowlines indicate three such zones, or areas from which ground water is simulated to have been removed during July 1996–December 1998, as well as extended areas from which ground water would be removed during the next 2.5 years (January 1999– June 2001).Simulation indicates that, as of December 31, 1998, the recovery trench was intercepting about 827 cubic feet per day of ground water that—without the trench—would have discharged into Cottonwood Bay. During this time, the trench is simulated to have removed about 3,221 cubic feet per day of water from the aquifer, with about 934 cubic feet per day (29 percent) coming from the south (Cottonwood Bay) side of the trench.

  6. Are Computer-Oriented Librarians Really Incompetent? Excerpts From the Proceedings of a LARC Meeting Held During the ALA Conference in Dallas, Texas, June 24, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Automation Research and Consulting Association, Tempe, AZ.

    The May 1971 issue of "College and Research Libraries" featured an article by Dr. Ellsworth Mason which constitutes an all-out attack on the application of computer technology to library systems. Dr. Mason views the computer-based technology to library systems developed to date (at least the ones he has studied) as unqualified disasters from a…

  7. Training Occupational, Physical, and Recreational Therapists in the Area of Deaf-Blind: Proceedings (Dallas, Texas, July 28-31, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Jill M.; Dantona, Robert

    The document contains 12 papers from the 1975 National Conference for Training Occupational, Physical, and Recreational Therapists in the Area of Deaf-Blind to assist in improving services to deaf-blind children and youth and thereby reduce the impact of their multiple impairments. Entries include the following titles and authors:…

  8. ADA (Trade Name) Software Engineering Education and Training Symposium (2nd) Held in Dallas, Texas on 9-11 June 1987.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-11

    and should be willing and able to comment on both content and, with guidance, on pedagogy . Making this initial effort is well worthwhile: spending...U) ADA JOINT PROGRAM OFFICE ARLINGTON VR C MCDONALD ET AL. 1t JUN 87 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 12/5 Ehhhhimhhml Iilllllililu * J 136L 2 11. -r -o w rl. W V V

  9. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] Project: Technical Training for the Future of Texas. Navarro College/Dallas Community College District. Final Report for Year One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsak, Charles; McGlohen, Patti J.

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is a national lab for research on the fundamental forces and constituents of the universe. A major part of the research will involve an oval ring 54 miles in circumference through which superconducting magnets will steer two beams of protons in opposite directions. In response to the…

  10. Proceedings of Annual Meeting (26th) Aquatic Plant Control Research Program, Held in Dallas, Texas on 18-22 November, 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    spicatum L.). Results studying natural enemies of pest insects, for of his surveys can be found in the previous example, the gypsy and apple ermine moths ...second biocontrol agent, the moth pakistanae population from China was Nanmangana pectinicornis, has been re- brought into quarantine and is being leased...presently maintaining colonies of the hydrilla stem wee- maintaining only a small colony of this insect vil and the waterlettuce moth , and because a

  11. National Conference for Trade and Industrial Education Professional Personnel. Theme: Issues with Implications for Professional Development Activities (Dallas, Texas, January 13-15, 1976). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The two major goals of the conference were to identify, prioritize, and address critical problem areas and needs in trade and industrial (T & I) education with major emphasis upon implications for personnel development, and to encourage participants to develop at least a rudimentary communications network. Participants gathered preconference data…

  12. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (56th, Dallas, Texas, April 5-8, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Arthur L., Ed.; Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.

    Abstracts of most of the papers presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) have been collected in this publication. Papers focus on such areas as student and teacher characteristics, student and teacher attitudes, science curriculum, science instruction, preservice and inservice…

  13. 40 CFR 52.2286 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Dallas-Fort...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for farming purposes, as that expression is used in the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. section 6420... equivalent. (4) Any facility for loading and unloading of volatile organic compounds (including gasoline...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2286 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Dallas-Fort...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for farming purposes, as that expression is used in the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. section 6420... equivalent. (4) Any facility for loading and unloading of volatile organic compounds (including gasoline...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2286 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Dallas-Fort...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for farming purposes, as that expression is used in the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. section 6420... equivalent. (4) Any facility for loading and unloading of volatile organic compounds (including gasoline...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2286 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Dallas-Fort...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for farming purposes, as that expression is used in the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. section 6420... equivalent. (4) Any facility for loading and unloading of volatile organic compounds (including gasoline...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2286 - Control of evaporative losses from the filling of gasoline storage vessels in the Dallas-Fort...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for farming purposes, as that expression is used in the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U.S.C. section 6420... equivalent. (4) Any facility for loading and unloading of volatile organic compounds (including gasoline...

  18. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Data During the Period January 1, 1998 Through January 21, 1999 at the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. Volume 2; Data and Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) requires accurate winds and turbulence to determine aircraft wake vortex behavior near the ground. Volume 1 described the wind input and quality analysis process. This volume documents the data available during the period January 1998 through January 1999 and the partitioning and concatenation of files for time of day, turbulence, non duplication, cross wind profile quality and ceiling and visibility. It provides the resultant filtered files for the first three partitions as well as identification of ceiling/visibility conditions when they were below 5000 feet and 5 miles respectively. It also includes the wind profile quality flags to permit automatic selection of files for AVOSS application using selected ceiling/visibility and wind profile quality values and flags (or no flags).

  19. The Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Reading; Yearbook of the Annual Meeting of the National Reading Conference (14th, Dallas, Texas, December 3-5, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Eric L., Ed.; Hafner, Lawrence E., Ed.

    Focusing on the philosophical and sociological bases of reading, the papers in this volume were drawn from the fourteenth annual meeting of the National Reading Conference held in 1964. Among the topics covered in the 27 papers are the following: the philosophy and sociology of reading; reading reform; adult literacy; paperback books; factors in…

  20. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, 33rd, Dallas, TX, Apr. 13-15, 1992, Technical Papers. Pt. 4 - Structural dynamics II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses composites damage tolerance, shell and cylinder buckling, computational structural mechanics, adaptive structures, structural risk and reliability, the analysis of composite structures, the thermal analysis of structures, the finite-element analysis of rotorcraft vibration, spacecraft dynamics, and rotor aeroelasticity. Also discussed are rotorcraft dynamics, structural damping, control analyses and control experiments, dynamic methods, experimental dynamics and testing, composite structural dynamics and damage, aeroelasticity, future directions in flight mechanics and structures, rotorcraft aeroelasticity, dynamics applications, unsteady aerodynamics, eigensolution methods, nonlinear dynamics, sensitivity analysis and topology optimization, shape optimization, modeling of material behavior, and ceramic-matrix composites.

  1. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, 33rd, Dallas, TX, Apr. 13-15, 1992, Technical Papers. Pt. 3 - Structural dynamics I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present conference on structural dynamics encompasses finite-element analyses of rotorcraft vibration, spacecraft dynamics, dynamic analyses, rotor aeroelasticity, rotorcraft dynamics, damping, control analysis and experiments, and experimental dynamics and testing. Specific issues addressed include NASA/industry design-analysis methods for vibrations, controlling a large flexible structure to mimic a rigid one, the dynamic response of rapidly heated space structures, interval prediction in structural dynamic analysis, mode localization in computer disk drives, and a discrete transfer-matrix method for rotating beams. Also addressed are the dynamics of axially moving continua on an elastic foundation, stiffness and stress in a fluid-filled circular diaphragm, linear structure control by the modal force technique, directional filters for sensing 1D structural dynamics, and an adaptive multilevel substructuring method for efficient modeling of complex structures.

  2. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, 33rd, Dallas, TX, Apr. 13-15, 1992, Technical Papers. Pt. 2 - Structures II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to damage tolerance of composites, buckling of shells and cylinders, computational structural mechanics, buckling/postbuckling of plates and stiffened panels, adaptive structures, structural risk and reliability, analysis of composite structures, structural design and verification, finite element analysis of rotorcraft vibration, spacecraft dynamics, rotor aeroelasticity, and rotorcraft dynamics. Attention is also given to aeroelasticity, unsteady aerodynamics, eigen solution methods, design engineering, aerospace structural design optimization, modeling of material behavior, and ceramic matrix composites.

  3. Advances in dynamics and control of flexible spacecraft and space-based manipulations; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M. (Editor); Alberts, Thomas E. (Editor); Kakad, Yogendra P. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to control formulations for vibration suppression of an active structure in slewing motions, the use if distributed sensing in control of large flexible spacecraft, an improved shooting method for solving minimum-time maneuver problems, and nonlinear slew maneuver dynamics of large flexible spacecrafts. Attention is also given to initial experiments in trusterless locomotion control of a free-flying robot, dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, initial experiments in cooperative manipulation from a moving platform, and intelligent pipelined control architecture for remote robotic applications.

  4. Students in Transition: Critical Mileposts in the Collegiate Journey. Inaugural National Conference Proceedings (1st, Dallas, Texas, November 9-11, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin.

    This publication contains a collection of 95 abstracts of presentations on college student transitions, particularly those of freshmen, transfer students, and seniors. Each abstract is designed to give the reader a short summary of a presentation and to provide the name, address, and telephone number of the person to contact for additional…

  5. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, 33rd, Dallas, TX, Apr. 13-15, 1992, Technical Papers. Pt. 1 - Structures I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The present conference on structures encompasses damage tolerance in composites, buckling in shells and cylinders, computational structural mechanics, the analysis of composite panels with cutouts, postbuckling in plates, adaptive structures, and structural risk. Specific issues addressed include the analysis of delamination in postbuckled dropped-ply laminates, the nonlinear bending response of thin-walled laminated composite cylinders, the global/local finite-element analysis of geometrically nonlinear structures, a Rayleigh-Ritz design methodology for cutouts in composite structures, and general plate stability using high-order techniques. Also addressed are an adaptive S-method in linear elastostatics, adaptive structures programs for the Strategic Defense Initiative organization, the damping of large space structures with large-stroke adaptive stiffness cables, system reliability and risk assessment, and the application of the variational-asymptotical method to composite plates.

  6. Differences between weekday and weekend air pollutant levels in Atlanta; Baltimore; Chicago; Dallas-Fort Worth; Denver; Houston; New York; Phoenix; Washington, DC; and surrounding areas.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Charles L; Tanenbaum, Shelley; Lawson, Douglas R

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated day-of-week differences in mean concentrations of ozone (O3) precursors (nitric oxide [NO], nitrogen oxides [NOx], carbon monoxide [CO], and volatile organic compounds [VOCs]) at monitoring sites in 23 states comprising seven geographic focus areas over the period 1998-2003. Data for VOC measurements were available for six metropolitan areas in five regions. We used Wednesdays to represent weekdays and Sundays to represent weekends; we also analyzed Saturdays. At many sites, NO, NOx, and CO mean concentrations decreased at all individual hours from 6:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Sundays compared with corresponding Wednesday means. Statistically significant (p < 0.01) weekend decreases in ambient concentrations were observed for 92% of NOx, sites, 89% of CO sites, and 23% of VOC sites. Nine-hour (6:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.) mean concentrations of NO, NOx, CO, and VOCs declined by 65, 49, 28, and 19%, respectively, from Wednesdays to Sundays (median site responses). Despite the large reductions in ambient NOx and moderate reductions in ambient CO and VOC concentrations on weekends, ozone and particulate matter (PM) nitrate did not exhibit large changes from weekdays to weekends. The median differences between Wednesday and Sunday mean ozone concentrations at all monitoring sites ranged from 3% higher on Sundays for peak 8-hr concentrations determined from all monitoring days to 3.8% lower on Sundays for peak 1-hr concentrations on extreme-ozone days. Eighty-three percent of the sites did not show statistically significant differences between Wednesday and weekend mean concentrations of peak ozone. Statistically significant weekend ozone decreases occurred at 6% of the sites and significant increases occurred at 11% of the sites. Average PM nitrate concentrations were 2.6% lower on Sundays than on Wednesdays. Statistically significant Sunday PM nitrate decreases occurred at one site and significant increases occurred at seven sites.

  7. Windows to the World. NECC 1992: Proceedings of the Annual National Educational Computing Conference (13th, Dallas, Texas, June 15-17, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayle, Susan, Ed.

    These proceedings address the appropriate uses of technology in education, including papers and summaries of presentations on the following topics: community partnerships; desktop publishing; English as a Second Language/English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESL/ESOL); cognitive issues in multimedia; higher education applications; social studies…

  8. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  9. Visions and Revisions for the 21st Century. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Commission of Professors of Adult Education (Dallas, Texas, November 19-21, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenland, Annette, Ed.

    These proceedings contain the papers presented during the opening and closing panels of the 1993 annual conference of the Commission of Professors of Adult Education (CPAE) as well as reports from the five special interest groups (SIGs) that met during the conference. The following papers/reports are included: "Opening Session: Introductory…

  10. 2011 Mid-America Orthopaedic Association Dallas B. Phemister Physician in Training Award: Can musculoskeletal tumors be diagnosed with ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy?

    PubMed

    Khalil, Jad G; Mott, Michael P; Parsons, Theodore W; Banka, Trevor R; van Holsbeeck, Marnix

    2012-08-01

    Percutaneous biopsy for musculoskeletal tumors commonly relies on imaging adjuncts including ultrasound (US), CT, or MRI. These modalities however have disadvantages (US) or are cumbersome, not universally available, and costly (CT and MRI). US fusion is a novel technique that fuses previously obtained CT or MRI data with real-time US, which allows biopsies to be performed in an US suite. It has proven useful in various body systems but musculoskeletal applications remain scarce. Our goal is to evaluate the fusion technology and determine its ability to diagnose musculoskeletal tumors. We determined whether biopsies performed via US fusion compared with CT guidance provide equivalent diagnostic yield and accuracy and allow quicker biopsy scheduling and procedure times. Forty-seven patients were assigned to undergo either US fusion (with MR, n = 16 or CT, n = 15) or CT-guided biopsies (n = 16). We evaluated adequacy of the histologic specimen (diagnostic yield) and correlation with surgical pathology (diagnostic accuracy). We determined scheduling times and lengths of the biopsy. US fusion and CT-guided biopsy groups had comparable diagnostic yields (CT = 94%; US/MRI = 94%; US/CT = 93%) and accuracy (CT = 83%; US/MRI = 90%; US/CT = 100%). US fusion biopsies were faster to schedule and perform. All procedures were safe with minimal complications. US fusion provides a high diagnostic yield and accuracy comparable to CT-guided biopsy while performed in the convenience of an US suite. This may have resulted in the observed faster scheduling and biopsy times. Level II, diagnostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. Seeking Solutions for Tomorrow's Challenges. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (13th, Dallas, Texas, December 5, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Alan A., Ed.

    This proceedings volume contains a total of 39 papers. The following 28 selected titles are cited as those most clearly relevant to education: "A National Study of Teacher Educators and State Supervisors in Agricultural Education" (Foster, Horner); "A Profile of the Effective Vocational Agriculture Teacher" (Rheault, Miller); "Analysis of Needs:…

  12. The Individualized Reading Program: A Guide for Classroom Teaching. Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the International Reading Assn. (11th, Dallas, May 4-7, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Lyman C., Jr., Ed.

    This publication is designed to aid teachers and school personnel who are seeking ways to individualize reading instruction. The chapters include: "The Individualized Reading Program: A Perspective" by Lyman C. Hunt, Jr.; "Initiating the Individualized Reading Program: Various Transitional Plans" by Lorraine Harvilla; "The Conference in IRP: The…

  13. Challenge Reassessment Affirmation. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western College Reading Association (14th, Dallas, Texas, April 9-12, 1981). Volume XIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Gwyn, Ed.

    The articles in this collection focus on reading, learning assistance, developmental education, and tutorial services at the college level. Topics of the 28 articles include the following: (1) a reassessment of the state of learning assistance; (2) a reaffirmation of the role of developmental instructors; (3) human brain research, cognitive…

  14. Advances in dynamics and control of flexible spacecraft and space-based manipulations; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M. (Editor); Alberts, Thomas E. (Editor); Kakad, Yogendra P. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to control formulations for vibration suppression of an active structure in slewing motions, the use if distributed sensing in control of large flexible spacecraft, an improved shooting method for solving minimum-time maneuver problems, and nonlinear slew maneuver dynamics of large flexible spacecrafts. Attention is also given to initial experiments in trusterless locomotion control of a free-flying robot, dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, initial experiments in cooperative manipulation from a moving platform, and intelligent pipelined control architecture for remote robotic applications.

  15. Asian/Pacific American Librarians: A Cross Cultural Perspective. Papers of the Program of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (Dallas, Texas, June 25, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collantes, Lourdes Y., Ed.

    Six symposium papers are included in this document. The first paper, by Henry Chang, is a brief profile of Asian/Pacific American (APA) librarians, emphasizing the need for more data on this group and the need for the group to become more assertive of their rights to equal opportunity in the field. The second paper, by Jane Katayama, addresses…

  16. Microcracking-induced damage in composites; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, George J.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    Consideration is given to characteristics of micro-level fracture in notched unidirectional graphite-epoxy, progressive matrix cracking of crossply composite laminates under biaxial loading, the use of microcrack analysis in performance simulation for composite material systems, modeling of the flexural behavior of the ceramic-matrix composites, the effects of microcracking on thermal expansion and cyclic stress-strain relations of composites, and analysis of damage growth in particulate composites using a work potential. Attention is also given to modeling of cracking induced damage in particulate and fiber-reinforced composites, interaction of cracks in anisotropic matrix and related problems, micromechanics of brittle composites exposed to chemically aggressive ambients, and effects of interface on tribological properties of graphite/aluminum composites.

  17. STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF RESIDENCE HALL ENVIRONMENTS--LIVING-LEARNING VS. CONVENTIONAL UNITS. PERSONNEL AND GUIDANCE ASSOCIATION CONVENTION, DALLAS, TEXAS, MARCH, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CENTRA, JOHN A.

    LIVING-LEARNING RESIDENCE HALLS WHICH INCLUDE CLASSROOMS, RECREATION FACILITIES, AND FACULTY OFFICES ALONG WITH THE DORMITORY ROOMS WERE COMPARED TO THE MORE CONVENTIONAL RESIDENCE HALLS. IT WAS EXPECTED THAT THE LIVING-LEARNING HALLS FOSTERED A MORE INTELLECTUAL AND COHESIVE ATMOSPHERE. UNDERGRADUATES IN A LARGE UNIVERSITY WHO RESIDED IN ONE OF…

  18. Patterns and influences in health-related quality of life in children with immune thrombocytopenia: A study from the Dallas ITP Cohort.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Klaassen, Robert J; Buchanan, George R; Neunert, Cindy E

    2017-08-01

    Relationships between clinical/demographic factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in childhood immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) remain poorly understood. Recent studies reveal conflicting information about factors that contribute to HRQoL. This was a prospective, single-institution, cohort study of newly diagnosed children with ITP. Serial evaluations of HRQoL were performed using the Kid's ITP Tools (KIT), scored from 0 (worst) to 100 (best), at enrollment and 1 week, 6 months, and 12 months following diagnosis. All visits included bleeding severity grading. Relationships between HRQoL and platelet count, treatment, bleeding severity, and course of disease were examined. A total of 99 children with newly diagnosed ITP were evaluable for analysis. KIT scores were low at diagnosis for parents (median 26, range 15-43) and children (median 65, range 55-81) and were not influenced by age or platelet count. At diagnosis, children who received treatment had lower platelet counts (P = 0.005), more severe hemorrhage (P < 0.0125), and lower HRQoL by parent, child, and proxy reporting (P < 0.05). Oral bleeding negatively impacted proxy-reported disease burden at diagnosis (P = 0.01). Persistence of disease and lower platelet counts at 6 and 12 month visits were the only factors noted to consistently impact quality of life beyond diagnosis for both parents and children. HRQoL is low at diagnosis but significantly improves over time. Patients with ongoing disease and lower platelet counts continue to have significant disease burden. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Report of Panel 3: Management Science in the Procurement Cycle, 1968 DoD Contract Management Conference, IMPACT 73, held in Dallas, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-11-01

    Force Plant Representative at the Rocketdyne Division, North Ameilcan Aviation, Inc. In August 1960 he completed the Air Force Training with Industry...Subjective judgement is required in diagnosing the prob- lem , developing a symbolic representation, interpreting the solution obtained, and in implementing the

  20. Cross-validation Methodology between Ground and GPM Satellite-based Radar Rainfall Product over Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Biswas, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two decades, a large number of rainfall products have been developed based on satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the space time variability of rainfall at many scales and the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different rainfall instruments. In order to produce high-resolution rainfall products for urban flash flood applications and improve the weather sensing capability in urban environment, the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA), in collaboration with National Weather Service (NWS) and North Central Texas Council of Governments (NCTCOG), has developed an urban radar remote sensing network in DFW Metroplex. DFW is the largest inland metropolitan area in the U.S., that experiences a wide range of natural weather hazards such as flash flood and hailstorms. The DFW urban remote sensing network, centered by the deployment of eight dual-polarization X-band radars and a NWS WSR-88DP radar, is expected to provide impacts-based warning and forecasts for benefit of the public safety and economy. High-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is one of the major goals of the development of this urban test bed. In addition to ground radar-based rainfall estimation, satellite-based rainfall products for this area are also of interest for this study. Typical example is the rainfall rate product produced by the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) onboard Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite. Therefore, cross-comparison between ground and space-based rainfall estimation is critical to building an optimal regional rainfall system, which can take advantages of the sampling differences of different sensors. This paper presents the real-time high-resolution QPE system developed for DFW urban radar network, which is based upon the combination of S-band WSR-88DP and X-band CASA radars. In addition, we focuses on the cross-comparison between rainfall estimation from this ground based QPE system and GPM rainfall products. The observations collected during the GPM satellite overpasses over DFW area will be used extensively in this study. Data alignment for better comparison will also be presented.

  1. 1990 MTT-S International Microwave Symposium and Exhibition and Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Monolithic IC Symposium, Dallas, TX, May 7-10, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuiddy, David N., Jr.; Sokolov, Vladimir

    1990-12-01

    The present conference discusses microwave filters, lightwave technology for microwave antennas, planar and quasi-planar guides, mixers and VCOs, cavity filters, discontinuity and coupling effects, control circuits, power dividers and phase shifters, microwave ICs, biological effects and medical applications, CAD and modeling for MMICs, directional couplers, MMIC design trends, microwave packaging and manufacturing, monolithic ICs, and solid-state devices and circuits. Also discussed are microwave and mm-wave superconducting technology, MICs for communication systems, the merging of optical and microwave technologies, microwave power transistors, ferrite devices, network measurements, advanced transmission-line structures, FET devices and circuits, field theory of IC discontinuities, active quasi-optical techniques, phased-array techniques and circuits, nonlinear CAD, sub-mm wave devices, and high power devices.

  2. GLOBECOM '89 - IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference and Exhibition, Dallas, TX, Nov. 27-30, 1989, Conference Record. Volumes 1, 2, & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present conference discusses topics in multiwavelength network technology and its applications, advanced digital radio systems in their propagation environment, mobile radio communications, switching programmability, advancements in computer communications, integrated-network management and security, HDTV and image processing in communications, basic exchange communications radio advancements in digital switching, intelligent network evolution, speech coding for telecommunications, and multiple access communications. Also discussed are network designs for quality assurance, recent progress in coherent optical systems, digital radio applications, advanced communications technologies for mobile users, communication software for switching systems, AI and expert systems in network management, intelligent multiplexing nodes, video and image coding, network protocols and performance, system methods in quality and reliability, the design and simulation of lightwave systems, local radio networks, mobile satellite communications systems, fiber networks restoration, packet video networks, human interfaces for future networks, and lightwave networking.

  3. Urban stormwater quality, event-mean concentrations, and estimates of stormwater pollutant loads, Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldys, Stanley; Raines, T.H.; Mansfield, B.L.; Sandlin, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Local regression equations were developed to estimate loads produced by individual storms. Mean annual loads were estimated by applying the storm-load equations for all runoff-producing storms in an average climatic year and summing individual storm loads to determine the annual load.

  4. Seeking Solutions for Tomorrow's Challenges. Proceedings of the Annual National Agricultural Education Research Meeting (13th, Dallas, Texas, December 5, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Alan A., Ed.

    This proceedings volume contains a total of 39 papers. The following 28 selected titles are cited as those most clearly relevant to education: "A National Study of Teacher Educators and State Supervisors in Agricultural Education" (Foster, Horner); "A Profile of the Effective Vocational Agriculture Teacher" (Rheault, Miller); "Analysis of Needs:…

  5. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  6. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] Project: Technical Training for the Future of Texas. Navarro College/Dallas Community College District. Final Report for Year One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsak, Charles; McGlohen, Patti J.

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is a national lab for research on the fundamental forces and constituents of the universe. A major part of the research will involve an oval ring 54 miles in circumference through which superconducting magnets will steer two beams of protons in opposite directions. In response to the…

  7. Advances in dynamics and control of flexible spacecraft and space-based manipulations; Proceedings of the Symposium, ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX, Nov. 25-30, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Alberts, Thomas E.; Kakad, Yogendra P.

    Consideration is given to control formulations for vibration suppression of an active structure in slewing motions, the use if distributed sensing in control of large flexible spacecraft, an improved shooting method for solving minimum-time maneuver problems, and nonlinear slew maneuver dynamics of large flexible spacecrafts. Attention is also given to initial experiments in trusterless locomotion control of a free-flying robot, dynamic analysis to evaluate viscoelastic passive damping augmentation for the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System, initial experiments in cooperative manipulation from a moving platform, and intelligent pipelined control architecture for remote robotic applications.

  8. R&D Speaks in Junior High School Mathematics: A Research Seminar for Practitioners (Dallas, Texas, August 8-9, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    Presented is an account of a day-and-a-half seminar which was held for selected mathematics educators from six states. It was sponsored by the Regional Exchange (RX), a National Institute of Education (NIE) dissemination project headquartered at the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL). The seminar had two important purposes: (1) to…

  9. Selected Proceedings from the International Conference on the Career Development of Handicapped Individuals: Program Implementation. Volume 2 (3rd, Dallas, TX, November 19-21, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokaska, Charles J., Ed.

    The document contains 16 papers on program implementation in the career development of the handicapped, and is one of three volumes of selected papers presented at a November, 1981, international conference on the career development of handicapped individuals. Papers have the following titles and authors: "A Career Education Materials Development…

  10. The Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Reading; Yearbook of the Annual Meeting of the National Reading Conference (14th, Dallas, Texas, December 3-5, 1964).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Eric L., Ed.; Hafner, Lawrence E., Ed.

    Focusing on the philosophical and sociological bases of reading, the papers in this volume were drawn from the fourteenth annual meeting of the National Reading Conference held in 1964. Among the topics covered in the 27 papers are the following: the philosophy and sociology of reading; reading reform; adult literacy; paperback books; factors in…

  11. [Model of chemical risk assessment (D.L 25/2002), applied in 19 chemical industries of the Province of Bergamo].

    PubMed

    Santini, M; Leghissa, P; Riva, M M; Rosso, G L; Deleidi, G; Mosconi, G

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe a model for the evaluation of chemical risk, according to the legislative decree 25/2002, planned by U.O.O.M.L. "Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo", in collaboration with "Gruppo Industriali Chimici dell'Unione Industriali-Provincia di Bergamo" and applied in 19 Chemical Industries of the Province of Bergamo. The objective of the model is the rationalization of the procedures to ponder the levels of exposure and to value different typologies of risk using and manipulating chemical substances with the purpose to optimize the relationship among the attention for safety, workers health and the employment of resources.

  12. CCA Newsletters

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 Newsletter - message from the executive director emeritus - cyberbullying - gingertown dallas 2014 - dallas holiday party - midwest holiday ... 5k for cca - lily's dinner - stand up to bullying - chocolate festival - ryan's road - holiday parties CCA Fall ...

  13. 77 FR 285 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... 75201-2272: 1. Triumph Consolidated Cos., LLC, Dallas, Texas, to engage de novo through the establishment of Triumph CRA Holdings, LLC, Dallas, Texas, as a nonbanking subsidiary in lending activities...

  14. 78 FR 56192 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Status for Arabis georgiana (Georgia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ..., Housing, Chinese privet and Hydropower. Japanese honeysuckle. Portland Landing River Slopes....... Dallas/AL Timber harvest, China berrytree, Hydropower. Japanese honeysuckle, and kudzu. Durant Bend Dallas/AL Timber harvest......... Chinese privet and Japanese honeysuckle. Murphys Bluff Bridge Cahaba...

  15. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 71 - Responsible Officials

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Atlanta Regional Administrator, Dallas Regional Administrator, Chicago Regional Administrator, San... Apprenticeship, Chicago Regional Director, Office of Apprenticeship, San Francisco Administrator, Office of..., Chicago Regional Director, Dallas Regional Director, San Francisco Mine Safety and Health Administration...

  16. 77 FR 26769 - Educational Forum on Medical Device Reporting, Complaint Files, and Recalls, Corrections, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... public workshop is to provide information about FDA's Medical Device Quality Systems Regulation (QSR) to... Renaissance Dallas Hotel, 2222 Stemmons Freeway, Dallas, TX 75207. Directions and lodging information are...

  17. Austin, DFW and Houston Businesses Saved $145 Million with Energy Efficient buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (March 25, 2015) Three of Texas' major metropolitan areas are embracing energy efficiency to save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by meeting EPA's Energy Star requirements. Austin, Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston jointly have over 5

  18. Cholesterol Levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... diet or exercise routine. References American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. About ... Cholesterol_UCM_001220_Article.jsp American Heart Association [Internet]. Dallas (TX): American Heart Association Inc.; c2017. Good ...

  19. 75 FR 57952 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... be obtained from the National Information Center website at www.ffiec.gov/nic/ . Unless otherwise... Dallas (E. Ann Worthy, Vice President) 2200 North Pearl Street, Dallas, Texas 75201-2272: 1. Henderson...

  20. AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, 33rd, Dallas, TX, Apr. 13-15, 1992, Technical Papers. Pt. 5 - Design engineering/design optimization, materials, work-in-progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The conference focuses on recent advances in disciplines related to the analysis and design of aerospace structures. Topics discussed include damage tolerance of composites, computational structural mechanics, buckling/postbuckling of plates and stiffened panels, adaptive structures, spacecraft dynamics, and aeroelasticity. Other topics include unsteady aerodynamics, aerospace structural design optimization, modeling of material behavior, and ceramic matrix composites.

  1. Presupposti teorici per un progetto di insegnamento della traduzione dalla lingua straniera basato sull'analisi testuale (Theoretical Presuppositions for a Project to Teach Translation from a Foreign Language Based on Textual Analysis).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrakh, Livio

    1987-01-01

    Discusses an approach to translation based on textual linguistics. The student/translator first looks at the foreign language text as a whole, then analyzes its parts, and finally arrives at a new synthesis (the translation) that is comparable to the original text. (CFM)

  2. Fabrication, installation, and two-year evaluation of a 245 square meter linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic and thermal (PVT) concentrator system at Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW) Airport, Texas. Final technical report, Phase II and Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, M.J.; Muzzy, D.B.

    1985-02-01

    This final technical report summarizes the results of the fabrication, installation, and two-year evaluation of the first linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic and thermal (PVT) concentrator system ever deployed. The system is located on the Central Utility Plant at DFW Airport, Texas. The roof-mounted collector field provides 245 square meters of sun-tracking collector aperture area. The nominal 25 kilowatt peak electrical output of the system is used for plant lighting, while the nominal 120 kilowatt peak thermal output is used to preheat domestic water for the nearby AMFAC hotel. The system has performed efficiently and reliably over the full two-year operational period. Long-term system conversion efficiencies have been 7.7% sunlight-to-electricity, 39.1% sunlight-to-heat, 46.8% sunlight-to-total energy output. Each of these efficiency levels is thought to be the highest ever achieved by a commercial-scale photovoltaic system. System durability has also been excellent, with no detectable degradation in performance over the full operational period. In summary, this successful application experiment has verified the potential of the linear Frenel lens PVT system to reliably and efficiently deliver electricity and heat in commercial-scale applications.

  3. Presupposti teorici per un progetto di insegnamento della traduzione dalla lingua straniera basato sull'analisi testuale (Theoretical Presuppositions for a Project to Teach Translation from a Foreign Language Based on Textual Analysis).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrakh, Livio

    1987-01-01

    Discusses an approach to translation based on textual linguistics. The student/translator first looks at the foreign language text as a whole, then analyzes its parts, and finally arrives at a new synthesis (the translation) that is comparable to the original text. (CFM)

  4. "Stars Shine Bright Deep in the Heart of LDA." Poster Session Abstracts of the International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America (Dallas, Texas, March 6-9, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Steven C., Comp.

    This monograph brings together 16 one- to two-page abstracts from research poster sessions held at the March 1996 international conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America. The first section, addressing research on assessment and characteristics of students with learning disabilities, includes abstracts on the Woodcock-Johnson…

  5. Commentary on "Radiofrequency ablation of incidental benign small renal mass: outcomes and follow-up protocol." Tan YK, Best SL, Olweny E, Park S, Trimmer C, Cadeddu JA, Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas, TX.

    PubMed

    Meng, Maxwell V

    2013-01-01

    To review our 10-year experience with radiofrequency ablation, focusing on the outcomes for the incidental benign renal tumor. Tumor ablation is an alternative, minimally invasive approach for the treatment of small renal masses (SRMs), with published series appropriately emphasizing the outcomes for the renal cell carcinoma subset of treated tumors. However, similar to partial nephrectomy, approximately 20% of the SRMs are benign. The intermediate to long-term outcome of the incidentally ablated benign tumor and its appropriate follow-up protocol are unknown. All SRMs treated with temperature-based radiofrequency ablation from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed. Of a total of 280 enhancing SRMs biopsied at radiofrequency ablation, 47 were confirmed as benign tumors. Ablation success was defined as the lack of enhancement on the initial postablation axial imaging. Recurrence was defined as tumor growth and enhancement on follow-up axial imaging. Of the 47 benign tumors, 32 were treated percutaneously and 15 laparoscopically. The histologic biopsy finding was angiomyolipoma in 10 and oncocytoma in 37. The median tumor size was 2cm (range 1-3.6), and the mean follow-up was 45 months. No recurrences developed, and all lesions required only 1 treatment session. The median preoperative and postoperative glomerular filtration rate was 77ml/min/1.73m(2) (range 39-137) and 68ml/min/1.73m(2) (range 36-137). The present study was limited by its retrospective nature and small sample population. Radiofrequency ablation of SRMs<3.5cm, found to be benign on concurrent biopsy, can be efficaciously treated with a single treatment session. Long-term follow-up imaging might not be required if successful ablation is determined at the initial post-treatment cross-sectional imaging study. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The Private Sector/University Technology Alliance: Making It Work. Proceedings of a Conference of the National Council of University Research Administrators (Dallas, Texas, September 4-7, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freise, Earl J., Ed.

    The transfer of technology from U.S. research universities in cooperation with the private sector is addressed in proceedings of a National Council of University Research Administrators conference. The first discussion session, "New Technology from University Research and Development (R&D)," examines the university research…

  7. Commentary on "effective testicular germ cell tumor therapy on renal function." Cost NG, Adibi M, Lubahn JD et al, Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX: Urology 2012;80:641.

    PubMed

    Richie, Jerome

    2013-02-01

    To assess the pre- and post-therapy glomerular filtration rate in patients with testicular germ cell tumors to determine its effect on the natural history of renal function. We reviewed an institutional database of patients with testicular germ cell tumor, with pre- and post-therapy serum creatinine levels available. The renal function was estimated using a calculated glomerular filtration rate. We compared the patients treated without chemotherapy (orchiectomy with or without radiotherapy or retroperitoneal lymph node dissection) with those who received systemic chemotherapy. We analyzed the data for the outcome of new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 between these groups. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed and compared using a log-rank test. A total of 144 patients were reviewed. The testicular germ cell tumor stage distribution was stage I in 78 (54.2%), stage II in 28 (19.4%), and stage III in 38 (26.4%). Overall, the median creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate at diagnosis was 0.9mg/dL (range 0.5-1.5) and 104.0mL/min/1.73m(2) (range 58.7-235), respectively. Of the 144 patients, 102 (70.8%) had CKD stage 0-1, 41 (28.5%) stage 2, and 1 (0.7%) stage 3. The median creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate at the last follow-up visit was 1.0mg/dL (range 0.6-2.6) and 95.5mL/min/1.73m(2) (range 31.5-167.6), respectively. This difference between the pre- and post-therapy estimated glomerular filtration rate was significant (P<0.01). A total of 81 patients (56.3%) received chemotherapy (median 4 cycles, range 1-12), and 63 (43.7%) were treated without chemotherapy. Of the 81 patients who received chemotherapy, 8 (9.9%) developed new-onset CKD 3 compared with none in the nonchemotherapy group (P =0.01). Patients with testicular germ cell tumor receiving chemotherapy experienced a significant decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate and had a significantly increased risk of developing CKD stage 3 compared with those treated without chemotherapy. These findings offer insight into the long-term risks of testicular germ cell tumor survivorship and will be useful in counseling patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. L'inglese per gli italiani; un corso programmato autodidattico realizzato dalla Britannica. Laboratorio Linguistico Individuale Anglotutor [English for Italians; A Self-Instructional Programmed Course developed by Encyclopaedia Britannica].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    This eight-volume audiolingual course in programmed English for Italian students appears with instructions and grammatical explanations in Italian and numerous illustrations. Special attention is given to contrastive pronunciation problems. The materials, intended for use on the beginning level, are accompanied by tapes. (AMM)

  9. Proceedings of Selected Research Paper Presentations at the Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology and Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (11th, Dallas, Texas, February 1-5, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael R., Ed.; Frey, Diane, Ed.

    The 46 papers is this volume represent some of the most current thinking in educational communications and technology. Individual papers address the following topics: gender differences in the selection of elective computer science courses and in the selection of non-traditional careers; instruction for individuals with different cognitive styles;…

  10. Proceedings for the Annual Meeting of the Association of University Evening Colleges on the Evening College: University and Community Relations (27th, Dallas, Texas, October 24-28, 1965).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Thomas J.

    Proceedings of the 1965 convention of the Association of University Evening Colleges contain a presentation on university and community relations as observed by the evening director at Loyola University of the South, a summary of discussion on the problems and prospects of evening divisions, discussion sessions on special interests (womens…

  11. The Effects of Blast Trauma (Impulse Noise) on Hearing: A Parametric Study. Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-21

    Callier Centw Vor Comamunicat.on Disorders The Universit.v o" i’as 4t Dallas Tfiai•, T,’xas 75235 App,’,Je, foc pitblic ieleas; distrib;rtion is unliniitd...applicable) Communication Disorders I 6c. ADDRESS (Giy, State, and ZIPCode) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State. and ZIP Code) The University of Texas at Dallas Dallas

  12. 78 FR 18806 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ..., TX, Dallas/Fort Worth Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 35C, ILS RWY 35C (CAT II), ILS RWY 35C (CAT III), ILS RWY 35C (SA CAT I), Amdt 2 Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, Dallas/Fort Worth Intl, RNAV (GPS) RWY 35C, Amdt 3...

  13. 77 FR 26549 - Notice of Proposed Administrative Settlement Pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. DATES: Comments must be submitted on or before June... settlement are available for public inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. A copy of the proposed settlement may be obtained from Lance Nixon at, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733 or...

  14. Anthropometry of Law Enforcement Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-10

    Little Rock IOWA OKLAHOMA Des Moines Oklahoma City Cedar Rapids Tulsa MINNESOTA TEXAS St. Paul Houston Police Academy Minneapolis Harris County...County Sheriffs Department SOUTH DAKOTA Rosharon, Texas State Correctional Facility Sioux Falls Lubbock Police Department Rapid City ARIZONA...Maricopa County Jail DALLAS, TEXAS Dallas Police Department South East Substation Northern Substation Fort Worth Police Department Dallas

  15. 47 CFR 90.614 - Segments of the 806-824/851-869 MHz band for non-border areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Crenshaw, Cullman, Dale, Dallas, DeKalb, Elmore, Escambia, Etowah, Fayette, Franklin, Geneva, Greene, Hale..., Seminole, Spalding, Stephens, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Tattnall, Taylor, Telfair, Terrell...

  16. 76 FR 6050 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... ILS OR LOC RWY 17C, ILS RWY 17C (CAT II), Intl. ILS RWY 17C (CAT III), Amdt 9 10-Mar-11 TX Dallas-Fort... Worth... Dallas-Fort Worth 0/3744 1/19/11 ILS OR LOC RWY 17L, ILS RWY 17L (CAT II), Intl. ILS RWY 17L (CAT III), Amdt 5B 10-Mar-11 TX Dallas-Fort Worth... Dallas-Fort Worth 0/3746 1/19/11 ILS OR LOC RWY...

  17. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  18. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  19. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  20. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  1. 7 CFR 249.26 - SFMNP information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 903, Denver, Colorado 80204. (7) Alaska, American Samoa, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho..., Dallas, Texas 75242. (6) Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South...

  2. 76 FR 22680 - Procurement List; Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Distribution Center, 1801 Exchange Park, Waco, TX. NPA: Statewide Consolidated Community Development Corporation, Inc., Beaumont, TX. Contracting Activity: AAFES--Army & Air Force Exchange Service, Dallas, TX...

  3. [Parasitism of passion fruit bugs in Brazil by Hexacladia smithii Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae)].

    PubMed

    Baldin, Edson L L; Fujihara, Ricardo T; Boiça, Arlindo L; Almeida, Maria C de

    2010-01-01

    We describe the new association of Hexacladia smithii (Ashmead) parasitizing two passion fruit bugs, Holhymenia histrio (Fabricius) and Anisoscelis foliacea marginella (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Coreidae), in Brazil.

  4. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, Feb. 3, 1934. FRONT VIEW. - SOUTH ELEVATION - Summerfield College, Music Building, Main & College Streets, Summerfield, Dallas County, AL

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey W. N. Manning, Photographer, March 23, 1934. FRONT VIEW. - SOUTHWEST - Summerfield College, Music Building, Main & College Streets, Summerfield, Dallas County, AL

  6. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 173 - List of Contractors for Whom Certification Is Required

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Electronics, 649 Lawrence Drive, Newbury Park, CA 91320 Unisys Corporation, One Unisys Place, Detroit, MI...: *Continental Electronics Manufacturing Company, Dallas, TX *Firm suspended as of July 6, 1988....

  7. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 173 - List of Contractors for Whom Certification Is Required

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Electronics, 649 Lawrence Drive, Newbury Park, CA 91320 Unisys Corporation, One Unisys Place, Detroit, MI...: *Continental Electronics Manufacturing Company, Dallas, TX *Firm suspended as of July 6, 1988....

  8. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 173 - List of Contractors for Whom Certification Is Required

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Electronics, 649 Lawrence Drive, Newbury Park, CA 91320 Unisys Corporation, One Unisys Place, Detroit, MI...: *Continental Electronics Manufacturing Company, Dallas, TX *Firm suspended as of July 6, 1988....

  9. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 173 - List of Contractors for Whom Certification Is Required

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Electronics, 649 Lawrence Drive, Newbury Park, CA 91320 Unisys Corporation, One Unisys Place, Detroit, MI...: *Continental Electronics Manufacturing Company, Dallas, TX *Firm suspended as of July 6, 1988....

  10. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 173 - List of Contractors for Whom Certification Is Required

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Electronics, 649 Lawrence Drive, Newbury Park, CA 91320 Unisys Corporation, One Unisys Place, Detroit, MI...: *Continental Electronics Manufacturing Company, Dallas, TX *Firm suspended as of July 6, 1988....

  11. Adult Education and Family Literacy Reform Act. Hearing on S. 797 Authorizing Funds for Fiscal Years 1996 through 2005 to Improve and Reform Literacy Services for Adults and Families, before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This Congressional hearing discussed the issue of reform of adult education and family literacy legislation. Testimony includes oral and written statements of U.S. senators and individuals representing the following: U.S. Department of Education; National Institute for Literacy; Dallas Can! Academy, Dallas, Texas; Pima County Adult Education,…

  12. Blast Trauma: The Effects on Hearing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    AD-Ai54 529 BLAST TRAUMA: THE EFFECTS ON HEARING(U TEXAS UNIV RT 1/1. DALLAS CALLIER CENTER FOR COMMUNICATION DISORDERS SS R P HAMERNIK ET AL. APR 81...TASK Callier Center for Commnuication Disorders AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS University of Texas, Dallas 62773A.3E162773A819.00.039 Richardson, TX 75080

  13. A Chinchilla Restraint System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    AD-A167 438 A CHINCHILLA RESTRAINT SYSTEM() TEXAS UNIV AT DALLAS l1/1 CALLIER CENTER FOR COMMUNICATION DISORDERS HARGETT ET AL. JAN 86 USRARL-96-1...86-1 0 A CHINCHILLA RESTRAINT SYSTEM By C.E. Hargett, Jr. / CALLIER CENTER FOR COMMUNICATION DISORDERS University of Texas at Dallas James H

  14. 78 FR 67147 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... the United States. Each notice is available for inspection at the Federal Reserve Bank indicated. The.... A. Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas (E. Ann Worthy, Vice President) 2200 North Pearl Street, Dallas...

  15. 75 FR 36546 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... relations, Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution control, Water supply..., 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. 4. Hand Delivery or Courier: Deliver your comments to Alima... Planning and Permitting Division, EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733....

  16. 77 FR 3152 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation-by-Reference of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... relations, Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution control, Water supply..., Multimedia Planning and Permitting Division, EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. 4..., 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID No....

  17. 77 FR 29231 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... relations, Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution control, Water supply..., 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. 4. Hand Delivery or Courier: Deliver your comments to Alima... Planning and Permitting Division, EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733....

  18. 77 FR 46964 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... lands, Intergovernmental relations, Penalties, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution... Planning and Permitting Division, EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. 4. Hand... Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. Instructions: Direct your comments to Docket ID No....

  19. Leadership in the Context of Conflict: A Response to Implied Allegations of Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    In December 2004, the "Amarillo Globe News" reported on a "Dallas Morning News" story that analyzed state-mandated test scores from across Texas (Benton & Hacker, 2004; Wilson, 2004). According the "Amarillo Globe News," "the Dallas Morning News" study implicated Sunrise Elementary School, in Amarillo,…

  20. Project Zero Reject Manual: Strategies in Child Find.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Deborah F. Carpenter; And Others

    The report describes Project Zero Reject, a cooperative effort between the Dallas (TX) Independent School District and the Dallas County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center to locate handicapped children not receiving educational services and to develop a computerized information system for planning regarding these children. Awareness efforts…

  1. 77 FR 14784 - Notice of Proposed Administrative Settlement Pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... comments received will be available for public inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733... additional background information relating to the settlement are available for public inspection at 1445 Ross..., 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733 or by calling (214) 665-7480. Comments should reference...

  2. 76 FR 13615 - Notice of Proposed Administrative Settlement Pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... comments received will be available for public inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733... additional background information relating to the settlement are available for public inspection at 1445 Ross..., 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733 or by calling (214) 665-7111. Comments should reference...

  3. 77 FR 13125 - Proposed Administrative Settlement Pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    .... The Agency's response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at 1445 Ross... for public inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. A copy of the proposed settlement may be obtained from Robert Werner, Enforcement Officer, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733...

  4. Project Zero Reject Manual: Strategies in Child Find.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Deborah F. Carpenter; And Others

    The report describes Project Zero Reject, a cooperative effort between the Dallas (TX) Independent School District and the Dallas County Mental Health Mental Retardation Center to locate handicapped children not receiving educational services and to develop a computerized information system for planning regarding these children. Awareness efforts…

  5. Business Advice Meets Academic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    The University of North Texas at Dallas (UNT-Dallas) was conceived 10 years ago as a public institution along tried-and-true lines--a comprehensive metropolitan university meant to serve a diverse student population and to improve the economic outlook of a part of the city that prosperity has left behind. But that was before management consultants…

  6. Wood Sculpture Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Whenever possible, the author tries to incorporate the work of artists who are included in the collection of nearby museums. The school is close to the Dallas area and visiting the Dallas Museum of Arts (DMA) is in the realm possibility. The DMA has a sculpture in their collection by artist David Bates called "Seated Man #4." The fact…

  7. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Colorado Jefferson County Airport. Carlsbad, California McClellan-Palomar Airport. Dallas, Texas Dallas..., Colorado Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Fresno, California Fresno... MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. McKinney, Texas Collin County Regional Airport. Melbourne,...

  8. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Colorado Jefferson County Airport. Carlsbad, California McClellan-Palomar Airport. Dallas, Texas Dallas..., Colorado Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Fresno, California Fresno... MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. McKinney, Texas Collin County Regional Airport. Melbourne,...

  9. 77 FR 65380 - Notice of Proposed Administrative Settlement Pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... received will be available for public inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. DATES... additional background information relating to the settlement are available for public inspection at 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202-2733. A copy of the proposed settlement may be obtained from Stephen Capuyan...

  10. The Value of 20th Century Technology in the 21st

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Error, Darise

    2003-01-01

    In Fall 2000, Dallas Teleconferences approached a prominent higher education organization about producing a series of satellite teleconferences for them. The intended recipient was complimentary of Dallas' teleconferencing endeavors, but representatives suggested that teleconferencing was an old medium employing antiquated technology. They…

  11. Eight Years of Special Education Research in a Large Urban School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisman, Karen Cortell; Macy, Daniel J.

    The authors consider the special education research studies conducted for the Special Education Department of the Dallas Independent School District. The Dallas evaluation model utilized a modification of the CIPP model which delineated four kinds of evaluation information: context (which describes the state of the world before intervention),…

  12. 75 FR 33757 - Major Capital Investment Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ..., Ontario Ballroom). 2. Wednesday, June 30, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., PST, 299 Second Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 (Courtyard Marriott San Francisco Downtown Hotel, Rincon Hill Ballroom). 3. Monday, July 12, 2010, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., CST, 300 Reunion Blvd, Dallas, TX 75207 (Hyatt Regency Dallas Hotel, Reunion...

  13. Steroids: To Test or to Educate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In February 2005, The Dallas Morning News published a multipart series on steroid use among high school students in Texas. The paper's four-month investigation was wide-ranging, but shined a particular spotlight upon alleged abuses in the 13,700-student Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District, north of Dallas. Use of steroids and other…

  14. Leadership in the Context of Conflict: A Response to Implied Allegations of Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    In December 2004, the "Amarillo Globe News" reported on a "Dallas Morning News" story that analyzed state-mandated test scores from across Texas (Benton & Hacker, 2004; Wilson, 2004). According the "Amarillo Globe News," "the Dallas Morning News" study implicated Sunrise Elementary School, in Amarillo,…

  15. 75 FR 19974 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisition of Shares of Bank or Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... Dallas (E. Ann Worthy, Vice President) 2200 North Pearl Street, Dallas, Texas 75201-2272: 1. Friedman Fleischer & Lowe Capital Partners III, LP; Friedman Fleischer & Lowe Parallel Fund III, LP; FFL Individual Partners III, LP; FFL Executive Partners III, LP; Friedman Fleischer & Lowe GP III, LP; Friedman...

  16. 78 FR 30964 - Pipeline Safety: Workshop on Public Awareness Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... the Hyatt Regency North Dallas hotel in Richardson, Texas. The workshop serves as an opportunity to... Regency North Dallas hotel, 701 East Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75081. Hotel reservations must be made by contacting the hotel directly. Hotel reservations can be made under the ``Public...

  17. VELA Network Evaluation and Automatic Processing Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-31

    VELA NETWORK EVALUATION AND AUTOMATIC PROCESSING RESEARCH William H. Swindell Texas Instruments, Incorporated Prepared for: Air Force Technical...Incorporated Equipment Group Dallas, Texas 75222 CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS Advanced Research Projects Agency Nuclear Monitor mg... RESEARCH 1. D D TEXAS INSTRUMENTS INCORPORATED Equipment Group Post Office Box 6015 Dallas, Texas 75222 Prepared for AIR FORCE TECHNICAL

  18. 31 CFR Appendix B to Subpart A of... - Internal Revenue Service

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Box 795, Ben Franklin Station, Washington, DC 20044 Walk-In Address Room 1621, 1111 Constitution... 5138, E:QMS:D, New York, NY 10163 Walk-In Address 11th Floor, 110 W. 44th Street, New York, NY... Street, Dallas, TX 75242 Walk-In Address 10th Floor, Rm. 10B37, 1100 Commerce Street, Dallas,...

  19. A University-Wide Approach to Teacher Education: School of Education Autonomy Abjured.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clifton S.

    The University of Texas at Dallas's teacher education program involves a university-wide approach. Unlike most other universities, there is no formal college or school of education at Dallas. Instead, faculty with the appropriate education and experience hold appointments in the academic disciplines and teach courses in professional education and…

  20. The Logistical Tracking System (LTS) Five Years Later: What Has Been Accomplished?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valcik, Nicolas A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to discuss development of the Logistical Tracking System (LTS)1 and evaluate the changes in processes and procedures at the University of Texas-Dallas (UT-Dallas) that were due to implementation of a new type of technology. The chapter elaborates on the positive and negative aspects of designing and constructing a…

  1. 76 FR 56455 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... voting shares of the University National Bank of Lawrence, Lawrence, Kansas. C. Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas (E. Ann Worthy, Vice President) 2200 North Pearl Street, Dallas, Texas 75201-2272: 1. Integrity Bancshares, Inc., Houston Texas; to become a bank holding company by acquiring 100 percent of the voting...

  2. Business Advice Meets Academic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    The University of North Texas at Dallas (UNT-Dallas) was conceived 10 years ago as a public institution along tried-and-true lines--a comprehensive metropolitan university meant to serve a diverse student population and to improve the economic outlook of a part of the city that prosperity has left behind. But that was before management consultants…

  3. EPA Proposes to Move DFW Area into Severe Ozone Category

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Feb. 10, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed to reclassify the Dallas-Fort Worth area (DFW) as being in severe nonattainment of the original 8-hour ozone standard of 84 parts per billion. The proposal will be publ

  4. Steroids: To Test or to Educate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFee, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In February 2005, The Dallas Morning News published a multipart series on steroid use among high school students in Texas. The paper's four-month investigation was wide-ranging, but shined a particular spotlight upon alleged abuses in the 13,700-student Grapevine-Colleyville Independent School District, north of Dallas. Use of steroids and other…

  5. 75 FR 2544 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in Permissible Nonbanking Activities or to Acquire Companies that...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... 75201-2272: 1. One World Holdings, Inc., Dallas, Texas; to engage de novo through its subsidiary, One World Asset Management, Inc., Dallas, Texas, in lending activities, pursuant to section 225.28(b)(1)...

  6. EPA recognizes Texas AandM Agrilife

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Oct. 13, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recognized Texas A&M Agrilife Research Extension Center at Dallas during the 2015 WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition in Las Vegas, Nev. The center rec

  7. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  8. Social Security Disability Reviews: The Human Costs. Joint Hearing before the Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate and the Subcommittee on Social Security of the Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session (Part 2 - Dallas, Texas).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Ways and Means.

    This document provides transcripts of witness testimony and prepared statements from the second of three Congressional hearings called to examine at the local level the administration of the social security disability review program. Opening statements by Congressmen Martin J. Frost and J. J. Pickle, and Senator John Heinz are presented. Testimony…

  9. Interstate Conference on Water Problems/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Workshops on Water Project Financing Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, Chicago, Illinois, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas, and Seattle, Washington on October - December 1984 and Water Project Financing Roundtable Held at Washington, DC on April 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    Servicios a la Navegacion en el Espacio Aereo Mexicano " .",’......’.’... .’........ ’.-’e ’’.-..’ ’e... ... ’._ ".*. .. . "* . . ’%~.- 4...la Navegacion en el Espacio Aereo Mexicano National Weather Service United States Coast Guard FAA, System Plans and Programs Division, AT-100’ FAA...Servicios a la Navegacion en el Espacio Aereo Mexicano. ( United States Coast Guard FAA, Office of Aviation Safety, ASF-1 FAA, System Plans and

  10. The Gamma-Ray Laser Project: Proof of the Feasibility of Coherent and Incoherent Schemes for Pumping a Gamma-Ray Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    the Tuning and Stimulation f Nuclear Radiation, University of Texas at Dallas, Report *GRL- 01, Office of Naval Research , October 1986. 21. W. J...A177 449 THE GANN-RAY LASER PROJECT: PROOF OF THE FESIBLITY i OF COHERENT RO INC. (U) TEXAS UNIV AT DALLAS RICHARDSON CENTER FOR QUANTUM ELECTRONIC...8217. . ’ + ,+,-,.",.’ ’.," ’ -. 4.’ ." "’ 1..,+.,-•., , , ,,- UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS/ THE GAMMA-RAY LASER PROJECT October-December 1986 QureVyRp6

  11. Regional Planning Commission of Southeast Louisiana Receives EPA Brownfields Cleanup Grant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced the Regional Planning Commission of Southeast La. as a recipient of $400,000 grant to assess, clean and redevelop contaminated properties in the local communit

  12. Tell EPA About Your Green Infrastructure Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Aug. 13, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a poster contest to highlight green infrastructure and low-impact development projects in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas. Did your business bu

  13. 77 FR 1950 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ... Glass Gainesville, TX. Companies Texas, Wind Turbine Blade Division. 80,512 Pilgrim's Pride Dallas, TX... Birds Eye Foods, LLC, Fulton, NY February 13, 2010. Fulton, NY Plant, Pinnacle Foods Group LLC, W L...

  14. 76 FR 65534 - Notice of Lodging of Modification of Consent Decree Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    .... EPA Region 6, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, Texas 75202 (contact Jonathan Bull). During the public comment... per page reproduction cost) payable to the U.S. Treasury, or, if by e-mail or fax, forward a check...

  15. DWD International, LCC Agrees to Address RCRA Violations in Texas

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (May 28, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently issued a consent agreement and final order to DWD International, LLC in Houston, Texas. The company violated laws under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) relat

  16. EPA Directs Additional Safety Measures for San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Feb. 17, 2016) Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced new safety requirements for the temporary armored cap at the San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund Site in Harris County, Texas. EPA has directed both Internat

  17. Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Seeks Public Comment on Priorities for $139.6 million

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Aug. 19, 2015) The Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (Council) recently released a draft Initial Funded Priorities List that would fund approximately $139.6 million in restoration activities. The funds are derived from the recent se

  18. Interactive Video: Why Trainers Are Tuning In.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Richard

    1982-01-01

    The uses of interactive video are explored through various case studies. They include cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for the Dallas American Heart Association, Ford Motor Company dealership training, employee training at the Los Angeles Plutonium Facility, and others. (CT)

  19. EPA Regional Administrator Tours Mining Areas with New Mexico Officials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (July 24, 2015) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regional Administrator Ron Curry toured areas of New Mexico and the Navajo Nation where progress in cleaning up legacy contamination from uranium mines is being made. He was joined

  20. Businesses Find Savings in Combined Heat and Power Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Oct. 30, 2015) Businesses and organizations across the country are saving money and reducing their environmental footprint by using combined heat and power (CHP) technology in their buildings. These highly efficient systems simultaneously