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Sample records for chip world congress

  1. The Eye and The Chip World Congress on Artificial Vision

    SciTech Connect

    Philip C Hessburg MD

    2005-03-01

    Editorial PCHessburg, MD, J Rizzo; The FDA's role in medical device clinical studies of human subjects J Saviola; In vitro activation of retinal cells JFRizzo III, RJJensen; Responses of rabbit retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation with an epiretinal electrode RJJensen, ORZiv, JRizzo; Creating a meaningful visual perception in blind volunteers by optic nerve stimulation MEBrelin,FDuret, BGerard, JDelbeke,CVeraart; A preparation for studying electrical stimulation of the retina in vivo in rat MSBaig-Silva,CDHathcock,JRHetling; Possible sources of neuroprotection following subretinal silicon chip implantation in RCS rats MTPardue,MJPhillips,HYin,AFernandes,YCheng,AYChow,SLBall;Comparison of electrically evoked cortical potential thresholds generated with subretinal or suprachoroidal placement of a microelectrode array in the rabbit YYamauchi, LM Franco, DJJackson, JFNaber, ROZiv, JFRizzoIII, HJKaplan, VEnzmann; Transscleral implantation and neurophysiological testing of subretinal polymide film electrodes in the domestic pig in visual prosthesis development HGSachs, TSchanze, U Brunner, HSailer, CWeisenack; Long-term stimulation by active epiretinal implants in normal and RCDI dogs DGuven, JDWeiland,GFujji,BVMech,MMahadevappa,RGreenspan,RRoisenblat,GQiu, LLaBree,XWang, DHinton, MSHumayun; How the retinal network reacts to epiretinal stimulation to form the prosthetic visual imput ot the cortex NPCottaris,SDElfar; Tunable retina encoders for retina implants REckmiller,DNeumann,OBaruth; Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis DPalanker, A Vankow, PHuie,SBaccus; Fabrication of implantable microeletrode arrays by laser cutting of silicone rubber and platinum foil MSchuettler, SStiess,BVKing GJSuaning; A method of technical equipment for an acute human trial to evaluate retinal implant technologyRHornig, TLaube, PWalter,MVelikay-Parel,NBornfeld,MFeucht, HAkguel, GRossler, NAlteheld,DLutkeNotarp, JWyatt, GRichard; Visual acuity measurement

  2. EDITORIAL: The Eye and the Chip: World Congress on Artificial Vision 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessburg, Philip C.; Rizzo, Joseph

    2005-03-01

    The Eye and the Chip meeting, hosted every other year by the Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology, is a collegial exercise designed to move forward the day when neuro-prosthetic devices afford some level of useful vision to persons now blind from a variety of causes. Our guiding principles are to have an all-inclusive meeting and to permit ample time for discussion among the researchers. Given the growing body of researchers in this exciting field and the significant progress that has been made, our last two meetings of the Eye and the Chip have required three days each to accommodate all who attended. The Eye and the Chip meeting has been successful because of adherence to these guiding principles and to the fact that all three meetings have attracted at least two team members from every research group in the world that is working on developing a visual prosthetic. The model used by the Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology is one used previously in the early days of intraocular lens implantation work. It empowers those sophisticated in the art, working in the field, to interface effectively with research leaders they may or may not have met, who are also heavily involved in the work. Each member of the invited faculty is given a precisely controlled 20-minute period of time to present work of his/her academic department or corporate research laboratory. Following this, there is a full 10-minute discussion with questions coming from the 34 members of the invited faculty, as well as from attendees from the general public, press, engineering, ophthalmology, etc. Often, insights unfold in these discussion periods that are not only of profound significance scientifically, but absolutely fascinating in their contributions to understanding and to the art. We have encouraged patients to attend. The contributions of the patients have helped keep the presentations better grounded. The patients reasonably ask if the researchers understand their needs, and the responses from the

  3. The 100th FDI World Dental Congress.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C A

    2013-05-01

    The 100th FDI World Dental Congress was held in Hong Kong from 29 August to 1 September 2012. This article gives a report on the congress, which saw the first FDI World Oral Health Recognition Award being given to Professor Zhu Chen, the Minister of Health in China. During the congress, both the FDI Vision 2020 project and the Global Caries Initiative website were launched.

  4. World Energy Council 16. Congress review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, T.J.; Kim, C.S.; Jennings, J.S.; Fresco, P.; Nasu, S.; Baker, J.

    1996-03-01

    The sixteenth World Energy Council (WEC) Congress was hosted in Tokyo, Japan, October 8--13, 1995, with a theme of ``Energy for Our Common World: What will the future ask of us?`` Participants in the congress examined several fundamental issues of these times: hot to provide the energy services for an increasing world population, especially in developing countries; hot to meet local, regional, and global environmental and social concerns; how to adapt to changing markets and institutions; how to respond to diversified transportation and other end use patterns reflecting human behavior; how to deal with the emerging interdependence of energy markets; and what action to be pursued individually and collectively. This article summarizes the highlights of the congress, and includes an overview of the World Energy Council (WEC), a synopsis of the events, summaries of the technical program division addresses, and a summary of the congress conclusions.

  5. World Geothermal Congress WGC-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses materials and results of the World Geothermal Congress that was held in Melbourne (Australia) from April 19 to April 25, 2015. Information on the extent and technological features of utilization of geothermal resources for heat supply and power production, as well as in other economic areas, is given. A stable growth in the capacity and number of geothermal power systems that is determined by ecological cleanliness, economic efficiency, and the highest (among renewable energy sources) indicators of installed capacity utilization is shown. It was noted that combined schemes of geothermal power plants (GPPs), such as turbine units of different type (binary units, units with one or two separation pressures, etc.), have become more frequently used to increase the efficiency of utilization of geothermal heat carrier. Actual data determining room heating systems with the total worldwide capacity of nearly 50000 MW thermal (MWt) as the most currently significant segment of consumption of geothermal waters are given. In addition, geothermal resources are also utilized in soil pumps, balneological and sports basins, greenhouse complexes, and other manufactures. It was noted that geological studies were carried out in more than 40 countries, with the development of methods of simulation of tanks for the existing and new geothermal fields. Trends of development and the role of geothermal power engineering in the energy supply of many countries are shown. It was shown that prospects for the development of geothermal power generation are significantly associated with utilization of low-temperature geothermal sources in binary power generating units, as well as with the increase in installed capacity of operating geothermal power plants (GPPs) without drilling additional wells, i.e., by using waste geothermal heat carrier in binary-cycle or combined-cycle power plants. The article provides data on a pilot binary power unit at Pauzhetka GPP and on a

  6. World Space Congress: a vision quest.

    PubMed

    Iannotta, Ben

    2003-01-01

    The World Space Congress (WSC) in October, 2002, brought together luminaries, aerospace engineers, students, and scientists to discuss strategies for reviving the world's space agency. WSC lectures and plenary sessions focused on future research in space. Among topics discussed are the use of the Hubble Space Telescope to scan for habitable planets and obtain data about the beginning of the universe, new weather satellites, planetary protection from comets or asteroids, exploration and establishment of colonies on the Moon and Mars, medical advances, the role of space exploration in the world economy.

  7. World Space Congress: a vision quest.

    PubMed

    Iannotta, Ben

    2003-01-01

    The World Space Congress (WSC) in October, 2002, brought together luminaries, aerospace engineers, students, and scientists to discuss strategies for reviving the world's space agency. WSC lectures and plenary sessions focused on future research in space. Among topics discussed are the use of the Hubble Space Telescope to scan for habitable planets and obtain data about the beginning of the universe, new weather satellites, planetary protection from comets or asteroids, exploration and establishment of colonies on the Moon and Mars, medical advances, the role of space exploration in the world economy. PMID:12524711

  8. World with Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Although we are well advised to look at the future 1 day at a time, we have seen in the chapters of this book, and they necessarily could cover only a selection on the features and applications of those tiny chips, that their potential continues to grow at the exceptional rates of the past. However, the new commitment has to be towards Sustainable Nanoelectronics, guided by creating sensing, computing, memory, and communication functions, which move just a few electrons per operation, each operation consuming energy less than one or a few femtojoule, less than any of the 1014 synapses in our brains. At these energy levels, chips can serve everywhere, making them ubiquitous, pervasive, certainly wireless, and often energy-autonomous. The expected six Billion users of these chips in 2020, through their mobile, intelligent companions, will benefit from global and largely equal access to information, education, knowledge, skills, and care.

  9. 1991 SOLAR WORLD CONGRESS - VOLUME 1, PART I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The four-volume proceedings document the 1991 Solar World Congress (the biennial congress of the International Solar Energy Society) in Denver, CO, August 19-23, 1991. Volume 1 is dedicated to solar electricity, biofuels, and renewable resources. Volume 2 contains papers on activ...

  10. The World Congress of Herpetology and Animal Conservation: Excerpts from the 6th World Congress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, T.W.J.; Hero, J.-M.; Jehle, R.; Kraus, F.; Muths, E.; Reed, R.N.; Vogt, R.C.; Hodl, W.

    2010-01-01

    The World Congress of Herpetology (WCH, http://www.worldcongressofherpetology.org/) is a relatively young organization as far as august herpetological societies go. It was formed in 1982, the year of the 25th meeting of the Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles (founded in 1958), which itself is a relative youngster when compared to organizations such as the American Society for Ichthyology and Herpetology (founded in 1913) or Die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Herpetologie und Terrarienkunde e. V. (originally founded in 1918 under a different name). Despite its youth, the WCH has accomplished much during its relatively short existence. Arguably the greatest accomplishment of the WCH was to provide the venue at the first meeting of the Congress, held in 1989 at Canterbury, UK, where numerous amphibian biologists shared tales of enigmatic declines and disappearances of amphibian study species. Undoubtedly these exchanges sparked the formation of the Declining Amphibian Populations Task Force, providing impetus for the establishment of IUCN's Global Amphibian Assessment. This assessment, along with other research, in turn confirmed that amphibians are declining at a global scale and are more threatened than any other vertebrate class comprehensively assessed to date (Houlahan et al., 2000; Stuart et al., 2004).

  11. Reflecting on the 2007 World Environmental Education Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Sisitka, Heila

    2007-01-01

    What motivates more than 800 people from 101 countries around the world to meet at a World Environmental Education Congress (WEEC)? And how does one make the most of such an incredible gathering of people, cultures, thoughts and minds? What did people learn and was it worthwhile? These are just some of the questions that have been chasing through…

  12. NASA NASA CONNECT: Special World Space Congress. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research Center.

    NASA CONNECT is an annual series of free integrated mathematics, science, and technology instructional distance learning programs for students in grades 5-8. This video presents the World Space Congress 2002, the meeting of the decade for space professionals. Topics discussed range from the discovery of distant planets to medical advancements,…

  13. World Petroleum Congress, 1983: contemporary questions for a new century

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-14

    The present glut and lower prices took some of the importance away from the 11th World Petroleum Congress in London which ended the first week of September. Only 2522 delegates from 69 countries participated, compared to 4331 attendees at the 1979 Congress in Bucharest. Projections were more modest and cautious, but the general message was that, barring the unexpected, we have enough oil to last until the end of this century, while coal, nuclear power, and hydroelectricity will increase their shares of the world's energy diet. Among the conclusions are: (1) the new oil will cost more to produce in the future; estimated oil industry cash needs will be US $200-billion (1983 US dollars) by the year 2000; (2) the need for alternative energy sources becomes increasingly critical for most of the world's countries; (3) a further concern about estimates of world petroleum availability is the present limited discovery rate relative to production; and (4) there is an immense quantity of conventional crude oil in the world, but our capacity for consumption is perfectly capable of challenging that supply. This issue includes the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for September 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  14. The 5th World Environmental Education Congress, 2009: A Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob; Sauve, Lucie; Briere, Laurence; Niblett, Blair; Root, Emily

    2010-01-01

    This paper contextualizes the 5th World Environmental Education Congress, discusses the theoretical underpinnings of the Congress theme "Earth Our Common Home," and relates this theorizing to the research project that was woven through the Congress. We provide a rationale for engaging in this research project, as an invitation for Congress…

  15. Educating Engineers for World Development. Proceedings of a World Congress (Estes Park, Colorado, June 10-12, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, J. Morley, Ed.; Collins, W. Leighton, Ed.

    This report comprises papers commissioned for the World Congress on Educating Engineers for World Development, sponsored by the International Division of the American Society for Engineering Education, and held in Colorado in June 1975. The purpose of the Congress was to bring about significant changes in the education of engineers and in the…

  16. Introduction: "The Napkin Area and its Dermatoses" symposium proceedings, World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, September 2013.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Dr Antonio Torrelo, President of the 12(th) World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, introduces the supplement as providing an opportunity for readers to access the lectures and related presentations delivered at the World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology held September 25-27, 2013, in Madrid. PMID:27311777

  17. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    PubMed

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  18. ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer And European Post-Chicago Melanoma/Skin Cancer Meeting.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2016-09-01

    We present sessions on the latest trials and treatments for colorectal cancer from the ESMO World Congress and report on new developments in diagnostics and therapy presented at the European Post-Chicago Melanoma/Skin Cancer Meeting. PMID:27630529

  19. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip Special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessburg, Philip C.

    2011-06-01

    Once again Journal of Neural Engineering is devoting an issue to the field of visual neuro-prosthetics. These papers were presented at the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the ChipA 13 DVD set of all presentations at The Eye and the Chip 2010 is available from Carolyn Barth PhD, Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology, 15415 E Jefferson, Grosse Pointe Park MI 48230, USA, 313.824.4710, clbarth@dioeyes.org, held in Detroit in September 2010. In the last decade this field has metamorphosed from 'in all probability a foolish and impractical dream' to a device approved for implantation in Europe and pending approval in the United States, and from a handful of serious efforts to several dozen on every continent save for Antartica. A recent comprehensive volume, Visual Prosthetics [1], edited by Gislin Dagnelie of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, focuses closely on this subject and is a tremendous addition to the literature. In his preface Dr Dagnelie notes as follows. 'In the year 2000, the Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology had the inspiration to foster a new collaboration among visual prosthesis researchers, clinicians, and workers in low vision rehabilitation by creating and sponsoring a series of biennial meetings called 'The Eye and the Chip'. Successful beyond expectations, these meetings have become the premier gathering place for researchers from all parts of the world and from very different backgrounds. Invited speakers are scientists who are advancing the field, yet the scale and atmosphere allow all researchers, patients, and the media to come and be updated about progress over the past two years. More perhaps than at other scientific meetings, where investigators tend to gather within disciplines, participants at The Eye and the Chip are challenged to be open-minded, learn about and critique each other's work, and return home with fresh ideas for interdisciplinary approaches. The interdisciplinary character of this book reflects that

  20. Virtual Worlds and Kids: Mapping the Risks. A Report to Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Trade Commission, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Expressing concern about reports that children can easily access explicit content in online virtual worlds, in March 2009 Congress directed the Federal Trade Commission to conduct a study of such worlds, examining the types of content available and the methods virtual world operators use to restrict minors' access to explicit content. Accordingly,…

  1. The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery: "The Olympics of our profession".

    PubMed

    Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Jacobs, Jeffery Phillip

    2012-12-01

    The first World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in London, United Kingdom, in 1980, organised by Dr. Jane Somerville and Prof. Fergus Macartney. The idea was that of Jane Somerville, who worked with enormous energy and enthusiasm to bring together paediatric cardiologists and surgeons from around the world. The 2nd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology took place in New York in 1985, organised by Bill Rashkind, Mary Ellen Engle, and Eugene Doyle. The 3rd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1989, organised by Chompol Vongraprateep. Although cardiac surgeons were heavily involved in these early meetings, a separate World Congress of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery was held in Bergamo, Italy, in 1988, organised by Lucio Parenzan. Thereafter, it was recognised that surgeons and cardiologists working on the same problems and driven by a desire to help children should really rather meet together. A momentous decision was taken to initiate a Joint World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery. A steering committee was established with membership comprising the main organisers of the four separate previous Congresses, and additional members were recruited in an effort to achieve numerical equality of cardiologists and surgeons and a broad geographical representation. The historic 1st "World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery" took place in Paris in June, 1993, organised by Jean Kachaner. The next was to be held in Japan, but the catastrophic Kobe earthquake in 1995 forced relocation to Hawaii in 1997. Then followed Toronto, Canada (2001, organised by Bill Williams and Lee Benson), Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005, organised by Horatio Capelli and Guillermo Kreutzer), and most recently Cairns, Australia (2009, organised by Jim Wilkinson). Having visited Europe (1993), Asia-Pacific (1997), North America (2001), South America (2005), and Australia (2009), and reflecting the "African Renaissance", the

  2. History of the World Allergy Organization: 1989 to 2006, the XVIII World Allergy Congress, Journal Development, Reorganization, and New Programs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    History of the World Allergy Organization: In 1951, the leaders in allergy from all over the world came together to form the International Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (IAACI). For the next 60 years, the allergy world converged at the IAACI triennial meetings, which became biennial in 2003. The international meetings, originally named the International Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ICACI), are now the World Allergy Congress (WAC) hosted by the World Allergy Organization (WAO). Everyone who has aspired to have worldwide recognition has played a part in IAACI-WAO. The History of the WAO traces the global arc of the allergy field over the past 60 years. The current officers of WAO elected to focus on this rich history, inviting prominent leaders who are interested in being part of this history project to write about their time with IAACI-WAO. This series will be presented in Cancún, México, as part of the XXII World Allergy Congress (December 4-8, 2011). Leading up to the Congress in Cancún, the WAO Journal is presenting segments of the History as part of the "Notes of Allergy Watchers Series." Please enjoy. --Michael A. Kaliner, MD Historian, and Past-President (2006-2007), World Allergy Organization PMID:23282542

  3. Invitation to the 17th international congress on photosynthesis research in 2016: photosynthesis in a changing world.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2016-02-01

    The 17th International Congress on Photosynthesis will be held from August 7 to 12, 2016 in Maastricht, The Netherlands. The congress will include an opening reception, 15 plenary lectures, 28 scientific symposia, many poster sessions, displays by scientific companies, excursions, congress dinner, social activities, and the first photosynthesis soccer world championship. See http://www.ps2016.com/ . The congress is organized as an official event of the International Society of Photosynthesis Research (see http://www.photosynthesisresearch.org/).

  4. PREFACE: 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics and 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, N.; Valliappan, S.; Li, Q.; Russell, A.

    2010-07-01

    The use for mathematical models of natural phenomena has underpinned science and engineering for centuries, but until the advent of modern computers and computational methods, the full utility of most of these models remained outside the reach of the engineering communities. Since World War II, advances in computational methods have transformed the way engineering and science is undertaken throughout the world. Today, theories of mechanics of solids and fluids, electromagnetism, heat transfer, plasma physics, and other scientific disciplines are implemented through computational methods in engineering analysis, design, manufacturing, and in studying broad classes of physical phenomena. The discipline concerned with the application of computational methods is now a key area of research, education, and application throughout the world. In the early 1980's, the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM) was founded to promote activities related to computational mechanics and has made impressive progress. The most important scientific event of IACM is the World Congress on Computational Mechanics. The first was held in Austin (USA) in 1986 and then in Stuttgart (Germany) in 1990, Chiba (Japan) in 1994, Buenos Aires (Argentina) in 1998, Vienna (Austria) in 2002, Beijing (China) in 2004, Los Angeles (USA) in 2006 and Venice, Italy; in 2008. The 9th World Congress on Computational Mechanics is held in conjunction with the 4th Asian Pacific Congress on Computational Mechanics under the auspices of Australian Association for Computational Mechanics (AACM), Asian Pacific Association for Computational Mechanics (APACM) and International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). The 1st Asian Pacific Congress was in Sydney (Australia) in 2001, then in Beijing (China) in 2004 and Kyoto (Japan) in 2007. The WCCM/APCOM 2010 publications consist of a printed book of abstracts given to delegates, along with 247 full length peer reviewed papers published with

  5. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip Special issue containing contributions from the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessburg, Philip C.

    2011-06-01

    Once again Journal of Neural Engineering is devoting an issue to the field of visual neuro-prosthetics. These papers were presented at the Sixth Biennial Research Congress of The Eye and the ChipA 13 DVD set of all presentations at The Eye and the Chip 2010 is available from Carolyn Barth PhD, Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology, 15415 E Jefferson, Grosse Pointe Park MI 48230, USA, 313.824.4710, clbarth@dioeyes.org, held in Detroit in September 2010. In the last decade this field has metamorphosed from 'in all probability a foolish and impractical dream' to a device approved for implantation in Europe and pending approval in the United States, and from a handful of serious efforts to several dozen on every continent save for Antartica. A recent comprehensive volume, Visual Prosthetics [1], edited by Gislin Dagnelie of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, focuses closely on this subject and is a tremendous addition to the literature. In his preface Dr Dagnelie notes as follows. 'In the year 2000, the Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology had the inspiration to foster a new collaboration among visual prosthesis researchers, clinicians, and workers in low vision rehabilitation by creating and sponsoring a series of biennial meetings called 'The Eye and the Chip'. Successful beyond expectations, these meetings have become the premier gathering place for researchers from all parts of the world and from very different backgrounds. Invited speakers are scientists who are advancing the field, yet the scale and atmosphere allow all researchers, patients, and the media to come and be updated about progress over the past two years. More perhaps than at other scientific meetings, where investigators tend to gather within disciplines, participants at The Eye and the Chip are challenged to be open-minded, learn about and critique each other's work, and return home with fresh ideas for interdisciplinary approaches. The interdisciplinary character of this book reflects that

  6. Proceedings of the Bio-Energy '80 world congress and exposition

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Many countries are moving with increasing urgency to obtain larger fractions of their energy from biomass. Over 1800 leading experts from 70 countries met on April 21 to 24 in Atlanta to conduct a World Congress and Exposition on Bio-Energy. This summary presents highlights of the Congress and thoughts stimulated by the occasion. Topics addressed include a comparison of international programs, world and country regionalism in the development of energy supplies, fuel versus food or forest products, production of ethyl alcohol, possibilities for expanded production of terrestrial vegetation and marine flora, and valuable chemicals from biomass. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 164 papers for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  7. World National Parks Congress. Recommendations. (Bali, Indonesia, October 11-22, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, Morges, (Switzerland).

    Recommendations of the World National Parks Congress, which met in Bali, Indonesia, are provided in this document. These recommendations address issues related to: information on protected areas; global system of representative terrestrial protected areas; marine and coastal protected areas; Antarctica; the role of protected areas in sustainable…

  8. EDITORIAL: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (WC2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    2004-08-01

    The World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering was held in Sydney on 24--29 August 2003. This special issue contains a selection of papers that serve as a snapshot of the state of the art in medical physics today, as represented in WC2003. The PDF file contains the full text of this editorial.

  9. The First World Congress on the Management of Electronic Commerce: Review and Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontis, Nick; De Castro, Akemi

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes some key findings of academic papers presented at the First World Congress on the Management of Electronic Commerce (January, 2000, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada). Outlines two meta-management issues that surfaced: taking a strategic approach to Internet ventures and considering infrastructure design during implementation. Highlights…

  10. Organising a World Congress of Epidemiology (WCE): reflections and lessons from the XIX WCE, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Bhopal, R S; Smith, W C; McEwen, J; MacFarlane, G; McCallum, A; Pattison, D; Bhala, N; Peto, R; Pell, J P

    2012-03-01

    The 3-yearly World Congress of Epidemiology is the premier, international, scientific conference organised under the auspices of the International Epidemiological Association (in open competition). This paper explores the justification for seeking to host the Congress and reflects on the structures and processes adopted in making the XIXth Congress in Scotland happen. Preparing the bid was invaluable for forming collaborations, generating scientific ideas, and garnering opinion. After the bid was accepted, we formed a local organising committee, named the Management Executive Committee to signal its decision making authority; and scientific, fundraising, marketing, international and social subcommittees. There was uncertainty about critical matters such as delegate numbers, costs and the total budget. Early decisions had to be made on, for example, the fee and fundraising target (£250,000), despite financial risks. Development of the scientific programme was a critical step that underpinned fundraising and marketing and permitted involvement of the international committee. Overall the 2011 WCE succeeded. The key ingredients to success were: a large collaboration of institutions and individuals; early pledges of financial support mostly from the UK; the valuable and relevant experience of the professional conference organisers; unstinting support and advice from IEA; and the effectiveness of the committee structure. The educational and professional development benefits of this WCE will reach a worldwide community and not just delegates, because of video, PowerPoint and textual accounts being open access on the Internet. This reach is unprecedented for IEA's World Congresses. We anticipate that the Congress will translate into better public health practice, better future Congresses, advances in epidemiology and improved population health. PMID:22414607

  11. Organising a World Congress of Epidemiology (WCE): reflections and lessons from the XIX WCE, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Bhopal, R S; Smith, W C; McEwen, J; MacFarlane, G; McCallum, A; Pattison, D; Bhala, N; Peto, R; Pell, J P

    2012-03-01

    The 3-yearly World Congress of Epidemiology is the premier, international, scientific conference organised under the auspices of the International Epidemiological Association (in open competition). This paper explores the justification for seeking to host the Congress and reflects on the structures and processes adopted in making the XIXth Congress in Scotland happen. Preparing the bid was invaluable for forming collaborations, generating scientific ideas, and garnering opinion. After the bid was accepted, we formed a local organising committee, named the Management Executive Committee to signal its decision making authority; and scientific, fundraising, marketing, international and social subcommittees. There was uncertainty about critical matters such as delegate numbers, costs and the total budget. Early decisions had to be made on, for example, the fee and fundraising target (£250,000), despite financial risks. Development of the scientific programme was a critical step that underpinned fundraising and marketing and permitted involvement of the international committee. Overall the 2011 WCE succeeded. The key ingredients to success were: a large collaboration of institutions and individuals; early pledges of financial support mostly from the UK; the valuable and relevant experience of the professional conference organisers; unstinting support and advice from IEA; and the effectiveness of the committee structure. The educational and professional development benefits of this WCE will reach a worldwide community and not just delegates, because of video, PowerPoint and textual accounts being open access on the Internet. This reach is unprecedented for IEA's World Congresses. We anticipate that the Congress will translate into better public health practice, better future Congresses, advances in epidemiology and improved population health.

  12. The Great World Congress of Librarians: Even Greater Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayward, W. Boyd; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A four-part account of a gathering of the world's library workers in the fall of 1977, the 50th anniversary of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA): "IFLA 1977" by W. Boyd Rayward; "Revolutionary Manifesto" by Alain Leens; "Innocents Abroad" by Richard M. Dougherty; and "Editor's Notes" by Art Plotnik. (JPF)

  13. Insights from the 3rd World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, D.; Goodlet, B.; Weaver, J.; Spanos, G.

    2016-05-01

    The 3rd World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) was a forum for presenting the "state-of-the-art" in the ICME discipline, as well as for charting a path for future community efforts. The event concluded with in an interactive panel-led discussion that addressed such topics as integrating efforts between experimental and computational scientists, uncertainty quantification, and identifying the greatest challenges for future workforce preparation. This article is a summary of this discussion and the thoughts presented.

  14. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, are contained in this document and encompass the research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications.

  15. Proceedings of the 4th International Conference and Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor); Burnham, Calvin (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held June 27-July 1, 1994 in Orlando, Florida. These documents encompass research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. The areas covered included: high-temperature materials; thin films; C-60 based superconductors; persistent magnetic fields and shielding; fabrication methodology; space applications; physical applications; performance characterization; device applications; weak link effects and flux motion; accelerator technology; superconductivity energy; storage; future research and development directions; medical applications; granular superconductors; wire fabrication technology; computer applications; technical and commercial challenges; and power and energy applications.

  16. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the World Congress on Superconductivity (WCS) have been to establish and foster the development and commercial application of superconductivity technology on a global scale by providing a non-adversarial, non-advocacy forum where scientists, engineers, businessmen and government personnel can freely exchange information and ideas on recent developments and directions for the future of superconductive research. Sessions were held on: accelerator technology, power and energy, persistent magnetic fields, performance characterization, physical properties, fabrication methodology, superconductive magnetic energy storage (SMES), thin films, high temperature materials, device applications, wire fabrication, and granular superconductors. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  17. Analysis of Seminar 82 - World Congress on Future Special Education "The Role of the Family in Early Childhood Education".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updike, Juliette; Foley, Gilbert M.

    The paper is an analysis of seminar 82 of the World Congress on Future Special Education, "The Role of the Family in Early Childhood Education". Issues and problems, alternative solutions and strategies, and pros and cons are listed for each of the following four presentations: "An Assessment Scale - Family Attachment to the High Risk Infant" (G.…

  18. Molecular Diagnostics--Select Biosciences' Second World Congress. 6-7 August 2009, South San Francisco, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Bodowitz, Steven

    2009-10-01

    The Select Biosciences' Molecular Diagnostics Second World Congress held in South San Francisco, CA, USA included topics covering new developments and technologies in the field of molecular diagnostics. This conference report highlights selected presentations on market analyses, DNA microarray diagnostics, multiplexed diagnostics and biomarker discovery.

  19. Proceedings of the fourth international conference and exhibition: World Congress on superconductivity. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, K.; Burnham, C.

    1994-12-31

    This document contains papers presented at the 4th International Conference Exhibition: World Congress on Superconductivity held at the Marriott Orlando World Center, Orlando, Florida, June 27--July 1, 1994. This conference encompassed research, technology, applications, funding, political, and social aspects of superconductivity. Specifically, the areas of research, technology, and development covered during the conference included high-temperature materials, thin films, C-60 based superconductors, persistent magnetic fields and shielding, fabrication methodology, space applications, physical applications, performance characterization, device applications, weak link effects and flux motion, accelerator technology, superconductivity energy, storage, future research and development directions, medical applications, granular superconductors, wire fabrication technology, computer applications, technical and commercial challenges, and power and energy applications. The key objective of this conference was to provide a forum for the world community to share technological results of recent advances made in the field of superconductivity and to discuss translation of the research to technology which will benefit humanity. More than 150 presentations were made at this conference. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  20. The 33rd IGC, Oslo, Norway 2008; Geoscience World Congress 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solheim, A.; Bjoerlykke, A.

    2007-12-01

    The International Geological Congress (IGC) has been arranged every four years since 1878. During the previous Congress in Florence, Italy, 2004, the Nordic countries were awarded the organisation of the 33rd IGC, which will be held in Oslo, Norway, August 6-14, 2008. We expect between 6000 and 9000 participants to the Congress, which also includes workshops, short-courses, and business meetings, as well as more than 50 pre -and post Congress excursions. The Congress is organised under the umbrella of IUGS and the patronage of UNESCO. The Congress will run with 40 parallel sessions and cover the whole width of the geosciences. About 500 symposia will run in 40 parallel sessions. There will be a major poster session, as well as a large exhibition (Geoexpo 2008), in which industry and other organisations will be able to exhibit their products and services. A number of international affiliations have announced their interest in organising annual business meetings during the Congress. In addition, a number of workshops and short-courses will be arranged. More than 50 excursions are planned for the two weeks before the Congress and one week after. These run in all the Nordic Countries, as well as in NW Russia, Ukraine, Greenland, Svalbard, and the Faeroes Islands. These excursions will give the participants a first-hand insight into Nordic Geosciences, as well as the Nordic natural and cultural heritage. Two major international events are important for the Congress. The "International Polar Year" (IPY) and the United Nations' "International Year of Planet Earth" (IYPE) are both running in the period 2007-2009. The Congress focuses on many of the main themes of IYPE, with major emphasis on "Geoscience and Society". Seven major themes will be treated in full-day plenary sessions of lectures given by invited lecturers. These plenary sessions will have a scientific part in the morning, a key-note lecture at lunch-time, and a societal part in the afternoon, followed by a

  1. Nanotechnology and the Developing World: Lab-on-Chip Technology for Health and Environmental Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that advances in nanotechnology in general, and lab-on-chip technology in particular, have the potential to benefit the developing world in its quest to control risks to human health and the environment. Based on the "risk society" thesis of Ulrich Beck, it is argued that the developed world must realign its science and…

  2. Proceedings of the International Federation of Automatic Control. World Congress 1984: Budapest, Hungary

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, W.R.; Macfarlane, A.G.J.; Leininger, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Over 500 papers by authors from 37 countries were presented at this triennial congress. Theoretical and practical subjects covering the entire field of automatic control are reviewed in the six volumes. Each volume includes a plenary paper, transcripts of panel discussions, an author index, subject index, and contents of the other volumes in the set.

  3. Selected Rapporteur Summaries from the XX World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Hamburg, Germany, October 14-18, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Schmidt, Heike; Beltcheva, Olga; Brandon, Mariko D; Byrne, Enda M; Diehl, Eric J; Duncan, Laramie; Gonzalez, Suzanne D; Hannon, Eilis; Kantojärvi, Katri; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Kos, Mark Z; Kotyuk, Eszter; Laufer, Benjamin I; Mantha, Katarzyna; McGregor, Nathaniel W; Meier, Sandra; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Spiers, Helen; Squassina, Alessio; Thakur, Geeta A; Tiwari, Yash; Viswanath, Biju; Way, Michael J; Wong, Cybele CP; O'Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2014-01-01

    The XXth World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics (WCPG), sponsored by The International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG) took place in Hamburg, Germany on October 14-18, 2012. Approximately 600 participants gathered to discuss the latest findings in this rapidly advancing field. The following report was written by student travel awardees. Each was assigned sessions as rapporteurs. This manuscript represents topics covered in most, but not all, oral presentations during the conference, and some of the major notable new findings reported at this 2012 WCPG. PMID:23341144

  4. World Congresses of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2013-2015: the way forward - from Beijing to Berlin.

    PubMed

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Li, Leonard S W; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Stucki, Gerold; Nugraha, Boya; Guzman, Juan Manuel; Imamura, Marta; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Li, Jianan

    2014-09-01

    Scientific congresses are an important tool to support communication among scientists, enabling exchange of knowledge and discussion of research results. They can also provide specialist education and allow a forum in which to develop the goals and policies of scientific societies. The World Congresses of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM) aims at continuous improvement of congress quality. The programme development aims are: to operate at the highest possible scientific level; to guarantee continuous communication within the main areas of science in the field; and to invite experts to present topics of recent interest. The first section, the basic programme, largely comprises original papers selected from submitted abstracts. The second section covers topics of recent interest in more depth. Other sessions include recent topics arising from the ISPRM-World Health Organization (ISPRM-WHO) liaison, collaborative sessions with other societies, including national societies special interest sessions and ISPRM partners, and sessions organized by young scientists and students. These aims and programme guide the organizers of the 9th World Congress, which will be held on 19-23 June 2015 in Berlin. The concepts described here will be developed further for use in future ISPRM World Congresses.

  5. The 13 world congress on medical and health informatics, Cape Town, South Africa: Partnerships for effective e-Health solutions.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Andrew

    2011-01-24

    The 13(th) World Congress on Medical and Health Informatics (Medinfo) was held in 2010 between 12 and 15 September in Cape Town, South Africa. This triennial international gathering is the official conference of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and brings together leading health informatics leaders, scientists, clinicians, researchers, vendors, developers and government and health care planners from around the globe. The conference attracted 905 submissions and resulted in a program that included 260 oral presentations, 349 posters presentations and 21 scientific demonstrations representing contributions from 58 countries. The Medinfo program covered all aspects of health informatics from traditional areas, such as hospital information systems, patient registries, nursing informatics, data integration, standards, interoperability issues and decision support, to innovative topics, such as translational bioinformatics, text mining, intelligent data analysis, emerging technologies, quality, social networking, workflow and organizational issues. The outgoing President of the IMIA, Professor Reinhold Haux, presented on health informatics challenges into the future, reinforcing that today and in the future, health care has to be considered as part of a continuous and coordinated life-time journey and not just as episodes of disease. Medical informatics has a key role to play in this paradigm shift. The new IMIA President, Professor Antoine Geissbuhler, was announced at the closing ceremony. The next Medinfo congress will take place in Copenhagen, Denmark, in September 2013.

  6. Defining future directions for endometriosis research: workshop report from the 2011 World Congress of Endometriosis In Montpellier, France.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Peter A W; D'Hooghe, Thomas M; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Giudice, Linda C; Montgomery, Grant W; Petraglia, Felice; Taylor, Robert N

    2013-05-01

    Endometriosis, defined as estrogen-dependent lesions containing endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterus, is a chronic and often painful gynecological condition that affects 6% to 10% of reproductive age women. Endometriosis has estimated annual costs of US $12 419 per woman (approximately €9579), comprising one-third of the direct health care costs with two-thirds attributed to loss of productivity. Decreased quality of life is the most important predictor of direct health care and total costs. It has been estimated that there is a mean delay of 6.7 years between onset of symptoms and a surgical diagnosis of endometriosis, and each affected woman loses on average 10.8 hours of work weekly, mainly owing to reduced effectiveness while working. To encourage and facilitate research into this debilitating disease, a consensus workshop to define future directions for endometriosis research was held as part of the 11th World Congress on Endometriosis in September 2011 in Montpellier, France. The objective of this workshop was to review and update the endometriosis research priorities consensus statement developed following the 10th World Congress on Endometriosis in 2008.(1) A total of 56 recommendations for research have been developed, grouped under 6 subheadings: (1) diagnosis, (2) classification and prognosis, (3) clinical trials, treatment, and outcomes, (4) epidemiology, (5) pathophysiology, and (6) research policy. By producing this consensus international research priorities statement, it is the hope of the workshop participants that researchers will be encouraged to develop new interdisciplinary research proposals that will attract increased funding support for work on endometriosis.

  7. Plug and measure - a chip-to-world interface for photonic lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Tobias Nils; Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Muñoz-Berbel, Xavier; Llobera, Andreu

    2016-08-16

    The integration of detection mechanisms with microfluidics may be one of the most promising routes towards widespread application of Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) devices. Photonic detection methods like in the so-called Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip (PhLoC) have advantages such as being non-invasive, easy to sterilize and highly sensitive even with short integration times and thus allow in situ monitoring and quantification of biological and chemical processes. The readout of such detection methods usually requires special training of potential users, as in most cases they are confronted with the need of establishing fiber-optics connections to and from the PhLoC and/or rely on the use of complex laboratory equipment. Here, we present a low-cost and robust chip-to-world interface (CWI), fabricated by CO2-laser machining, facilitating the non-expert use of PhLoCs. Fiber-optics with standard SMA-connectors (non-pigtailed) and PhLoCs can be plugged into the CWI without the need for further adjustments. This standardization bestows great versatility on the interface, providing a direct link between PhLoCs and a wide range of light sources and photo-detectors. The ease-of-use of the proposed simple plug mechanism represents a step forward in terms of user-friendliness and may lead PhLoC devices to practical applications. PMID:27428056

  8. Plug and measure - a chip-to-world interface for photonic lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Tobias Nils; Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Muñoz-Berbel, Xavier; Llobera, Andreu

    2016-08-16

    The integration of detection mechanisms with microfluidics may be one of the most promising routes towards widespread application of Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) devices. Photonic detection methods like in the so-called Photonic Lab-on-a-Chip (PhLoC) have advantages such as being non-invasive, easy to sterilize and highly sensitive even with short integration times and thus allow in situ monitoring and quantification of biological and chemical processes. The readout of such detection methods usually requires special training of potential users, as in most cases they are confronted with the need of establishing fiber-optics connections to and from the PhLoC and/or rely on the use of complex laboratory equipment. Here, we present a low-cost and robust chip-to-world interface (CWI), fabricated by CO2-laser machining, facilitating the non-expert use of PhLoCs. Fiber-optics with standard SMA-connectors (non-pigtailed) and PhLoCs can be plugged into the CWI without the need for further adjustments. This standardization bestows great versatility on the interface, providing a direct link between PhLoCs and a wide range of light sources and photo-detectors. The ease-of-use of the proposed simple plug mechanism represents a step forward in terms of user-friendliness and may lead PhLoC devices to practical applications.

  9. Participation of People with Disabilities: An International Perspective. Selected Papers from the 1980 World Congress of Rehabilitation International (Winnipeg, Canada, June 22-27, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kathleen S., Ed.; And Others

    Selected papers from the 1980 World Congress of Rehabilitation International Meeting on the participation of disabled people are presented. The papers address the rights of the disabled, the organization and functions of consumer groups, the impact of consumer involvement on rehabilitation and related services, social implications of the consumer…

  10. Reading for All; Proceedings of the IRA (International Reading Association) World Congress on Reading (4th, Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 3-5, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Robert, Ed.

    This book contains papers presented at the Fourth International Reading Association World Congress on Reading in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in August 1972. The contents of the book are divided into three parts: "Literacy and Literature" includes papers on libraries, books, and reading by Jorge Borges, the future of reading by Theodore Harris, the…

  11. Observations on the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mary G; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions took place in San Diego, California, March 17-19, 2016. Hosts were the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME), Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professionals (ACEhp), and Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME). The target audience was the international community working to improve medical (CME), nursing (CNE), pharmacy (CPE), and interprofessional (CIPE) continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD). Goals included: addressing patients' concerns and needs; advancing global medical and interprofessional health sciences education; utilizing learning to address health disparities; and promoting international cooperation. The five keynote speakers were: patient advocate Alicia Cole ("Why What We Do Matters: The Patients Voice"); linguist Lorelei Lingard ("Myths about Healthcare Teamwork and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence"); futurist and philosopher Alex Jadad ("What Do We Need to Protect at All Costs in the 21st Century?"); ethicist and change agent Zeke Emanuel ("Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Healthcare Horizon"); and technology innovator Stephen Downes ("From Individual to Community: The Learning Is in the Doing"). Organizers announced the new Dave Davis Distinguished Award for Excellence in Mentorship in Continuing Professional Development to honor the career of David Davis, MD, in CME/CPD scholarship in Canada, the United States, and beyond. Participants valued the emphasis on interprofessional education and practice, the importance of integrating the patient voice, the effectiveness of flipped classroom methods, and the power of collective competency theories. Attendee-respondents encouraged Congress planners to continue to strive for a broad global audience and themes of international interest. PMID:27584068

  12. Observations on the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mary G; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions took place in San Diego, California, March 17-19, 2016. Hosts were the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME), Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professionals (ACEhp), and Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME). The target audience was the international community working to improve medical (CME), nursing (CNE), pharmacy (CPE), and interprofessional (CIPE) continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD). Goals included: addressing patients' concerns and needs; advancing global medical and interprofessional health sciences education; utilizing learning to address health disparities; and promoting international cooperation. The five keynote speakers were: patient advocate Alicia Cole ("Why What We Do Matters: The Patients Voice"); linguist Lorelei Lingard ("Myths about Healthcare Teamwork and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence"); futurist and philosopher Alex Jadad ("What Do We Need to Protect at All Costs in the 21st Century?"); ethicist and change agent Zeke Emanuel ("Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Healthcare Horizon"); and technology innovator Stephen Downes ("From Individual to Community: The Learning Is in the Doing"). Organizers announced the new Dave Davis Distinguished Award for Excellence in Mentorship in Continuing Professional Development to honor the career of David Davis, MD, in CME/CPD scholarship in Canada, the United States, and beyond. Participants valued the emphasis on interprofessional education and practice, the importance of integrating the patient voice, the effectiveness of flipped classroom methods, and the power of collective competency theories. Attendee-respondents encouraged Congress planners to continue to strive for a broad global audience and themes of international interest.

  13. 7th HUPO World Congress: the human disease glycomics/proteomics initiative (HGPI) session 17 August 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Pierce, J Michael; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2009-04-01

    The Human Disease Glycomics/Proteomics Initiative (HGPI) Session was held on August 17, 2008, at the HUPO World Congress in Amsterdam. Reports were made on the progress of the first and second analytical pilot studies to profile N- and O-linked glycan structures of standard glycoproteins utilizing laboratories from around the world. In addition, recent advances in glycan structural analyses were presented, including the use of O-linked glycan libraries of standards, use of negative mode nano-LC-MS for O-linked glycan analysis, and identification of aberrant O-glycosylation of IgA1 as a cause of IgA nephropathy. A report was made of a newly discovered lectin, malectin, which appears to function in the folding/quality control of glycoproteins with N-linked glycans and may regulate several human disorders whose etiology involves protein quality control in the ER. The major glycan ligand for malectin was identified using a novel printed glycan microarray. Advances in the analysis of the genes that are associated with glycan expression and recognition--the glycotranscriptome--were described, as well as technologies to determine the relative quantitation of N- and O-linked glycans from as few as 2 x 10(6) cells. These technologies are being applied to identify potential biomarkers of stem and cancer cells.

  14. The First World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders: Controversies and Hot Topics in Etiology and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Carol A; Stern, Jeremy S

    2016-01-01

    The first World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders was held in London, June 2016 by the Tourette Association of America, Tourettes Action (UK), and the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome. Presentations arising from large-scale collaborative projects were an important component of the scientific programme. This article focuses on areas raised in the hot topics session and two moderated debates, which covered emerging research in etiology and treatment. The hot topics ranged across genetics, arguably including the first confirmed Tourette Syndrome (TS) susceptibility gene NRXN1, neurocognition, and neurophysiology, including the possibility of a neurocognitive endophenotype for TS and the use of depth and cortical surface electrodes to investigate the neurophysiology of tics on the background of the evolving field of deep brain stimulation (DBS), to novel treatment approaches such as dental orthotics and an online behavioral intervention. The debates aired controversies in treatment; pharmacotherapy vs. behavioral treatment and the place of medical cannabinoids. These sessions demonstrate the vibrancy of a field that has considerably expanded in the last decade, the significant progress that has been made, and the direction that some of the most fruitful next phases of research will take. PMID:27375411

  15. The First World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders: Controversies and Hot Topics in Etiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Carol A.; Stern, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    The first World Congress on Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders was held in London, June 2016 by the Tourette Association of America, Tourettes Action (UK), and the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome. Presentations arising from large-scale collaborative projects were an important component of the scientific programme. This article focuses on areas raised in the hot topics session and two moderated debates, which covered emerging research in etiology and treatment. The hot topics ranged across genetics, arguably including the first confirmed Tourette Syndrome (TS) susceptibility gene NRXN1, neurocognition, and neurophysiology, including the possibility of a neurocognitive endophenotype for TS and the use of depth and cortical surface electrodes to investigate the neurophysiology of tics on the background of the evolving field of deep brain stimulation (DBS), to novel treatment approaches such as dental orthotics and an online behavioral intervention. The debates aired controversies in treatment; pharmacotherapy vs. behavioral treatment and the place of medical cannabinoids. These sessions demonstrate the vibrancy of a field that has considerably expanded in the last decade, the significant progress that has been made, and the direction that some of the most fruitful next phases of research will take. PMID:27375411

  16. Photonics-on-a-chip: recent advances in integrated waveguides as enabling detection elements for real-world, lab-on-a-chip biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Adam L; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-01-21

    By leveraging advances in semiconductor microfabrication technologies, chip-integrated optical biosensors are poised to make an impact as scalable and multiplexable bioanalytical measurement tools for lab-on-a-chip applications. In particular, waveguide-based optical sensing technology appears to be exceptionally amenable to chip integration and miniaturization, and, as a result, the recent literature is replete with examples of chip-integrated waveguide sensing platforms developed to address a wide range of contemporary analytical challenges. As an overview of the most recent advances within this dynamic field, this review highlights work from the last 2-3 years in the areas of grating-coupled, interferometric, photonic crystal, and microresonator waveguide sensors. With a focus towards device integration, particular emphasis is placed on demonstrations of biosensing using these technologies within microfluidically controlled environments. In addition, examples of multiplexed detection and sensing within complex matrices--important features for real-world applicability--are given special attention.

  17. 10th World IHEA and ECHE Joint Congress: health economics in the age of longevity.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B; Getzen, Thomas E; Torbica, Aleksandra; Anegawa, Tomofumi

    2014-12-01

    The 10th consecutive World Health Economics conference was organized jointly by International Health Economics Association and European Conference on Health Economics Association and took place at The Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland in July 2014. It has attracted broad participation from the global professional community devoted to health economics teaching,research and policy applications. It has provided a forum for lively discussion on hot contemporary issues such as health expenditure projections, reimbursement regulations,health technology assessment, universal insurance coverage, demand and supply of hospital services, prosperity diseases, population aging and many others. The high-profile debate fostered by this meeting is likely to inspire further methodological advances worldwide and spreading of evidence-based policy practice from OECD towards emerging markets.

  18. Roundtable discussion at the UICC World Cancer Congress: looking toward the realization of universal health coverage for cancer in Asia.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Hideyuki; Kawahara, Norie; Nozaki, Shinjiro; Sonoda, Shigeto; Fukuda, Takashi; Cazap, Eduardo; Trimble, Edward L; Roh, Jae Kyung; Hao, Xishan

    2015-01-01

    The Japan National Committee for the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) and UICC-Asia Regional Office (ARO) organized a Roundtable Discussion as part of the official program of the UICC World Cancer Congress 2014 in Melbourne, Australia. The theme for the Roundtable Discussion was - Looking Toward the Realization of Universal Health Care (UHC) for Cancer in Asia - and it was held on December 5, 2014. The meeting was held based on the recognition that although each country may take a different path towards the realization of UHC, one point that is common to all is that cancer is projected to be the most difficult disease to address under the goals of UHC and that there is, therefore, an urgent and pressing need to come to a common understanding and awareness with regard to UHC concepts that are a priority component of a post-MDG development agenda. The presenters and participants addressed the issue of UHC for cancer in Asia from their various perspectives in academia and international organizations. Discussions covered the challenges to UHC in Asia, collaborative approaches by international organizations, the need for uniform and relevant data, ways to create an Asia Cancer Barometer that could be applied to all countries in Asia. The session concluded with the recognition that research on UHC in Asia should continue to be used as a tool for cancer cooperation in Asia and that the achievement of UHC would require research and input not only from the medical community, but from a broad sector of society in a multidisciplinary approach. Discussions on this issue will continue towards the Asia-Pacific Cancer Conference in Indonesia in August 2015.

  19. 2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern.

    PubMed

    Ardern, Clare L; Glasgow, Philip; Schneiders, Anthony; Witvrouw, Erik; Clarsen, Benjamin; Cools, Ann; Gojanovic, Boris; Griffin, Steffan; Khan, Karim M; Moksnes, Håvard; Mutch, Stephen A; Phillips, Nicola; Reurink, Gustaaf; Sadler, Robin; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thorborg, Kristian; Wangensteen, Arnlaug; Wilk, Kevin E; Bizzini, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Deciding when to return to sport after injury is complex and multifactorial-an exercise in risk management. Return to sport decisions are made every day by clinicians, athletes and coaches, ideally in a collaborative way. The purpose of this consensus statement was to present and synthesise current evidence to make recommendations for return to sport decision-making, clinical practice and future research directions related to returning athletes to sport. A half day meeting was held in Bern, Switzerland, after the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy. 17 expert clinicians participated. 4 main sections were initially agreed upon, then participants elected to join 1 of the 4 groups-each group focused on 1 section of the consensus statement. Participants in each group discussed and summarised the key issues for their section before the 17-member group met again for discussion to reach consensus on the content of the 4 sections. Return to sport is not a decision taken in isolation at the end of the recovery and rehabilitation process. Instead, return to sport should be viewed as a continuum, paralleled with recovery and rehabilitation. Biopsychosocial models may help the clinician make sense of individual factors that may influence the athlete's return to sport, and the Strategic Assessment of Risk and Risk Tolerance framework may help decision-makers synthesise information to make an optimal return to sport decision. Research evidence to support return to sport decisions in clinical practice is scarce. Future research should focus on a standardised approach to defining, measuring and reporting return to sport outcomes, and identifying valuable prognostic factors for returning to sport. PMID:27226389

  20. 2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern.

    PubMed

    Ardern, Clare L; Glasgow, Philip; Schneiders, Anthony; Witvrouw, Erik; Clarsen, Benjamin; Cools, Ann; Gojanovic, Boris; Griffin, Steffan; Khan, Karim M; Moksnes, Håvard; Mutch, Stephen A; Phillips, Nicola; Reurink, Gustaaf; Sadler, Robin; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Thorborg, Kristian; Wangensteen, Arnlaug; Wilk, Kevin E; Bizzini, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Deciding when to return to sport after injury is complex and multifactorial-an exercise in risk management. Return to sport decisions are made every day by clinicians, athletes and coaches, ideally in a collaborative way. The purpose of this consensus statement was to present and synthesise current evidence to make recommendations for return to sport decision-making, clinical practice and future research directions related to returning athletes to sport. A half day meeting was held in Bern, Switzerland, after the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy. 17 expert clinicians participated. 4 main sections were initially agreed upon, then participants elected to join 1 of the 4 groups-each group focused on 1 section of the consensus statement. Participants in each group discussed and summarised the key issues for their section before the 17-member group met again for discussion to reach consensus on the content of the 4 sections. Return to sport is not a decision taken in isolation at the end of the recovery and rehabilitation process. Instead, return to sport should be viewed as a continuum, paralleled with recovery and rehabilitation. Biopsychosocial models may help the clinician make sense of individual factors that may influence the athlete's return to sport, and the Strategic Assessment of Risk and Risk Tolerance framework may help decision-makers synthesise information to make an optimal return to sport decision. Research evidence to support return to sport decisions in clinical practice is scarce. Future research should focus on a standardised approach to defining, measuring and reporting return to sport outcomes, and identifying valuable prognostic factors for returning to sport.

  1. 13th IUPAC- international congress of pesticide chemistry: crop, environment, and public health protection, technologies for a changing world

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This introductory paper provides an overview of Perspectives papers written by plenary speakers from the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry held in San Francisco, CA in August, 2014. This group of papers emphasizes some of the emerging issues and challenges at the forefront of...

  2. Summaries of oral sessions at the XXI World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Boston, Massachusetts, 17-21 October 2013: state of the field.

    PubMed

    Akpudo, Hilary; Aleksic, Branko; Alkelai, Anna; Burton, Christie; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Carillo Roa, Tania; Chen, David T W; Cheng, Min-Chih; Cocchi, Enrico; Davis, Lea K; Giori, Isabele G; Hubbard, Leon M; Merikangas, Alison; Moily, Nagaraj S; Okewole, Adeniran; Olfson, Emily; Pappa, Irene; Reitt, Markus; Singh, Ajeet B; Steinberg, Julia; Strohmaier, Jana; Ting, Te-Tien; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; O'Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2014-08-01

    The XXI World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics (WCPG), sponsored by the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG), took place in Boston, Massachusetts, on 17-21 October 2013. Approximately 900 participants gathered to discuss the latest findings in this rapidly advancing field. The following report was written by student travel awardees. Each was assigned one or more sessions as a rapporteur. This manuscript represents topics covered in most, but not all of the oral presentations during the conference, and contains some of the major notable new findings reported.

  3. Proteomics for everyday use: activities of the HUPO Brain Proteome Project during the 5th HUPO World Congress.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Michael; Stephan, Christian; Eisenacher, Martin; van Hall, Andre; Marcus, Katrin; Martens, Lennart; Park, Young Mok; Gutstein, Howard B; Herberg, Friedrich; Meyer, Helmut E

    2007-04-01

    Long Beach hosted this year's annual congress of the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). In addition to the numerous sessions, talks and poster presentations organized by HUPO itself, several events were arranged by the HUPO initiatives. The Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) was very active, initiating three pre-congress workshops: (i) the kick-off meeting of the EU-funded ProDaC consortium (Proteomics Data Collection) that is aiming at the bioinformatics Standardization in the proteomics field; (ii) the workshop "Standardization Issues in Proteomics: Perspectives from Vendors" giving an overview about the lessons learned by proteomics industrial partners; (iii) the 6th HUPO BPP Workshop "New Proteomics Approaches for further HUPO BPP Studies" offering new concepts for brain-related proteomics studies.

  4. 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry: Crop, Environment, and Public Health Protection, Technologies for a Changing World.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Laura L; Racke, Kenneth D; Hapeman, Cathleen J; Seiber, James N

    2016-01-13

    This introductory paper provides an overview of Perspectives papers written by plenary speakers from the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry held in San Francisco, CA, USA, in August 2014. This group of papers emphasizes some of the emerging issues and challenges at the forefront of agricultural research: sustainability; agriculture's response to climate change and population growth; pollinator health and risk assessment; and global food production and food security. In addition, as part of the Congress, a workshop on "Developing Global Leaders for Research, Regulation, and Stewardship of Crop Protection Chemistry in the 21st Century" identified specific recommendations to attract the best scientists to agricultural science, to provide opportunities to study and conduct research on crop protection chemistry topics, and to improve science communication skills. PMID:26709728

  5. Participation of Brazil in the World Congresses on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences: an increase in commitment to the Three Rs.

    PubMed

    Presgrave, Octavio; Caldeira, Cristiane; Moura, Wlamir; Cruz, Mayara; Méier, Gisele; Dos Santos, Elisabete; Boas, Maria H V

    2015-03-01

    Many Brazilian researchers have long been interested in the development and use of alternative methods. Most of their research groups work in isolation, due to the lack of funding for collaborative studies. Despite these problems, since the Third World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences, Brazilian researchers have strongly participated, not only by presenting posters and oral presentations, but also by being involved in the World Congress Committees. The Brazilian Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (BraCVAM) must play an important role in the development and validation of alternative methods, through the active participation of the National Network of Alternative Methods (ReNaMA). In Brazil, Law 11,794/2008 regulates the use of animals in experimentation and education, and Law 9,605/1998 clearly states that use of the original animal test is not permitted, if an alternative method is available. Therefore, given the current legal framework, it is very important that all the Ministries involved with animal use, and the organisations responsible for funding researchers, strive to increase the financial support of those groups that are involved in the development and use of alternative methods in Brazil.

  6. Participation of Brazil in the World Congresses on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences: an increase in commitment to the Three Rs.

    PubMed

    Presgrave, Octavio; Caldeira, Cristiane; Moura, Wlamir; Cruz, Mayara; Méier, Gisele; Dos Santos, Elisabete; Boas, Maria H V

    2015-03-01

    Many Brazilian researchers have long been interested in the development and use of alternative methods. Most of their research groups work in isolation, due to the lack of funding for collaborative studies. Despite these problems, since the Third World Congress on Alternatives and Animal Use in the Life Sciences, Brazilian researchers have strongly participated, not only by presenting posters and oral presentations, but also by being involved in the World Congress Committees. The Brazilian Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (BraCVAM) must play an important role in the development and validation of alternative methods, through the active participation of the National Network of Alternative Methods (ReNaMA). In Brazil, Law 11,794/2008 regulates the use of animals in experimentation and education, and Law 9,605/1998 clearly states that use of the original animal test is not permitted, if an alternative method is available. Therefore, given the current legal framework, it is very important that all the Ministries involved with animal use, and the organisations responsible for funding researchers, strive to increase the financial support of those groups that are involved in the development and use of alternative methods in Brazil. PMID:25802998

  7. Browsing the Real World using Organic Electronics, Si-Chips, and a Human Touch.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T; Nilsson, David; Dyreklev, Peter; Norberg, Petronella; Nordlinder, Staffan; Ersman, Peter Andersson; Gustafsson, Göran; Wikner, J Jacob; Hederén, Jan; Hentzell, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Organic electronics have been developed according to an orthodox doctrine advocating "all-printed'', "all-organic'' and "ultra-low-cost'' primarily targeting various e-paper applications. In order to harvest from the great opportunities afforded with organic electronics potentially operating as communication and sensor outposts within existing and future complex communication infrastructures, high-quality computing and communication protocols must be integrated with the organic electronics. Here, we debate and scrutinize the twinning of the signal-processing capability of traditional integrated silicon chips with organic electronics and sensors, and to use our body as a natural local network with our bare hand as the browser of the physical world. The resulting platform provides a body network, i.e., a personalized web, composed of e-label sensors, bioelectronics, and mobile devices that together make it possible to monitor and record both our ambience and health-status parameters, supported by the ubiquitous mobile network and the resources of the "cloud".

  8. Clinical trials update from the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting: PEP-CHF, ACCLAIM and the HHH study.

    PubMed

    Cleland, John G F; Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L

    2006-10-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure, presented at the joint European Society and World Congress of Cardiology meeting held in Barcelona in September 2006. All reports should be considered as preliminary data, as analyses may change in the final publication. The PEP-CHF study suggests that perindopril improves symptoms and functional capacity and may reduce heart failure hospitalisations in patients with diastolic heart failure. Although immune modulation therapy failed to reduce the incidence of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisations in the ACCLAIM study, the observed differences in outcome in some heart failure patients warrants further investigation. The HHH study failed to show a beneficial effect of telemonitoring over usual care in patients with heart failure but potentially important country interactions were observed. PMID:17045839

  9. The World Encompassed. Remarks at a Dinner in the Great Hall in Celebration of the Treasures of the Library of Congress (Washington, DC, March 19, 1981). The Center for the Book Viewpoint Series No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boorstin, Daniel J.

    The theme for the celebration of the Library of Congress treasures, "The World Encompassed," is suggested by the title of a nephew's account of Sir Francis Drake's circumnavigation of the earth. This account is part of the Sir Francis Drake collection donated by patrons to the library. In April 1581, Drake was knighted by Queen Elizabeth I for…

  10. News Girls in Physics: Getting girls engaged with physics Schools Lecture: How to explore the universe: the IOP schools lecture series 2009 Elastomobile Competition: Rubber-band vehicles go for gold Congress: Congress celebrates centenary Outreach Programme: Tales of the Stars inspires young children from around the world Physics Olympiad: BPhO selects top students for International Physics Olympiad Mobile Science: Mobile teaching lab visits rural Turkey China: Inspiration and competition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    Girls in Physics: Getting girls engaged with physics Schools Lecture: How to explore the universe: the IOP schools lecture series 2009 Elastomobile Competition: Rubber-band vehicles go for gold Congress: Congress celebrates centenary Outreach Programme: Tales of the Stars inspires young children from around the world Physics Olympiad: BPhO selects top students for International Physics Olympiad Mobile Science: Mobile teaching lab visits rural Turkey China: Inspiration and competition in China

  11. Introduction: Highlights of HeartWeek 2013 at the Sixth World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town South Africa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip

    2013-12-01

    This December issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 11th annual publication generated from the two meetings that compose "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child,and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease,organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine and entering its 14th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Pediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and entering its 17th year.This December, 2013 issue of Cardiology in the Young highlights the sessions from HeartWeek 2013 that were held at The Sixth World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to medicine by John Brown, and therefore we dedicate this HeartWeek 2013 issue of Cardiology in the Young to him.

  12. Hepatic encephalopathy--definition, nomenclature, diagnosis, and quantification: final report of the working party at the 11th World Congresses of Gastroenterology, Vienna, 1998.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, Peter; Lockwood, Alan; Mullen, Kevin; Tarter, Ralph; Weissenborn, Karin; Blei, Andres T

    2002-03-01

    Research on hepatic encephalopathy is hampered by the imprecise definition of this disabling complication of liver disease. Under this light, the Organisation Mondiale de Gastroentérologie commissioned a Working Party to reach a consensus in this area and to present it at the 11th World Congress of Gastroenterology in Vienna (1998). The Working Party continued its work thereafter and now present their final report. In summary, the Working Party has suggested a modification of current nomenclature for clinical diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy; proposed guidelines for the performance of future clinical trials in hepatic encephalopathy; and felt the need for a large study to redefine neuropsychiatric abnormalities in liver disease, which would allow the diagnosis of minimal (subclinical) encephalopathy to be made on firm statistical grounds. In the interim, it proposes the use of a psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score, based on the result of 5 neuropsychologic tests. Finally, the need for a careful evaluation of the newer neuroimaging modalities for the diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy was stressed.

  13. The Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamolinara, Guy, Ed.; Dalrymple, Helen, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    These 10 issues, representing one calendar year, including two double issues (2002) of "The Library of Congress Information Bulletin," contain information on Library of Congress new collections and program developments, lectures and readings, financial support and materials donations, budget, honors and awards, World Wide Web sites and digital…

  14. New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy: Summary from a scientific symposium at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World (IVW) 2012 Congress, 11 October, Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Poland, Gregory A; Fleming, Douglas M; Treanor, John J; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Luke, Thomas C; Ball, Emma M A; Poland, Caroline M

    2013-04-17

    Both seasonal and pandemic influenza cause considerable morbidity and mortality globally. In addition, the ongoing threat of new, unpredictable influenza pandemics from emerging variant strains cannot be underestimated. Recently bioCSL (previously known as CSL Biotherapies) sponsored a symposium 'New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy' at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World Congress in Valencia, Spain. This symposium brought together a renowned faculty of experts to discuss lessons from past experience, novel influenza vaccine developments, and new methods to increase vaccine acceptance and coverage. Specific topics reviewed and discussed included new vaccine development efforts focused on improving efficacy via alternative administration routes, dose modifications, improved adjuvants, and the use of master donor viruses. Improved safety was also discussed, particularly the new finding of an excess of febrile reactions isolated to children who received the 2010 Southern Hemisphere (SH) trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Significant work has been done to both identify the cause and minimize the risk of febrile reactions in children. Other novel prophylactic and therapeutic advances were discussed including immunotherapy. Standard IVIg and hIVIg have been used in ferret studies and human case reports with promising results. New adjuvants, such as ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were noted to provide single-dose, prolonged protection with seasonal vaccine after lethal H5N1 virus challenge in a ferret model of human influenza disease. The data suggest that adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines may provide broader protection than unadjuvanted vaccines. The use of an antigen-formulated vaccine to induce broad protection between pandemics that could bridge the gap between pandemic declaration and the production of a homologous vaccine was also discussed. Finally, despite the availability of effective vaccines, most current efforts to increase influenza vaccine coverage

  15. New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy: Summary from a scientific symposium at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World (IVW) 2012 Congress, 11 October, Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Poland, Gregory A; Fleming, Douglas M; Treanor, John J; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Luke, Thomas C; Ball, Emma M A; Poland, Caroline M

    2013-04-17

    Both seasonal and pandemic influenza cause considerable morbidity and mortality globally. In addition, the ongoing threat of new, unpredictable influenza pandemics from emerging variant strains cannot be underestimated. Recently bioCSL (previously known as CSL Biotherapies) sponsored a symposium 'New Wisdom to Defy an Old Enemy' at the 4th Influenza Vaccines for the World Congress in Valencia, Spain. This symposium brought together a renowned faculty of experts to discuss lessons from past experience, novel influenza vaccine developments, and new methods to increase vaccine acceptance and coverage. Specific topics reviewed and discussed included new vaccine development efforts focused on improving efficacy via alternative administration routes, dose modifications, improved adjuvants, and the use of master donor viruses. Improved safety was also discussed, particularly the new finding of an excess of febrile reactions isolated to children who received the 2010 Southern Hemisphere (SH) trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV). Significant work has been done to both identify the cause and minimize the risk of febrile reactions in children. Other novel prophylactic and therapeutic advances were discussed including immunotherapy. Standard IVIg and hIVIg have been used in ferret studies and human case reports with promising results. New adjuvants, such as ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were noted to provide single-dose, prolonged protection with seasonal vaccine after lethal H5N1 virus challenge in a ferret model of human influenza disease. The data suggest that adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines may provide broader protection than unadjuvanted vaccines. The use of an antigen-formulated vaccine to induce broad protection between pandemics that could bridge the gap between pandemic declaration and the production of a homologous vaccine was also discussed. Finally, despite the availability of effective vaccines, most current efforts to increase influenza vaccine coverage

  16. EDITORIAL: The Eye and The Chip 2008 The Eye and The Chip 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Joseph F.; O'Malley, Edward R.; Hessburg, Philip C.

    2009-06-01

    Over the course of the past decade, The Eye and The Chip world congress on visual neuro-prosthetic devices has become a premier meeting for those who believe that 'artificial' vision will one day be used to improve the quality of life of visually impaired patients. Although substantial progress has been made, there are numerous unresolved issues, like the preferred methods for wireless communication, placement of devices, and materials and design among others. The Eye and The Chip meeting of 2008, held in Detroit on 12-14 June 2008, provided important new information about these and other important topics, and thus served to advance this field of scientific research. From a research seedling a decade ago to the crowd of superb presentations in Detroit last June, a very real sense of justifiable optimism has developed. The prospects of artificial vision are no longer remote. Many of the researchers expressed confidence that implantable devices will provide the hoped-for level of vision to justify their widespread use in the future. The often dramatic successes of cochlear implants continues to provide credence that artificial stimulation of nerve tissue is a plausible strategy to restore vision. The Eye and The Chip 2008 attracted researchers from four continents (North America, Europe, Asia and Australia). The meeting also benefited from the attendance and presentations by representatives of the FDA, who have been present for all The Eye and The Chip meetings. The 2008 meeting was also enhanced by the inclusion of a new and related scientific field that shares the goal of restoring vision to the blind—the field of molecular restoration of retinal function by insertion of channelrhodopsin. Just as the field of ophthalmology went from Ridley's primitive intraocular lens replacement to implants useful in virtually every cataract patient in one surgeon's clinical lifetime, the field of retinal prostheses seems to be following a very similar trajectory. Likewise, the

  17. EDITORIAL: Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009) Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio and the 4th International Conference on Artificial Muscles were held in Osaka, Japan, 23-27 November 2009. This special section of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers presented at this international conference and congress. Of the 76 or so papers presented at the conference, only 10 papers were finally selected, reviewed and accepted for this special section, following the regular reviewing procedures of the journal. This special section is focused on polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites and their applications. In particular, an electromechanical model for self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes is presented which discusses the concept of creating self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes where actuator and sensor elements are separated by a grounded shielding electrode. Eventually, an electromechanical model of the device is also proposed and validated. Following that, there is broad coverage of polytetrahydrofurane-polyethylene oxide-PEDOT conducting interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) for high speed actuators. The conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) is incorporated within the IPNs, which are synthesized from polyethylene oxide (PEO)/polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) networks. PEO/PTHF IPNs are prepared using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and dimethacrylate and hydroxythelechelic PTHF as starting materials. The conducting IPN actuators are prepared by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene (EDOT) using FeCl3 as an oxidizing agent within the PEO/PTHF IPN host matrix. Subsequently, giant and reversible magnetorheology of carrageenan/iron oxide magnetic gels are discussed and the effect of magnetic fields on the viscoelastic properties

  18. Chip, Chip, Hooray!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Presents a science laboratory using different brands of potato chips in which students test their oiliness, size, thickness, saltiness, quality, and cost, then analyze the results to determine the best chip. Gives a brief history of potato chips. (YDS)

  19. EDITORIAL: Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009) Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio and the 4th International Conference on Artificial Muscles were held in Osaka, Japan, 23-27 November 2009. This special section of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers presented at this international conference and congress. Of the 76 or so papers presented at the conference, only 10 papers were finally selected, reviewed and accepted for this special section, following the regular reviewing procedures of the journal. This special section is focused on polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites and their applications. In particular, an electromechanical model for self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes is presented which discusses the concept of creating self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes where actuator and sensor elements are separated by a grounded shielding electrode. Eventually, an electromechanical model of the device is also proposed and validated. Following that, there is broad coverage of polytetrahydrofurane-polyethylene oxide-PEDOT conducting interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) for high speed actuators. The conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) is incorporated within the IPNs, which are synthesized from polyethylene oxide (PEO)/polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) networks. PEO/PTHF IPNs are prepared using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and dimethacrylate and hydroxythelechelic PTHF as starting materials. The conducting IPN actuators are prepared by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene (EDOT) using FeCl3 as an oxidizing agent within the PEO/PTHF IPN host matrix. Subsequently, giant and reversible magnetorheology of carrageenan/iron oxide magnetic gels are discussed and the effect of magnetic fields on the viscoelastic properties

  20. Role of Educational Institutions in Helping to Alleviate World Hunger. Hearing before the Select Committee on Hunger, House of Representatives. Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session (Davis, California).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Hunger.

    Hearings on the role of higher education in reducing hunger and malnutrition are presented. Within this country a key concern is nutrition and consumer education, especially of low-income people, as well as nutrition education for health and other professionals. In addition to providing food and feed grains to Third World countries, the United…

  1. Immunizing the World's Children by 1990. Hearing before the International Task Force of the Select Committee on Hunger. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    A hearing was held to update information on progress toward immunizing the world's children against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, polio, measles, and tuberculosis. Immunization programs are regarded as essential in the effort to break the infection-malnutrition cycle in children in developing nations. Witnesses at the hearing included…

  2. 101st Congress: The Children's Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willer, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    Reports on legislation on child care and regulations for children's television enacted during the 101st congress. Legislation involving block grants, Title IV-A funding, and earned income tax credits was intended to bring about quality improvement and affordability. Reauthorizations included Head Start, Follow Through, Community Services Block…

  3. Plain radiography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Which is better in assessing outcome in clinical trials of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs? Summary of a debate held at the World Congress of Osteoarthritis 2014.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Felix; Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common disease of synovial joints and currently lacks treatment options that modify structural pathology. Imaging is ideally suited for directly evaluating efficacy of disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs) in clinical trials, with plain radiography and MRI being most often applied. The current article is based on a debate held on April 26, 2014, at the World Congress of Osteoarthritis: The authors were invited to contrast strengths and limitations of both methods, highlighting scientific evidence on reliability, construct-validity, and correlations with clinical outcome, and comparing their sensitivity to change in knee OA and sensitivity to DMOAD treatment. The authors concluded that MRI provides more comprehensive information on articular tissues pathology, and that implementation of radiography in clinical trials remains a challenge. However, neither technique has thus far been demonstrated to be strongly superior over the other; for the time being it therefore appears advisable to use both in parallel in clinical trials, to provide more evidence on their relative performance. Radiographic JSW strongly depends on adequate positioning; it is not specific to cartilage loss but also to the meniscus. MRI provides somewhat superior sensitivity to change compared with the commonly used non-fluoroscopic radiographic acquisition protocols, and has recently provided non-location-dependent measures of cartilage thickness loss and gain, which are potentially more sensitive in detecting DMOAD effects than radiographic JSW or region-specific MRI. Non-location-dependent measures of cartilage thickness change should thus be explored further in context of anabolic and anti-catabolic DMOADs.

  4. First Mayan Women's Congress.

    PubMed

    Teissedre, S

    1997-01-01

    In October 1997, over 200 participants attended the First Mayan Women's Congress in Mexico and called for financial assistance, capacity building, and training to help Mayan women escape poverty. The Congress was initiated by the UN Development Fund for Women in collaboration with the Small Grants Program of the UN Development Program. Traditionally, Mayan women and men have played distinct roles in society, and efforts are underway to increase gender sensitivity and achieve a new balance of power. Mayan women attending the Congress reported that they face daily challenges in gaining their husbands' approval for participation in income-generating activities outside of the home. Eventually, however, some husbands also start working in these enterprises and are learning to assume their share of domestic responsibilities. Mayan women have been forced to reevaluation their role in society by a prevailing agricultural and environmental crisis as well as a high unemployment rate. Crafts that were once produced only for household consumption are now considered for export. Because the women need funds to initiate income-generating activities, the Conference linked women's groups with development practitioners, policy-makers, and donors. The women requested financial aid for more than 30 specific projects, and Congress participants agreed to pursue innovate strategies to support the enterprises with funds, training, and technical assistance. The Congress also encouraged environmental nongovernmental organizations to include Mayan women in mainstream development activities. This successful Congress will be duplicated in other Mexican states. PMID:12293736

  5. Congress and national security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharfman, Peter

    1983-10-01

    The starting point for any serious discussion of Congress role in matters of national security is the recognition that Congress does some kinds of things very effectively, but generally fails when it tries to do other kinds of things. Consequently, a citizen with a desire to shape national policy may find Congress to be the focal point of national decision, or largely irrelevant, depending almost, entirely on the nature of the issue. As a political scientist, I am tempted to relate this to the provisions of the U.S. Constitution and to the differing structures of the Executive and Legislative institutions; since I am addressing an audience of physicists, I will confine my explanation of causes to the observation that you cannot easily push on a string.

  6. Sport Heroes in Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Doris R.

    This paper reports the findings of a study of the role of sports in the lives of U.S. Congressmen and focuses attention on six gifted athletes for whom sports provided preparation for government service. The word "hero" as used in this paper refers to former members of Congress who were admired for their athletic prowess and for their political…

  7. Communicating with Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochs, Mike

    2005-01-01

    At a seminar, two Congressional staff members offered good tips on how it is best to communicate with legislators. Although offered in the context of communicating with Congress, these insights are also valuable when working with state and local legislators. This article discusses the key points that were provided in the seminar. In addition to…

  8. 21st International Congress on Anticancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Magné, Nicolas; Pacaut, Cécile; Chargari, Cyrus

    2010-05-01

    The 21st International Congress on Anticancer Treatment, endorsed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, was held in Paris (France) 1-5 February 2010. It was led and jointly sponsored by Gabriel Hortobagyi and David Khayat and by the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (TX, USA) and the Hôpital de la Pitié Salpêtrière (Paris, France), respectively. The meeting provided complete updates and innovations in the management of various cancers and supportive care. This well-recognized annual international educational and scientific conference brought together the leading scientists from across the world to share their skills and expertise by participating in this high-quality meeting. This congress provides an exceptional opportunity to meet with fellow professionals and discuss new educational case studies. In the present article, we have highlighted particularly pertinent sessions concerning hot topics for the new areas of cancer. PMID:20469995

  9. Districts for 104th Congress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1990-01-01

    This is a polygon coverage of 104th Congressional District boundaries obtained from the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The 103rd Congress was the first Congress that reflected the reapportionment and delineation of congressional districts based on the 1990 census. The next (104th) Congress reflects redelineation of districts that occurred for six states: Georgia, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, South Carolina, and Virginia. Congressional Districts U.S. House of Representatives Census TIGER/Line Files

  10. Congress Honors Glenn, Apollo 11 Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    Congress honored storied NASA astronauts John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin on Wednesday, with the Gold Medal, Congress' highest expression of national appreciation for dis...

  11. Literary Lectures Presented at the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 37 out-of-print lectures on American, English, and world literature that have been presented at the Library of Congress over the past 30 years. Lectures by Thomas Mann, T. S. Eliot, R. P. Blackmur, Archibald Henderson, Irving Stone, John O'Hara, MacKinlay Kantor, John Crowe Ransom, Delmore Schwartz, John Hall Wheelock, Robert…

  12. 75 FR 3904 - Appointments to the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ...The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 established MACPAC to review Medicaid and CHIP access and payment policies and to advise Congress on issues affecting Medicaid and CHIP. The Act directs the Comptroller General to appoint MACPAC's members, with initial appointments to be made no later than January 1, 2010. The terms of MACPAC commissioners are intended to be......

  13. Upcoming hearings in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    1984-04-01

    The following markup and conference committees have been tentatively scheduled by the Senate and House of Representatives. Dates and times should be verified with the committee or subcommittee holding the markup or conference; all offices on Capitol Hill may be reached by telephoning 202-224-3121. For guidelines on contacting a member of Congress, see AGU's Guide to Legislative Information and Contacts (Eos, April 17, 1984, p. 159).August 7: Mark up legislation that would require federal Coastal Zone Management plans to be consistent with state management plans (H.R. 4589) by the House Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee. Longworth Building, Room 1334, 10 A.M.

  14. Annual report to Congress 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Since its creation in 1977, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has provided high-quality energy information products and services to a broad spectrum of customers across the Nation and around the world, including Congress, representatives of the print and broadcast news media, businesses, officials of Federal, State, and local agencies, foreign governments and international organizations, students, librarians, researchers, lawyers and private citizens. Our motto: {open_quotes}On-line or off the shelf, EIA is the first place to go for the last word in energy information.{close_quotes} Established as an independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), EIA was charged by its enabling legislation with: (1) Maintaining a comprehensive data and information program on energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. (2) Developing and maintaining analytical tools and collection and processing systems; providing analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and providing information dissemination services. This report summarizes the reports and contact information issued by the EIA.

  15. Congress trims NSF budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The last-minute spending bill adopted by Congress just before its 1987 holiday recess provides $1,717 billion for the National Science Foundation (NSF) for fiscal year (FY) 1988. The approved figure is more than 9% lower than the request in President Reagan's budget plan. In addition, wording in the House version of the bill that mandated protection of ocean science and women and minorities programs did not appear in the final product that was approved by Congress and signed into law.In absolute terms, NSF's budget will be 6% more than in 1987, far less than expected by the agency and the White House, which had proposed a doubling of NSF's budget over the next several years. The Research and Related Activities section of the budget, out of which comes the bulk of NSF's support of basic research, was funded at $1,453 billion, $200 million less than its $1,653 billion request, and the Antarctic Research section received $124.8 million of $143 million in the President's budget. Science Education, on the other hand, was budgeted for $139.2 million, $25 million more than requested.

  16. [The participation of the Warsaw otolaryngologists in medical conferences and congresses in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Kierzek, A

    1998-01-01

    The participation of a famous Polish laryngologist Teodor Heryng (1847-1925) in many scientific congresses was presented in separate publications. Many Varsovian otolaryngologists also took part in a great number of international congresses. Jan Sedziak's (1861-1932) participation in international congress in Vienna in 1908 on account of the 50th anniversary of the invention of laryngoscopy by Manuel Garcia is stressed. Sedziak was specially esteemed in Great Britain and in the United States of North America. Very significant contribution of Alfred M. Sokołowski (1849-1924) to the medical congress in Rome in 1894 is described. The widespread contacts of Varsovian otolaryngologists: Zdzisław Dmochowski, Feliks Erbrich, Leopold Lubliner, Edmund Modrzejewski, Zygmunt Srebrny. Jan Szmurło, Witold Szumlański with the European scientific world are mentioned, as well as their active participation in many medical meetings and congresses.

  17. The Library of Congress as the National Library; Potentialities for Service. A Report to the National Advisory Commission on Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    This report presents a statement of the Library of Congress's view of its position as the National Library of the United States. The Library has developed from a small parliamentary library to serve the Congress to a library that performs more national-library functions than any national library in the world. Its organizational position in the…

  18. Upcoming hearings in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The following hearings and markups have been tentatively scheduled for the coming weeks by the Senate and House of Representatives. Dates and times should be verified with the committee or subcommittee holding the hearing or markup; all offices on Capitol Hill may be reached by telephoning 202-224-3121. For guidelines on contacting a member of Congress, see AGU's Guide to Legislative Information and Contacts (Eos, August 28, 1984, p. 669).June 27: Hearing on legislation to impose user fees for some of the services provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration by the Coast Guard Subcommit-tee of the House Merchant Marine and Fisheries Committee. Room 1334, Longworth Building, 9:30 A.M.

  19. Congress initiates science study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The U.S. House of Representatives announced in October a year-long study to review the nation's science and technology policy and the government's role in funding scientific research. The Science Policy Study, led by Rep. Vernon Ehlers (R-MI), is the first comprehensive review by Congress since 1985—a time when the Cold War still was being fought and the Internet was largely unknown.At a workshop to discuss the initiative, House Science Committee Chair James Sensenbrenner, Jr., told about 30 scientists and policy experts that the challenge is “to develop a new, sensible, coherent long-range science and technology policy, including a review of our nation's science and math education programs.”

  20. Strategies for Exploiting American Inventiveness in the World Marketplace. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Science, Research and Technology of the Committee on Science and Technoloyg. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (June 24-26, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    The need to ensure that the United States would become more economically competitive and would effectively translate scientific leadership into technological innovations is addressed in this report of a 3-day series of hearings on strategies for exploiting American inventiveness in the world marketplace. Testimonies are offered from…

  1. Technology assessment and the Congress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The legislative branch is considered as the major focus for technology assessment, and the functions of the Congressional Research Service in supplying Congressmen with scientific and technological development is outlined, and the need for Congress to control, assess, and integrate the various and conflicting elements for the benefit of both technology and society is stressed. The organization of the Science Policy Research Division is mentioned, and its duties in gathering facts for the increased understanding by the members of Congress are indicated. Technology assessment aspects associated with congressional committees and hearings, adequacy of advice, trends in engineering education, and the public interest are also discussed.

  2. Library of Congress Model, Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets.

    Anaglyph glasses are required to see this view in three-dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest.

    The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the

  3. Library of Congress Model, Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets.

    Anaglyph glasses are required to see this view in three-dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest.

    The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the

  4. Update on Congress: A Review of Current Issues Facing Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Addresses four issues facing Congress: (1) freedom from religious bias in the workplace; (2) campaign finance reform; (3) President Clinton's education program and the allocation of money for various proposals; and (4) Senator John McCain's legislative package for reducing smoking in the United States. (CMK)

  5. The Hemophiliac and His World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourdeau, R., Ed.

    The document contains the papers presented at the 5th Congress of the World Federation of Hemophilia in Montreal in 1968. Seven papers concern specific therapy of hemophilia, five papers treat nonspecific forms of therapy, seven papers deal with prophylaxis and complications in hemophilia, seven others deal with orthopedic and other surgical…

  6. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part II: nonspinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part II) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for nonspinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for spinal tumors (part I) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980677

  7. Best of International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress 2013: stereotactic body radiation therapy. Part I: spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Lo, Simon S; Chang, Eric L; Ryu, Samuel; Chung, Hans; Slotman, Ben J; Teh, Bin S; Sahgal, Arjun

    2013-09-01

    The 11th biennial International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society Congress represented another historical gathering of professionals in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery. This congress was held on 16-20 June 2013 in Toronto (ON, Canada), and the chairman was Arjun Sahgal, the co-chair was Michael Schwartz and president of the society was Jean Regis. The congress attracted 550 attendants from all over the world and over 300 abstracts were presented. Among the abstracts presented, 62 (36 oral) were pertaining to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Exciting new findings were presented by colleagues from North America, Europe and Asia. This short conference scene (part I) provides a summary of the best abstracts on SBRT for spinal tumors presented in the congress. A separate conference scene on SBRT for nonspinal tumors (part II) also appears in this issue of Future Oncology. PMID:23980676

  8. Back to Basics for Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1991-01-01

    Some members of Congress retain a Norman Rockwell image of the two-parent household. To make headway with these leaders, educators must get them into schools and neighborhoods to let them see firsthand the crying needs of children and the schools providing safe harbor for a few hours. Administrators should also share their visions of education's…

  9. Congress Wraps Up 2011 Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2011-01-01

    Education advocates are already bracing for protracted budget battles in the coming year, even as they sort the winners and losers in the bill approved by Congress late last week financing the U.S. Department of Education and the rest of the federal government through September. The hard-fought agreement followed months of wrangling between…

  10. Congress enacts health care reform.

    PubMed

    2010-03-01

    Health care reform at last: After nearly a century of effort by Presidents from Theodore Roosevelt on down, the Congress finally agreed on and President Barack Obama signed into law a system that covers most Americans, regulates sharp insurance practices, and embraces a paradigm shift from acute institutionally focused care to chronic disease management based on home and community-based care. PMID:20465039

  11. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress Report from London 2015.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Tsuyoshi; Akasaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in London from 29 August to 2 September 2015. It is the leading conference in cardiology in the world, with presentations on the latest scientific discoveries, innovations, technology, education, and clinical practices. More than 32,000 delegates and 5,000 exhibitors from 140 countries participated, sharing a number of scientific presentations, including 28 clinical hot lines, 18 clinical trial updates, 20 registry studies, 12 basic and translational science hot line studies, and 4,533 abstract studies. Japan had the highest number of accepted abstracts at the Congress, indicating the great contribution of Japanese scientists and the Japanese Circulation Society. PMID:26459395

  12. Annual report to Congress 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1997 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1997, and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  13. Annual report to Congress, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Section 205 of the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 established the Energy Information Administration (EIA). One of the mandates in this legislation is that EIA prepare for Congress an annual report summarizing both activities and information collected and published. EIA`s major 1998 accomplishments are profiled in the body of this edition of the Annual Report to Congress. Appendix A contains abstracts of significant reports issued by EIA in 1998 and a chart of all titles and a list of all feature articles published during the year. Appendix B contains graphs of selected performance measures. Appendix C lists contact information for EIA subject matter specialists. Appendix D lists the major laws which form the basis of EIA`s legislative mandate.

  14. Annual report to Congress, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Created by Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. With the mandate to ``collect, assemble, evaluate, analyze, and disseminate data and information,`` EIA`s mission has been defined to: maintain a comprehensive data and information program relevant to energy resources and reserves, energy production, energy demand, energy technologies, and related financial and statistical information relevant to the adequacy of energy resources to meet the Nation`s demands in the near and longer term future. Develop and maintain analytical tool and collection and processing systems; provide analyses that are accurate, timely, and objective; and provide information dissemination services. This annual report summarizes EIA`s activities and accomplishments in 1993.

  15. Annual report to Congress 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-25

    By Congress in 1977 as an independent entity within the Department of Energy, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the principal and authoritative source of comprehensive energy data for the Congress, the Federal Government, the States, and the public. During 1992, EIA provided information and analysis in response to many energy-related issues and events, including Hurricane Andrew. In addition, EIA made substantial strides in a number of critical special projects, most notably development of the National Energy Modeling System, preparation of National Petroleum Council studies on petroleum refining and natural gas, and establishment of oxygenate data program mandated by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. EIA also took advantage of new opportunities for international consultations and energy information exchanges. This report to Congress contains energy-related information on the following: petroleum; natural gas; integrated analysis and forecasting; electricity; coal; energy markets and end use, nuclear, statistical standards, and information services. The appendices include: data collection surveys of the Energy Information Administration; Analytic models of the Energy Information Administration; EIA publication -- EIA products available on diskette; and Major laws affecting EIA, 1974-1992.

  16. The return of the phoenix: the 1963 International Congress of Zoology and American zoologists in the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the International Congress of Zoology held in Washington D.C. in 1963 as a portrait of American zoologists' search for effective and rewarding relationships with both each other and the public. Organizers of the congress envisioned the congress as a last ditch effort to unify the disparate subdisciplines of zoology, overcome the barriers of specialization, and ward off the heady claims of more reductionist biologists. The problems zoologists faced as they worked to fulfill these ambitious goals illuminate some of the challenges faced by members of the naturalist tradition as they worked to establish disciplinary unity while seeking public support in the competitive world of twentieth century science.

  17. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago. PMID:26847252

  18. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago.

  19. PREFACE: XVII Congress of Bioengineering and VI Clinical Engineering Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Darío

    2011-09-01

    SABI 2009 was the XVII Biennial Congress of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society (SABI - www.sabi.org.ar), celebrated along with the VI Clinical Engineering Conference. It took place in Rosario, the second city of Argentina, located on the west bank of the Paraná, one of the world's most important rivers. This city, with its 150 year history and one million inhabitants, is characterized by a strong enterprising spirit. It is the agroindustrial leader of Argentina, with cereal ports recognized to be among the most active in the world, and its cereal stock exchange competes with Chicago's in international cereal pricing. Demographically Rosario presents a European profile, and there are seven national and private higher level universities in the area. SABI 2009 was the first time the Congress was celebrated in Rosario. Usually the Congress is organized by the Bioengineering Society in cooperation with a university with an undergraduate program, which Rosario lacks. To meet the needs of this exceptional case, a young local institution was asked to coordinate the Congress, the Rosario Technological Center (www.polotecnologico.net). This organization gathers together around 100 companies that produce technology, with a large number focused on IT, but those focused on biotechnology also stand out. The Center is also integrated with relevant public and government bodies. Traditionally, bioengineering has been related to human health applications, with less emphasis on applications significant to agrotechnology, an area in which Rosario is growing as an economic force. In order to address this oversight, the Congress formulated its main goals for integrating and synergizing bioengineering and biotechnology, particularly bioengineering and agrotechnology. This initiative has produced promising results. The importance of the Congress was reflected in the high number of participants - including researchers, professionals and students - from abroad, with participants from

  20. European Association of Urology--31st Annual Congress (March 11-15, 2016--Munich, Germany).

    PubMed

    Dulsat, C

    2016-04-01

    The 31st Annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress held in Munich, Germany, was a platform for expert urological specialists from all over the world to find a unique space to share their evidence-based knowledge during state-of-the art lectures, presentations and courses. This report covers selected presentations covering cancer-related presentations.

  1. The New Library of Congress/New York Public Library Microfilming Project for Official Gazettes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, John Y.

    The Library of Congress and the New York Public Library have recently undertaken sponsorship of a new project to microfilm official national gazettes from nations throughout the world. The New York Public Library had conducted such a program from 1956 through 1971, but had discontinued the service due to lack of financial support. With…

  2. IC chip stress during plastic package molding

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Benson, D.A.; Peterson, D.W.; Sweet, J.N.

    1998-02-01

    Approximately 95% of the world`s integrated chips are packaged using a hot, high pressure transfer molding process. The stress created by the flow of silica powder loaded epoxy can displace the fine bonding wires and can even distort the metalization patterns under the protective chip passivation layer. In this study the authors developed a technique to measure the mechanical stress over the surface of an integrated circuit during the molding process. A CMOS test chip with 25 diffused resistor stress sensors was applied to a commercial lead frame. Both compression and shear stresses were measured at all 25 locations on the surface of the chip every 50 milliseconds during molding. These measurements have a fine time and stress resolution which should allow comparison with computer simulation of the molding process, thus allowing optimization of both the manufacturing process and mold geometry.

  3. The Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress Information Bulletin, 1999

    1999-01-01

    These 12 issues, representing 1 calendar year (1999) of "The Library of Congress Information Bulletin," contain information on Library of Congress new collections and program developments, lectures and readings, financial support and materials donations, budget, honors and awards, Web sites and digital collections, new publications, exhibits,…

  4. Clean Water: Report to Congress - 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This publication, an annual report to Congress, covers measures taken to implement the objectives of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. The report was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and covers calendar year 1973. A letter introducing and highlighting the report from the EPA Director to the Congress is given at the…

  5. Congress Takes Activist Role in Science Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinger, Madeleine

    1972-01-01

    Second of three articles that probe the nature of federal involvement in science. The role of Congress in formulating and implementing science policy is changing to a more activist one. Congress is seetting up mechanisms to interpret the flood of information used in making policy decisions. (Author/TS)

  6. [Retrospection on Hygiene Congress organisation in Opatija 1950].

    PubMed

    Bakasun, Vjekoslav; Mićović, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    In years following to the second world war the convention organisator was faced with major technical difficulties due to universal shortage of resources. During the 50's, two conventions of health workers with topics related to preventive medicine were held in Opatija. On both occasion Sanitary Bureau of Rijeka (Institute of Hygiene) was the main organisator. Reviewing the correspondance in Institute of Hygiene archive, one can monitor the preparations for the congress. In order to meet the participant's expectation, director of Institute of Hygiene, requested from the local entrepreneur adequate supply of postcard and cigarettes. PMID:23607176

  7. Science policy studied in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The House Science and Technology Committee will initiate a comprehensive study of science policy in the United States. Although the study will not formally begin until January, when the 99th Congress convenes for its 2-year term, a newly appointed task force has begun to develop the agenda for the committee's work and has begun to prepare background information for the study.Don Fuqua (D-Fla.), chairman of the Science and Technology Committee, said that the health and vitality of American science unquestionably has been a major factor in the strong performance of the American economy over the last 35 years. However, the committee is concerned that present policies and practices may not be fully adequate to the new environment facing U.S. science in the coming decades.

  8. Congress approves science agency nominees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In late July, with the U.S. Congress rushing toward its recess and preparing for the November elections, the Senate confirmed several nominees for key positions in the government. In addition, President Bill Clinton announced his nominee for director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), a division of the Department of the Interior.The Senate confirmed Neal Lane as director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Lane also will serve as assistant to the President for science and technology, provide the President with advice in all areas of science and technology policy, and work to coordinate science, space, and technology policy and programs across the federal government. Lane previously was director of the National Science Foundation.

  9. Congress turns cold on fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1984-06-22

    A 5% cut in fusion research budgets will force some programs to be dropped in order to keep the large machinery running unless US and European scientists collaborate instead of competing. Legislators became uneasy about the escalating costs of the new devices. The 1984 budget of $470 million for magnetic fusion research is only half the projected cost of the Tokomak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) planned to ignite, for the first time, a self-sustaining burn. Planning for the TCFX continued despite the message from Congress. Work at the large institutions at Princeton, MIT, etc. may survive at the expense of other programs, some of which will lose academic programs as well. Scientists point to the loss of new ideas and approaches when projects are cancelled. Enthusiasm is growing for international collaboration.

  10. Congress Struggles through Two Science Policy Hearings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervis, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the Congress's science committee meetings that decides the budget and sets the science policy for the United States is provided. The supercollider and global warming are two of the issues discussed at the hearings. (KR)

  11. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON BLACK CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Report to Congress on Black Carbon describes domestic and international sources of black carbon emissions, and summarizes available scientific information on the climate effects of black carbon. Further, the Report evaluates available black carbon mitigation options and thei...

  12. Energy Crisis Spurs Congress Into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses legislation recently passed by Congress in response to the energy crisis, and the Nixon Administration's proposal for creating a new Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and a Nuclear Energy Commission (NEC). (JR)

  13. Working at Congress : a Sandian's experience.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    During the 110th Congress (calendar years 2007 and 2008), Matthew Allen, a Sandian nuclear scientist, served as a Congressional Fellow on the Committee on Homeland Security in the House of Representatives. This report is an informative account of the role staffers play in assisting the members of Congress in their oversight and legislative duties. It is also a personal account of Matthew Allen's experience as a committee staffer in the House of Representatives.

  14. Our World Their World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Build, create, make, blog, develop, organize, structure, perform. These are just a few verbs that illustrate the visual world. These words create images that allow students to respond to their environment. Visual culture studies recognize the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world. This…

  15. The NASA budget in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Patricia H.

    I would like to make the members of AGU aware of the recent happenings in Congress with regard to the fiscal year (FY) 1986 budget for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA was scheduled for modest increases from FY 1985 levels in the President's budget (Eos, February 19, 1985, p. 73), which was approved by the House Science and Technology Committee. However, when the authorization bill (H.R. 1714) “hit the floor” on April 3, amendments were offered and overwhelmingly passed to freeze funding at FY 1985 levels. (A similar fate met the National Science Foundation bill, H.R. 1210, on April 17.) The process is under way in the Senate, and the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, which is the authorizing committee (under the chairmanship of Slade Gorton), plans to mark up its NASA bill in the next few days; the full committee—the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee—will then offer it to the floor.

  16. Critical Views of LCSH--the Library of Congress Subject Headings; A Bibliographic and Bibliometric Essay and An Analysis of Vocabulary Control in the Library of Congress List of Subject Headings (LCSH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Kirtland, Monika

    A comprehensive guide to the literature published between World War II and 1979 which critically evaluates the Library of Congress list of Subject Headings (LCSH), this bibliography has been prepared for information personnel involved with subject authority files, thesauri, or vocabulary control. A brief bibliometric analysis of the literature…

  17. Proceedings of the International Congress on Pharmacy Education (2nd, Boston, Massachusetts, July 17-20, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suntrup, Noreen L., Ed.

    Proceedings of the Second International Congress on Pharmacy Education, which address the entire pharmacy curriculum, are presented. Contents are as follows: "Educating for the Pharmaceutical Industry," J.N. Banerjee; "Overview on Pharmaceuticals for Developing Countries," Leighton E. Cluff; "Pharmacy and the Third World," Patrick F. D'Arcy; "The…

  18. Computers in Education. Proceedings of the South African Congress. = Rekenaars in die Onderrig. Verrigtinge van die Suid-Afrikaanse Kongres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Vyver, Dawid H., Ed.

    The 54 conference papers and abstracts on the possible role of computers in the world of education in the Republic of South Africa which are presented in this volume are published under the sections and in the order in which they appeared on the congress program. The names of the sections and the number of presentations in each are as follows: (1)…

  19. Summaries of the Regional Conferences Held in Preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNEVOC Info, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, five regional conferences were held in preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education (TVE). The Asia-Pacific regional conference focused on challenges of the 21st century, demands of the world of work, and changing patterns in the delivery of training programs. The European symposium covered five…

  20. PREFACE: XVII Congress of Bioengineering and VI Clinical Engineering Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Darío

    2011-09-01

    SABI 2009 was the XVII Biennial Congress of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society (SABI - www.sabi.org.ar), celebrated along with the VI Clinical Engineering Conference. It took place in Rosario, the second city of Argentina, located on the west bank of the Paraná, one of the world's most important rivers. This city, with its 150 year history and one million inhabitants, is characterized by a strong enterprising spirit. It is the agroindustrial leader of Argentina, with cereal ports recognized to be among the most active in the world, and its cereal stock exchange competes with Chicago's in international cereal pricing. Demographically Rosario presents a European profile, and there are seven national and private higher level universities in the area. SABI 2009 was the first time the Congress was celebrated in Rosario. Usually the Congress is organized by the Bioengineering Society in cooperation with a university with an undergraduate program, which Rosario lacks. To meet the needs of this exceptional case, a young local institution was asked to coordinate the Congress, the Rosario Technological Center (www.polotecnologico.net). This organization gathers together around 100 companies that produce technology, with a large number focused on IT, but those focused on biotechnology also stand out. The Center is also integrated with relevant public and government bodies. Traditionally, bioengineering has been related to human health applications, with less emphasis on applications significant to agrotechnology, an area in which Rosario is growing as an economic force. In order to address this oversight, the Congress formulated its main goals for integrating and synergizing bioengineering and biotechnology, particularly bioengineering and agrotechnology. This initiative has produced promising results. The importance of the Congress was reflected in the high number of participants - including researchers, professionals and students - from abroad, with participants from

  1. An Inquiry into Library of Congress Cataloging Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellen, George B., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Two problems related to the delay in Library of Congress cataloging which are beyond the control of the Library of Congress are presented. It is concluded that some explanation should be given of the priority system of cataloging employed by the Library of Congress, and that steps must be taken to alleviate the printing backlog. (16 references)…

  2. Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP): accomplishments, challenges, and policy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Racine, Andrew D; Long, Thomas F; Helm, Mark E; Hudak, Mark; Racine, Andrew D; Shenkin, Budd N; Snider, Iris Grace; White, Patience Haydock; Droge, Molly; Harbaugh, Norman

    2014-03-01

    Sixteen years ago, the 105th Congress, responding to the needs of 10 million children in the United States who lacked health insurance, created the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) as part of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Enacted as Title XXI of the Social Security Act, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP; or SCHIP as it has been known at some points) provided states with federal assistance to create programs specifically designed for children from families with incomes that exceeded Medicaid thresholds but that were insufficient to enable them to afford private health insurance. Congress provided $40 billion in block grants over 10 years for states to expand their existing Medicaid programs to cover the intended populations, to erect new stand-alone SCHIP programs for these children, or to effect some combination of both options. Congress reauthorized CHIP once in 2009 under the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act and extended its life further within provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The purpose of this statement is to review the features of CHIP as it has evolved over the 16 years of its existence; to summarize what is known about the effects that the program has had on coverage, access, health status, and disparities among participants; to identify challenges that remain with respect to insuring this group of vulnerable children, including the impact that provisions of the new Affordable Care Act will have on the issue of health insurance coverage for near-poor children after 2015; and to offer recommendations on how to expand and strengthen the national commitment to provide health insurance to all children regardless of means.

  3. PHYSICS: Toward Atom Chips.

    PubMed

    Fortágh, József; Zimmermann, Claus

    2005-02-11

    As a novel approach for turning the peculiar features of quantum mechanics into practical devices, researchers are investigating the use of ultracold atomic clouds above microchips. Such "atom chips" may find use as sensitive probes for gravity, acceleration, rotation, and tiny magnetic forces. In their Perspective, Fortagh and Zimmermann discuss recent advances toward creating atom chips, in which current-carrying conductors in the chips create magnetic microtraps that confine the atomic clouds. Despite some intrinsic limits to the performance of atom chips, existing technologies are capable of producing atom chips, and many possibilities for their construction remain to be explored.

  4. Library of Congress Model, Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets.

    The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest.

    The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the mountains, leaving little rainfall for areas further inland, thus creating the deserts.

    Topography also controls the land use pattern. The mountains are mostly very

  5. Library of Congress Model, Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets.

    The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest.

    The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the mountains, leaving little rainfall for areas further inland, thus creating the deserts.

    Topography also controls the land use pattern. The mountains are mostly very

  6. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) - 17th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (June 8-11, 2016 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Walker, G; Croasdell, G

    2016-06-01

    The 2016 Annual European Congress of Rheumatology, an annual conference organized by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), took place in London, U.K. Over 4,000 abstracts were submitted this year with over 199 sessions and poster tours on offer. The congress has become a major event in the field of rheumatology with participants attending from around the world. The oral sessions, poster displays and lectures cover a broad spectrum of topics, including the latest understanding of disease processes, as well as recent advances in diagnosis and patient care. PMID:27458612

  7. Legislative Update--104th Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Cindy

    1996-01-01

    Discusses major issues pending in the Second Session of the 104th Congress, noting the impact on language education and focusing on educational reform agendas, recissions, the budget process, appropriations, and English as the official U.S. government language. Individuals in related professional organizations are urged to take steps to influence…

  8. Groups concerned about Congress and criticism

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-12-07

    Environmental groups are concerned about the impact a Republican-dominated Congress will have on their activities. The Republican agenda would {open_quotes}severely undercut public health and environmental protection, {close_quotes} says the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC; Washington).

  9. American Sculpture and the Library of Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somma, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress is one of the more significant public structures in American architecture, due for the most part to its wealth and quality of decoration, including an extensive sculptural program executed in 1894-97. The architects entrusted the program to a committee of three prominent sculptors, J. Q. A.…

  10. Legislative Priorities for the 105th Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Vocational Technical Education Consortium.

    The National Association of State Directors of Vocational Technical Education Consortium (NASDVTEC) supports enactment of legislation that is dedicated solely to vocational-technical education (VTE). NASDVTEC urges the 105th Congress to build on the existing foundation of a strong state role in VTE by drafting legislation that achieves the…

  11. Perkins Bill is Approved by Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2006-01-01

    Career and technical education programs will face new pressure to show that they are academically rigorous and guiding high school students through a lineup of courses that prepares them for college or the workplace, under a bill approved by Congress. The reauthorization of the federal law known as the Perkins Act--dealing with what traditionally…

  12. Math-Science Bills Advance in Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.; Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Improving K-12 instruction and student achievement in mathematics and science is at the heart of separate bills intended to bolster America's economic standing that won overwhelming approval in both houses of Congress last week. The House on April 24 approved the 10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds Science and Math Scholarship Act by a vote of…

  13. The 106th Congress: What to Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fege, Arnold F.

    1999-01-01

    The Improving America's School Act funds numerous small programs that dissipate its purpose and increase its vulnerability. Congress is debating extension of federal roles into areas such as social promotion, parental rights, reading programs, class-size reduction, and national voluntary tests. Changing budget rules pits education against military…

  14. IT Strategy for the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inouye, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Presents an abstract for a planned technical session to discuss the report of the Committee on the Information Technology Strategy of the Library of Congress, developed by the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Highlights include digital information, Web links, preservation, and the management of libraries.…

  15. CONGRESS ON SCIENCE TEACHING AND ECONOMIC GROWTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-Union Commission on the Teaching of Science, Paris (France).

    REPORTED ARE THE ACTIVITIES OF THE CONGRESS ORGANIZED BY THE INTER-UNION COMMISSION ON SCIENCE TEACHING (CEIS) OF THE INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF SCIENTIFIC UNIONS (ICSU). STUDIED WERE PROBLEMS ARISING IN SEVERAL BRANCHES OF KNOWLEDGE DUE TO BOTH INCREASED NUMBERS OF STUDENTS AND SHORTAGE OF TEACHERS. OF PARTICULAR INTEREST WERE THE PROBLEMS OF…

  16. Punctuation in Library of Congress Subject Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Hilda

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the punctuation of the eighth edition Library of Congress Subject Headings reveals that the hyphen, coma and parentheses are most often used. Examples of these and the use of the apostrophe, dash, and period are discussed. (Author/MBR)

  17. International Energy and Environmental Congress: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information presented at the International Energy and Environmental Congress `93 proceedings. Symposiums included demand-side management strategic directions; federal energy management; corporate energy management; and pollution control technologies. Individual reports from the symposiums are processed separately for the data bases.

  18. A Message to Congress: Redefining Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, David

    1997-01-01

    This article sees Reading Recovery as a tool for systemic change that has the potential to reduce the number of children classified with learning disabilities. The article contends that as the United States Congress meets to revisit the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" (IDEA), it is imperative that they develop an awareness of…

  19. Molecular spectroscopy and molecular structure - Selected communications presented at the 1st International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durig, James R.; Fausto, Rui; Ünsalan, Ozan; Bayarı, Sevgi; Kuş, Nihal; Ildız, Gülce Ö.

    2016-01-01

    The First International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013) took place at the Harbiye Cultural Center & Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, September 15-20, 2013. The main aim of the congress was to encourage the exchange of scientific ideas and collaborations all around the world, introduce new techniques and instruments, and discuss recent developments in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Among the different subjects covered, particular emphasis was given to the relevance of spectroscopy to elucidate details of the molecular structure and the chemical and physical behavior of systems ranging from simple molecules to complex biochemical molecules. Besides experimental spectroscopic approaches, related computational and theoretical methods were also considered. In this volume, selected contributions presented at the congress were put together.

  20. A proposed holistic approach to on-chip, off-chip, test, and package interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelink, Dirk J.

    1998-11-01

    The term interconnection has traditionally implied a `robust' connection from a transistor or a group of transistors in an IC to the outside world, usually a PC board. Optimum system utilization is done from outside the IC. As an alternative, this paper addresses `unimpeded' transistor-to-transistor interconnection aimed at reaching the high circuit densities and computational capabilities of neighboring IC's. In this view, interconnections are not made to some human-centric place outside the IC world requiring robustness—except for system input and output connections. This unimpeded interconnect style is currently available only through intra-chip signal traces in `system-on-a-chip' implementations, as exemplified by embedded DRAMs. Because the traditional off-chip penalty in performance and wiring density is so large, a merging of complex process technologies is the only option today. It is suggested that, for system integration to move forward, the traditional robustness requirement inherited from conventional packaging interconnect and IC manufacturing test must be discarded. Traditional system assembly from vendor parts requires robustness under shipping, inspection and assembly. The trend toward systems on a chip signifies willingness by semiconductor companies to design and fabricate whole systems in house, so that `in-house' chip-to-chip assembly is not beyond reach. In this scenario, bare chips never leave the controlled environment of the IC fabricator while the two major contributors to off-chip signal penalty, ESD protection and the need to source a 50-ohm test head, are avoided. With in-house assembly, ESD protection can be eliminated with the precautions already familiar in plasma etching. Test interconnection impacts the fundamentals of IC manufacturing, particularly with clock speeds approaching 1GHz, and cannot be an afterthought. It should be an integral part of the chip-to-chip interconnection bandwidth optimization, because—as we must

  1. How to interact with Congress about Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbach, Raymond

    The role of Congress is critical to the succes of the scientific enterprise, both in terms of authorization and appropriation. As a consequence, it is very important to make the case for science directly with Congress. Every scientist has a representative in the House of Representatives in whose district he/she lives, and in the Senate. Constituents are especially welcomed in their offices. A personal visit is the most effective means for transmitting the importance of science in general, and physics in particular. The AAAS website lists the ``Top Ten Rules for Working With Congress.'' They are: (1) Know your goal; (2) Understand how Congress works; (3) Conduct detailed background research; (4) Determine the timing of your course of action; (5) Be clear and succinct; (6) Understand Congressional staff and their influence; (7) Provide concrete suggestions; (8) Present support of science as a means to meet national and local goals, not as an entitlement; (9)Be willing to say ``I don't know'' and (10) Follow up appropriately. Each of these will be described in more detail during the presentation. The March Meeting is an example of a particularly important time period for meeting with representatives (Rule #4). The President's Budget Request has been submitted to Congress, and the individual appropriation subcommittees are in the process of developing their respective ``mark ups.'' Appointments with members or their staff is now timely, and urgent. Authorization bills are also in play, and can have significant impact on the scientific community. Paying attention to their development in key committees (e.g. the Science, Space, and Technology Committee of the House of Representatives), and providing appropriate and timely input, is the responsibility of every scientist.

  2. To keep the catch – that is the question: a personal account of the 3rd Annual EULAR Congress, Stockholm

    PubMed Central

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2002-01-01

    The 3rd Annual EULAR Congress, held in Stockholm on 12–15 June 2002, had a turnout of 8300 delegates, almost identical to last year's record attendance level in Prague. The venue was close to ideal, allowing ample space for poster sessions in the exhibition hall. The manned poster sessions were well attended, even on the last day of the Congress. The numerous invited speakers represented the world's elite, allowing the staging of excellent state-of-the-art podium sessions. The aim of attracting the young scientific community was partly achieved, but individual delegates' dependence on industry sponsorship poses potential problems. The organization was a big improvement compared to that of the two previous congresses. Approximately 1800 abstracts were submitted, an increase of 50%, resulting in a higher quality of accepted abstracts. The satellite symposia held every morning and late afternoon were well attended; thus, industry exposure of new products, both in podium sessions and at the exhibitions, was well accommodated. The Annual EULAR Congress consolidates its position as one of the two most important annual congresses of rheumatology, but EULAR economy and commercial aspects are still too dominant in relation to science. PMID:12223107

  3. A decline in prosocial language helps explain public disapproval of the US Congress

    PubMed Central

    Frimer, Jeremy A.; Aquino, Karl; Gebauer, Jochen E.; Zhu, Luke (Lei); Oakes, Harrison

    2015-01-01

    Talking about helping others makes a person seem warm and leads to social approval. This work examines the real world consequences of this basic, social-cognitive phenomenon by examining whether record-low levels of public approval of the US Congress may, in part, be a product of declining use of prosocial language during Congressional debates. A text analysis of all 124 million words spoken in the House of Representatives between 1996 and 2014 found that declining levels of prosocial language strongly predicted public disapproval of Congress 6 mo later. Warm, prosocial language still predicted public approval when removing the effects of societal and global factors (e.g., the September 11 attacks) and Congressional efficacy (e.g., passing bills), suggesting that prosocial language has an independent, direct effect on social approval. PMID:25964358

  4. A decline in prosocial language helps explain public disapproval of the US Congress.

    PubMed

    Frimer, Jeremy A; Aquino, Karl; Gebauer, Jochen E; Zhu, Luke Lei; Oakes, Harrison

    2015-05-26

    Talking about helping others makes a person seem warm and leads to social approval. This work examines the real world consequences of this basic, social-cognitive phenomenon by examining whether record-low levels of public approval of the US Congress may, in part, be a product of declining use of prosocial language during Congressional debates. A text analysis of all 124 million words spoken in the House of Representatives between 1996 and 2014 found that declining levels of prosocial language strongly predicted public disapproval of Congress 6 mo later. Warm, prosocial language still predicted public approval when removing the effects of societal and global factors (e.g., the September 11 attacks) and Congressional efficacy (e.g., passing bills), suggesting that prosocial language has an independent, direct effect on social approval.

  5. VII International Congress of Engineering Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    In the frame of the fortieth anniversary celebration of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana and the Physics Engineering career, the Division of Basic Science and Engineering and its Departments organized the "VII International Congress of Physics Engineering". The Congress was held from 24 to 28 November 2014 in Mexico City, Mexico. This congress is the first of its type in Latin America, and because of its international character, it gathers experts on physics engineering from Mexico and all over the globe. Since 1999, this event has shown research, articles, projects, technological developments and vanguard scientists. These activities aim to spread, promote, and share the knowledge of Physics Engineering. The topics of the Congress were: • Renewable energies engineering • Materials technology • Nanotechnology • Medical physics • Educational physics engineering • Nuclear engineering • High precision instrumentation • Atmospheric physics • Optical engineering • Physics history • Acoustics This event integrates lectures on top trending topics with pre-congress workshops, which are given by recognized scientists with an outstanding academic record. The lectures and workshops allow the exchange of experiences, and create and strengthen research networks. The Congress also encourages professional mobility among all universities and research centres from all countries. CIIF2014 Organizing and Editorial Committee Dr. Ernesto Rodrigo Vázquez Cerón Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco ervc@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Luis Enrique Noreña Franco Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco lnf@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Alberto Rubio Ponce Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco arp@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Óscar Olvera Neria Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco oon@correo.azc.uam.mx Professor Jaime Granados Samaniego Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Azcapotzalco jgs@correo.azc.uam.mx Dr. Roberto Tito Hern

  6. The 16th International Geological Congress, Washington, 1933

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1933, the International Geological Congress (IGC) returned to the United States of America (USA) for its sixteenth meeting, forty-two years after the 5th IGC convened in Washington. The Geological Society of America and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) supplied the major part of the required extra-registration funding after the effects of the Great Depression influenced the 72th U.S. Congress not to do so. A reported 1, 182 persons or organizations, representing fifty-four countries, registered for the 16 th IGC and thirty-four countries sent 141 official delegates. Of the total number of registrants, 665 actually attended the meeting; 500 came from the USA; and fifteen had participated in the 5th IGC. The 16 th Meeting convened in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Building from 22 to 29 July. The eighteen half-day scientific sections-orogenesis (four), major divisions of the Paleozoic (three), miscellaneous (three), batholiths and related intrusives (two), arid-region geomorphic processes and products (one), fossil man and contemporary faunas (one), geology of copper and other ore deposits (one), geology of petroleum (one), measuring geologic time (one), and zonal relations of metalliferous deposits (one)-included 166 papers, of which fifty (including several of the key contributions) appeared only by title. The Geological Society of Washington, the National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. Bureau of Mines hosted or contributed to evening presentations or receptions. Twenty-eight of the 16th IGC's thirty new guidebooks and one new USGS Bulletin aided eight pre-meeting, seven during-meeting, and four post-meeting field trips of local, regional, or national scope. The remaining two new guidebooks outlined the USA's structural geology and its stratigraphic nomenclature. The 16th IGC published a two-volume monograph on the world's copper resources (1935) and a two-volume report of its proceedings (1936).

  7. Wrapping up the 105th Congress.

    PubMed

    Link, D

    1998-12-01

    The 105th Congress was one of the most fiercely partisan in memory. It approved historic increases in AIDS funding, wrestled through the Clinton impeachment process, and saw dramatic changes in leadership. Virtually all legislative activity related to HIV funding occurred just before the election, in an omnibus budget package that included an $855 million increase in AIDS funding. The 105th Congress also restored immigrants' eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid. The Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief Act was passed, providing financial compensation to people infected by contaminated clotting products. Also, Dr. Jane Henney was approved as Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). She is the first woman to head the agency. She was approved only after promising not to support an anti-tobacco agenda or the approval of RU-486, which is also known as the abortion pill.

  8. Wrapping up the 105th Congress.

    PubMed

    Link, D

    1998-12-01

    The 105th Congress was one of the most fiercely partisan in memory. It approved historic increases in AIDS funding, wrestled through the Clinton impeachment process, and saw dramatic changes in leadership. Virtually all legislative activity related to HIV funding occurred just before the election, in an omnibus budget package that included an $855 million increase in AIDS funding. The 105th Congress also restored immigrants' eligibility for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid. The Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief Act was passed, providing financial compensation to people infected by contaminated clotting products. Also, Dr. Jane Henney was approved as Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). She is the first woman to head the agency. She was approved only after promising not to support an anti-tobacco agenda or the approval of RU-486, which is also known as the abortion pill. PMID:11366021

  9. Annual report to Congress, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for disposing of the Nation`s spent nuclear fuel from civilian nuclear power reactors and high-level radioactive waste from its defense activities in a cost-effective manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers and the quality of the environment. To accomplish this mission OCRWM is developing a waste management system consisting of a geologic repository, a facility for monitored retrievable storage, and a system for transporting the waste. This is the ninth annual report submitted by the OCRWM to Congress. The OCRWM submits this report to inform Congress of its activities and expenditures during fiscal year 1992 (October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992).

  10. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  11. Causes of stem end chip defect in chipping potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect (SECD) is a serious tuber quality concern that affects chipping potatoes. This defect is characterized by dark-colored vascular tissues and adjacent cortical tissues at the tuber stem-end of potato chips after frying. Chips with SECD are unappealing to consumers and raw product ...

  12. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-09-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases.

  13. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once!

  14. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-09-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases. PMID:27621942

  15. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases.

  16. 11th International Congress of Endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, P J

    2001-03-01

    The Olympics of endocrinology, the 11th International Congress of Endocrinolgy was held rather appropriately in Sydney, four weeks after the summer games of the XXWIIth Modern Olympiad. Both occasions were a great success and whilst it may be tempting to extend the analogy to the pool or the track or heaven forbid, digress into 'drugs in sport', this review will focus on endocrinology. There were over 3000 participants with ten plenary lectures, 20 meet-the-expert sessions, 41 symposia, 128 oral free communications and 1500 posters. Sydney post-Olympics provided a vibrant, exciting and picturesque setting with outstanding convention facilities. The Congress Party was held at Campbells Cove in the lee of the Harbour Bridge looking toward the Opera House which provided an opportunity for delegates to view the two architectural icons that had become so familiar in the preceding months. Credit must be given both to the Local Organising Committee of Sydney endocrinologists who made it all happen and to the International Program Organising Committee who crafted a pageant of first rate endocrinology. It is self-evident that this report can only hope to give the reader a flavour of a Congress such as this with the choice of topics being largely idiosyncratic. With five concurrent symposia and two concurrent orals each morning and afternoon of the four days, any omissions reflect not on the topic or its importance but on this reviewer's inability to be in more than one place at once! PMID:11424899

  17. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases. PMID:27621942

  18. CHIP, CHIP, ARRAY! THREE CHIPS FOR POST-GENOMIC RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cambridge Healthtech Institute recently held the 4th installment of their popular "Lab-on-a-Chip" series in Zurich, Switzerland. As usual, it was enthusiastically received and over 225 people attended the 2-1/2 day meeting to see and hear about some of the latest developments an...

  19. WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST CORRIDOR (ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD CATALOG) ON FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING EAST - Free Library of Philadelphia, Central Library, 1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. History of the World Allergy Organization: ICACI XI, London 1982, Planning and Results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    History of the World Allergy Organization: In 1951, the leaders in allergy from all over the world came together to form the International Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (IAACI). For the next 60 years, the allergy world converged at the IAACI triennial meetings, which became biennial in 2003. The international meetings, originally named the International Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ICACI), are now the World Allergy Congress (WAC) hosted by the World Allergy Organization (WAO). Everyone who has aspired to have worldwide recognition has played a part in IAACI-WAO. The History of the World Allergy Organization traces the global arc of the allergy field over the past 60 years. The current officers of WAO elected to focus on this rich history, inviting prominent leaders who are interested in being part of this history project to write about their time with IAACI-WAO. This series will be presented in Cancún, México as part of the XXII World Allergy Congress (December 4-8, 2011). Leading up to the Congress in Cancún, the World Allergy Organization Journal is presenting segments of the History as part of the "Notes of Allergy Watchers Series," starting with this issue. Please enjoy. --Michael A. Kaliner, MD Historian, and Past-President (2006-2007) World Allergy Organization PMID:23282476

  1. On-chip particle trapping and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leake, Kaelyn Danielle

    The ability to control and manipulate the world around us is human nature. Humans and our ancestors have used tools for millions of years. Only in recent years have we been able to control objects at such small levels. In order to understand the world around us it is frequently necessary to interact with the biological world. Optical trapping and manipulation offer a non-invasive way to move, sort and interact with particles and cells to see how they react to the world around them. Optical tweezers are ideal in their abilities but they require large, non-portable, and expensive setups limiting how and where we can use them. A cheap portable platform is required in order to have optical manipulation reach its full potential. On-chip technology offers a great solution to this challenge. We focused on the Liquid-Core Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguide (liquid-core ARROW) for our work. The ARROW is an ideal platform, which has anti-resonant layers which allow light to be guided in liquids, allowing for particles to easily be manipulated. It is manufactured using standard silicon manufacturing techniques making it easy to produce. The planner design makes it easy to integrate with other technologies. Initially I worked to improve the ARROW chip by reducing the intersection losses and by reducing the fluorescence and background on the ARROW chip. The ARROW chip has already been used to trap and push particles along its channel but here I introduce several new methods of particle trapping and manipulation on the ARROW chip. Traditional two beam traps use two counter propagating beams. A trapping scheme that uses two orthogonal beams which counter to first instinct allow for trapping at their intersection is introduced. This scheme is thoroughly predicted and analyzed using realistic conditions. Simulations of this method were done using a program which looks at both the fluidics and optical sources to model complex situations. These simulations were also used to

  2. World oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. L.

    1982-06-01

    Results obtained through the application of 10 prominent world oil or world energy models to 12 scenarios are reported. These scenarios were designed to bound the range of likely future world oil market outcomes. Conclusions relate to oil market trends, impacts of policies on oil prices, security of oil supplies, impacts of policies on oil security problems, use of the oil import premium in policymaking, the transition to oil substitutes, and the state of the art of world oil modeling.

  3. Population Growth and Hunger. Hearing before the Select Committee on Hunger. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session (June 6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Hunger.

    Recommendations and issues concerning population growth rate and its linkage to hunger and malnutrition, family planning programs and U.S. foreign aid are presented in statements from representatives in Congress from the states of Texas, Michigan, Illinois and New York, and also representatives from World Population Society, the Futures Group,…

  4. Beating Swords into . . . Chips?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Eliot

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the efforts of the Pentagon to help U.S. companies remain competitive in high-tech civilian markets. The tug-of-war for these companies between Congress, which has come to view them as a vehicle for pork-barrel funding, and the administration, which is trying to rein them in, is described. (KR)

  5. International Congress of Applied Linguistics: Congress Abstracts (3rd, Copenhagen, August 21-26, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qvistgaard, Jacques, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains abstracts of the 239 papers given at the Third International Congress of Applied Linguistics. The volume contains a topical and author index arranged alphabetically. Topics include applied linguistics, quantitative linguistics, contrastive linguistics, application of grammar models, the syntax of spoken language, applied…

  6. Population Estimates Used by Congress during the Constitutional Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2006-01-01

    During the summer of 1787, when the delegates to the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia, the issue of representation in Congress was strongly debated. Delegates from the large states favored the Virginia Plan's proposal for two houses of Congress with representation based on population. Delegates from the small states favored equal…

  7. Finding the middle ground: how kinetochores power chromosome congression

    PubMed Central

    Saurin, Adrian T.

    2010-01-01

    Genomic stability requires error-free chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome congression to the spindle equator precedes chromosome segregation in anaphase and is a hallmark of metazoan mitosis. Here we review the current knowledge and concepts on the processes that underlie chromosome congression, including initial attachment to spindle microtubules, biorientation, and movements, from the perspective of the kinetochore. PMID:20232224

  8. 22 CFR 1102.9 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1102.9 Section 1102.9 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1102.9 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before March 1 of...

  9. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101.17 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.17 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before August 1 of...

  10. LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    The Library of Congress asked the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Academies to conduct a study to provide strategic advice concerning the information technology path that the Library of Congress should traverse over the coming decade. The Committee on an Information Technology Strategy for the Library of…

  11. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101.17 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.17 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before August 1 of each calendar year the Commissioner shall submit...

  12. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101.17 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1101.17 Annual report to Congress. (a) On or before August 1 of each calendar year the Commissioner shall submit...

  13. 6 Universities Give Congress New Plan for Taxing Campus Businesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaschik, Scott

    1988-01-01

    A new lobbying strategy by six universities, designed to show Congress that higher education may be willing to give up some tax advantages under current law, is also criticized as a tactical error when Congress is just beginning to consider changes in the tax law affecting nonprofit groups. (MSE)

  14. Kennedy Giving Historic Speech to Congress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    President John F. Kennedy in his historic message to a joint session of the Congress, on May 25, 1961 declared, '...I believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth.' This goal was achieved when astronaut Neil A. Armstrong became the first human to set foot upon the Moon at 10:56 p.m. EDT, July 20, 1969. Shown in the background are, (left) Vice President Lyndon Johnson, and (right) Speaker of the House Sam T. Rayburn.

  15. ChipScope: Actually, That Funny Way of Looking at It Works Pretty Well

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leander, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author describes and reflects on a kind of vision that is unique to Bertram C. ("Chip") Bruce. This "funny way of looking at it" includes a way of seeing the world as it is made in myriad connections, a way of seeing the world imaginatively and metaphorically, and a way of seeing the world with optimism and…

  16. Solar world congress: Proceedings of the biennial congress of the international solar energy society, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arden, M. E.; Burley, S. M. A.; Coleman, M.

    Contents: Wind Energy Experiences; Wind Energy Systems Performance; Wind Systems Applications and Hydropower; Utility and Regulatory Issues; Solar Hydrogen Technologies; Biotechnology; Bio-Chemical Conversion; Biofuels; Radiation Instruments, Measurements; Radiation Models; Simulation; Radiation Resources; Use of Radiation Data; and Renewable Resource Posters.

  17. Accelerator on a Chip

    ScienceCinema

    England, Joel

    2016-07-12

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  18. Accelerator on a Chip

    SciTech Connect

    England, Joel

    2014-06-30

    SLAC's Joel England explains how the same fabrication techniques used for silicon computer microchips allowed their team to create the new laser-driven particle accelerator chips. (SLAC Multimedia Communications)

  19. Chipping citrus wood for gasifiction

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, D.B.; Hedden, S.L.; Whitney, J.D.; Shaw, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    Both green and dead citrus trees were used for chipping. Chip moisture content, fuel analysis, drying time, and data on fuel/tonne of chips were obtained. The average moisture contents of green and dead trees when chipped were 25% and 16% (wet basis) respectively. Chips were sized to a minimum of 0.32 squared cm x 0.32 cm thick to a maximum of 5.0 cm squared x 0.32 cm thick and normally required 4 weeks to air dry to 14% (wet basis) moisture content before use. Approximately 50% of the total tree by weight could be made into usable chips. 9 references.

  20. In Congress Budget Update for NOAA, USGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Among the agenda items facing Congress as it reconvenes this week are the fiscal 1984 budgets for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is part of the Department of Commerce, and for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which is within the Department of the Interior. Fiscal year 1984 begins October 1, 1983. As Congress rolls up its shirtsleeves and gets down to business, Eos presents a status report on the two agency budgets.Both House and Senate appropriations committees have finished their work on the NOAA budget, which had been targeted by President Ronald Reagan for a $799.8 million appropriation request (program level of $843.2 million) in his proposed fiscal 1984 budget (Eos, February 15, 1983, p. 65). The House appropriation for NOAA (H.R. 3134 and H.R. 3222) is $998.5 million, with a program level of $1043.9 million. The Senate Appropriations Committee set its appropriation (S. 1721) at $987.8 million, with a program level of $1041.0 million.

  1. U.S. Congress playing budgetary endgame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Mike

    With fiscal year 1997 (FY '97) set to begin on October 1, the U.S. Congress was poised to fund most American science programs and agencies at or above the levels of funding appropriated in the tumultuous FY '96. Seeking to avert a drawn-out budget debate during an election year, congressional leaders were working feverishly in the last week of September to write appropriations bills that would be acceptable—though not necessarily satisfying—to both Congress and the Clinton Administration.On September 24, the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate approved the conference report of H.R. 3666, the appropriations bill that provides funding for the departments of Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and the Independent Agencies. The conference report of this VA-HUD bill provides $84.7 billion in spending for the affected agencies, including NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The conference report was weighted heavily toward the preferences of the Senate, where moderates and pragmatists were stressing compromise and pushing for appropriations bills that President Clinton would be likely to sign.

  2. 26 CFR 5e.274-8 - Travel expenses of Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Travel expenses of Members of Congress. 5e.274-8... TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS, TRAVEL EXPENSES OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS § 5e.274-8 Travel expenses of Members of Congress. (a) In general. Members of Congress (including any Delegate...

  3. 26 CFR 5e.274-8 - Travel expenses of Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Travel expenses of Members of Congress. 5e.274...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS, TRAVEL EXPENSES OF MEMBERS OF CONGRESS § 5e.274-8 Travel expenses of Members of Congress. (a) In general. Members of Congress (including...

  4. ESEA Reauthorization: The Importance of a World-Class K-12 Education for Our Economic Success. Hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, Second Session on Examining Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Reauthorization, Focusing on K-12 Education for Economic Success (March 9, 2010). Senate Hearing 111-885

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This hearing of the Committee of Health, Education, Labor and Pensions focused on the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This hearing on the economic importance of having a world-class K-12 education system should remind everyone of the critical importance of this reauthorization. Well-educated Americans are the single…

  5. Chip packaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaraj, Kumaraswamy (Inventor); Noll, Thomas E. (Inventor); Lockwood, Harry F. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hermetically sealed package for at least one semiconductor chip is provided which is formed of a substrate having electrical interconnects thereon to which the semiconductor chips are selectively bonded, and a lid which preferably functions as a heat sink, with a hermetic seal being formed around the chips between the substrate and the heat sink. The substrate is either formed of or includes a layer of a thermoplastic material having low moisture permeability which material is preferably a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and is a multiaxially oriented LCP material for preferred embodiments. Where the lid is a heat sink, the heat sink is formed of a material having high thermal conductivity and preferably a coefficient of thermal expansion which substantially matches that of the chip. A hermetic bond is formed between the side of each chip opposite that connected to the substrate and the heat sink. The thermal bond between the substrate and the lid/heat sink may be a pinched seal or may be provided, for example by an LCP frame which is hermetically bonded or sealed on one side to the substrate and on the other side to the lid/heat sink. The chips may operate in the RF or microwave bands with suitable interconnects on the substrate and the chips may also include optical components with optical fibers being sealed into the substrate and aligned with corresponding optical components to transmit light in at least one direction. A plurality of packages may be physically and electrically connected together in a stack to form a 3D array.

  6. The congress that never was: the Madrid International Congress of Psychology (1936).

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Helio; Lafuente, Enrique

    2008-11-01

    The 11th International Congress of Psychology did not take place in Madrid in September 1936, as initially planned. Instead, it was held in Paris in July of the following year. The finding of a so-far unpublished correspondence between the main organizers of the event, the Spanish psychologists José Germain and Emilio Mira, and the Swiss psychologist Edouard Claparède, makes it possible to gain new insight into the circumstances preventing its celebration in Madrid. This paper aims at shedding some light on such circumstances by unraveling the social and political context alluded to in these letters, and connecting their contents with other significant events and documents on the various organizational aspects of the congress. PMID:19244832

  7. The congress that never was: the Madrid International Congress of Psychology (1936).

    PubMed

    Carpintero, Helio; Lafuente, Enrique

    2008-11-01

    The 11th International Congress of Psychology did not take place in Madrid in September 1936, as initially planned. Instead, it was held in Paris in July of the following year. The finding of a so-far unpublished correspondence between the main organizers of the event, the Spanish psychologists José Germain and Emilio Mira, and the Swiss psychologist Edouard Claparède, makes it possible to gain new insight into the circumstances preventing its celebration in Madrid. This paper aims at shedding some light on such circumstances by unraveling the social and political context alluded to in these letters, and connecting their contents with other significant events and documents on the various organizational aspects of the congress.

  8. Superhabitable worlds.

    PubMed

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world. PMID:24380533

  9. Superhabitable worlds.

    PubMed

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world.

  10. After three decades of Medical Informatics Europe congresses.

    PubMed

    Dezelic, Gjuro

    2009-01-01

    European medical informatics professionals traditionally gather at congresses of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) named "Medical Informatics Europe - MIE". After more than three decades of successive organization of these congresses, some important points of their history of are presented. As the MIE Congress in Sarajevo, organized by the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BHSMI), is the third EFMI event in the western part of South-East Europe, a short review of the development of medical informatics in this part of Europe, together with important events in its history, will shortly be presented.

  11. The 2003 Air Medical Leadership Congress: findings and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Frank; Robinson, Kenneth; Judge, Tom; Eastlee, Connie; Frazer, Eileen; Thomas, Stephen H; Romig, Laurie; Blumen, Ira; Brozen, Reed; Williams, Ken; Swanson, Eric R; Hartsell, Stephen; Johnson, Jill; Hutton, Kevin; Heffernan, J; North, Michelle; Johnson, Kent; Petersen, Pat; Toews, Robert; Zalar, Christine M

    2004-01-01

    To address important concerns facing the air medical community, 149 air medical transport leaders, providers, consultants, and experts met September 4-6, 2003, in Salt Lake City, Utah, for a 3-day summit-the Air Medical Leadership Congress: Setting the Health Care Agenda for the Air Medical Community. Using data from a Web-based survey, top air medical transport issues were identified in four core areas: safety, medical care, cost/benefit, and regulatory/compliance. This report reviews the findings of previous congresses and summarizes the discussions, findings, recommendations, and proposed industry actions to address these issues as set forth by the 2003 congress participants. PMID:15127042

  12. Smart vision chips: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Christof

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents four working analog VLSI vision chips: (1) time-derivative retina, (2) zero-crossing chip, (3) resistive fuse, and (4) figure-ground chip; work in progress on computing motion and neuromorphic systems; and conceptual and practical lessons learned.

  13. Chipping citrus wood for gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, D.B.; Hedden, S.L.; Whitney, J.D.; Shaw, L.N.

    1985-01-01

    Non-productive citrus trees were chipped with a portable fly-wheel-type chipper powered by a 45 kW engine. Chips were air dried under an open shed to 14% (w.b.) moisture content. By weight, approximately 50% of the total tree could be made into usable chips. The root system averaged 36% of the total tree weight.

  14. Microstereolithography and its application to biochemical IC chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Koji; Maruo, Shoji; Hasegawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Takao

    2001-06-01

    The world's first micro stereo lithography, named IH process, was proposed and developed by the speaker in 1992. By now, several types of micro stereo lithography systems have been developed. Three-dimensional resolution of solidification has reached to 0.2 micron at present. These 3D micro fabrication processes using UV curable polymer gave a big impact on not only MEMS but also optics. The latest version of IH process enables us to make a movable micro mechanism without assemble process or sacrificial layer technique often used in silicon process. It is well known that the IH process is the mother of two-photon micro stereo lithography and its applications. Recently new micro chemical device named Biochemical IC Chip was proposed and developed by the speaker. This chip is based on the module IC chip-set like today's TTL family. IH process enable to make the biochemical IC including real three-dimensional micro fluid channels. Various kinds of Biochemical IC chips such as micro pump, switching valve, reactor, concentrator and detector have already been fabricated successfully. Basic performance of micro chemical devices constructed by the biochemical IC chips were demonstrated. The biochemical IC chips will open new bioscience and medicine based on innovative technology.

  15. Congress hears testimony on Augustine Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    A range of space analysts assessed the future of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on January 29 and 31 before the House Science, Space, and Technology Committee. The committee's new chairman, George E. Brown, Jr. (D-Calif.), held the hearing on the Report of the Advisory Committee on the Future of the U.S. Space Program, better known as the Augustine Report, which was released in December.Most witnesses from government agencies, scientific associations, and universities lauded the report's conclusions, expressing strong consensus that NASA needed new direction. John M. Logsdon, director of George Washington University's Space Policy Institute, summed up the report's message as “let's stop 20 years of arguments and uncertainty and get on with a space program that commands stable support from the White House, the Congress, and the American people.”

  16. Siren song: physicians, congress, and medicare fees.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Miriam J

    2009-04-01

    Physicians' fees under Medicare are updated by regulation annually based on a formula called the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR). Since 2003 Congress has reversed impending cuts to fees in response to physician calls for reform of the SGR, yet physician groups supported the SGR when fee increases outstripped medical inflation. Physician groups are partly culpable for the failure of cost containment because physician groups have resisted efforts to regulate their practice or link effectiveness research to coverage and reimbursement decisions. In the story of Ulysses and the Sirens, Ulysses has himself bound to the mast so that he cannot be seduced by the calls of the Sirens. Physician groups are like sirens because legislators cannot resist their songs. Future policy changes should consider physician needs alongside broader cost-containment goals, including linking reimbursement to comparative effectiveness research. PMID:19276315

  17. History of the World Allergy Organization: The Miyamoto Years of 1991-1994, ICACI XIV in Kyoto, 1991

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    History of the World Allergy Organization: In 1951, the leaders in allergy from all over the world came together to form the International Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (IAACI). For the next 60 years, the allergy world converged at the IAACI triennial meetings, which became biennial in 2003. The international meetings, originally named the International Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ICACI), are now the World Allergy Congress (WAC) hosted by the World Allergy Organization (WAO). Everyone who has aspired to have worldwide recognition has played a part in IAACI-WAO. The History of the World Allergy Organization traces the global arc of the allergy field over the past 60 years. The current officers of WAO elected to focus on this rich history, inviting prominent leaders who are interested in being part of this history project to write about their time with IAACI-WAO. This series will be presented in Cancún, México as part of the XXII World Allergy Congress (December 4-8, 2011). Leading up to the Congress in Cancún, the World Allergy Organization Journal is presenting segments of the History as part of the "Notes of Allergy Watchers Series," starting with this issue. Please enjoy. --Michael A. Kaliner, MD Historian, and Past-President (2006-2007) World Allergy Organization PMID:23282477

  18. [Relations of Theodor Kocher with the "International Society of Surgery". His role as the 1st congress president].

    PubMed

    Liebermann-Meffert, D; Allgöwer, M; Rüedi, T

    1992-01-01

    With the aim of promoting progress in surgery through the friendly exchange of views and experience, the first International Society of Surgery was founded at Brussels in 1902, hereby helping to overcome the narrow boundaries of that times' nationalism. At its first congress, the "International Society of Surgery (ISS)", otherwise known by its French name "Société Internationale de Chirurgie (SIC)", numbered already 638 members, amongst them the most important surgeons from all over the world. Theodor Kocher was the president of the first congress, held at Brussels in 1905, and was also responsible for the choice of topics. His presidential address clearly reflected the high aims the Society set itself. Kocher's personal and professional authority, his surgical skill, which he liked so much to communicate to his colleagues, and his internationally minded thinking shaped the young society. He remained in the international committee of the ISS until his death in 1917. PMID:1398160

  19. Hydrogen program goal-setting methodologies: Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2006-08-01

    DOE's Hydrogen Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress summarizes the processes used to set Hydrogen Program goals and milestones. Published in August 2006, it fulfills the requirement under section 1819 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  20. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Original at Library of Congress, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Original at Library of Congress, Pictorial Archives of Early American Architecture Arthur A. Snyder, Photographer AQUEDUCT BRIDGE, FEBRUARY 2,1900 - Potomac Aqueduct, Georgetown abutment at Georgetown waterfront, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  2. 35. Photocopy of drawing (from Library of Congress) Artist unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of drawing (from Library of Congress) Artist unknown 1891 SOUTH FRONT FROM THE SOUTHWEST - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Campus Projects that Congress Earmarked for Funds This Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Colleen, Comp.; Leatherman, Courtney, Comp.

    1988-01-01

    A list of specific campus projects that Congress has directed federal agencies to support this year includes controversial projects (so-called pork barrel projects) for which the agencies did not request funding or sponsor competitions. (MSE)

  4. Computerization at the Library of Congress: The First Twenty Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrum, Charles; Dalrymple, Helen

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the automation process at the Library of Congress begun in 1961, noting problems encountered and future possibilities, and describing databases currently in use--SCORPIO, MUMS, MARC, COPICS AND COINS, ISIS, AND PAGING. (EJS)

  5. Cytometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (.50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the various species in

  6. Cytometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2011-01-01

    A cytometer now under development exploits spatial sorting of sampled cells on a microarray chip followed by use of grating-coupled surface-plasmon-resonance imaging (GCSPRI) to detect the sorted cells. This cytometer on a chip is a prototype of contemplated future miniature cytometers that would be suitable for rapidly identifying pathogens and other cells of interest in both field and laboratory applications and that would be attractive as alternatives to conventional flow cytometers. The basic principle of operation of a conventional flow cytometer requires fluorescent labeling of sampled cells, stringent optical alignment of a laser beam with a narrow orifice, and flow of the cells through the orifice, which is subject to clogging. In contrast, the principle of operation of the present cytometer on a chip does not require fluorescent labeling of cells, stringent optical alignment, or flow through a narrow orifice. The basic principle of operation of the cytometer on a chip also reduces the complexity, mass, and power of the associated laser and detection systems, relative to those needed in conventional flow cytometry. Instead of making cells flow in single file through a narrow flow orifice for sequential interrogation as in conventional flow cytometry, a liquid containing suspended sampled cells is made to flow over the front surface of a microarray chip on which there are many capture spots. Each capture spot is coated with a thin (approximately 50-nm) layer of gold that is, in turn, coated with antibodies that bind to cell-surface molecules characteristic of one the cell species of interest. The multiplicity of capture spots makes it possible to perform rapid, massively parallel analysis of a large cell population. The binding of cells to each capture spot gives rise to a minute change in the index of refraction at the surface of the chip. This change in the index of refraction is what is sensed in GCSPRI, as described briefly below. The identities of the

  7. Anti-choice groups target reproductive rights in Congress.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    In a May 3 memo, the GOP "Family Caucus" presented its legislative agenda for the remainder of the 104th Congress. Chaired by Representative Tom Coburn (R-OK), the anti-choice caucus promotes family and social issues, and emphasizes religious liberty and parental rights. It is seeking to eliminate funding for Title X of the Public Health Service Act, which provides grants to domestic family planning providers; repeal the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE); curtail fetal tissue research; restrict the production and sale of RU486; reduce funding for the US Agency for International Development (USAID); and hinder US representation at the UN Fourth World Conference on Women. On May 17, the Virginia-based Christian Coalition unveiled a ten-point "Contract with the American Family," which targets reproductive health care by restricting late-term abortions, reversing the Medicaid requirement that states cover abortions in cases of rape or incest, and eliminating funding for Title X and international family planning. Director Ralph Reed was joined at the group's press conference in the Capitol by Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich (R-GA) and Senator Phil Gramm (R-TX), both of whom are anti-abortion. Senate Majority Leader Robert Dole (R-KS), who is also anti-choice, met with Reed in his office later that day. Anti-choice representatives and senators met with some success in the last month in restricting US funding for family planning programs abroad, US participation in international meetings, and the performance of abortions at military facilities. Representative Charles Canady (R-FL) has introduced a bill banning modified dilation and evacuation abortions, and Representative Robert Dornan (R-CA) has introduced the "Family Planning Programs Repeal Act" (HR 1623).

  8. Radiometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Lee, Choonsup; Schlecht, Erich T.; Skalare, Anders; Ward, John S.; Siegel, Peter H.; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2009-01-01

    The radiometer on a chip (ROC) integrates whole wafers together to p rovide a robust, extremely powerful way of making submillimeter rece ivers that provide vertically integrated functionality. By integratin g at the wafer level, customizing the interconnects, and planarizing the transmission media, it is possible to create a lightweight asse mbly performing the function of several pieces in a more conventiona l radiometer.

  9. The fifth International Geological Congress, Washington, 1891

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 5th International Geological Congress (IGC), the initial meeting in North America, was the first of the three IGCs that have been held in the United States of America (USA). Of the 538 registrants alive when the 5th IGC convened in Washington, 251 persons, representing fifteen countries, actually attended the meeting. These participants included 173 people from the USA, of whom forty-two represented the US Geological Survey (USGS). Fourteen of the US State geological surveys sent representatives to Washington. Eight participants came from other countries in the Western Hemisphere - Canada (3), Chile (1), Mexico (3), and Peru (1). The sixty-six European geologists and naturalists at the 5th IGC represented Austro-Hungary (3), Belgium (3), Britain (12), France (7), Germany (23), Norway (1), Romania (3), Russia (8), Sweden (4), and Switzerland (2). The USGS and the Columbian College (now the George Washington University) acted as the principal hosts. The American Association for the Advancement of Science and then the Geological Society of America (GSA) met in the Capital immediately before the Congress convened (26 August-1 September 1891). The 5th IGC's formal discussions treated the genetic classification of Pleistocene rocks, the chronological correlation of clastic rocks, and the international standardization of colors, symbols, and names used on geologic maps. The third of those topics continued key debates at the 1st through 4th IGCs. The GSA, the Korean Embassy, the Smithsonian Institution's US National Museum, the USGS, and one of the two Secretaries-General hosted evening receptions. Field excursions examined Paleozoic exposures in New York (18-25 August), Cretaceous-Pleistocene localities along the Potomac River south of Washington (30 August), and classic Precambrian-Pleistocene sequences and structures in the Great Plains, Yellowstone, Rocky Mountains, and Great Basin (2-26 September), with optional trips to the Grand Canyon (19-28 September) and Lake

  10. Sofia Ionescu, the first woman neurosurgeon in the world.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Alexandru-Vlad; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Mohan, Dumitru

    2013-11-01

    The authors present the activity of Mrs. Sofia Ionescu, the one female surgeon who was nominated as the first woman neurosurgeon in the world. Sofia Ionescu worked in the field of neurosurgery for 47 years, performing all the known neurosurgical procedures of the time. She made herself known through her incredible surgical skill and her enormous work power. Due to her incredible modesty and workload, she never participated at international congresses or manifestations. The nomination as first woman neurosurgery took place in Marrakech, Morocco, during the 2005 WFNS Congress. Although some claim that Diana Beck was the first woman neurosurgeon in the world, our theory suggests otherwise. The first documented surgical intervention performed by Diana Beck dates to 1952. Sofia Ionescu operated for the first time on a human brain as early as 1944. Furthermore, Diana Beck's actions surfaced in the year 1947, long after the war had ended and Sofia Ionescu had become a neurosurgeon.

  11. Sofia Ionescu, the first woman neurosurgeon in the world.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Alexandru-Vlad; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Mohan, Dumitru

    2013-11-01

    The authors present the activity of Mrs. Sofia Ionescu, the one female surgeon who was nominated as the first woman neurosurgeon in the world. Sofia Ionescu worked in the field of neurosurgery for 47 years, performing all the known neurosurgical procedures of the time. She made herself known through her incredible surgical skill and her enormous work power. Due to her incredible modesty and workload, she never participated at international congresses or manifestations. The nomination as first woman neurosurgery took place in Marrakech, Morocco, during the 2005 WFNS Congress. Although some claim that Diana Beck was the first woman neurosurgeon in the world, our theory suggests otherwise. The first documented surgical intervention performed by Diana Beck dates to 1952. Sofia Ionescu operated for the first time on a human brain as early as 1944. Furthermore, Diana Beck's actions surfaced in the year 1947, long after the war had ended and Sofia Ionescu had become a neurosurgeon. PMID:23528794

  12. Our World?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling, Ed.

    Authored by individuals from five Nordic countries, this book focuses on questions about the child's right to live in and learn about an ecologically sustainable world. The first five chapters are theoretical in character, while the final six chapters are derived from work done by early childhood teachers together with children. The goal of the…

  13. World Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceres, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents a report that deals with several topics from different parts of the world. A system for creating more meaningful maps, the recycling of organic wastes in agriculture in China, and producing pigs and poultry without pollution problems are among the topics presented. (HM)

  14. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  15. The NAPAP 1996 report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Uhart, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) is currently producing its 1996 Report to Congress. In accordance with Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), this report will attempt to address two main policy-relevant issues: (1) the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV of the 1990 CAAA, and (2) the reductions in deposition rates needed to prevent adverse ecological effects. The 1996 Report is the first in a series of assessment reports that are required every four years. Therefore, this report must layout the foundation and methodology for future assessment reports, as well as identify research and monitoring gaps that will lead to more comprehensive assessments in the future. Several analyses have been performed on the costs of the acid deposition control program (Title IV) to date. Identifying and valuing the benefits of the program will be an evolving process. NAPAP has supported efforts that attempt to quantify aquatic, visibility, and health benefits for inclusion in the 1996 report with the hopes of expanding valuation to other benefits areas over the next four years. Reporting on ecological effects will also be a challenge. Future efforts will need to focus on further development of dose response functions for relevant effects areas in order to more fully understand ecological changes resulting from emissions reductions.

  16. 7th Annual European Antibody Congress 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 7th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The 2011 version of the EAC was attended by nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The first day focused on advances in understanding structure-function relationships, choosing the best format, glycoengineering biobetter antibodies, improving the efficacy and drugability of mAbs and epitope mapping. On the second day, the discovery of novel targets for mAb therapy, clinical pipeline updates, use of antibody combinations to address resistance, generation and identification of mAbs against new targets and biosimilar mAb development were discussed. Antibody-drug conjugates, domain antibodies and new scaffolds and bispecific antibodies were the topics of the third day. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:22453093

  17. Status report on the 104th congress

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, D.

    1995-11-01

    It`s hard to believe that just one year ago the Republicans introduced their {open_quotes}Contract with America{close_quotes}, promising broad legislative reform as they swept into Congress on a tide of national discontent with the political system. The first 100 days brought a frenzy of legislation that could have dramatically affected the nuclear medicine community with bills calling for the demise of Department Energy (DOE) to those that would have reduced the regulatory the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Yet most of the dramatic initiatives that came House were either defeated, delayed or diluted by the Senate. Entering the final stretch of the long legislative year, both the House and the Senate are now grappling with big items such as the Budget Reconciliation bill and Medicare reform. {open_quotes}It`s been an interesting year and most likely only the beginning of several years of legislative focus on issues affecting nuclear medicine including FDA reform,{close_quotes} said David Nichols, Associate Director of Government Relations for ACNP/SNM. Here are how things are shaping up and the potential impact on nuclear physicians.

  18. Congress delves into science with RU-486.

    PubMed

    Kaeser, L

    1998-12-01

    In June 1998, a conservative, Republican member of the US House of Representatives attempted to amend the 1999 bill authorizing funding for the US Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) to prevent government funds from being used to test, develop, or approve "any drug for the chemical inducement of abortion." This bill was designed to halt the approval process for RU-486, a drug that was deemed "approvable" by the USFDA in 1996. Arguments mounted against the amendment by medical, health, and research groups stated that 1) RU-486 is an advance because it permits abortions early in pregnancies, 2) it is improper for the US Congress to impose a scientific judgement on the USFDA, and 3) this amendment has adverse implications for a wide range of drugs and devices that might have an abortifacient effect but be approved for other uses. The House of Representatives passed the amendment but the Senate rejected it, and it was deleted from the final version of the legislation. The amendment is expected to resurface next year. The Congressional debate on RU-486 also spilled over into the appointment hearings for the nomination of Jane Henney as USFDA commissioner. During her confirmation process, Henney was grilled about whether she would grant final approval to RU-486. Henney's nomination was approved by committee but has not yet been considered by the full Senate.

  19. Astronomers, Congress, and the Large Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanle, P. A.

    1985-04-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project was initiated near the end of the Apollo program and immediately encountered fiscal contraints. Planned as a long-term facility, the HST had to be continually justified to the public, astronomers and Congress from 1973 onward. Budgetary restraints caused design reductions which for a while threatened the practicality of the HST and changed it from a pressurized, manned unit to an automatic mode, teleoperated, intermittently visited spacecraft. It is noted that numerous exaggerations were made of both the power of the HST for scientific research and the total support of the astronomical community during promotion of the HST program, although the HST is the most powerful visual wavelength telescope ever to be built due to its unique operating environment. NASA's consistent and steadily more detailed definitions of the design features and missions of the HST proved to be a decisive factor in repeated requests for information by funding committees who were deliberating in the presence of severe fiscal difficulties.

  20. National Space Transportation Policy: Issues for Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-05-01

    This report, prepared for the House Committee on Science, is the first in a broad assessment of the health and future prospects of the U.S. space transportation technology and industrial base. The report focuses on the Clinton Administration's National Space Transportation Policy, which was released last fall. It examines administration policy in light of the implementation plans prepared by NASA, DOD, and the Transportation and Commerce Departments. The policy also emphasizes the important contribution private industry can make to the direction and development of U.S. space transportation capabilities. However, an analysis of the policy and implementation plans also raises some issues that might be of interest to Congress as it debates space transportation legislation, oversight, and funding. These issues involve decisions on NASA and DOD development programs, the use of foreign launch vehicles, and the new role of the private sector in space transportation research and development decisionmaking. This report also identifies two issues omitted from the Administration's policy: the preservation of long-range ballistic missile capabilities after final production in 2005, and the perspective of lower industrial tier firms toward national space transportation policy.

  1. On-Chip Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems have been rapidly emerging to pave the way toward ultra-compact, efficient, mass producible and cost-effective biomedical research and diagnostic tools. Although such microfluidic and micro electromechanical systems achieved high levels of integration, and are capable of performing various important tasks on the same chip, such as cell culturing, sorting and staining, they still rely on conventional microscopes for their imaging needs. Recently several alternative on-chip optical imaging techniques have been introduced, which have the potential to substitute conventional microscopes for various lab-on-a-chip applications. Here we present a critical review of these recently emerging on-chip biomedical imaging modalities, including contact shadow imaging, lensfree holographic microscopy, fluorescent on-chip microscopy and lensfree optical tomography. PMID:23558399

  2. Impressive Words: Linguistic Predictors of Public Approval of the U.S. Congress.

    PubMed

    Decter-Frain, Ari; Frimer, Jeremy A

    2016-01-01

    What type of language makes the most positive impression within a professional setting? Is competent/agentic language or warm/communal language more effective at eliciting social approval? We examined this basic social cognitive question in a real world context using a "big data" approach-the recent record-low levels of public approval of the U.S. Congress. Using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), we text analyzed all 123+ million words spoken by members of the U.S. House of Representatives during floor debates between 1996 and 2014 and compared their usage of various classes of words to their public approval ratings over the same time period. We found that neither agentic nor communal language positively predicted public approval. However, this may be because communion combines two disparate social motives (belonging and helping). A follow-up analysis found that the helping form of communion positively predicted public approval, and did so more strongly than did agentic language. Next, we conducted an exploratory analysis, examining which of the 63 standard LIWC categories predict public approval. We found that the public approval of Congress was highest when politicians used tentative language, expressed both positive emotion and anxiety, and used human words, numbers, prepositions, numbers, and avoided conjunctions and the use of second-person pronouns. These results highlight the widespread primacy of warmth over competence as the primary dimensions of social cognition. PMID:26941691

  3. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H.; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host–pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress. PMID:27730203

  4. Impressive Words: Linguistic Predictors of Public Approval of the U.S. Congress

    PubMed Central

    Decter-Frain, Ari; Frimer, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    What type of language makes the most positive impression within a professional setting? Is competent/agentic language or warm/communal language more effective at eliciting social approval? We examined this basic social cognitive question in a real world context using a “big data” approach—the recent record-low levels of public approval of the U.S. Congress. Using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), we text analyzed all 123+ million words spoken by members of the U.S. House of Representatives during floor debates between 1996 and 2014 and compared their usage of various classes of words to their public approval ratings over the same time period. We found that neither agentic nor communal language positively predicted public approval. However, this may be because communion combines two disparate social motives (belonging and helping). A follow-up analysis found that the helping form of communion positively predicted public approval, and did so more strongly than did agentic language. Next, we conducted an exploratory analysis, examining which of the 63 standard LIWC categories predict public approval. We found that the public approval of Congress was highest when politicians used tentative language, expressed both positive emotion and anxiety, and used human words, numbers, prepositions, numbers, and avoided conjunctions and the use of second-person pronouns. These results highlight the widespread primacy of warmth over competence as the primary dimensions of social cognition. PMID:26941691

  5. Improving adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Latin America: reflections from an International Congress.

    PubMed

    Córdova Pozo, Kathya; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Decat, Peter; Nelson, Erica; De Meyer, Sara; Jaruseviciene, Lina; Vega, Bernardo; Segura, Zoyla; Auquilla, Nancy; Hagens, Arnold; Van Braeckel, Dirk; Michielsen, Kristien

    2015-01-01

    In February 2014, an international congress on Promoting Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (ASRH) took place in Cuenca, Ecuador. Its objective was to share evidence on effective ASRH intervention projects and programs in Latin America, and to link this evidence to ASRH policy and program development. Over 800 people participated in the three-day event and sixty-six presentations were presented.This paper summarizes the key points of the Congress and of the Community Embedded Reproductive Health Care for Adolescents (CERCA) project. It aims at guiding future ASRH research and policy in Latin America. 1. Context matters. Individual behaviors are strongly influenced by the social context in which they occur, through determinants at the individual, relational, family, community and societal levels. Gender norms/attitudes and ease of communication are two key determinants. 2. Innovative action. There is limited and patchy evidence of effective approaches to reach adolescents with the health interventions they need at scale. Yet, there exist several promising and innovative examples of providing comprehensive sexuality education through conventional approaches and using new media, improving access to health services, and reaching adolescents as well as families and community members using community-based interventions were presented at the Congress. 3. Better measurement. Evaluation designs and indicators chosen to measure the effect and impact of interventions are not always sensitive to subtle and incremental changes. This can create a gap between measured effectiveness and the impact perceived by the targeted populations. Thus, one conclusion is that we need more evidence to better determine the factors impeding progress in ASRH in Latin American, to innovate and respond flexibly to changing social dynamics and cultural practices, and to better measure the impact of existing intervention strategies. Yet, this Congress offered a starting point from which to

  6. Improving adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Latin America: reflections from an International Congress.

    PubMed

    Córdova Pozo, Kathya; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Decat, Peter; Nelson, Erica; De Meyer, Sara; Jaruseviciene, Lina; Vega, Bernardo; Segura, Zoyla; Auquilla, Nancy; Hagens, Arnold; Van Braeckel, Dirk; Michielsen, Kristien

    2015-01-01

    In February 2014, an international congress on Promoting Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health (ASRH) took place in Cuenca, Ecuador. Its objective was to share evidence on effective ASRH intervention projects and programs in Latin America, and to link this evidence to ASRH policy and program development. Over 800 people participated in the three-day event and sixty-six presentations were presented.This paper summarizes the key points of the Congress and of the Community Embedded Reproductive Health Care for Adolescents (CERCA) project. It aims at guiding future ASRH research and policy in Latin America. 1. Context matters. Individual behaviors are strongly influenced by the social context in which they occur, through determinants at the individual, relational, family, community and societal levels. Gender norms/attitudes and ease of communication are two key determinants. 2. Innovative action. There is limited and patchy evidence of effective approaches to reach adolescents with the health interventions they need at scale. Yet, there exist several promising and innovative examples of providing comprehensive sexuality education through conventional approaches and using new media, improving access to health services, and reaching adolescents as well as families and community members using community-based interventions were presented at the Congress. 3. Better measurement. Evaluation designs and indicators chosen to measure the effect and impact of interventions are not always sensitive to subtle and incremental changes. This can create a gap between measured effectiveness and the impact perceived by the targeted populations. Thus, one conclusion is that we need more evidence to better determine the factors impeding progress in ASRH in Latin American, to innovate and respond flexibly to changing social dynamics and cultural practices, and to better measure the impact of existing intervention strategies. Yet, this Congress offered a starting point from which to

  7. Forensic Analysis of BIOS Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershteyn, Pavel; Davis, Mark; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Data can be hidden in BIOS chips without hindering computer performance. This feature has been exploited by virus writers and computer game enthusiasts. Unused BIOS storage can also be used by criminals, terrorists and intelligence agents to conceal secrets. However, BIOS chips are largely ignored in digital forensic investigations. Few techniques exist for imaging BIOS chips and no tools are available specifically for analyzing BIOS data.

  8. Securing Contactless Chips with PACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügler, Dennis

    PACE (Password Authenticated Connection Establishment) is a cryptographic protocol that was developed to provide a secure knowledge-based authentication mechanism for contactless chips. The problems that are inherent to (but not limited to) contactless chips are described and PACE as a solution based on cryptographic tools is sketched. Finally, it is shown how to use PACE together with traditional short PINs of 4-6 digits as access control mechanism for contactless chips withstanding denial-of-service attacks.

  9. Chips in banknotes for a banknote electronic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, Maurice; Grimal, Jean-Michel; Beauchet, Frederic; Dell'Ova, Francis

    2004-06-01

    A lot of information can be found in the media about the possibility of using micro-chips in banknotes. This mostly comes from chip manufacturers whose technology is becoming mature for this application. A lot of patents have been applied therefore but what must be noticed is that all these patents concern the processes to insert chips in banknotes and not a lot is said about the product itself and for what use. The Banque de France is a Central Bank involved in all tasks concerning banknotes from design, production, issue, recirculation and sorting, action against counterfeiting and finally destruction. These activities concern, of course, the banknotes in circulation in France (formerly the French francs notes, presently the Euro notes as Banque de France is part of the Eurosystem) and in other countries in the world. The Banque de France approach in looking to the future of chips in banknotes is at first a product approach. Banknotes are means of payment for which security of authentication is fundamental. They could carry chips to provide more security in the transactions but without altering their nature: the anonyminity and immediacy of the transactions.

  10. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  11. First Congress of the United States tackled geophysics in 1789

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Sam

    1998-06-01

    When the first Congress of the United States under the new Constitution convened in the spring of 1789, one of the first orders of business involved a geophysical project. This involved, first, a petition from John Churchman for protection of an invention for determination of longitude using magnetic variation, and second, a request for congressional support for a voyage to Baffin's Bay to determine the cause of the magnetic variation. The discussions and arguments are an instructive introduction to those that arise when Congress considers scientific projects. The new government came into being after ratification by the requisite nine states. The new Congress met for the first time on March 4, 1789, in New York, but almost immediately adjourned in the absence of a quorum.

  12. 75 FR 3372 - Safety Zone: Congress Street Bridge, Pequonnock River, Bridgeport, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone: Congress Street Bridge, Pequonnock River... establishing a temporary safety zone in the waters surrounding the Congress Street Bridge over the Pequonnock... Congress Street Bridge. Entry into this zone is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain of the...

  13. How Members of Congress Practice Private School Choice. Backgrounder. Number 2066

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Evan

    2007-01-01

    In this report, the author presents the results of the Heritage Foundation's 2007 parental choice survey of Members of Congress, conducted to determine the percentage of Members of Congress that practice private school choice. It was found that the percentage of Members of the 110th Congress who practice private school choice is disproportionate…

  14. More than a Library for Congress: Making LC the Nation's Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Marilyn Gell

    1993-01-01

    Discusses designating the Library of Congress (LC) as a national library. Topics addressed include problems with Congress; costs of serving the information needs of Congress; funds for electronic conversion; access to LC resources; user fees; reallocating federal library aid; and governance of LC. (LRW)

  15. As the Economic Crisis Hits Home, Colleges Seek Help from Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Congress is crafting a second economic-stimulus bill, and the nation's colleges, hit by the deepening fiscal crisis, want a share of the money. Over the last few weeks, colleges and their lobbyists have bombarded members of Congress with letters and phone calls seeking money for research, student aid, and infrastructure. However, Congress is…

  16. Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower. Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This is a formal Department of Energy report to Congress. It outlines the findings of an assessment directed by Congress in Section 9505 of the SECURE Water Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11), the US Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and other federal agencies, including federal dam owners, has prepared a comprehensive assessment examining the effects of climate change on water available for hydropower at federal facilities and on the marketing of power from these federal facilities.

  17. Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 1, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  18. Nuclear Regulatory legislation: 103d Congress. Volume 2, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 103d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  19. Nuclear regulatory legislation: 102d Congress. Volume 1, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include: The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  20. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 102d Congress. Volume 2, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document is a compilation of nuclear regulatory legislation and other relevant material through the 102d Congress, 2d Session. This compilation has been prepared for use as a resource document, which the NRC intends to update at the end of every Congress. The contents of NUREG-0980 include The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as amended, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978; Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act; Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and NRC Authorization and Appropriations Acts. Other materials included are statutes and treaties on export licensing, nuclear non-proliferation, and environmental protection.

  1. Single chip camera active pixel sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Timothy (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Olson, Brita (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Panicacci, Roger A. (Inventor); Mansoorian, Barmak (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A totally digital single chip camera includes communications to operate most of its structure in serial communication mode. The digital single chip camera include a D/A converter for converting an input digital word into an analog reference signal. The chip includes all of the necessary circuitry for operating the chip using a single pin.

  2. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.; Malba, Vincent; Riddle, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  3. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

    1997-08-05

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

  4. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  5. Services to the Nation: The Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet describes the many services that the Library of Congress (LC) provides. A brief historical background of the Library's founding is followed by descriptions of LC's buildings and facilities. Other topics which are presented include the library's extensive collection, which runs the gamut from papyrus to optical disk; services to…

  6. 25 Years of Progress: Professional Staff Congress/CUNY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yellowitz, Irwin

    This publication reviews the history of the Professional Staff Congress (PSC) of the City University of New York (CUNY), which in 1997 celebrated its 25th anniversary, commemorating the 1972 merger of the institution's Legislative Conference and the United Federation of College Teachers, two previously rival unions. The first chapter covers the…

  7. Learning Disabilities: A Report to the U.S. Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Interagency Committee on Learning Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    The report to Congress by the Interagency Committee on Learning Disabilities, required by the Health Research Extension Act of 1985, Public Law 99-158, provides a review and assessment of Federal research priorities, activities, and findings regarding learning disabilities. Included in the report is information on (1) the number of persons…

  8. Serials on Optical Disks: A Library of Congress Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Lela Beth

    1983-01-01

    Description of the Optical Disk Pilot Program of the Library of Congress defines characteristics and differences between analog videodisks and optical digital disk technology. Benefits of the optical digital disk, material selection, and the system configuration (bibliographic indexing, document preparation and input scanning, image and record…

  9. Commission on Child Online Protection (COPA) Report to Congress. Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    The appendices for the Commission on Child Online Protection (COPA) Report to Congress, October 20, 2000, include the following: Commission overview, which includes scope and timeline, original statute, amended statute, technologies and methods, and biographies of the commissioners; Commission finances; Commission meetings for the year 2000;…

  10. Semiannual Report to Congress, October 1, 2002-March 31, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (ED), Washington, DC.

    This semiannual report to Congress by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), U.S. Department of Education, covers the actions of the OIG from October 1, 2002, through March 31, 2003. The report discusses four goals of the President's Management Agenda: (1) improved financial performance: includes information on financial statement audits,…

  11. Child Care Development Fund (CCDF): Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Child Care Bureau.

    Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) monies are used primarily to provide subsidized child care services to low-income working families through vouchers or certificates. This report to Congress describes and analyzes the most current information about the CCDF including that drawn from state plans, expenditure reports, case-level reports, and…

  12. Colleges Must Get Used to Collaborating with Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trible, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Differences in political ideology between college and university administrators and federal legislators have brought about lack of communication, mistrust, and indifference between Congress and higher education. This article discusses the bridging of these differences through common understanding and collaboration to meet the challenges faced by…

  13. Review of Issues Facing Congress. News from Capitol Hill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Ann Simeo

    2001-01-01

    Discusses various topics that have faced the 107th U.S. Congress, such as tax cuts, judicial appointments, domestic issues, patients' bill of rights, stem cell research, election law, and campaign finance reform. Includes information on U.S. Senate and federal judicial appointments. Provides ideas for student learning activities. (CMK)

  14. Fission yeast kinesin-8 controls chromosome congression independently of oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Mary, Hadrien; Fouchard, Jonathan; Gay, Guillaume; Reyes, Céline; Gauthier, Tiphaine; Gruget, Clémence; Pécréaux, Jacques; Tournier, Sylvie; Gachet, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In higher eukaryotes, efficient chromosome congression relies, among other players, on the activity of chromokinesins. Here, we provide a quantitative analysis of kinetochore oscillations and positioning in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a model organism lacking chromokinesins. In wild-type cells, chromosomes align during prophase and, while oscillating, maintain this alignment throughout metaphase. Chromosome oscillations are dispensable both for kinetochore congression and stable kinetochore alignment during metaphase. In higher eukaryotes, kinesin-8 family members control chromosome congression by regulating their oscillations. By contrast, here, we demonstrate that fission yeast kinesin-8 controls chromosome congression by an alternative mechanism. We propose that kinesin-8 aligns chromosomes by controlling pulling forces in a length-dependent manner. A coarse-grained model of chromosome segregation implemented with a length-dependent process that controls the force at kinetochores is necessary and sufficient to mimic kinetochore alignment, and prevents the appearance of lagging chromosomes. Taken together, these data illustrate how the local action of a motor protein at kinetochores provides spatial cues within the spindle to align chromosomes and to prevent aneuploidy. PMID:26359299

  15. 22 CFR 1101.17 - Annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Annual report to Congress. 1101.17 Section 1101.17 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED.... Section's effort to comply with the objectives of the Act, to include any problems encountered,...

  16. Information Policy: Public Laws from the 95th Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on House Administration.

    This compilation of abstracts provides brief descriptions of the 74 new public laws relating to computers and information policy that were enacted during the 95th Congress. Each of these bills is concerned with information, although the diverse subject matter--e.g., energy and clean water, food and health, foreign investments, ethics in…

  17. 33. Photocopy of photograph (from Library of Congress, #USZ6224770) (???) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Photocopy of photograph (from Library of Congress, #USZ62-24770) (???) M'Clees, Photographer 1859 SOUTH PORTICO, WITH POST OFFICE IN FOREGROUND (4 x 5 negative; 8 x 10 print) - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Bush Administration Looks to Congress to Proceed in Lender Bailout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The Bush administration has called off internal deliberations over a bailout plan for student-loan companies after concluding it did not have the authority to act on its own. Instead, it endorsed a Congressional proposal that would allow the education secretary to purchase loans from private lenders. The decision leaves Congress facing a ticking…

  19. School Prayer: The Court, the Congress, and the First Amendment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Robert S.

    When Congress adopted the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1789, it left open many questions that would arise concerning church-state relations. It became clear early in the history of the country that the Supreme Court would have a great impact on how the First Amendment would be upheld and interpreted. This book examines how Congress…

  20. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....304 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Secretary of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the...

  1. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....304 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Secretary of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the...

  2. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....304 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Secretary of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the...

  3. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....304 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Secretary of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the...

  4. 32 CFR 700.304 - Recommendations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....304 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS The Secretary of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy § 700.304 Recommendations to Congress. After first informing the...

  5. Library of Congress Cataloging Directorate Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Cataloging Directorate.

    This fiscal year 2002 annual report of the Library of Congress (LC) Cataloging Directorate covers the following topics: (1) production and productivity; (2) arrearage reduction; (3) the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001; (4) cooperative cataloging programs; (5) conversion of LC records in Chinese from Wade-Giles to pinyin…

  6. Library of Congress Report Urges Technological Updates of Cataloging Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.; Howard, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Libraries need to share records more with one another, make greater use of the Web, and bring more attention to their special collections, according to a report released last month by the Library of Congress. The new study examines how libraries can improve the distribution and use of their materials in a technology-centric environment. But "On…

  7. 31 CFR 0.212 - Influencing legislation or petitioning Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Influencing legislation or... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT Rules of Conduct § 0.212 Influencing legislation or... Congress to favor or oppose any legislation. This prohibition does not apply to the official...

  8. American Perspectives on the Seventh International Congress on Mathematical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossey, John A., Ed.

    This publication is a collection of papers portraying an American view of the happenings of the Seventh International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME-7). Papers included: (1) "ICME-7 and Tertiary Level Mathematics: Une Petite Affaire" (Shirley Hill); (2) "Technology and Mathematics Education at ICME-7" (James T. Fey); (3) "Assessment in…

  9. Congress Gives Colleges a Billion-Dollar Bonanza.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey; Southwick, Ron

    2000-01-01

    Reports that Congress has earmarked a record amount of money (more than $1 billion) for projects involving specific colleges in the 2000 fiscal year. Notes that such "pork-barrel" spending has tripled since 1996. Charts show trends in earmarks since 1989, year 2000 earmarks by agency, the top 20 recipients of earmarked grants, and ranking of…

  10. 31 CFR 50.91 - Notice to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Notice to Congress. 50.91 Section 50.91 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE... terrorism, stating whether the Secretary estimates that aggregate insured losses will exceed...

  11. The 1925 Fort Union Indian Congress: Divergent Narratives, One Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blee, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    This essay investigates how various perspectives differ and converge in the span of an afternoon, thus illustrating how divergent narratives, through their very difference, enhance one's understanding of the past. The case study of the 1925 Fort Union Indian Congress points to the process of narrativizing experience and underscores how meaning is…

  12. 32 CFR 270.19 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reports to Congress. 270.19 Section 270.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF...

  13. 32 CFR 270.19 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reports to Congress. 270.19 Section 270.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF...

  14. 32 CFR 270.19 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports to Congress. 270.19 Section 270.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF...

  15. 32 CFR 270.19 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reports to Congress. 270.19 Section 270.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF...

  16. 32 CFR 270.19 - Reports to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reports to Congress. 270.19 Section 270.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COMPENSATION OF CERTAIN FORMER OPERATIVES INCARCERATED BY THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF...

  17. 43 CFR 1610.6 - Management decision review by Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Management decision review by Congress. 1610.6 Section 1610.6 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) PLANNING, PROGRAMMING,...

  18. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  19. Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

  20. Critics of NCLB Ask Congress to Overhaul It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the contents of a proposal released last week by a coalition that includes some of the most prominent critics of the No Child Left Behind Act. It asks Congress to scrap the accountability system at the center of the federal education law in favor of one that holds schools responsible for improving teacher training and…

  1. Indian Education Legislative Report, 106th Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, Arlington, VA.

    This report notes that with a Republican majority in the 106th Congress and a Democratic administration, little new legislation was passed, but funding for Indian education programs did better than at any time in the recent past. Funding highlights include: no funding for school renovation grants to public schools with high concentrations of…

  2. Highlights of the EANM Congress 2011: Birmingham, UK.

    PubMed

    de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Zerizer, Imene; Uebleis, Christopher; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2012-02-01

    The EANM Congress 2011 took place in Birmingham between the 15th and 19th October 2011 under the presidency of Professor Werner Langsteger. The attendance was reassuringly high, in line with other EANM congresses, despite the current 'Eurozone Crisis'. Participants from 87 countries came along, met old friends and made new ones. They were presented with a massive programme of 1,480 abstracts, symposia, and CME, scientific, plenary and featured sessions. The industry made a substantial contribution to the success of the congress with 109 hardware, software and radiopharmaceutical companies demonstrating the latest technology and innovations in the field. A feature in this year's congress was the emphasis on the role of the young generation. The highlight lecture was presented and this article was compiled by three young EANM members chosen from the young investigator project of the EANM. They review the most highly rated presentations in clinical and preclinical imaging in oncology, neuroendocrine tumours, cardiology, paediatrics and neurology, and provide an update on radionuclide therapy, physics, instrumentation, innovative tracers and techniques. PMID:22237847

  3. National Water Quality Inventory, 1975 Report to Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document summarizes state submissions and provides a national overview of water quality as requested in Section 305(b) of the 1972 Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments (P.L. 92-500). This report provides the first opportunity for states to summarize their water quality and to report to EPA and Congress. Chapters of this report deal…

  4. 18 CFR 401.119 - Disclosure to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disclosure to Congress. 401.119 Section 401.119 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Public Access to Records and Information §...

  5. 29 CFR 1400.735-19 - Influencing Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Influencing Members of Congress. 1400.735-19 Section 1400.735-19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE Employees: Ethical and Other Conduct...

  6. 29 CFR 1400.735-19 - Influencing Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Influencing Members of Congress. 1400.735-19 Section 1400.735-19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE Employees: Ethical and Other Conduct...

  7. 29 CFR 1400.735-19 - Influencing Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Influencing Members of Congress. 1400.735-19 Section 1400.735-19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE Employees: Ethical and Other Conduct...

  8. 29 CFR 1400.735-19 - Influencing Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Influencing Members of Congress. 1400.735-19 Section 1400.735-19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE Employees: Ethical and Other Conduct...

  9. 29 CFR 1400.735-19 - Influencing Members of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Influencing Members of Congress. 1400.735-19 Section 1400.735-19 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE Employees: Ethical and Other Conduct...

  10. 31 CFR 50.91 - Notice to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notice to Congress. 50.91 Section 50.91 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE... terrorism, stating whether the Secretary estimates that aggregate insured losses will exceed...

  11. 31 CFR 50.91 - Notice to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Notice to Congress. 50.91 Section 50.91 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE... terrorism, stating whether the Secretary estimates that aggregate insured losses will exceed...

  12. 31 CFR 50.91 - Notice to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice to Congress. 50.91 Section 50.91 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE... terrorism, stating whether the Secretary estimates that aggregate insured losses will exceed...

  13. 31 CFR 50.91 - Notice to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notice to Congress. 50.91 Section 50.91 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE... terrorism, stating whether the Secretary estimates that aggregate insured losses will exceed...

  14. Five Decades of Microforms at the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history of the microform collections at the Library of Congress (LC), highlighting the exchange of microfilmed newspapers between LC and the Biblioteca Nacional, Brazil. Recent developments in preservation microfilming, LC's acquisition of microforms, and the activities of the LC Preservation Microfilming Office are described. (3…

  15. Library of Congress Gives Teachers Digital Access to All Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchowski, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    "Learning to think is the real goal of educators," said Lauren Resnick, internationally known University of Pittsburgh professor of cognitive science, in mid-March at the Library of Congress (LOC). "The real pedagogical conflict is over what comes first: content or thinking skills?" According to Resnick, new brain research leads to the answer:…

  16. 10 CFR 9.109 - Report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Government in the Sunshine Act, including a tabulation of the total number of open meetings, the total number... REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Government in the Sunshine Act Regulations § 9.109 Report to Congress... against the Commission pursuant to the Government in the Sunshine Act, including any cost assessed...

  17. 20 CFR 1001.131 - Secretary's annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Secretary's annual report to Congress. 1001.131 Section 1001.131 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES FOR VETERANS State Employment Service...

  18. 20 CFR 1001.131 - Secretary's annual report to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Secretary's annual report to Congress. 1001.131 Section 1001.131 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES FOR VETERANS State Employment Service...

  19. Try a Local "Congress" to Understand Sensitive Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Sharon L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a First Amendment "Congress," a national seminar for business and labor leaders, educators, civic and charitable organizations, religious leaders, lawyers, and students, designed to elicit discussion about various interpretations of the amendment. Recommends this type of seminar for exploring sensitive issues at the local or state level.…

  20. 32 CFR 211.10 - Reporting determinations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting determinations to Congress. 211.10 Section 211.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS MISSION COMPATIBILITY EVALUATION PROCESS Project Evaluation Procedures §...

  1. 32 CFR 211.10 - Reporting Determinations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting Determinations to Congress. 211.10 Section 211.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS MISSION COMPATIBILITY EVALUATION PROCESS Project Evaluation Procedures §...

  2. 32 CFR 211.10 - Reporting Determinations to Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting Determinations to Congress. 211.10 Section 211.10 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS MISSION COMPATIBILITY EVALUATION PROCESS Project Evaluation Procedures §...

  3. Film and Video Resources at the Library of Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anita

    While the primary emphasis of the Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division (MBRS) of the Library of Congress (LC) has been on collecting theatrical features, other materials are also collected, including theatrical shorts, newsreels, instructional films, television news, entertainment programs, and documentaries. Access to MBRS…

  4. The Role and Tasks of Education in the Politic of Evolution of the Modern World (with Especial Regard to the Developing Countries).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podoski, Kazimierz

    This paper, one of several on the theme of economy and culture in the politics of nation building, was written for the Ninth World Congress of the International Political Science Association. The author's aim is to indicate the role of modern education policy in the world's socio-economic development, especially in developing countries. Access to…

  5. Editorial Introduction on Proceedings of the 2015 International Congress on Ultrasonics, 2015 ICU Metz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patin, Nico Felicien Declercq de

    A brief summary of the 2015 International Congress on Ultrasonics is presented. The 2015 ICU has taken place in Metz, France, at the Arsenal and was hosted by Georgia Tech Lorraine in collaboration with the French Acoustical Society. The congress hosted a record number of 700 participants. The report focuses on the awards presented during the congress, the invited speakers and some statistics. Other details can be found in reports available on the congress website. The author N. F. Declercq, president of 2015 ICU and Editor of the congress proceedings, wishes to publish the congress proceedings in loving memory of his father Maurice Alois who suddenly passed away 5 weeks after the end of the congress.

  6. Financial security for women -- Fem Consult congress.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The nongovernmental organization "Fem Consult," which seeks to strengthen the socioeconomic position of women by applying a gender perspective to programs and projects in developing countries, celebrated its 10th anniversary in 1996 by holding a conference in the Netherlands on financial security for women in the developing world. During the conference, the President of the WWF (Working Women's Forum) described her agency's 17 years of experience in lending to impoverished rural and urban women in India. By extending microcredit assistance through a network of cooperatives, the WWF has been the catalyst for lasting improvements in the economic and social status of impoverished women. Representatives of the Grameen Bank, Women's World Banking, the Ecumenical Development Cooperative Society, and other organizations also addressed the conference.

  7. Summary and highlights of the scientific tracks at the STI & AIDS World Congress 2013, Vienna.

    PubMed

    Whale, J; Banks, J; Foley, E; Patel, R

    2014-05-01

    The joint meeting of International Society for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Research (ISSTDR) and International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI) was held in July 2013 in Vienna, Austria. The conference had attracted over 1300 submissions and was divided into six tracks. The track chairs reviewed all presentations and identified key themes and data that delegates should be aware of. In a conference summary session, each track chair presented these highlights. This conference report details and expands on this summary.

  8. [See the strabismus and amblyopia research development trend from the twelfth World Congress of strabismus].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kanxing; Kang, Xiaoli; Liu, Hu; Wei, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The International strabismus association conference has a history of fifty years until now. It's the most influential academic communication forum for the worldwide doctors and related scientists or technical carers in strabismus and amblyopia area. The conference gathered the top-level experts. The latest clinical/research achievements of strabismus, amblyopia in the field of binocular vision and ocular motility have been showed. The breakthroughs in the etiology study of incomitant strabismus have been and are being transformed into new therapeutic concepts and techniques. Re-adjust the competition between dominant and amblyopic eye using binocular stimulation methods may overcome the existing defects of monocular occlusion therapy, expand new interventional methods to treat amblyopia, and represent the future trends of amblyopia therapy. In this paper, we will introduce the main contents of the XII ISA meeting and spread knowledge of strabismus/amblyopia promoting directions in order to provide reference ideas for the clinicians and research colleagues in this field. PMID:26310112

  9. Packaging commercial CMOS chips for lab on a chip integration.

    PubMed

    Datta-Chaudhuri, Timir; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-05-21

    Combining integrated circuitry with microfluidics enables lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices to perform sensing, freeing them from benchtop equipment. However, this integration is challenging with small chips, as is briefly reviewed with reference to key metrics for package comparison. In this paper we present a simple packaging method for including mm-sized, foundry-fabricated dies containing complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits within LOCs. The chip is embedded in an epoxy handle wafer to yield a level, large-area surface, allowing subsequent photolithographic post-processing and microfluidic integration. Electrical connection off-chip is provided by thin film metal traces passivated with parylene-C. The parylene is patterned to selectively expose the active sensing area of the chip, allowing direct interaction with a fluidic environment. The method accommodates any die size and automatically levels the die and handle wafer surfaces. Functionality was demonstrated by packaging two different types of CMOS sensor ICs, a bioamplifier chip with an array of surface electrodes connected to internal amplifiers for recording extracellular electrical signals and a capacitance sensor chip for monitoring cell adhesion and viability. Cells were cultured on the surface of both types of chips, and data were acquired using a PC. Long term culture (weeks) showed the packaging materials to be biocompatible. Package lifetime was demonstrated by exposure to fluids over a longer duration (months), and the package was robust enough to allow repeated sterilization and re-use. The ease of fabrication and good performance of this packaging method should allow wide adoption, thereby spurring advances in miniaturized sensing systems. PMID:24682025

  10. Digital PCR on an integrated self-priming compartmentalization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Qiu, Lin; Yu, Bingwen; Xu, Yanan; Gao, Yibo; Pan, Tingting; Tian, Qingchang; Song, Qi; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2014-03-21

    An integrated on-chip valve-free and power-free microfluidic digital PCR device is for the first time developed by making use of a novel self-priming compartmentalization and simple dehydration control to realize 'divide and conquer' for single DNA molecule detection. The high gas solubility of PDMS is exploited to provide the built-in power of self-priming so that the sample and oil are sequentially sucked into the device to realize sample self-compartmentalization based on surface tension. The lifespan of its self-priming capability was about two weeks tested using an air-tight packaging bottle sealed with a small amount of petroleum jelly, which is significant for a practical platform. The SPC chip contains 5120 independent 5 nL microchambers, allowing the samples to be compartmentalized completely. Using this platform, three different abundances of lung cancer related genes are detected to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the microchip for amplifying a single nucleic acid molecule. For maximal accuracy, within less than 5% of the measurement deviation, the optimal number of positive chambers is between 400 and 1250 evaluated by the Poisson distribution, which means one panel can detect an average of 480 to 4804 template molecules. This device without world-to-chip connections eliminates the constraint of the complex pipeline control, and is an integrated on-chip platform, which would be a significant improvement to digital PCR automation and more user-friendly.

  11. Heart-on-a-chip based on stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Tomecka, Ewelina; Jesion, Iwona

    2016-01-15

    Heart diseases are one of the main causes of death around the world. The great challenge for scientists is to develop new therapeutic methods for these types of ailments. Stem cells (SCs) therapy could be one of a promising technique used for renewal of cardiac cells and treatment of heart diseases. Conventional in vitro techniques utilized for investigation of heart regeneration do not mimic natural cardiac physiology. Lab-on-a-chip systems may be the solution which could allow the creation of a heart muscle model, enabling the growth of cardiac cells in conditions similar to in vivo conditions. Microsystems can be also used for differentiation of stem cells into heart cells, successfully. It will help better understand of proliferation and regeneration ability of these cells. In this review, we present Heart-on-a-chip systems based on cardiac cell culture and stem cell biology. This review begins with the description of the physiological environment and the functions of the heart. Next, we shortly described conventional techniques of stem cells differentiation into the cardiac cells. This review is mostly focused on describing Lab-on-a-chip systems for cardiac tissue engineering. Therefore, in the next part of this article, the microsystems for both cardiac cell culture and SCs differentiation into cardiac cells are described. The section about SCs differentiation into the heart cells is divided in sections describing biochemical, physical and mechanical stimulations. Finally, we outline present challenges and future research concerning Heart-on-a-chip based on stem cell biology.

  12. Earth Sciences Changed Influence on the Public Policy Process, or How Congress Stopped Communicating with Geologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Measured in political capital, the latter third of the twentieth century was tough for geoscientists. Federal funding for geoscience research and development decreased between 1960 and 2000. Furthermore, although funds devoted to natural resources remained stable as a proportion of total federal expenditures over the same time, they declined by a factor of ten in proportion to the GDP in constant dollars. The size of the natural resource industry sector of the economy declined, as did the number of employed geologists. Geologists even disappeared as a separate category in federal statistical reports by 2000. Each of these indicators tells a portion of the story of how and why Congress stopped communicating with geologists as well as other physical scientists. Changes within the institution of Congress (e.g., lengthened careers, candidate centered politics, and the rise of conservatism) in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in economic expertise replacing the scientific. At the same time, while research and development in the geosciences required larger budgets, the practical application of the discoveries became less obvious to the public. When this was added to the rise of environmental protection in public policy geology was rendered politically vulnerable. Geologists were easily perceived by political actors as the old guard, which made them part of the problem. The hard won favored position held by geology at mid-twentieth century, built by leaders such as Powell, Nolan, and Peck evaporated as national policy shifted from resource exploitation to preservation. The language of the policy debate also shifted, with geologists moving quickly from insiders to outsiders in the policy game. Further compounding the situation, and possibly catalyzing it was the politicization of scientific expertise written into environmental preservation legislation in the 1970s. The high-level nuclear waste site selection process at Yucca Mountain is but one example of Congress passing the

  13. Microfluidic Chips for Semen Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Segerink, L.I.; Sprenkels, A.J.; Oosterhuis, G.J.E.; Vermes, I.; van den Berg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard of semen analysis is still an manual method, which is time-consuming, labour intensive and needs thorough quality control. Microfluidics can also offer advantages for this application. Therefore a first step in the development of a microfluidic chip has been made, which enables the man the semen analysis at home. In this article recent efforts to determine the concentration and motility using a microfluidic chip are summarized.

  14. Rutger's CAM2000 chip architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Donald E.; Hall, J. Storrs; Miyake, Keith

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the architecture and instruction set of the Rutgers CAM2000 memory chip. The CAM2000 combines features of Associative Processing (AP), Content Addressable Memory (CAM), and Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) in a single chip package that is not only DRAM compatible but capable of applying simple massively parallel operations to memory. This document reflects the current status of the CAM2000 architecture and is continually updated to reflect the current state of the architecture and instruction set.

  15. Virtualization of the Y.E.S. Congress 2009 Roundtable Symposia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Gaines, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Y.E.S. Congress 2009 was the first international conference organized by the Y.E.S. Network, an association of early-career geoscientists who represent professional societies, geoscience companies, geoscience departments, and interested policy makers from across the world, in collaboration with the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE). The conference, hosted by the China University of Geosciences in Beijing, focused on scientific and career challenges faced by early-career geoscientists, with a particular emphasis on how the Y.E.S. Network can work collaboratively and internationally towards solving these challenges and furthering the IYPE motto of “Earth Sciences for Society”. A key features of the Y.E.S. Congress was the implementation of “virtualized” roundtable symposia which engaged senior and early-career geoscientists via presentations, panel discussions, and working group sessions in which strategies related to scientific challenges (i.e. climate change in the polar regions, natural hazards, natural resource sustainability) and academic and career pathway challenges (i.e. academic-industry linkages, gender parity in the geosciences, geoscience education sustainability, and international licensure issues) were developed. These strategies were then tasked to the Y.E.S. Network for further development and implementation. The virtualization of the roundtable symposia facilitated active discussion between those participants and speakers who were physically located at the conference facilities in Beijing with a wider international audience of virtual participants and speakers. This talk will address the key features of the roundtable virtualization, the successes and challenges faced during the pre-conference set-up as well as during the roundtable sessions, and potential future applications.

  16. CRRES microelectronic test chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-S.; Buehler, M. G.; Ray, K. P.; Sokoloski, M. M.

    1991-12-01

    The JPL CRRES chip was designed and fabricated in 1985 and included in the CRRES MEP. MOSFET Matrix results show the effect of shielding on radiation-induced MOSFET threshold voltage shifts and channel mobility degradation. Shielded (middle board) MOSFETs have a threshold-voltage damage factor that is approximately three orders of magnitude smaller than would be estimated from Co-60 ground tests. Unshielded (outer board) MOSFETs have a threshold-voltage damage factor that would be estimated from Co-60 ground tests. Temperature swings as large as 23 C with a 22.5 orbit periodicity affected the MOSFET data and were removed from the data in order to reveal the radiation effects. This experiment demonstrated the feasibility of characterizing MOSFETs in a matrix, thus reducing the complexity and mass of the experiment.

  17. Apheresis in developing countries around the World.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Quentin; Smid, W Martin; Crookes, Robert; Naim, Norris; Mendrone, Alfredo; Marques, José Francisco Comenalli; Marques, Marisa B

    2015-08-01

    At the combined American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) Annual Meeting/World Apheresis Association (WAA) Congress in San Francisco, California, in April of 2014, the opening session highlighted the status of apheresis outside of the United States. The organizers invited physicians active in apheresis in countries not usually represented at such international gatherings to give them a forum to share their experiences, challenges, and expectations in their respective countries with regard to both donor and therapeutic apheresis. Apheresis technology is expensive as well as technically and medically demanding, and low and median income countries have different experiences to share with the rest of the world. Apheresis procedures also require resources taken for granted in the developed world, such as reliable electrical power, that can be unpredictable in parts of the developing world. On the other hand, it was obvious that there are significant disparities in access to apheresis within the same country (such as in Brazil), as well as between neighboring nations in Africa and South America. A common trend in the presentations from Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nigeria, and South Africa, was the need for more and better physicians and practitioners' training in the indications of the various apheresis modalities and patient oversight during the procedures. As ASFA and WAA continue to work together, and globalization allows for increased knowledge-sharing, improved access to apheresis procedures performed by qualified personnel with safety and high-quality standards will be increasingly available.

  18. Apheresis in developing countries around the World.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Quentin; Smid, W Martin; Crookes, Robert; Naim, Norris; Mendrone, Alfredo; Marques, José Francisco Comenalli; Marques, Marisa B

    2015-08-01

    At the combined American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) Annual Meeting/World Apheresis Association (WAA) Congress in San Francisco, California, in April of 2014, the opening session highlighted the status of apheresis outside of the United States. The organizers invited physicians active in apheresis in countries not usually represented at such international gatherings to give them a forum to share their experiences, challenges, and expectations in their respective countries with regard to both donor and therapeutic apheresis. Apheresis technology is expensive as well as technically and medically demanding, and low and median income countries have different experiences to share with the rest of the world. Apheresis procedures also require resources taken for granted in the developed world, such as reliable electrical power, that can be unpredictable in parts of the developing world. On the other hand, it was obvious that there are significant disparities in access to apheresis within the same country (such as in Brazil), as well as between neighboring nations in Africa and South America. A common trend in the presentations from Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nigeria, and South Africa, was the need for more and better physicians and practitioners' training in the indications of the various apheresis modalities and patient oversight during the procedures. As ASFA and WAA continue to work together, and globalization allows for increased knowledge-sharing, improved access to apheresis procedures performed by qualified personnel with safety and high-quality standards will be increasingly available. PMID:25346394

  19. A World View Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willard, Timothy; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An overview of topics discussed at the World View '84 conference, sponsored by the World Future Society, is provided. Topics include technology, the economy, the Third World, the environment, world order, and outer space. (RM)

  20. Policy Making While Paradigms Shift: Understanding the Development of Policy Drought in the U.S. Congress 1981-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Ronald Reagan famously announced in his 1981 inaugural address that 'government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem.' For the scientific community and Members of Congress of that time, who were partners in working within the scientific management policy paradigm and the meritocracy on which its technical expertise depended, these words were outside their paradigm of good public service. Despite this announcement of a new paradigm by the incoming President, their policy world continued undisturbed, finding points of agreement to make incremental improvements in policy. Executive branch actions in Reagan's two terms as president were dismissed as peculiar, although they were the beginnings of realizing a policy goal of reducing the size and influence of the federal government. The important parameters influencing policy making in the U.S. Congress, which party holds the majority that sets the agenda and schedules votes, seniority that determines leadership positions in the conference and caucus, specialization on policy by committee jurisdictions, vary little annually and thereby were treated as constants by participants and observers alike. But member replacement has policy consequences that are infrequently noted. Members die in office, retire, and lose re-election bids, while the new members replacing them do not replicate any of their institutional characteristics. The policy process continues seemingly unchanged, but there are changes that become apparent with time. By 2013, scientists are no longer unquestioning partners in shaping federal public policy. They have been ridiculed in congressional hearings and in media attacks. Meanwhile new legislative strategies are being tried, e.g. shutting down government, increasing the use of earmarks instead of peer review, filibuster threats, and repeated attempts to repeal laws are now common tactics in Congress. Science and Congress no longer seem to act as partners in policy making, but as

  1. Analysis Methods of Magnesium Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmann, Sven; Ditze, André; Scharf, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The quality of recycled magnesium from chips depends strongly on their exposure to inorganic and organic impurities that are added during the production processes. Different kinds of magnesium chips from these processes were analyzed by several methods. In addition, the accuracy and effectiveness of the methods are discussed. The results show that the chips belong either to the AZ91, AZ31, AM50/60, or AJ62 alloy. Some kinds of chips show deviations from the above-mentioned normations. Different impurities result mainly from transition metals and lime. The water and oil content does not exceed 25%, and the chip size is not more than 4 mm in the diameter. The sieve analysis shows good results for oily and wet chips. The determination of oil and water shows better results for the application of a Soxhlet compared with the addition of lime and vacuum distillation. The most accurate values for the determination of water and oil are obtained by drying at 110°C (for water) and washing with acetone (for oil) by hand.

  2. Report to the Congress: Regional petroleum reserves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-12-01

    Actions taken to determine the benefits and costs of establishing in-region Regional Petroleum Reserves (RPR's) and the extent to which existing analyses reflect DOE's current assessments of US and world supply/demand conditions are discussed. A discussion of sites considered, cost comparisons of RPR and Gulf Coast storage, an SPR distribution capabilities and is continuing system enhancements is given. The SPR Plan of 1977, in its thorough analysis of SPR options, developed a basic program oach which continues to be valid in today's petroleum market. Current assessments indicate that SPR system enhancements, current market strategies, and the removal of prior regulatory barriers will significantly increase the flexibility of the SPR system in providing protection to all regions and noncontiguous areas. The SPR, located in the Gulf Coast salt domes as crude oil, continues to represent the most practical, efficient, and effective means of providing flexibility, security, and low cost energy storage.

  3. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation. Final program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  4. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D; Schachter, Steven C; Amlerova, Jana; Bialer, Meir; van Emde Boas, Walter; Brázdil, Milan; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Engel, Jerome; Gotman, Jean; Komárek, Vladmir; Leppik, Ilo E; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Metternich, Birgitta; Moulin, Chris J A; Muhlert, Nils; Mula, Marco; Nakken, Karl O; Picard, Fabienne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Theodore, William; Wolf, Peter; Zeman, Adam; Rektor, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Epilepsy in history and the arts and its relationships with religion were discussed, as were overviews of epilepsy and relevant aspects of social cognition, handedness, accelerated forgetting and autobiographical amnesia, and large-scale brain networks. PMID:26276417

  5. Congress ends session with a whimper, but EPA is roaring

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1994-10-19

    The end of session for Congress (October 1994) marked a disturbing end for environmental concerns which did not see Congressional action. EPA`s agenda of worker protection, chemical monitoring and criminal enforcement will most likely resurface. Legislation that died included Superfund reform, Clean Water Act and Product liability. However, NAFTA got passed, as did a hazardous materials transportation reauthorization and risk assessment in an agricultural bill.

  6. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D; Schachter, Steven C; Amlerova, Jana; Bialer, Meir; van Emde Boas, Walter; Brázdil, Milan; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Engel, Jerome; Gotman, Jean; Komárek, Vladmir; Leppik, Ilo E; Marusic, Petr; Meletti, Stefano; Metternich, Birgitta; Moulin, Chris J A; Muhlert, Nils; Mula, Marco; Nakken, Karl O; Picard, Fabienne; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Theodore, William; Wolf, Peter; Zeman, Adam; Rektor, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the first of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Epilepsy in history and the arts and its relationships with religion were discussed, as were overviews of epilepsy and relevant aspects of social cognition, handedness, accelerated forgetting and autobiographical amnesia, and large-scale brain networks.

  7. Stem end chip defect in tubers used for potato chip production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem-end chip defect (SECD) is a serious tuber quality concern that affects chipping potatoes (Solanum tuberosum). SECD defect is characterized by dark-colored vascular tissues and adjacent cortical tissues at the tuber stem-end portion of potato chips after frying. Chips with SECD are unattractive ...

  8. Congress moves to set priorities for EPA research spending

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.

    1993-05-31

    Research and development spending at the Environmental Protection Agency is slated to rise more than 5% in President Bill Clinton's fiscal 1994 budget. Congress is stepping in, however, and may have something to say not only about how much money is spent, but also how it is spent. For the first time in a decade, formal authorization of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) is moving through Congress. The ORD authorization was approved May 20 in the House Science Committee's Subcommittee on Technology, Environment and Aviation. Introduced by subcommittee chairman Rep. Tim Valentine (D.-N.C.), the authorization bill (H.R. 1994) would provide $475 million in funding for fiscal 1994. This equals the amount proposed by Clinton, $536 million, if about $60 million earmarked for Superfund-related research is removed. The Valentine bill would set out programmatic guidelines for EPA research, requiring fundamental research in ecology, health, and risk reduction. It would also require the agency's Science Advisory Board to review these programs and submit progress reports to Congress every two years. Another part of the bill would require EPA to consolidate agency efforts to identify, compare, and assess risk to public health and the environment posed by pollution.

  9. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (CIMMEC2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    From October 14th to 16th 2014, The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality, and Technology (Inmetro) and the Brazilian Society of Metrology (SBM) organized the 3rd International Congress on Mechanical Metrology (3rd CIMMEC). The 3rd CIMMEC was held in the city of Gramado, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Anticipating the interest and enthusiasm of the technical-scientific community, the Organizing Institutions invite people and organizations to participate in this important congress, reiterating the commitment to organize an event according to highest international standards. This event has been conceived to integrate people and organizations from Brazil and abroad in the discussion of advanced themes in metrology. Manufacturers and dealers of measuring equipment and standards, as well as of auxiliary accessories and bibliographic material, had the chance to promote their products and services in stands at the Fair, which has taken place alongside the Congress. The 3rd CIMMEC consisted of five Keynote Speeches and 116 regular papers. Among the regular papers, the 25 most outstanding ones, comprising a high quality content on Mechanical Metrology, were selected to be published in this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series to the scientific community to promote further research in Mechanical Metrology and related areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by CIMMEC 2014.

  10. Micromachined systems-on-a-chip: Technology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Lemkin, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Sacrificial polysilicon surface micromachining is emerging as a technology that enables the mass production of complex microelectromechanical systems by themselves or integrated with microelectronic systems. Early versions of these micromachined systems-on-a-chip have already found application in the commercial world as acceleration sensors for airbag deployment (for example, ADI`s ADXL50). Two technologies described here, enable systems with increasing degrees of complexity to be fabricated. The first is a three-level polysilicon micromachining process which includes a fourth polysilicon electrical interconnect level, while the other is a single-level (+ second electrical interconnect level) polysilicon surface micromachining process integrated with 1.25 micron CMOS. Samples of systems-on-a-chip built in these processes such as combination locks, pop-up mirrors, and multi-axis accelerometers are also given.

  11. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, V.

    1998-11-10

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: (1) holding individual chips for batch processing, (2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, (3) opening vias in the dielectric, (4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and (5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume. 3 figs.

  12. Process for 3D chip stacking

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    A manufacturable process for fabricating electrical interconnects which extend from a top surface of an integrated circuit chip to a sidewall of the chip using laser pantography to pattern three dimensional interconnects. The electrical interconnects may be of an L-connect or L-shaped type. The process implements three dimensional (3D) stacking by moving the conventional bond or interface pads on a chip to the sidewall of the chip. Implementation of the process includes: 1) holding individual chips for batch processing, 2) depositing a dielectric passivation layer on the top and sidewalls of the chips, 3) opening vias in the dielectric, 4) forming the interconnects by laser pantography, and 5) removing the chips from the holding means. The process enables low cost manufacturing of chips with bond pads on the sidewalls, which enables stacking for increased performance, reduced space, and higher functional per unit volume.

  13. 20th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, ICTAM2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Aref

    2000-08-27

    The 20th International Congress of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, ICTAM2000, was held in Chicago, IL, from August 27 - September 2, 2000. It was 32 years since the last of these congresses had been held in USA. A record number of researchers in the mechanical engineering sciences attended and presented their work. The Congress provided an opportunity for the US mechanics community to act as international hosts. Several universities, professional societies, private foundations and individuals, and Federal agencies provided financial support for the Congress.

  14. Role of Congress in the High Level Radioactive Waste Odyssey: The Wisdom and Will of the Congress - 13096

    SciTech Connect

    Vieth, Donald L.

    2013-07-01

    Congress has had a dual role with regard to high level radioactive waste, being involved in both its creation and its disposal. A significant amount of time has passed between the creation of the nation's first high level radioactive waste and the present day. The pace of addressing its remediation has been highly irregular. Congress has had to consider the technical, regulatory, and political issues and all have had specific difficulties. It is a true odyssey framed by an imperative and accountability, by a sense of urgency, by an ability or inability to finish the job and by consequences. Congress had set a politically acceptable course by 1982. However, President Obama intervened in the process after he took office in January 2009. Through the efforts of his Administration, by the end of 2012, the US government has no program to dispose of high level radioactive waste and no reasonable prospect of a repository for high level radioactive waste. It is not obvious how the US government program will be reestablished or who will assume responsibility for leadership. The ultimate criteria for judging the consequences are 1) the outcome of the ongoing NRC's Nuclear Waste Confidence Rulemaking and 2) the concomitant permissibility of nuclear energy supplying electricity from operating reactors in the US. (authors)

  15. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Ceramics (ICC3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niihara, Koichi; Ohji, Tatsuki; Sakka, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Early in 2005, the American Ceramic Society, the European Ceramic Society and the Ceramic Society of Japan announced a collaborative effort to provide leadership for the global ceramics community that would facilitate the use of ceramic and glass materials. That effort resulted in an agreement to organize a new biennial series of the International Congress on Ceramics, convened by the International Ceramic Federation (ICF). In order to share ideas and visions of the future for ceramic and glass materials, the 1st International Congress on Ceramics (ICC1) was held in Canada, 2006, under the organization of the American Ceramic Society, and the 2nd Congress (ICC2) was held in Italy, 2008, hosted by the European Ceramic Society. Organized by the Ceramic Society of Japan, the 3rd Congress (ICC3) was held in Osaka, Japan, 14-18 November 2010. Incorporating the 23rd Fall Meeting of the Ceramic Society of Japan and the 20th Iketani Conference, ICC3 was also co-organized by the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation, and was endorsed and supported by ICF, Asia-Oceania Ceramic Federation (AOCF) as well as many other organizations. Following the style of the previous two successful Congresses, the program was designed to advance ceramic and glass technologies to the next generation through discussion of the most recent advances and future perspectives, and to engage the worldwide ceramics community in a collective effort to expand the use of these materials in both conventional as well as new and exciting applications. ICC3 consisted of 22 voluntarily organized symposia in the most topical and essential themes of ceramic and glass materials, including Characterization, design and processing technologies Electro, magnetic and optical ceramics and devices Energy and environment related ceramics and systems Bio-ceramics and bio-technologies Ceramics for advanced industry and safety society Innovation in traditional ceramics It also contained the Plenary Session and the

  16. Lab-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  17. Silicon-nanowire based attachment of silicon chips for mouse embryo labelling.

    PubMed

    Durán, S; Novo, S; Duch, M; Gómez-Martínez, R; Fernández-Regúlez, M; San Paulo, A; Nogués, C; Esteve, J; Ibañez, E; Plaza, J A

    2015-03-21

    The adhesion of small silicon chips to cells has many potential applications as direct interconnection of the cells to the external world can be accomplished. Hence, although some typical applications of silicon nanowires integrated into microsystems are focused on achieving a cell-on-a-chip strategy, we are interested in obtaining chip-on-a-cell systems. This paper reports the design, technological development and characterization of polysilicon barcodes featuring silicon nanowires as nanoscale attachment to identify and track living mouse embryos during their in vitro development. The chips are attached to the outer surface of the Zona Pellucida, the cover that surrounds oocytes and embryos, to avoid the direct contact between the chip and the embryo cell membrane. Two attachment methodologies, rolling and pushpin, which allow two entirely different levels of applied forces to attach the chips to living embryos, are evaluated. The former consists of rolling the mouse embryos over one barcode with the silicon nanowires facing upwards, while in the latter, the barcode is pushed against the embryo with a micropipette. The effect on in vitro embryo development and the retention rate related to the calculated applied forces are stated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy inspection, which allowed high-resolution imaging, also confirms the physical attachment of the nanowires with some of them piercing or wrapped by the Zona Pellucida and revealed extraordinary bent silicon nanowires.

  18. The Academic Life: Small Worlds, Different Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, William

    2010-01-01

    "The Academic Life: Small Worlds, Different Worlds" represented an impressive investigation of the largest and most complex national academic community in the world, which seriously attempted a detailed representation of the variations in its form. Its ethnographic orientation to understanding the internal academic life through exploratory…

  19. Camera-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory's research on a second generation, solid-state image sensor technology has resulted in the Complementary Metal- Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor (CMOS), establishing an alternative to the Charged Coupled Device (CCD). Photobit Corporation, the leading supplier of CMOS image sensors, has commercialized two products of their own based on this technology: the PB-100 and PB-300. These devices are cameras on a chip, combining all camera functions. CMOS "active-pixel" digital image sensors offer several advantages over CCDs, a technology used in video and still-camera applications for 30 years. The CMOS sensors draw less energy, they use the same manufacturing platform as most microprocessors and memory chips, and they allow on-chip programming of frame size, exposure, and other parameters.

  20. Chip Advancer For GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, Thomas K.; Srinivasan, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, J. Brooks

    1989-01-01

    Instrument errors made negligible. For each integration interval, both delay and rate of change of delay initialized to small fraction of chip - for example, to order of 10 to the negative 7th power - thereby making feedback control and extraction of delay highly accurate and flexible. With appropriate selection of sampling rate relative to chip rate, commensurability errors reduced to extremely small levels. In Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, pseudorandom code sequence generated by simple digital logic incorporating effects of time, delay, and rate of change of delay. Flexibility in starting time and sum interval very useful in aligning correlation interval with beginnings and endings of data bits.

  1. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  2. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-11-16

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  3. Programmable multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2004-03-02

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  4. Programmable Multi-Chip Module

    DOEpatents

    Kautz, David; Morgenstern, Howard; Blazek, Roy J.

    2005-05-24

    A multi-chip module comprising a low-temperature co-fired ceramic substrate having a first side on which are mounted active components and a second side on which are mounted passive components, wherein this segregation of components allows for hermetically sealing the active components with a cover while leaving accessible the passive components, and wherein the passive components are secured using a reflow soldering technique and are removable and replaceable so as to make the multi-chip module substantially programmable with regard to the passive components.

  5. Atom chip gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  6. Chipped Paint Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 9 April 2003

    In the high northern latitudes NW of Alba Patera, a smooth mantle of material that covers the landscape appears chipped away from the rim of a large crater. The prominent scarp that has formed from the retreat of the mantle lacks the rounded appearance of other ice-rich mantles found in the mid-latitudes. The nature of this mantling layer therefore is more enigmatic.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 62.9, Longitude 226.2 East (133.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  7. 22 CFR 214.38 - Submission of reports to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission of reports to the Library of... MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 214.38 Submission of reports to the Library of Congress. (a) Each advisory committee is to file with the Library of Congress eight copies of each of its...

  8. 41 CFR 105-54.203-3 - Submission to Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission to Library of... Submission to Library of Congress. The GSA Committee Management Officer furnishes a copy of each charter to the Library of Congress when or shortly after copies are filed with the requisite committees of...

  9. Does Economic Education Make a Difference in Congress? How Economics Majors Vote on Trade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Roark, J. Brian

    2012-01-01

    The author of this article expands the background theory of voting to incorporate the undergraduate majors of members of Congress. Examining nine votes on trade across the 109th and 110th Congresses reveals that economics majors are the only category of college major to vote in favor of free trade in a predictable way. Controls for a variety of…

  10. How Members of the 111th Congress Practice Private School Choice. Backgrounder. No. 2257

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lindsey

    2009-01-01

    Policies that give parents the ability to exercise private-school choice continue to proliferate across the country. On Capitol Hill, however, recent Congresses have not implemented policies to expand private-school choice although many Members of Congress exercise school choice for their own families. A Heritage survey of the members of the 111th…

  11. The First Act of Congress: Administering Oaths for a New Kind of Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2004-01-01

    In the spring of 1789, the first Congress faced a daunting task. Although the newly adopted Constitution provided a blueprint for the new government, Congress needed to enact legislation that would ensure a smooth transition from the Articles of Confederation and lay the groundwork for a strong national government, while simultaneously protecting…

  12. 76 FR 5154 - Availability of Draft Report, Biofuels and the Environment: First Triennial Report to Congress

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... AGENCY Availability of Draft Report, Biofuels and the Environment: First Triennial Report to Congress... external review draft document titled, Biofuels and the Environment: The First Triennial Report to Congress... EPA's Office of Research and Development. The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act...

  13. 37 CFR 201.23 - Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress. 201.23 Section 201.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.23...

  14. 37 CFR 201.23 - Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress. 201.23 Section 201.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights U.S. COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.23...

  15. 37 CFR 201.23 - Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress. 201.23 Section 201.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.23...

  16. 37 CFR 201.23 - Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress. 201.23 Section 201.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.23...

  17. 37 CFR 201.23 - Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transfer of unpublished copyright deposits to the Library of Congress. 201.23 Section 201.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.23...

  18. 22 CFR 214.38 - Submission of reports to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Submission of reports to the Library of... MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 214.38 Submission of reports to the Library of Congress. (a) Each advisory committee is to file with the Library of Congress eight copies of each of its...

  19. 22 CFR 214.38 - Submission of reports to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Submission of reports to the Library of... MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 214.38 Submission of reports to the Library of Congress. (a) Each advisory committee is to file with the Library of Congress eight copies of each of its...

  20. 22 CFR 214.38 - Submission of reports to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Submission of reports to the Library of... MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 214.38 Submission of reports to the Library of Congress. (a) Each advisory committee is to file with the Library of Congress eight copies of each of its...

  1. Management Review of the Library of Congress: The 1996 Booz Allen and Hamilton Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes the methodology and findings of the "Management Review of the Library of Congress" completed in 1996. Highlights include mission statements; organizational structure; lack of strategic planning; performance measurement for support staff; the need for distributed leadership roles; the future of the Library of Congress; and implications for…

  2. Title V Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs. 2008 Report to Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "2008 Title V Report to Congress" marks a departure from the past. Before 2008, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) reported solely on the Community Prevention Grants program in its "Title V Report to Congress." This year, OJJDP is reporting on the four delinquency prevention programs that were…

  3. 22 CFR 214.38 - Submission of reports to the Library of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Submission of reports to the Library of... MANAGEMENT Operation of Advisory Committees § 214.38 Submission of reports to the Library of Congress. (a) Each advisory committee is to file with the Library of Congress eight copies of each of its...

  4. 30 CFR 903.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, applies to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  5. 30 CFR 922.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  6. 30 CFR 933.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated Unsuitable for Coal Mining by Act of Congress, with the exception of §§ 761.11(c) and 761.12(f)(1), shall apply to surface coal mining and...

  7. 30 CFR 939.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  8. 30 CFR 947.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  9. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  10. 30 CFR 912.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  11. 30 CFR 921.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  12. 30 CFR 942.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  13. 30 CFR 903.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, applies to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  14. 30 CFR 947.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  15. 30 CFR 933.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated Unsuitable for Coal Mining by Act of Congress, with the exception of §§ 761.11(c) and 761.12(f)(1), shall apply to surface coal mining and...

  16. 30 CFR 941.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  17. 30 CFR 905.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  18. 30 CFR 939.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  19. 30 CFR 942.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  20. 30 CFR 910.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  1. 30 CFR 912.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  2. 30 CFR 937.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining and... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  3. 30 CFR 910.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  4. 30 CFR 922.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  5. 30 CFR 921.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by Act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  6. 30 CFR 941.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  7. 30 CFR 905.761 - Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.761 Areas designated unsuitable for surface coal mining by act of Congress. Part 761 of this chapter, Areas Designated by Act of Congress, shall apply to surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Areas designated unsuitable for surface...

  8. Commission on Child Online Protection (COPA) Report to Congress [and] Personal Statements of COPA Commissioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In October, 1998, Congress enacted the Child Online Protection Act and established the Commission on Online Child Protection (COPA) to study methods to help reduce access by minors to certain sexually explicit material, defined in the statute as harmful to minors. Congress directed the Commission to evaluate the accessibility, cost, and…

  9. Our National Monument of Art: Constructing and Debating the National Body at the Library of Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    It is not surprising that the Library of Congress would be defined as our national monument of art given the scale of the project, its federal sponsorship, and its posture as a public library with access to all Americans. Paralleling the assumption of the Library of Congress as not merely a building for housing books but a ritualistic center of…

  10. NRC's 13th Annual Congress highlights the mainstream of recycling

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.M.

    1994-12-01

    The theme of the National Recycling Coalition's (NRC, Washington, DC) recent 13th Annual Congress and Exposition in Portland, OR, was ''Jump into the Mainstream: Recycle,'' which is an action organizers of the show set out to prove is currently happening across this country. Indeed, this year's congress was designed to demonstrate how far recycling has jumped into the mainstream of American life, and show attendees what it will take to make recycling succeed in the future. Lending testament to recycling's increasing visibility, the most dominant topic at this year's show was the creation of national recycling policy. Through this agenda, and other programs that surfaced at the congress, NRC is hoping to move closer to its goal of making recycling as mainstream as taking out the garbage. NRC's board of directors unanimously voted to adopt a draft advocacy message that promotes recycling initiatives at the national level, but rejected a proposed demand-side initiative that would have established post-consumer-content recycling rates for certain materials, with product-specific, minimum-content standards as an alternative method of compliance. The initiative had called for glass, metal, paper, plastic, and wood used in primary and secondary packaging to achieve a 50% post-consumer recycling rate by the year 2000. As an alternative method of compliance, individual companies could meet the following post-consumer, minimum-content standards for products: glass, metal, paper, plastic, and wood packaging: 40% by 2000; newsprint and tissue paper: 50% by 2000; and printing and writing papers: 25% by 2000.

  11. Student Travel to Pan-Am Congress of Plants & Biofuels in Merida, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberly, Kimnach

    2014-04-01

    Department of Energy – Final Technical Report Grant Title: Student Travel to Pan-Am Congress of Plants & Biofuels in Merida, Mexico Award #: DE-FG02-08ER64612 Award Amount: $15,000.00 Award period: 6/15/2008 to 6/14/2009 ______________________________________________________________________________ The Pan American Congress on Plants and BioEnergy convened in Mérida, Mexico, June 22 to 25, 2008. The program was organized by Steve Long (University of Illinois) and Nick Carpita (Purdue University), along with co-organizers Marcos Buckeridge (University of São Paulo, Brazil) and Federico Sánchez (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México). More than 200 scientists from over a dozen nations around the world gathered to discuss key issues surrounding the development of biofuel feedstocks and to report on their research in this area. This three day conference had invited speakers surrounding developing renewable and sustainable energy resources which are typically propelled by three important drivers – security, cost and environmental impact. The first day of the conference was delegated to governmental policy makers and designers of national research and plant biologists, agronomists, microbiologists, economists and ecologists in relation to bioenergy security in the Western Hemisphere that is sustainable and ecologically and economically sound. Speakers from countries that have already made themselves energy independent shared solutions to improve efficiency that is being researched. Venture capitalist and industry leaders also spoke on their commitment to economic success in a new green agroindustry. Days two and three explored bioenergy crops and introduced the participants to the breadth of the agricultural landscape, the underlying biology of bioenergy plants and new ideas to enhance biomass yield and quality of the energy crops of the future. These presentations educated the participants in an effort to develop energy strategies in countries across the

  12. A report from the 22nd European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (March 31-April 4, 2012 - London, UK).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2012-06-01

    The 22nd European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) centered much of the scientific attention on the background of increasing resistance, the re-emergence of old pathogens and the increasing spread of bacteria thought to be exclusive of certain areas through international travel. Important news on putative new therapies overcoming the challenges infectious diseases are placing on populations around the world were discussed during 4 days of oral and poster sessions. This report will briefly summarize new findings leading to new and putative new treatment modalities for diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites.

  13. Learn about communicating with Congress at Fall Meeting lunch workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2011-11-01

    Are you interested in science policy and curious about how you can use your expertise to help inform policy makers? Come to a luncheon event at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco to learn how you can better inform legislators. The "Communicating With Congress" workshop will emphasize that good policy is informed by good science. As a scientist, you have every reason to establish a relationship with your legislators. At the event, AGU's 2009-2010 Congressional Science Fellow, Maeve Boland, will use her experience as a scientist and legislative staff member to teach you how to effectively share your science with local and national policy makers.

  14. Strategic Defense Initiative, 1989. Report to the Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-13

    This report serves as a summary of the SDI legacy of President Reagan, who launched the initiative with his historic speech of March 23, 1983. The report describes in detail current assessment of the best program for resolution of remaining technical issues, validation of technologies, and demonstration of our ability to integrate them. The program of research, development, and testing would, if adequately funded, support a fully informed decision by the President and Congress in the future on whether to deploy a strategic defense of the United States. Such defenses could enhance deterrence and increase stability.

  15. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management annual report to Congress

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This sixth Annual Report to Congress by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) describes activities and expenditures of the Office during fiscal year 1988. An epilogue chapter reports significant events from the end of the fiscal year on September 30, 1988 through March 1989. The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPA) of 1987 made significant changes to the NWPA relating to repository siting and monitored retrievable storage and added new provisions for the establishment of several institutional entities with which OCRWM will interact. Therefore, a dominant theme throughout this report is the implementation of the policy focus and specific provisions of the Amendments Act. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress, Volume 1, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document is the first of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Atomic Energy Act, Energy Reorganization Act, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act, and Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Other information included in this volume pertains to NRC user fees, NRC authorizations, the Inspector General Act, and the Administrative Procedure Act.

  17. Congress approves 13 percent increase in AIDS spending.

    PubMed

    1996-10-18

    A Republican Congress voted for a significant increase in AIDS-related spending for the fiscal year 1996. Increases were granted in every major program, including the Ryan White CARE Act and the once-doomed Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) program. Overall, discretionary spending for Federal AIDS programs rose by 13 percent. This increase includes an additional $94 million for AIDS-related research at the National Institute's of Health (NIH). Advocates call on policy-makers to develop a long-term strategy for providing drugs to those who lack private insurance and are not qualified for Medicaid.

  18. Congress split on best way to reshape network of labs

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, A.

    1995-09-15

    Reducing the size of the federal bureaucracy was a bread-and -butter issue for the Republicans who took over Congress in January. And the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) $6 billion network of national laboratories seemed like a tempting morsel. But 9 months later, congressional plates are loaded down with competing plans to reform the DOE labs, and the issue is giving majority members a case of indigestion. Their discomfort seems likely to delay adoption of any reform plans until at least next year. This article discusses the broad alternatives and possibilities for the future.

  19. [Progress and tradition. 100 years of the congress held by the German Society of Urology: Vienna 1907-Berlin 2007].

    PubMed

    Rathert, P

    2007-09-01

    The history of the German Urological Society and their congress reflects the scientific medical achievements of the last 100 years as well as the political and social structure of the twentieth century with the fantastic medical progress and the tremendous catastrophes. The congress in Berlin in 2007 once again links the urological society with the congress in Vienna of 1907.

  20. Congress, courts, and commerce: upholding the individual mandate to protect the public's health.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; Brown, Erin C Fuse; Orenstein, Daniel G; O'Keefe, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Among multiple legal challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is the premise that PPACA's "individual mandate" (requiring all individuals to obtain health insurance by 2014 or face civil penalties) is inviolate of Congress' interstate commerce powers because Congress lacks the power to regulate commercial "inactivity." Several courts initially considering this argument have rejected it, but federal district courts in Virginia and Florida have concurred, leading to numerous appeals and prospective review of the United States Supreme Court. Despite creative arguments, the dispositive constitutional question is not whether Congress' interstate commerce power extends to commercial inactivity. Rather, it is whether Congress may regulate individual decisions with significant economic ramifications in the interests of protecting and promoting the public's health. This article offers a counter-interpretation of the scope of Congress' interstate commerce power to regulate in furtherance of the public's health.

  1. Advent of a Link between Ayurveda and Modern Health Science: The Proceedings of the First International Congress on Ayurveda, “Ayurveda: The Meaning of Life—Awareness, Environment, and Health” March 21-22, 2009, Milan, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Antonio; Tosto, Carmen; Sartori, Guido; Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The First International Congress on Ayurveda was held in Milan, Italy in March 2009 and it has been the first scientific event of this kind in western world. This groundbreaking international congress was devoted to human being as the product of interactions between Awareness, Environment and Health, subjects that the West tends to consider separate and independent, but that are believed deeply connected in Ayurveda, whose interdependence defines “The Meaning of Life”. The Congress established a bridge between indian and western philosophy, scientific and biomedical thinking in order to expand knowledge and healthcare. Main attention and address of the invited speakers was on the concept of “relationships” that, connecting living beings with environment, shape Nature itself. This concept is central in Ayurveda but is also common to other western scientific disciplines such as quantum physics and epigenetics that, in the four Sessions of the Congress, were represented by eminent experts. The importance of this event was underlined by the attendance of more than 400 participants and by noteworthy institutional endorsements, that added a significative political dimension of high social impact due to the topical period for CAM acceptance and integration in Europe. PMID:20981327

  2. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOEpatents

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  3. PREFACE: 12th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelier, Michel

    2005-05-01

    This special issue presents a collection of refereed plenary and review papers presented at the 12th International Congress on Plasma Physics held in Nice, France, 25 29 October, 2004 (ICPP2004). The primary aims of ICPPs are: To advance all fields of plasma physics worldwide. To promote strong linkage with other areas of science in order to highlight the interdisciplinary character of the field. To strongly encourage participation by all members of the plasma physics community, in particular by young plasma physicists, women plasma physicists and plasma physicists from developing countries. The 12th ICPP was organized on behalf of the International Advisory Committee (IAC). About 330 papers (invited and contributed) were presented. These papers covered the four topics: Plasma applications Space and astrophysical plasmas Fundamental plasma physics Fusion plasmas Most of the contributions are available online at the following address: http://hal.ccsd.cnrs.fr/ICPP2004/en/. The Congress was underwritten by the Association Euratom CEA. The organizers wish to thank the main sponsors: the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, the Region Provence Alpes Côtes d'Azur, the city of Nice and the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs. For this special issue, the Programme Committee selected 41 speakers from about 100 proposals received from the IAC, to present invited talks. Some of them provided a written paper. Refereeing of these papers was conducted by the guest editors, following the normal refereeing standards of the journal.

  4. Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1995-01-01

    Congressional failure to pass a Superfund reauthorization bill this fall disappointed environmental consulting and engineering companies, environmentalists and parties liable for site cleanups. The Clinton administration's reform bill was introduced in the House Feb. 3, six months overdue, only seven months before Congress' annual summer break and less than a year before mid-term elections. The House bill was revised in August, but reauthorization was declared a lost cause in October, when supporters faced the harsh political fact that Republicans would hold the line against passing a new law until after the November elections. Of the three major environmental laws overdue for reauthorization--the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Clean Water Act and Superfund (officially, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act)--the Superfund law appears to have the best chance of making it through the 104 Congress successfully. The latest version of the administration-sponsored bill received wide-spread support from environmentalists, industry and environmental business groups as being more reasonable and fair than the existing law.

  5. World Foods. Can the World Feed Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindman, Wanda; And Others

    This teacher's guide contains resources to facilitate the study of the world food situation in home economics classes. It provides terms, historical elements of famine, and the effects of hunger and dietary deficiency on humans. Brief overviews of the basic factors influencing the world food situation and some of the proposed measures to solve the…

  6. Teaching World Religions without Teaching "World Religions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locklin, Reid B.; Tiemeier, Tracy; Vento, Johann M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of "religion" and "world religions" and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions…

  7. Sow the Seeds of Victory! Posters from the Food Administration during World War I. The Constitution Community: The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Linda

    From the outbreak of World War I in Europe until the signing of the Versailles Treaty, President Woodrow Wilson's administration proposed and implemented an extraordinary number of programs that affected people in their everyday activities. In August 1917 Congress passed the Food and Fuel Control Act, also known as the Lever Act, which gave the…

  8. Infrared vertically-illuminated photodiode for chip alignment feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloatti, L.; Ram, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We report on vertically-illuminated photodiodes fabricated in the GlobalFoundries 45nm 12SOI node and on a packaging concept for optically-interconnected chips. The photodiodes are responsive at 1180 nm -a wavelength currently used in chip-to-chip communications. They have further a wide field-of-view which enables chip-to-board positional feedback in chip-board assemblies. Monolithic integration enables on-chip processing of the positional data.

  9. Design and experiment of silicon PCR chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zheng; Zhao, Zhan; Xia, Shanhong

    2002-04-01

    There are considerable interests in integrating Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a microchip can have much fast heating and cooling rate, the delicacy in its structure makes the PCR experiment difficult and cracks often occur particularly for the thin membrane type of PCR chips. Design study and experiment of silicon PCR chips are presented with the aim of identifying the problems encountered in experiment and finding an optimum chip structure. Heating characteristics of four different heater designs have been compared, so have the PCR chambers with fixed frame and with suspended frame. The thermal stress analysis has shown that the structure and heater design can make a significant difference in heating characteristics and in reducing the failure of PCR chips. Different solutions to reduce PCR chip failure have been proposed. One of the solutions was implemented in the experiment, confirming the design study results. Silicon PCR chips have been fabricated. Thermal cycling and initial DNA amplification results are presented.

  10. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

  11. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2010-10-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  12. Fermilab silicon strip readout chip for BTev

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Raymond; Hoff, Jim; Mekkaoui, Abderrezak; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Angeleri, Valentina; Manfredi, Pier Francesco; Ratti, Lodovico; Speziali, Valeria; /Fermilab /Bergamo U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U.

    2005-05-01

    A chip has been developed for reading out the silicon strip detectors in the new BTeV colliding beam experiment at Fermilab. The chip has been designed in a 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology for high radiation tolerance. Numerous programmable features have been added to the chip, such as setup for operation at different beam crossing intervals. A full size chip has been fabricated and successfully tested. The design philosophy, circuit features, and test results are presented in this paper.

  13. The 1948 international congress of genetics in Sweden: people and politics.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Bengt O; Tunlid, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The International Congresses have played an important role in the history of genetics. The Eighth International Congress, which in 1948 was held in Sweden, celebrated the conclusion of the war against Nazism and many new decisive scientific advances. It also signaled a hardening of the fight against Lysenkoism, which was growing in strength in the Soviet Union. A rare document is available from the Congress--an amateur film made by a young delegate, Nils Nybom. With its help a living description can be given of the scientific and political melees in which the delegates were involved.

  14. On chip shapeable optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaut, C.; Cluzel, B.; Dellinger, J.; Lalouat, L.; Picard, E.; Peyrade, D.; Hadji, E.; de Fornel, F.

    2013-07-01

    Particles manipulation with optical forces is known as optical tweezing. While tweezing in free space with laser beams was established in the 1980s, integrating the optical tweezers on a chip is a challenging task. Recent experiments with plasmonic nanoantennas, microring resonators, and photonic crystal nanocavities have demonstrated optical trapping. However, the optical field of a tweezer made of a single microscopic resonator cannot be shaped. So far, this prevents from optically driven micromanipulations. Here we propose an alternative approach where the shape of the optical trap can be tuned by the wavelength in coupled nanobeam cavities. Using these shapeable tweezers, we present micromanipulation of polystyrene microspheres trapped on a silicon chip. These results show that coupled nanobeam cavities are versatile building blocks for optical near-field engineering. They open the way to much complex integrated tweezers using networks of coupled nanobeam cavities for particles or bio-objects manipulation at a larger scale.

  15. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings.

  16. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings. PMID:27472609

  17. Wrap-Around Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Flogiston Corporation was included in Spinoff 1992 for its stress reducing chair based on data from NASA's Anthropometric Source Book. Now, under a NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research), Flogiston developed a new form of immersion in virtual and video spaces called Neutral Immersion. The technology is called Flostation and is the commercial spinoff from the astronaut training system. Motorola purchased the first Flostation for testing and demonstrating a new warping chip it is developing.

  18. World Hunger: Teaching about World Hunger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jane

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of world hunger in the classroom. Controversial questions and map skills for students are discussed as well as activities for home economics and science classes. A list of resource materials is included. (AM)

  19. Updates from the Sixth International Congress 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic', the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, U.K., 1-3 December 2011.

    PubMed

    Shams, K; Burden, A D

    2012-10-01

    The 15 years between the First International Congress 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic' and the Sixth Congress held in London from 1 to 3 December 2011 have seen extraordinary progress in the sciences that are relevant to psoriasis and therapeutics that have transformed its treatment. Over this time, 'Psoriasis: from Gene to Clinic' has emerged as the premier conference for clinicians and scientists interested in this field. Its popularity is attested to by the 450 registered delegates from the U.K. and around the world, which necessitated a change of venue to the excellent facilities of the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. Although the content has evolved over the years, the structure of this 3-day conference has remained similar. The first day was given to genetics, comorbidities and outcome measures. Immunology and immunity were covered on the second day and therapeutics on the third. The stature of the three keynote lecturers and eight invited speakers was truly world class and their presentations were interspersed with 23 free communications. Here we review highly selected personal highlights of the meeting that we hope will be of general interest.

  20. Thirtieth Annual Congress on Veterinary Acupuncture: IVAS Report

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    More than 155 participants from 25 countries attended the 30th Annual IVAS Congress, September 8–11, 2004 in Oostende, Belgium. The focus was on veterinary acupuncture (AP) and immunology, and the event was sponsored by the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS). IVAS is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting excellence in the practice of veterinary AP as an integral part of the total veterinary health care delivery system. The Society endeavors to establish uniformly high standards of veterinary AP through its educational programs and accreditation examination. IVAS seeks to integrate veterinary AP and the practice of Western veterinary science, while also noting that the science of veterinary AP does not overlook allied health systems, such as homeopathy, herbology, nutrition, chiropractic, kinesiology, etc. ().

  1. Health, safety and environmental education at the Canadian Labour Congress.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Dave

    2011-01-01

    This piece describes involvement and reflections by Dave Bennett in three areas: 1) union education at the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) from the late 1970s onwards; 2) insights regarding how the CLC moved into health and safety education in the early 1980s; and 3) further thoughts on how the CLC moved from health and safety into environmental protection education in the early 1990s, and consequent changes in the perspective adopted by health and safety courses. There are two types of critical comment on these educational processes, one which examines the educational dilemmas at the time, with an evaluation of the decisions reached, and the other a retrospective view of the educational process as a result of reflective hindsight.

  2. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arya, Ravindra; Arzy, Shahar; Braakman, Hilde; Brodie, Martin J; Brugger, Peter; Chang, Bernard S; Guekht, Alla; Hermann, Bruce; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kanner, Andres M; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Mareš, Pavel; Mula, Marco; Neufeld, Miri; Risse, Gail L; Ryvlin, Philippe; Seeck, Margitta; Tomson, Torbjörn; Korczyn, Amos D

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the second of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Humanistic, biologic, and therapeutic aspects of epilepsy, particularly those related to the mind, were discussed. The extended summaries provide current overviews of epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and treatment, including brain functional connectivity and functional organization; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy; cognitive problems in newly diagnosed epilepsy; SUDEP including studies on prevention and involvement of the serotoninergic system; aggression and antiepileptic drugs; body, mind, and brain, including pain, orientation, the "self-location", Gourmand syndrome, and obesity; euphoria, obsessions, and compulsions; and circumstantiality and psychiatric comorbidities. PMID:26264466

  3. The language of science and communication with Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Grace F.

    2011-11-01

    "There are in fact two things, science and opinion; the former begets knowledge, the latter, ignorance." So stated Hippocrates back in 400 C.E. Today we find ourselves in a tug of war between science and opinion as we try to fashion a path forward on many important societal issues, including the use of science in addressing the water, energy, and climate change issues that are growing in importance. Our job in Congress is making sure we use the knowledge gained from asking questions and apply the responses properly in the decision-and policy-making processes. While that all sounds good in theory, the application is at best cumbersome, often leaving us with more questions than answers.

  4. Water politics as usual may be losing ground in Congress

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, L.

    1980-07-19

    Critics of Federal water projects point to the Ogallala aquifer and the Tennessee-Tombigbee projects as examples of government mismanagement and lack of goals. A legislative proposal to change the way Congress funds water projects would transfer some of the decision-making role to the states. The Domenici-Moynihan bill would increase the share of money to the northeastern states for municipal water systems and decrease funding for multi-purpose dam and irrigation projects in the Southwest. Political debate pits the historical pork barrel approach against the demand for an equitable distribution of water money. Opponents of the bill fear that state legislatures will not uniformly seek cost-effective, environmentally sound projects. (DCK)

  5. Semiannual report to Congress, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Office of Inspector General Semiannual Report to the Congress covers the period October 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995. The report summarizes significant audit, inspection and investigative accomplishments for the reporting period, a large number of which facilitated Department management`s efforts to improve management controls and ensure efficient and effective operation. Narratives of the most significant reports are grouped by six primary performance measures: (1) Recommendations accepted by management, (2) Audit/inspection savings, recoveries, and funds identified for better use, (3) Legislative/regulatory compliance to recommendations, (4) Positive impacts on the Department after implementation of recommendations, (5) Complaints resolved, and (6) Investigation recoveries, fines, and funds identified for better use.

  6. Nuclear regulatory legislation, 104th Congress. Volume 2, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document is the second of two volumes compiling statutes and material pertaining to nuclear regulatory legislation through the 104th Congress, 2nd Session. It is intended for use as a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) internal resource document. Legislative information reproduced in this document includes portions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, various acts pertaining to low-level radioactive waste, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, the West Valley Demonstration Project Act, Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Export Licensing Statutes, and selected treaties, agreements, and executive orders. Other information provided pertains to Commissioner tenure, NRC appropriations, the Chief Financial Officers Act, information technology management reform, and Federal civil penalties.

  7. Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain, and Mind: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Rektor, Ivan; Schachter, Steven C; Arya, Ravindra; Arzy, Shahar; Braakman, Hilde; Brodie, Martin J; Brugger, Peter; Chang, Bernard S; Guekht, Alla; Hermann, Bruce; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn; Kanner, Andres M; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; Mareš, Pavel; Mula, Marco; Neufeld, Miri; Risse, Gail L; Ryvlin, Philippe; Seeck, Margitta; Tomson, Torbjörn; Korczyn, Amos D

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsy is both a disease of the brain and the mind. Here, we present the second of two papers with extended summaries of selected presentations of the Third International Congress on Epilepsy, Brain and Mind (April 3-5, 2014; Brno, Czech Republic). Humanistic, biologic, and therapeutic aspects of epilepsy, particularly those related to the mind, were discussed. The extended summaries provide current overviews of epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and treatment, including brain functional connectivity and functional organization; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy; cognitive problems in newly diagnosed epilepsy; SUDEP including studies on prevention and involvement of the serotoninergic system; aggression and antiepileptic drugs; body, mind, and brain, including pain, orientation, the "self-location", Gourmand syndrome, and obesity; euphoria, obsessions, and compulsions; and circumstantiality and psychiatric comorbidities.

  8. Virtual Worlds? "Outlook Good"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelton, AJ

    2008-01-01

    Many people believed that virtual worlds would end up like the eight-track audiotape: a memory of something no longer used (or useful). Yet today there are hundreds of higher education institutions represented in three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds such as Active Worlds and Second Life. The movement toward the virtual realm as a viable teaching…

  9. World Literature Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Robert J.

    The development of a curriculum for graduate-level education in world literature, a logical extension of comparative literature, poses many problems. Among these is the misinterpretation and misuse of the term "world literature," which should be defined as literature from all over the world that is taught by those who read it in the original…

  10. World breastfeeding week.

    PubMed

    Coleridge, Hannah-Lee

    2003-08-01

    'Breastfeeding in a globalised world for peace and justice' is the theme of this year's World Breastfeeding Week, which is to be held at the beginning of August. This article explores the aims of the campaign, the obstacles and benefits of globalisation and the activities that are being held around the world.

  11. Congress, health care, and congressional caucuses: an examination of the Diabetes Caucus.

    PubMed

    Burgin, Eileen

    2003-10-01

    Caucuses have become a critical feature of the congressional landscape, yet are neglected in the literature on health-policy making in Congress. The principal goal of the article is to use the Diabetes Caucus as a case study to highlight this significant yet underappreciated political actor in the health-policy realm in Congress. The exploration, which draws on information gathered from thirty-two interviews with members of the Diabetes Caucus and their staff, will contribute to an increased understanding of both Congress's operations in the health area and the potential impact of caucuses on health-policy making. The article emphasizes particular characteristics relating to the membership and objectives of the Diabetes Caucus. In addition, the study stresses that the group had the requisite political momentum to achieve legislative successes when a policy window opened in the 105th Congress because it served much like, in the terminology of John Kingdon, a "policy entrepreneur".

  12. Environmental, energy and natural resources status report for the 101st Congress. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Contents: environmental, energy and natural resources status report for the 101st Congress; abandoned-mine fees passed in budget bill; cleanup effort and NRC fees boosted; other measures stall; Strategic Petroleum Reserve to grow to 1 billion barrels; circle of poison provisions cut in farm bill conference; congress clears landmark oil spill liability legislation; motor fuels tax tops massive debt reduction measure; Bush plans to sign massive clean air bill; global climate change bill passes at session end; lots of conservation provisions in farm bill; tongass bill moves; loggers and owls remain stalemated; major reform bills on parks, land fund and blm wither; coastal zone, great lakes, barrier bills beat deadline; modified tuna bill clears congress; Arizona, Alaska, Nevada wilderness bills approved; bills passed on asbestos, transport, waste reduction; bills passed on alternative power, low-income energy aid; numerous money bills clear Congress at the last minute; EPA-to-cabinet bill dies; DOD to fund environment research.

  13. Land-Grant Colleges Take Aggressive Steps to Get Agriculture Funds from Congress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, Colleen

    1987-01-01

    Increasingly, institutions are seeking money directly from Congress for new research facilities and other science projects, stirring criticism of "pork-barrel science" and special advantages given to land-grant colleges. (MSE)

  14. 37 CFR 251.56 - Order of the Librarian of Congress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES OF PROCEDURE Procedures of Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panels § 251.56 Order of the Librarian of Congress....

  15. Report On 15Th International Congress On High Speed Photography And Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endelman, Lincoln L.

    1984-01-01

    The 15th International Congress on High Speed Photography and Photonics was a gathering of international representatives who presented papers on the latest developnents on the use of high speed photography for scientific, industrial, research, medical and educational purposes.

  16. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-06-08

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multi chip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  17. Microluminometer chip and method to measure bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Michael L; Paulus, Michael J; Sayler, Gary S; Applegate, Bruce M; Ripp, Steven A

    2008-05-13

    An integrated microluminometer includes an integrated circuit chip having at least one n-well/p-substrate junction photodetector for converting light received into a photocurrent, and a detector on the chip for processing the photocurrent. A distributed electrode configuration including a plurality of spaced apart electrodes disposed on an active region of the photodetector is preferably used to raise efficiency.

  18. Radiation Behavior of Analog Neural Network Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langenbacher, H.; Zee, F.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network experiment conducted for the Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1) 1-b launched in June 1994. Identical sets of analog feed-forward neural network chips was used to study and compare the effects of space and ground radiation on the chips. Three failure mechanisms are noted.

  19. Teaching Quality Control with Chocolate Chip Cookies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ardith

    2014-01-01

    Chocolate chip cookies are used to illustrate the importance and effectiveness of control charts in Statistical Process Control. By counting the number of chocolate chips, creating the spreadsheet, calculating the control limits and graphing the control charts, the student becomes actively engaged in the learning process. In addition, examining…

  20. Multimedia-Based Chip Design Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catalkaya, Tamer; Golze, Ulrich

    This paper focuses on multimedia computer-based training programs on chip design. Their development must be fast and economical, in order to be affordable by technical university institutions. The self-produced teaching program Illusion, which demonstrates a monitor controller as an example of a small but complete chip design, was implemented to…

  1. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  2. Oligonucleotides direct synthesis on porous silicon chip.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Luca; De Tommasi, Edoardo; Rea, Ilaria; Rotiroti, Lucia; Giangrande, Luca; Oliviero, Giorgia; Borbone, Nicola; Galeone, Aldo; Piccialli, Gennaro

    2008-01-01

    A solid phase oligonucleotide (ON) synthesis on porous silicon (PSi) chip is presented. The prepared Si-OH surface were analyzed by FT-IR and the OH functions were quantified by reaction with 3'-phosphoramidite nucleotide building block. Short ONs were synthesized on the chip surface and the coupling yields evaluated. PMID:18776583

  3. Teamwork and the future of practice explored at SPVS/VPMA congress.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    Effective leadership, strong teamwork and the client journey all formed key themes at this year's congress of the Society of Practising Veterinary Surgeons and the Veterinary Practice Management Association. The congress, the third the two organisations have held jointly, discussed a variety of management topics for vets, practice managers and other members of the veterinary team, with a view to making their practices better places to work in and for clients to visit. PMID:25748185

  4. Electrothermal modeling of silicon PCR chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zheng; Zhao, Zhan; Xia, Shanhong

    2001-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a microchip has drawn considerable attention in recent years. Although a microchip can have must fast heating and cooling rate, the delicacy in its structure makes the PCR experiment difficult and cracks often occurs particularly for the thin membrane type of PCR chips. Electrothermal modeling of PCR chips is presented using commercial MEMS software tool IntelliSuiteTM, with the aim of identifying the problems encountered in experiment and finding an optimum chip structure. Heating characteristics of four different heater designs have been compared, so have the PCR chambers with fixed frame and with suspended frame. The thermal stress analysis has shown that the structure and heater design can make significant difference in heating characteristics and in reducing the failure of PCR chips. The computer simulation has confirmed what has been found in experiment the reason of membrane cracks. Improvement in PCR chip design has been proposed.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Amperometric Chips with Pneumatic Micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujita, Yuichi; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Chikae, Miyuki; Torai, Soichiro; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-04-01

    We fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) amperometric chips with pneumatic micropumps by the combination of amperometric biosensors based on CNT-arrayed electrodes and microchannels with pneumatic micropumps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane). On the chip, phosphate buffer solution and potassium ferricyanide, K3[Fe(CN)6], were introduced into the CNT electrodes using each pneumatic micropump and electrochemically measured by differential pulse voltammetry. The results indicate that our chip can automatically exchange reagents on the CNT electrodes and clearly detect molecules. Moreover, by modifying the CNT electrodes with enzyme glucose oxidase, glucose molecules could be detected using our chips by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. We conclude that microfluidic chips with CNT-arrayed electrodes are a promising candidate for the development of hand-held electrochemical biosensors.

  6. Gene Assembly from Chip-Synthesized Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Eroshenko, Nikolai; Kosuri, Sriram; Marblestone, Adam H; Conway, Nicholas; Church, George M.

    2012-01-01

    De novo synthesis of long double-stranded DNA constructs has a myriad of applications in biology and biological engineering. However, its widespread adoption has been hindered by high costs. Cost can be significantly reduced by using oligonucleotides synthesized on high-density DNA chips. However, most methods for using off-chip DNA for gene synthesis have failed to scale due to the high error rates, low yields, and high chemical complexity of the chip-synthesized oligonucleotides. We have recently demonstrated that some commercial DNA chip manufacturers have improved error rates, and that the issues of chemical complexity and low yields can be solved by using barcoded primers to accurately and efficiently amplify subpools of oligonucleotides. This article includes protocols for computationally designing the DNA chip, amplifying the oligonucleotide subpools, and assembling 500-800 basepair (bp) constructs. PMID:25077042

  7. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program Report to Congress: An Integrated Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Uhart, M.; et al,

    2005-08-01

    Under Title IX of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, Congress reauthorized the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) to continue coordinating acid rain research and monitoring, as it had done during the previous decade, and to provide Congress with periodic reports. In particular, Congress asked NAPAP to assess all available data and information to answer two questions: (1) What are the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of Title IV? This question addresses the costs and economic impacts of complying with the Acid Rain Program as well as benefit analyses associated with the various human health and welfare effects, including reduced visibility, damages to materials and cultural resources, and effects on ecosystems. (2) What reductions in deposition rates are needed to prevent adverse ecological effects? This complex questions addresses ecological systems and the deposition levels at which they experience harmful effects. The results of the assessment of the effects of Title IV and of the relationship between acid deposition rates and ecological effects were to be reported to Congress quadrennially, beginning with the 1996 report to Congress. The objective of this Report is to address the two main questions posed by Congress and fully communicate the results of the assessment to decision-makers. Given the primary audience, most of this report is not written as a technical document, although information supporting the conclusions is provided along with references.

  8. Transcriptional regulation by CHIP/LDB complexes.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-08-12

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes "on" or "off" depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required for

  9. A multi-year survey of stem-end chip defect in chipping potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most serious tuber quality concerns of US chip potato growers is stem-end chip defect, which is defined as a localized post-fry discoloration in and adjacent to the vasculature on the stem end portion of potato chips. The incidence and severity of stem-end chip defect vary with growing lo...

  10. My World Indoors: My Health My World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Denk, James; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. Focusing on indoor environmental health, it includes (1) an activities guide for teachers which focuses on physical science, life science, and the environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that…

  11. The Third World Is a Different World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Leonard P.

    The Third World Assembly of Adult Education held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 24-30, 1985, brought 450 adult educators from 90 countries together to discuss the theme adult education, development, and peace. The week-long conference mixed morning general sessions with 17 intensive work groups. The first work group searched for common…

  12. PREFACE: VII Brazilian Congress on Metrology (Metrologia 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Félix, Rodrigo; Bernardes, Americo; Valente de Oliveira, José Carlos; Mauro Granjeiro, José; Epsztejn, Ruth; Ihlenfeld, Waldemar; Smarçaro da Cunha, Valnei

    2015-01-01

    SEVENTH BRAZILIAN CONGRESS ON METROLOGY (METROLOGIA 2013) Metrology and Quality for a Sustainable Development From November 24th to 27th 2013 was issued the Seventh Brazilian Congress on Metrology (Metrologia 2013), which is a biannual conference organized and sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Metrology (SBM) and the Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro). This edition was held in the charming and historical city of Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil, and aimed to join people and institutions devoted to the dissemination of the metrology and conformity assessment. The Metrologia 2013 Conference consisted of Keynote Speeches (7) and regular papers (204). Among the regular papers, the 47 most outstanding ones, comprising a high quality content on Metrology and Conformity Assessment, were selected to be published in this issue of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The topics of the conference covered all important areas of Metrology, which were agglutinated in the following sessions in the present issue: . Physical Metrology (Acoustics, Vibration and Ultrasound; Electricity and Magnetism; Mechanics; Optics); . Metrology on Ionizing Radiations; . Time and Frequency; . Chemistry Metrology; . Materials Metrology; . Biotechnology; . Uncertainty, Statistics and Mathematics; . Legal Metrology; . Conformity Assessment. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) to the scientific community to promote further research in Metrology and related areas. We believe that this volume will be both an excellent source of scientific material in the fast evolving fields that were covered by Metrologia 2013. President of the congress Americo Bernardes Federal University of Ouro Preto atb@iceb.ufop.br Editor-in-chief Rodrigo Costa-Félix Brazilian National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology rpfelix@inmetro.gov.br Editors José Carlos Valente de Oliveira (Editor on Mechanical Metrology

  13. Bridging the Gap, Facing the Challenge—the 26th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    The joint venue of the 26th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC) & Asia Pacific Heart Congress 2015 (APHC 2015) & International Congress Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation 2015 (ICCPR 2015) were held from October 29 to November 01, 2015 at the China National Convention Center (CNCC), Beijing, China. This year’s conference focused on cardiovascular disease prevention, health promotion, education and training, as well as disease management and rehabilitation. PMID:26885499

  14. Bridging the Gap, Facing the Challenge-the 26(th) Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingmei; Ren, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The joint venue of the 26(th) Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC) & Asia Pacific Heart Congress 2015 (APHC 2015) & International Congress Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation 2015 (ICCPR 2015) were held from October 29 to November 01, 2015 at the China National Convention Center (CNCC), Beijing, China. This year's conference focused on cardiovascular disease prevention, health promotion, education and training, as well as disease management and rehabilitation.

  15. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  16. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  17. Microchannel cooling of face down bonded chips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1993-01-01

    Microchannel cooling is applied to flip-chip bonded integrated circuits, in a manner which maintains the advantages of flip-chip bonds, while overcoming the difficulties encountered in cooling the chips. The technique is suited to either multichip integrated circuit boards in a plane, or to stacks of circuit boards in a three dimensional interconnect structure. Integrated circuit chips are mounted on a circuit board using flip-chip or control collapse bonds. A microchannel structure is essentially permanently coupled with the back of the chip. A coolant delivery manifold delivers coolant to the microchannel structure, and a seal consisting of a compressible elastomer is provided between the coolant delivery manifold and the microchannel structure. The integrated circuit chip and microchannel structure are connected together to form a replaceable integrated circuit module which can be easily decoupled from the coolant delivery manifold and the circuit board. The coolant supply manifolds may be disposed between the circuit boards in a stack and coupled to supplies of coolant through a side of the stack.

  18. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Petersen, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow dummy chips'' are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned on the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  19. Three dimensional, multi-chip module

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Petersen, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A plurality of multi-chip modules are stacked and bonded around the perimeter by sold-bump bonds to adjacent modules on, for instance, three sides of the perimeter. The fourth side can be used for coolant distribution, for more interconnect structures, or other features, depending on particular design considerations of the chip set. The multi-chip modules comprise a circuit board, having a planarized interconnect structure formed on a first major surface, and integrated circuit chips bonded to the planarized interconnect surface. Around the periphery of each circuit board, long, narrow "dummy chips" are bonded to the finished circuit board to form a perimeter wall. The wall is higher than any of the chips on the circuit board, so that the flat back surface of the board above will only touch the perimeter wall. Module-to-module interconnect is laser-patterned o the sides of the boards and over the perimeter wall in the same way and at the same time that chip to board interconnect may be laser-patterned.

  20. The commission for the geological map of the world and its future projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delany, F.

    From a small group of European geologists that was officially constituted during the 1881 International Geological Congress in Bologna to propose a standard legend and draft a Geological Map of Europe, the Commission for the Geological Map of the World (CGMW) has evolved into a worldwide network of cooperating geological surveys. It has contributed to progress in the earth sciences by preparing and printing maps, recognizing that these maps provide the geometric constraints for data syntheses and can, through imaginative and novel legends, demonstrate the relationship between heterogeneous parameters.The original Bologna group was enlarged to comprise representatives of all the geological surveys of Europe, thus forming the Commission for the Geological Map of Europe, which still retains a certain autonomy within the framework of CGMW. In 1910, at the eleventh session of the International Geological Congress, when the first edition of the Geological Map of Europe was nearly ready for printing, a 1:1,000,000 geological map of the world was proposed. In view of the size of such a task, and the lack of a base map, it was decided that a world map be drafted to a ‘suitable scale’ according to the legend used for the Geological Map of Europe. Representatives of all countries were invited to collaborate, and thus the Commission for the Geological Map of the World came into being.

  1. Fermilab Physics Department TVC chip

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S.; Cotta-Ramusino, A.

    1990-07-01

    The Electronics Group in the Physics Department at Fermilab has designed and has had produced 20 prototypes of a full custom four channel time to voltage converter using the ES2 direct write 2 {mu}m CMOS process. The actual implementation of the design was performed under contract by ASIC designs Inc. of Naperville, Illinois. Each channel has two hit capability and one level of input buffering: that is, up to four voltages representing time internals can be stored from each input for later ADC conversion. The chip produces an edited list of hits and presents the appropriate analog value on its output for each digital value on its hit address lines. The next hit address and analog voltage in the event is presented in response to an external strobe. One current sum proportional to the number of inputs hit for each input buffer is also provided. The chip has been designed to be used on a fastbus TDC card developed here, but it is our belief that it could be adapted to many TDC applications. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Whole-Teflon microfluidic chips

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Kangning; Dai, Wen; Zhou, Jianhua; Su, Jing; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-01-01

    Although microfluidics has shown exciting potential, its broad applications are significantly limited by drawbacks of the materials used to make them. In this work, we present a convenient strategy for fabricating whole-Teflon microfluidic chips with integrated valves that show outstanding inertness to various chemicals and extreme resistance against all solvents. Compared with other microfluidic materials [e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)] the whole-Teflon chip has a few more advantages, such as no absorption of small molecules, little adsorption of biomolecules onto channel walls, and no leaching of residue molecules from the material bulk into the solution in the channel. Various biological cells have been cultured in the whole-Teflon channel. Adherent cells can attach to the channel bottom, spread, and proliferate well in the channels (with similar proliferation rate to the cells in PDMS channels with the same dimensions). The moderately good gas permeability of the Teflon materials makes it suitable to culture cells inside the microchannels for a long time. PMID:21536918

  3. Gene Chips and Functional Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadeh, Hisham; Afshari, Cynthia

    2000-11-01

    These past few years of scientific discovery will undoubtedly be remembered as the "genomics era," the period in which biologists succeeded in enumerating the sequence of nucleotides making up all, or at least most, of human DNA. And while this achievement has been heralded as a technological feat equal to the moon landing, it is only the first of many advances in DNA technology. Scientists are now faced with the task of understanding the meaning of the DNA sequence. Specifically, they want to learn how the DNA code relates to protein function. An important tool in the study of "functional genomics," is the cDNA microarray—also known as the gene chip. Inspired by computer microchips, gene chips allow scientists to monitor the expression of hundreds, even thousands, of genes in a fraction of the time it used to take to monitor the expression of a single one. By altering the conditions under which a particular tissue expresses genes—say, by exposing it to toxins or growth factors—scientists can determine the suite of genes expressed in different situations and hence start to get a handle on the function of these genes. The authors discuss this important new technology and some of its practical applications.

  4. Physiologically relevant organs on chips.

    PubMed

    Yum, Kyungsuk; Hong, Soon Gweon; Healy, Kevin E; Lee, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.

  5. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTURE TOOTH MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The applicability of the edge chipping method to denture tooth materials was assessed. These are softer materials than those usually tested by edge chipping. The edge chipping fracture resistances of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) based and two filled resin composite denture tooth materials were compared. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to chip rectangular blocks and flattened anterior denture teeth. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Between 20 and 65 chips were made per condition depending upon the material, the scatter, and the indenter type. Different indenter types were used including Rockwell C, sharp conical 120°, Knoop, and Vickers. The edge toughness, Te, was evaluated for different indenter types. Results The edge chipping data collected on the blocks matched the data collected from flattened teeth. High scatter, particularly at large distances and loads, meant that many tests (up to 64) were necessary to compare the denture tooth materials and to ascertain the appropriate data trends. A linear force – distance trend analysis was adequate for comparing these materials. A power law trend might be more appropriate, but the large scatter obscured the definitive determination of the precise trend. Different indenters produce different linear trends, with the ranking of: sharp conical 120°, Rockwell C, and Knoop, from lowest to highest edge toughness. Vickers indenter data were extremely scattered and a sensible trend could not be obtained. Edge toughness was inversely correlated to hardness. Significance Edge chipping data collected either from simple laboratory scale test blocks or from actual denture teeth may be used to evaluate denture materials. The edge chipping method’s applicability has been extended to another class of restorative materials. PMID:24674342

  6. Education, U.S. Economic Performance and the Federal Role. Hearing before the Joint Economic Committee, Congress of the United States. One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Economic Committee, Washington, DC.

    In the context of a growing debate over the relationship between education and the economic performance of the United States, this hearing focused on what the federal government, and the Congress in particular, can do to foster improved economic performance. Oral and written testimony was delivered by three witnesses: Henry M. Levin, director,…

  7. Points of View at the Two Congresses: National People's Congress Deputies and Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference Members Discuss Education (Excerpts)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rongwei, Zhang; Xiaobai, Shi

    2006-01-01

    The Second Meeting of the Tenth National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) opened in Beijing at 3:00 P.M. on March 3, 2004, and closed on the afternoon of March 12. The Second Meeting of the Tenth National People's Congress (NPC) opened on March 5, 2004, in Beijing and closed on the afternoon of March 14…

  8. Proceedings, National Congress on Environmental Health Management, AMA Congress on Environmental Health Problems (4th, New York, New York, April 24-26, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archives of Environmental Health, 1967

    1967-01-01

    Included are 18 papers presented at the fourth American Medical Association Congress on Environmental Health Problems. Topics related to environmental health include clinical and epidemiological considerations, genetics, patterns of health agencies, role of the physician and the medical society, and environmental stress. Topics related to…

  9. The Role of Older Women in the Work Force. Hearing before the Joint Economic Committee. Congress of the United States, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Economic Committee, Washington, DC.

    This document presents witness testimony and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the role of older women in the work force. The opening statement from Representative Olympia J. Stowe stresses the need for Congress to recognize the social realities facing older women when it considers changes in education, job…

  10. Rural Development: Seventh Annual Report of the President to the Congress on Government Services to Rural America. 95th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    Analyzing 1975 Federal Outlays for 275 programs in terms of rural development and government services, this 7th annual report to the Congress pursuant to Title IX, Section 901 (e) of the Agricultural Act of 1970 includes tabular and narrative data pertaining to: metropolitan and nonmetropolitan distribution; regional distribution (census regions);…

  11. New England Energy Congress project. Final report, June 1978-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-11-20

    From May 1978 until April 1979, 120 New Englanders volunteered for one of six committees to devise and consider energy policy recommendations for the region's twenty-five Member, six state Congressional delegation. Sponsored by the New England Congressional Caucus and Tufts University, the New England Energy Congress was funded by grants from the Economic Development Administration, US Department of Commerce and the Office of Environment, US Department of Energy. The results of the work of the 120 delegates and nine staff was a 500 page report, Blueprint for Energy Action, containing over 150 policy recommendations to the Congress, Executive agencies, state legislatures and municipalities. The New England Congressional Caucus responded in June 1979 with an Energy Package, including twenty (and ultimately twenty-five) legislative bills and several letters to federal agencies, based on the recommendations of the Energy Congress. Following the release of the report in June 1979, 55 delegates continued their efforts as members of the Implementation Group of the Energy Congress. In July 1980, this group released a volume of Strategy Papers designed to assist in the implementation of Energy Congress recommendations. As a result of this work, a broad array of energy activities were initiated in New England and in Washington. By January 1981, 20 of the 25 bills in the Caucus package had been passed in whole or in part. This final report discusses the Energy Congress' activities, consensus decision-making process and its findings. The report reviews the results of a thorough evaluation conducted through the mail and by phone of participants, outside observers and from Capital Hill. The clear conclusion is that the Energy Congress made a unique and significant contribution towards enabling New Englanders, both in the region and in Washington, to set energy goals and priorities and to begin serious efforts to reduce the region's precarious dependence on oil imports.

  12. Distillation. Third World Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  13. Scriptures of the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, William, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of "Research and Creative Activity" features 10 articles on Indiana University faculty members whose work on various campuses continues to broaden and advance knowledge about "Scriptures of the World" and their meaning in human life. The articles are as follows: "Why Scriptures of the World Still Matter (William Jackson); Reading…

  14. The Two World Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Ross E.

    2008-01-01

    In the arenas where the two world histories have taken shape, educators vigorously debate among themselves intellectual, pedagogical, and policy issues surrounding world history as a school subject. The people in each arena tend to share, despite internal disagreements, a common set of premises and assumptions for ordering the discussion of world…

  15. ILLITERACY, A WORLD PROBLEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JEFFRIES, CHARLES

    THIS STUDY OF WORLD ILLITERACY BEGINS WITH A BRIEF OUTLINE OF THE NATURE OF THE PROBLEM OF ILLITERACY AND DISCUSSION OF THE SPECIAL TECHNIQUES WHICH HAVE BEEN EVOLVED TO OVERCOME IT. A WORLD MAP OF ILLITERACY PLOTS ILLITERACY IN SPECIFIC AREAS AND COUNTRIES. PAST AND PRESENT EFFORTS TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM (THE PIONEER WORK OF WORK OF MISSIONARIES,…

  16. Fermentation. Third World Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Natalie; Hughes, Wyn

    This unit, developed by the Third World Science Project, is designed to add a multicultural element to existing science syllabi (for students aged 11-16) in the United Kingdom. The project seeks to develop an appreciation of the: boundless fascination of the natural world; knowledge, skills, and expertise possessed by men/women everywhere;…

  17. World Religions. Senior Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto.

    This curriculum guide provides a general view of the various considerations governing a senior year or high school course in world religions. An early section on objectives sets out some of the aims of a course in world religions. It states that the particular aim should be the development of a sympathetic understanding of the meaning of different…

  18. Education and World Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The impact on educational analysis of mainstream international relations (IR) theories is yet to realize its full potential. The problem of education in relation to the construction of world order is considered in relation to core developments in IR theory since the Second World War. In particular, the global architecture of education is seen as a…

  19. Towards Developmental World Englishes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Kingsley; Graddol, David; Meierkord, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Over the last three decades scholars promoting the world Englishes paradigm (WE) have worked towards establishing a more positive attitude towards international varieties of English. However, despite the best intentions of Western linguists working in this field, there is an obvious imbalance between the developed and developing world in many…

  20. World Music Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Access to world music resources such as videos and sound recordings have increased with the advent of YouTube and the efforts of music educators working closely with ethnomusicologists to provide more detailed visual and audio information about various musical practices. This column discusses some world music resources available for music…