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Sample records for chironomus riparius meigen

  1. Accumulation of mercury in larvae and adults, Chironomus riparius (Meigen)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Among benthic aquatic insects there are taxa that grow abundant in sediments polluted with organic matter. Some of them also tolerate high levels of heavy metals. In this research short exposure and partial life cycle tests were carried out to evaluate the accumulation of mercury in Chironomus riparius Meigen larvae, pupal exuviae and adults from water enriched with HgCl/sub 2/. Their abundance in heavily polluted waters and the fact that it is easy to rear them suggested the use of this species for the toxicity tests considered in our present research. Short exposure tests were carried out to evaluate the LC/sub 50/ of HgCl/sub 2/ for the 4th instar larva of C. riparius Meigen.

  2. Proteomic evaluation of cadmium toxicity on the midge Chironomus riparius Meigen larvae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Yoo, Dong-hun; Son, Jino; Cho, Kijong

    2006-02-01

    Heavy-metal pollution of aquatic ecosystems is a widespread phenomenon after industrial consumption. Whether aquatic organisms are adapted to the heavy-metal pollutants or not, such environmental stress causes changes in physiological responses. In this study, the aquatic midge, Chironomus riparius Meigen, was used to find changes of expression of proteins in relation to cadmium exposure. Dose-response relationships between cadmium concentrations and mortality of 3rd instar midge larvae were observed and the protein levels were compared using PD-Quest after 2-DE. Comparing the intensity of protein spots, 21 proteins decreased and 18 proteins increased in response to cadmium treatment. With increased proteins, three enzymes such as S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, O-methyltransferase, and aspartokinase were involved in the glutathione biosynthesis and a key enzyme regulating fatty acid biosynthesis, oleyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase was also identified. According to the functional classification of decreased levels of proteins, they were involved in energy production, protein fate, nucleotide biosynthesis, cell division, transport and binding, signal transduction, and fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism in the cell. In addition, phenol hydroxylase, thioesterase, zinc metalloprotease, and aspartate kinase were newly expressed after cadmium exposure at the concentration of the LC(10 )value. Therefore, these proteins seem to be potential biomarkers for cadmium exposure in the aquatic ecosystems. PMID:16372273

  3. Sexual dimorphism in Chironomus riparius (Meigen): Impact on interpretation of growth in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Day, K.E.; Kirby, R.S.; Reynoldson, T.B. . Dept. of the Environment)

    1994-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in fourth-instar larvae and adults was studied for Chironomus riparius. Wet weight of fourth-instar male chironomids was on average 29.4% lower than that of fourth-instar female chironomids at day 10 post-hatch of eggs, when organisms were reared individually in 250-ml beakers with 60 g sediment. This weight differential continued to the adult stage and was enhanced with males weighing 39.8% less than females. When animals were reared in groups of 15 larvae per beaker, differences between the sexes in larval wet weight were not statistically significant, but males were still 7.4% smaller than females; however, adult males weighed an average of 42.7% less than females upon emergence. Stage of development was confirmed by head capsule measurement; no significant differences in head capsule widths were detected between the sexes. Animals reared alone, regardless of sex, weighed more than animals reared as a group, indicating that initial larval densities and size of bioassay container can significantly affect larval growth. The probability of making a type 1 error in sediment toxicity tests due to sexual dimorphism in weight was estimated to be only 3% when dimorphism was most enhanced, that is, for animals reared individually. The effect of dimorphism on data interpretation when animals are reared in groups of 15 to 50 animals per container is thought to be minimal. It is recommended that both larval weight and head capsule width be measured as end points in sediment toxicity tests to differentiate reduced growth from retardation of instar development.

  4. Characterization of Heterochromatin in the Salivary Gland Chromosomes of Chironomus riparius Meigen and Chironomuspiger Strenzke (Diptera, Chironomidae) by Differential and Fluorochrome Staining.

    PubMed

    Michailova, Paraskeva; Ilkova, Julia; Maryańska-Nadachowska, Anna; Warchałowska-Śliwa, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The constitutive heterochromatin of two homosequential sibling species, Chironomus riparius and Chironomus piger, was studied. The salivary gland chromosomes of both species were analyzed using three staining methods: orcein and C band staining combined with DAPI and CMA3 fluorochrome staining. Both species have the chromosome set 2n = 8, with the same banding pattern and chromosome arm combinations: AB, CD, EF, G, but they differed in number and distribution of heterochromatic bands, AT-rich sequences (DAPI+) and GC-rich sequences (CMA3+). In the polytene chromosomes of C. piger, C-bands were found in centromeres only. They contain two types of repetitive DNA sequences: DAPI+ (very weak) and CMA3+ sequences. However, the polytene chromosomes of C. riparius have many interstitial heterochromatic bands in addition to the centromeric heterochromatin. Some of these bands contain both AT-rich and GC-rich sequences, while others are either AT-rich (DAPI+) or GC-rich (CMA3+). Therefore, these closely related species differ both in the content and localization of constitutive heterochromatin. The species-specific organization of the constitutive heterochromatin can be used as an additional cytogenetic marker for species differentiation. PMID:26255462

  5. Multiple-trait analysis of fluctuating asymmetry levels in anthropogenically and naturally stressed sites: a case study using Chironomus riparius Meigen, 1804 larvae.

    PubMed

    Servia, M J; Cobo, F; González, M A

    2004-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry levels were measured in fourth-instar Chironomus riparius larvae collected from various sampling sites in Galicia (northwest Spain) subjected to different types and degrees of stress. Specifically, we selected sites with contamination of anthropogenic origin, ranging from urban and industrial sewages to organic wastes, as well as two sites without chemical contamination, but with marked diurnal variations in their physicochemical conditions. Fluctuating asymmetry levels were determined for various structures of the head capsule (antennal segment I length, antennal segment II length, mentum width, and number of pecten epipharyngis teeth). The results obtained group the sampling sites in a similar way to other measures of stress. In particular, grouping resulted to be similar to that obtained after analysis of head capsule deformities. Moreover, results of our work are consistent with the hypothesis that some characters may possibly be useful indicators of specific types of stress. PMID:15887366

  6. Karyotypes of Chironomus Meigen (Diptera: Chironomidae) species from Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wülker, Wolfgang F.; Kiknadze, I.I.; Istomina, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The karyotypes of six African Chironomus species (Chironomus alluaudi Kieffer, 1913, Chironomus transvaalensis Kieffer, 1923, Chironomus sp. Nakuru, Chironomus formosipennis Kieffer, 1908, Chironomus prope pulcher Wiedemann, 1830, Chironomus sp. Kisumu) were investigated; four of these karyotypes were described for the first time (Chironomus sp. Nakuru, Chironomus formosipennis, Chironomus prope pulcher, Chironomus sp. Kisumu). Of the six Chironomus karyotypes, three had “pseudothummi” cytocomplex chromosome arms combinations AE CD BF G (Chironomus alluaudi, Chironomus transvaalensis, Chironomus sp. Nakuru), two had “thummi”cytocomplex arms combinations AB CD EF G (Chironomus formosipennis, Chironomus prope pulcher), and one had “parathummi”armcombinations AC BF DE G (Chironomus sp. Kisumu). Thus, three of the ten main cytocomplexes known were detected in Africa. Detailed photomaps of all chromosome arms, with the exception of arms B and G, were prepared for the karyotypes of Chironomus alluaudi, Chironomus transvaalensis, Chironomus sp. Nakuru, Chironomus prope pulcher; the karyotypes of Chironomus formosipennis, Chironomus sp. Kisumucould only be fragmentarily mapped. Endemic African banding sequences were characteristic for most of the chromosomal arms in all species studied. However, basic sequences, which can be present in different Chironomus species on different continents (Wülker, 1980; Kiknadze et al. 2008), were also detected also in several African species (Chironomus alluaudi, Chironomus sp. Nakuru, and Chironomus formosipennis). The banding sequences of African species studied allow discussion of the derivation of modern banding patterns from hypothetical species, living before separation of cytocomplexes and continents. PMID:24260617

  7. Responses of the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius to DEET exposure.

    PubMed

    Campos, Diana; Gravato, Carlos; Quintaneiro, Carla; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pestana, João L T

    2016-03-01

    N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is the active ingredient of many commercial insect repellents. Despite being detected worldwide in effluents, surface water and groundwater, there is still limited information on DEET's toxicity toward non-target aquatic invertebrates. Thus, our main objective was to assess the effects of DEET in the life cycle of Chironomus riparius and assess its biochemical effects. Laboratory assays showed that DEET reduced developmental rates (reduced larval growth, delayed emergence) of C. riparius larvae and also caused a decrease in the size of adult midges. Concerning the biochemical responses, a short exposure to DEET caused no effects in lipid peroxidation, despite the significant inhibition of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase activities and of total glutathione contents. Moreover, inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity was also observed showing neurotoxic effects. Environmental risk assessment of insect repellents is needed. Our results showed moderate toxicity of DEET toward C. riparius, however, due to their mode of action, indirect ecological effects of DEET and of other insect repellents cannot be excluded and should be evaluated. PMID:26773354

  8. Experimental Induction of Morphological Deformities in Chironomus riparius Larvae by Chronic Exposure to Copper and Lead

    PubMed

    Janssens de Bisthoven L; Vermeulen; Ollevier

    1998-08-01

    Five consecutive generations of Chironomus riparius Meigen larvae were chronically exposed from egg to fourth instar to four sublethal concentrations of copper (0, 1, 10, 100 µg L-1) and lead (0, 5, 50, 500 µg L-1) in artificially spiked water (static with renewal), with diatomaceous earth as substrate and tetraphyl(R) as food, in order to test the induction of morphological deformities by these metals. The use of diatomaceous earth was suboptimal because it caused high mortalities (>60%), independent of metal stress. The higher copper concentrations had a positive effect on the survivals relative to the control. Split medial mentum teeth were recorded in more than 10% of the larvae, but could not be related to metal stress. Deformities of the mentum and the mandibles were recorded in second, third, and fourth instars exposed to both metals. Concentration and generation effects were noted for unusual number of mentum teeth (0-5.3%, lead), unusual number of mandible inner teeth (0-10.4%, copper and lead), and small open mentum gap (0-6.5%, copper). These experiments demonstrated the potential of both an essential and a non-essential metal to induce weak deformities in a small proportion of a C. riparius population as well as the induction of deformities which are independent of metal stress or fluctuating over the generations. The study shows the potential of midge deformities as a biomonitoring tool, but at the same time warns for a careful interpretation of deformity scores because of the influence of population dynamics on the final outcome of deformity frequencies and of the existence of deformities not related to pollution. PMID:9680517

  9. The Use of the Developmental Rate of the Aquatic Midge Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) in the Assessment of the Postsubmersion Interval.

    PubMed

    González Medina, Alejandro; Soriano Hernando, Óscar; Jiménez Ríos, Gilberto

    2015-05-01

    Nonbiting midges (Diptera, Chironomidae) are the most abundant members of the fauna associated with submerged carcasses, but their use in the medicolegal context is very restricted because of their complex ontogeny. In this case, the corpse of a woman was recovered in late spring from a river in Granada (Iberian Peninsula). It showed obvious signs of long permanence in the aquatic environment and, along with pulmonary and microscopical analyses, led to the conclusion that the cause of death was drowning. Several larvae-like specimens were sampled from the scalp and later identified by morphological external features as IV instar larvae of Chironomus riparius Meigen, 1804 (Diptera, Chironomidae). Sequencing of cytochrome oxidase subunit I was performed to confirm the identification. The knowledge of the biology of C. riparius at low temperatures was critical to assess a postsubmersion interval of 16-17 days.

  10. Food and density effects in sediment tests with Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, K.M.; Thompson, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Environmentally relevant and cost-effective test procedures are needed to assess the impact of sediment-associated chemicals, and further the understanding of factors controlling bioavailability. Experiments were performed to optimize the biology of chronic test systems (using the freshwater midge Chironomus riparius) in sediments with different characteristics. The effects of food level (0 to 1.0 mg/organism/day) and organism density (20 to 56 per vessel) on survival and successful development of newly hatched larvae, through to adult emergence, were investigated. The test system comprised of three replicate vessels per treatment, each containing 40 g dry weight (equivalent) of substrate, flooded with reconstituted water to a total volume of 300 ml. Aeration was provided throughout the test period. Natural sediments with low organic carbon content did not support development to emergence without supplemental feeding. However, with sufficient daily food (ground fish-flake) the small-scale test systems supported greater than 80% emergence. Minimum food levels were defined at which survival and development were unchanged over a wide range of organism densities, by comparison with results using an inorganic substrate the nutritional role as well as effects on chemical partitioning. Since incorporated food carbon, unlike daily additions, would be expected to be at chemical equilibrium with the sediment, the implications of the results when formulating artificial sediments for standardized tests are discussed.

  11. Ecdysteroid synthesis and imaginal disc development in the midge Chironomus riparius as biomarkers for endocrine effects of tributyltin.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Torsten; Schulz, Ralf

    2002-05-01

    Acute effects of the endocrine disruptor bis(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) on molting-hormone biosynthesis and imaginal-disc development were investigated in larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius (Meigen). Ecdysteroid synthesis was measured by 24-h incubation of molting-hormone-synthesizing tissues (prothoracic glands) in vitro with or without the addition of TBTO. The amount of ecdysteroids produced was analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Developmental effects in vivo were investigated by determining the developmental phase of the genital imaginal discs before and after a 48-h exposure to TBTO in water. Sex-specific effects were found with both endpoints. Ecdysteroid synthesis was significantly reduced (analysis of variance [ANOVA], p < or = 0.005) in female larvae at all concentrations (TBTO-Sn at 50, 500, and 5,000 ng/L), whereas a significant elevation of the biosynthesis rate occurred in male larvae in the 500-ng/L treatment (ANOVA, p < or = 0.05). In vivo experiments with development of the genital imaginal disc within a 48-h exposure period revealed a significantly slower development in female larvae and a significantly faster development in male larvae (contingency tables, p < or = 0.001) at all concentrations tested (TBTO-Sn at 10, 50, 200, and 1,000 ng/L). These results partly coincided with the in vitro effects on molting-hormone synthesis. The 48-h median lethal concentration (LC50) was 25 microg/L (20-30 microg/L 95% confidence intervals). The combination of in vitro and in vivo methods has proven to be a useful approach for the detection of endocrine effects of TBTO in C. riparius at levels 2,000-fold below the LC50 value. High sensitivity and short test duration suggest that chironomids may have potential as freshwater sentinel organisms for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. PMID:12013127

  12. Ecotoxicological multilevel-evaluation of the effects of fenbendazole exposure to Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Bang, Hyun Woo; Park, Jungan; Kwak, Inn-Sil

    2009-10-01

    Veterinary antibiotics may find their way into the aquatic environment through direct or indirect pathways due to their widespread use. Fenbendazole is a benzimidazole anthelmintic that is widely used in veterinary medicine. To evaluate the potential ecological risk of fenbendazole, we examined the molecular and biochemical responses of biomarker genes such as heat shock proteins (HSPs), cytochrome P450 (CYP450), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and hemoglobins (Hbs) in Chironomus riparius for long periods. The expression of HSP70, HSP40, HSP90 and CYP450 in C. riparius increased significantly after exposure to all concentrations of fenbendazole evaluated, while the levels of GST and HbA only increased in C. riparius exposed to relatively high concentrations of fenbendazole (30 microg L(-1)). HbB expression did not differ significantly between the control and treatment groups. Exposure to 30 microg L(-1) fenbendazole had significant effects on the survival, growth, sex balance of emergent adults and development of mouthpart deformity in C. riparius. These results should constitute an important contribution to the understanding of the toxicology of fenbendazole in C. riparius. Moreover, the responses of the biomarker genes also provide valuable information that will aid in understanding the effects of fenbendazole in aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Dynamics and recovery of a sediment-exposed Chironomus riparius population: A modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Diepens, Noël J; Beltman, Wim H J; Koelmans, Albert A; Van den Brink, Paul J; Baveco, Johannes M

    2016-06-01

    Models can be used to assess long-term risks of sediment-bound contaminants at the population level. However, these models usually lack the coupling between chemical fate in the sediment, toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic processes in individuals and propagation of individual-level effects to the population. We developed a population model that includes all these processes, and used it to assess the importance of chemical uptake routes on a Chironomus riparius population after pulsed exposure to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. We show that particle ingestion is an important additional exposure pathway affecting C. riparius population dynamics and recovery. Models ignoring particle ingestion underestimate the impact and the required recovery times, which implies that they underestimate risks of sediment-bound chemicals. Additional scenario studies showed the importance of selecting the biologically relevant sediment layer and showed population effects in the long term. PMID:27031571

  14. Toxicity of fullerene (C60) to sediment-dwelling invertebrate Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Waissi-Leinonen, Greta C; Petersen, Elijah J; Pakarinen, Kukka; Akkanen, Jarkko; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2012-09-01

    An environmentally realistic method to test fullerene (C(60) ) toxicity to the benthic organism Chironomus riparius was created by allowing suspended fullerenes to settle down, making a layer on top of the sediment. To test the hypothesis that higher food concentrations will reduce toxic responses, two food concentrations were tested (0.5 and 0.8% Urtica sp.) in sediment containing fullerene masses of 0.36 to 0.55 mg/cm(2) using a 10-d chronic test. In the 0.5% food level treatments, there were significant differences in all growth-related endpoints compared with controls. Fewer effects were observed for the higher food treatment. Fullerene agglomerates were observed by electron microscopy in the gut, but no absorption into the gut epithelial cells was detected. In the organisms exposed to fullerenes, microvilli were damaged and were significantly shorter. The potential toxicity of fullerene to C. riparius appears to be caused by morphological changes, inhibiting larval growth.

  15. Assessing the risk of metal mixtures in contaminated sediments on Chironomus riparius based on cytosolic accumulation.

    PubMed

    Péry, Alexandre R R; Geffard, Alain; Conrad, Arnaud; Mons, Raphaël; Garric, Jeanne

    2008-11-01

    Sediments usually contain mixtures of trace metals introduced via natural geochemical processes and anthropogenic activities. Kinetics and effects of these metals are strongly dependent both on the composition of the mixture and on the physico-chemical characteristics of the sediment. Relating effects to metal concentration may consequently be advised. However, total accumulation may be a poor predictor of metal toxicity for Chironomus riparius exposed to contaminated field sediments. As an alternative, we proposed to relate effects on Chironomus growth with cytosolic metal accumulation, measured in larvae after a short exposure period. Dose-response relationships were derived for zinc, copper, and cadmium through single-metal exposure data analysed with toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics models. They permitted, on the basis of cytosolic accumulation measures, to predict successfully the effects of mixtures of cadmium, zinc, and copper on the growth of larvae exposed to spiked sediments, as well as to field sediments in which zinc and copper were assumed to be predominant. PMID:18514899

  16. Sediment microbes and biofilms increase the bioavailability of chlorpyrifos in Chironomus riparius (Chironomidae, Diptera).

    PubMed

    Widenfalk, Anneli; Lundqvist, Anna; Goedkoop, Willem

    2008-10-01

    In a microcosm study, the importance of different sources of organic matter (humic acids, sterile sediment, sediment, and a microbial extract) for the bioavailability of the hydrophobic pesticide chlorpyrifos to Chironomus riparius larvae was quantified. In the last two treatments biofilms were allowed to grow before (14)C-chlorpyrifos addition. Chlorpyrifos accumulation was quantified after 25 h of exposure and after 21 h of depuration. Larval accumulation was twice as high in the microbial extract treatment (447+/-79 microg/kg ww larvae) and 1.7 times higher in the sediment treatment (371+/-33 microg/kg). After depuration, chlorpyrifos accumulation in larval tissue showed even higher differences; 3.1 times higher tissue concentrations in the microbial extract treatment (218+/-21 microg/kg) and 2.2 times higher in the sediment treatment (156+/-35 microg/kg). In contrast, chlorpyrifos accumulation in the humic acid and sterile sediment did not differ from that in controls. These results show that living microbes and biofilms, by creating a microenvironment and providing food for larvae, markedly increase the bioavailability of chlorpyrifos to Chironomus riparius.

  17. Biochemical and morphological responses in Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) larvae exposed to lead-spiked sediment.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Helene; Gismondi, Eric; Branchu, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the potential use of biochemical markers and mentum deformities as indicators of long-term exposure to lead (Pb) in Chironomus riparius larvae. To do this, the authors measured 3 biochemical markers (i.e., malondialdehyde level, metallothionein concentration, and energy reserve content) as well as larval growth and mentum deformities after 16-d exposure to sediment containing Pb. The concentrations studied ranged from 3.5 mg/kg to 505.5 mg/kg dry weight. Despite the bioaccumulation of Pb in C. riparius bodies, frequencies of both mentum deformities and the dry weight were not significantly different between the control and stressed groups. On the contrary, Pb exposure caused a significant increase of both malondialdehyde level and metallothionein concentration. The increase of body Pb concentrations did not significantly modify body copper and zinc concentrations. Moreover, we observed a decrease of total lipid content and an increase of glycogen content as a function of a dose-response relationship, while no variation in protein concentrations was observed. Despite the adverse effects observed at the biochemical level, larval development was not affected. These results suggested that measurements of malondialdehyde level, metallothionein concentration, and energy reserve content can be used as relevant biomarkers of long-term sublethal exposure to Pb in C. riparius larvae. PMID:23893569

  18. The effect of temperature gradients on endocrine signaling and antioxidant gene expression during Chironomus riparius development.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2014-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors affecting the biological processes of aquatic species. To investigate the potential effects of temperature on the developmental processes of aquatic invertebrates, we analyzed biological and molecular transcriptional responses during Chironomus riparius development, including five stages spanning from embryo to adult stages. We assessed the temperature change-induced reduction of survival rate, changes in biological development including the male:female ratio in emerged adults, the success rates of pupation and emergence, and the developmental timing of pupation and emergence. The increased temperature induced expression of endocrine signaling genes, such as the ecdysone receptor, ultraspiracle (ortholog of the RXR), and the estrogen-related receptor in the fourth-instar larval and pupal stages of C. riparius development. Altered temperature also affected the activity of antioxidant genes, including catalase, peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase during the fourth-instar larval to adult stages of C. riparius development, as a result of altered development. Increased temperature during the fourth-instar larval stage increased oxidative stress in pupae and adults. Responses of antioxidant genes to increased temperature occurred in a developmental stage-dependent manner. However, reduced temperature did not induce the expression of antioxidant genes in a developmental stage-dependent manner, although it did induce oxidative stress during C. riparius development. Increased temperature also caused greater toxicity of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in fourth-instar larvae. Our findings suggest that altered temperatures may disturb the invertebrate hormone system and developmental processes by inducing oxidative stress in aquatic environments.

  19. The effect of temperature gradients on endocrine signaling and antioxidant gene expression during Chironomus riparius development.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2014-02-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors affecting the biological processes of aquatic species. To investigate the potential effects of temperature on the developmental processes of aquatic invertebrates, we analyzed biological and molecular transcriptional responses during Chironomus riparius development, including five stages spanning from embryo to adult stages. We assessed the temperature change-induced reduction of survival rate, changes in biological development including the male:female ratio in emerged adults, the success rates of pupation and emergence, and the developmental timing of pupation and emergence. The increased temperature induced expression of endocrine signaling genes, such as the ecdysone receptor, ultraspiracle (ortholog of the RXR), and the estrogen-related receptor in the fourth-instar larval and pupal stages of C. riparius development. Altered temperature also affected the activity of antioxidant genes, including catalase, peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase during the fourth-instar larval to adult stages of C. riparius development, as a result of altered development. Increased temperature during the fourth-instar larval stage increased oxidative stress in pupae and adults. Responses of antioxidant genes to increased temperature occurred in a developmental stage-dependent manner. However, reduced temperature did not induce the expression of antioxidant genes in a developmental stage-dependent manner, although it did induce oxidative stress during C. riparius development. Increased temperature also caused greater toxicity of di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in fourth-instar larvae. Our findings suggest that altered temperatures may disturb the invertebrate hormone system and developmental processes by inducing oxidative stress in aquatic environments. PMID:24239821

  20. Induction of mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius larvae exposed to 4-n-nonylphenol.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, G; Pluymers, L; Ollevier, F

    2001-01-01

    Chironomid mouthpart deformities have often been associated with sediment contamination and are, therefore, currently used to assess sediment quality. Deformities were only occasionally induced in laboratory bioassays. Mouthpart deformities results from a physiological disturbance during larval molting. In the past few years it has been shown that some chemicals can exert negative effects on both vertebrates and invertebrates at the level of endocrine regulation. As insect molting is hormonally regulated, we wanted to test the hypothesis that deformities are induced due to a hormonal disruption in the developmental process. The aim of the present study was to test whether the endocrine disrupter, 4-n-nonylphenol (4NP), induces mouthpart deformities in chironomids. A laboratory bioassay was performed exposing Chironomus riparius larvae to 10, 50 and 100 micrograms l-1 4NP. Survival of the larvae was not affected by the tested concentrations, but the frequency of mentum deformities increased significantly (P < 0.01) after exposure to 4NP. PMID:11202727

  1. Combined effects of chemical and temperature stress on Chironomus riparius populations with differing genetic variability.

    PubMed

    Oetken, Matthias; Jagodzinski, Lucas S; Vogt, Christian; Jochum, Adrienne; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2009-08-01

    Exposure to pollutants under multiple environmental stressors (e.g., climate change and global warming) and the genetic diversity of populations are suspected to have serious impacts on populations and ecosystems but have only rarely been analysed. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the biocide tributyltin (TBT) within a temperature gradient (17, 20 and 23 degrees C) on life history parameters of a genetically diverse (GEN+) and a highly inbred population (GEN-) of the midge Chironomus riparius. While endpoints, mortality and reproduction parameters were considered, the population growth rate as an integrative endpoint was determined. We found severe effects for GEN-, indicating that populations with lower genetic diversity are more endangered by combined stressors such as increasing temperature and chemical pollution compared to genetically diverse populations.

  2. Standardization of a chronic sediment toxicity test with Chironomus riparius -- An EU collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.; Grootelaar, L.; Guchte, C. van de |

    1995-12-31

    Because of the need for sensitive measures of low level contaminants in European sediments, a chronic sediment toxicity test method, using Chironomus riparius has been developed as part of a collaborative program for the European Commission. The protocol is a partial life cycle test exposing the animals from egg stage to pre-emergence in sediment-water systems. In 1995 the protocol was ring tested in several laboratories in Europe, the US and Canada using the moth-proofer permethrin as a model substance. This was spiked into a natural sediment using a spiking protocol also developed in this program. Results of the ring test and details of the protocols will be presented.

  3. Effect of cadmium on oviposition and egg viability in Chironomus riparius (diptera: chironomidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Green, D.W.J.; Pascoe, D.; Gower, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Although the importance of toxicity data on freshwater macroinvertebrates for establishing water quality criteria is now well recognized few attempts have been made to determine the relative sensitivities of different life stages or ages within a species. Previous work with insects has suggested that earlier life stages may be more sensitive than later ones although toxicant effects on the egg itself have been virtually ignored. The selection of water of a suitable quality for egg-laying has been demonstrated in mosquitoes. However, there is virtually no information available on oviposition behavior in relation to toxicant stress or water quality although some authors have speculated on the presence of chemo-receptors in insect antennae and their possible involvement in testing water quality prior to oviposition. The present study aimed to investigate the extent of selection by Chironomus riparius females between a range of cadmium solutions as sites for oviposition and the effect of cadmium on egg hatching.

  4. Effects of activated carbon amended sediment on biological responses in Chironomus riparius multi-generation testing.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-11-15

    The biological effects of activated carbon (AC) amendments in sediments were studied with the midge Chironomus riparius. The effects on larvae growth were studied using three different AC particles sizes (PAC: 90% <63μm, MAC: ø 63-200μm and GAC: ø 420-1700μm). The long- term effects of MAC were studied in an emergence experiment over two generations (P, F1), together with larvae growth experiment over three generations (P, F1, F2). Retarded growth and development of the larvae were observed in the two smallest particle sizes (PAC and MAC), as well as morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer studied from transmission electron micrographs. In addition, at high AC treatments the larvae reaching fourth instar stage were of a smaller size compared to the controls. With PAC treatment AC amendment dosages higher than 1% of sediment dry weight induced mortality. In the emergence experiment there was an indication of a delay in F1 generation emergence. Male dry weight (dw) in P generation was significantly reduced in the 2.5% MAC treatment. The effects of AC amendments were more obvious in the C. riparius larvae compared to the effects seen in emerging adults exposed to AC-amended sediment during the larval stage. PMID:27450330

  5. Increased cadmium excretion in metal-adapted populations of the midge Chironomus riparius (Diptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, J.F.; Nugteren, P. van; Buckert-De Jong, M.B.

    1996-03-01

    Cadmium kinetics were studied in cadmium-adapted and nonadapted field populations of the midge Chironomus riparius. Accumulation and elimination experiments were carried out using first-generation laboratory-reared animals. Differences between populations were, therefore, assumed to have a genetic basis. Larvae were dissected to analyze the guts and the remainder of the larvae separately. First-order one-compartment models were not always successful in describing accumulation processes, probably due to acclimation. No interpopulation differences were observed in larval development based on dry weights, whereas some differences existed based on pupation rate. In most cases more than 80% of the total amount of cadmium was found in the guts of all populations. Larvae from cadmium-adapted populations showed a decreased net accumulation rate as well as higher equilibrium values (15--20%) compared to nonadapted populations. In addition, cadmium excretion efficiency was increased for cadmium-adapted larvae, which was due to an increased elimination rate from the guts. It was concluded that exposure to high cadmium concentrations in the field resulted in populations of C. riparius with an increased storage capability and an increased excretion efficiency, especially regarding the guts.

  6. Effects of sediment contamination by artisanal gold mining on Chironomus riparius in Mabubi River, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibunda, R. T.; Pereka, A. E.; Tungaraza, C.

    The contamination of sediments by mercury from in artisanal gold mining has been only assessed through bulk chemical analysis and subsequent comparison with reference values from uncontaminated areas. However, measurement of contaminant levels alone has a limited ability to predict adverse effects on living resources. This study investigated the possible effects of contamination of sediments in Mabubi River by mercury drained from Mugusu artisanal gold mine on the survival, growth and emergency of the benthic midge Chironomus riparius. Sediments collected downstream from the Mugusu Mine impaired growth and delayed emergence of the midges but did not impair survival. Mean dry body weight of larvae from sediments collected 3 km down stream (1012 μg) was significantly lower than those from the control sediment ( p < 0.05). Compared to the control sediment, the emergence of the midges from sediments collected up to 6 km downstream of the mining activity were delayed for four days. In conclusion, chemistry and ecotoxicity results from this study suggest that sediments collected in the Mabubi River downstream of the Mugusu mine adversely affect C. riparius and probably other fauna and as such present a considerable local environmental risk.

  7. Ecotoxicological assessment of grey water treatment systems with Daphnia magna and Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Hernández Leal, L; Soeter, A M; Kools, S A E; Kraak, M H S; Parsons, J R; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; Buisman, C J N

    2012-03-15

    In order to meet environmental quality criteria, grey water was treated in four different ways: 1) aerobic 2) anaerobic+aerobic 3) aerobic+activated carbon 4) aerobic+ozone. Since each treatment has its own specific advantages and disadvantages, the aim of this study was to compare the ecotoxicity of differently treated grey water using Chironomus riparius (96 h test) and Daphnia magna (48 h and 21d test) as test organisms. Grey water exhibited acute toxicity to both test organisms. The aerobic and combined anaerobic+aerobic treatment eliminated mortality in the acute tests, but growth of C. riparius was still affected by these two effluents. Post-treatment by ozone and activated carbon completely removed the acute toxicity from grey water. In the chronic toxicity test the combined anaerobic+aerobic treatment strongly affected D. magna population growth rate (47%), while the aerobic treatment had a small (9%) but significant effect. Hence, aerobic treatment is the best option for biological treatment of grey water, removing most of the toxic effects of grey water. If advanced treatment is required, the treatment with either ozone or GAC were shown to be very effective in complete removal of toxicity from grey water.

  8. Effects of activated carbon amended sediment on biological responses in Chironomus riparius multi-generation testing.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-11-15

    The biological effects of activated carbon (AC) amendments in sediments were studied with the midge Chironomus riparius. The effects on larvae growth were studied using three different AC particles sizes (PAC: 90% <63μm, MAC: ø 63-200μm and GAC: ø 420-1700μm). The long- term effects of MAC were studied in an emergence experiment over two generations (P, F1), together with larvae growth experiment over three generations (P, F1, F2). Retarded growth and development of the larvae were observed in the two smallest particle sizes (PAC and MAC), as well as morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer studied from transmission electron micrographs. In addition, at high AC treatments the larvae reaching fourth instar stage were of a smaller size compared to the controls. With PAC treatment AC amendment dosages higher than 1% of sediment dry weight induced mortality. In the emergence experiment there was an indication of a delay in F1 generation emergence. Male dry weight (dw) in P generation was significantly reduced in the 2.5% MAC treatment. The effects of AC amendments were more obvious in the C. riparius larvae compared to the effects seen in emerging adults exposed to AC-amended sediment during the larval stage.

  9. In situ bioassay using Chironomus riparius: An intermediate between laboratory and field sediment quality assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Guchte, C. van de; Grootelaar, L.; Naber, A.

    1995-12-31

    Benthic macroinvertebrates like chironomid larvae are important indicators for sediment quality. Both in field surveys and laboratory bioassays effect parameters like abundance, survival, growth, larval development and morphological abnormalities of chironomids are recommended biological endpoints to assess the impact of sediment associated contaminants. Now and then results from field surveys on contaminated sites appeared to differ from results in laboratory bioassays on sediment field samples from the same sites. The impact of so-called modifying factors like temperature, oxygen levels and the availability of food could be studied in the laboratory. However, these factors could not fully explain the observed differences. In situ bioassays have been developed to bridge the gap between laboratory and field derived data with respect to the exposure of cultured Chironomus riparius larvae versus field collected Chironomus sp. larvae. Control survival in the in situ bioassays was within acceptable limits (> 80%). Effects observed during the caged exposure of laboratory cultured first instar larvae at contaminated sites were in agreement with the hypothesis that adequate in-field bioassessment reduces uncertainties inherent in the use of standardized laboratory bioassays. Although relative risk ranking of chemicals or contaminated sites can rely upon standard testing protocols, in situ bioassays can give a better insight in exposure-effect relationships under actual field conditions.

  10. Patterns of fluctuating asymmetry and shape variation in Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) exposed to nonylphenol or lead.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Hélène; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Branchu, Philippe; Debat, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Deformities and fluctuating asymmetry in chironomid larvae have been proposed as sensitive indicators of biological stress and are commonly used to assess the ecological impact of human activities. In particular, they have been associated in Chironomus riparius, the most commonly used species, with heavy metal and pesticide river pollution. In this study, the effect of lead and 4-nonylphenol on mouthpart morphological variation of Chironomus riparius larvae was investigated by traditional and geometric morphometrics. For this purpose, first to fourth instar larvae were exposed to sediment spiked with lead (from 3.0 to 456.9 mg/kg dry weight) or 4-NP (from 0.1 to 198.8 mg/kg dry weight). Mentum phenotypic response to pollutants was assessed by four parameters: (1) the frequency of deformities, (2) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length, (3) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum shape and (4) the mentum mean shape changes. Despite the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the chironomid's body, no significant differences between control and stressed groups were found for mouthpart deformities and fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length. Slight effects on mentum shape fluctuating asymmetry were observed for two stressed groups. Significant mean shape changes, consisting of tooth size increase and tooth closing, were detected for lead and 4-NP exposure respectively. Those variations, however, were negligible in comparison to mentum shape changes due to genetic effects. These results suggest that the use of mentum variation as an indicator of toxic stress in Chironomus riparius should be considered cautiously. PMID:23133660

  11. Patterns of Fluctuating Asymmetry and Shape Variation in Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) Exposed to Nonylphenol or Lead

    PubMed Central

    Arambourou, Hélène; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Branchu, Philippe; Debat, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Deformities and fluctuating asymmetry in chironomid larvae have been proposed as sensitive indicators of biological stress and are commonly used to assess the ecological impact of human activities. In particular, they have been associated in Chironomus riparius, the most commonly used species, with heavy metal and pesticide river pollution. In this study, the effect of lead and 4-nonylphenol on mouthpart morphological variation of Chironomus riparius larvae was investigated by traditional and geometric morphometrics. For this purpose, first to fourth instar larvae were exposed to sediment spiked with lead (from 3.0 to 456.9 mg/kg dry weight) or 4-NP (from 0.1 to 198.8 mg/kg dry weight). Mentum phenotypic response to pollutants was assessed by four parameters: (1) the frequency of deformities, (2) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length, (3) fluctuating asymmetry of mentum shape and (4) the mentum mean shape changes. Despite the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the chironomid’s body, no significant differences between control and stressed groups were found for mouthpart deformities and fluctuating asymmetry of mentum length. Slight effects on mentum shape fluctuating asymmetry were observed for two stressed groups. Significant mean shape changes, consisting of tooth size increase and tooth closing, were detected for lead and 4-NP exposure respectively. Those variations, however, were negligible in comparison to mentum shape changes due to genetic effects. These results suggest that the use of mentum variation as an indicator of toxic stress in Chironomus riparius should be considered cautiously. PMID:23133660

  12. Bioconcentration and acute toxicity of polycyclic musks in two benthic organisms (Chironomus riparius and Lumbriculus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Artola-Garicano, Elsa; Sinnige, Theo L; van Holsteijn, Ineke; Vaes, Wouter H J; Hermens, Joop L M

    2003-05-01

    In the current study, the bioconcentration behavior and acute toxicity of two polycyclic musks, Tonalide 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN) and Galaxolide 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexa-methylcyclopenta[gamma]-2-benzopyran (HHCB), were studied in two benthic organisms. Polycyclic musks are frequently used fragrances, and they have been detected in different compartments of the environment. The aim of this study was to fill some empirical data gaps for AHTN and HHCB for benthic organisms. Results show that differences exist between both organisms. Chironomus riparius exhibited bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for AHTN and HHCB substantially lower than predicted for nontransformed organics. The BCFs for both chemicals increased after coexposure of the organism to the cytochrome P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide. Thus, the low BCF values were the result of rapid biotransformation of AHTN and HHCB in the midge larvae. Bioconcentration kinetics indicated that both chemicals induced their own cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism. Acute toxicity of AHTN to midge larvae was reduced compared to predicted baseline toxicity and was similar for HHCB. Bioconcentration of AHTN and HHCB in the worm (Lumbriculus variegatus) is in agreement with predictions based on the octanol-water partition coefficients of these chemicals. Acute toxicity was found to be similar to predicted values for baseline toxicity. Summarizing, for AHTN and HHCB, acute toxicity and bioconcentration behavior in L. variegatus was in accordance with predicted data for nontransformed organics. In C. riparius, bioconcentration as well as toxicity were reduced.

  13. Effects of Activated Carbon on PCB Bioaccumulation and Biological Responses of Chironomus riparius in Full Life Cycle Test.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Inna; Abel, Sebastian; Waissi, Greta; Väänänen, Kristiina; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K; Akkanen, Jarkko

    2016-05-17

    The nonbiting midge Chironomus riparius was used to study the remediation potential and secondary effects of activated carbon (AC, ø 63-200 μm) in PCB contaminated sediments. AC amendments efficiently reduced PCB bioavailability determined by Chironomus riparius bioaccumulation tests and passive samplers. PCBs were shown to transfer from larvae to adults. Lower PCB concentrations were observed in adult midges emerging from AC amended compared to unamended sediments. Increased reproduction, survival, larval growth and gut wall microvilli length were observed with low AC dose (0.5% sediment dw) compared to unamended sediment, indicating an improved success of larvae in the sediment with low organic carbon content. On the other hand, higher AC doses (2.5% sediment dw) caused adverse effects on emergence and larval development. In addition, morphological changes in the gut wall microvilli layer were observed. This study showed that the secondary effects of AC amendments are dependent on the dose and the sediment characteristics. Metamorphic species, such as C. riparius, may act as a vector for organic pollutants from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems and according to this study the AC amendments may reduce this transport. PMID:27100921

  14. Calculation of sediment effect concentrations (SECs) for Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Haverland, P.S.; Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    A data base for sediment toxicity and chemistry was generated with field-collected sediments using 10 to 32 d tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus riparius. Physical characterizations of sediment included organic carbon, percentage water, and particle size. Chemical characterizations of sediment included total metals, butyltins, methyl-mercury, acid volatile sulfide, (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals, chlorinated pesticides, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dioxins and furans, or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Samples which significantly reduced survival, length, or maturation of test organisms relative to the control were classified as ``toxic``. A 10-fold difference in concentration for at least one chemical among the samples at each site was checked. If the concentration of a chemical measured in a toxic sample was less than or equal to the mean concentration of the chemical in the non-toxic samples at a site, then the chemical in this toxic sample was classified as ``no concordance`` (and then designated as a non-toxic in the calculations of SECs). The authors will discuss how the data base was created and the criteria used to calculate SECs (three types of SECs were calculated: (1) ERL and MM, (2) TEL and PEL, and (3) AET).

  15. Evaluation of sediment effect concentrations (SECs) for Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Canfield, T.J.; Dwyer, F.J.; Haveriand, P.S.; Henke, C.E.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    A data base for sediment toxicity and chemistry was generated for field-collected sediments from sites across the United States. Toxicity tests were conducted for 10 to 32 d with Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius. Characterizations of sediment included organic carbon, percentage water, particle size, metals, AVS, chlorinated pesticides, PCBs, dioxins and furans, or PAHs. Three types of SECs were calculated: (1) Effect Ranges Low and Median (ERL and ERM), (2) Threshold and Probable Effect Levels (TEL and PEL), and (3) Apparent Effect Threshold (AET). SECs were normalized to: (1) dry weight, (2) total organic carbon, or (3) AVS. SECs were generated primarily for metals and PAHs. Ranges of concentrations were typically too narrow to adequately evaluate SECs for butyltins, methyl mercury, dioxins and furans, chlorinated pesticides, or PCBs. Use of ERLs or TELs to predict the toxicity of samples minimized Type 2 error (toxic sample predicted to be non-toxic), but resulted in a relatively high Type 1 error (non-toxic sample predicted to be toxic). In contrast, use of AETs to predict toxicity resulted in higher Type 2 error and lower Type 1 error. Use of ERMs or PELs resulted in moderate Type 1 and 2 error when predicting the toxicity of samples. Selection of appropriate SECs requires decisions regarding the acceptability of incorrectly classifying the toxicity of sediment samples.

  16. Mouthpart deformities and nucleolus activity in field-collected Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, G; Bettinetti, R; Pluymers, L; Vermeulen, A C; Rossaro, B; Ollevier, F

    2002-05-01

    Chironomid mouthpart deformities and aberrations of their polytenic chromosomes are sublethal responses to toxic stress. These endpoints have been used in several cases as bioindications for sediment pollution. In the present study we aimed to establish whether there was an association between mouthpart deformities and nucleolus activity in the polytenic chromosomes. Such information could be useful to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of mouthpart deformities and their consequences on the larvae. Third-instar larvae of Chironomus riparius were collected at a site downstream of a sewage treatment plant mostly contaminated by pesticides. Larvae were then raised in the laboratory in aquaria containing sediment and water from the study location. During a 16-day period, larvae ready to molt to the fourth instar were reared individually. Within a few hours of their molt, the larvae were preserved. The presence of mouthpart deformities (mentum, mandibles, and pecten epipharyngis) and the percentage of active nucleoli were assessed. Those larvae presenting mentum deformities had a significantly higher incidence of active nucleoli in their polytenic chromosomes than nondeformed larvae. Because a high number of active nucleoli generally indicates increased rRNA synthesis, deformed larvae seemed to exhibit a higher protein synthesis than normal individuals. The synthesis of additional proteins may increase deformed larva tolerance to toxicants. PMID:11994780

  17. Metallothionein modulation in relation to cadmium bioaccumulation and age-dependent sensitivity of Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Toušová, Zuzana; Kuta, Jan; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtěch; Kizek, René; Bláha, Luděk; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to contribute to understanding of the mechanisms behind sensitivity differences between early and late instar larvae of Chironomus riparius and to address the influence of the differences in standard testing approaches on the toxicity evaluation. A 10-day contact sediment toxicity test was carried out to assess sensitivity to cadmium exposure in relation to different age and laboratory culture line origin of test organisms. Chironomid larvae of early (OECD 218 method) and late instar (US-EPA600/R-99/064 method) differed substantially in sensitivity of traditional endpoints (OECD: LOEC 50 and 10 μg Cd/g dry weight (dw); US-EPA: LOEC > 1000 and 100 μg Cd/g dw for survival and growth, respectively). Bioaccumulated cadmium and metallothioneins (MTs) concentrations were analyzed to investigate the role of MTs in reduced sensitivity to cadmium in late instar larvae. Metallothioneins were induced after treatment to greater Cd concentrations, but their levels in relation to cadmium body burdens did not fully explain low sensitivity of late instars to cadmium, which indicates some other effective way of detoxification in late instars. This study brings new information related to the role of MTs in age-dependent toxicant sensitivity and discusses the implications of divergence in data generated by chironomid sediment toxicity tests by standardized methods using different instars. PMID:26957427

  18. Transcriptional changes induced by in vivo exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Martín, Raquel; Planelló, Rosario; Urien, Josune; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been extensively used worldwide as a pesticide and biocide and is frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In the present work, the toxicity of PCP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects following short- and long-term exposures were evaluated at the molecular level by analyzing changes in the transcriptional profile of different endocrine genes, as well as in genes involved in the stress response and detoxification. Interestingly, although no differences were found after 12- and 24-h treatments, at 96-h exposures PCP was able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the early ecdysone-inducible E74 gene, the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), the Hsp70 gene and the CYP4G gene. In contrast, the Hsp27 gene appeared to be downregulated, while the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor) was not altered in any of the conditions assayed. Moreover, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activity was not affected. The results obtained show the ability of PCP to modulate transcription of different biomarker genes from important cellular metabolic activities, which could be useful in genomic approaches to monitoring. In particular, the significant upregulation of hormonal genes represents the first evidence at the genomic level of the potential endocrine disruptive effects of PCP on aquatic invertebrates.

  19. Telomeric transcriptome from Chironomus riparius (Diptera), a species with noncanonical telomeres.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, J L; de la Fuente, M; Morcillo, G

    2014-06-01

    Although there are alternative telomere structures, most telomeres contain DNA arrays of short repeats (6-26 bp) maintained by telomerase. Like other diptera, Chironomus riparius has noncanonical telomeres and three subfamilies, TsA, TsB and TsC, of longer sequences (176 bp) are found at their chromosomal ends. Reverse transcription PCR was used to show that different RNAs are transcribed from these sequences. Only one strand from TsA sequences seems to render a noncoding RNA (named CriTER-A); transcripts from both TsB strands were found (CriTER-B and αCriTER-B) but no TsC transcripts were detected. Interestingly, these sequences showed a differential transcriptional response upon heat shock, and they were also differentially affected by inhibitors of RNA polymerase II and RNA polymerase III. A computer search for transcription factor binding sites revealed putative regulatory cis-elements within the transcribed sequence, reinforcing the experimental evidence which suggests that the telomeric repeat might function as a promoter. This work describes the telomeric transcriptome of an insect with non-telomerase telomeres, confirming the evolutionary conservation of telomere transcription. Our data reveal differences in the regulation of telomeric transcripts between control and stressful environmental conditions, supporting the idea that telomeric RNAs could have a relevant role in cellular metabolism in insect cells.

  20. Comprehensive sediment toxicity assessment of Hessian surface waters using Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Galluba, Simone; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was a sediment assessment of predominantly small rivers in the German federal state of Hesse. For this purpose, sediment samples were taken at 50 study sites with different contamination levels. The benthic invertebrates Chironomus riparius (Diptera) and Lumbriculus variegatus (Oligochaeta) were used as test species and exposed to whole sediments in chronic laboratory experiments. The bioassays were carried out on the basis of OECD guidelines 218 and 225 for the testing of chemicals. For about 50 % of the study sites chemical analytical data for pollutants from environmentally important substance classes like metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organotin compounds were available. These data were used to analyze correlations between effects in the bioassays and measured chemical contaminations at sampling sites. For 22 % of the sediments ecologically relevant adverse effects were observed. In the majority of these cases effects occurred in only one of the biotests, and only one sediment sample exerted a negative effect on both test organisms. There was no significant correlation between biological responses and chemical data considering substance classes. However, there was a weak positive correlation between arsenic concentration and both worm number and worm biomass as well as a weak positive correlation between single PAHs and worm biomass. In some sediment tests elevated ammonia concentrations occurred in the overlying water so that an influence of these partially toxic concentrations on the test results cannot be ruled out. PMID:22375534

  1. Transcriptional changes induced by in vivo exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Martín, Raquel; Planelló, Rosario; Urien, Josune; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been extensively used worldwide as a pesticide and biocide and is frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In the present work, the toxicity of PCP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects following short- and long-term exposures were evaluated at the molecular level by analyzing changes in the transcriptional profile of different endocrine genes, as well as in genes involved in the stress response and detoxification. Interestingly, although no differences were found after 12- and 24-h treatments, at 96-h exposures PCP was able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the early ecdysone-inducible E74 gene, the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), the Hsp70 gene and the CYP4G gene. In contrast, the Hsp27 gene appeared to be downregulated, while the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor) was not altered in any of the conditions assayed. Moreover, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activity was not affected. The results obtained show the ability of PCP to modulate transcription of different biomarker genes from important cellular metabolic activities, which could be useful in genomic approaches to monitoring. In particular, the significant upregulation of hormonal genes represents the first evidence at the genomic level of the potential endocrine disruptive effects of PCP on aquatic invertebrates. PMID:25306060

  2. Assessment of potential biomarkers, metallothionein and vitellogenin mRNA expressions in various chemically exposed benthic Chironomus riparius larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kiyun; Kwak, Inn-Sil

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was conducted to identify the possibility of using Chironomus metallothionein (MT) and vitellogenin (VTG) as biomarkers of stress caused by endocrinedisrupting chemicals (EDCs), heavy metals, herbicides and veterinary antibiotics. We characterized the MT and VTG cDNA in Chironomus riparius and evaluated their mRNA expression profiles following exposure to different environmental pollutants. The gene expression analysis showed that the MT mRNA levels increased significantly after long-term exposure to cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), Lead (Pb), di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Moreover, the VTG mRNA expression increased significantly in C. riparius larvae exposed to BPA, NP, DEHP, Cd, 2,4-D and fenbendazole. Evaluation of the long-term effects of environmental pollutants revealed up regulation of Chironomus MT mRNA in response to DEHP exposure among EDCs, and the level of the VTG mRNA was increased significantly following treatment with Cd and herbicide 2,4-D at all concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that VTG could be used as a potential biomarker of herbicide and Cd as well as EDCs, while MT was a potential biomarker of heavy metals such as Cd, Cu, and Pb in aquatic environments.

  3. FLUID AND ION SECRETION BY MALPIGHIAN TUBULES OF LARVAL CHIRONOMIDS, Chironomus riparius: EFFECTS OF REARING SALINITY, TRANSPORT INHIBITORS, AND SEROTONIN.

    PubMed

    Zadeh-Tahmasebi, Melika; Bui, Phuong; Donini, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Larvae of Chironomus riparius respond to ion-poor and brackish water (IPW, BW) conditions by activating ion uptake mechanisms in the anal papillae and reducing ion absorption at the rectum, respectively. The role that the Malpighian tubules play in ion and osmoregulation under these conditions is not known in this species. This study examines rates of fluid secretion and major cation composition of secreted fluid from tubules of C. riparius reared in IPW, freshwater (FW) and BW. Fluid secretion of tubules from FW and BW larvae was similar but tubules from IPW larvae secrete fluid at higher rates, are more sensitive to serotonin stimulation, and the secreted fluid contains less Na(+) . Therefore in IPW, tubules work in concert with anal papillae to eliminate excess water while conserving Na(+) in the hemolymph. Tubules do not appear to play a significant role in ion/osmoregulation under BW. Serotonin immunoreactivity in the nervous system and gastrointestinal tract of larval C. riparius was similar to that seen in mosquito larvae with the exception that the hindgut was devoid of staining. Hemolymph serotonin titer was similar in FW and IPW; hence, serotonin is not responsible for the observed high rates of fluid secretion in IPW. Instead, it is suggested that serotonin may work in a synergistic manner with an unidentified hormonal factor in IPW. Ion transport mechanisms in the tubules of C. riparius are pharmacologically similar to those of other insects.

  4. Bioconcentration of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl and pentachlorophenol in the midge, Chironomus riparius, as measured by a pharmacokinetic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Hayton, W.L.; Staubus, A.E.; Fisher, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    A two compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed which describes the uptake and elimination of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl (TCB) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the midge, Chironomus riparius. C. riparius were exposed to nominal TCB (2 ??g L-1) and PCP (9 ??g L-1) concentrations during a 16 h static uptake phase. Depuration was determined over approximately 45 h using a flowthrough system without feeding. The uptake clearance (P) was 330 ?? 61 ml g-1 midge h-1 for TCB and 55 ?? 4 ml g-1 midge h-1 for PCP, while measured bioconcentration factors (BCF) were 35,900 and 458 for TCB and PCP, respectively. Overall, the clearance-volume- based pharmacokinetic model predicted BCF values that were consistent with published values as well as with BCF values obtained from the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)).

  5. Effects of pH on the toxicity and uptake of (14C)lindane in the midge, Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.W.

    1985-10-01

    The toxicity of the insecticide, lindane, was measured in the midge, Chironomus riparius, at pH 4, 6, and 8 with the finding that lindane is significantly more toxic at pH 6 than at pH 4 and 8. The higher toxicity of lindane at pH 6 is a product of two factors. First the penetration of the compound into the midge is lower at pH 4 than at pH 6 and 8. Second, a greater percentage of total radioactivity is contributed by parent compound at pH 6.

  6. Acute toxicity of selected herbicides and surfactants to larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buhl, Kevin J.; Faerber, Neil L.

    1989-01-01

    The acute toxicities of eight commercial herbicides and two surfactants to early fourth instar larvae of the midgeChironomus riparius were determined under static conditions. The formulated herbicides tested were Eradicane® (EPTC), Fargo® (triallate), Lasso® (alachlor), ME4 Brominal® (bromoxynil), Ramrod® (propachlor), Rodeo® (glyphosate), Sencor®(metribuzin), and Sutan (+)® (butylate); the two surfactants were Activator N.F.® and Ortho X-77®. In addition, technical grade alachlor, metribuzin, propachlor, and triallate were tested for comparison with the formulated herbicides. The relative toxicity of the commercial formulations, based on percent active ingredient, varied considerably. The EC50 values ranged from 1.23 mg/L for Fargo® to 5,600 mg/L for Rodeo®. Fargo®, ME4 Brominal®, and Ramrod®were moderately toxic to midge larvae; Lasso®, Sutan (+)®, and Eradicane® were slightly toxic; and Sencor® and Rodeo® were practically non-toxic. The 48-hr EC50 values of the two surfactants were nearly identical and were considered moderately toxic to midges. For two of the herbicides in which the technical grade material was tested, the inert ingredients in the formulations had a significant effect on the toxicity of the active ingredients. Fargo® was twice as toxic as technical grade triallate, whereas Sencor® was considerably less toxic than technical grade metribuzin. A comparison of the slope function values indicated that the toxic action of all the compounds occurred within a relatively narrow range. Published acute toxicity data on these compounds for other freshwater biota were tabulated and compared with our results. In general, the relative order of toxicity toC. riparius was similar to those for other freshwater invertebrates and fish. Maximum concentrations of each herbicide in bulk runoff during a projected “critical” runoff event were calculated as a percentage of the application rate lost in a given volume of runoff. A comparison

  7. Effect of sulfidation and dissolved organic matters on toxicity of silver nanoparticles in sediment dwelling organism, Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si-Won; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Younghun; Im, Hosub; Choi, Jinhee

    2016-05-15

    The properties, fate, and toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are readily modified in the environment. Thus, in order to predict the environmental impact of AgNPs, the toxicity test should be conducted to assess the interactions of AgNPs with environmental matrices. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to mitigate AgNPs toxicity in natural systems, and it is also known that silver binds strongly to sulfur. Little is known, however, about the effect of sulfidation and to what extent it could compete with DOM in the sediment. We therefore investigated the effect of sulfide on a sediment dwelling organism, Chironomus riparius using ecotoxicity endpoints. We then investigated how sulfide and a combination of sulfide and DOM affect the toxicity of AgNPs in C. riparius. We also monitored the concentrations of silver in the water and sediment compartments, as well as in C. riparius tissue, in the presence and absence of sulfide. Finally, in order to investigate how sulfide and DOM affect the release of ions from AgNPs, we also monitored released Ag(+) in each treatment. In the presence of sulfide, AgNPs were found to be less toxic to C. riparius in acute and chronic endpoints than AgNPs alone, whereas DOM treatment did not modulate the toxicity of AgNPs. Sulfide treatment reduced the release of Ag(+) from AgNPs. Water-spiked AgNPs with sulfide were found to be more slowly incorporated into both sediment and larvae as compared to the AgNP alone. Overall, the results suggest that the presence of sulfide in sediment mitigates the ecotoxicity of AgNPs in C. riparius. PMID:26938319

  8. Critical body residues for lethal and sublethal effects of membrane narcotics in the midge, Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.W.; Hwang, H.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    The concept of the critical body residue (CBR) offers a compelling new way to evaluate hazard posed by persistent contaminants such as PCBs. The authors tested the utility of using CBRs for PCBs in an invertebrate species, Chironomus riparius. Acute toxicity (< 10 d) tests were performed with 2nd instar larvae by adding trace amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled PCBs to unlabeled PCBs in amounts sufficient to generate a dose-responsive mortality curve. Because of the limited water solubility of the PCBs tested, it was not possible to produce a toxic tissue concentration via aqueous exposure. This difficulty was overcome by allowing the midges to feed upon contaminated algae (Chlorella vulgaris) which could be loaded with much higher levels of PCBs than would dissolve in water. CBRs for acute toxicity were measured for 3 PCBs; an average CBR of about 1 mmol/kg was determined. If the midge CBRs are lipid normalized, they fall into the range of values that have previously been determined for vertebrates. The authors also evaluated CBRs in midges for a variety of sublethal impairments including development time within a stadium, larval weight and fecundity. A CBR of 1.09 {micro}mol/kg resulted in a significant increase in larval development time and decrease in larval weight for second instar larvae. Tissue residues declined in the third and fourth instars, despite continuing exposure suggesting that the animals developed attenuating mechanisms or that contaminant loss at ecdysis is significant. Despite declining tissue residues throughout the larval instars, fecundity was reduced from 284 eggs/female in controls to 244 eggs/female in animals exposed to the highest sublethal concentration.

  9. Mercury tissue residue approach in Chironomus riparius: Involvement of toxicokinetics and comparison of subcellular fractionation methods.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Frédéric; Geffard, Alain; Guédron, Stéphane; Dominik, Janusz; Ferrari, Benoit J D

    2016-02-01

    Along with the growing body of evidence that total internal concentration is not a good indicator of toxicity, the Critical Body Residue (CBR) approach recently evolved into the Tissue Residue Approach (TRA) which considers the biologically active portion of metal that is available to contribute to the toxicity at sites of toxic action. For that purpose, we examined total mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation and subcellular fractionation kinetics in fourth stage larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius during a four-day laboratory exposure to Hg-spiked sediments and water. The debris (including exoskeleton, gut contents and cellular debris), granule and organelle fractions accounted only for about 10% of the Hg taken up, whereas Hg concentrations in the entire cytosolic fraction rapidly increased to approach steady-state. Within this fraction, Hg compartmentalization to metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) and heat-sensitive proteins (HSP), consisting mostly of enzymes, was assessed in a comparative manner by two methodologies based on heat-treatment and centrifugation (HT&C method) or size exclusion chromatography separation (SECS method). The low Hg recoveries obtained with the HT&C method prevented accurate analysis of the cytosolic Hg fractionation by this approach. According to the SECS methodology, the Hg-bound MTLP fraction increased linearly over the exposure duration and sequestered a third of the Hg flux entering the cytosol. In contrast, the HSP fraction progressively saturated leading to Hg excretion and physiological impairments. This work highlights several methodological and biological aspects to improve our understanding of Hg toxicological bioavailability in aquatic invertebrates. PMID:26688328

  10. The effects of binary UV filter mixtures on the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-06-15

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used in a wide variety of products, including cosmetics, to prevent damage from UV light in tissues and industrial materials. Their extensive use has raised concerns about potential adverse effects in human health and aquatic ecosystems that accumulate these pollutants. To increase sun radiation protection, UV filters are commonly used in mixtures. Here, we studied the toxicity of binary mixtures of 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC), octyl-methoxycinnamate (OMC), and benzophenone-3 (BP-3), by evaluating the larval mortality of Chironomus riparius. Also molecular endpoints have been analyzed, including alterations in the expression levels of a gene related with the endocrine system (EcR, ecdysone receptor) and a gene related with the stress response (hsp70, heat shock protein 70). The results showed that the mortality caused by binary mixtures was similar to that observed for each compound alone; however, some differences in LC50 were observed between groups. Gene expression analysis showed that EcR mRNA levels increased in the presence of 0.1mg/L 4MBC but returned to normal levels after exposure to mixtures of 4MBC with 0.1, 1, and 10mg/L of BP-3 or OMC. In contrast, the hsp70 mRNA levels increased after exposure to the combinations tested of 4MBC and BP-3 or OMC mixtures. These data suggest that 4MBC, BP-3, and OMC may have antagonist effects on EcR gene transcription and a synergistic effect on hsp70 gene activation. This is the first experimental study to show the complex patterned effects of UV filter mixtures on invertebrates. The data suggest that the interactions within these chemicals mixtures are complex and show diverse effects on various endpoints. PMID:26971216

  11. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms. PMID:27089421

  12. UV filters induce transcriptional changes of different hormonal receptors in Chironomus riparius embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Aquilino, Mónica; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are emerging contaminants that are ubiquitous in fresh and marine aquatic systems due to their extensive use in cosmetics, plastics, paints, textiles, and many other industrial products. The estrogenic effects of organic UV filters have been long demonstrated in vertebrates, and other hormonal activities may be altered, according to more recent reports. The impact of UV filters on the endocrine system of invertebrates is largely unknown. We have previously reported that some UV filters may affect ecdysone-related genes in the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius, an ecotoxicologically important model organism. To further analyze other possible effects on endocrine pathways, we first characterized four pivotal genes related with hormonal pathways in insects; thereafter, these genes were assessed for alterations in transcriptional activity after exposure to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) or benzophenone-3 (BP-3), two extensively used sunscreens. We found that both chemicals disturbed the expression of all four genes analyzed: hormonal receptor 38 (HR38), methoprene-tolerant (Met), membrane-associate progesterone receptor (MAPR) and insulin-like receptor (INSR), measured by changes in mRNA levels by real-time PCR. An upregulatory effect at the genomic level was detected in different developmental stages. Interestingly, embryos appeared to be more sensitive to the action of the UV filters than larvae. Our results suggest that the risk of disruption through different endocrine routes is not negligible, considering the significant effects of UV filters on key hormonal receptor and regulatory genes. Further effort is needed to develop environmental risk assessment studies on these pollutants, particularly for aquatic invertebrate model organisms.

  13. The effects of binary UV filter mixtures on the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-06-15

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used in a wide variety of products, including cosmetics, to prevent damage from UV light in tissues and industrial materials. Their extensive use has raised concerns about potential adverse effects in human health and aquatic ecosystems that accumulate these pollutants. To increase sun radiation protection, UV filters are commonly used in mixtures. Here, we studied the toxicity of binary mixtures of 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC), octyl-methoxycinnamate (OMC), and benzophenone-3 (BP-3), by evaluating the larval mortality of Chironomus riparius. Also molecular endpoints have been analyzed, including alterations in the expression levels of a gene related with the endocrine system (EcR, ecdysone receptor) and a gene related with the stress response (hsp70, heat shock protein 70). The results showed that the mortality caused by binary mixtures was similar to that observed for each compound alone; however, some differences in LC50 were observed between groups. Gene expression analysis showed that EcR mRNA levels increased in the presence of 0.1mg/L 4MBC but returned to normal levels after exposure to mixtures of 4MBC with 0.1, 1, and 10mg/L of BP-3 or OMC. In contrast, the hsp70 mRNA levels increased after exposure to the combinations tested of 4MBC and BP-3 or OMC mixtures. These data suggest that 4MBC, BP-3, and OMC may have antagonist effects on EcR gene transcription and a synergistic effect on hsp70 gene activation. This is the first experimental study to show the complex patterned effects of UV filter mixtures on invertebrates. The data suggest that the interactions within these chemicals mixtures are complex and show diverse effects on various endpoints.

  14. Hazard evaluation of ten organophosphorous insecticides against the midge, Chironomus riparius via QSAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landrum, Peter F.; Fisher, Susan W.; Hwang, Haejo; Hickey, James P.

    1999-01-01

    Toxicities of ten organophosphorus (OP) insecticides were measured against midge larvae (Chironomus riparius) under varying temperature (11, 18, and 25°C) and pH (6, 7, and 8) conditions and with and without sediment. Toxicity usually increased with increasing temperature and was greater in the absence of sediment. No trend was found with varying pH. A series of unidimensional parameters and multidimensional models were used to describe the changes in toxicity. Log Kow was able to explain about 40–60% of the variability in response data for aqueous exposures while molecular volume and aqueous solubility were less predictive. Likewise, the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model only explained 40–70% of the response variability, suggesting that factors other than solubility were most important for producing the observed response. Molecular connectivity was the most useful for describing the variability in the response. In the absence of sediment, 1χv and 3κ were best able to describe the variation in response among all compounds at each pH (70–90%). In the presence of sediment, even molecular connectivity could not describe the variability until the partitioning potential to sediment was accounted for by assuming equilibrium partitioning. After correcting for partitioning, the same molecular connectivity terms as in the aqueous exposures described most of the variability, 61–87%, except for the 11°C data where correlations were not significant. Molecular connectivity was a better tool than LSER or the unidimensional variables to explain the steric fitness of OP insecticides which was crucial to the toxicity.

  15. Acute toxicity of ammonia (NH3-N) in sewage effluent to Chironomus riparius: II. Using a generalized linear model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monda, D.P.; Galat, D.L.; Finger, S.E.; Kaiser, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Toxicity of un-ionized ammonia (NH3-N) to the midge, Chironomus riparius was compared, using laboratory culture (well) water and sewage effluent (≈0.4 mg/L NH3-N) in two 96-h, static-renewal toxicity experiments. A generalized linear model was used for data analysis. For the first and second experiments, respectively, LC50 values were 9.4 mg/L (Test 1A) and 6.6 mg/L (Test 2A) for ammonia in well water, and 7.8 mg/L (Test 1B) and 4.1 mg/L (Test 2B) for ammonia in sewage effluent. Slopes of dose-response curves for Tests 1A and 2A were equal, but mortality occurred at lower NH3-N concentrations in Test 2A (unequal intercepts). Response ofC. riparius to NH3 in effluent was not consistent; dose-response curves for tests 1B and 2B differed in slope and intercept. Nevertheless, C. riparius was more sensitive to ammonia in effluent than in well water in both experiments, indicating a synergistic effect of ammonia in sewage effluent. These results demonstrate the advantages of analyzing the organisms entire range of response, as opposed to generating LC50 values, which represent only one point on the dose-response curve.

  16. Biological and molecular responses of Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae) to herbicide 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid).

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Park, Jungan; Kim, Jongkyu; Kwak, Inn-Sil

    2010-05-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is an agricultural contaminant found in rural ground water. It remains to be determined whether neither 2,4-D poses environmental risks, nor is the mechanism of toxicity known at the molecular level. To evaluate the potential ecological risk of 2,4-D, we assessed the biological parameters including the survival rate, adult sex ratio of emerged adults, and mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius after long-term exposure to 2,4-D. The larvae were treated with 0.1, 1 or, 10microgL(-1) of 2,4-D for short- and long-term exposure periods. The sex ratio was changed in C. riparius exposed to only 10microgL(-1) of 2,4-D, whereas mouthpart deformities were observed as significantly higher in C. riparius exposed to 0.1microgL(-1) of 2,4-D. Survival rates were not significantly affected by 2,4-D. Furthermore, we evaluated the molecular and biochemical responses of biomarker genes such as gene expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), ferritins and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in C. riparius exposed to 2,4-D for 24h. The expressions of HSP70, HSP40, HSP90 and GST levels in C. riparius were significantly increased after exposure to a 10microgL(-1) concentration of 2,4-D, whereas ferritin heavy and light chain gene expressions were significantly increased at all concentrations of 2,4-D exposure. Finally, these results may provide an important contribution to our understanding of the toxicology of 2,4-D herbicide in C. riparius. Moreover, the 2,4-D-mediated gene expressions may be generated by 2,4-D is the causative effects on most probable cause of the observed alterations. These biological, molecular and morphological parameters and the measured parameters can be used to monitor 2,4-D toxicity in an aquatic environment.

  17. Ribosomal genes as early targets of cadmium-induced toxicity in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Planelló, R; Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Morcillo, G

    2007-02-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant that causes severe impacts in organisms. Although the effects of cadmium on aquatic insects have been studied in terms of their toxicity and changes in developmental parameters, little is known about its molecular and genetic effects. We have investigated the alterations in the pattern of gene expression provoked by acute exposure to cadmium in Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera, Chironomidae), a sentinel organism widely used in aquatic toxicity testing. The early cytotoxic effects were evaluated using immunocytochemistry and specific fluorescent probes in fourth instar larvae after 12 h of 10 mM cadmium treatments; under these conditions no significant effect on larvae mortality was detected until after 36 h of exposure. The changes in the pattern of gene expression were analysed by means of DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies in the polytene chromosomes from salivary gland cells. A decrease in the activity of the nucleolus is especially remarkable, accompanied by a significant reduction in size and the modification in nucleolar architecture, as shown by FISH. The inhibition of rDNA transcription was further evaluated by Northern blot analysis, which showed a marked decrease in the level of preribosomal rRNA (54% 45S 12 h). However, the BR genes, whose products are the giant polypeptides that constitute the silk-like secretion for constructing housing tubes, remain active. Simultaneously, decondensation and activation take place at some chromosomal regions, especially at the centromeres. The changes observed in the pattern of gene expression do not resemble those found after heat shock or other cell stressors. These data provide the first evidence that cadmium interacts with ribosomal genes and results in a drastic impairment of the functional activity of the nucleolus, an essential organelle for cellular survival. Therefore, the depletion of ribosomes would be a long-term effect of Cd-induced cellular damage. These findings may

  18. Vinclozolin alters the expression of hormonal and stress genes in the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide used in agriculture that can reach aquatic ecosystems and affect the organisms living there. Its effects have been intensively studied in vertebrates, where it acts as an antiandrogen, but there is a lack of information about its mechanistic effects on invertebrates. In this work, we analyzed the response of genes related to the endocrine system, the stress response, and the detoxification mechanisms of Chironomus riparius fourth instar larvae after 24h and 48h exposures to 20 (69.9nM), 200 (699nM), and 2000μg/L (6.99μM) of Vinclozolin. Survival analysis showed that this compound has low toxicity, as it was not lethal for this organism at the concentrations used. However, this fungicide was shown to modify the transcriptional activity of the ecdysone response pathway genes EcR, E74, and Kr-h1 by increasing their mRNA levels. While no changes were observed in disembodied, a gene related with the ecdysone synthesis metabolic pathway, Cyp18A1, which is involved in the inactivation of the active form of ecdysone, was upregulated. Additionally, the expression of two genes related to other hormones, FOXO and MAPR, did not show any changes when Vinclozolin was present. The analysis of stress response genes showed significant changes in the mRNA levels of Hsp70, Hsp24, and Gp93, indicating that Vinclozolin activates the cellular stress mechanisms. Finally, the expressions of the genes Cyp4G and GstD3, which encode enzymes involved in phase I and phase II detoxification, respectively, were analyzed. It was found that their mRNA levels were altered by Vinclozolin, suggesting their involvement in the degradation of this compound. For the first time, these results show evidence that Vinclozolin can modulate gene expression, leading to possible significant endocrine alterations of the insect endocrine system. These results also offer new clues about the mode of action of this compound in invertebrates.

  19. Vinclozolin alters the expression of hormonal and stress genes in the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Aquilino, Mónica; Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-05-01

    Vinclozolin is a fungicide used in agriculture that can reach aquatic ecosystems and affect the organisms living there. Its effects have been intensively studied in vertebrates, where it acts as an antiandrogen, but there is a lack of information about its mechanistic effects on invertebrates. In this work, we analyzed the response of genes related to the endocrine system, the stress response, and the detoxification mechanisms of Chironomus riparius fourth instar larvae after 24h and 48h exposures to 20 (69.9nM), 200 (699nM), and 2000μg/L (6.99μM) of Vinclozolin. Survival analysis showed that this compound has low toxicity, as it was not lethal for this organism at the concentrations used. However, this fungicide was shown to modify the transcriptional activity of the ecdysone response pathway genes EcR, E74, and Kr-h1 by increasing their mRNA levels. While no changes were observed in disembodied, a gene related with the ecdysone synthesis metabolic pathway, Cyp18A1, which is involved in the inactivation of the active form of ecdysone, was upregulated. Additionally, the expression of two genes related to other hormones, FOXO and MAPR, did not show any changes when Vinclozolin was present. The analysis of stress response genes showed significant changes in the mRNA levels of Hsp70, Hsp24, and Gp93, indicating that Vinclozolin activates the cellular stress mechanisms. Finally, the expressions of the genes Cyp4G and GstD3, which encode enzymes involved in phase I and phase II detoxification, respectively, were analyzed. It was found that their mRNA levels were altered by Vinclozolin, suggesting their involvement in the degradation of this compound. For the first time, these results show evidence that Vinclozolin can modulate gene expression, leading to possible significant endocrine alterations of the insect endocrine system. These results also offer new clues about the mode of action of this compound in invertebrates. PMID:26966872

  20. Effect of sediment contact and uptake mechanisms on accumulation of three chlorinated hydrocarbons in the midge, Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.M.; Fisher, S.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) are major contaminants of bottom sediments in many freshwater systems. The behavior and availability of sediment-sorbed compounds arouse much controversy due to the potential impact these contaminants could have on the ecosystem if they were to get into the food chain. Benthic organisms are at great risk from sediment-sorbed contaminants since they inhabit bottom sediments. In this investigation, uptake of sediment-sorbed 5,5{prime},6-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB), p,p{prime}-DDE and PCP by the midge (Chironomus riparius) was examined under 3 conditions. Uptake from direct contact with contaminated sediment (sediment + water) was compared to uptake levels by the midge when it was screened from contaminated sediment contact (screened sediment) and to uptake in dead organisms exposed to contaminated sediment (passive).

  1. Exposure to 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol and bisphenol A--effects on larval moulting and mouthpart structure of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Watts, Matthew M; Pascoe, David; Carroll, Kathleen

    2003-02-01

    The effects of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE) and bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of the aquatic life-cycle stages (eggs to pupa) of Chironomus riparius were investigated. The test species was exposed to sublethal concentrations of EE and BPA (10 ng/L-1mg/L) and effects on larval weight and moulting success were recorded. In addition, three mouthpart structures (mentum, mandibles, and pecten epipharyngis) present on the head capsules of fourth-instar larvae were examined for structural deformities. Moulting was delayed and larval wet weight significantly reduced (P<0.05) at the highest treatment concentration (1mg/L) of both chemicals. No significant effect on either of these parameters was noted in the remaining treatments. However, deformities in the mouthparts of C. riparius were observed at very low exposure concentrations (10 ng/L), although the incidence of deformities was greater in the chironomids exposed to EE than BPA. Effects were mainly associated with the mentum, with statistically significant differences in median deformity score (Kruskal-Wallis P<0.001) recorded for both chemicals. At similar effect concentrations, an increased percentage of exposed animals had deformities of the pecten epipharyngis; however, little evidence of deformity was noted for the mandibles. At high concentrations, where moulting and wet weight were affected, no incidence of mouthpart deformity was noted. The relevance of these results in relation to the identification of an "endocrine-sensitive" endpoint for invertebrates is discussed. PMID:12550099

  2. Efficient shedding of accumulated metals during metamorphosis in metal-adapted populations of the midge Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Groenendijk, D.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W. . Dept. of Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology)

    1999-06-01

    Metal accumulation and loss during metamorphosis were investigated in Chironomus riparius populations in a metal contaminated lowland river. Cadmium and zinc levels were measured in imagoes and larvae at reference and metal-exposed sites. It was hypothesized that the relationship between metal concentrations in biota and environmental compartments would be influenced by the presence of metal-adapted chironomids. In contrast to the large interpopulation differences in larval body burdens of cadmium, body burdens in imagoes vanished to background levels for all midge populations. This indicated that any cadmium accumulated in larval stages was lost during metamorphosis. This nearly 100% efficiency in shedding of cadmium is most likely caused by an increased metal handling capacity present in exposed midges. In agreement with the cadmium measurements, larval body burdens of zinc showed also highly significant interpopulation differences. In contrast with the cadmium values, however, body burdens of zinc in imagoes showed highly significant interpopulation differences and differences were even recorded between the two exposed sites, indicating interpopulation differences in shedding capacity for zinc. It is concluded that the highly efficient shedding of accumulated metals reflected the metal adaptation recorded in earlier studies of metal-exposed C. riparius populations from the River Dommel. Based on the differences in metal accumulation and the differences found in shedding of metals between the two exposed midge populations, it was concluded that population differentiation due to metal stress is a gradual process rather than an all-or-nothing situation.

  3. Fullerenes(nC60) affect the growth and development of the sediment-dwelling invertebrate Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Waissi-Leinonen, Greta C; Nybom, Inna; Pakarinen, Kukka; Akkanen, Jarkko; Leppänen, Matti T; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2015-11-01

    The possible toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) to aquatic organisms needs to be investigated for chronic effects at low concentrations. Chronic effects of carbon NPs, fullerenesC60, on the midges of Chironomus riparius at different life stages on larvae and adult midges were investigated. Sediment associated fullerenesC60 were studied by 10-day growth and 42-day emergence tests with artificial sediment at nominal concentration ranges 0.0004-80 mg/kg dry weight. The body length decreased in the lower tested concentrations (0.0025-20 mg/kg), but the effect vanished with higher concentrations. Delayed emergence rate observed at 0.5 mg/kg. The observed effects correlated with analyzed sediment particle sizes indicating that small agglomerates of fullerene have more significant effects on C. riparius than larger agglomerates observed with higher C60 doses. The results reveal that fullerene may pose risks to benthic organisms, emerging as changes in the ecotoxic parameters studied here which inflects by the survival of the population.

  4. Exposure to sediments from polluted rivers has limited phenotypic effects on larvae and adults of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Hélène; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas; Branchu, Philippe; Debat, Vincent

    2014-06-15

    Laboratory studies have sometimes failed to detect a relationship between toxic stress and morphological defects in invertebrates. Several hypotheses have been proposed to account for this lack of effect. (1) It was suggested that only a combination of stressful conditions - rather than a single one - would affect the phenotype. (2) Phenotypic defects should be detected on adult individuals, rather than on juveniles. (3) Phenotypic abnormalities might mostly affect the progeny of the exposed individuals, some contaminants exhibiting trans-generational effects. In the present study, we test those three hypotheses. We first examined the effects of a multiple exposure by using laboratory Chironomus riparius larvae cultured on two sediments sampled in contaminated rivers and those containing a mixture of mineral and organic compounds. On the larvae, we investigated mentum phenotypes: the frequency of phenodeviants, the shape fluctuating asymmetry and the mean shape. To test whether adult's morphology was more sensitive than the larval's, we also measured asymmetry and mean shape of the adult wings. Finally, to test for a trans-generational phenotypic effect, we measured mentum shape variations in the offspring derived from the measured adults. Overall, our results point out a very limited phenotypic response to contaminated sediments, suggesting that a multiple exposure is not necessarily sufficient to generate phenotypic defects. Adult traits were no more affected than larval traits, discarding the hypothesis that adult phenotypes would be more sensitive biomarkers. Finally, no effect was detected on the offspring generation, suggesting that no trans-generational effect occurs. This general lack of effect suggests that the use of phenotypic defects in C. riparius as an indicator of sediment contamination should be considered cautiously. PMID:24691209

  5. The ribosome biogenesis pathway as an early target of benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) toxicity in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2016-02-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) is a ubiquitous contaminant whose presence in the environment is expected for decades, since it has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products. In the present study, the interaction of BBP with the ribosome biogenesis pathway and the general transcriptional profile of Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae were investigated by means of changes in the rDNA activity (through the study of the internal transcribed spacer 2, ITS2) and variations in the expression profile of ribosomal protein genes (rpL4, rpL11, and rpL13) after acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses. Furthermore, cytogenetic assays were conducted to evaluate the transcriptional activity of polytene chromosomes from salivary gland cells, with special attention to the nucleolus and the Balbiani rings (BRs) of chromosome IV. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers, with a general depletion in the gene expression levels and the activity of BR2 after 48-h treatments. At the same time, decondensation and activation of some centromeres took place, while the activity of nucleolus remained unaltered. Withdrawal of the xenobiotic allowed the larvae to reach control levels in the case of rpL4 and rpL13 genes, which were previously slightly downregulated in 24-h tests. These data provide the first evidence on the interaction of BBP with the ribosome synthesis pathways, which results in a significant impairment of the functional activity of ribosomal protein genes. Thus, the depletion of ribosomes would be a long-term effect of BBP-induced cellular damage. These findings may have important implications for understanding the adverse biological effects of BBP in C. riparius, since they provide new sensitive biomarkers of BBP exposure and highlight the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic

  6. Genotoxic effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on the aquatic insect Chironomus riparius evaluated using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-12-12

    Genotoxicity is one of the most important toxic endpoints in chemical toxicity testing and environmental risk assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of various environmental pollutants frequently found in aquatic environments and characterized by their endocrine disrupting activity. Monitoring of DNA damage was undertaken after in vivo exposures of the aquatic larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius, a model organism that represents an abundant and ecologically relevant macroinvertebrate, widely used in freshwater toxicology. DNA-induced damage, resulting in DNA fragmentation, was quantified by the comet assay after short (24 h) and long (96 h) exposures to different concentrations of the selected toxicants: bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), tributyltin (TBT) and triclosan (TCS). All five compounds were found to have genotoxic activity as demonstrated by significant increases in all the comet parameters (%DNA in tail, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment) at all tested concentrations. Persistent exposure did not increase the extent of DNA damage, except for TCS at the highest concentration, but generally there was a reduction in DNA damage thought to be associated with the induction of the detoxification processes and repairing mechanisms. Comparative analysis showed differences in the genotoxic potential between the chemicals, as well as significant time and concentration-dependent variations, which most likely reflect differences in the ability to repair DNA damage under the different treatments. The present report demonstrates the sensitivity of the benthic larvae of C. riparius to these environmental genotoxins suggesting its potential as biomonitor organism in freshwater ecosystems. The results obtained about the DNA-damaging potential of these environmental pollutants reinforce the need for additional studies on the genotoxicity of endocrine active substances that, by linking genotoxic

  7. Alteration in the expression of antioxidant and detoxification genes in Chironomus riparius exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, Prakash M; Chung, Ill Min

    2015-12-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are widely used in several commercial products due to their unique physicochemical properties. However, their release into the aquatic environments through various anthropogenic activities will lead to toxic effect in aquatic organisms. Although several investigations have been reported on the effect of ZnONPs in aquatic organisms using traditional end points such as survival, growth, and reproduction, the molecular level end points are faster and sensitive. In this study, the expression of different genes involved in oxidative stress response, detoxification, and cellular defense was studied in an ecotoxicologically important bio-monitoring organism Chironomus riparius in order to understand the subcellular effects of ZnONPs. The fourth instar larvae were exposed to 0, 0.2, 2, 10, and 20 mg/L of ZnONPs and Zn ions (in the form of ZnSO4.7H2O) for 24 and 48 h period. The expression of CuZn superoxide dismutase, manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase 1 and delta-3, sigma-4 and epsilon-1 classes of glutathione S-transferases, cytochrome p4509AT2, and heat shock protein 70 were studied using real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Gene expression results showed that the expression of genes related to oxidative stress response was more pronounced as a result of ZnONPs exposure as compared to Zn ions. The mRNA expression of genes involved in detoxification and cellular protection was also modulated. Significantly higher expression levels of oxidative stress-related genes shows that oxidative stress is an important mechanism of toxicity as a result of ZnONPs exposure in C. riparius.

  8. Alteration in the expression of antioxidant and detoxification genes in Chironomus riparius exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan Nair, Prakash M; Chung, Ill Min

    2015-12-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are widely used in several commercial products due to their unique physicochemical properties. However, their release into the aquatic environments through various anthropogenic activities will lead to toxic effect in aquatic organisms. Although several investigations have been reported on the effect of ZnONPs in aquatic organisms using traditional end points such as survival, growth, and reproduction, the molecular level end points are faster and sensitive. In this study, the expression of different genes involved in oxidative stress response, detoxification, and cellular defense was studied in an ecotoxicologically important bio-monitoring organism Chironomus riparius in order to understand the subcellular effects of ZnONPs. The fourth instar larvae were exposed to 0, 0.2, 2, 10, and 20 mg/L of ZnONPs and Zn ions (in the form of ZnSO4.7H2O) for 24 and 48 h period. The expression of CuZn superoxide dismutase, manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase 1 and delta-3, sigma-4 and epsilon-1 classes of glutathione S-transferases, cytochrome p4509AT2, and heat shock protein 70 were studied using real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Gene expression results showed that the expression of genes related to oxidative stress response was more pronounced as a result of ZnONPs exposure as compared to Zn ions. The mRNA expression of genes involved in detoxification and cellular protection was also modulated. Significantly higher expression levels of oxidative stress-related genes shows that oxidative stress is an important mechanism of toxicity as a result of ZnONPs exposure in C. riparius. PMID:26278375

  9. Effects of exposure to high concentrations of waterborne Tl on K and Tl concentrations in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Belowitz, Ryan; Leonard, Erin M; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a non-essential metal which is released into the environment primarily as the result of anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel burning and smelting of ores. The ionic radius of monovalent Tl⁺ is similar to that of K⁺ and Tl⁺ may thus interfere with K⁺-dependent processes. We determined that the acute (48 h) lethal concentration where 50% of the organisms do not survive (LC₅₀) of Tl for 4th instar Chironomus riparius larvae was 723 μmol L⁻¹. Accumulation of Tl by the whole animal was saturable, with a maximum accumulation (Jmax) of 4637 μmol kg⁻¹ wet mass, and K(D) of 670 μmol Tl l⁻¹. Tl accumulation by the gut appeared saturable at the lowest four Tl concentrations, with a Jmax of 2560 μmol kg⁻¹ wet mass and a K(D) of 54.5 μmol Tl l⁻¹. The saturable accumulation at the gut may be indicative of a limited capacity for intracellular detoxification, such as storage in lysosomes or complexation with metal-binding proteins. Tl accumulation by the hemolymph was found to be linear and Tl concentrations in the hemolymph were ~75% of the exposure concentration at Tl exposures >26.9 μmol L⁻¹. There was not a significant decrease in whole animal, gut or hemolymph K during exposure to waterborne Tl at any of the concentrations tested (up to 1500 μmol L⁻¹). The avoidance of hypokalemia by C. riparius larvae may contribute to survival during acute waterborne exposures to Tl.

  10. Fluctuating asymmetry and mentum gaps in populations of the midge Chironomus riparius (Diptera: Chironomidae) from a metal-contaminated River

    SciTech Connect

    Groenendijk, D.; Zeinstra, L.W.M.; Postma, J.F.

    1998-10-01

    The developmental stability of both metal-exposed and nonexposed Chironomus riparius populations from the lowland River Dommel was investigated using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and the incidence of mentum gaps. It was hypothesized that larval development was affected by the influx of Cd, Zn, Fe, Cu, and Pb directly by chemical stress, as well as through inbreeding of metal-adapted and nonadapted specimens. Morphological para/meters were therefore assessed in field-collected larvae and in clean, laboratory-cultured, first-generation (F1) larvae. Fluctuating asymmetry values and mentum gap incidence at contaminated field sites were significantly higher than at clean, upstream locations. Furthermore, FA values of clean, laboratory-cultured F1 larvae generally fell to reference values, indicating the direct effect of metal pollution on developmental aberrations. Mentum gaps were not observed in clean F1 cultures. Slightly elevated FA values were, however, still observed in clean F1 larvae from polluted locations downstream from the metal input. This residual disturbance was thought to reflect genetic stress emerging from interbreeding between metal-adapted and nonadapted specimens. Fluctuating asymmetry and mentum gaps together serve as a useful ecotoxicological marker for metal stress and, when combined with in situ studies and F1 cultures, allow for analysis of the response of animal populations to spatial and temporal gradients in metal exposure.

  11. Support for the evolutionary speed hypothesis from intraspecific population genetic data in the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Oppold, Ann-Marie; Pedrosa, João A M; Bálint, Miklós; Diogo, João B; Ilkova, Julia; Pestana, João L T; Pfenninger, Markus

    2016-02-24

    The evolutionary speed hypothesis (ESH) proposes a causal mechanism for the latitudinal diversity gradient. The central idea of the ESH is that warmer temperatures lead to shorter generation times and increased mutation rates. On an absolute time scale, both should lead to an acceleration of selection and drift. Based on the ESH, we developed predictions regarding the distribution of intraspecific genetic diversity: populations of ectothermic species with more generations per year owing to warmer ambient temperatures should be more differentiated from each other, accumulate more mutations and show evidence for increased mutation rates compared with populations in colder regions. We used the multivoltine insect species Chironomus riparius to test these predictions with cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequence data and found that populations from warmer regions are indeed significantly more differentiated and have significantly more derived haplotypes than populations from colder regions. We also found a significant correlation of the annual mean temperature with the population mutation parameter θ that serves as a proxy for the per generation mutation rate under certain assumptions. This pattern could be corroborated with two nuclear loci. Overall, our results support the ESH and indicate that the thermal regime experienced may be crucially driving the evolution of ectotherms and may thus ultimately govern their speciation rate. PMID:26888029

  12. Effects of exposure to azaarenes on emergence and mouthpart development in the midge Chironomus riparius (Diptera: Chironomidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Bleeker, E.A.J.; Leslie, H.A.; Groenendijk, D.; Plans, M.; Admiraal, W.

    1999-08-01

    Adverse effects of azaarenes on emergence and mouthpart development of the midge Chironomus riparius were analyzed using six closely related three-ringed isomers and metabolites. Effects on growth rate were examined by comparing the average day of emergence of exposed midges with that of controls. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in the pecten epipharyngis was examined as a measure of developmental abnormality. Delayed emergence was found at concentrations as low as 2% of the acute LC50, so emergence day appears to be a useful sensitive parameter to quantity life cycle effects. No differences in FA were found between exposed and control larvae, although, in other studies, all compounds have been proven to be genotoxic. The differences in FA were found between exposed and control larvae, although, in other studies, all compounds have been proven to be genotoxic. The differences in the genotoxic and FA-inducing properties of these compounds indicate that different mechanisms are involved in expressing these adverse effects. This study also illustrates that the choice of the morphological parameter strongly influences the results of developmental disturbance analyses and thus the risk qualification of a potentially hazardous compound.

  13. DNA damage and transcriptional changes induced by tributyltin (TBT) after short in vivo exposures of Chironomus riparius (Diptera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a widespread environmental contaminant in aquatic systems whose adverse effects in development and reproduction are related to its well-known endocrine-disrupting activity. In this work, the early molecular effects of TBT in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) were evaluated by analyzing its DNA damaging potential and the transcriptional response of different endocrine-related genes. Twenty-four-hour in vivo exposures of the aquatic larvae, at environmentally relevant doses of TBT, revealed genotoxic activity as shown by significant increases in DNA strand breaks quantified with the comet assay. TBT was also able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor), the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) gene and the E74 early ecdysone-inducible gene, as measured by real-time RT-PCR. In contrast, the expression of the vitellogenin (vg) gene remained unaltered, while the hsp70 gene appeared to be down-regulated. The ability of TBT to up-regulate hormonal target genes provides the first evidence, at genomic level, of its endocrine disruptive effects and also suggests a mechanism of action that mimics ecdysteroid hormones in insects. These data reveal for the first time the early genomic effects of TBT on an insect genome.

  14. Predictions of sediment toxicity using a database for Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Haverland, P.S.; Dwyer, F.J.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Mount, D.R.; Field, J.; MacDonald, D.D.; Smith, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    A database was developed for calculating sediment effect concentrations (SECS) for various contaminants Associated with field-collected sediment using laboratory toxicity data for the amphipod H. azteca and the midge C. riparius. Three types of SECs were calculated: (1) Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Median (ERM), (2) Threshold Effect Level (TEL) and Probable Effect Level (PEL), and (3) No Effect Concentration (NEC). The predictive abilities of SECs were evaluated using independent toxicity data sets. For example, the predictive ability of ERMs was evaluated by first calculating ERMs using just the Great Lakes (GL) portion of the database. These GL ERMs were then used to predict responses in independent H. azteca 28-d tests and C. riparius 1 4-d tests with Clark Fork River sediments. About 70 to 90% of the samples were correctly classified at 1 to 2 exceedances of GL ERMS. At 1 to 2 exceedances of GL ERMS, Type 2 error (false negatives) was < 10% and Type 1 error (false positives) was 10 to 30%. Evaluations using GL PELs and GL NECs resulted in similar predictive ability compared to GL ERMS. When SECs are used to conduct a preliminary screening to predict the potential for toxicity in the absence of actual toxicity testing, a low number of SEC exceedances should be used to minimize the potential for false negatives; however, the risk of accepting higher false positives is increased. The authors are currently using SECs calculated from the entire database to predict the response of H. azteca and C. riparius in a variety of independent data sets generated by other laboratories.

  15. Transcriptional profiling induced by pesticides employed in organic agriculture in a wild population of Chironomus riparius under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Valeria; Grazioli, Valentina; Rossaro, Bruno; Bernabò, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Copper (Cu) and azadirachtin (AZA-A+B) are pesticides allowed in organic agriculture whose environmental risk and toxicity for aquatic wildlife is only partially known. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to assess the molecular effect of acute and short-term exposure (3, 24h) of Cu (0.01, 0.05, 1, 10, 25mgl(-1)) and AZA-A+B (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1mgl(-1)) on the expression of five candidate genes (hsp70, hsc70, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450) in a non-target species, Chironomus riparius. Fourth-instar larvae were collected from a mountain stream polluted by agricultural land run-off. All genes were responsive to both pesticides but each gene had a specific response to the different experimental concentrations and exposure times. A few similarities in transcriptional profiling were observed, such as a linear concentration-dependent response of hsp70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥1mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B) and an up-regulation regardless of the concentration of hsc70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥0mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B and the up-regulation of hsp70 after 3h of exposure at ~LC50 (Cu-LC50=26.1±2.5mgl(-1), AZA-A+B-LC50=1.1±0.2mgl(-1)). According to the results, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450 may be defined as pesticide-dependent (i.e., hsp40 and hsp10 seemed to responded mainly to AZA-A+B and cyP450 to Cu), while hsc70 as time-dependent regardless of the pesticide (i.e., hsc70 responded only after 24h of treatment with Cu and AZA-A+B). This study gives new insights on the potential role of the C. riparius's hsps and cyP450 genes as sensitive biomarkers for freshwater monitoring. PMID:26994805

  16. The ribosome biogenesis pathway as an early target of benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) toxicity in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2016-02-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) is a ubiquitous contaminant whose presence in the environment is expected for decades, since it has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products. In the present study, the interaction of BBP with the ribosome biogenesis pathway and the general transcriptional profile of Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae were investigated by means of changes in the rDNA activity (through the study of the internal transcribed spacer 2, ITS2) and variations in the expression profile of ribosomal protein genes (rpL4, rpL11, and rpL13) after acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses. Furthermore, cytogenetic assays were conducted to evaluate the transcriptional activity of polytene chromosomes from salivary gland cells, with special attention to the nucleolus and the Balbiani rings (BRs) of chromosome IV. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers, with a general depletion in the gene expression levels and the activity of BR2 after 48-h treatments. At the same time, decondensation and activation of some centromeres took place, while the activity of nucleolus remained unaltered. Withdrawal of the xenobiotic allowed the larvae to reach control levels in the case of rpL4 and rpL13 genes, which were previously slightly downregulated in 24-h tests. These data provide the first evidence on the interaction of BBP with the ribosome synthesis pathways, which results in a significant impairment of the functional activity of ribosomal protein genes. Thus, the depletion of ribosomes would be a long-term effect of BBP-induced cellular damage. These findings may have important implications for understanding the adverse biological effects of BBP in C. riparius, since they provide new sensitive biomarkers of BBP exposure and highlight the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic

  17. Transcriptional profiling induced by pesticides employed in organic agriculture in a wild population of Chironomus riparius under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Valeria; Grazioli, Valentina; Rossaro, Bruno; Bernabò, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Copper (Cu) and azadirachtin (AZA-A+B) are pesticides allowed in organic agriculture whose environmental risk and toxicity for aquatic wildlife is only partially known. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction was used to assess the molecular effect of acute and short-term exposure (3, 24h) of Cu (0.01, 0.05, 1, 10, 25mgl(-1)) and AZA-A+B (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1mgl(-1)) on the expression of five candidate genes (hsp70, hsc70, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450) in a non-target species, Chironomus riparius. Fourth-instar larvae were collected from a mountain stream polluted by agricultural land run-off. All genes were responsive to both pesticides but each gene had a specific response to the different experimental concentrations and exposure times. A few similarities in transcriptional profiling were observed, such as a linear concentration-dependent response of hsp70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥1mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B) and an up-regulation regardless of the concentration of hsc70 after 24h of exposure (at ≥0mgl(-1) of Cu and ≥0.2mgl(-1) of AZA-A+B and the up-regulation of hsp70 after 3h of exposure at ~LC50 (Cu-LC50=26.1±2.5mgl(-1), AZA-A+B-LC50=1.1±0.2mgl(-1)). According to the results, hsp40, hsp10 and cyP450 may be defined as pesticide-dependent (i.e., hsp40 and hsp10 seemed to responded mainly to AZA-A+B and cyP450 to Cu), while hsc70 as time-dependent regardless of the pesticide (i.e., hsc70 responded only after 24h of treatment with Cu and AZA-A+B). This study gives new insights on the potential role of the C. riparius's hsps and cyP450 genes as sensitive biomarkers for freshwater monitoring.

  18. Evolutionary ecotoxicology of perfluoralkyl substances (PFASs) inferred from multigenerational exposure: a case study with Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Stefani, F; Rusconi, M; Valsecchi, S; Marziali, L

    2014-11-01

    A multigeneration toxicity test on Chironomus riparius was performed with the aim of investigating the evolutionary consequences of exposure to perfluoralkyl substances (perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, PFOS; perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA; perfluorobutane sulfonate, PFBS). Six-hundred larvae were bred per treatment and per generation until emergence and egg deposition under a nominal concentration of 10μg/L of contaminants. Newborn larvae were used to start the next generation. Evolution of genetic variability was evaluated along a total of 10 consecutive generations based on 5 microsatellite loci. Analysis of life-history traits (survival, sex ratio and reproduction) was also carried out. Rapid genetic variability reduction was observed in all treatments, including controls, across generations due to the test conditions. Nevertheless, an increased mutation rate determined a stronger conservation of genetic variability in PFOS and, at minor extent, in PFBS exposed populations compared to controls. No significant effects were induced by exposure to PFOA. Direct mutagenicity or induced stress conditions may be at the base of increased mutation rate, indicating the potential risk of mutational load caused by exposure to PFOS and PFBS. The test provided the opportunity to evaluate the use of approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) and coalescent approaches in evolutionary ecotoxicology. A weak performance was evidenced for ABC, either in terms of bias or dispersion of effective population sizes and of estimates of mutation rate. On the contrary, coalescent simulations proved the sensitivity of traditional genetic endpoints (i.e. heterozygosity and number of alleles) to the alteration of mutation rate, but not to erosion of genetic effective size.

  19. Interactive effects of acidity and aluminum exposure on the life cycle of the midge Chironomus riparius (Diptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Palawski, D.U.; Hunn, J.B.; Chester, D.N.; Wiedneyer, R.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The chronic toxicity of acidic pH and the toxicity of aluminum at pH 5.6 and pH 5.0 to the midge Chironomus riparius were determined in 30-day flow-through exposures. Larvae were exposed to water pHs of 7.2, 6.2, 5.8, 5.3, and 4.5; total aluminum concentrations were 14.6, 34.8, 61.4, 128.7, and 259.2 microgram/L at a water pH of 5.6 and to aluminum concentrations of 15.6, 32.5, 56.9, 111.4, and 235.2 microgram/L at a water pH of 5.0. The survival of midges was only 11% at pH 4.5 and 52.3% at pH 5.8. In soft water (12 mg/L as CaCO3) at pH 5.6, survival declined significantly at aluminum concentrations of 61 to 259 microgram/L, but significantly increased at 14.6 microgram/L. In soft water at pH 5.0, survival increased at concentrations of 14.6 to 111.4 microgram/L but decreased significantly at 235.2 microgram/L. At both pH 5.6 and pH 5.0, the toxicological response of midges to aluminum was thus bimodal, in that acid stress was slightly ameliorated by relatively low aluminum concentrations, but exacerbated by higher concentrations. 25 refs., 55 tabs.

  20. Transcriptional responses, metabolic activity and mouthpart deformities in natural populations of Chironomus riparius larvae exposed to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Servia, María J; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Herrero, Óscar; Cobo, Fernando; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers are an important tool in laboratory assays that link exposure or effect of specific toxicants to key molecular and cellular events, but they have not been widely used in invertebrate populations exposed to complex mixtures of environmental contaminants in their natural habitats. The present study focused on a battery of biomarkers and their comparative analysis in natural populations of the benthic larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera), sampled in three differentially polluted rivers (the Con, Sar, and Louro in Galicia, Spain). In our study, some parameters were identified, such as hsp70 gene activity, GST enzymatic activity, total glycogen content and mouthpart deformities, which showed significant differences among populations from the three rivers that differed in the levels and types of sedimentary contaminants analyzed (metals, organic-chlorine pesticides, alkylphenols, pharmaceutical, and personal care products). In contrast to these sensitive biomarkers, other parameters showed no significant differences (hsc70 gene, EcR gene, P450 gene, RNA:DNA ratio, total protein content), and were stable even when comparing field and nonexposed laboratory populations. The hsp70 gene seems to be particularly sensitive to conditions of pollutant exposure, while its constitutive counterpart hsc70 showed invariable expression, suggesting that the hsc70/hsp70 ratio may be a potential indicator of polluted environments. Although further studies are required to understand the correlation between molecular responses and the ecological effects of pollutants on natural populations, the results provide new data about the biological responses to multiple-stressor environments. This field study adds new molecular endpoints, including gene expression, as suitable tools that, complementing other ecotoxicological parameters, may help to improve the methodologies of freshwater monitoring under the increasing burden of xenobiotics. PMID:23893657

  1. Ultraviolet filters differentially impact the expression of key endocrine and stress genes in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Several organic UV filters have hormonal activity in vertebrates, as demonstrated in fishes, rodents and human cells. Despite the accumulation of filter contaminants in aquatic systems, research on their effects on the endocrine systems of freshwaters invertebrates is scarce. In this work, the effects of five frequently used UV filters were investigated in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius, which is a reference organism in ecotoxicology. LC50 values for larvae as well as the percentage of eclosion of eggs were determined following exposures to: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also known as 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC); 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). To assess sublethal effects, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and heat shock protein HSP70 were investigated as biomarkers for endocrine and stress effects at the cellular level. Life-stage-dependent sensitivity was found. In embryos, all of the UV filters provoked a significant overexpression of EcR at 24h after exposure. OC, 4MBC and OD-PABA also triggered transcriptional activation of the hsp70 stress gene in embryos. In contrast, in larvae, only 4MBC and OMC/EHMC increased EcR and hsp70 mRNA levels and OD-PABA upregulated only the EcR gene. These results revealed that embryos are particularly sensitive to UV filters, which affect endocrine regulation during development. Most UV filters also triggered the cellular stress response, and thus exhibit proteotoxic effects. The differences observed between embryos and larvae and the higher sensitivity of embryos highlight the importance of considering different life stages when evaluating the environmental risks of pollutants, particularly when analyzing endocrine effects. PMID:26994811

  2. Ultraviolet filters differentially impact the expression of key endocrine and stress genes in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Several organic UV filters have hormonal activity in vertebrates, as demonstrated in fishes, rodents and human cells. Despite the accumulation of filter contaminants in aquatic systems, research on their effects on the endocrine systems of freshwaters invertebrates is scarce. In this work, the effects of five frequently used UV filters were investigated in embryos and larvae of Chironomus riparius, which is a reference organism in ecotoxicology. LC50 values for larvae as well as the percentage of eclosion of eggs were determined following exposures to: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also known as 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC); 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). To assess sublethal effects, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR) and heat shock protein HSP70 were investigated as biomarkers for endocrine and stress effects at the cellular level. Life-stage-dependent sensitivity was found. In embryos, all of the UV filters provoked a significant overexpression of EcR at 24h after exposure. OC, 4MBC and OD-PABA also triggered transcriptional activation of the hsp70 stress gene in embryos. In contrast, in larvae, only 4MBC and OMC/EHMC increased EcR and hsp70 mRNA levels and OD-PABA upregulated only the EcR gene. These results revealed that embryos are particularly sensitive to UV filters, which affect endocrine regulation during development. Most UV filters also triggered the cellular stress response, and thus exhibit proteotoxic effects. The differences observed between embryos and larvae and the higher sensitivity of embryos highlight the importance of considering different life stages when evaluating the environmental risks of pollutants, particularly when analyzing endocrine effects.

  3. Overexpression of long non-coding RNAs following exposure to xenobiotics in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2012-04-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent an important transcriptional output of eukaryotic genomes. In addition to their functional relevance as housekeeping and regulatory elements, recent studies have suggested their involvement in rather unexpected cellular functions. The aim of this work was to analyse the transcriptional behaviour of non-coding RNAs in the toxic response to pollutants in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Three well-characterized long non-coding sequences were studied: telomeric repeats, Cla repetitive elements and the SINE CTRT1. Transcription levels were evaluated by RT-PCR after 24-h exposures to three current aquatic contaminants: bisphenol A (BPA), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) and the heavy metal cadmium (Cd). Upregulation of telomeric transcripts was found after BPA treatments. Moreover, BPA significantly activated Cla transcription, which also appeared to be increased by cadmium, whereas BBP did not affect the transcription levels of these sequences. Transcription of SINE CTRT1 was not altered by any of the chemicals tested. These data are discussed in the light of previous studies that have shown a response by long ncRNAS (lncRNAs) to cellular stressors, indicating a relationship with environmental stimuli. Our results demonstrated for the first time the ability of bisphenol A to activate non-coding sequences mainly located at telomeres and centromeres. Overall, this study provides evidence that xenobiotics can induce specific responses in ncRNAs derived from repetitive sequences that could be relevant in the toxic response, and also suggests that ncRNAs could represent a novel class of potential biomarkers in toxicological assessment.

  4. Transcriptional responses, metabolic activity and mouthpart deformities in natural populations of Chironomus riparius larvae exposed to environmental pollutants.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Servia, María J; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Herrero, Óscar; Cobo, Fernando; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers are an important tool in laboratory assays that link exposure or effect of specific toxicants to key molecular and cellular events, but they have not been widely used in invertebrate populations exposed to complex mixtures of environmental contaminants in their natural habitats. The present study focused on a battery of biomarkers and their comparative analysis in natural populations of the benthic larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera), sampled in three differentially polluted rivers (the Con, Sar, and Louro in Galicia, Spain). In our study, some parameters were identified, such as hsp70 gene activity, GST enzymatic activity, total glycogen content and mouthpart deformities, which showed significant differences among populations from the three rivers that differed in the levels and types of sedimentary contaminants analyzed (metals, organic-chlorine pesticides, alkylphenols, pharmaceutical, and personal care products). In contrast to these sensitive biomarkers, other parameters showed no significant differences (hsc70 gene, EcR gene, P450 gene, RNA:DNA ratio, total protein content), and were stable even when comparing field and nonexposed laboratory populations. The hsp70 gene seems to be particularly sensitive to conditions of pollutant exposure, while its constitutive counterpart hsc70 showed invariable expression, suggesting that the hsc70/hsp70 ratio may be a potential indicator of polluted environments. Although further studies are required to understand the correlation between molecular responses and the ecological effects of pollutants on natural populations, the results provide new data about the biological responses to multiple-stressor environments. This field study adds new molecular endpoints, including gene expression, as suitable tools that, complementing other ecotoxicological parameters, may help to improve the methodologies of freshwater monitoring under the increasing burden of xenobiotics.

  5. Ecdysone-Related Biomarkers of Toxicity in the Model Organism Chironomus riparius: Stage and Sex-Dependent Variations in Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Herrero, Óscar; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Ozáez, Irene; Cobo, Fernando; Servia, María J

    2015-01-01

    Despite being considered a model organism in toxicity studies, particularly in assessing the environmental impact of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and other chemicals, the molecular basis of development is largely unknown in Chironomus riparius. We have characterized the expression patterns of important genes involved in the ecdysone pathway from embryos to pupa, but specially during the different phases of C. riparius fourth larval instar, according to the development of genital and thoracic imaginal discs. Real-Time PCR was used to analyze: EcR and usp, two genes encoding the two dimerizing partners of the functional ecdysone receptor; E74, an early response gene induced by ecdysteroids; vg (vitellogenin), an effector gene; hsp70 and hsc70, two heat-shock genes involved in the correct folding of the ecdysone receptor; and rpL13, as a part of the ribosomal machinery. Our results show for the first time stage and sex-dependent variations in ecdysone-responsive genes, specially during the late larval stage of C. riparius. The induction in the expression of EcR and usp during the VII-VIII phase of the fourth instar is concomitant with a coordinated response in the activity of the other genes analyzed, suggesting the moment where larvae prepare for pupation. This work is particularly relevant given that most of the analyzed genes have been proposed previously in this species as sensitive biomarkers for the toxicological evaluation of aquatic ecosystems. Identifying the natural regulation of these molecular endpoints throughout the Chironomus development will contribute to a more in-depth and accurate evaluation of the disrupting effects of EDCs in ecotoxicological studies.

  6. Ecdysone-Related Biomarkers of Toxicity in the Model Organism Chironomus riparius: Stage and Sex-Dependent Variations in Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Ozáez, Irene; Cobo, Fernando; Servia, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite being considered a model organism in toxicity studies, particularly in assessing the environmental impact of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and other chemicals, the molecular basis of development is largely unknown in Chironomus riparius. We have characterized the expression patterns of important genes involved in the ecdysone pathway from embryos to pupa, but specially during the different phases of C. riparius fourth larval instar, according to the development of genital and thoracic imaginal discs. Real-Time PCR was used to analyze: EcR and usp, two genes encoding the two dimerizing partners of the functional ecdysone receptor; E74, an early response gene induced by ecdysteroids; vg (vitellogenin), an effector gene; hsp70 and hsc70, two heat-shock genes involved in the correct folding of the ecdysone receptor; and rpL13, as a part of the ribosomal machinery. Our results show for the first time stage and sex-dependent variations in ecdysone-responsive genes, specially during the late larval stage of C. riparius. The induction in the expression of EcR and usp during the VII-VIII phase of the fourth instar is concomitant with a coordinated response in the activity of the other genes analyzed, suggesting the moment where larvae prepare for pupation. This work is particularly relevant given that most of the analyzed genes have been proposed previously in this species as sensitive biomarkers for the toxicological evaluation of aquatic ecosystems. Identifying the natural regulation of these molecular endpoints throughout the Chironomus development will contribute to a more in-depth and accurate evaluation of the disrupting effects of EDCs in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:26448051

  7. Ecdysone-Related Biomarkers of Toxicity in the Model Organism Chironomus riparius: Stage and Sex-Dependent Variations in Gene Expression Profiles.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Herrero, Óscar; Gómez-Sande, Pablo; Ozáez, Irene; Cobo, Fernando; Servia, María J

    2015-01-01

    Despite being considered a model organism in toxicity studies, particularly in assessing the environmental impact of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and other chemicals, the molecular basis of development is largely unknown in Chironomus riparius. We have characterized the expression patterns of important genes involved in the ecdysone pathway from embryos to pupa, but specially during the different phases of C. riparius fourth larval instar, according to the development of genital and thoracic imaginal discs. Real-Time PCR was used to analyze: EcR and usp, two genes encoding the two dimerizing partners of the functional ecdysone receptor; E74, an early response gene induced by ecdysteroids; vg (vitellogenin), an effector gene; hsp70 and hsc70, two heat-shock genes involved in the correct folding of the ecdysone receptor; and rpL13, as a part of the ribosomal machinery. Our results show for the first time stage and sex-dependent variations in ecdysone-responsive genes, specially during the late larval stage of C. riparius. The induction in the expression of EcR and usp during the VII-VIII phase of the fourth instar is concomitant with a coordinated response in the activity of the other genes analyzed, suggesting the moment where larvae prepare for pupation. This work is particularly relevant given that most of the analyzed genes have been proposed previously in this species as sensitive biomarkers for the toxicological evaluation of aquatic ecosystems. Identifying the natural regulation of these molecular endpoints throughout the Chironomus development will contribute to a more in-depth and accurate evaluation of the disrupting effects of EDCs in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:26448051

  8. Effects of pH on the acute toxicity and uptake of (14C)pentachlorophenol in the midge, Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.W.; Wadleigh, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    The acute toxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was determined at pH levels 4, 6, 9 to the midge, Chironomus riparius, with the findings that PCP is of greatest toxicity at pH 4 and of least toxicity at pH 9. This differential toxicity is attributable to variations in uptake levels at the respective pH levels. At pH 4, PCP is fully protonated and therefore highly lipophilic. The amount of (14C)PCP present in the midges at 24 hr is thus highest at pH 4. Conversely, at pH 9, the compound is completely ionized. The reduction in lipophilicity at pH 9 decreases the ability of the compound to penetrate into the midge, thereby decreasing the observed toxicity of the compound.

  9. The UV filter benzophenone 3 (BP-3) activates hormonal genes mimicking the action of ecdysone and alters embryo development in the insect Chironomus riparius (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-09-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the endocrine effects of UV filters in vertebrates, but little attention has been paid to their possible hormonal activity in invertebrates. We examined the effects of benzophenone-3 (BP-3), one of the most common sunscreen agents, in Chironomus riparius (Insecta), a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Salivary glands from larvae were treated with either the hormone ecdysone or BP-3 to compare the response of endocrine genes. It was found that BP-3 elicits the same effects as the natural hormone activating the expression of a set of ecdysone responsive genes. BP-3 also activated the stress gene hsp70. Interestingly, similar effects have been confirmed in vivo in embryos. Moreover, BP-3 also altered embryogenesis delaying hatching. This is the first demonstration of hormonal activity of UV filters in invertebrates, showing a mode of action similar to ecdysteroid hormones. This finding highlights the potential endocrine disruptive effects of these emergent pollutants.

  10. The UV filter benzophenone 3 (BP-3) activates hormonal genes mimicking the action of ecdysone and alters embryo development in the insect Chironomus riparius (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-09-01

    Numerous studies have evaluated the endocrine effects of UV filters in vertebrates, but little attention has been paid to their possible hormonal activity in invertebrates. We examined the effects of benzophenone-3 (BP-3), one of the most common sunscreen agents, in Chironomus riparius (Insecta), a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Salivary glands from larvae were treated with either the hormone ecdysone or BP-3 to compare the response of endocrine genes. It was found that BP-3 elicits the same effects as the natural hormone activating the expression of a set of ecdysone responsive genes. BP-3 also activated the stress gene hsp70. Interestingly, similar effects have been confirmed in vivo in embryos. Moreover, BP-3 also altered embryogenesis delaying hatching. This is the first demonstration of hormonal activity of UV filters in invertebrates, showing a mode of action similar to ecdysteroid hormones. This finding highlights the potential endocrine disruptive effects of these emergent pollutants. PMID:24878782

  11. The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) alters the ecdysone hormone pathway, the cellular response to stress, the energy metabolism, and several detoxication mechanisms in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-06-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products, and its presence in the aquatic environment is expected for decades. In the present study, the toxicity of BBP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects of acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses were evaluated at the molecular level by analysing changes in genes related to the stress response, the endocrine system, the energy metabolism, and detoxication pathways, as well as in the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers. 24-h exposures to high doses affected larval survival and lead to a significant response of several heat-shock genes (hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27), and to a clear endocrine disrupting effect by upregulating the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR). Longer treatments with low doses triggered a general repression of transcription and GST activity. Furthermore, delayed toxicity studies were specially relevant, since they allowed us to detect unpredictable toxic effects, not immediately manifested after contact with the phthalate. This study provides novel and interesting results on the toxic effects of BBP in C. riparius and highlights the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Use of whole-body and subcellular Cu residues of Lumbriculus variegatus to predict waterborne Cu toxicity to both L. variegatus and Chironomus riparius in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tania Y T; Pais, Nish M; Dhaliwal, Tarunpreet; Wood, Chris M

    2012-06-01

    We tested the use of whole-body and subcellular Cu residues (biologically-active (BAM) and inactive compartments (BIM)), of the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus to predict Cu toxicity in fresh water. The critical whole-body residue associated with 50% mortality (CBR(50)) was constant (38.2-55.6 μg g(-1) fresh wt.) across water hardness (38-117 mg L(-1) as CaCO(3)) and exposure times during the chronic exposure. The critical subcellular residue (CSR(50)) in metal-rich granules (part of BIM) associated with 50% mortality was approximately 5 μg g(-1) fresh wt., indicating that Cu bioavailability is correlated with toxicity:subcellular residue is a better predictor of Cu toxicity than whole-body residue. There was a strong correlation between the whole-body residue of L. variegatus (biomonitor) and survival of Chironomus riparius (relatively sensitive species) in a hard water Cu co-exposure. The CBR(50) in L. variegatus for predicting mortality of C. riparius was 29.1-45.7 μg g(-1) fresh wt., which was consistent within the experimental period; therefore use of Cu residue in an accumulator species to predict bioavailability of Cu to a sensitive species is a promising approach.

  13. The plasticizer benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) alters the ecdysone hormone pathway, the cellular response to stress, the energy metabolism, and several detoxication mechanisms in Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Óscar; Planelló, Rosario; Morcillo, Gloria

    2015-06-01

    Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) has been extensively used worldwide as a plasticizer in the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) industry and the manufacturing of many other products, and its presence in the aquatic environment is expected for decades. In the present study, the toxicity of BBP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects of acute 24-h and 48-h exposures to a wide range of BBP doses were evaluated at the molecular level by analysing changes in genes related to the stress response, the endocrine system, the energy metabolism, and detoxication pathways, as well as in the enzyme activity of glutathione S-transferase. BBP caused a dose and time-dependent toxicity in most of the selected biomarkers. 24-h exposures to high doses affected larval survival and lead to a significant response of several heat-shock genes (hsp70, hsp40, and hsp27), and to a clear endocrine disrupting effect by upregulating the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR). Longer treatments with low doses triggered a general repression of transcription and GST activity. Furthermore, delayed toxicity studies were specially relevant, since they allowed us to detect unpredictable toxic effects, not immediately manifested after contact with the phthalate. This study provides novel and interesting results on the toxic effects of BBP in C. riparius and highlights the suitability of this organism for ecotoxicological risk assessment, especially in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25725395

  14. Characterization of the small heat shock protein Hsp27 gene in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) and its expression profile in response to temperature changes and xenobiotic exposures.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Martín, Raquel; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-07-01

    Small heat shock proteins constitute the most diverse and least conserved group within the large family of heat shock proteins, which play a crucial role in cell response to environmental insults. Chironomus riparius larvae are widely used in environmental research for testing pollutant toxicity in sediments and freshwater environments. Different genes, such as Hsp70, Hsc70, Hsp90, and Hsp40, have been identified in this species as sensitive biomarkers for xenobiotics, but small Hsps genes remain largely unknown. In this study, the Hsp27 has been characterized in C. riparius and its transcriptional response evaluated under several environmental stimuli. The Hsp27 gene was mapped by FISH on polytene chromosomes at region I-C4 and was found to encode a 195 aa protein, which contains an α-crystallin domain bounded by three conserved regions. This protein shows homology with Drosophila melanogaster HSP27, Ceratitis capitata HSP27, and Sarcophaga crassipalpis HSP25. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that heat shock (35 °C) and cadmium dramatically upregulate this gene. Moreover, exposures to triclosan and bisphenol A were able to significantly increase mRNA levels. However, neither nonylphenol nor tributyltin altered Hsp27 gene expression. The transcriptional activity of Hsp27 gene was modulated during cold stress. Interestingly, cold shock (4 °C) significantly reduced Hsp27 transcripts, but this gene was significantly overexpressed during the recovery time at the normal growing temperature. These results show that the Hsp27 gene is sensitive to different environmental stimuli, including endocrine-disrupting pollutants, suggesting its potential as a suitable biomarker for ecotoxicological studies in aquatic systems.

  15. Characterization of Hsp70 gene in Chironomus riparius: expression in response to endocrine disrupting pollutants as a marker of ecotoxicological stress.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Planelló, Rosario; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Herrero, Oscar; Cortés, Estrella; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the Hsp70 cDNA in Chironomus riparius and evaluated its expression profile under different environmental stressors. It is highly conserved, at both DNA and protein levels, displaying many of the hallmarks of Hsps and sharing 80-96% of overall amino acid identities with homologous sequences from other diptera. The changes are mainly concentrated in the C-terminal domain of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis was consistent with the known classification of insects. The Hsp70 gene was located by in situ hybridization in region III-3A at the third polytene chromosome, a locus activated upon heat shock as shown by RNA pol II binding. As C. riparius is widely used in aquatic ecotoxicology testing, we studied Hsp70 gene induction in fourth instar aquatic larvae submitted to heat shock and selected environmental pollutants classified as potential endocrine disruptors. RT-PCR analysis showed that Hsp70 mRNA levels increased significantly (p<0.05) after short-term acute exposures to a temperature shift (HS), cadmium chloride (Cd), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (NP) and ethinylestradiol (EE). However, neither pentachlorophenol (PCP) nor tributyltin (TBTO) treatments were able to activate the Hsp70 gene. The cognate form, Hsc70, was also analysed and, unlike Hsp70, was not altered by any of the different treatments assayed. Moreover, at the times tested, there was no significant mortality of the larvae. The rapid upregulation of the Hsp70 gene suggests that it is sensitive and selective for different environmental pollutants, and could be used as an early molecular endpoint in ecotoxicological studies.

  16. Effects of uranium-contaminated sediments on the bioturbation activity of Chironomus riparius larvae (Insecta, Diptera) and Tubifex tubifex worms (Annelida, Tubificidae).

    PubMed

    Lagauzère, S; Boyer, P; Stora, G; Bonzom, J-M

    2009-07-01

    Freshwater sediments represent a compartment for accumulation of toxic substances, notably of metallic pollutants such as uranium. However, they also constitute a privileged habitat for many benthic macro-invertebrate species with important roles in the functioning of these ecosystems, particularly through their bioturbation activities. Uranium accumulation in sediments can thus have harmful effects on these organisms (e.g., developmental delay, malformations, mortality). The present study aimed to evaluate the consequences of these effects on the bioturbation activity of Chironomus riparius larvae and Tubifex tubifex worms. These two species, which are widespread in freshwater ecosystems, are characteristic of two different modes of bioturbation: bioirrigation and upward bioconveying, respectively. By quantifying the burial and redistribution of fluorescent particulate tracers (microspheres), sediment reworking induced by these macro-invertebrates was measured after 12d of exposure. Biodiffusion D(b) and bioadvection W rates, as well as several other parameters, were estimated to assess and compare the bioturbation activity of the two species, separately and in combination, between uncontaminated and uranium-spiked sediments. The results reveal that C. riparius larvae were more sensitive to uranium, but their bioturbation activity, even under uncontaminated conditions, had little effect on sediment reworking. Particle mixing was mainly induced by T. tubifex worms, which were only affected by uranium at high concentrations in the sediment. Finally, bioturbation by T. tubifex led to a high degree of uranium release from sediment to the overlying water, which highlights the crucial role of this mostly dominant species on uranium biogeochemical cycles at concentrations existing in naturally contaminated sites.

  17. Characterization and expression during development and under environmental stress of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins L11 and L13 in Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Planelló, R; Morcillo, G

    2007-08-01

    The Chironomus riparius gene sequences encoding ribosomal proteins L11 and L13 were characterized and their expression analysed during development, and under different types of cellular stress. A comparative and phylogenetic study among different orders of insects was carried out by analysis of sequence databases. L11 is highly conserved, both at the level of DNA and protein, and it shares over 90% amino acid identity with homologous sequences from other insects. Interestingly, the changes are mainly concentrated in the C-terminal domain of the protein. Conversely, L13 shows a lower degree of homology, around 60% amino acid identity, and the changes were dispersed throughout the length of the polypeptide. Surprisingly, when comparing L13 nucleotide sequences, only a very low or no homology was found even among diptera. These results are helpful for defining the structural and, therefore, evolutionary constraints of these proteins. Studies of gene expression by RT-PCR showed that they are differentially expressed in distinct stages of development. Both L11 and L13 were significantly upregulated during embryogenesis. The expression profiles of the transcripts were also analysed after a general stress, such as heat shock, as well as after a specific stress, such as acute cadmium treatment. In both conditions, no significant differences to controls were detected in L11 and L13 transcripts, in spite of the drastic changes observed in the stress-induced gene HSP70, and the inhibitory effect on rRNA transcription. These data confirm that both genes are equally robust against harmful environmental conditions, suggesting that they could be used as a control for environmentally responsive genes in Chironomus. Overall, our results show a coordinated expression of both the L11 and the L13 genes, but not a coordinated regulation of rRNA and ribosomal protein production.

  18. Life-cycle changes and zinc shortage in cadmium-tolerant midges, Chironomus riparius (Diptera), reared in the absence of cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, J.F.; Mol, S.; Larsen, H.; Admiraal, W. . Section of Aquatic Ecotoxicology)

    1995-01-01

    Adaptation to selected metals is known to modify life-cycle characteristics of some invertebrates and can modify the response to other metals. The reverse process, i.e., adaptation to nonpolluted conditions in a metal-tolerant strain, was studied here for a cadmium-tolerant population of the midge Chironomus riparius to detect whether this backward adaptation followed the same lines. It appeared that cadmium-tolerant populations, reared in the absence of cadmium, continued to suffer from high mortality rates and lowered larval growth rates and reproductive success. Also, some cadmium-tolerant populations accumulated more zinc than did nontolerant populations. Successive experiments in which both cadmium-tolerant and nontolerant populations were exposed to zinc indicated that the reduced growth rate and reproduction were a direct consequence of zinc shortage in tolerant midges reared in the absence of cadmium. Mortality among cadmium-tolerant midges was, however, not lowered by zinc exposure and, judged by their high mortality rates, these midges were even more sensitive to zinc than were nontolerant chironomids. It was concluded that cadmium-tolerant chironomid populations recovering from prolonged exposure are affected by an increased need for zinc as well as by an increased mortality rate as a direct consequence of their earlier adaptation process.

  19. Life-cycle effects of sediment-associated 2,4,5-trichlorophenol on two groups of the midge Chironomus riparius with different exposure histories.

    PubMed

    Ristola, T; Parker, D; Kukkonen, J V

    2001-08-01

    Effects of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) on life-cycle traits of the midge Chironomus riparius and the ability of the midge to evolve tolerance to TCP were assessed using a reference group and a group preexposed to TCP during three generations, both originating from the same laboratory culture. F1 larvae of these groups were then exposed to nominal TCP concentrations of 51, 177, 355, and 532 micromol TCP/kg dry sediment and a control sediment in a life-cycle experiment. Most studied life-cycle traits (mortality, egg production, life span, male dry wt) were fairly insensitive to TCP, and significant effects were observed only at high (> or = 355 micromol/kg) concentrations. Larval development rate was variable, and in some cases it responded more readily to low TCP concentrations than other life-cycle parameters. Some of the observed responses were attributed to changes in food availability. No clear evidence of tolerance to 2,4,5-trichlorophenol was found, but the preexposed midges produced more eggs than the reference group. They also emerged earlier and at a smaller size than the reference midges. These differences between the midge groups suggest that some changes toward tolerance induction had occurred during the preexposure.

  20. Characterization of six small HSP genes from Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae): Differential expression under conditions of normal growth and heat-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Martín-Folgar, Raquel; de la Fuente, Mercedes; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2015-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) comprise the most numerous, structurally diverse, and functionally uncharacterized family of heat shock proteins. Several Hsp genes (Hsp 90, 70, 40, and 27) from the insect Chironomus riparius are widely used in aquatic toxicology as biomarkers for environmental toxins. Here, we conducted a comparative study and characterized secondary structure of the six newly identified sHsp genes Hsp17, Hsp21, Hsp22, Hsp23, Hsp24, and Hsp34. A characteristic α-crystallin domain is predicted in all the new proteins. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a strong relation to other sHSPs from insects and interesting evidence regarding evolutionary origin and duplication events. Comparative analysis of transcription profiles for Hsp27, Hsp70, and the six newly identified genes revealed that Hsp17, Hsp21, and Hsp22 are constitutively expressed under normal conditions, while under two different heat shock conditions these genes are either not activated or are even repressed (Hsp22). In contrast, Hsp23, Hsp24, and Hsp34 are significantly activated along with Hsp27 and Hsp70 during heat stress. These results strongly suggest functional differentiation within the small HSP subfamily and provide new data to help understand the coping mechanisms induced by stressful environmental stimuli.

  1. Characterization of six small HSP genes from Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae): Differential expression under conditions of normal growth and heat-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Martín-Folgar, Raquel; de la Fuente, Mercedes; Morcillo, Gloria; Martínez-Guitarte, José-Luis

    2015-10-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) comprise the most numerous, structurally diverse, and functionally uncharacterized family of heat shock proteins. Several Hsp genes (Hsp 90, 70, 40, and 27) from the insect Chironomus riparius are widely used in aquatic toxicology as biomarkers for environmental toxins. Here, we conducted a comparative study and characterized secondary structure of the six newly identified sHsp genes Hsp17, Hsp21, Hsp22, Hsp23, Hsp24, and Hsp34. A characteristic α-crystallin domain is predicted in all the new proteins. Phylogenetic analysis suggests a strong relation to other sHSPs from insects and interesting evidence regarding evolutionary origin and duplication events. Comparative analysis of transcription profiles for Hsp27, Hsp70, and the six newly identified genes revealed that Hsp17, Hsp21, and Hsp22 are constitutively expressed under normal conditions, while under two different heat shock conditions these genes are either not activated or are even repressed (Hsp22). In contrast, Hsp23, Hsp24, and Hsp34 are significantly activated along with Hsp27 and Hsp70 during heat stress. These results strongly suggest functional differentiation within the small HSP subfamily and provide new data to help understand the coping mechanisms induced by stressful environmental stimuli. PMID:26129721

  2. Joint effects of density and a growth inhibitor on the life history and population growth rate of the midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Helen L; Sibly, Richard M; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Maund, Stephen J

    2005-05-01

    Results of previous laboratory studies suggest that high population density often buffers the effects of chemical stressors that predominately increase mortality. Mortality stressors act to release more resources for the survivors and, therefore, produce less-than-additive effects. By contrast, growth stressors are expected to have opposite results or more-than-additive effects. We investigated the effects of a growth inhibitor (lufenuron) on larval growth and survival of Chironomus riparius and examined its joint effects with density on population growth rate (PGR). Exposure to 60 microg/kg sediment or greater inhibited larval growth, and exposure to 88 microg/kg or greater often resulted in mortality before reaching emergence. The effects of lufenuron, however, differed with population density. At 88 microg/kg, mortalities and, to a lesser extent, reduced fecundity resulted in a reduction in PGR at low density. Conversely, when populations were initiated at high density, PGR was similar to that of controls, because the few survivors reached maturity sooner and started producing offspring earlier. The effect of density as a growth stressor therefore was stronger than the effect of lufenuron, which had effects similar to those of a mortality stressor and produced less-than-additive effects. Long-term studies under field conditions, however, are needed before less-than-additive effects are considered to be the norm. PMID:16110992

  3. Uptake and metabolism of benzo(a)pyrene absorbed to sediment by the freshwater invertebrate species Chironomus riparius and Sphaerium corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Borchert, J.; Karbe, L.; Westendorf, J.

    1997-01-01

    The polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is a widespread contaminant, which is known to be carcinogenic in mammals after ic activation. BP is released into the environment and the water as a by-product of combustion of fossil and recent material (fuel, wood) in industry, traffic and households and is also released by natural sources. Most of the PAHs are highly lipophilic and therefore bound to humic substances, dissolved macromolecules and particulate matter which are at least deposited in the aquatic sediments. The BP concentrations in sediments of pristine waters do normally not exceed 1 {mu}g/g dry weight (dw). In polluted waters of industrial areas, the BP concentration may increase up to 100 {mu}g/g dw. The risk for environmental health caused by such sediment bound PAHs can be assessed by using BP as a model substance. One aim of this study was to investigate if the sediment bound BP is bioavailable to sediment dwelling organisms. For this purpose we examined the uptake of sediment bound BP. The metabolism of PAHs in insects has been investigated, however, only little is known about the Phase I and Phase II metabolism in clams, especially in freshwater species. The organisms choosen were two sediment inhabiting invertebrates, the larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius and the European fingernail clam Sphaerium corneum. Also investigated was the question of whether the BP taken up by the test organisms undergoes metabolic activation, since the toxicity of BP is modulated by metabolism. 11 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Relative acute effects of low pH and high iron on the hatching and survival of the water mite (Arrenurus manubriator) and the aquatic insect (Chironomus riparius)

    SciTech Connect

    Rousch, J.M.; Simmons, T.W.; Kerans, B.L.; Smith, B.P.

    1997-10-01

    The authors investigated the relative effects of low pH and high iron on a water mite, Arrenurus manubriator and an aquatic insect, Chironomus riparius. Eggs and active stages were exposed in static renewal toxicity tests to pH 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2, made by adding sulfuric acid to reconstituted soft water, or to iron levels of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1,000 mg/L, made by adding ferrous sulfate to soft water at pH 4. Experiments were conducted at 22 C with a 16:8-h photoperiod, and treatments were replicated three times with at least nine individuals per treatment. Data were analyzed with a logistic response function and one-way ANOVA for pH and iron tests, respectively. Egg hatching was reduced at pH 2 for midges and at pH 3 for mites. Iron had no effect on hatching for either species. Survival of midge larvae was partially reduced at pH 4, and survival of mite deutonymphs, larvae, female and male adults was reduced at pH 3. Survival of midge larvae, and mite deutonymphs and male adults was reduced at 400, 200, and 1,000 mg Fe/L, respectively. Mite female adults and larvae were unaffected by iron. Higher metabolic requirements of unfed immature stages, the gelatinous covering of mite and insect eggs, the longer incubation period of mite eggs, and the greater osmoregulatory potential of adult mites may have contributed to the differences observed.

  5. Effects of carbamazepine and two of its metabolites on the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius in a sediment full life cycle toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Heye, Katharina; Becker, Dennis; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Durmaz, Vedat; Ternes, Thomas A; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) and its main metabolites carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide (EP-CBZ) and 10,11-dihydro-10,11-dihydroxy-carbamazepine (DiOH-CBZ) were chosen as test substances to assess chronic toxicity on the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. All the three substances were tested in a 40-day sediment full life cycle test (according to OECD 233) in which mortality, emergence, fertility, and clutch size were evaluated. In addition, these parameters were considered to calculate the population growth rate which represents an integrated measure to assess population relevant effects. With an LC50 of 0.20 mg/kg (time-weighted mean), the metabolite EP-CBZ was significantly more toxic than the parent substance CBZ (LC50: 1.1 mg/kg). Especially mortality, emergence, and fertility showed to be sensitive parameters under the exposure to CBZ and EP-CBZ. By using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the binding of CBZ to the ecdysone receptor was investigated as one possible mode of action (MoA) but appeared to be unlikely. The second metabolite DiOH-CBZ did not cause any effects within the tested concentration rage (0.17-1.2 mg/kg). Even though CBZ was less toxic compared to EP-CBZ, CBZ is found in the environment at much higher concentrations and therefore causes a higher potential risk for sediment dwelling organisms compared to its metabolites. Nevertheless, the current study illustrates the importance of including commonly found metabolites into the risk assessment of parent substances. PMID:27064208

  6. The endocrine disruptor bisphenol A increases the expression of HSP70 and ecdysone receptor genes in the aquatic larvae of Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Planelló, R; Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Morcillo, G

    2008-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor that can mimic the action of estrogens by interacting with hormone receptors and is, therefore, potentially able to influence reproductive functions in vertebrates. Although information about the interaction with the endocrine systems in invertebrates is limited, it has also been shown its effect on reproductive and developmental parameters in these organisms. As little is known about its mechanism of action in aquatic invertebrates, we have examined the effects of BPA on the expression of some selected genes, including housekeeping, stress-induced and hormone-related genes in Chironomus riparius larvae, a widely used organism in aquatic ecotoxicology. The levels of different gene transcripts were measured by Northern blot or by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Exposure to BPA (3 mgl(-1), 12-24h) did not affect the levels of rRNA or those of mRNAs for both L11 or L13 ribosomal proteins, selected as examples of housekeeping genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nevertheless, BPA treatment induced the expression of the HSP70 gene. Interestingly, it was found that BPA significantly increases the mRNA level of the ecdysone receptor (EcR). These results show for the first time that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, such as BPA, can selectively affect the expression of the ecdysone receptor gene suggesting a direct interaction with the insect endocrine system. Furthermore, this finding suggests a common way of BPA action, shared by vertebrates and invertebrates, through interaction with steroid hormone receptors. Our study adds a new element, the EcR, which may be a useful tool for the screening of environmental xenoestrogens in insects.

  7. Effect of acute exposure to cadmium on the expression of heat-shock and hormone-nuclear receptor genes in the aquatic midge Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Planelló, R; Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Morcillo, G

    2010-03-01

    Cadmium is a widespread and highly toxic pollutant of particular ecotoxicological relevance for aquatic ecosystems where it accumulates. To identify biomarkers for ecotoxicity monitoring, the effect of cadmium on the expression of different genes related to the stress response as well as to the ecdysone hormone-signalling pathway was studied in the aquatic larvae of Chironomus riparius (Diptera, Chironomidae), a standard test organism in aquatic toxicology testing. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate the effects of acute and short-term cadmium exposures (10mM CdCl(2), 12h and 24h) on the expression of hsp70, hsc70, hsp90 and hsp40 genes, as well as on that of the ecdysone hormonal-receptor genes (EcR and usp). A significant 3-fold increase in the level of hsp70 gene transcripts was induced by the treatment, whereas neither the other stress genes tested (hsp90 and hsp40) nor the constitutive form of hsp70, hsc70, was affected in the larvae exposed to cadmium. These results show that hsp70 is differentially activated to other environmentally regulated heat-shock genes, and constitutes a biomarker of exposure to this toxic metal. In addition, we also found that cadmium is able to alter the expression of the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), whose mRNA level is significantly increased whereas usp levels remained unaltered. This finding, evidenced for the first time in invertebrates, supports the view that cadmium has the ability to mimic the effect of the hormone by the activation of the ecdysone nuclear receptor, which may partly explain the endocrine disruption capability that has been previously suggested for this toxic metal. Our research adds to the growing evidence implicating heavy metals, and cadmium in particular, as potential endocrine disruptive agents and may have significant implications for ecological risk assessment of endocrine-disrupting compounds in invertebrates.

  8. Characterization of a cytochrome P450 gene (CYP4G) and modulation under different exposures to xenobiotics (tributyltin, nonylphenol, bisphenol A) in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2012-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 family members participate in xenobiotic transformation as a detoxification mechanism. We have characterized a CYP gene, assigned to the 4G family, in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. Due to the potential interest of CYP genes and P450 proteins for monitoring pollution effects at the molecular level, the alterations in the pattern of expression of this gene, induced by different xenobiotics, were analyzed. Different compounds, such as the biocide tributyltin (TBTO) and two other well-known endocrine disruptors, nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA), were tested at different concentrations and acute exposures. Upregulation of the CrCYP4G gene was found after exposures to TBTO (1 ng/L 24h-0.1 ng/L 96 h) and, as measured by RT-PCR mRNA quantification, its level was up to twofold that of controls. However, in contrast, NP (1, 10, 100 μg/L, 24h) and BPA (0.5mg/L 24h-3mg/L 96 h) downregulated the gene (by around a half of the control level) suggesting that this gene responds specifically to particular chemicals in the environment. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzymatic activity was also evaluated for each condition. A fairly good correlation was found with CYP4G gene behavior, as it was activated by TBTO (96 h), but inhibited by NP and BPA (24h). Only the higher concentration of BPA tested activated GST, whereas it inhibited CYP4G activity. The results show that different xenobiotics can induce distinct responses in the detoxification pathway, suggesting multiple xenobiotic transduction mechanisms. This work confirms that specific P450 codifying genes, as well as GST enzyme activities, could be suitable biomarkers for ecotoxicological studies.

  9. Effects of in vivo exposure to UV filters (4-MBC, OMC, BP-3, 4-HB, OC, OD-PABA) on endocrine signaling genes in the insect Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Ozáez, Irene; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing evidence indicating that several UV filters might have endocrine disruptive effects. Numerous studies have evaluated hormonal effects in vertebrates, mainly reporting estrogenic and androgenic activities in mammals and fishes. There is only limited knowledge about potential endocrine activity in invertebrate hormonal systems. In this work, the effects on endocrine signaling genes of six frequently used UV filters were investigated in Chironomus riparius, a reference organism in aquatic toxicology. The UV filters studied were: octyl-p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) also called 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate (EHMC); 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC); benzophenone-3 (BP-3); 4-hidroxybenzophenone (4-HB); octocrylene (OC); and octyldimethyl-p-aminobenzoate (OD-PABA). After in vivo exposure at different dosages, expression levels of the genes coding for the ecdysone receptor (EcR), the ultraspiracle (usp, ortholog of the RXR) and the estrogen-related receptor (ERR) were quantified by Real Time PCR. The EcR gene was significantly upregulated by 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA, with a dose-related response following 24h exposure. In contrast, the benzophenones, BP-3 and 4-HB, as well as OC did not alter this gene at the same exposure conditions. The transcription profiles of the usp and ERR genes were not significantly affected, except for BP-3 that inhibited the usp gene at the highest concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence in invertebrates of a direct effect of UV filters on endocrine-related genes, and is consistent with the known effects on vertebrate hormonal receptor genes. The capability of 4-MBC, OMC/EHMC and OD-PABA to stimulate the expression of the ecdysone receptor, a key transcription factor for the ecdysone-genomic response in arthropods, suggests the possibility of a broad and long-term effect on this hormonal pathway. These findings strengthen the need for further research about the ecotoxicological implications

  10. Roles of uptake, biotransformation, and target site sensitivity in determining the differential toxicity of chlorpyrifos to second to fourth instar Chironomous riparius (Meigen)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Sandahl, J.F.; Jenkins, J.J.; Curtis, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    Early life stages of aquatic organisms tend to be more sensitive to various chemical contaminants than later life stages. This research attempted to identify the key biological factors that determined sensitivity differences among life stages of the aquatic insect Chironomous riparius. Specifically, second to fourth instar larvae were exposed in vivo to both low and high waterborne concentrations of chlorpyrifos to examine differences in accumulation rates, chlorpyrifos biotransformation, and overall sensitivity among instars. In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) assays were performed with chlorpyrifos and the metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon, to investigate potential target site sensitivity differences among instars. Earlier instars accumulated chlorpyrifos more rapidly than later instars. There were no major differences among instars in the biotransformation rates of chlorpyrifos to the more polar metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and chlorpyridinol (TCP). Homogenate AChE activities from second to fourth instar larvae were refractory to chlorpyrifos, even at high concentrations. In contrast, homogenate AChE activities were responsive in a dose-dependent manner to chlorpyrifos-oxon. In general, it appeared that chlorpyrifos sensitivity differences among second to fourth instar C. riparius were largely determined by differences in uptake rates. In terms of AChE depression, fourth instar homogenates were more sensitive to chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon than earlier instars. However, basal AChE activity in fourth instar larvae was significantly higher than basal AChE activity in second to third instar larvae, which could potentially offset the apparent increased sensitivity to the oxon. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative effects of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) on the aquatic larvae of Chironomus riparius based on gene expression assays related to the endocrine system, the stress response and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Planelló, Rosario; Herrero, Oscar; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the effects of butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), two of the most extensively used phthalates, were studied in Chironomus riparius under acute short-term treatments, to compare their relative toxicities and identify genes sensitive to exposure. The ecotoxicity of these phthalates was assessed by analysis of the alterations in gene expression profiles of selected inducible and constitutive genes related to the endocrine system, the cellular stress response and the ribosomal machinery. Fourth instar larvae, a model system in aquatic toxicology, were experimentally exposed to five increasing concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100mg/L) of DEHP and BBP for 24h. Gene expression was analysed by the changes in levels of transcripts, using RT-PCR techniques with specific gene probes. The exposures to DEHP or BBP were able to rapidly induce the hsp70 gene in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the cognate form hsc70 was not altered by either of these chemicals. Transcription of ribosomal RNA as a measure of cell viability, quantified by the levels of ITS2, was not affected by DEHP, but was slightly, yet significantly, downregulated by BBP at the highest concentrations tested. Finally, as these phthalates are classified as endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), their potential effect on the ecdysone endocrine system was studied by analysing the two genes, EcR and usp, of the heterodimeric ecdysone receptor complex. It was found that BBP provoked the overexpression of the EcR gene, with significant increases from exposures of 0.1mg/L and above, while DEHP significantly decreased the activity of this gene at the highest concentration. These data are relevant as they show for the first time the ability of phthalates to interfere with endocrine marker genes in invertebrates, demonstrating their potential capacity to alter the ecdysone signalling pathway. Overall, the study clearly shows a differential gene-toxin interaction

  12. Comparative analysis of karyotypes of Chironomus solitus Linevich & Erbaeva, 1971 and Chironomus anthracinus Zetterstedt, 1860 (Diptera, Chironomidae) from East Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Proviz, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A comparative chromosome banding analysis of Chironomus solitus Linevich & Erbaeva, 1971 and Chironomus anthracinus Zetterstedt, 1860 from East Siberia (Lakes Baikal, Gusinoe, Arakhley and Irkutsk Reservoir) showed close similarity of banding sequences. Chironomus solitus differs from Chironomus anthracinus in one species-specific sequence of arm B. Arms C (43%) and D (30%) had inversion banding sequences previously reported in Chironomus anthracinus The similarity of karyotypic features of Chironomus solitus and Chironomus anthracinus in combination with morphological features of larvae provide evidence in favour of including Chironomus solitus in the Chironomus anthracinus group of sibling species long with Chironomus reservatus Shobanov, 1997. PMID:26140165

  13. A cysteine-clamp gene drives embryo polarity in the midge Chironomus*

    PubMed Central

    Klomp, Jeff; Athy, Derek; Kwan, Chun Wai; Bloch, Natasha I.; Sandmann, Thomas; Lemke, Steffen; Schmidt-Ott, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the common fruit fly Drosophila, head formation is driven by a single gene, bicoid, which generates head-to-tail polarity of the main embryonic axis. Bicoid deficiency results in embryos with tail-to-tail polarity and no head. However, most insects lack bicoid, and the molecular mechanism for establishing head-to-tail polarity is poorly understood. We have identified a gene that establishes head-to-tail polarity of the mosquito-like midge, Chironomus riparius. This gene, named panish, encodes a cysteine-clamp DNA binding domain and operates through a different mechanism than bicoid. This finding, combined with the observation that the phylogenetic distributions of panish and bicoid are limited to specific families of flies, reveals frequent evolutionary changes of body axis determinants and a remarkable opportunity to study gene regulatory network evolution. PMID:25953821

  14. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-01

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study.

  15. Differential sensitivity of Chironomus and human hemoglobin to gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, Pallavi S; Panicker, Lata; Mohole, Madhura; Sawant, Sangeeta; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-08-01

    Chironomus ramosus is known to tolerate high doses of gamma radiation exposure. Larvae of this insect possess more than 95% of hemoglobin (Hb) in its circulatory hemolymph. This is a comparative study to see effect of gamma radiation on Hb of Chironomus and humans, two evolutionarily diverse organisms one having extracellular and the other intracellular Hb respectively. Stability and integrity of Chironomus and human Hb to gamma radiation was compared using biophysical techniques like Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry and CD spectroscopy after exposure of whole larvae, larval hemolymph, human peripheral blood, purified Chironomus and human Hb. Sequence- and structure-based bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the sequence and structural similarities or differences in the heme pockets of respective Hbs. Resistivity of Chironomus Hb to gamma radiation is remarkably higher than human Hb. Human Hb exhibited loss of heme iron at a relatively low dose of gamma radiation exposure as compared to Chironomus Hb. Unlike human Hb, the heme pocket of Chironomus Hb is rich in aromatic amino acids. Higher hydophobicity around heme pocket confers stability of Chironomus Hb compared to human Hb. Previously reported gamma radiation tolerance of Chironomus can be largely attributed to its evolutionarily ancient form of extracellular Hb as evident from the present study. PMID:27237970

  16. Exposure of Chironomus riparius larvae (diptera) to lead, mercury and beta-sitosterol: effects on mouthpart deformation and moulting.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A C; Liberloo, G; Dumont, P; Ollevier, F; Goddeeris, B

    2000-11-01

    Mouthpart deformation in chironomid larvae is induced by exposure to chemical contaminants and is becoming an established bio-indicator in sediment assessment programmes. However, concentration-response relationships with causal agents have only been established occasionally and with varying success. In this laboratory study, instar II and III larvae were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of lead, mercury and beta-sitosterol. A significant deformation response was induced in the pecten with lead and mercury. Deformation frequencies of the mentum after metal exposures were not significantly different from the control. Moulting was retarded by both metals and was well correlated with mouthpart deformation. The beta-sitosterol is an endocrine disruptor, which was used to test the hypothetical cause-effect relation between disruption of ecdyson functioning and chironomid deformation. In the present study, exposure to sublethal concentrations of beta-sitosterol did not result in any effect on deformation or moulting. As such, the proposed hypothesis of endocrine disruptors as primary causal agents of chironomid deformation could not be substantiated. Acetone, which was used as a solvent to apply beta-sitosterol caused a significant increase of mentum deformation. The ground filtration paper used as substrate seemed to induce deformities as well. Substrate contamination, acetone and (especially) inbreeding were most probably responsible for the high deformation frequencies in the control conditions. PMID:11057685

  17. Rearing and Maintaining Midge Cultures (Chironomus tentans) for Laboratory Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, John; Mahadeva, Madhu N.

    1992-01-01

    The life history of the Chironomus tentans can be observed in easily established and maintained laboratory cultures. Projects for the classroom include observing hydration of an egg mass; embryonic development, hatching and larval feeding; larval activity; and mating activity. (MDH)

  18. Human external ophthalmomyiasis caused by Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae)--a green bottle fly.

    PubMed

    Kalezić, Tanja; Stojković, Milenko; Vuković, Ivana; Spasić, Radoslava; Andjelkovic, Marko; Stanojlović, Svetlana; Božić, Marija; Džamić, Aleksandar

    2014-07-01

    Ophthalmomyiasis externa is the result of infestation of the conjunctiva by the larval form or maggots of flies from the order Diptera. If not recognized and managed appropriately, it can be complicated by the potentially fatal condition ophthalmomyiasis interna. Ophthalmomyiasis externa is mainly caused by the sheep bot fly (Oestrus ovis). We present the first case, to our knowledge, of ophthalmomyiasis externa in an elderly woman from Belgrade caused by Lucilia sericata Meigen--a green bottle fly.

  19. Chironomus group classification according to the mapping of polytene chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, Syafinaz; Kutty, Ahmad Abas

    2013-11-01

    Chironomus is one of the important genera in Chironomidae family since they are widely diverse and abundance in aquatic ecosystem. Since Chironomus is very diverse, taxonomic work on this genus is very difficult and incomplete. Objective of this study is to form group classification of Chironomus according to the polytene chromosome mapping. The specific characteristics of polytene chromosomes in the salivary gland appeared to be particularly promising for taxonomic diagnosis of chironomid species. Chironomid larvae were collected from pristine sites at Sg. Langat and cultured in laboratory to reach fourth instar stage. The salivary glands were removed from larvae and chromosomes were stained with aceto orcein. Results showed that polytene chromosomes of Chironomus comprise of three long metacentric or submetacentric arms (BF, CD and AE arms) and one short acrocentric (G arm). In regards to nucleolar organizing region (NOR), Balbiani ring (BR), puffings and chromosome rearrangement, a number of four groups of different banding patterns were found. Two groups called as G group A and B have common NOR on arm BF and BR on arm G. However, group A has rearrangement pattern on arm CD and not in group B. This makes group B separated from group A. Another two groups called as groups C and D do not have common NOR on arm BF and also BR on arm G. Groups C and D were separated using arms G and arm AE. At arm G, only group C rearrangement pattern at unit 23c whereas group D was found to have large NOR at arm G and as well as arm AE, only group D has rearrangement pattern at unit 12c. This study indicates that chromosome arrangement could aid in revealing Chironomus diversity.

  20. Redescription of Chironomus javanus and Chironomus kiiensis (Diptera: Chironomidae) Larvae and Adults Collected from a Rice Field in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shami, Salman A; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Nor, Siti Azizah Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Chironomus javanus (Kieffer) and Chironomus kiiensis Tokunaga were redescribed from materials collected from a rice field in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. The larvae can only be distinguished after careful preparation and examination using a compound microscope, but the pupae were not useful to differentiate C. javanus from C. kiiensis. The adult specimens showed clear body and wing characteristics for rapid and accurate identification. PMID:24575227

  1. New data on poorly known species of the genus Leia Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) from the Palaearctic region.

    PubMed

    Polevoi, Alexei; Salmela, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    New data on four poorly known species of the genus Leia Meigen (L. nigricornis van Duzee, L. flavipennis Laštovka & Matile, L. iturupensis Zaitzev and L. rufiptera Ostroverkhova) are presented. Detailed redescriptions and terminalia figures are provided. Leia nigricornis is reported for the first time from the Palaearctic region and L. automnala Ostroverkhova & Grishina is found to be a junior synonym of L. flavipennis. A variation in the male terminalia of L. bimaculata Meigen is illustrated, based on specimens from several European countries. PMID:27394752

  2. Biological responses of midge (Chironomus riparius) and lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) larvae in ecotoxicity assessment of PCDD/F-, PCB- and Hg-contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Salmelin, J; Karjalainen, A K; Hämäläinen, H; Leppänen, M T; Kiviranta, H; Kukkonen, J V K; Vuori, K M

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the utility of chironomid and lamprey larval responses in ecotoxicity assessment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/F)-, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)- and mercury (Hg)-contaminated river sediments. Sediment samples were collected from the River Kymijoki with a known industrial pollution gradient. Sediment for the controls and lamprey larvae were obtained from an uncontaminated river nearby. Contamination levels were verified with sediment and tissue PCDD/F, PCB and Hg analyses. Behaviour of sediment-exposed chironomid and lamprey larvae were measured with Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor© utilizing quadrupole impedance conversion technique. In addition, mortality, growth and head capsule deformity incidence of chironomids were used as ecotoxicity indicators. WHOPCDD/F+PCB-TEQ in the R. Kymijoki sediments ranged from the highest upstream 22.36 ng g(-1) dw to the lowest 1.50 ng g(-1) near the river mouth. The sum of PCDD/Fs and PCBs correlated strongly with Hg sediment concentrations, which ranged from <0.01 to 1.15 μg g(-1). Lamprey tissue concentrations of PCDD/Fs were two orders and PCBs one order of magnitude higher in the R. Kymijoki compared to the reference. Chironomid growth decreased in contaminated sediments and was negatively related to sediment ∑PCDD/Fs, WHOPCDD/F+PCB-TEQ and Hg. There were no significant differences in larval mortality or chironomid mentum deformity incidence between the sediment exposures. The distinct behavioural patterns of both species indicate overall applicability of behavioural MFB measurements of these species in sediment toxicity bioassays. Chironomids spent less and lampreys more time in locomotion in the most contaminated sediment compared to the reference, albeit statistically significant differences were not detected. Lamprey larvae had also a greater activity range in some of the contaminated sediments than in the reference. High pollutant levels in lamprey indicate risks for biomagnification in the food webs, with potential health risks to humans consuming fish. PMID:27282370

  3. Biological responses of midge (Chironomus riparius) and lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis) larvae in ecotoxicity assessment of PCDD/F-, PCB- and Hg-contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Salmelin, J; Karjalainen, A K; Hämäläinen, H; Leppänen, M T; Kiviranta, H; Kukkonen, J V K; Vuori, K M

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the utility of chironomid and lamprey larval responses in ecotoxicity assessment of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans (PCDD/F)-, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)- and mercury (Hg)-contaminated river sediments. Sediment samples were collected from the River Kymijoki with a known industrial pollution gradient. Sediment for the controls and lamprey larvae were obtained from an uncontaminated river nearby. Contamination levels were verified with sediment and tissue PCDD/F, PCB and Hg analyses. Behaviour of sediment-exposed chironomid and lamprey larvae were measured with Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor© utilizing quadrupole impedance conversion technique. In addition, mortality, growth and head capsule deformity incidence of chironomids were used as ecotoxicity indicators. WHOPCDD/F+PCB-TEQ in the R. Kymijoki sediments ranged from the highest upstream 22.36 ng g(-1) dw to the lowest 1.50 ng g(-1) near the river mouth. The sum of PCDD/Fs and PCBs correlated strongly with Hg sediment concentrations, which ranged from <0.01 to 1.15 μg g(-1). Lamprey tissue concentrations of PCDD/Fs were two orders and PCBs one order of magnitude higher in the R. Kymijoki compared to the reference. Chironomid growth decreased in contaminated sediments and was negatively related to sediment ∑PCDD/Fs, WHOPCDD/F+PCB-TEQ and Hg. There were no significant differences in larval mortality or chironomid mentum deformity incidence between the sediment exposures. The distinct behavioural patterns of both species indicate overall applicability of behavioural MFB measurements of these species in sediment toxicity bioassays. Chironomids spent less and lampreys more time in locomotion in the most contaminated sediment compared to the reference, albeit statistically significant differences were not detected. Lamprey larvae had also a greater activity range in some of the contaminated sediments than in the reference. High pollutant levels in lamprey indicate risks for biomagnification in the food webs, with potential health risks to humans consuming fish.

  4. Cladistic analysis of the subgenus Anopheles (Anopheles) Meigen (Diptera: Culicidae) based on morphological characters.

    PubMed

    Collucci, Eliana; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, we used morphological characters to estimate phylogenetic relationships among members of the subgenus Anopheles Meigen. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out for 36 species of Anopheles (Anopheles). An. (Stethomyia) kompi Edwards, An. (Lophopodomyia) gilesi (Peryassú), Bironella hollandi Taylor, An. (Nyssorhynchus) oswaldoi (Peryassú) and An. (Cellia) maculatus Theobald were employed as outgroups. One hundred one characters of the external morphology of the adult male, adult female, fourth-instar larva, and pupa were scored and analyzed under the parsimony criterion in PAUP. Phylogenetic relationships among the series and several species informal groups of Anopheles (Anopheles) were hypothesized. The results suggest that Anopheles (Anopheles) is monophyletic. Additionally, most species groups included in the analysis were demonstrated to be monophyletic.

  5. Chromosome analysis of Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830 and morphologically similar Endochironomus sp. (Diptera, Chironomidae) from water bodies of the Volga region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Durnova, Natalya; Sigareva, Ludmila; Sinichkina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Based upon the detailed chromosome map of polytene chromosomes of the eurybiont species Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830, the localization of the centromere regions using a C-banding technique is defined. Chromosomal polymorphism in populations from two water bodies in the Volga region has been studied, 17 sequences are described. Polytene chromosomes of Endochironomus sp. (2n=6), having larvae morphologically similar to those of Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830 (2n=6) are described for the first time. PMID:26752268

  6. Chromosome analysis of Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830 and morphologically similar Endochironomus sp. (Diptera, Chironomidae) from water bodies of the Volga region, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Durnova, Natalya; Sigareva, Ludmila; Sinichkina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based upon the detailed chromosome map of polytene chromosomes of the eurybiont species Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830, the localization of the centromere regions using a C-banding technique is defined. Chromosomal polymorphism in populations from two water bodies in the Volga region has been studied, 17 sequences are described. Polytene chromosomes of Endochironomus sp. (2n=6), having larvae morphologically similar to those of Endochironomus albipennis Meigen, 1830 (2n=6) are described for the first time. PMID:26752268

  7. A new species of the genus Ctenophora Meigen (Diptera: Tipuloidea: Tipulidae) from China, with a key to the world species.

    PubMed

    Men, Qiu-Lei; Huang, Min-Yi

    2014-01-01

    One new species of the genus Ctenophora Meigen, 1803, C. fumosa Men, sp. nov. (southern China: Anhui) is described and illustrated. A key to known species along with a checklist of known species of the genus Ctenophora are provided. The type specimens of the new species are deposited in the animal specimen room, School of Life Science, Anqing Normal University, Anqing, Anhui Province, China.  PMID:25082059

  8. Neotropical Hemerodromia Meigen (Diptera: Empididae), a world of discovery I: new generic record and new species from Brazilian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Câmara, J T; Plant, A R; Rafael, J A

    2014-12-08

    Ten new species of Hemerodromia Meigen, 1822 are described and illustrated from the Brazilian state of Amazonas: H. amazonensis sp. nov., H. breviradia sp. nov., H. cercusdilatata sp. nov., H. collini sp. nov., H. epandriocurvialis sp. nov., H. jauensis sp. nov., H. lamellata sp. nov., H. longilamellata sp. nov., H. maturaca sp. nov., H. smithi sp. nov. This is the first record of the genus from the Brazilian Amazon Basin.

  9. A new species of the genus Ctenophora Meigen (Diptera: Tipuloidea: Tipulidae) from China, with a key to the world species.

    PubMed

    Men, Qiu-Lei; Huang, Min-Yi

    2014-07-29

    One new species of the genus Ctenophora Meigen, 1803, C. fumosa Men, sp. nov. (southern China: Anhui) is described and illustrated. A key to known species along with a checklist of known species of the genus Ctenophora are provided. The type specimens of the new species are deposited in the animal specimen room, School of Life Science, Anqing Normal University, Anqing, Anhui Province, China. 

  10. Comparative evaluation of the sensitivity of Hyallela azteca and Chironomus tentans for use in freshwater toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellino, S.; Brix, K.V.; Andreasen, E.

    1994-12-31

    Laboratory studies were conducted to assess the bioavailability of contaminants in a creek located in western Washington. Bioassays were conducted on eighteen sediment samples using the amphipod Hyallela azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. The Hyallela test was a standard 10-day acute test with survival as the test endpoint. The Chironomus test was a 30-day chronic test evaluating both survival and adult emergence. Results from these bioassays showed Chironomus emergence to be the most sensitive endpoint, followed by Chironomus survival and Hyallela survival, respectively.

  11. Morphologic and growth responses in Chironomus tentans to arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, E A; Wold, L; Moore, B C; Schaumloffel, J; Dasgupta, N

    2006-11-01

    Laboratory bioassays consisting of sediments spiked with three concentrations (30, 130, and 260 microg g-1 As dry wt) of arsenic (As+3) were used to assess morphologic responses and growth in Chironomus tentans larvae. Chironomid larvae were raised in contaminated sediments from egg stage to emergence, and mouthpart abnormalities, larval length, and larval head width were used as end points to determine differences between metal-spiked and control specimens. C. tentans exhibited significantly higher mouthpart deformity proportions, smaller body sizes, smaller head widths, and slower development than control larvae. Our results demonstrate a dose-response relationship between As and mentum deformities in C. tentans. However, the proportion of deformed larvae did not increase with time in the treatment tanks. Results demonstrate that As induces mouthpart abnormalities at various concentrations. This research provides more support for the use of chironomid abnormalities as a tool for the assessment of heavy-metal pollution in aquatic systems. PMID:16998632

  12. Terminal long tandem repeats in chromosomes form Chironomus pallidivittatus.

    PubMed Central

    Löpez, C C; Nielsen, L; Edström, J E

    1996-01-01

    We provide evidence that a chromosome end in the dipteran Chironomus pallidivittatus contains 340-bp tandem repeats reaching the extreme terminus of the chromosome. After adding synthetic oligonucleotide tails to DNA extracted from the microdissected right end of the fourth chromosome, we could demonstrate that the blocks of repeats were tailed at only one end, the chromosome terminus, the interior of the arrays being unavailable for tailing. Using PCR, we furthermore showed that the added tails were connected to 340-bp repeat DNA directly, i.e., without intervening DNA of any other kind. The tailed repeats belong to a subfamily previously known to be the most peripheral one of the different types of 340-bp units. Using plasmid controls, we could also make certain that we did not amplify rare or nonrepresentative DNA termini. PMID:8668143

  13. Revision of the Nearctic species of Callomyia Meigen (Diptera: Platypezidae) and phylogeny of the genus.

    PubMed

    Cumming, Heather J; Wheeler, Terry A

    2016-01-01

    The Nearctic fauna of the genus Callomyia Meigen is revised and a phylogeny of the world species, based on morphological characters, is presented. Although morphological data are used primarily to delimit species, molecular sequence data (DNA barcodes) are used where possible, to help determine species boundaries and associate sexes. Species descriptions, diagnoses, and distribution maps are presented, along with illustrations of habitus, male terminalia, and additional important diagnostic characters. A key to the Nearctic species is provided. Ten species are recorded from the Nearctic Region including three new species: C. argentea Cumming sp. nov., C. arnaudi Cumming sp. nov., C. bertae Kessel, C. browni Cumming sp. nov., C. calla Kessel, C. corvina Kessel, C. gilloglyorum Kessel, C. proxima Johnson, C. velutina Johnson, and C. venusta Snow. The female of C. velutina is described, and three new synonyms are proposed: C. cleta Kessel is a junior synonym of C. calla syn. nov.; C. clara Kessel is a junior synonym of C. corvina syn. nov.; and C. liardia Kessel & Buegler is a junior synonym of C. proxima syn. nov. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus are reconstructed. The genus is monophyletic based primarily on the setulose R1 wing vein, female antennal size and three larval characters. The Nearctic species do not form a monophyletic group with respect to the Old World species. PMID:27395101

  14. Antennal sensilla of the green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Liu, X H; Li, X Y; Zhang, M; Li, K

    2013-11-01

    Lucilia sericata (Meigen) is a cosmopolitan synanthropic fly of forensic and medical importance, which can work as a mechanic vector of pathogens or cause myiasis of both human and sheep. As essential olfactory organs, antennae of adult L. sericata were examined with stereoscopic microscope, scanning electron microscope, and laser scanning confocal microscope. On antennal scape and pedicel, both microtirchiae and several bristles are detected, while another two structures, setiferous plaques and pedicellar buttons, are also found on the antennal pedicel. Seven subtypes of antennal sensilla are observed on antennal funiculus including one subtype of trichoid sensilla, two subtypes of basiconic sensilla, two subtypes of coeloconic sensilla, and two subtypes of sensory pits. Size and density of the former four types of sensilla on antennal funiculus are measured. Three distinctive sensillar characters of L. sericata are detected, which may contribute to greater olfactory sensitivity of this species and their wide distribution throughout the world. Unlike the common poreless pedicellar button with mechanoreceptor function, every pedicellar button in L. sericata is perforated by three pores, which might indicate potential chemoreceptor function of this structure. Besides, another unique feature is greater number of setiferous plaques in genus Lucilia than calliphorids of other genera. Expect for the common sensory pits with basiconic or basiconic-like sensilla in them, sensory pits filled with rarely described coeloconic-like sensilla are founded in L. sericata as well. After comparison with previous equivalent findings, the functions of these specific structures are discussed according to the life history of this calliphorid. PMID:23955594

  15. A review of the genus Drymeia Meigen, 1826 (Diptera: Muscidae) in Russia.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Vera S; Pont, Adrian C

    2015-08-14

    A key is provided to the 26 species of the genus Drymeia Meigen, 1826 known from Russia and four additional species that may be found in Russia (D. brumalis (Rondani, 1866), D. cantabrigensis (Huckett, 1965), D. gymnophthalma (Hennig, 1963), D. similis (Malloch, 1918)). The key includes the 10 new species here described from the mountains of South Siberia (D. acrostichalis sp. nov., D. aristata sp. nov., D. cilitarsis sp. nov., D. glabra sp. nov., D. grandis sp. nov., D. grisea sp. nov., D. longiseta sp. nov., D. phaonina sp. nov., D. puchokana sp. nov., D. triseta sp. nov.,) and other two new species from the Russian Arctic (D. cristata sp. nov., D. taymirensis sp. nov.). Five species (D. fasciculata (Stein, 1916), D. firthiana (Huckett, 1965), D. groenlandica (Lundbeck, 1901), D. quadrisetosa (Malloch, 1919), D. neoborealis (Snyder, 1949)) are newly recorded from Russia. Three new synonymies are proposed: D. pribilofensis (Malloch, 1921) (syn: D. inaequalis (Malloch, 1922)), D. setibasis (Huckett, 1965) (syn: D. gymnophthalma sibirica (Lavčiev, 1971, unavailable junior secondary homonym) and D. quadrisetosa (Malloch, 1919) (syn: D. amurensis (Lavčiev, 1971)). The male terminalia and the female ovipositors of the new species are illustrated. New faunistic data are given for some previously described species of Russian Drymeia.

  16. Ethmolaimus riparius sp. n. and Paramononchus major sp. n. (Nematoda) from Lake Baikal, Russia.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Vladimir G; Naumova, Tatyana V

    2016-01-01

    Two new nematode species found in Lake Baikal (Russia) are described and illustrated. Ethmolaimus riparius sp. n. is morphologically close to E. pilosus Shoshin, 1998 and E. lanatus Shoshin, 1998. The new species differs from E. pilosus by the longer and thinner body (L = 1228-1501 µm, a = 26-34 vs L = 720-1070 µm, a = 19-23), larger stoma (26-32 µm long vs 19-24 µm long), longer spicules and gubernaculum (45-50 µm long and 21-25 µm long vs accordingly 32-37 µm long and 8 µm long). E. riparius sp. n. differs from E. lanatus by the longer body (L = 1228-1501 µm vs L = 680-1180), shorter cephalic setae (its length is equal 1.1-1.4 labial region diameter vs 1.6-2.1 labial region diameter) and longer spicules and gubernaculum (45-50 µm long and 21-25 µm long vs accordingly 25-30 µm long and 7-8 µm long). Paramononchus major sp. n is close to P. orientalis Gagarin & Naumova, 2012, but differs from it by the longer body (L = 5926-7820 µm vs L = 3081-3778 µm), longer spicules (410-475 µm long vs 208-238 µm long) and larger number of precloacal supplements (52-61 vs 21-24). Keys for the identification of valid species of the genera Ethmolaimus and Paramononchus are given. PMID:27394603

  17. Redescription of larva, pupa and imago male of Chironomus (Chironomus) salinarius Kieffer from the saline rivers of the Lake Elton basin (Russia), its karyotype and ecology.

    PubMed

    Orel Zorina, Oksana V; Istomina, Albina G; Kiknadze, Iya I; Zinchenko, Tatiana D; Golovatyuk, Larisa V

    2014-07-29

    Cytology and ecology of Chironomus (Chironomus) salinarius Kieffer, 1915 (Diptera, Chironomidae) was examined from material collected in the saline rivers of the Lake Elton basin (Volgograd region, Russia). Larvae of salinarius-type were identified as C. salinarius on the basis of their karyotype. The species is redescribed on the basis of all metamorphic stages. The reared imago and karyotype were obtained from larvae of the same population. The karyotype of C. salinarius, detailed mapping of the 5 chromosome arms A, C, D, E, F and characteristics of chromosome polymorphism are provided. Information on distribution and ecology of C. salinarius from the saline rivers (total mineralization 6.8-31.6 g l-1) of the Lake Elton basin is also given. Chironomus salinarius is a common in the saline rivers and occurs in sediments with high silt content. On the basis of recent samplings C. salinarius appears to be very abundant in saline, mesotrophic as well as in eutrophic rivers. Chironomus salinarius accounted for 49-66% of total abundance of zoobenthos in water with salinity up to 13-31.6 g l-1.

  18. The first report of Telomerina flavipes (Meigen, 1830) (Diptera, Sphaeroceridae) in a forensic case, with redescription of its pupa.

    PubMed

    Arnaldos, María-Isabel; Ubero-Pascal, Nicolás; García, Rafael; Carles-Tolrá, Miguel; Presa, Juan-José; García, María-Dolores

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a forensic investigation that took place in the city of Murcia (SE Spain) and shows how the entomological specimens collected at the scene were extremely helpful for estimating the minimum post-mortem interval (PMImin). The occurrence of Telomerina flavipes (Meigen, 1830) (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae) is reported here for the first time in a forensic case. Additionally, the importance of other entomological evidence in this case is discussed. The first known images of the puparium are provided, as well as its redescription and that of the cephalopharyngeal skeleton recovered from the puparium.

  19. Aggregated oviposition inDelia antiqua (Meigen): A case for mediation by semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Judd, G J; Borden, J H

    1992-04-01

    Experiments conducted in the laboratory tested the hypotheses that aggregated oviposition by onion maggot flies,Delia antiqua (Meigen), is caused by stimuli associated with ovipositing females, newly laid eggs, or both. Using a paired oviposition station bioassay that eliminated visual stimuli associated with the treatment under study, 67% of the eggs laid by caged females were in response to the odor of females already ovipositing on an onion slice, as opposed to 33% of the eggs laid in response to an onion slice alone. When newly laid eggs were transferred to onion slices and held for either 24 or 48 hr before being bioassayed against similarly aged untreated onions, 74% and 97% of the eggs were laid at the egg-treated onion stations, respectively. Similar results were achieved when an aqueous wash of newly laid eggs was applied to the onion slice. When the egg wash was processed through a bacterial filter or when eggs were present but not in contact with onions, all response was eliminated. These results implicate microorganisms transmitted on the egg surface in creating an attraction for ovipositing females. Heptane extracts of ovipositor tips from mated, ovipositing females induced 72% of the test females to oviposit near points at which extracts were applied to the oviposition station floor. A behavioral sequence for an optimal host-selection strategy is hypothesized, whereby host-seeking female onion flies respond to host-derived alkyl sulfides at long range and metabolic by-products of microbially infested hosts and visual cues at short range (ca. l m), with final selection of oviposition sites potentially reinforced by contact with an aggregation pheromone released or left on the substrate by ovipositing females. PMID:24253871

  20. Uranium uptake and depuration in the aquatic invertebrate Chironomus tentans.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Jorgelina R; Liber, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Evaluation of aqueous uranium (U) uptake and depuration in larvae of the midge Chironomus tentans were investigated in two separated experiments. First, a static-renewal experiment was performed with 10-d old C. tentans larvae exposed to 300 microg U/L. The animals steadily accumulated U (K(u) = 20.3) approaching steady-state conditions (BAF = 56) in approximately 9-11 d. However, accumulated U was readily depurated (K(d) = 0.36) with U tissue concentration decreasing rapidly within 3 d of the larvae being placed in clean water (t(1/2) = 1.9 d). Also, the growth of C. tentans larvae appeared to decrease after 6-11 d of U exposure, probably due to the reallocation of resources into U detoxification mechanisms. However, growth significantly increased once C. tentans were transferred to clean water. A separate short-term experiment was performed to evaluate the possible mechanism of U uptake in this invertebrate. Results suggested a passive mechanism of U uptake coupled with an active mechanism of U depuration but no details related to the type of mechanisms or pathway was investigated.

  1. RNA TRANSPORT FROM NUCLEUS TO CYTOPLASM IN CHIRONOMUS SALIVARY GLANDS

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Barbara J.; Swift, Hewson

    1966-01-01

    The fine structure and cytochemistry of the extremely large RNA puffs, or Balbiani rings, in salivary gland nuclei of midge, Chironomus thummi, larvae have been investigated. The Balbiani rings are composed of a diffuse mass of electron-opaque 400 to 500 A granules, short threads about 180 to 220 A in diameter and associated fine chromatin fibrils. These components appear to be organized into brushlike elements which form the ring. Electron microscope cytochemistry has shown that the granules and short threads contain RNA. After ribonuclease digestion, only 50 to 100 A chromatin fibrils were apparent in the Balbiani ring, and the granules were no longer demonstrable. Deoxyribonuclease digestion had no apparent effect on these structures. Observations indicate that the granules are formed from the short threads and released into the nucleoplasm in which they are evenly distributed. At the nuclear envelope, many granules have been observed partially or completely within the nuclear pores. These granules become elongated and are shown to penetrate the center of the pore in a rodlike form, about 200 A in diameter. The Balbiani ring granules are not normally visible within the cytoplasm adjacent to the nuclear envelope, but have been rarely found in this region. It is suggested that the granules represent the product of the Balbiani ring, possibly a messenger RNA bound to protein, and that they regularly pass into the cytoplasm through a narrow central channel in the pores of the nuclear envelope. PMID:5971975

  2. Centromeric polymerase III transcription units in Chironomus pallidivittatus.

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, C; Edström, J E

    1996-01-01

    Cp1 is a polymorphic short interspersed repeat (SINE) which is distributed over the whole genome of the dipteran Chironomus pallidivittatus, and is particularly abundant in the centromeres. It contains two different sequence modules, one of which, the B module, has a polymerase III internal control region (ICR) typical for tRNA genes (A and B box). Such sequence motifs are common in SINEs and assumed to function in RNA-mediated transposition. In the present case, however, several structural features speak for another role. An investigation of the transcription of the B module shows that it encodes a 99 nt RNA species in vivo, Cp1-RNA, terminating within the module. The transcription unit is likely to have evolved from a pre-tRNA gene and the transcript has sequence similarities to non-processed pre-tRNA. Most of the in vitro transcription is eliminated by deletion or substitution mutation of an upstream TATA box, present within the B module, as well as by changing either the A or B box. The properties of the transcript suggest that it does not have a role in transposition but may have some other function, perhaps in the centromere. PMID:8649983

  3. Effect of He-Ne laser radiation on polytene chromosomes of Chironomus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Gregory E.; Apina, Oksana R.; Belyanina, Svetlana I.; Panina, Nadezda P.

    1994-02-01

    In this work the influence of He-Ne laser irradiation (wavelength 632.8 nm, power density 1 mW/cm2, 15 and 30 min) on giant polytene chromosomes from salivary gland cells of larvae Chironomus plumosus and Chironomus balatonicus was studied. Increase of chromosome compactness depending on the dose, as well as formation of puffs de novo in different loci of different chromosomes, were revealed. The activity of the nucleolar organizer increased only in the case of initially low activity of this zone. Indices of genetic activity of Balbiani ring-7 in chromosome 4 and Balbiani ring-16 in chromosome 1 did not change.

  4. Silver toxicity to Chironomus tentans in two freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Call, D.J.; Polkinghorne, C.N.; Markee, T.P.; Brooke, L.T.; Geiger, D.L.; Gorsuch, J.W.; Robillard, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    Sediment collected from two freshwater lakes, West Bearskin Lake (Cook, MN, USA) and Bond Lake (Douglas, WI, USA), was characterized for grain size, total organic carbon, (TOC), acid-volatile sulfides (AVS), simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), and iron (Fe). Both sediments had low levels of TOC. West Bearskin Lake sediment contained more small particles than Bond Lake, which was 95% sand. West Bearskin Lake also had higher SEM and had an Fe content that was approximately 30-fold greater than that of Bond Lake. These sediments were amended with AgNO{sub 3} in a series of concentrations, some of which were intended to exceed the total silver (Ag)-binding capacity of the sediments, allowing for the appearance of dissolved Ag in pore water (PW). Sediment toxicity tests were then designed such that the AgNO{sub 3} amendment levels would result in PW concentrations that bracketed the 10-d concentration causing 50% lethality for dissolved Ag of 0.057 mg/L, as determined in a toxicity test in water alone. The 10-d LC50 values for Chironomus tentans, based upon nominal additions of Ag to the sediments, were 2.75 and 1.17 g Ag per kilogram dry sediment for West Bearskin and Bond Lake sediments, respectively. An LC50 value based upon dissolved Ag in the PW was determined only for Bond Lake sediment and was approximately 275 times greater than the water-only LC50 value. This indicated that a high proportion of the dissolved fraction was not readily bioavailable to cause lethality. A reduction in PW pH and the displacement of other metals from sediment into PW with Ag additions to the sediment likely contributed to the observed mortalities and weight losses, particularly at the higher exposure levels. The concentrations of Ag in these sediments that resulted in biological effects are considerably higher than levels reported in the environment.

  5. A new record of Chironomus (Chironomus) acidophilus Keyl (Diptera, Chironomidae) from the Uzon volcanic caldera (Kronotsky Reserve, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia), its karyotype, ecology and biology.

    PubMed

    Orel, Oksana V; Lobkova, Ludmila E; Zhirov, Sergey V; Petrova, Ninel A

    2015-07-03

    Morphology, cytology, ecology and biology of Holarctic Chironomus (Chironomus) acidophilus Keyl, 1960 (Diptera, Chironomidae) was examined from material collected in the geothermal Vosmerka Lake (pH=2.0-2.5). An illustrated redescription of C. acidophilus is given on the basis of adult males reared from field-collected pupae, and of simultaneously collected larvae. Additional larvae belonging to the pseudothummi-complex were identified as C. acidophilus on the basis of their karyotype. The karyotype of C. acidophilus (2n=8) and detailed mapping of the 4 chromosome arms A, E, D and F are provided. The population of C. acidophilus from Kamchatka was found to be karyologically monomorphic. Information on distribution and ecology of C. acidophilus from Vosmerka Lake (total mineralization 1583.5 mg/l) is also given. Chironomus acidophilus is the only species of aquatic insects recorded in this lake. Lack of competition and a richness of food resources contribute to the high abundance (35161 ind./m2) and biomass (11.342 g/m2) of the larvae of C. acidophilus in Vosmerka Lake.

  6. Cloning and expression of an atrazine inducible cytochrome P450 from Chironomus tentans (Diptera: Chironomidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies performed in our lab have measured the effect of atrazine exposure on cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase activity and have found increased activity in midge larvae (Chironomus tentans) as a result of atrazine exposure (1-10 ppm). Here we report the cloning and expression of a ...

  7. Ku-related antigens are associated with transcriptionally active loci in Chironomus polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Gorab, E; Botella, L M; Quinn, J P; Amabis, J M; Díez, J L

    1996-09-01

    Antigens of Chironomus reactive with human sera containing anti-Ku antibodies and also with specific antibodies to each Ku subunit were characterized by immunoblot analysis. Three main antigen species were identified in nuclear-enriched extracts from salivary gland cells of Chironomus thummi, ranging in Mr from 55000 to 67000. The nuclear localization of Ku-related antigens in the dipteran Chironomus was studied by immunofluorescent labeling in polytene chromosomes of the salivary glands. Balbiani rings, loci highly active in transcription, were found to be strongly labeled by anti-Ku antibodies. Sugar-induced changes in the activity of the Balbiani ring genes were accompanied by the redistribution of Ku-related antigens as visualized by their absence in regressed Balbiani ring loci, and continued presence only in those that were transcriptionally active. A drastic change in the distribution of Ku-related antigens was also observed when C. thummi larvae underwent heat treatment as the immunofluorescent staining was restricted to previously described heat shock puffs. Anti-Ku sera reacted in addition with several chromosomal bands in which the presence of RNA polymerase II was also immunologically detected. The results show that Chironomus antigens reactive with anti-Ku antibodies are related to transcription in polytene chromosomes.

  8. Method refinements for the midge life-cycle, Chironomus dilutus test

    EPA Science Inventory

    Larval stages of non-biting midges can be found in almost any freshwater ecosystem, and one of the commonly tested midges is Chironomus dilutus (Chironomidae, Diptera) which is used for toxicity testing and ecological risk assessment of freshwater contaminants. USEPA, ASTM, Envir...

  9. What Food and Feeding Rates are Optimum for the Chironomus dilutus Sediment Toxicity Test Method?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used to assess the toxicity of both contaminated sediments and individual chemicals. Among the standard procedures for benthic macroinvertebrates are 10-d, 20-d, and life cycle exposures using the midge, Chironomus ...

  10. Ceriodaphnia and Chironomus in situ toxicity tests assessing the wastewater treatment efficacy of constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Barjaktarovic, L.; Nix, P.; Gulley, J.

    1995-12-31

    In situ toxicity tests were designed for Ceriodaphnia dubia and Chironomus tentans as part of a larger study designed to assess the effectiveness of constructed wetlands for the treatment of wastewater produced by oil production at Suncor OSG. The artificial wetlands were 50m long by 3m wide, with three replicates of the control and the treatment. Each wetland had four sample sites equidistant along its length, creating a gradient of treatment from site A being the most toxic to site D being the least toxic. Each test was conducted twice during the summer of 1994. Both the Ceriodaphnia and Chironomus test cages were a flow through design to allow for maximal exposure to the water within the wetlands. Mortality and reproduction were used as endpoints for Ceriodaphnia, whereas mortality and growth were used as endpoints for the Chironomus test. Test durations were fifteen and ten days respectively. Chironomus had very high mortality along the entire wetlands whereas Ceriodaphnia survival and fecundity increased along the length of the treatment wetlands. Both organisms had low mortality and high growth/fecundity in the control wetlands.

  11. Changes in the morphology and presumptive chemistry of impact and pooled bloodstain patterns by Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Amanda; Barksdale, Larry; Higley, Leon G; Carter, David O

    2011-09-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis can be critical to accurate crime scene reconstruction. However, bloodstain patterns can be altered in the presence of insects and can confound crime scene reconstruction. To address this problem, we conducted a series of controlled laboratory experiments to investigate the effect of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) on impact bloodstains and pooled bloodstains in association with three combinations of common surfaces (linoleum/painted drywall, wood floor/wallpaper, and carpet/wood paneling). L. sericata fed from the pooled bloodstains and added insect stains through regurgitation and defecation of consumed blood. L. sericata formed defecatory trails of insect stains that indicated directionality. Defecatory stains fluoresced when viewed at 465 nm with an orange filter. These observations differed from Calliphora vicina insect stains because feeding on blood spatter was not observed and trails of insect stains were formed by L. sericata. The fluorescence of defecatory stains can be used as a method to detect insect stains and discriminate them from real bloodstains.

  12. Mineral Deposition in Bacteria-Filled and Bacteria-Free Calcium Bodies in the Crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species. PMID:23554963

  13. Mineral deposition in bacteria-filled and bacteria-free calcium bodies in the crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species.

  14. Chronic effects of contaminated sediment on Daphnia magna and Chironomus tentans (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeker, A.V.; Onjukka, S.T.; Cairns, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic tests were conducted with Daphnia magna (cladoceran) and Chironomus tentans (midge) to determine their usefulness as test organisms for chronic sediment assays, and to estimate the potential long-term impact of contaminated freshwater sediments and contaminated Superfund-site soils on freshwater invertebrates. These two species were used successfully in acute sediment tests and were shown to be useful in chronic tests in water.

  15. Chronic effects of contaminated sediment on Daphnia magna and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeker, A.V.; Onjukka, S.T.; Cairns, M.A.

    1988-10-01

    Chronic tests were conducted with Daphnia magna (cladoceran) and Chironomus tentans (midge) to determine their usefulness as test organisms for chronic sediment assays, and to estimate the potential long-term impact of contaminated freshwater sediments and contaminated Superfund site soils on freshwater invertebrates. These two species have been used successfully in acute sediment tests, and have been shown to be useful in chronic tests in water--only bioassays.

  16. Changes in the morphology and presumptive chemistry of impact and pooled bloodstain patterns by Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Amanda; Barksdale, Larry; Higley, Leon G; Carter, David O

    2011-09-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis can be critical to accurate crime scene reconstruction. However, bloodstain patterns can be altered in the presence of insects and can confound crime scene reconstruction. To address this problem, we conducted a series of controlled laboratory experiments to investigate the effect of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) on impact bloodstains and pooled bloodstains in association with three combinations of common surfaces (linoleum/painted drywall, wood floor/wallpaper, and carpet/wood paneling). L. sericata fed from the pooled bloodstains and added insect stains through regurgitation and defecation of consumed blood. L. sericata formed defecatory trails of insect stains that indicated directionality. Defecatory stains fluoresced when viewed at 465 nm with an orange filter. These observations differed from Calliphora vicina insect stains because feeding on blood spatter was not observed and trails of insect stains were formed by L. sericata. The fluorescence of defecatory stains can be used as a method to detect insect stains and discriminate them from real bloodstains. PMID:21554312

  17. New insight into the Delia platura Meigen caused alteration in nutrient content of soybean (Glycine max L. Merill).

    PubMed

    Bosnyákné, Helga Egri; Kerepesi, Ildikó; Keszthelyi, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    Climate change has brought about an increasing level of seedcorn maggot (Delia platura Meigen, 1826) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) damage in Hungary. In order to have a more accurate understanding of the effects of these plant injuries induced by the larvae of D. platura, the nutrient content of soybean (Glycine max L. Merill.) was studied. Our results show that the moisture, raw fat, raw fibre, and raw ash content of the batches damaged by D. platura were significantly less in comparison with that of the control samples. In response to the deleterious effect of the insect, the infected soybean plants showed forced ripening (P = 0.004) (P > 0.05). The difference of moisture content between damaged and control samples was 2.30% on average. The fact of nutritional value loss was also reflected by the alteration of sugar mobilisation. As the result of this experiment the sucrose breakdown to glucose and fructose during the germination was significantly slower in the damaged seeds than that of the control ones. Overall, this late and surprising damage caused by D. platura led to the forced ripening of the affected soybean plants and a significant change in their nutritional values. Based on the herein reported results, it is presumable that in cases when the current climatic extremities, which are envisaged to occur more frequently in the future, and effects of agricultural practices will be coincided in the future a qualitative change of the produced soybean batches can be expected through the damage caused by this fly species.

  18. Effect of ketamine on the development of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and preliminary pathological observation of larvae.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Huang, Ming; Huang, Ruiting; Wu, Xinwu; You, Zhijie; Lin, Jieqiong; Huang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Sheng

    2013-03-10

    The estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) based on the growth patterns of necrophagous arthropods is the main mission of forensic entomology in practice. The larval development rates can be affected by various drugs or toxins, causing deviation in PMI estimate. Ketamine is a widely used anesthetic and recreational drug in Asia, which is rarely focused on in the previous entomotoxicological studies. The present work investigated the effect of ketamine on the development of Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) by the measurement of body length and weight and the analysis of relationship between the ketamine effect and drug dosage or time interval, meanwhile the difference between ketamine effect on larval body length and weight was also analyzed. Additionally, the preliminary pathological observation of larvae was also employed for evaluating the drug effect in morphology. Significant differences were observed between control and treatment colonies of L. sericata at each life stage, and the effect of ketamine displayed a dosage-and-time-dependent manner, but no differences were noticed between the effects of ketamine on larval body length and weight, which provided a useful indication for larvae sample collection in practice. The pathological observation revealed that ketamine could promote the growth of trophocytes in fat body of L. sericata. PMID:23434378

  19. New insight into the Delia platura Meigen caused alteration in nutrient content of soybean (Glycine max L. Merill).

    PubMed

    Bosnyákné, Helga Egri; Kerepesi, Ildikó; Keszthelyi, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    Climate change has brought about an increasing level of seedcorn maggot (Delia platura Meigen, 1826) (Diptera: Anthomyiidae) damage in Hungary. In order to have a more accurate understanding of the effects of these plant injuries induced by the larvae of D. platura, the nutrient content of soybean (Glycine max L. Merill.) was studied. Our results show that the moisture, raw fat, raw fibre, and raw ash content of the batches damaged by D. platura were significantly less in comparison with that of the control samples. In response to the deleterious effect of the insect, the infected soybean plants showed forced ripening (P = 0.004) (P > 0.05). The difference of moisture content between damaged and control samples was 2.30% on average. The fact of nutritional value loss was also reflected by the alteration of sugar mobilisation. As the result of this experiment the sucrose breakdown to glucose and fructose during the germination was significantly slower in the damaged seeds than that of the control ones. Overall, this late and surprising damage caused by D. platura led to the forced ripening of the affected soybean plants and a significant change in their nutritional values. Based on the herein reported results, it is presumable that in cases when the current climatic extremities, which are envisaged to occur more frequently in the future, and effects of agricultural practices will be coincided in the future a qualitative change of the produced soybean batches can be expected through the damage caused by this fly species. PMID:27630049

  20. Novel oligonucleotide probes for in situ detection of pederin-producing endosymbionts of Paederus riparius rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae).

    PubMed

    Kador, Matthias; Horn, Marcus A; Dettner, Konrad

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts from female Paederus rove beetles are hitherto uncultured, phylogenetically related to Pseudomonas sp., and produce the polyketide pederin, which exhibits strong cytotoxic effects and antitumoral activities. The location of such endosymbionts inside beetles and on beetles' eggs is hypothesized based on indirect evidence rather than elucidated. Thus, an endosymbiont-specific and a competitor oligonucleotide probe (Cy3-labelled PAE444 and unlabelled cPAE444, respectively) were designed and utilized for FISH with semi-thin sections of Paederus riparius eggs. Cy3-PAE444-positive cells were densely packed and covered the whole eggshell. Hundred percent of EUB338-Mix-positive total bacterial cells were PAE444 positive, indicating a biofilm dominated by Paederus endosymbionts. Analysis of different egg deposition stadiums by electron microscopy and pks (polyketide synthase gene, a structural gene associated with pederin biosynthesis)-PCR supported results obtained by FISH and revealed that the endosymbiont-containing layer is applied to the eggshell inside the efferent duct. These findings suggest that P. riparius endosymbionts are located inside unknown structures of the female genitalia, which allow for a well-regulated release of endosymbionts during oviposition. The novel oligonucleotide probes developed in this study will facilitate (1) the identification of symbiont-containing structures within genitalia of their beetle hosts and (2) directed cultivation approaches in the future.

  1. A new case of an Holarctic element in the Colombian Andes: first record of Cordyla Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) from the Neotropical region.

    PubMed

    Kurina, Olavi; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of Mycetophilidae - Cordyla monticola sp. n., Cordyla pseudopusilla sp. n. and Cordyla reducta sp. n. - are described from the Colombian Andes, representing the first described species of Cordyla Meigen from the Neotropical region. Colour photos of their habitus, wing and terminalia are provided. The morphological affinities of male terminalia are discussed in a worldwide context. The distributional pattern of the genus clearly indicates a case of northern elements reaching the north-western region of the Neotropics that corresponds to a secondary extension of a Holarctic clade to the south. PMID:26445929

  2. A new case of an Holarctic element in the Colombian Andes: first record of Cordyla Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) from the Neotropical region

    PubMed Central

    Kurina, Olavi; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of Mycetophilidae – Cordyla monticola sp. n., Cordyla pseudopusilla sp. n. and Cordyla reducta sp. n. – are described from the Colombian Andes, representing the first described species of Cordyla Meigen from the Neotropical region. Colour photos of their habitus, wing and terminalia are provided. The morphological affinities of male terminalia are discussed in a worldwide context. The distributional pattern of the genus clearly indicates a case of northern elements reaching the north-western region of the Neotropics that corresponds to a secondary extension of a Holarctic clade to the south. PMID:26445929

  3. Effects of pentachlorophenol on Galba pervia, Tubifex sinicus and Chironomus plumousus larvae.

    PubMed

    Song, Z H

    2007-09-01

    The 24-h median lethal concentrations of pentachlorophenol to Chironomus plumousus, Tubifex sinicus and Galba pervia were 0.302, 0.977 and 0.293 mg/L, respectively. Bioconcentration factors of C. plumousus, T. sinicus and G. pervia to pentachlorophenol were 108, 367 and 85 at 0.02 mg/L pentachlorophenol, respectively. As pentachlorophenol concentration increased, the G. pervia egg hatching rates became lower, and the total hatched time became longer. Pentachlorophenol teratogenesis was demonstrated by observing the deformation of C. plumousus larvae mentum. PMID:17713712

  4. Induction of morphological deformities in Chironomus tentans exposed to zinc- and lead-spiked sediments.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A; Moore, B C; Schaumloffel, J; Dasgupta, N

    2001-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were used to assess morphological responses of Chironomus tentans larvae exposed to three levels of zinc and lead. Chironomus tentans egg masses were placed into triplicate control and metal-spiked aquaria containing the measured concentrations 1,442, 3,383, and 5,562 microg/g Pb dry weight and 1,723, 3,743, and 5,252 microg/g Zn dry weight. Larvae were collected at 10-d intervals after egg masses were placed in aquaria until final emergence. Larvae were screened for mouthpart deformities and metal body burdens. Deformities increased with time of exposure in both Zn and Pb tanks. Deformity rates between the three Zn concentrations differed statistically, with low and medium Zn levels containing the highest overall deformity rates of 12%. Deformity rates for larvae held in the Pb aquaria were found to differ significantly. Larvae in the low-Pb tanks had a deformity rate of 9%. Larvae and water from both the Zn and Pb aquaria had increasing metal concentrations with increasing sediment metal concentration. Results demonstrate that Zn and Pb each induce chironomid mouthpart deformities at various concentrations. However, a clear dose-related response was not demonstrated. Our research provides more support for the potential use of chironomid deformities as a tool for the assessment of heavy metal pollution in aquatic systems. PMID:11699772

  5. Refining methods for conducting long-term sediment and water toxicity tests with Chironomus dilutus: Formation of a midge chronic testing work group

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard methods have been established by USEPA, ASTM International, Environment Canada and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for conducting sediment toxicity tests with various species of midges including Chironomus dilutus. Short-term 10-day exposures are ty...

  6. Effects of sediment bioturbation by Chironomus tentans on toxicity of heavy metals to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, M.S.; Clements, W.H.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the toxicological significance of bioturbation by Chironomus tentans (Diptera: Chironomidae) exposed to mixtures of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) in sediment. Overlying water was collected from beakers with and without chironomids. Overlying water samples from beakers with chironomids showed significantly higher levels of total zinc (p = 0.0088), copper (p < 0.0001) and lead (p = 0.0485) compared to beakers without chironomids. Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity tests were used to evaluate toxicity of the overlying water. Overlying water from beakers without chironomids was not toxic to C. dubia. In contrast, overlying water from beakers with chironomids was acutely toxic to C. dubia at dilutions > 50%. Dilutions of 6.25%, 12.5% and 25% had a reproductive effect on C. dubia. Results of this laboratory experiment indicate that benthic invertebrates may be responsible for increased toxicity of overlying waters.

  7. Toxicity of hexachlorobenzene to Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans in spiked sediment bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.R.; Fuchsman, P.C.; Chappie, D.J.; Sferra, J.C.; Sheehan, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    Fourteen-day, whole-sediment toxicity tests using the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans were conducted on spiked sediment samples representing a range of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) concentrations. High rates of survival and growth relative to controls were observed in both test species. No observed effects concentrations (NOECs) were equal to the highest HCB concentration tested (42 mg/kg, normalized to 1% total organic carbon). Available literature on the aquatic toxicity of this hydrophobic chemical shows an absence of lethal and sublethal effects from exposure to HCB or below water solubility concentrations, and toxicity from exposure to dissolved HCB in sediment porewater therefore would not be expected. Because whole-sediment toxicity tests integrate exposure to HCB dissolved in porewater and adsorbed to particles, it was considered possible that exposure via sediment ingestion could cause toxicity; however, no such effect was observed in this study.

  8. Sensitivity of midge larvae of Chironomus tentans Fabricius (Diptera Chironomidae) to heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Khangarot, B.S.; Ray, P.K.

    1989-03-01

    The discharge of heavy metals into the natural waters has numerous obvious impacts on physical, chemical and biological parameters of aquatic ecosystem. Bioassay tests are important steps in establishing appropriate water quality criteria and standards for diverse use of ponds, lakes, streams and river waters. Therefore, the acute toxicities of various heavy metals to water flea Daphnia magna, and snail Lymnaea acuminata, and toad tadpoles Bufo mentanostictus have been reported from the authors' laboratory. Chironomid larvae might be particularly useful as indicators of water quality because they are widely distributed in freshwater systems and often from diverse communities within particular habitat. The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of ten heavy metals to the midge larvae Chironomus tentans Fabricius, which forms an important link in aquatic food chain(s).

  9. Polytene chromosomes and phylogenetic relationships of Chironomus atrella (Diptera: Chironomidae) in North America.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jon; Andreeva, Eugenia N; Kiknadze, Iya I; Wülker, Wolfgang F

    2006-11-01

    The identity of Chironomus atrella Townes has been confusing because the name has been used for at least 2 quite different species. This situation is clarified karyosystematically by describing the banding patterns and chromosomal polymorphisms from a number of locations in Canada and the US. Most populations show only moderate levels of polymorphism (average heterozygosity, 0.36), although in some samples from shallow waters, the level of polymorphism is much higher (average heterozygosity, up to 0.92). The banding patterns of the polytene chromosomes are either identical or closely related to those found in Holarctic species with a northern distribution. These patterns and the distribution of inversions in the C. atrella populations are consistent with a progenitor that colonized North America across the Bering Strait and spread down the Rocky Mountain chain; at the same time, new gene combinations developed that allowed it to spread eastward over the majority of the continent. PMID:17426753

  10. Teratogenic and genotoxic responses of larval Chironomus (Diptera) to contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, L.A.; Muir, K.; Ciborowski, J.J.H.

    1994-12-31

    Sediment-associated contaminants can produce developmental or genotoxic stresses independently of their cytotoxic effects. In the laboratory, the authors exposed Chironomus larvae to mixtures of polluted (either Detroit R., MI, or cadmium or benzo-[a]-pyrene-spiked) sediment diluted with uncontaminated, formulated sediment. Second-instar Chironomus nr. salinarius were grown to 4th star in water filled 1-L jars containing 300 mL of contaminated:formulated sediment mixture in ratios of 1:0, 1:1, 1:3, 1:7, 1:15 or 0:1. Surviving larvae were preserved in Carnoy`s solution. Each larva`s head was slide-mounted and examined for deformities of the mentum. Polytene chromosome preparations were made from salivary glands of the same animals using acid fuschin staining and examined for reduced relative size of the nuclear organizer (NO) indicative of inhibition of RNA synthesis activity. Incidence of chironomid deformities from control (0:1) sediments ({plus_minus}I SE) was 7.9 {plus_minus} 1.6% (N = 268): 4.0 {plus_minus} 1.5% of 178 control larvae examined displayed NO reduction. Incidence of mentum deformities and of NO reduction increased linearly with each doubling of Detroit R. concentration at 1:0 for deformities; 12.2 {plus_minus} 3.5% (N = 149) for NO reductions. Reduction of NO in a larva was unrelated to mentum condition, indicating that these are independent responses to contaminant stress. Equivalent results were obtained for exposure to single-compound sediments. This is the first documentation of controlled dose-response effects of contaminants on chironomid deformities.

  11. Prevalence of vector-borne bacterial pathogens in riparian brush rabbits (Sylvilagus bachmani riparius) and their ticks.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Kelly M; Foley, Janet E; Kasten, Rickie W; Chomel, Bruno B; Larsen, R Scott

    2014-04-01

    From June to October 2010, 48 endangered riparian brush rabbits (Sylvilagus bachmani riparius) were trapped at a captive propagation site in central California with the intention of release into re-established habitats. During prerelease examinations, ticks and blood samples were collected for surveillance for Rickettsia spp., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Bartonella spp. Ticks were identified, and DNA was extracted for PCR analysis. Serology was performed to detect exposure to Rickettsia spp., B. burgdorferi, and A. phagocytophilum. DNA was extracted from blood samples and analyzed for A. phagocytophilum using PCR assays. Rabbit blood samples were also cultured for Bartonella spp. Haemaphysalis leporispalustris ticks were detected on all rabbits except one. A total of 375 ticks were collected, with 48% of the rabbits (23 rabbits) having a burden ranging from 0 to 5 ticks, 15% (seven rabbits) from 6 to 10 ticks, 25% (12 rabbits) from 11 to 15 ticks, and 12% (six rabbits) with >15 ticks. There was no evidence of B. burgdorferi or R. rickettsii in tick or rabbit samples. There was also no evidence of Bartonella spp. in the rabbit samples. Four tick samples and 14 rabbits were weakly PCR positive for A. phagocytophilum, and six rabbits were antibody positive for A. phagocytophilum. These results suggest that there may be little risk of these tick-borne diseases in riparian brush rabbits or to the people in contact with them.

  12. Comparison of the 10-day freshwater sediment toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.S.; Bigham, G.N.; Rose, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    Comparisons were made of the performance of the 10-d freshwater sediment toxicity tests using the amphipod Hyalella azteca and midge Chironomus tentans. Sediments were collected from eight stations in Onondaga Lake, New York, and represented a wide range of toxicity. The biological end points were survival, biomass, and body length. The two tests were compared on the basis of correspondence among relative values of the end points and ability to statistically discriminate adverse effects relative to control responses (i.e., discriminatory ability). Minimum detectable differences (MDDs) and adverse response ranges of the end points were used to further evaluate the discriminatory ability of the end points. Relative responses and discriminatory abilities of the end points of both tests were similar, despite numerous differences that exist among characteristics of the test species and end points. Significant concordance was found among all end points with respect to relative toxicity of sediments from the eight stations. Although MDDs and adverse response ranges of the various end points differed substantially, the observed positive correlation between those two variables resulted in all end points having similar discriminatory ability. Although amphipod biomass and body length have rarely been used as end points in 10-d tests, both end points provided results comparable to those of the other end points evaluated in the present study.

  13. Bioavailability of sediment-sorbed chlorobenzenes to larvae of the midge, Chironomus decorus

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.P.; Harrison, F.L.

    1988-04-01

    Larval stages of the midge, Chironomus decorus, were used to define the bioaccumulation of sediment-sorbed mono-, di-, tri-, and hexachlorobenzene. Larvae were exposed to high- and low-organic-content sediments that had been equilibrated with individual radiolabeled chlorobenzenes prior to testing. Equilibrium or nonequilibrium aqueous concentrations of the volatile test chemicals were flowed through sealed chambers in a sediment-water exposure system. The uptake of chlorobenzenes by midge larvae was rapid for all compounds tested, and apparent steady-state conditions were reached within 48 hr of exposure. Bioconcentration factors for the accumulation of chlorobenzenes from sediments and from interstitial and overlying waters were related to the octanol/water partition coefficients of the compounds. Because the diffusion of chlorobenzenes to overlying water during nonequilibrium flow through conditions was very slow, bioaccumulation was dependent on the concentration of the chemicals in interstitial water. These results show how benthic organisms may be able to accumulate significant levels of chlorinated aromatic compounds from ecosystems where their concentrations in the water column are relatively low.

  14. [Development of Sediment Micro-Interface Under Physical and Chironomus plumosus Combination Disturbance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren; Li, Da-peng; Huang, Yong; Liu, Yan-jian; Chen, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Synergistic effect of physical and Chironomus plumosus combination disturbance on the characteristics of the micro-environment and micro-interface was investigated by the Rhizon samplers and Unisense micro sensor system. The results showed that the oxygen penetration depth (OPD), total oxygen exchange (TOE), water content and total microbial activity increased under the combination disturbance and bioturbation and were kept at the higher level, compared with the control. These parameters increased with the physical intensity under combination disturbance. However, the content of Fe2+ decreased under the combination disturbance and bioturbation and the decrease was more obvious than that in the control. The changes of the Fe2+, the water content and the total microbial activity were large at 0-4 cm depth in the sediments. Therefore, the area might be the active area for the transformation of internal sedimentary phosphorus forms. The curve fitting was used for the OPD, TOE, the content of Fe2+, the water content and the total microbial activity with the physical intensity under combination disturbance. It was observed that the second-order polynomial equation was suitable for the curve fitting. In addition, jump type synergistic effect was presented in the above mentioned parameters under combination disturbance when the physical intensity was higher than 34 r x min(-1). The remodeling on the sediment micro-interface and micro-environment might be the main inducing mechanism for the transformation of internal phosphorus. PMID:26910997

  15. Phototoxicity of three PAHs to Chironomus tentans in the presence and absence of a metabolic inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Monson, P.D.; Sheedy, B.R.; Cox, J.S.; Kosian, P.A.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Chironomus tentans has been observed to be insensitive to photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to other benthic test species. The midge is generally accepted to have the ability to metabolize organic compounds (e.g. pesticides) via the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system, which may explain in part the organisms insensitivity. The objective of this study was to characterize the enhanced effects, if any, of a metabolic inhibitor of P450, piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the phototoxicity and tissue concentrations of three PAHs (fluoranthene, anthracene and pyrene) using C. tentans. Results indicated that phototoxicity (time to mortality) to the midge exposed to PAH + PBO followed the order fluoranthene > pyrene {much_gt} anthracene. These differences in phototoxicity were not as marked in exposures without PBO. However, based on a lethal tissue dose (LD50), anthracene was the most toxic of the three. Tissue concentrations corresponded with toxicity results in that higher concentrations of PAH accumulated in exposures containing PBO. Though presence of PBO increased tissue concentrations and phototoxicity of the PAHs to the midge, the differences were slight and suggest that metabolism of PAHs by the cytochrome P450 pathway is not solely responsible for the midges relative insensitivity to this class of compounds.

  16. Similarity analysis of PAH and PCB bioaccumulation patterns in sediment-exposed Chironomus tentans larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.W.; O`Keefe, P.; Bush, B.

    1997-02-01

    Larvae of the aquatic insect Chironomus tentans were exposed at the third or fourth instar stage to sediments collected near the outfalls of two aluminum foundries and an aluminum fabrication plant. Biota and sediment bioaccumulation factors (BFs), based on wet tissue weights and dry sediment weights, ranged from 0.07 to 0.27 for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and from 0.22 to 1.42 for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A higher rate of metabolism of PAHs compared with PCBs could explain the differences in BF values for the two groups of chemicals. It was found, using community similarity procedures from the field of ecology, that the congener patterns for PAHs and PCBs bioaccumulated by the larvae differed from the pattern of the same compounds in the sediments to which they were exposed. Affinity analysis indicated that the larvae favored the higher molecular weight PAH and PCB congeners. Preferential ingestion of sediments with defined particle size ranges, metabolism, and octanol/water partition coefficients (log K{sub ow}) are factors that may have influenced the bioaccumulation patterns. However, no single factor could adequately account for the differences between the larval and sediment patterns.

  17. Toxicity in Chironomus tentans larvae from exposure to sediments containing PAHs, PCBs and PCDDs/PCDFs

    SciTech Connect

    O`Keefe, P.W.; Wood, L.W.; Bush, B.; Hong, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    Sediments were collected in the Massena area of the St. Lawrence River near an effluent discharge point from an aluminum manufacturing plant (A) and opposite a waste disposal site associated with a plant manufacturing die-cast aluminum parts for the automotive industry (B). The Grasse River is a tributary of the St. Lawrence River and an additional sediment sample was collected in the Grasse River near the discharge point of a second aluminum plant (C). The plant A sediment contained high concentrations of PAHs (3,234 mg/kg), PCBs (702 mg/kg) and PCDFs (1652 ng/g) and there were no survivors when Chironomus tentans larvae at the 3{sup rd} instar stage were exposed to a dilution of 33% of the sediment in control sediment for 2 weeks. Even a 3--6 dilution of this sediment resulted in 75% mortality while the mortalities for exposure to the undiluted sediments from plants B and C were 50% and < 20% respectively. However the PAH and PCB concentrations in larvae exposed to the undiluted sediments from plants B and C were comparable or lower (PAHs in plant B sediment) than concentrations of the same compounds in larvae exposed to the diluted plant A sediment. Differences in the concentrations of coplanar PCBs may account for the higher toxicity of the plant A sediment. Toxicity contributions from 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDFs appear to be negligible.

  18. A family of complex tandem DNA repeats in the telomeres of Chironomus pallidivittatus.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y J; Kamnert, I; López, C C; Cohn, M; Edström, J E

    1994-01-01

    A family of 340-bp tandem telomere-associated DNA repeats is present in 50- to 200-kb blocks in seven of the eight paired chromosome ends in Chironomus pallidivittatus. It consists of four main subfamilies, differing from each other by small clusters of mutations. This differentiation may reflect different functional roles for the repeats. Here we find that one subfamily, D3, is consistently localized most peripherally and extends close to the ends of the chromosomes, as shown by its sensitivity to the exonuclease Bal 31. The amounts of D3 are highly variable between individuals. The repeat characteristic for D3 forms a segment with pronounced dyad symmetry, which in single-strand form would give rise to a hairpin. Evidence from an interspecies comparison suggests that a similar structure is the result of selective forces. Another subfamily, M1, is present more proximally in a subgroup of telomeres characterized by a special kind of repeat variability. Thus, a complex block with three kinds of subfamilies may occupy different M1 telomeres depending on the stock of animals. We conclude that subfamilies are differentially distributed between and within telomeres and are likely to serve different functions. Images PMID:7969141

  19. Toxicity and affecting factors of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis on Chironomus kiiensis larvae.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chuan-Wang; Sun, Li-Li; Wen, Rong-Rong; Li, Xiao-Peng; Wu, Hong-Qu; Wang, Zhi-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) is a suitable agent for controlling Chironomus kiiensis, a major pest polluting water. In this study, laboratory bioassays were used to study toxicity and affecting factors of Bti on C. kiiensis larvae. Tests were conducted using three commercial Bti formulations (oil miscible suspension, 1,200 ITU/mL; wettable power, 1,200 ITU/mg; technical material, 5,000 ITU/mg) of Bti. The toxicity of Bti formulations to third and fourth instar C. kiiensis larvae was in decreasing order of technical material, oil miscible suspension, and wettable powder, based on the 12 and 24 hour LC50 values. Increasing larval densities (from 10 to 30 per bioassay cup) increased the LC50 values for fourth instar C. kiiensis larvae. The LC50 values for fourth instar larvae reared in sand substrate were higher than those from soil substrate, and autoclaved substrates significantly increased the LC50 values. The technical material of Bti at 12 and 24 hours responded similarly to changes in temperature between 30° C and 15° C, but the LC50 values at a range of tested temperatures showed distinct differences in time points.

  20. Genes involved in cysteine metabolism of Chironomus tepperi are regulated differently by copper and by cadmium.

    PubMed

    Jeppe, Katherine J; Carew, Melissa E; Long, Sara M; Lee, Siu F; Pettigrove, Vincent; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2014-05-01

    Freshwater invertebrates are often exposed to metal contamination, and changes in gene expression patterns can help understand mechanisms underlying toxicity and act as pollutant-specific biomarkers. In this study the expressions of genes involved in cysteine metabolism are characterized in the midge Chironomus tepperi during exposures to sublethal concentrations of cadmium and copper. These metals altered gene expression of the cysteine metabolism differently. Both metals decreased S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase expression and did not change the expression of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Cadmium exposure likely increased cystathionine production by up-regulating cystathionine-β-synthase (CβS) expression, while maintaining control level cysteine production via cystathionine-γ-lyase (CγL) expression. Conversely, copper down-regulated CβS expression and up-regulated CγL expression, which in turn could diminish cystathionine to favor cysteine production. Both metals up-regulated glutathione related expression (γ-glutamylcysteine synthase and glutathione synthetase). Only cadmium up-regulated metallothionein expression and glutathione S-transferase d1 expression was up-regulated only by copper exposure. These different transcription responses of genes involved in cysteine metabolism in C. tepperi point to metal-specific detoxification pathways and suggest that the transsulfuration pathway could provide biomarkers for identifying specific metals.

  1. Transcription and activation under environmental stress of the complex telomeric repeats of Chironomus thummi.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guitarte, J L; Díez, J L; Morcillo, G

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to their traditional role, telomeres seem to behave as transcriptionally active regions. RNAs complementary to the short DNA repeats characteristic of telomerase-maintained telomeres have recently been identified in various mammalian cell lines, representing a new and unexpected element in telomere architecture. Here, we report the existence of transcripts complementary to telomeric sequences characteristic of Chironomus thummi telomeres. As in other Diptera, the non-canonical telomeres of chironomids lack the simple telomerase repeats and have instead more complex repetitive sequences. Northern blots of total RNA hybridized with telomere probes and RT-PCR with telomere-specific tailed primers confirm the existence of small non-coding RNAs of around 200 bp, the size of the DNA repeated telomeric unit. Telomere transcripts are heterogeneous in length, and they appear as a ladder pattern that probably corresponds to multimers of the repeat. Moreover, telomeres are activated under conditions of environmental stress, such as heat shock, appearing highly decondensed and densely labelled with acetylated H4 histone, as well as with RNA polymerase II antibodies, both marks of transcriptional activity. Changes in the expression levels of telomeric RNA were detected after heat shock. These findings provide evidence that transcriptional activity of the repetitive telomere sequences is an evolutionarily conserved feature, not limited to telomerase telomeres. The functional significance of this non-coding RNA as a new additional element in the context of telomere biology remains to be explained.

  2. Evaluation of short-term chronic in situ testing with Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Chappie, D.J.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Traditional toxicity testing of simple grab samples is limited by uncertainties arising from extrapolations of laboratory results to field situations. Long term testing in lakes and streams measured the effects of intermittent storm events and contamination from sediments. Aquatic organisms are enclosed in plastic containers with 149 um mesh openings. These chambers were anchored to the bottom allowing continual water exchange and association with sediments to occur. This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of chronic in situ testing (one to four weeks of exposure) with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca. With the addition of 0.01 g of rabbit pellets per chamber as a food source, H. azteca survival was greater than 80% after four weeks of exposure. Testing with H. azteca was limited by cold water temperatures (< 12 C). The midge C. tentans required a silica sand or shredded paper towel substrate added to the chambers. C. tentans were more sensitive to handling stress and stream flow than H. azteca. maximizing the usefulness of in situ testing with chronic exposures allows lethal, sub-lethal, and bioaccumulation effects to be measured.

  3. A novel giant secretion polypeptide in Chironomus salivary glands: implications for another Balbiani ring gene

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Chironomus salivary glands contain a family of high Mr (approximately 1,000 X 10(3)) secretion polypeptides thought to consist of three components: sp-Ia, sp-Ib, and sp-Ic. The use of a new extraction protocol revealed a novel high Mr component, sp-Id. Results of a survey of individual salivary glands indicated that sp-Id was widespread in more than a dozen strains of C. tentans and C. pallidivittatus. Sp-Id was phosphorylated at Ser residues, and a comparison of cyanogen bromide and tryptic peptide maps of 32P-labeled polypeptides suggested that sp-Ia, sp-Ib, and sp-Id are comprised of similar but nonidentical tandemly repeated amino acid sequences. We concluded that sp-Id is encoded by an mRNA whose size and nucleotide sequence organization are similar to Balbiani ring (BR) mRNAs that code for the other sp-I components. Furthermore, parallel repression of sp-Ib and sp-Id synthesis by galactose led us to hypothesize that both of their genes exist within Balbiani ring 2. PMID:4030890

  4. Effects of atrazine and cyanazine on chlorpyrifos toxicity in Chironomus tentans (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Jin-Clark, Ying; Lydy, Michael J; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2002-03-01

    Toxicities of two triazine herbicides (atrazine and cyanazine) and an organophosphate insecticide (chlorpyrifos) were evaluated individually and with each herbicide in binary combination with chlorpyrifos using fourth-instar larvae of the aquatic midge, Chironomus tentans. Chlorpyrifos at 0.25 microg/L resulted in an effect in less than 10% of midges in 48-h acute toxicity bioassays. Neither atrazine nor cyanazine alone at relatively high concentrations (up to 1,000 microg/L) caused significant acute toxicity to C. tentans. However, atrazine and cyanazine caused significant synergistic effects on the toxicity of chlorpyrifos when midges were exposed to mixtures of atrazine or cyanazine (10, 100, 1,000 microg/L) with chlorpyrifos (0.25 microg/L). At fixed concentrations (200 microg/L) of the herbicides, toxicity of chlorpyrifos was enhanced by 1.8- and 2.2-fold by atrazine and cyanazine, respectively, at the 50% effective concentration levels. Although atrazine and cyanazine are not effective inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro, the synergism of the two triazine herbicides with chlorpyrifos was associated with increased in vivo inhibition of AChE in midges. We observed a positive correlation between the degree of inhibition of AChE and the concentration of atrazine or cyanazine in the presence of a fixed concentration of chlorpyrifos. It is possible that these herbicides may affect cytochrome P450 enzymes to confer synergistic effects on the toxicity of chlorpyrifos.

  5. Reduced chromosomal puffing in Chironomus tentans as a biomarker for potentially genotoxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Bentivegna, C.S. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Cooper, K.R. . Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology)

    1993-06-01

    Chromosomal puffing in the salivary glands of larval Chironomus tentans was developed as a biomarker for genotoxic substances. Reduced chromosomal puffing was considered an indication of decreased RNA synthesis. Third- or fourth-instar larvae were exposed to test chemicals in an artificial substrate under static conditions. Chromosomes from glands of individual larvae were stained with methyl green and pyronin Y. The widths of Balbiani rings 1 and 2 were measured. Three carcinogens with different mechanisms of action were tested, benzo[a] pyrene(BaP), actinomycin D(Act D), and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). Puff size was statistically reduced by all three chemicals with varying potency. Lowest-observable-effect levels were 0.5 nmol BaP, 6.0 nmol Act D, and 24443,000 nmol DMN. The degree of response was influenced by exposure time, applied dose, individual sensitivity, and possibly chemical hydrophobicity. Biomarker specificity was determined by testing a weak carcinogen, benzo[e]pyrene(BeP), and an acutely toxic noncarcinogen, naphthalene(NP). The effective dose of BaP was four orders of magnitude higher than that of BaP. Only lethal doses of NP had statistically significant effects on puff size, LD50 = 25,000 nmol. Approximately 40% of the larvae in the laboratory population appeared tolerant to the effects of BaP. Advantages of this biomarker were its association with a known mechanism of action and measurement of the whole-organism integrated response.

  6. Brachyopa minima (Diptera: Syrphidae), a new species from Greece with notes on the biodiversity and conservation of the genus Brachyopa Meigen in the Northern Aegean Islands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bañón, Celeste; Radenković, Snezana; Vujić, Ante; Petanidou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    An on-going study of the hoverfly fauna of the Northern Aegean Islands (Greece) has revealed the presence of four species of the genus Brachyopa Meigen. During the survey the following species were found: B. bicolor (Fallén), B. quadrimaculosa Thompson in Kaplan & Thompson, B. minima Vujić & Pérez-Bañón sp. nov. and an unidentified species very close to B. pilosa (Collin). Morphological characters and mitochondrial COI barcodes were used to link different life stages of B. minima, and to identify a larval specimen of B. bicolor. In this study adult and larval morphology and habitat preferences for B. minima are described. The description of larval morphology of B. bicolor and Brachyopa sp. aff. pilosa is amended too. An identification key to the adults of the B. quadrimaculosa group sensu Kassebeer (2002) in the Eastern Mediterranean (Greece, Israel and Turkey) is provided. The importance of specific microhabitats for the continued existence of these taxa is discussed. PMID:27395920

  7. Species of Coenosia Meigen (Diptera, Muscidae) described by Fritz van Emden from the British Museum Ruwenzori Expedition of 1934-1935.

    PubMed

    Couri, Márcia; Pont, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    All the species of Coenosia Meigen (Diptera, Muscidae) described by Fritz van Emden from the British Museum (Natural History) Ruwenzori Expedition of 1934-1935 (Emden 1940), supplemented by species from the Entomological Expedition to Abyssinia of 1926-1927 (Emden 1941), were studied, a total of 51 species. All types are deposited in the Natural History Museum, London, UK. For each species, a diagnosis is given and photographs of the 10 holotypes and of their labels are presented. Dissections and illustrations of the male terminalia were made when paratypes or identified specimens were available; all terminalia are described for the first time. One new synonym is proposed: C. kilembana (Emden, 1940) as a junior synonym of C. rebmanni Speiser, 1924; and three subspecies had their status revised and were elevated to species rank: C. brunneigena Emden, 1940, previously a subspecies of C. heterocnemis Emden, 1940; and C. albisquama (Emden, 1940) and C. argentescens (Emden, 1940), both previously subspecies of C. niveifrons (Stein, 1913).

  8. Species of Coenosia Meigen (Diptera, Muscidae) described by Fritz van Emden from the British Museum Ruwenzori Expedition of 1934-1935.

    PubMed

    Couri, Márcia; Pont, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    All the species of Coenosia Meigen (Diptera, Muscidae) described by Fritz van Emden from the British Museum (Natural History) Ruwenzori Expedition of 1934-1935 (Emden 1940), supplemented by species from the Entomological Expedition to Abyssinia of 1926-1927 (Emden 1941), were studied, a total of 51 species. All types are deposited in the Natural History Museum, London, UK. For each species, a diagnosis is given and photographs of the 10 holotypes and of their labels are presented. Dissections and illustrations of the male terminalia were made when paratypes or identified specimens were available; all terminalia are described for the first time. One new synonym is proposed: C. kilembana (Emden, 1940) as a junior synonym of C. rebmanni Speiser, 1924; and three subspecies had their status revised and were elevated to species rank: C. brunneigena Emden, 1940, previously a subspecies of C. heterocnemis Emden, 1940; and C. albisquama (Emden, 1940) and C. argentescens (Emden, 1940), both previously subspecies of C. niveifrons (Stein, 1913). PMID:27470872

  9. A Chironomus tentans bioassay for testing synthetic fuel products and effluents, with data on acridine and quinoline

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; McKamey, M.I.

    1981-05-01

    As part of a programme to evaluate the environmental effects of synthetic fuel products and effluents, a series of tests is being used to measure the toxicity of these products and of representative pure compounds to aquatic organisms. A method was developed using the midge, Chironomus tentans. Unlike previous C. tentans bioassays the procedure excludes effects of organic substrates, feeding, aeration and light. The midges were treated in glass beakers of filtered well water on a glass wool substrate. Calculated 48-hour LC/sub 50/ values for typical synthetic fuel products were acridine, 1.96 mg/l and quinoline, 57.2 mg/l.

  10. Sediment properties influencing the bioavailability of uranium to Chironomus dilutus larvae in spiked field sediments.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah E; Liber, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The partitioning of metals between dissolved and solid phases directly affects metal bioavailability to benthic invertebrates and is influenced by metal-binding properties of sediment phases. Little research has been done examining the effects of sediment properties on the bioavailability of uranium (U) to freshwater benthic invertebrates. In the present study, 18 field sediments with a wide range of properties (total organic carbon, fine fraction, cation exchange capacity, and iron content) were amended with the same concentrations of U to characterize the effects of these sediment properties on U bioavailability to freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus. Bioaccumulation of U by C. dilutus larvae varied by over an order of magnitude when exposed to sediments spiked with 50 mg U kg(-1) d.w. (5-69 mg U kg(-1) d.w.) and 500 mg U kg(-1) d.w. (20-452 mg U kg(-1) d.w.), depending on the type of sediment. Variance in U bioaccumulation was best explained by differences in the cation exchange capacity, fine fraction (≤50 μm particle size), and Fe content of U-spiked sediment, with generated regression equations predicting observed bioaccumulation within a factor of two. The presented regression equations offer an easy-to-apply method for accounting for the influence of sediment properties on U bioavailability in freshwater sediment, with fine fraction being the single most practical variable. This research strongly supports that risk assessments and guidelines for U-contaminated sediments should not ignore the influence of sediment properties that can result in substantial differences in the bioaccumulation of U in benthic invertebrates. PMID:26802266

  11. Field validation of 10-day freshwater sediment toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.S.; Bigham, G.N.

    1995-12-31

    Two of the toxicity tests commonly used to evaluate freshwater sediments are the 10-day amphipod (Hyalella azteca) and chironomid (Chironomus tentans) tests. EPA and ASTM have recently developed standardized protocols for these tests. Although both tests are considered sensitive indicators of sediment toxicity, little information exists on how well test results correspond to adverse biological effects in the field. In this study, the lethal and sublethal (i.e., biomass) responses of the two toxicity tests were compared with alterations of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages (i.e., benthic effects) at 56 stations in Onondaga Lake, New York. The lake has received municipal and industrial discharges for more than 100 years, and sediment chemical concentrations range widely throughout the lake. Toxicity results for Onondaga Lake were compared with reference conditions using the t-test, and benthic effects were determined using classification analysis of log-transformed taxa abundances. In general, a relatively high level of agreement was found between results of the toxicity tests and alterations of benthic assemblages. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between all toxicity test endpoints and taxa richness of benthic assemblages. In addition, significant concordance (P {le} 0.01, binomial test) was found between toxicity designations for the 56 stations based on toxicity tests and toxicity designations based on benthic effects. Despite the general level of agreement among the various biological indicators, chironomid biomass and benthic effects were found to be the most sensitive indicators of toxicity, whereas amphipod survival and biomass were the least sensitive indicators. This study suggests that results of the 10-day amphipod and chironomid toxicity tests are highly predictive of adverse biological effects in the field.

  12. The significance of growth in Chironomus tentans sediment toxicity tests: Relationship to reproduction and demographic endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, P.K.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.

    1997-02-01

    In the Chironomus tentans 10-d growth test, changes in larval growth relative to sediment contamination are often ascribed ecological relevance by assuming that such changes become manifest at the population level through effects on reproductive output. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between growth and reproduction in C. tentans and to use these data in a demographic model to predict the growth and size of a theoretical population. Growth was manipulated by varying food supply. The test was initiated with 12 newly hatched larvae per replicate and carried through one complete generation. Larval growth and survival were determined at 20 d, and reproduction was monitored daily during emergence. Food supply did not significantly affect survivorship at any life stage; survival of larvae at 20 d, pupae, and adults exceeded 83%, while survival of larvae in the reproduction replicates exceeded 65%. Both larval and adult dry weight declined significantly with a reduction in food supply. Total emergence was reduced at the lowest feeding level only, whereas the rate of emergence declined at food supplies below 0.42 mg/individual per d. Based on the relationship between larval and adult dry weight, a minimum larval tissue mass of between 0.5 and 0.6 mg dry weight/individual appears to be necessary before emergence can take place. The number of eggs/female declined significantly with a decrease in food supply below 0.42 mg/individual per d. Above this level, the addition of more food had no effect on reproductive output. Fecundity (number of daughters/female) and expected number of progeny declined linearly with reduced food supply. Application of the data in a demographic model showed that the growth and predicted size of a population would decline significantly with a decline in larval growth and reproductive output.

  13. Interlaboratory study of precision: Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans freshwater sediment toxicity assays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, G.A.; Norberg-King, T. J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.; Winger, P.V.; Kubitz, J.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Smith, M.E.; Greer, E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Call, D.J.; Day, K.E.; Kennedy, P.; Stinson, M.

    1996-01-01

    Standard 10-d whole-sediment toxicity test methods have recently been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. An interlaboratory evaluation of method precision was performed using a group of seven to 10 laboratories, representing government, academia, and environmental consulting firms. The test methods followed the EPA protocols for 4-d water-only reference toxicant (KCl) testing (static exposure) and for 10-d whole-sediment testing. Test sediments included control sediment, two copper-containing sediments, and a sediment contaminated primarily with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Reference toxicant tests resulted in H. azteca and C. tentans median lethal concentration (LC50) values with coefficents of variation (CVs) of 15.8 and 19.6%, respectively. Whole sediments which were moderately contaminated provided the best estimates of precision using CVs. Hyalella azteca and C. tentans tests in moderately contaminated sediments exhibited LC50 CVs of 38.9 and 13.5%, respectively. The CV for C. tentans growth was 31.9%. Only 3% (1 of 28) of samples exceeded acceptable interlaboratory precision limits for the H. azteca survival tests. No samples exceeded the intralaboratory precision limit for H. azteca or C. tentans survival tests. However, intralaboratory variability limits for C. tentans growth were exceeded by 80 and 100% of the laboratories for a moderately toxic and control sample, respectively. Interlaboratory variability limits for C. tentans survival were not exceeded by any laboratory. The results showed these test methods to have relatively low variance and acceptable levels of precision in interlaboratory comparisons.

  14. Toxicity of sediment-associated pesticides to Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuping; Weston, Donald P; You, Jing; Rothert, Amanda K; Lydy, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Two hundred sediment samples were collected and their toxicity evaluated to aquatic species in a previous study in the agriculturally dominated Central Valley of California, United States. Pyrethroid insecticides were the main contributors to the observed toxicity. However, mortality in approximately one third of the toxic samples could not be explained solely by the presence of pyrethroids in the matrices. Hundreds of pesticides are currently used in the Central Valley of California, but only a few dozen are analyzed in standard environmental monitoring. A significant amount of unexplained sediment toxicity may be due to pesticides that are in widespread use that but have not been routinely monitored in the environment, and even if some of them were, the concentrations harmful to aquatic organisms are unknown. In this study, toxicity thresholds for nine sediment-associated pesticides including abamectin, diazinon, dicofol, fenpropathrin, indoxacarb, methyl parathion, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin were established for two aquatic species, the midge Chironomus dilutus and the amphipod Hyalella azteca. For midges, the median lethal concentration (LC₅₀) of the pesticides ranged from 0.18 to 964 μg/g organic carbon (OC), with abamectin being the most toxic and propargite being the least toxic pesticide. A sublethal growth endpoint using average individual ash-free dry mass was also measured for the midges. The no-observable effect concentration values for growth ranged from 0.10 to 633 μg/g OC for the nine pesticides. For the amphipods, fenpropathrin was the most toxic, with an LC₅₀ of 1-2 μg/g OC. Abamectin, diazinon, and methyl parathion were all moderately toxic (LC₅₀s 2.8-26 μg/g OC). Dicofol, indoxacarb, oxyfluorfen, propargite, and pyraclostrobin were all relatively nontoxic, with LC₅₀s greater than the highest concentrations tested. The toxicity information collected in the present study will be helpful in decreasing the

  15. Accumulation and chronic toxicity of uranium over different life stages of the aquatic invertebrate Chironomus tentans.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Jorgelina R; Liber, Karsten

    2009-10-01

    Limited data are available on the effects of uranium (U) exposures on benthic macroinvertebrates, something that would be needed before national or provincial water quality guidelines could be developed. The goal of this study was to evaluate chronic U toxicity and accumulation in the aquatic invertebrate Chironomus tentans. Test organisms were exposed to three aqueous U concentrations (40, 200, and 1,000 microg/L) and an untreated control. Larval growth, adult emergence, and U tissue concentrations at different life stages were evaluated. The measured no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) for growth of C. tentans larvae after 10 days of U exposure were 39 and 157 microg/L, respectively. At U concentrations >157 ug/L, there was reduced larval growth of 30% to 40%, which corresponded to reduced adult emergence of 40% to 60%. Despite significant delays in time to adult emergence, there were no significant effects on reproductive output of successfully emerged adults. The F(1) generation C. tentans larvae that were never directly exposed to U, but originated from adult males and females exposed to U during their immature life stages, displayed a significant decrease in 10-day growth that was similar to that observed for the F(0)-exposed larvae. This suggests that the environment of the parental generation can significantly influence the development of the next generation through environmentally induced parental effects. Uranium accumulated in C. tentans immature stages was partially excreted during molting and metamorphosis to the adult stage. However, the elimination of U was not complete and some was still measured in adult midges. Consequently, a minor transfer of U from the aquatic to the terrestrial environment could be expected to occur.

  16. Potential impact of Chironomus plumosus larvae on hypolimnetic oxygen in the central basin of Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.; Edwards, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that burrow-irrigating infauna can increase sediment oxygen demand (SOD) and impact hypolimnetic oxygen in stratified lakes. We conducted laboratory microcosm experiments and computer simulations with larvae of the burrowing benthic midge Chironomus plumosus to quantify burrow oxygen uptake rates and subsequent contribution to sediment oxygen demand in central Lake Erie. Burrow oxygen uptake and water flow velocities through burrows were measured using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, respectively. Burrow oxygen consumption averaged 2.66 × 10− 10 (SE = ± 7.82 × 10− 11) mol O2/burrow/s at 24 °C and 9.64 × 10− 10 (SE = ± 4.86 × 10− 10) mol O2/burrow/s at 15 °C. In sealed microcosm experiments, larvae increased SOD 500% at 24 °C (density = 1508/m2) and 375% at 15 °C (density = 864/m2). To further evaluate effects of densities of C. plumosus burrows on SOD we developed a 3-D transport reaction model of the process. Using experimental data and chironomid abundance data in faunal surveys in 2009 and 2010, we estimated that bioirrigation by a population of 140 larvae/m2 could account for between 2.54 × 10− 11 mol/L/s (model results) and 5.58 × 10− 11 mol/L/s (experimental results) of the average 4.22 × 10− 11 mol/L/s oxygen depletion rate between 1970 and 2003, which could have accounted for 60–132% of the oxygen decline. At present, it appears that the population density of this species may be an important factor in development of hypoxic or anoxic conditions in central Lake Erie.

  17. Sediment organic matter content as a confounding factor in toxicity tests with Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, R.; Watzin, M.C.; McIntosh, A.W.

    1999-02-01

    Physicochemical characteristics of sediment unrelated to contaminant levels and bioavailability may influence the outcome of toxicity tests. In particular, sediment organic matter content has the potential to be a confounding factor in toxicity tests using the midge larva Chironomus tentans because the larvae are infaunal and feed on organic matter in the sediments. To examine the possibility, the authors conducted a series of tests using formulated sediments with varying organic matter contents following the standard US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) 10-day C. tentans growth and survival protocol. Formulated sediments made with peat moss, {alpha}-cellulose, and maple leaves were tested. An organic-rich natural sediment diluted with formulated sediment to achieve a range of organic matter contents was also examined. In a final experiment, sediments containing each of the four organic matter sources at the same concentration were tested against one another. Survival was not greatly affected by concentration of organic matter, except at the lowest concentrations in natural sediment, where survival dipped below 70%. In experiments using peat moss, {alpha}-cellulose, and maple leaves, significant differences in C. tentans growth were found at different organic matter concentrations. In contrast, concentration of organic matter in the natural sediment dilution series had little effect on growth, perhaps because much of this material was highly refractory. In the comparison experiment, growth differed significantly among the four sediments, with best growth achieved with {alpha}-cellulose and leaves. These results suggest that both organic matter quantity and quality can be confounding factors in toxicity tests using C. tentans.

  18. Sediment properties influencing the bioavailability of uranium to Chironomus dilutus larvae in spiked field sediments.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah E; Liber, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    The partitioning of metals between dissolved and solid phases directly affects metal bioavailability to benthic invertebrates and is influenced by metal-binding properties of sediment phases. Little research has been done examining the effects of sediment properties on the bioavailability of uranium (U) to freshwater benthic invertebrates. In the present study, 18 field sediments with a wide range of properties (total organic carbon, fine fraction, cation exchange capacity, and iron content) were amended with the same concentrations of U to characterize the effects of these sediment properties on U bioavailability to freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus. Bioaccumulation of U by C. dilutus larvae varied by over an order of magnitude when exposed to sediments spiked with 50 mg U kg(-1) d.w. (5-69 mg U kg(-1) d.w.) and 500 mg U kg(-1) d.w. (20-452 mg U kg(-1) d.w.), depending on the type of sediment. Variance in U bioaccumulation was best explained by differences in the cation exchange capacity, fine fraction (≤50 μm particle size), and Fe content of U-spiked sediment, with generated regression equations predicting observed bioaccumulation within a factor of two. The presented regression equations offer an easy-to-apply method for accounting for the influence of sediment properties on U bioavailability in freshwater sediment, with fine fraction being the single most practical variable. This research strongly supports that risk assessments and guidelines for U-contaminated sediments should not ignore the influence of sediment properties that can result in substantial differences in the bioaccumulation of U in benthic invertebrates.

  19. Transcriptome Profiling of Chironomus kiinensis under Phenol Stress Using Solexa Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chuanwang; Wang, Zhiying; Niu, Changying; Desneux, Nicolas; Gao, Xiwu

    2013-01-01

    Phenol is a major pollutant in aquatic ecosystems due to its chemical stability, water solubility and environmental mobility. To date, little is known about the molecular modifications of invertebrates under phenol stress. In the present study, we used Solexa sequencing technology to investigate the transcriptome and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of midges (Chironomus kiinensis) in response to phenol stress. A total of 51,518,972 and 51,150,832 clean reads in the phenol-treated and control libraries, respectively, were obtained and assembled into 51,014 non-redundant (Nr) consensus sequences. A total of 6,032 unigenes were classified by Gene Ontology (GO), and 18,366 unigenes were categorized into 238 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) categories. These genes included representatives from almost all functional categories. A total of 10,724 differentially expressed genes (P value <0.05) were detected in a comparative analysis of the expression profiles between phenol-treated and control C. kiinensis including 8,390 upregulated and 2,334 downregulated genes. The expression levels of 20 differentially expressed genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR, and the trends in gene expression that were observed matched the Solexa expression profiles, although the magnitude of the variations was different. Through pathway enrichment analysis, significantly enriched pathways were identified for the DEGs, including metabolic pathways, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pancreatic secretion and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction pathways, which may be associated with the phenol responses of C. kiinensis. Using Solexa sequencing technology, we identified several groups of key candidate genes as well as important biological pathways involved in the molecular modifications of chironomids under phenol stress. PMID:23527048

  20. Influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Monson, P.D.; West, C.W.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-04-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criteria establish permissible levels of ammonia in the nation`s fresh waters. These criteria are based on accumulated research suggesting that, for most aquatic species (primarily fishes), the toxicity of un-ionized ammonia predominates over that of the ammonium ion. The development of a sediment-quality criterion for ammonia requires evaluation of the relative toxicity of the two ammonia forms to benthic and epibenthic macroinvertebrates to determine whether the water-quality toxicity model can be applied to sediments. Flow-through ammonia toxicity tests were conducted over 10 d with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and the larval midge Chironomus tentans at four pH values (6.3, 7.2, 7.8, and 8.6) using a unique pH control system. Total ammonia was more toxic at elevated than at low pH to both species, suggesting that un-ionized ammonia (more prevalent at high pH) is important in determining the toxicity of ammonia to these two species. Hardness or alkalinity differences in the range of 30 to 200 mg/kg (as CaCO{sub 3}) did not appear to affect the toxicity of ammonia to the two species in separate 4-d tests. Based on results of the 10-d tests, the joint toxicity/pH model that establishes the water-quality criterion value for ammonia appears to be sufficiently protective of L. variegatus and C. tentans, by factors of at least 3 and 10, respectively. However, this study did not address potential differences in exposure of benthic organisms to ammonia in sediments vs. that in the water column; nor were the chronic effects of ammonia on these species measured in this study.

  1. Complex telomere-associated repeat units in members of the genus Chironomus evolve from sequences similar to simple telomeric repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, L; Edström, J E

    1993-01-01

    The dipteran Chironomus tentans has complex tandemly repeated 350-bp DNA sequences at or near the chromosome ends. As in Drosophila melanogaster, short simple repeats with cytosines and guanines in different strands have never been observed. We were therefore interested in learning whether the Chironomus repeats could have evolved from simple sequence telomeric DNA, which might suggest that they constitute a functional equivalent. We screened for repeat units with evolutionarily ancient features within the tandem arrays and recovered two clones with a less-evolved structure. Sequence analysis reveals that the present-day 350-bp unit probably evolved from a simpler 165-bp unit through the acquisition of transposed sequences. The 165-bp unit contains DNA with a highly biased distribution of cytosine and guanine between the two strands, although with the ratios inverted in two minor parts of the repeat. It is largely built up of short degenerate subrepeats for which most of the sequence can be reconstructed. The consensus for the subrepeat sequence is similar to the simple telomeric repeat sequences of several kinds of eukaryotes. We propose that the present-day unit has evolved from telomeric, simple sequence, asymmetric DNA from which it has retained some original sequence features and possibly functions. Images PMID:8441399

  2. Complex telomere-associated repeat units in members of the genus Chironomus evolve from sequences similar to simple telomeric repeats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, L; Edström, J E

    1993-03-01

    The dipteran Chironomus tentans has complex tandemly repeated 350-bp DNA sequences at or near the chromosome ends. As in Drosophila melanogaster, short simple repeats with cytosines and guanines in different strands have never been observed. We were therefore interested in learning whether the Chironomus repeats could have evolved from simple sequence telomeric DNA, which might suggest that they constitute a functional equivalent. We screened for repeat units with evolutionarily ancient features within the tandem arrays and recovered two clones with a less-evolved structure. Sequence analysis reveals that the present-day 350-bp unit probably evolved from a simpler 165-bp unit through the acquisition of transposed sequences. The 165-bp unit contains DNA with a highly biased distribution of cytosine and guanine between the two strands, although with the ratios inverted in two minor parts of the repeat. It is largely built up of short degenerate subrepeats for which most of the sequence can be reconstructed. The consensus for the subrepeat sequence is similar to the simple telomeric repeat sequences of several kinds of eukaryotes. We propose that the present-day unit has evolved from telomeric, simple sequence, asymmetric DNA from which it has retained some original sequence features and possibly functions.

  3. [Response of Sediment Micro Environment and Micro Interface to Physical Disturbance Intensity Under the Disturbance of Chironomus plumosus].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-dan; Li, Yong; Li, Da-peng; Wang, Ren; Deng, Meng; Huang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The response of sediment micro environment and micro intertace to physical disturbance intensity under the physical and Chironomus plumosus disturbance was investigated by means of sediment Rhizon samplers and Unisense micro sensor system. The sediment and overlying water were taken from Meiliang bay of Taihu Lake. The results showed that the OPD reached up to 12.1 mm under the high intensity (240 r · min(-1)), while it was higher than 3. 8. mm under low intensity (60 r · min(-1)). The TOE, the difference of TOE and DOE, OPD, ORP and the difference of DO spatial distribution were all positively correlated with the physical disturbance intensity. The increasing magnitude and range of pH as well as the decreasing magnitude and range of ferrous followed the same response tendency. Within the 0-6 cm sediment, the water content and porosity as well as the microbial activity at the same depth increased with the increase of physical disturbance intensity. In addition, the degree of response of the above parameters to the physical disturbance intensity was weakened with the increase of sediment depth. It was suggested that Chironomus plumosus dug more and deeper galleries under high intensity physical disturbance. Therefore, the sediment micro environment and micro interface were transformed in the vertical direction of the sediment. PMID:26314108

  4. [Identification of Ca2+ release channels in salivary glands secretory cells of Chironomus plumosus L].

    PubMed

    Man'ko, V V; Bychkova, S V; Klevets', M Iu

    2004-01-01

    The presence of two types of well-characterised Ca2+ release channels, namely IP3-receptors (Ins(1,4,5)P3Rs) and ryanodine-receptors (RyRs), was detected in the salivary glands secretory cells of Chironomus plumosus L. For this aim different blockators and activators of these Ca2+ -transport systems were used. The conditions for permeabilization of these cells by saponine were experimentally chosen for their more intensive action. It was shown that IP3 decreased calcium content in saponine-treated gland tissue by (41.14 +/- 11.75)%. The effect of IP3 was not observed under condition of heparin and eosin Y presence in the incubation medium, but heparin alone did not cause any action on calcium content in saponine-treated gland tissue. The observed effects of IP3 are supposed to be the evidences of Ins (1,4,5)P3Rs presence in the intracellular membrane of this object. It was also shown that calcium content in intact gland tissue increased by (67.12 +/- 22.60)% in presence of heparin (500 mkg/ml) in the incubation medium. This effect of heparin was also observed with presence of verapamil (100 mkM) and eosin Y (5, 20 mkM) in incubation medium. So, this effect is not connected with function of voltage-gated Ca2+ -channels and Ca2+ -pumps. Ryanodine in concentration of 5nM decreased calcium content in saponine-treated gland tissue by (35.18 +/- 3.87)% but it caused the increase of calcium content at high concentration (500 nM) by (40.72 +/- 12.52)%. It improved the presence of RyRs in intracellular membrane of secretory cells of this object. Besides, these channels, perhaps, belong to "non-sensitive" to caffeine, because caffeine did not affect calcium content in the gland tissue neither in presence nor with absence of eosin Y. PMID:15909419

  5. [Chromosomal variation in Chironomus plumosus L. (Diptera, Chironomidae) from populations of Bryansk region, Saratov region (Russia), and Gomel region (Belarus)].

    PubMed

    Belyanina, S I

    2015-02-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on samples of Chironomus plumosus L. (Diptera, Chironomidae) taken from waterbodies of various types in Bryansk region (Russia) and Gomel region (Belarus). Karyotypes of specimens taken from stream pools of the Volga were used as reference samples. The populations of Bryansk and Gomel regions (except for a population of Lake Strativa in Starodubskii district, Bryansk region) exhibit broad structural variation, including somatic mosaicism for morphotypes of the salivary gland chromosome set, decondensation of telomeric sites, and the presence of small structural changes, as opposed to populations of Saratov region. As compared with Saratov and Bryansk regions, the Balbiani ring in the B-arm of chromosome I is repressed in populations of Gomel region. It is concluded that the chromosome set of Ch. plumosus in a range of waterbodies of Bryansk and Gomel regions is unstable.

  6. Examining the joint toxicity of chlorpyrifos and atrazine in the aquatic species: Lepomis macrochirus, Pimephales promelas and Chironomus tentans.

    PubMed

    Tyler Mehler, W; Schuler, Lance J; Lydy, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The joint toxicity of chlorpyrifos and atrazine was compared to that of chlorpyrifos alone to discern any greater than additive response using both acute toxicity testing and whole-body residue analysis. In addition, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and biotransformation were investigated to evaluate the toxic mode of action of chlorpyrifos in the presence of atrazine. The joint toxicity of atrazine and chlorpyrifos exhibited no significant difference in Lepomis macrochirus compared to chlorpyrifos alone; while studies performed with Pimephales promelas and Chironomus tentans, did show significant differences. AChE activity and biotransformation showed no significant differences between the joint toxicity of atrazine and chlorpyrifos and that of chlorpyrifos alone. From the data collected, the combination of atrazine and chlorpyrifos pose little additional risk than that of chlorpyrifos alone to the tested fish species.

  7. An inducible HSP70 gene from the midge Chironomus dilutus: Characterization and transcription profile under environmental stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Rao, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and characterized an inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from the midge Chironomus dilutus and investigated the transcriptional profile of the gene under baseline and environmentally stressful conditions. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we observed increased expression of CD-HSP70-1 in response to both heat shock and copper stress. We also investigated the expression of this gene during midge development. All C. dilutus developmental stages expressed CD-HSP70-1 under normal conditions, although at extremely low levels. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequence demonstrated distinct clustering of this gene with inducible HSP70s from other insect species. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  8. Evaluation of mentum deformities of Chironomus spp. (Chironomidae: Diptera) larvae using modified toxic score index (MTSI) to assess the environmental stress in Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shami, Salman Abdo; Salmah, Mad Rawi Che; Hassan, Ahmad Abu; Azizah, Mohd Nor Siti

    2011-06-01

    Morphological mentum deformities which represent sublethal effect of exposure to different types of pollutants were evaluated in Chironomus spp. larvae inhabiting three polluted rivers of Juru River Basin in northwestern peninsular Malaysia. Using mentum deformity incidences, the modified toxic score index (MTSI) was developed based on Lenat's toxic score index (TSI). The suggested MTSI was compared with TSI in terms of its effectiveness to identify different pollutants including heavy metals. The MTSI showed stronger relationship to total deformity incidence expressed as percentage. Additionally, the multivariate RDA model showed higher capability of MTSI to explain the variations in heavy metal contents of the river sediments. The MTSI was recommended in bioassessment of water and sediment quality using the mentum deformities of Chironomus spp. larvae from aquatic ecosystems receiving anthropogenic, agricultural, or industrial discharges. PMID:20697808

  9. Evaluation of mentum deformities of Chironomus spp. (Chironomidae: Diptera) larvae using modified toxic score index (MTSI) to assess the environmental stress in Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shami, Salman Abdo; Salmah, Mad Rawi Che; Hassan, Ahmad Abu; Azizah, Mohd Nor Siti

    2011-06-01

    Morphological mentum deformities which represent sublethal effect of exposure to different types of pollutants were evaluated in Chironomus spp. larvae inhabiting three polluted rivers of Juru River Basin in northwestern peninsular Malaysia. Using mentum deformity incidences, the modified toxic score index (MTSI) was developed based on Lenat's toxic score index (TSI). The suggested MTSI was compared with TSI in terms of its effectiveness to identify different pollutants including heavy metals. The MTSI showed stronger relationship to total deformity incidence expressed as percentage. Additionally, the multivariate RDA model showed higher capability of MTSI to explain the variations in heavy metal contents of the river sediments. The MTSI was recommended in bioassessment of water and sediment quality using the mentum deformities of Chironomus spp. larvae from aquatic ecosystems receiving anthropogenic, agricultural, or industrial discharges.

  10. Karyotype characteristics and polymorphism peculiarities of Chironomus bernensis Wülker & Klötzli, 1973 (Diptera, Chironomidae) from the Central Caucasus and Ciscaucasia

    PubMed Central

    Karmokov, Mukhamed Kh.; Polukonova, Natalia V.; Sinichkina, Olga V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data about the karyotype characteristics, features of chromosomal polymorphism and larval morphology of populations of Chironomus bernensis Wülker & Klötzli, 1973 (Diptera, Chironomidae) from the Central Caucasus (the northern macroslope) and Ciscaucasia are presented. The characteristics of the pericentromeric regions of the long chromosomes of this species from Caucasian populations were very similar to the ones from some European populations (from Poland and Italy), but differed from Swiss and Siberian populations. In the North Caucasian populations 10 banding sequences were found: two in arms A, C, and E, and one in arms B, D, F, and G. Nine of them were already known for this species, and one, berC2, is described for the first time. Cytogenetic distances between all the studied populations of Chironomus bernensis show that close geographical location of all studied populations from the Central Caucasus and Ciscaucasia is reflected in their similar cytogenetic structure, but on the other hand, that they are more closely related to populations from Europe than to populations from Western Siberia. At the same time, all studied larvae from Caucasian populations have a four-bladed premandible, instead of a two-bladed one, as in the description of Chironomus bernensis from Switzerland (Wülker and Klötzli 1973, Polukonova 2005c). These peculiarities may indicate the relative isolation of the Caucasus from the viewpoint of microevolution. Further research on karyological and morphological characteristics of Chironomus bernensis from geographically distant regions is necessary as there is a possibility that the presently known species is actually polytypic and consists of several sibling species. PMID:26312128

  11. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of a mixture of heavy metals in Chironomus tentans (Diptera: Chironomidae) in synthetic sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrahy, E.A.; Clements, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    This research investigated toxicity and bioaccumulation of a mixture of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in Chironomus tentans in synthetic sediment, and compared predicted to measured steady-state bioaccumulation factors (BAFs). In a toxicity test, C. tentans were exposed to various dilutions of a base concentration (1.0 X) of a mixture of the four metals (5 {micro}g/g Cd. 10 {micro}g/g Cu. 70 {micro}g/g Pb, and 300 {micro}g/g Zn) in synthetic sediment. Mortality ranged from 17 to 100%. To measure bioaccumulation of the metals, C. tentans were exposed to 0.35 X the base concentration for a period of up to 14 d in two uptake tests. Bioaccumulation of all four metals increased over the 14-d uptake phases. Concentrations of metals in chironomids were significantly correlated with exposure time in the uptake phases. Only concentrations of copper approached background levels after 7 d depuration. Uptake rate coefficients and elimination rate constants were determined for each metal. Bioaccumulation factors were highest for Cd and lowest for Pb. With the exception of Pb, steady-state BAFs were within a factor of about two of those calculated using the first-order kinetic model. The high BAFs calculated may indicate greater bioavailability in synthetic sediment. Studies comparing toxicity and bioaccumulation of natural and synthetic sediments are necessary before the use of synthetic sediments is widely adopted.

  12. Potential use of acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and metallothionein for assessment of contaminated sediment in tropical chironomid, Chironomus javanus.

    PubMed

    Somparn, A; Iwai, C B; Noller, B

    2015-11-01

    Heavy metals and organophosphorus insecticide is known to act as disruptors for the enzyme system, leading to physiologic disorders. The present study was conducted to investigate the potential use of these enzymes as biomarkers in assessment of contaminated sediments on tropical chironomid species. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and metallothionein (MT) activity was measured in the fourth-instar chironomid larvae, Chironomus javanus, Kieffer, after either 48-hr or 96-hr exposure to organophosphorus insecticide, chlorpyrifos (0.01- 0.25 mg kg(-1)) or heavy metal cadmium (0.1-25 mg kg(-1)). Exposure to chlorpyrifos (0.01 mg kg(-1)) at 48 and 96 hr significantly of AChE activity (64.2%-85.9%) and induced GST activity (33.9-63.8%) when compared with control (P < 0.05). Moreover, exposure to cadmium (0.1 mg kg(-1)) at 48 and 96 hr also showed significant increas GST activity (11.7-40%) and MT level (9.0%-70.5%) when compared with control (P < 0.05). The results indicated the impact of enzyme activity on chlorpyrifos and cadmium contamination. Activity of AChE, GST and MT could serve as potential biomarkers for assessment and biomonitoring the effects of insecticide and heavy metal contamination in tropical aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26688973

  13. Suitability of morphological parameters for instar determination of pestiferous midges Chironomus crassicaudatus and Glyptotendipes paripes (Diptera: Chironomidae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Frouz, Jan; Ali, Arshad; Lobinske, Richard J

    2002-09-01

    The midges Chironomus crassicaudatus and Glyptotendipes paripes were reared in the laboratory on artificial food under constant temperature (30 degrees C) and a 14:10 h light: dark photoperiod for 31 days, from eggs laid by field-collected females. Sequential samples of developing immature stages were taken and measured. Eggs were on average 254 microm long and 102 microm wide at the widest point for C. crassicaudatus and 286 microm long and 113 microm wide at the widest point for G. paripes. Mean larval lengths ranged from 0.9 mm after hatching to 16.3 mm before pupation in C. crassicaudatus and from 0.8 mm after hatching to 9.7 mm before pupation in G. paripes. Mean length of pupae was 8.7 mm and 8.3 mm in C. crassicaudatus and G. paripes, respectively. Four morphometric head parameters (length, width, mentum width, and cephalolabial length) were tested for differentiation of larval instars. All parameters revealed 4 larval instars in both species, with head capsule width apparently the most sensitive indicator for instar differentiation. The cephalolabial length was the most sensitive indicator of sex differentiation in last instar. All investigated morphological parameters of head capsule of both species followed Dyar's law. PMID:12322946

  14. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.W.; Ankley, G.T.; Elonen, G.E.; Phipps, G.W.; Fernandez, J.D.; Libal, J.J.; Nessa, D.

    1994-12-31

    Invertebrate exposure to 2,3,7,8-TCDD is important, not necessarily because of their sensitivity (which appears to be less than that of fish) , but as a vector from chemical reservoirs in sediments, through the food chain, to sensitive species. Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus are not only vectors for TCDD to fish species, but C. tentans may also be a direct vector to avian species which feed upon emergent insects. For this reason determination of the kinetics of TCDD uptake by invertebrates is important, especially for those with short life spans such as midges, or those that reproduce as rapidly as oligochaetes. In these experiments, these two species were fed contaminated food at three different TCDD levels spanning three orders of magnitude. Tissue residue levels were measured over a time period which included several different life stages and points in the reproductive cycle of the two species and uptake and deputation rates determined. As expected, no significant impacts of TCDD on growth, reproduction or biomass of the invertebrates were observed. From this information predictions can be made on bioaccumulation of TCDD from differing levels of contamination, and potential food chain transfer of the compound to more sensitive species.

  15. Effects of phenol on metabolic activities and transcription profiles of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Chironomus kiinensis larvae.

    PubMed

    Cao, C W; Sun, L L; Niu, F; Liu, P; Chu, D; Wang, Z Y

    2016-02-01

    Phenol, also known as carbolic acid or phenic acid, is a priority pollutant in aquatic ecosystems. The present study has investigated metabolic activities and transcription profiles of cytochrome P450 enzymes in Chironomus kiinensis under phenol stress. Exposure of C. kiinensis larvae to three sublethal doses of phenol (1, 10 and 100 µM) inhibited cytochrome P450 enzyme activity during the 96 h exposure period. The P450 activity measured after the 24 h exposure to phenol stress could be used to assess the level (low or high) of phenol contamination in the environment. To investigate the potential of cytochrome P450 genes as molecular biomarkers to monitor phenol contamination, the cDNA of ten CYP6 genes from the transcriptome of C. kiinensis were identified and sequenced. The open reading frames of the CYP6 genes ranged from 1266 to 1587 bp, encoding deduced polypeptides composed of between 421 and 528 amino acids, with predicted molecular masses from 49.01 to 61.94 kDa and isoelectric points (PI) from 6.01 to 8.89. Among the CYP6 genes, the mRNA expression levels of the CYP6EW3, CYP6EV9, CYP6FV1 and CYP6FV2 genes significantly altered in response to phenol exposure; therefore, these genes could potentially serve as biomarkers in the environment. This study shows that P450 activity combined with one or multiple CYP6 genes could be used to monitor phenol pollution.

  16. Chironomus plumosus larvae increase fluxes of denitrification products and diversity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in freshwater sediment.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Morten; Kofoed, Michael V W; Larsen, Lone H; Schramm, Andreas; Stief, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Benthic invertebrates affect microbial processes and communities in freshwater sediment by enhancing sediment-water solute fluxes and by grazing on bacteria. Using microcosms, the effects of larvae of the widespread midge Chironomus plumosus on the efflux of denitrification products (N2O and N2+N2O) and the diversity and abundance of nitrate- and nitrous-oxide-reducing bacteria were investigated. Additionally, the diversity of actively nitrate- and nitrous-oxide-reducing bacteria was analyzed in the larval gut. The presence of larvae increased the total effluxes of N2O and N2+N2O up to 8.6- and 4.2-fold, respectively, which was mostly due to stimulation of sedimentary denitrification; incomplete denitrification in the guts accounted for up to 20% of the N2O efflux. Phylotype richness of the nitrate reductase gene narG was significantly higher in sediment with than without larvae. In the gut, 47 narG phylotypes were found expressed, which may contribute to higher phylotype richness in colonized sediment. In contrast, phylotype richness of the nitrous oxide reductase gene nosZ was unaffected by the presence of larvae and very few nosZ phylotypes were expressed in the gut. Gene abundance of neither narG, nor nosZ was different in sediments with and without larvae. Hence, C. plumosus increases activity and diversity, but not overall abundance of nitrate-reducing bacteria, probably by providing additional ecological niches in its burrow and gut.

  17. Effects of TFM and Bayer 73 on in vivo oxygen consumption of the aquatic midge Chironomus tentans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kawatski, J.A.; Dawson, V.K.; Reuvers, J.L.

    1974-01-01

    Exposure of fourth instar larvae of Chironomus tentans to 2.0-8.0 mg/liter of TFM (3-trifluormethyl-4-nitrophenol) for 6 hr at 22 A? 0.5 C in soft water resulted in a significantly increased rate of larval oxygen consumption compared to that of control larvae, as measured with the Warburg respirometer. Maximum stimulation of oxygen consumption occurred with 8.0 mg/liter of TFM, and 1.0 mg/liter of TFM had no measurable effect on basal respiration. When hardness of exposure water was progressively increased, the effect of TFM on oxygen consumption was diminished. Bayer 73 (5,2'-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide) stimulated oxygen consumption at 0.75 and 1.0 mg/liter, had no significant effect at concentrations less that 0.75 mg/liter, and inhibited oxygen consumption at concentrations of 1.20 mg/liter or greater. Mixtures of TFM and Bayer 73, in the ratio of 98:2, had no greater effect on oxygen consumption than TFM alone.

  18. Dynamic properties of monomeric insect erythrocruorin III from Chironomus thummi-thummi: relationships between structural flexibility and functional complexity.

    PubMed Central

    Di Iorio, E E; Tavernelli, I; Yu, W

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of geminate carbon monoxide binding to the monomeric component III of Chironomus thummi-thummi erythrocruorin, a protein that undergoes pH-induced conformational changes linked to a pronounced Bohr effect. Measurements were performed from cryogenic temperatures to room temperature in 75% glycerol and either 0.1 M potassium phosphate (pH 7) or 0.1 potassium borate (pH 9) after nanosecond laser photolysis. The distributions of the low temperature activation enthalpy g(H) for geminate ligand binding derived from the kinetic traces are quite narrow and are influenced by temperature both below and above approximately 170 K, the glass transition temperature. The thermal evolution of the CO binding kinetics between approximately 50 K and approximately 170 K indicates the presence of some degree of structural relaxation, even in this temperature range. Above approximately 220 K the width of the g(H) progressively decreases, and at 280 K geminate CO binding becomes exponential in time. Based on a comparison with analogous investigations of the homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis, we propose a link between dynamic properties and functional complexity. PMID:9370468

  19. Role of ingestion route in the perfluoroalkyl substance bioaccumulation by Chironomus plumosus larvae in sediments amended with carbonaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yawei; Xia, Xinghui; Zhao, Xiuli; Dong, Haiyang; Zhu, Baotong; Xia, Na; Dong, Jianwei

    2016-01-25

    The role of ingestion route in the bioaccumulation of six types of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) by Chironomus plumosus larvae in sediments amended with four types of carbonaceous materials (CMs) was studied. The results showed that the body burden of PFASs decreased in the presence of CMs at mass ratios of 0.2-2%, regardless of ingestion. PFASs accumulated by the larvae with ingestion exposure were higher than those without ingestion, and the role of ingestion route was altered in the presence of CMs. The contribution of ingestion route to PFAS bioaccumulation was 2.7-31.6% without CMs, and it increased to more than 61.4% in the presence of fullerene at mass ratios of 0.2-2%. The enhancement of the ingestion route contribution caused by CMs is due to the fact that the CMs can be ingested and CM-associated PFASs can be partly desorbed in larvae. The maximum desorption efficiency of perfluorooctanoic acid was 20.8% from fullerene by the larval digestive juice. This study suggests that CM-associated PFASs could be accumulated partly by organisms, and the ecological risk of PFASs might increase in some cases with the presence of CMs. This should be considered when applying CMs in PFAS and other hydrophobic organic compound pollution remediation. PMID:26489915

  20. Effects of anti-C23 (nucleolin) antibody on transcription of ribosomal DNA in Chironomus salivary gland cells

    SciTech Connect

    Egyhazi, E.; Pigon, A. ); Chang, Jinhong; Ghaffari, S.H.; Dreesen, T.D.; Wellman, S.E.; Case, S.T.; Olson, M.O.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Protein C23 (also called nucleolin or 100-kDa nucleolar protein) is a major nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in ribosome biogenesis. To determine the effects of protein C23 on preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) synthesis anti-C23 antiserum was microinjected into nuclei of Chironomus tentans salivary glands. Transcription was measured by incubation of the glands with {sup 32}P-labeled RNA precursors followed by microdissection of nucleoli, RNA extraction, and electrophoretic analyses. Injection of the anti-C23 antibody caused a 2- to 3.5-fold stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation into 38 S pre-rRNA. No stimulation was observed in salivary glands injected with preimmune serum or antiserum preabsorbed with protein C23. The stimulatory effect was selective for pre-rRNA as indicated by the lack of stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation into extranucleolar RNA. Injection of the antiserum produced little or no effect on pre-RNA processing as measured by the relative amounts of {sup 32}P-labeled intermediate cleavage products of pre-rRNA in stimulated versus control glands. These results suggest that protein C23 not only is involved in ribosome assembly but also plays a role in regulating the transcription of the preribosomal RNA.

  1. Rapid Recovery of Chironomidae (Diptera) in Little Mill Creek (Kansas, U.S.A.) After the Decommissioning of a Waste Water Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. W.; Ferrington, L. C.

    2005-05-01

    In June 1995 the Lenexa Waste Water Treatment Plant was decommissioned, providing an opportunity to study recovery of Chironomidae community structure in Little Mill Creek. Using pupal exuviae, weekly changes in the species richness and composition of Chironomidae emerging upstream and downstream of the effluent outfall was evaluated from two weeks before decommissioning to eight weeks post-decommissioning. Chironomidae emergence was clearly different between upstream and downstream sites both before and shortly after effluent input ceased. Before decommissioning, sites immediately downstream of the effluent had low species richness and were dominated by Chironomus riparius (Meigen) and other tolerant taxa, with some recovery at sites farther downstream. Two weeks after decommissioning, only sites immediately downstream of the former effluent were clearly impacted, but effects were reduced compared to pre-recovery collections. At five weeks post-decommissioning, species richness was only slightly lower at the sites immediately downstream of the former effluent and the composition of common species (i.e., >5% of relative abundance) was similar between upstream and downstream sites. Rapid recovery of chironomid emergence below the sewage effluent likely resulted from both colonization of drifting larvae from upstream sources and adult dispersal and oviposition, indicating rapid responses in emergence as water quality conditions improved.

  2. Chronic toxicity of zinc-spiked sediments; Evaluation of the acid volatile sulfide (AVS) model using Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, P.K.; Ankley, G.T.; Cotter, A.M.; Leonard, E.N.

    1995-12-31

    Most research supporting AVS as a normalization phase for predicting the bioavailability of cationic metals from sediments is based on short-term laboratory exposures. Evidence supporting the theory with respect to chronic exposures is lacking. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate whether the AVS model could predict toxicity to Chironomus tentans in a life cycle exposure to zinc-spiked sediments. Clean sediment was spiked with Zn to obtain nominal treatments ranging from {minus}2.35 to 58.5 {micro}g/g dw with respect to the molar difference between simultaneously extracted metal and AVS. The test was initiated with newly hatched larvae and carried through one complete generation (56 d) during which survival, growth, emergence, and reproduction were monitored. When SEM-AVS was < 0, the concentration of Zn in the pore water was low and no adverse effects were observed for any of the endpoints. Conversely, when SEM-AVS exceeded 0, a dose-dependent increase in the relative concentration of pore water Zn was observed. However, the absolute concentration of pore water Zn at each treatment declined with time, corresponding to an increase in AVS and to loss of Zn due to diffusion into the overlying water (renewed twice daily). Only when SEM-AVS exceeded approximately 6.5 were significant reductions in survival, growth, emergence, and reproductive output observed. In general, the chemical and biological data of this study agree with observations made in short-term exposures and thus support the use of AVS as a normalization phase for predicting the potential for toxicity in metal-contaminated sediments.

  3. Bioconcentration of perfluoroalkyl substances by Chironomus plumosus larvae in water with different types of dissolved organic matters.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wu; Xia, Xinghui; Chen, Xi; Wang, Haotian; Zhu, Baotong; Li, Husheng; Li, Yang

    2016-06-01

    The effects of four types of dissolved organic matters (DOM) on the bioconcentration of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in Chironomus plumosus larvae have been studied. The PFASs included perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnA), and perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA). The DOM included humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), tannic acid (TA), and a protein, peptone (PEP), and their concentrations ranged from 0 to 50 mg L(-1). The results showed that, upon bioconcentration equilibrium, the body burdens of longer perfluoroalkyl chain PFASs (PFOS, PFDA, PFUnA and PFDoA) decreased with PEP and HA concentrations while increased with FA and TA concentrations. When FA and TA concentrations increased from 0 to 50 mg L(-1), body burdens of these PFASs increased by 7.5%-148.8% and 5.7%-37.1%, respectively. However, the DOM had no significant impact on the body burdens of shorter perfluoroalkyl chain PFASs (PFOA and PFNA). All of the four types of DOM lowered not only the uptake rate constants (ku) of PFASs due to the decrease of freely dissolved PFAS concentrations, but also the elimination rate constants (ke) due to the inhibition effect of DOM on the PFAS elimination from the larvae. The reduction in the two constants varied with both DOM and PFAS types. In the presence of PEP and HA with larger molecular weights, the ku values decreased more than ke, leading to the decreased body burdens of longer perfluoroalkyl chain PFASs. As for FA and TA with smaller molecular weights, the ke values decreased more than ku, resulting in increased body burdens of longer perfluoroalkyl chain PFASs. This study suggests that the effects of DOM on PFAS bioconcentration depend not only on the concentration but also on the molecule weight of DOM, which should be considered in the bioavailability assessment of PFASs. PMID:26925752

  4. Chironomus tentans life-cycle test: Design and evaluation for use in assessing toxicity of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Sibley, P.K.; Ankley, G.T.; Juenemann, J.L.

    1997-06-01

    The development and standardization of toxicity test methods for assessing toxicity of contaminated freshwater sediments has focused predominantly on short-term exposures and lethality. In many situations, however, toxicity is more likely to become manifest over long periods of time so there is need for standardized testing procedures by which sublethal sediment toxicity can be adequately assessed. In this study, the authors present and evaluate a new life cycle test, using the midge Chironomus tentans, which enables the assessment of sublethal toxicity of contaminated sediments. The test is initiated with newly hatched larvae and uses four effects-based endpoints to assess toxicity: survival, growth, emergence, and reproduction. Survival is determined at 20 d and at the end of the test by back-calculating through emergence data. Growth can be determined at 20 d, which corresponds to the 10-d endpoint in the 10-d C. tentans growth test initiated with 10-d-old larvae. From day 23 to the end of the test, emergence and reproduction are monitored daily. The number of eggs per female is determined for each egg mass, which is then incubated for 6 d to determine hatching success. Each treatment in the life cycle test is terminated separately after 7 consecutive days without emergence. The authors evaluated the life cycle test by following one generation of C. tentans in sediments collected from the upper Mississippi River. Survival of larvae exceeded 90% at 20 d. Of these larvae, between 60 and 70% successfully emerged; survivorship among pupae and adults exceeded 85%. Mean egg production ranged from 906 to 1,107 eggs per female. The test required 65 d to complete, including pretest preparation. These data show that the C. tentans life cycle test can be used to assess sublethal toxicity accurately in contaminated sediments and provides a suitable compliment to the standard C. tentans 10-d test.

  5. Effects of acid-volatile sulfide on metal bioavailability and toxicity to midge (Chironomus tentans) larvae in black shale sediments.

    PubMed

    Ogendi, George M; Brumbaugh, William G; Hannigan, Robyn E; Farris, Jerry L

    2007-02-01

    Metal bioavailability and toxicity to aquatic organisms are greatly affected by variables such as pH, hardness, organic matter, and sediment acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). Sediment AVS, which reduces metal bioavailability and toxicity by binding and immobilizing metals as insoluble sulfides, has been studied intensely in recent years. Few studies, however, have determined the spatial variability of AVS and its interaction with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments containing elevated concentrations of metals resulting from natural geochemical processes, such as weathering of black shales. We collected four sediment samples from each of four headwater bedrock streams in northcentral Arkansa (USA; three black shale-draining streams and one limestone-draining stream). We conducted 10-d acute whole-sediment toxicity tests using the midge Chironomus tentans and performed analyses for AVS, total metals, SEMs, and organic carbon. Most of the sediments from shale-draining streams had similar total metal and SEM concentrations but considerable differences in organic carbon and AVS. Zinc was the leading contributor to the SEM molar sum, averaging between 68 and 74%, whereas lead and cadmium contributed less than 3%. The AVS concentration was very low in all but two samples from one of the shale streams, and the sum of the SEM concentrations was in molar excess of AVS for all shale stream sediments. No significant differences in mean AVS concentrations between sediments collected from shale-draining or limestone-draining sites were noted (p > 0.05). Midge survival and growth in black shale-derived sediments were significantly less (p < 0.001) than that of limestone-derived sediments. On the whole, either SEM alone or SEM-AVS explained the total variation in midge survival and growth about equally well. However, survival and growth were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the two sediment samples that contained measurable AVS compared with the two sediments from the

  6. Joint toxicity of sediment-associated permethrin and cadmium to Chironomus dilutus: The role of bioavailability and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Li, Huizhen; You, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides and metals commonly co-occurred in sediment and caused toxicity to benthic organisms jointly. To improve accuracy in assessing risk of the sediments contaminated by insecticides and metals, it is of great importance to understand interaction between the contaminants and reasons for the interaction. In the current study, permethrin and cadmium were chosen as representative contaminants to study joint toxicity of pyrethroids and metals to a benthic invertebrate Chironomus dilutus. A median effect/combination index-isobologram was applied to evaluate the interaction between sediment-bound permethrin and cadmium at three dose ratios. Antagonistic interaction was observed in the midges for all treatments. Comparatively, cadmium-dominated group (the ratio of toxicity contribution from permethrin and cadmium was 1:3) showed stronger antagonism than equitoxicity (1:1) and permethrin-dominated groups (3:1). The reasons for the observed antagonism were elucidated from two aspects, including bioavailability and enzymatic activity. The bioavailability of permethrin, expressed as the freely dissolved concentrations in sediment porewater and measured by solid phase microextraction, was not altered by the addition of cadmium, suggesting the change in permethrin bioavailability was not the reason for the antagonism. On the other hand, the activities of metabolic enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase in the midges which were exposed to mixtures of permethrin and cadmium were significantly higher than those in the midges exposed to permethrin solely. Cadmium considerably enhanced the detoxifying processes of permethrin in the midges, which largely explained the observed antagonistic interaction between permethrin and cadmium.

  7. Effects of acid-volatile sulfide on metal bioavailability and toxicity to midge (Chironomus tentans) larvae in black shale sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogendi, G.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Hannigan, R.E.; Farris, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Metal bioavailability and toxicity to aquatic organisms are greatly affected by variables such as pH, hardness, organic matter, and sediment acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). Sediment AVS, which reduces metal bioavailability and toxicity by binding and immobilizing metals as insoluble sulfides, has been studied intensely in recent years. Few studies, however, have determined the spatial variability of AVS and its interaction with simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediments containing elevated concentrations of metals resulting from natural geochemical processes, such as weathering of black shales. We collected four sediment samples from each of four headwater bedrock streams in northcentral Arkansa (USA; three black shale-draining streams and one limestone-draining stream). We conducted 10-d acute whole-sediment toxicity tests using the midge Chironomus tentans and performed analyses for AVS, total metals, SEMs, and organic carbon. Most of the sediments from shale-draining streams had similar total metal and SEM concentrations but considerable differences in organic carbon and AVS. Zinc was the leading contributor to the SEM molar sum, averaging between 68 and 74%, whereas lead and cadmium contributed less than 3%. The AVS concentration was very low in all but two samples from one of the shale streams, and the sum of the SEM concentrations was in molar excess of AVS for all shale stream sediments. No significant differences in mean AVS concentrations between sediments collected from shale-draining or limestone-draining sites were noted (p > 0.05). Midge survival and growth in black shale-derived sediments were significantly less (p < 0.001) than that of limestone-derived sediments. On the whole, either SEM alone or SEM-AVS explained the total variation in midge survival and growth about equally well. However, survival and growth were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the two sediment samples that contained measurable AVS compared with the two sediments from the

  8. An assessment of the antibacterial activity in larval excretion/secretion of four species of insects recorded in association with corpses, using Lucilia sericata Meigen as the marker species.

    PubMed

    Barnes, K M; Gennard, D E; Dixon, R A

    2010-12-01

    The relative antibacterial activities of excretion/secretion (ES) from two carrion-feeding insects, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Dermestes maculatus DeGeer, and a detritivore, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, were compared to that of Lucilia sericata Meigen, a species with ES of known antibacterial capacity, in order to explore the antimicrobial potential of other carrion and detritivore species. Viable counts were used to assess time-kill of ES against five bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis. Antibacterial activity was recorded in all four insect species although T. molitor and D. maculatus were the most effective in controlling growth of P. mirabilis. The blowflies were more effective in controlling a wider range of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The larval ES from all species was shown to reduce bacterial growth rate although differences in antibacterial spectrum were noted and the degree of potency varied between the four species. These differences may be explained ecologically by the different colonisation times of each insect species on the corpse. Overall, this study demonstrates that research into other carrion-feeding insect species has potential to provide an increased source of antimicrobial chemicals to broaden the range of bacterial species beyond that currently controlled using L. sericata. PMID:20307342

  9. Occallatibacter riparius gen. nov., sp. nov. and Occallatibacter savannae sp. nov., acidobacteria isolated from Namibian soils, and emended description of the family Acidobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Foesel, Bärbel U; Mayer, Susanne; Luckner, Manja; Wanner, Gerhard; Rohde, Manfred; Overmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Three Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, encapsulated bacteria were isolated from a Namibian river-bank soil (strains 277T and 307) and a semiarid savannah soil (strain A2-1cT). 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses placed them within subdivision 1 of the Acidobacteria and revealed 100 % similarity between strains 277T and 307 and 98.2 % similarity between A2-1cT and the former two strains. The closest relatives with validly published names were Telmatobacter bradus, Acidicapsa borealis and Acidicapsa ligni (94.7-95.9 % similarity to the type strains). Cells of all three strains were rod-shaped and motile and divided by binary fission. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a thick cell envelope, resulting mainly from a thick periplasmic space. Colonies of strains 277T and 307 were white to cream and light pink, respectively, while strain A2-1cT displayed a bright pink colour. All three strains were aerobic, chemoheterotrophic mesophiles with a broad temperature range for growth and a moderately acidic pH optimum. Sugars and complex proteinaceous substrates were the preferred carbon and energy sources. A few polysaccharides were degraded. The major quinone in all three strains was MK-8; MK-7 occurred in strain A2-1cT as a minor compound. Major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 1ω7c. In addition, iso-C17 : 0 occurred in significant amounts. The DNA G+C contents of strains 277T, 307 and A2-1cT were 59.6, 59.9 and 58.5 mol%, respectively. Based on these characteristics, the three isolates are assigned to two novel species of the novel genus Occallatibacter gen. nov., Occallatibacter riparius sp. nov. [type strain 277T ( = DSM 25168T = LMG 26948T) and reference strain 307 ( = DSM 25169 = LMG 26947)] and Occallatibacter savannae sp. nov. [type strain A2-1cT ( = DSM 25170T = LMG 26946T)]. Together with several other recently described taxa, the novel isolates provide the basis for an emended description of the established family

  10. Sodium regulation in the larvae of Chironomus dorsalis (Meig.) and Camptochironomus tentans (Fabr.): the effect of slat depletion and some observations on temperature changes.

    PubMed

    Wright, D A

    1975-02-01

    Sodium regulation was studied in fourth instar larvae of Chironomus dorsalis and Camptochironomus tentans. Both maintain a body sodium level well above that of the surrounding medium. The haemolymph contains approximately 90% of total body sodium and approximates to a single compartment freely exchanging sodium with the external medium. The anal papillae play a primary role in sodium regulation, the gut being in secondary importance. Sodium regulation in both species is comparatively insensitive to alterations in acclimatization temperature. C. dorsalis and C. tentans are capable of maintaining sodium balance in media containing 10 mumole Na and 25 mumole Na respectively. When exposed to several changes of distilled water, C. tentansis capable of reducing sodium loss by elaboration of a more dilute urine. This is apparently,supplemented by a reduction in the permeability of the body surface. Activation of sodium uptake in both species is comparatively sluggish, with influx reaching a maximum only after the loss of greater than 30% body sodium.

  11. Effects of exposure to a combination of zinc- and lead-spiked sediments on mouthpart development and growth in Chironomus tentans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Edward A; Moore, Barry C; Schaumloffel, John; Dasgupta, Nairanjana

    2004-03-01

    Exposures to either zinc or lead in contaminated sediments have been shown to induce characteristic deformities in larval chironomids. This study examined the effects of exposure to lead and zinc in combination on Chironomus tentans larvae. Proportions of mouthpart deformities in populations of larvae reared in sediments containing nominal combinations of lead and zinc were tested for additive, synergistic, and antagonistic interactions using logistic regression. Metal body burdens, body size measurements, and survival were used to evaluate toxicity and developmental impacts. Results demonstrate zinc and lead mixtures produce fewer deformities than the individual metal, so their interaction may be characterized as antagonistic. However, exposure to the metal mixtures also caused delayed development and failure to hatch. The apparent decline in deformities may be an artifact of higher mortalities or developmental effects. This research provides better understanding of some of the problems and considerations for use of chironomid population deformity proportions in bioassessments for sediment metal contamination. PMID:15285360

  12. A low concentration of atrazine does not influence the acute toxicity of the insecticide terbufos or its breakdown products to Chironomus tepperi.

    PubMed

    Choung, Catherine B; Hyne, Ross V; Stevens, Mark M; Hose, Grant C

    2010-11-01

    The acute toxicities of the insecticide terbufos and its major breakdown products individually, as binary mixtures, and in combination with the co-applied herbicide atrazine were evaluated using final instar larvae of the midge Chironomus tepperi. Terbufos, terbufos sulfoxide and terbufos sulfone were highly toxic to C. tepperi with mean 96-h EC50 values of 2.13, 3.64 and 2.59 μg/l, respectively. No interaction was observed between atrazine (25 μg/l) and terbufos or its breakdown products while the binary mixture of terbufos sulfoxide and terbufos sulfone exhibited additive toxicity. The high toxicities of terbufos and its environmentally persistent oxidation products suggest that contamination of aquatic systems with this insecticide pose a threat to aquatic organisms whether or not atrazine is also present.

  13. Responses of Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans to particle-size distribution and organic matter content of formulated and natural freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Suedel, B.C.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-10-01

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca (Saussure), and midge, Chironomus tentans (Fabricius), were exposed to formulated sediments and nontoxic field-collected sediments for 10 d to determine their responses to varying sediment particle sizes and organic matter content of freshwater sediments. In experiments with formulated sediments, H. azteca survival was >80% when exposed for 10 d to all particle-size regimes examined. Subsequent exposures of H. azteca to field-collected sediments resulted in >80% H. azteca survival in all sediments. Field-collected sediments with organic matter content ranging from 0.12 to 7.8% yielded no observed effects on amphipod survival, which ranged from 84 to 100%. Survival of C. tentans ranged from 4 to 56% when exposed to formulated sediments for 10 d with 0% particulate organic matter content. A threshold organic matter content between 0.76 and 0.91% was observed for C. tentans exposed to formulated and field-collected sediments. Chironomus tentans survival was >80% in all cases when exposed to various particle-size regimes in formulated sediments containing 2.5% particulate organic matter. Formulated sediments were suitable for determining H. azteca and C. tentans responses to particle-size regimes and organic matter content of sediments, as test results using formulated and natural sediments were in agreement. Except for C. tentans observed intolerance of <0.76 to 0.91% organic matter content of sediments, C. tentans and H. azteca are suitable benthic toxicity testing organisms for determining the potential toxicity of sediments with a wide range of particle-size regimes and organic matter content.

  14. Influence of carbon nanotubes with preloaded and coexisting dissolved organic matter on the bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to Chironomus plumosus larvae in sediment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mohai; Xia, Xinghui; Zhai, Yawei; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhao, Xiuli; Zhang, Pu

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an aqueous environment may have influence on the carbonaceous material's impact on the bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to benthonic organisms in contaminated sediment. In the present study, 1 multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT); 2 types of DOM (fulvic acid and tannic acid), and 2 PAHs (pyrene and chrysene) were selected to study the influence of MWNT with preloaded and coexisting DOM on the bioaccumulation of PAHs to Chironomus plumosus larvae in sediment. Moreover, the freely dissolved concentrations of PAHs were measured to explore the influence mechanisms. The results showed that despite the presence or absence of preloaded or coexisting DOM, the presence of 1% MWNT in sediments suppressed the biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) and elevated the water-based bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of PAHs. However, the BSAF and BAF values generally decreased with the increase of 2 forms of both DOM; this was caused by the combined impact of DOM and MWNT on the freely dissolved concentrations of PAHs and the ingestion behavior of benthic organisms.

  15. Toxicokinetics of sediment-sorbed benzo[a]pyrene and hexachlorobiphenyl using the freshwater invertebrates Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Lance J; Wheeler, Matthew; Bailer, A John; Lydy, Michael J

    2003-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of long-term sediment aging on the toxicokinetics of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) using three freshwater benthic invertebrates. Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus were exposed to BaP- and HCBP-spiked sediments that were aged for 7 d or 1.5 years. The toxicokinetics of the two compounds were determined for each test organism using a two-compartment model. The modeling of BaP was more complex because biotransformation was included within the model. The results of this study showed that the HCBP uptake clearance rates (k(s)) for each species were generally an order of magnitude greater than those determined for BaP and this difference was most likely due to preferential and rapid binding of BaP to sediment particles. Overall, the bioavailability of HCBP in spiked sediments tended to decrease with duration of aging, based on k(s) values and bioaccumulation factors (BAFs). However, the decreases in bioavailability appear to be species specific. Benzo[a]pyrene did not decline in bioavailability for the species tested because it may resist movement into the micropores of the sediment due to its large size. In addition to the bioassays, this article outlines a method for toxicokinetic modeling of biotransformed compounds and methods for statistical comparisons of kinetic parameters (i.e., k(s), k(d)...) and BAF values.

  16. The effect of {sup 210}Pb and stable lead on the induction of menta deformities in Chironomus tentans larvae and on their growth and survival

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, G.A.; Schwartz, W.J.; Joseph, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    To determine whether menta deformities in chironomid larvae collected from Port Hope Harbor, Ontario, were the result of exposure to ionizing radiation or to heavy metals in the sediment, Chironomus tentans larvae were exposed in the laboratory to concentrations of {sup 210}Pb and stable lead representative of contaminant levels in the harbor. Exposure to 100, 1,000, and 2,000 Bq {sup 210}Pb g{sup {minus}1} dry sediment had no effect on larval survival, growth, or frequency of deformities. Likewise, exposure to 0.5 and 5.0 mg lead g{sup {minus}1} dry sediment had no effect on the larvae, but exposure to 35.0 mg lead g{sup {minus}1} dry sediment (the maximum levels observed in Port Hope Harbor) resulted in 100% mortality of the larvae. These results indicate that the observed mouthpart deformities in chironomid larvae of Port Hope Harbor are not the result of radiation exposure. They also indicate that heavy metals (lead) may be having an impact on the Port Hope Harbor population. Deformities were observed in all treatments and were confined mainly to the median tooth, with cleft or forked median teeth being the most common deformity. Restriction of the deformities to the median tooth is consistent with an inherited genetic effect, and they consider them to be natural abnormalities. These natural abnormalities must be considered when using chironomid mouthpart deformities as an index of environmental degradation.

  17. Toxicity of fluoranthene to Daphnia magna, Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Stylaria lacustris in water-only and whole sediment exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Suedel, B.C.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    Fluoranthene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with a hydrophobic nature (water solubility = 265 {mu}g/L; U.S. EPA 1980) and a propensity to sorb to sediments. Fluoranthene has a K{sub oc} of 4.65, an intermediate value for PAHs. Fluoranthene can be toxic to some aquatic organisms at concentrations lower than its aqueous solubility. Therefore, desorption from sediments could produce aqueous concentrations that are harmful to aquatic organisms. Very few studies have examined the toxicity of fluoranthene to freshwater organisms. Data for other PAHs show that crustaceans are the most sensitive species, followed by polychaete worms and fish. Effects of fluoranthene-amended sediments on selected marine benthic organisms were examined. The objectives of this research were to (1) determine the relative sensitivities of Daphnia magna Straus, Hyalella azteca Saussure, Chironomus tentans Fabricius, and Stylaria lacustris Linnaeus in 48-hr and 10-d aqueous phase exposures to fluoranthene; and (2) determine the relative responses of these organisms in 10-d fluoranthene-amended sediment exposures. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Relative sensitivity of an amphipod Hyalella azteca, a midge Chironomus dilutus, and a unionid mussel Lampsilis siliquoidea to a toxic sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Hughes, James P.; Wang, Ning; Ireland, D. Scott; Mount, Dave R.; Hockett, Russ J; Valenti, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relative sensitivity of test organisms in exposures to dilutions of a highly toxic sediment contaminated with metals and organic compounds. One dilution series was prepared using control sand (low total organic carbon [TOC; <0.1%, low binding capacity for contaminants]) and a second dilution series was prepared using control sediment from West Bearskin Lake, Minnesota, USA (high TOC [~10% TOC, higher binding capacity for contaminants]). Test organisms included an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 10-d and 28-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 20-d and 48-d exposures started with <1-h-old larvae, and 13-d and 48-d exposures started with 7-d-old larvae), and a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposures). Relative species sensitivitydepended on the toxicity endpoint and the diluent. All 3 species were more sensitive in sand dilutions than in West Bearskin Lake sediment dilutions. The <1-h-old C. dilutus were more sensitive than 7-d-old C. dilutus, but replicate variability was high in exposures started with the younger midge larvae. Larval biomass and adult emergence endpoints of C. dilutus exhibited a similar sensitivity. Survival, weight, and biomass of H. azteca were more sensitive endpoints in 28-d exposures than in 10-d exposures. Weight and biomass of L. siliquoidea were sensitive endpoints in both sand and West Bearskin Lake sediment dilutions. Metals, ammonia, oil, and other organic contaminants may have contributed to the observed toxicity.

  19. Predicting chronic toxicity of sediments spiked with zinc: An evaluation of the acid-volatile sulfide model using a life-cycle test with the midge Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, P.K.; Ankley, G.T.; Cotter, A.M.; Leonard, E.N.

    1996-12-01

    The development of sediment quality criteria for the cationic metals cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc has focused on the use of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) as the primary normalization phase for predicting interstitial pore-water concentrations and bioavailability of the metals. To date, most research in support of AVS in this context has utilized short-term laboratory exposures, with a relative paucity of information pertaining to long-term exposures. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate the use of AVS as a predictor of metal toxicity to a benthic organism in a long-term laboratory exposure. Clean sediment was spiked with zinc to obtain nominal treatments ranging from {minus}2.34 to 58.5 {micro} g/g dry weight with respect to the molar difference between simultaneously extracted metal (SEM) and AVS. The test was initiated with newly hatched larvae of the midge Chironomus tentans and carried through one complete generation (56 d) during which survival, growth, emergence, and reproduction were monitored. When the molar difference between SEM and AVS was < 0, the concentration of zinc in the sediment interstitial water was low and no adverse effects were observed for any of the biological endpoints measured. Conversely, when SEM-AVS exceeded 0, a dose-dependent increase in the relative concentration of zinc in the pore water was detected. However, the absolute concentration of pore-water zinc at each treatment declined over the course of the study, corresponding to an increase in sediment AVS and to a loss of zinc due to diffusion into the overlying water, which was renewed twice daily. Only when SEM-AVS exceeded 0 were significant reductions in survival, growth, emergence, and reproduction observed. Together, the chemical and biological data from this study compare favorably with observations made in short-term exposures and thus support the use of AVS as a normalization phase for predicting toxicity in metal-contaminated sediments.

  20. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part II—sediment toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemble, Nile E.; Hardesty, Douglas K.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Sibley, Paul K.; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Nowell, Lisa H.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroids are hydrophobic compounds that have been observed to accumulate in sediments (Laskowski 2002). Toxicity of pyrethroids in field-collected sediment from small urban streams (Weston et al. 2005; Holmes et al. 2008; Ding et al. 2010; Domagalski et al. 2010) or with pyrethroids spiked into sediment (Amweg et al. 2006; Hintzen et al. 2009) have been evaluated primarily in 10 day lethality tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. However, the sublethal effects in long-term exposures to pyrethroids in sediment have not been evaluated, and the distribution of pyrethroids sediments has not typically been evaluated in wadeable streams (Gilliom et al. 2006). This article is the second in a series that describe the results of a study of the distribution and toxicity of pyrethroids and other co-occurring trace elements and organic contaminants (PCBs, PAHs, OC pesticides) in stream sediments from 7 metropolitan areas across the United States (Moran et al. 2012). The study evaluated 98 sediment samples collected from streams ranging from undeveloped to highly urban and differs from previous studies by sampling larger wadeable streams and avoiding point sources (such as storm drains) and other inflows (Gilliom et al. 2006). Part 1 of the series characterizes sediment contaminants in relation to urbanization and other factors in the 7 metropolitan study areas (Nowell et al. 2012). Part 2 (this article) evaluates relationships between sediment chemistry and sediment toxicity in 28 day whole-sediment exposures conducted with the amphipod H. azteca and in 10 day whole-sediment exposure conducted with the midge Chironomus dilutus (USEPA United States Environmental Protection Agency 2000; ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials International 2012). Toxicity end points evaluated in the amphipod and midge exposures included the effects of these field-collected sediments on survival, weight, or biomass of the test organisms.

  1. Endocrine disruption and oxidative stress in larvae of Chironomus dilutus following short-term exposure to fresh or aged oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, S B; Anderson, J C; Liber, K; Giesy, J P

    2013-10-15

    Understanding the toxicity of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is a significant issue associated with the production of oil from the Alberta oil sands. OSPW is acutely and chronically toxic to organisms, including larvae of Chironomus dilutus. In this study, fresh OSPW ('WIP-OSPW') was collected from the West In-Pit settling pond and aged OSPW ('FE5-OSPW') was collected from the FE5 experimental reclamation pond, both of which are located on the Syncrude Canada Ltd. lease site near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. Larvae of C. dilutus were exposed to a freshwater control, WIP-OSPW, or FE5-OSPW for 4 or 7 days and survival, growth, and markers of oxidative stress and endocrine disruption were assessed. Survival was not significantly different among treatment groups. Compared to masses of larvae exposed to freshwater, masses of larvae exposed to WIP-OSPW were 49% lesser on day 4 and 62% lesser on day 7. However, organisms exposed to FE5-OSPW did not have significantly lesser masses than controls. Abundances of transcripts of glutathione-s-transferase (gst), catalase (cat), and glutathione peroxidase (gpx), which are important for the response to oxidative stress, were significantly altered in larvae exposed to WIP-OSPW, but not FE5-OSPW, relative to controls. Peroxidation of lipids was greater in larvae exposed to WIP-OSPW, but not FE5-OSPW. Exposure to fresh OSPW might have caused endocrine disruption because abundances of transcripts of the steroid hormone receptors, ultraspiricle protein (usp), ecysteroid receptor (esr), and estrogen related receptor (err) were greater in larvae exposed to WIP-OSPW for 7 days, but not FE5-OSPW. These results suggest that lesser growth of larvae of C. dilutus exposed to fresh OSPW might be due to oxidative stress and disruption of endocrine processes, and that aging of OSPW attenuates these adverse effects. PMID:24096237

  2. Effects of clay minerals and organic matter in formulated sediments on the bioavailability of sediment-associated uranium to the freshwater midge, Chironomus dilutus.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sarah E; Liber, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that bioavailability influences metal toxicity in aquatic ecosystems. However, the factors and mechanisms that influence uranium (U) bioavailability and toxicity in sediment have not been thoroughly evaluated, despite evidence that suggests different sediment components can influence the sorption and interaction of some metals. Given that dissolved U is generally accepted as being the primary bioavailable fraction of U, it is hypothesized that adsorption and interaction of U with different sediment components will influence the bioavailability of U in sediment. We investigated the effects of key sediment physicochemical properties on the bioavailability of U to a model freshwater benthic invertebrate, Chironomus dilutus. Several 10-day spiked sediment bioaccumulation experiments were performed, exposing C. dilutus larvae to a variety of formulated sediments spiked with different concentrations of U (5, 50 and/or 200 mg U/kg d.w.). Mean accumulation of U in C. dilutus larvae decreased significantly from 1195 to 10 mg U/kg d.w. as kaolin clay content increased from 0% to 60% in sediment spiked with 50 mg U/kg d.w. Similarly, higher organic matter content also resulted in a significant reduction of U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae, indicating a reduction in U bioavailability. Concentrations of U in both the overlying water and sediment pore water displayed a strong positive relationship to U bioaccumulation in C. dilutus larvae (r(2) = 0.77, p<0.001 and r(2) = 0.57, p < 0.001, respectively) for all experiments, while total U concentrations in the sediment had a poor relationship to U bioaccumulation (r(2) = 0.10, p = 0.028). Results from this research confirm that sediment clay and organic matter content play a significant role in altering U bioavailability, which is important in informing risk assessments of U contaminated sites and in the development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for U.

  3. Effects of Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida, Oligochaete) bioturbation on zinc sediment chemistry and toxicity to the epi-benthic invertebrate Chironomus tepperi (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Valentina; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Golding, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Classical laboratory-based single-species sediment bioassays do not account for modifications to toxicity from bioturbation by benthic organisms which may impact predictions of contaminated sediment risk to biota in the field. This study aims to determine the effects of bioturbation on the toxicity of zinc measured in a standard laboratory bioassay conducted with chironomid larvae (Chironomus tepperi). The epi-benthic chironomid larvae were exposed to two different levels of sediment contamination (1600 and 1980 mg/kg of dry weight zinc) in the presence or absence of annelid worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) which are known to be tolerant to metal and to have a large impact on sediment properties through bioturbation. Chironomids had 5-6x higher survival in the presence of L. variegatus which shows that bioturbation had a beneficial effect on the chironomid larvae. Chemical analyses showed that bioturbation induced a flux of zinc from the pore water into the water column, thereby reducing the bioavailability of zinc in pore water to the chironomid larvae. This also suggested that pore water was the major exposure path for the chironomids to metals in sediment. During the study, annelid worms (Oligochaetes) produced a thin layer of faecal pellets at the sediment surface, a process known to: (i) create additional adsorption sites for zinc, thus reducing its availability, (ii) increase the microbial abundance that in turn could represent an additional food source for opportunistic C. tepperi larvae, and (iii) modify the microbial community's structure and alter the biogeochemical processes it governs thus indirectly impact zinc toxicity. This study represents a contribution in recognising bioturbating organisms as "ecological engineers" as they directly and indirectly influence metal bioavailability and impact other sediment-inhabiting species. This is significant and should be considered in risk assessment of zinc levels (and other metals) in contaminated sediment

  4. Effects of Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida, Oligochaete) bioturbation on zinc sediment chemistry and toxicity to the epi-benthic invertebrate Chironomus tepperi (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Valentina; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Golding, Lisa A

    2016-09-01

    Classical laboratory-based single-species sediment bioassays do not account for modifications to toxicity from bioturbation by benthic organisms which may impact predictions of contaminated sediment risk to biota in the field. This study aims to determine the effects of bioturbation on the toxicity of zinc measured in a standard laboratory bioassay conducted with chironomid larvae (Chironomus tepperi). The epi-benthic chironomid larvae were exposed to two different levels of sediment contamination (1600 and 1980 mg/kg of dry weight zinc) in the presence or absence of annelid worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) which are known to be tolerant to metal and to have a large impact on sediment properties through bioturbation. Chironomids had 5-6x higher survival in the presence of L. variegatus which shows that bioturbation had a beneficial effect on the chironomid larvae. Chemical analyses showed that bioturbation induced a flux of zinc from the pore water into the water column, thereby reducing the bioavailability of zinc in pore water to the chironomid larvae. This also suggested that pore water was the major exposure path for the chironomids to metals in sediment. During the study, annelid worms (Oligochaetes) produced a thin layer of faecal pellets at the sediment surface, a process known to: (i) create additional adsorption sites for zinc, thus reducing its availability, (ii) increase the microbial abundance that in turn could represent an additional food source for opportunistic C. tepperi larvae, and (iii) modify the microbial community's structure and alter the biogeochemical processes it governs thus indirectly impact zinc toxicity. This study represents a contribution in recognising bioturbating organisms as "ecological engineers" as they directly and indirectly influence metal bioavailability and impact other sediment-inhabiting species. This is significant and should be considered in risk assessment of zinc levels (and other metals) in contaminated sediment

  5. Winter third- to fourth-instar larvae of Chironomus plumosus as bioassay tools for assessment of acute toxicity of metals and their binary combinations.

    PubMed

    Fargasová, A

    2001-01-01

    The ecotoxicological effect expressed as mortality of four metal ions (Cd, Cu, Zn, Al) and their associations on winter third- to fourth-instar larvae of Chironomus plumosus was determined. The effect of individual metals was introduced as acute toxicological effect and expressed as LC(50) and LC95 values with 95% intervals of confidence. On the basis of the LC50 values the toxicity of metals after 96 h treatment was ranked Cu>Cd>Zn>Al. Copper was at least 100 times more toxic than other metals tested. When the acute toxic effect of metal pairs was observed, in general, deleterious effects were directly proportional to metal concentrations. The toxicity of metals in combinations was different from that of individual metals, because of either antagonism or synergism. From the results obtained it can be concluded that when in metal pairs in which the original metal (the metal for which the interaction was determined) is at the lower concentration (Cd 10 mg x L(-1), Zn 25 mg x L(-1), Al 25 mg x L(-1), Cu 0.1 mg x L(-1)), the prevailing interaction is synergism (mortality was higher for metal combinations than for individual metals). Except for an overadditive effect (synergism), additivity was also confirmed in some cases (Al25+Cd10; Al25+Cd25; Al25+Cu0.1; Cu0.1+Cd10; Cu0.1+Cd25; Cu0.1+Al50). Synergism, in combinations in which the original metal is at the higher concentration (Cd 25 mg x L(-1), Zn 50 mg x L(-1), Al 50 mg x L(-1), Cu 1.0 mg x L(-1)), was observed only for the pairs Zn50+Al25 and Zn50+Cu1.0. Reciprocal additivity was observed after 96 h of treatment only for the combination Zn50+Al50. For all other binary combinations in which the original metal was at the higher concentration, an antagonistic effect was confirmed.

  6. Separating the effects of water physicochemistry and sediment contamination on Chironomus tepperi (Skuse) survival, growth and development: a boosted regression tree approach.

    PubMed

    Hale, Robin; Marshall, Stephen; Jeppe, Katherine; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    More comprehensive ecological risk assessment procedures are needed as the unprecedented rate of anthropogenic disturbances to aquatic ecosystems continues. Identifying the effects of pollutants on aquatic ecosystems is difficult, requiring the individual and joint effects of a range of natural and anthropogenic factors to be isolated, often via the analysis of large, complicated datasets. Ecotoxicologists have traditionally used multiple regression to analyse such datasets, but there are inherent problems with this approach and a need to consider other potentially more suitable methods. Sediment pollution can cause a range of negative effects on aquatic animals, and these are used as the basis for toxicity bioassays to measure the biological impact of pollution and the success of remediation efforts. However, experimental artefacts can also lead to sediments being incorrectly classed as toxic in such studies. Understanding the influence of potentially confounding factors will help more accurate assessments of sediment pollution. In this study, we analysed standardised sediment bioassays conducted using the chironomid Chironomus tepperi, with the aim of modelling the impact of sediment toxicants and water physico-chemistry on four endpoints (survival, growth, median emergence day, and number of emerging adults). We used boosted regression trees (BRT), a method that has a number of advantages over multiple regression, to model bioassay endpoints as a function of water chemistry, sediment quality and underlying geology. Endpoints were generally influenced most strongly by water quality parameters and nutrients, although some metals negatively influenced emergence endpoints. Sub-lethal endpoints were generally better predicted than lethal endpoints; median emergence day was the most sensitive endpoint examined in this study, while the number of emerging adults was the least sensitive. We tested our modelling results by experimentally manipulating sediment and

  7. Gene expression profiling reveals decreased expression of two hemoglobin genes associated with increased consumption of oxygen in Chironomus tentans exposed to atrazine: a possible mechanism for adapting to oxygen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Troy D; Jin-Clark, Ying; Begum, Khurshida; Starkey, Sharon R; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2008-01-31

    Atrazine is an extensively used triazine herbicide in agricultural and residential areas and has been routinely detected in many surface and ground waters. This study reveals various up- and down-regulated genes associated with hypoxic stress in atrazine-treated fourth-instar Chironomus tentans larvae (midges) by using restriction fragment differential display-PCR. Two down-regulated hemoglobin cDNAs were isolated from the midges. Northern blot analysis indicated CteHb-IIbeta and CteHb-III mRNA expressions decreased by 36 and 21%, respectively, in midges exposed to atrazine at 1 microg/L for 96h. Decreased hemoglobin gene expression was associated with elevated oxygen consumption in atrazine-treated midges. Midges exposed to atrazine at 1 microg/L increased their oxygen consumption by 47%, whereas midges exposed to atrazine at 1000 microg/L for 48h increased their oxygen consumption by 66%. Our study demonstrates for the first time that atrazine, at environmentally relevant concentrations, can elevate respiration, possibly eliciting counteractive measures at the transcriptional level to adapt to oxygen deficiency in an ecologically important aquatic insect. Our results further suggest that the ability to modulate both the quantity and quality of Hb serves as an adaptive response to counteract the initial onset of oxygen deficiency induced by atrazine in midges.

  8. Comparative acute toxicity to aquatic organisms of components of coal-derived synthetic fuels. [Selenastrum capricornutum; Nitzchia palea; Physa gyrina, Daphnia magna; Chironomus tentans; Gammarus minus; Pimephales promelas; Salmo gairdneri; Micropterus salmoides

    SciTech Connect

    Millemann, R.E.; Birge, W.J.; Black, J.A.; Cushman, R.M.; Daniels, K.L.; Franco, P.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Stewart, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    In acute toxicity tests, green algae Selenaastrum capricornutum, diatoms Nitzschia palea, adult snails Physa gyrina, juvenile cladocerans Daphnia magna, larval midges Chironomus tentans, adult amphipods Gammarus minus, juvenile fathead minnows Pimephales promelas, and embryo-larva stages of rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri and largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides were exposed for 4 hours (algae), 48 hours (arthropods and snails), 96 hours (fathead minnows), 7 days (large-mouth bass), and 27 days (rainbow trout) to two phenols (phenol and ..beta..-naphthol), two azaarenes (quinoline and acridine), and two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene and phenanthrene) present in coal-derived oils. Median lethal or median effective concentrations (LC50s or EC50s) ranged from 0.03 mg/liter for phenanthrene and rainbow trout to 286.54 mg/liter for phenol and the green alga. The rainbow trout embryo-larva assay was the most sensitive of the test systems to all the chemicals except quinoline. For this last compound, systems with juvenile fathead minnows and largemouth bass embryos were the most sensitive. As test systems, fish embryos and larvae were the most sensitive, juvenile fathead minnows and arthropods had intermediate sensitivity, and algae and snails were the most resistant to the test compounds under the test conditions. Within each chemical class (phenols, azaarenes, and polycylcic aromatic hydrocarbons), toxicity increased with increased ring number except for the reversed relationship with the azaarenes and fathead minnows. Thus, ..beta..-naphthol (two rings) was 2 to 45 times more toxic than phenol (one ring); acridine (three rings) was 7 to 27 times more toxic than quinoline (two rings); and phenanthrene (three rings) was 3 to 9 times more toxic than naphthalene (two rings). 50 references.

  9. Coenosia Meigen (Diptera: Muscidae) from Angola: new species and records.

    PubMed

    Couri, Marcia S; Pont, Adrian C

    2016-01-01

    The study of unidentified material from Angola (Africa), deposited in the collection of the Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom, has revealed three new Coenosia species: Coenosia lucens sp. nov., Coenosia flavohumeralis sp. nov. and Coenosia setosa sp. nov., and five new records: Coenosia macrochaeta (Emden, 1940), Coenosia nodosa Stein, 1913, Coenosia ochroprocta (Speiser, 1910), Coenosia planifrons Stein, 1913 and Coenosia translucida (Emden, 1940). Only one species of Coenosia had previously been recorded from Angola: Coenosia sanguenguei Zielke 1971. The new species are described with illustrations of the male terminalia, and diagnoses of the newly-recorded species with descriptions of the male terminalia are given. A list of all Muscidae species recorded from Angola is presented.

  10. Coenosia Meigen (Diptera: Muscidae) from Angola: new species and records.

    PubMed

    Couri, Marcia S; Pont, Adrian C

    2016-01-01

    The study of unidentified material from Angola (Africa), deposited in the collection of the Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom, has revealed three new Coenosia species: Coenosia lucens sp. nov., Coenosia flavohumeralis sp. nov. and Coenosia setosa sp. nov., and five new records: Coenosia macrochaeta (Emden, 1940), Coenosia nodosa Stein, 1913, Coenosia ochroprocta (Speiser, 1910), Coenosia planifrons Stein, 1913 and Coenosia translucida (Emden, 1940). Only one species of Coenosia had previously been recorded from Angola: Coenosia sanguenguei Zielke 1971. The new species are described with illustrations of the male terminalia, and diagnoses of the newly-recorded species with descriptions of the male terminalia are given. A list of all Muscidae species recorded from Angola is presented. PMID:27394753

  11. Morphological deformities in Chironomus spp. (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae as a tool for impact assessment of anthropogenic and environmental stresses on three rivers in the Juru river system, Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shami, Salman; Rawi, Che Salmah M; Nor, Siti Azizah M; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ali, Arshad

    2010-02-01

    Morphological deformities in parts of the head capsule of Chironomus spp. larvae inhabiting three polluted rivers (Permatang Rawa [PRR], Pasir [PR], and Kilang Ubi [KUR]) in the Juru River Basin, northeastern peninsular Malaysia, were studied. Samples of the fourth-instar larvae at one location in each river were collected monthly from November 2007 to March 2008 and examined for deformities of the mentum, antenna, mandible, and epipharyngis. At each sample location, in situ measurements of water depth, river width, water pH, dissolved oxygen, and water temperature were made. Samples of river water and benthic sediments were also collected monthly from each larval sample location in each river and taken to the laboratory for appropriate analysis. Total suspended solids (TSSs), ammonium-N, nitrate-N, phosphate-P, chloride, sulfate, and aluminum content in water were analyzed. Total organic matter and nonresidual metals in the sediment samples were also analyzed. Among the three rivers, the highest mean deformity (47.17%) was recorded in larvae collected from KUR that received industrial discharges from surrounding garment and rubber factories, followed by PRR (33.71%) receiving primarily residues of fertilizers and pesticides from adjacent rice fields, and PR (30.34%) contaminated primarily by anthropogenic wastes from the surrounding residential areas. Among the various head capsule structures, deformity of the mentum was strongly reflective of environmental stress and amounted to 27.9, 20.87, and 30.19% in the PRR, PR, and KUR, respectively. Calculated Lenat's toxic score index satisfactorily explained the influence of prevailing environmental variables on the severity of mentum deformities. Redundancy analysis and forward selection selected TSSs, sediment Zn, Mn, Cu, and Ni, and water pH, dissolved oxygen, water temperature, total organic matter, nitrate-N, chloride, phosphate-P, ammonium-N, sulfate, and aluminum as parameters that significantly affected some

  12. Morphological deformities in Chironomus spp. (Diptera: Chironomidae) larvae as a tool for impact assessment of anthropogenic and environmental stresses on three rivers in the Juru river system, Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shami, Salman; Rawi, Che Salmah M; Nor, Siti Azizah M; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Ali, Arshad

    2010-02-01

    Morphological deformities in parts of the head capsule of Chironomus spp. larvae inhabiting three polluted rivers (Permatang Rawa [PRR], Pasir [PR], and Kilang Ubi [KUR]) in the Juru River Basin, northeastern peninsular Malaysia, were studied. Samples of the fourth-instar larvae at one location in each river were collected monthly from November 2007 to March 2008 and examined for deformities of the mentum, antenna, mandible, and epipharyngis. At each sample location, in situ measurements of water depth, river width, water pH, dissolved oxygen, and water temperature were made. Samples of river water and benthic sediments were also collected monthly from each larval sample location in each river and taken to the laboratory for appropriate analysis. Total suspended solids (TSSs), ammonium-N, nitrate-N, phosphate-P, chloride, sulfate, and aluminum content in water were analyzed. Total organic matter and nonresidual metals in the sediment samples were also analyzed. Among the three rivers, the highest mean deformity (47.17%) was recorded in larvae collected from KUR that received industrial discharges from surrounding garment and rubber factories, followed by PRR (33.71%) receiving primarily residues of fertilizers and pesticides from adjacent rice fields, and PR (30.34%) contaminated primarily by anthropogenic wastes from the surrounding residential areas. Among the various head capsule structures, deformity of the mentum was strongly reflective of environmental stress and amounted to 27.9, 20.87, and 30.19% in the PRR, PR, and KUR, respectively. Calculated Lenat's toxic score index satisfactorily explained the influence of prevailing environmental variables on the severity of mentum deformities. Redundancy analysis and forward selection selected TSSs, sediment Zn, Mn, Cu, and Ni, and water pH, dissolved oxygen, water temperature, total organic matter, nitrate-N, chloride, phosphate-P, ammonium-N, sulfate, and aluminum as parameters that significantly affected some

  13. Effects of cadmium and resource quality on freshwater detritus processing chains: a microcosm approach with two insect species.

    PubMed

    Campos, Diana; Alves, Artur; Lemos, Marco F L; Correia, António; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pestana, João L T

    2014-07-01

    Detritus processing is vital for freshwater ecosystems that depend on the leaf litter from riparian vegetation and is mediated by microorganisms and aquatic invertebrates. Shredder invertebrates transform coarse particulate organic matter into fine particulate organic matter used as food by collector species. Direct and indirect effects of contaminants can impair detritus processing and thus affect the functioning of these ecosystems. Here, we assessed the combined effects of a toxic metal (cadmium) and resource quality (leaf species) on detritus processing and shredder-collector interactions. We considered two types of leaves, alder and eucalyptus that were microbially conditioned under different Cd concentrations in the laboratory. The microbial communities present on leaves were analyzed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), and we also measured microbial respiration rates. Sericostoma vittatum (a caddisfly shredder) and Chironomus riparius (a midge collector) were also exposed to Cd and allowed to consume the corresponding alder or eucalyptus leaves. We evaluated C. riparius growth and leaf mass loss in multispecies microcosms. Cadmium exposure affected leaf conditioning and fungal diversity on both leaf species, as assessed by DGGE. Cadmium exposure also affected the mass loss of alder leaves by reductions in detritivore feeding, and impaired C. riparius growth. Chironomus riparius consumed alder leaf discs in the absence of shredders, but S. vittatum appear to promote C. riparius growth in treatments containing eucalyptus. These results show that indirect effects of contaminants along detritus-processing chains can occur through effects on shredder-collector interactions such as facilitation but they also depend on the nutritional quality of detritus and on sensitivity and feeding plasticity of detritivore species. PMID:24648031

  14. Evaluation of toxicity to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and to the midge, Chironomus dilutus; and bioaccumulation by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, with exposure to PCB-contaminated sediments from Anniston, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Coady, Matthew R.; Farrar, J. Daniel; Lotufo, Guilherme R.; Kemble, Nile E.; Kunz, James L.; Stanley, Jacob K.; Sinclair, Jesse A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) requested that as part of the remedial investigation for the Anniston, Alabama Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Site (Anniston PCB Site), that Pharmacia Corporation and Solutia Inc. (P/S) perform long-term reproduction toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and the midge, Chironomus dilutus, and bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, using sediment samples collected from reference locations and from Operable Unit 4 of the Anniston PCB Site. The sediment toxicity testing and sediment bioaccumulation results will be used by ARCADIS U.S., Inc. (ARCADIS) as part of a weight-of-evidence assessment to evaluate risks and establish sediment remediation goals for contaminants to sediment-dwelling organisms inhabiting the Anniston PCB Site. The goal of this study was to characterize relations between sediment chemistry and sediment toxicity and relations between sediment chemistry and sediment bioaccumulation in samples of sediments collected from the Anniston PCB Site. A total of 32 samples were evaluated from six test sites and one reference site to provide a wide range in concentrations of chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) including PCBs in samples of whole sediment. The goal of this study was not to determine the extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Hence, the test sites or samples collected from within a test site were not selected to represent the spatial extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Sediment chemistry, pore-water chemistry, and sediment toxicity data were generated for 26 sediment samples from the Anniston PCB Site. All of the samples were evaluated to determine if they qualified as reference sediment samples. Those samples that met the chemical selection criteria and biological selection criteria were identified as reference samples and used to develop the reference envelope for each toxicity test endpoint. Physical

  15. The use of chironomid deformation in an in situ test for sediment toxicity.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, G; Vermeulen, A C; Ollevier, F

    2000-11-01

    An in situ bioassay using mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius larvae was developed to monitor sediment toxicity. Second-instar larvae, along with a standardized amount of food and sediment taken from the study locations, were enclosed in cages that were placed on the sediment surface of rivers. Mouthpart deformities were screened after larval molting to the fourth instar (exposure time: 7-10 days). Mouthpart deformities of caged and field larvae (when present) were related to the estimated sediment toxicity. By summing toxicant concentrations and normalizing them to the organic matter and clay contents, a significant relationship between toxicity levels and mouthpart deformities in the mentum was revealed. Results suggest that the pattern of observed deformities was indicative of site toxicity rather than a characteristic of the laboratory larval population used. The main advantage of the proposed in situ bioassay is the possibility to assess the incidence of deformities at sites where C. riparius does not occur naturally. PMID:11139175

  16. Evaluation of toxicity to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and to the midge, Chironomus dilutus; and bioaccumulation by the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, with exposure to PCB-contaminated sediments from Anniston, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Coady, Matthew R.; Farrar, J. Daniel; Lotufo, Guilherme R.; Kemble, Nile E.; Kunz, James L.; Stanley, Jacob K.; Sinclair, Jesse A.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Steevens, Jeffery A.; MacDonald, Donald D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) requested that as part of the remedial investigation for the Anniston, Alabama Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Site (Anniston PCB Site), that Pharmacia Corporation and Solutia Inc. (P/S) perform long-term reproduction toxicity tests with the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and the midge, Chironomus dilutus, and bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, using sediment samples collected from reference locations and from Operable Unit 4 of the Anniston PCB Site. The sediment toxicity testing and sediment bioaccumulation results will be used by ARCADIS U.S., Inc. (ARCADIS) as part of a weight-of-evidence assessment to evaluate risks and establish sediment remediation goals for contaminants to sediment-dwelling organisms inhabiting the Anniston PCB Site. The goal of this study was to characterize relations between sediment chemistry and sediment toxicity and relations between sediment chemistry and sediment bioaccumulation in samples of sediments collected from the Anniston PCB Site. A total of 32 samples were evaluated from six test sites and one reference site to provide a wide range in concentrations of chemicals of potential concern (COPCs) including PCBs in samples of whole sediment. The goal of this study was not to determine the extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Hence, the test sites or samples collected from within a test site were not selected to represent the spatial extent of sediment contamination across the Anniston PCB Site. Sediment chemistry, pore-water chemistry, and sediment toxicity data were generated for 26 sediment samples from the Anniston PCB Site. All of the samples were evaluated to determine if they qualified as reference sediment samples. Those samples that met the chemical selection criteria and biological selection criteria were identified as reference samples and used to develop the reference envelope for each toxicity test endpoint. Physical

  17. Collective Dynamics of a Laboratory Insect Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Nicholas; Kelley, Douglas; Khurana, Nidhi

    2012-02-01

    Self-organized collective animal behavior is ubiquitous throughout the entire biological size spectrum. But despite broad interest in the dynamics of animal aggregations, little empirical data exists, and modelers have been forced to make many assumptions. In an attempt to bridge this gap, we report results from a laboratory study of swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. Using multicamera stereoimaging and particle tracking, we measure the three-dimensional trajectories and kinematics of each individual insect, and study their statistics and interactions.

  18. Phthalate esters: Testing for ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Thompson, R.; Croudace, C.; Stewart, K.; Williams, N.

    1995-12-31

    Ortho-phthalate esters are produced in high tonnages for use as plasticizers, in particular for PVC. Their physical chemical properties are typically very low water solubility and high octanol/water partition coefficient. This combination of properties presents a number of experimental difficulties in the design and interpretation of ecological effect studies. These difficulties are described and results presented showing techniques for the performance of reproduction studies with the water flea, Daphnia magna, in aqueous solution and with the midge, Chironomus riparius, in sediments. The results which showed no effect for the phthalate esters tested are discussed in the context of other ecotoxicity data obtained on these products.

  19. The Parthenogenetic Cosmopolitan Chironomid, Paratanytarsus grimmii, as a New Standard Test Species for Ecotoxicology: Culturing Methodology and Sensitivity to Aqueous Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Bryant S; Long, Sara M; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2015-09-01

    Chironomids from the genus Chironomus are widely used in laboratory ecotoxicology, but are prone to inbreeding depression, which can compromise test results. The standard Chironomus test species (C. riparius, C. dilutus and C. yoshimatsui) are also not cosmopolitan, making it difficult to compare results between geographic regions. In contrast, the chironomid Paratanytarsus grimmii is cosmopolitan, and not susceptible to inbreeding depression because it reproduces asexually by apomictic parthenogenesis. However, there is no standardised culturing methodology for P. grimmii, and a lack of acute toxicity data for common pollutants (metals and pesticides). In this study, we developed a reliable culturing methodology for P. grimmii. We also determined 24-h first instar LC50s for the metals Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and the insecticide imidacloprid. By developing this culturing methodology and generating the first acute metal and imidacloprid LC50s for P. grimmii, we provide a basis for using P. grimmii in routine ecotoxicological testing.

  20. Clarification of Einfeldia Kieffer, 1922 (Diptera: Chironomidae) with E. australiensis (Freeman, 1961), comb. n. based on immature stages.

    PubMed

    Cranston, Peter S; Martin, Jon; Mulder, Monica; Spies, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The immature stages are described for the first time for Chironomus (Xenochironomus) australiensis Freeman (Diptera: Chironomidae) and the adult male is redescribed including from type specimens. The species does not belong to Chironomus Meigen or Xenochironomus Kieffer, but is best placed in a modestly expanded Einfeldia Kieffer. Application of this genus name is clarified, including by a lectotype fixation for its type species, E. pectoralis Kieffer, 1924. Einfeldia australiensis (Freeman) comb. n. provides the first record of the genus from Australia; otherwise the genus is reported confidently only from North America, Central America and western Europe to Japan. The immature stages of E. australiensis occur in relatively shallow mesotrophic to eutrophic dune lakes and maars with circum-neutral pH and high conductivity, from southeastern Queensland to southern Australia. The cytology is described briefly from larval salivary glands. Alternative genus placements for the species are discussed, and problems with Einfeldia and connected systematics in the tribe Chironomini are addressed. PMID:27615899

  1. Toxicity of the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine in sediments to Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca: low-dose hormesis and high-dose mortality.

    PubMed

    Steevens, Jeffery A; Duke, B Maurice; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Bridges, Todd S

    2002-07-01

    The toxicity of the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT); hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (royal demolition explosive [RDX]); and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (high-melting explosive [HMX]), was evaluated in spiked sediment with two freshwater invertebrates. The midge Chironomus tentans and the amphipod Hyalella azteca demonstrated significant toxic effects after exposure to TNT and its degradation products, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) and 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (2,4-DANT). Significant reductions in survival of C. tentans exposed to TNT, TNB, and 2,4-DANT were observed at nominal sediment concentrations as low as 200 mg/kg. Hyalella azteca was more sensitive to TNT, TNB, and 2,4-DANT than the midge, where significant reductions in survival were observed at nominal concentrations of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively. Survival of the midge and the amphipod was unaffected after exposure to RDX or HMX at the highest concentrations of 1,000 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. Growth of the midge, measured as total weight, was significantly reduced by 2,4-DANT. However, significantly increased growth was observed after exposure to sublethal concentrations of RDX and HMX. Although significant reductions in amphipod survival were observed at high concentrations of TNB, growth was significantly increased at sublethal concentrations. The results of the current investigation suggest that organisms exposed to explosives at contaminated sites may be affected at concentrations less than 25 mg/kg through hormetic growth enhancement and at higher concentrations through increased mortality.

  2. Formulated sediment for use in whole-sediment toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    A formulated control sediment was developed to provide consistent and acceptable biological endpoints for a variety of species used in whole sediment toxicity testing. In an attempt to develop such a sediment the authors conducted multiple tests to evaluate: (1) {alpha}-cellulose as an organic carbon source, (2) various TOC concentrations, (3) various grain sizes, (4) different food types, and (5) overlying waters. Studies were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca the midges Chironomus riparius, Chironomus tentans and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus in 10 d exposures and H. azteca in 28 d exposures. Sediment from West Bearskin Lake Minnesota was used as a control sediment with each species in each test. Survival of test organisms in all of the 10-d experiments, with the exception of C. riparius, was above the acceptable levels for a control sediment. Survival in the formulated sediments also was not significantly different when compared to the control sediment. Amphipod survival in the 28-d exposures was low; however, the use of reconstituted water in combination with the formulated sediment may have been a problem. The authors are currently evaluating various types of overlying water with formulated sediments and sublethal endpoints in each of the exposures (i.e., growth, sexual maturation or head capsule width).

  3. Toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from the upper Clark Fork River, Montana, to aquatic invertebrates and fish in laboratory exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G. . Midwest Science Center); Monda, D.P. ); Woodward, D.F. . Midwest Science Center)

    1994-12-01

    Sediments of the upper Clark Fork River, from the Butte and Anaconda area to Milltown Reservoir (230 km downstream), are contaminated with As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn primarily from mining activities. The toxicity of pore water from these sediments was determined using Daphnia magna, rainbow trout, and Microtox[reg sign]. However, pore-water data from these exposures were questionable because of changes in the toxicity of pore-water samples after 5 to 7 d of storage. Whole-sediment tests were conducted with Hyalella azteca, Chironomus riparius, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) 21- to 28-d exposure and Daphnia magna. Sediment samples from Milltown Reservoir and the Clark Fork River were not generally lethal to test organisms. However, both reduced growth and delayed sexual maturation of amphipods were associated with exposure to elevated concentrations of metals in sediments from the reservoir and river. Relative sensitivity (most sensitive to least sensitive) of organisms in whole-sediment toxicity tests was: Hyalella azteca > Chironomus riparius > rainbow trout > Daphnia magna. Relative sensitivity (most sensitive to least sensitive) of the three end points evaluated with Hyalella azteca was: length > sexual maturation > survival. The lack of lethal effects on organisms may be related to temporal differences in sediment, acid-volatile sulfide, or organic carbon.

  4. Effect of indigenous animals on chronic end points in freshwater sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reynoldson, T.B.; Day, K.E.; Clarke, C.; Milani, D. )

    1994-06-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted using three species of benthic invertebrates, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, and Hexagenia limbata, with various densities of the oligochaete worm Tubifex tubifex. It was shown that indigenous animals, simulated by the presence of Tubifex tubifex, did not affect survival of the test species (P [>=] 0.05) but did reduce growth in all three test species and in two species at the lowest tested densities, equivalent to 1,460 worms per square meter. At densities of Tubifex tubifex equivalent to 20,000 m[sup [minus]2], the growth of Chironomus riparius was reduced by >90%, Hyalella azteca by >60%, and Hexagenia limbata by almost 50%. The densities of oligochaetes are equivalent to those found in many contaminated sites. Therefore, it is concluded that the presence of indigenous organisms can confound the interpretation of toxicity test results, based on chronic end points. It is recommended that removal of organisms by considered before toxicity tests are conducted with freshwater sediments from sites with large populations of benthic invertebrates, especially oligochaete worms.

  5. Predator prey interactions of Procambarus clarkii with aquatic macroinvertebrates in single and multiple prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandra Marçal; Bandeira, Nuno; Anastácio, Pedro Manuel

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the interspecific interactions of Procambarus clarkii with other aquatic macroinvertebrates will help to unveil the mechanisms and processes underlying biological invasiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate predator-prey interactions of two ontogenic phases of P. clarkii with native and exotic species of aquatic macroinvertebrates at a single and multiple prey level. We performed laboratory experiments to determine the consumption and the behavioral responses of Chironomus riparius, Physa acuta and Corbicula fluminea to P. clarkii. The presence of P. clarkii significantly affected the abundance of C. riparius and P. acuta, but not of C. fluminea whether prey species were provided singly or simultaneously. The consumption of C. riparius by P. clarkii was higher than P. acuta for both crayfish sizes and situations (single/multiple prey systems) and C. fluminea was never consumed. Physa acuta was the only species that exhibited an anti-predator behavior to P. clarkii. Our results show that P. clarkii can have strong consumptive and trait effects on aquatic macroinvertebrate prey at a single and multiple prey level, resulting in differential impacts on different prey species. This study clarifies some aspects of the predator-prey interactions between P. clarkii and native as well as other exotic macroinvertebrate species that have invaded freshwater biocenosis worldwide.

  6. Trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites between aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Navarro, V; Leppänen, M T; Kukkonen, J V K; Godoy Olmos, S

    2013-02-01

    The trophic transfer of pyrene metabolites was studied using Gammarus setosus as a predator and the invertebrates Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus riparius as prey. The results obtained by liquid scintillation counting confirmed that the pyrene metabolites produced by the aquatic invertebrates L. variegatus and C. riparius were transferred to G. setosus through the diet. More detailed analyses by liquid chromatography discovered that two of the metabolites produced by C. riparius appeared in the chromatograms of G. setosus tissue extracts, proving their trophic transfer. These metabolites were not present in chromatograms of G. setosus exclusively exposed to pyrene. The present study supports the trophic transfer of PAH metabolites between benthic macroinvertebrates and common species of an arctic amphipod. As some PAH metabolites are more toxic than the parent compounds, the present study raises concerns about the consequences of their trophic transfer and the fate and effects of PAHs in natural environments. PMID:23202283

  7. Effects of pharmaceuticals on aquatic invertebrates. Part I. The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Oetken, M; Nentwig, G; Löffler, D; Ternes, T; Oehlmann, J

    2005-10-01

    The effects of the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) were studied in three freshwater invertebrate species representing different taxonomic groups, life histories, and habitats in aquatic ecosystems. The oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed by way of CBZ-spiked sediments at nominal concentrations between 0.625 and 10 mg/kg dry weight (dw) for 28 days. At the end of the test, reproduction and biomass were monitored as end points. The non-biting midge Chironomus riparius was exposed to CBZ in a series of tests at nominal CBZ concentrations in sediment ranging from 0.16 to 100 mg/kg dw at 20 degrees C and 23 degrees C. Emergence and gender ratio were monitored at the end of the test. The freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum as the third test species was used in a chronic reproduction test for 28 days at aqueous CBZ concentrations from 0.4 to 250 mg/L. Whereas for the oligochaete and the snail no effects were observed, C. riparius exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent decrease of emergence in all test series. No observed effect concentrations and 10% effect concentrations were in the range of 33 to 140 and 70 to 210 microg/kg dw, respectively, based on measured CBZ concentrations in sediments. These low values indicate that CBZ may pose a potential threat for the survival of C. riparius and probably also for other aquatic insect populations in the field.

  8. Transfer modelling and toxicity evaluation of the effluent from an installation of cleansing and uranium recovery using a battery of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, Béatrice; Boyer, Patrick; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Simon, Olivier; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2011-01-01

    On July 7, 2008, a leak of effluent from an Installation of Cleansing and Uranium Recovery (Tricastin, France) led to the spillage of uranium in a stream. The acute toxicity of the effluent was evaluated, and compared to the toxicity of uranium nitrate in bioassays using several organisms: Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Daphnia magna, Chironomus riparius and Danio rerio. A sediment bioassay was also performed on C. riparius using water and sediment sampled along the river. Results showed that effluent EC(50) 72 h was 0.65 mg U/l for algae and LC(50) 48 h was 1.67 mg U/l for daphnia, while values obtained for uranium nitrate were higher. The LC(50) 96 h of effluent to C. riparius was 22.7 mg U/l, similar to value for uranium nitrate; the sediment collected was not toxic to C. riparius larvae. The LOEC of effluent and uranium nitrate on HT(50) of D. rerio were similar (0.03 mg U/l), but larvae were more sensitive to uranium nitrate than to effluent. Our results suggest that other substances contained in the effluent could potentially be toxic to wildlife in association with uranium. In parallel, the modelling of the transfers based on uranium measurements in the surface water was used to fill data gaps and assess the impact along the river. These results provided an estimate of exposure conditions that occurred along the river. This approach allowed us to see that the risk to ecosystem during this incident was certainly low and concerned a short period of time, but it could have existed at least for some species.

  9. Descriptions of three new species of the genus Cheilosia Meigen from China (Diptera, Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Barkalov, Anatolij V; Ståhls, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    Three species of genus Cheilosia (Diptera, Syrphidae: Eristalinae) from China are described as new to science, Cheilosia bullabucca Barkalov & Ståhls sp. n., C. lamproptera Barkalov & Ståhls sp. n. and C. yunnanensis Barkalov & Ståhls sp. n. We provide species descriptions and keys for their identification. The phylogenetic placements of the taxa was estimated based on their morphological characteristics and by analysing the taxa under parsimony using a mtDNA COI sequence dataset including a comprehensive set of Palaearctic previously generated Cheilosia spp. sequences representing all major subgenera. Based on both their morphological affinities and the molecular data. The Chinese taxa were placed in the subgenera Eucartosyrphus (C. bullabucca), Cheilosia s. str. (C. oblonga), Floccocheila (C. versicolor) while C. yunnanensis was not resolved as member of Cheilosia s. str. based on DNA despite sharing morphological characteristics with the subgenus. As the name Cheilosia (Nephocheila) prima Barkalov & Cheng from China is a junior homonym of Cheilosia (Cartosyrphus) prima Hunter, 1896 from the Nearctic region, for the Chinese species the new name Cheilosia (Nephocheila) primaria Barkalov & Ståhls nomen nov. is proposed. PMID:26249493

  10. A new species of the genus Micropeza Meigen (Diptera: Micropezidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Harterreiten-Souza, Erica Sevilha; Sujii, Edison Ryoiti; Pujol-Luz, José Roberto

    2014-07-04

    The stilt-legged fly genus Micropeza contains 82 valid species. Currently 10 species are recorded in Brazil. Here we describe a new species, M. dactyloptera sp. nov., based on 108 specimens (55 males and 53 females) from the States of Goiás, Paraná, and Distrito Federal, Brazil.

  11. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY FOR EXCRETION AND SECRETION OF THE GREENBOTTLE FLY LARVAE LUCILIA SERICATA (MEIGEN) (DIPTERA: CALLIPHORIDAE).

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mostafa I; Amer, Mounir S; Hammad, Kotb M; Zidan, Mahmoud M

    2016-04-01

    Sterile larval excretion/secretion (ES) exhibited antibacterial activity against some species of bacteria. They were shown to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and Fungi Geotricum candidum and Aspergillus fumigatus thus exhibited limited inhibitory effect towards Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus epidermidis and Gram-negative Proteous vulgaris and Fungi Syncephalastrum racemosum, Candida albicans, that effect was slowed down when challenged with secretion on a solid media but no zone of complete inhibition was detectqd. Growth inhibiting activity was determined in liquid growth media using the Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacterial and fungal strains as indicator organisms. PMID:27363054

  12. Use of chironomids (Diptera: Chironomidae) as bioindicators of contaminant stress: Biochemical, chromosomal and developmental measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ciborowski, J.J.H.; Cervi, L.; Sinasac, D.; Pardalis, G.; Day, K.

    1995-12-31

    Sublethal environmental stresses produce effects ranging from subtle biochemical changes that protect an organism from damage, through developmental effects that interfere with growth and compromise fitness. Benthic chironomids live in intimate contact with the sediments to which most persistent chemicals are bound. Their short life cycle and unique developmental and genetic structure make them excellent candidates as biological indicators of stress. The authors evaluated the short and long-term responses of Chironomus riparius larvae to contaminants. To determine short-term stress responses, third and fourth instar Chironomus larvae were exposed to up to 1.5 {micro}L/g creosote or up to 100 {micro}g/g Cd for 12 h. Creosote-exposed larvae exhibited proteins of a molecular weight consistent with production of heat shock proteins of the HSP 70 family. Exposure to Cd induced significant enlargement of Balbiani Rings of the 4th chromosome in chironomid salivary glands, indicative of increased transcription of RNA precursors to salivary mucoproteins. Chironomus larvae individually reared from second instar larvae at [Cd] up to 40 {micro}g/g sediment exhibited increased incidence of mentum deformities, and delayed development that resulted in larger size at pupation. Thus deformities are biologically relevant indicators of stress. Overall, the results confirm the potential of chironomids as relevant bioindicators of contaminant stress.

  13. Relative sensitivity of Chironomus tentans instars to various toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Norberg-King, T.J.; Juenemann, P.S.; Juenemann, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    During the recent efforts by the US Environmental Protection Agency to standardize the sediment toxicity test methods, the authors conducted experiments to evaluate the influence of instar on the sensitivity of C. tentans to seven toxicants with varying modes of action. These experiments consisted of water only 96 h acute toxicity tests using C. tentans larvae that were 4-d, 6-d, 8-d, 10-d, and 12-d post-hatch. These ages covered the first, second, third, and fourth instar stages. Toxicants used were copper, nickel, zinc, potassium chloride, diazinon, a surfactant, and ammonia. Each acute test was also conducted using larvae cultured on two different amounts of the same Tetrafin{reg_sign} food. For the type of toxicant, differences in the sensitivity were observed with respect to the age of the animals for the two feeding levels. However, the overall age-specific difference was variable for the type of toxicant. For most of the toxicants, the LC50s varied by 50% or less among the ages tested for either feeding level while the older animals were more sensitive to the surfactant tested yet for potassium chloride the fourth instar was the least sensitive. The trends observed will be discussed. Additional information on identifying the instar and useful measurements will be discussed.

  14. Induction of the cellular stress response in Chironomus (Diptera)

    SciTech Connect

    Pardalis, G.; Hudson, L.A.; Ciborowski, J.J.H.; Day, K.E.; Robinson, R.D.; Solomon, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    The accumulation of stress or heat shock proteins is involved in the protection and defense of a cell from environmentally induced damage. Under stressful conditions, cytoplasmic stress protein 70 migrates to the nucleus where it assists in the restoration of the nucleolar function. The authors have demonstrated a dose-response relationship between incidence of decreased nucleolar size in chironomid salivary glands and degree of sediment contamination. Reduced nucleolar size is indicative of reduced nucleolar function. The relationship between nucleolus size and stress protein accumulation is being explored. They are conducting experiments on chironomids to characterize the response elicited by heat shock and PAH exposure in the laboratory to determine if the simultaneous action of more than one stressor can significantly alter the stress response. Simultaneous studies are being conducted to validate these biomarkers in mesocosm caging experiments. Aspects of the response will be useful as biomarkers of general stress.

  15. On the tensile strength of insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-08-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young’s modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids.

  16. Bioaccumulation and food-chain transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals: A laboratory and field investigation. Final report, 15 Oct 91-14 Oct 92

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, W.H.

    1992-10-14

    The extent to which heavy metals and Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) may be transferred up the food chain from sediments to benthic invertebrates and then on to fish species was examined using both laboratory and field techniques. PAHs were shown to bioaccumulate in a chironomid invertebrate (chironomus riparius) to relatively high levels depending on the specific compound. Accumulation in a fish specie (Lepomis macrochirus) that was fed contaminated chironomids was found to be generally low. Mobilization of PAHs from sediments into water was affected by benthic organisms enhancing the bioavailability of these contaminants to other organisms. In field studies, certain benthic invertebrates and abiotic sediment components were also shown to accumulate heavy metals. This metal accumulation persisted even when metal concentrations in the water were diminishing.

  17. Intrinsic fluctuations and driven response of insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Puckett, James G.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-03-01

    Much of our understanding of collective behaviour in social animals comes from passive observations of animal groups. To understand the group dynamics fully, however, we must also characterize the response of animal aggregations to disturbances. Using three-dimensional particle tracking, we study both the intrinsic fluctuations of laboratory swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius and the response of the swarms to controlled external perturbations: the amplitude-modulated sound of male midge wingbeats. Although these perturbations have an insignificant effect on the behavior of individuals, we find that they can have a strong impact on the collective movement. Intriguingly, the response of the swarm is similar reminiscent to of that of a passive equilibrium system to an external driving force, with microscopic fluctuations underlying combining to produce a macroscopic linear response over a wide range of driving frequencies.

  18. Searching for effective forces in laboratory insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2014-04-01

    Collective animal behaviour is often modeled by systems of agents that interact via effective social forces, including short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. We search for evidence of such effective forces by studying laboratory swarms of the flying midge Chironomus riparius. Using multi-camera stereoimaging and particle-tracking techniques, we record three-dimensional trajectories for all the individuals in the swarm. Acceleration measurements show a clear short-range repulsion, which we confirm by considering the spatial statistics of the midges, but no conclusive long-range interactions. Measurements of the mean free path of the insects also suggest that individuals are on average very weakly coupled, but that they are also tightly bound to the swarm itself. Our results therefore suggest that some attractive interaction maintains cohesion of the swarms, but that this interaction is not as simple as an attraction to nearest neighbours.

  19. On the tensile strength of insect swarms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young's modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids. PMID:27559838

  20. Searching for effective forces in laboratory insect swarms

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, James G.; Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    Collective animal behaviour is often modeled by systems of agents that interact via effective social forces, including short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. We search for evidence of such effective forces by studying laboratory swarms of the flying midge Chironomus riparius. Using multi-camera stereoimaging and particle-tracking techniques, we record three-dimensional trajectories for all the individuals in the swarm. Acceleration measurements show a clear short-range repulsion, which we confirm by considering the spatial statistics of the midges, but no conclusive long-range interactions. Measurements of the mean free path of the insects also suggest that individuals are on average very weakly coupled, but that they are also tightly bound to the swarm itself. Our results therefore suggest that some attractive interaction maintains cohesion of the swarms, but that this interaction is not as simple as an attraction to nearest neighbours. PMID:24755944

  1. Emergent dynamics of laboratory insect swarms.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Douglas H; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2013-01-01

    Collective animal behaviour occurs at nearly every biological size scale, from single-celled organisms to the largest animals on earth. It has long been known that models with simple interaction rules can reproduce qualitative features of this complex behaviour. But determining whether these models accurately capture the biology requires data from real animals, which has historically been difficult to obtain. Here, we report three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions, velocities, and accelerations of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. Even though the swarms do not show an overall polarisation, we find statistical evidence for local clusters of correlated motion. We also show that the swarms display an effective large-scale potential that keeps individuals bound together, and we characterize the shape of this potential. Our results provide quantitative data against which the emergent characteristics of animal aggregation models can be benchmarked.

  2. Emergent dynamics of laboratory insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2013-01-01

    Collective animal behaviour occurs at nearly every biological size scale, from single-celled organisms to the largest animals on earth. It has long been known that models with simple interaction rules can reproduce qualitative features of this complex behaviour. But determining whether these models accurately capture the biology requires data from real animals, which has historically been difficult to obtain. Here, we report three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions, velocities, and accelerations of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. Even though the swarms do not show an overall polarisation, we find statistical evidence for local clusters of correlated motion. We also show that the swarms display an effective large-scale potential that keeps individuals bound together, and we characterize the shape of this potential. Our results provide quantitative data against which the emergent characteristics of animal aggregation models can be benchmarked.

  3. Velocity correlations in laboratory insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, R.; Ouellette, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to animal groups such as bird flocks or migratory herds that display net, directed motion, insect swarms do not possess global order. Without such order, it is difficult to define and characterize the transition to collective behavior in swarms; nevertheless, visual observation of swarms strongly suggests that swarming insects do behave collectively. It has recently been suggested that correlation rather than order is the hallmark of emergent collective behavior. Here, we report measurements of spatial velocity correlation functions in laboratory mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. Although we find some correlation at short distances, our swarms are in general only weakly correlated, in contrast to what has been observed in field studies. Our results hint at the potentially important role of environmental conditions on collective behavior, and suggest that general indicators of the collective nature of swarming are still needed.

  4. Determining asymptotically large population sizes in insect swarms

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, James G.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    Social animals commonly form aggregates that exhibit emergent collective behaviour, with group dynamics that are distinct from the behaviour of individuals. Simple models can qualitatively reproduce such behaviour, but only with large numbers of individuals. But how rapidly do the collective properties of animal aggregations in nature emerge with group size? Here, we study swarms of Chironomus riparius midges and measure how their statistical properties change as a function of the number of participating individuals. Once the swarms contain order 10 individuals, we find that all statistics saturate and the swarms enter an asymptotic regime. The influence of environmental cues on the swarm morphology decays on a similar scale. Our results provide a strong constraint on how rapidly swarm models must produce collective states. But our findings support the feasibility of using swarms as a design template for multi-agent systems, because self-organized states are possible even with few agents. PMID:25121646

  5. Identifying and quantifying interactions in a laboratory swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James; Kelley, Douglas; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    Emergent collective behavior, such as in flocks of birds or swarms of bees, is exhibited throughout the animal kingdom. Many models have been developed to describe swarming and flocking behavior using systems of self-propelled particles obeying simple rules or interacting via various potentials. However, due to experimental difficulties and constraints, little empirical data exists for characterizing the exact form of the biological interactions. We study laboratory swarms of flying Chironomus riparius midges, using stereoimaging and particle tracking techniques to record three-dimensional trajectories for all the individuals in the swarm. We describe methods to identify and quantify interactions by examining these trajectories, and report results on interaction magnitude, frequency, and mutuality.

  6. How Many Insects Does It Take to Make a Swarm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    Aggregations of social animals, such as flocks of birds, schools of fish, or swarms of insects, are beautiful, natural examples of self-organized behavior far from equilibrium. They tend to display a range of emergent properties, from enhanced sensing to the rapid propagation of information throughout the aggregate. Many classes of models have been proposed to describe these systems, including agent-based models that specify explicit social forces between individuals and continuum models that abstract the interactions between individuals into some smooth advecting velocity field. Assessing these various modeling approaches requires comparison with empirical data. We will discuss measurements of laboratory mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius in the context of model assessment. In particular, we focus on the question of the small-number limit: how large must the population be before collective properties emerge?

  7. Critical body residue of compounds having different mode of action on energy metabolism in benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, O.P.; Kukkonen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of organic chemicals with different mode of toxic action was evaluated by determining their effect on the metabolic rate of two common benthic invertebrates, midge larva (Chironomus riparius) and oligochate worm (Lumbriculus variegatus). The rate of metabolism was monitored by direct microcalorimetry and the change of heat output was related to the body residue of chemicals. The expected response of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP), known as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, was an increase of metabolic rate. The animals were exposed 24 h to water spiked with TCP (10 to 1,200 {micro}g/L) and they received the body residues of TCP in the range of 8.8 to 336 {micro}g/g wet wt (0.04 to 1.75 {micro}mol/g). The threshold concentration was 0.7 {micro}mol/g wet wt. (C. riparius) or 1.0 {micro}mol/g wet wt. (L. variegatus) above which the rate of heat dissipation increased in direct proportion to the concentration of TCP in tissue. At maximum, the metabolic rate increased by a factor of three. At the highest water concentration animals were dying and the metabolic rate was low. The energetic responses obtained with TCP are compared to those of a non-polar narcotic compound 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and an other uncoupling agent, 2,4-dinitrophenol.

  8. The effect of manipulations of freshwater sediments on responses of benthic invertebrates in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Day, K.E.; Kirby, R.S.; Reynoldson, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    Manipulations of freshwater sediment were performed to remove indigenous organisms prior to conducting toxicity tests with three species of benthic invertebrates. The effects of these treatments on end points in bioassays were compared within and between two sediments, i.e., a ``clean`` sediment and a ``contaminated`` sediment. In addition, the effects of manipulations on the physicochemical structure of the two sediments and the presence of metals, PAHs, and PCBs in the contaminated sediment were examined. The amphipod Hyalella azteca was most sensitive to the manipulations and had low survival in sediment that was sterilized. Growth (milligrams dry weight per individual) was affected by the presence of contaminants. Survival of Chironomus riparius was not affected by any manipulation but was reduced by contaminants as well as indigenous organisms. Growth of C. riparius was higher in autoclaved sediment but lower in sediment containing endemic tubificid worms. Production of young by Tubifex tubifex increased in sediment that was irradiated, possibly due to increased detrital material. Particle size distribution, metals, nutrients, and PAHs varied little as a function of manipulation; however, sieving of sediment through 250-{micro}m mesh did reduce percent total organic carbon (TOC), percent loss on ignition (LOI), and concentrations of some PCBs in either clean or contaminated sediment. Manipulation of sediments to remove endemic species should be determined on a case-by-case basis and is specific to the organisms used in toxicity tests.

  9. Preliminary study to compare body residues and sublethal energetic responses in benthic invertebrates exposed to sediment-bound 2,4,5-trichlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, O.P.; Kukkonen, J.; Pellinen, J.

    1996-02-01

    Relationships between concentration of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) in sediment, body residues of the chemical, and sublethal biological effects in three benthic invertebrates were studied. Uncontaminated lake sediment was spiked with four concentrations (23--85 {micro}g/g dry sediment) of TCP. Chironomid larvae (Chironomus riparius), oligochaete worms (Lumbriculus variegatus), and sphaeriid bivalves (Sphaerium corneum) were exposed to the sediment. The effect of chlorophenol on the rate of heat dissipation of animals was monitored by direct microcalorimetry. It appeared that both the behavior of the animals and their body residues explained the energetic response. Valve closure behavior of S. corneum reduced the accumulation of toxicant (< 0.3 {micro}mol/g) but was observed as a complex energetic response. Heat dissipation of L. variegatus was at the same level in control animals and those with high body residues of TCP (> 1.5 {micro}mol/g). Regardless of the amount of TCP accumulated to C. riparius (0.1--0.6 {micro}mol/g), the rate of heat dissipation was almost two times higher than that of the control animals, probably reflecting uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, which is the primary mode of toxic action of chlorophenols. However, when a threshold concentration was exceeded there was no concentration-response dependence until acute toxicity appears.

  10. Folded gastrulation and T48 drive the evolution of coordinated mesoderm internalization in flies

    PubMed Central

    Urbansky, Silvia; González Avalos, Paula; Wosch, Maike; Lemke, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Gastrulation constitutes a fundamental yet diverse morphogenetic process of metazoan development. Modes of gastrulation range from stochastic translocation of individual cells to coordinated infolding of an epithelial sheet. How such morphogenetic differences are genetically encoded and whether they have provided specific developmental advantages is unclear. Here we identify two genes, folded gastrulation and t48, which in the evolution of fly gastrulation acted as a likely switch from an ingression of individual cells to the invagination of the blastoderm epithelium. Both genes are expressed and required for mesoderm invagination in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster but do not appear during mesoderm ingression of the midge Chironomus riparius. We demonstrate that early expression of either or both of these genes in C.riparius is sufficient to invoke mesoderm invagination similar to D.melanogaster. The possible genetic simplicity and a measurable increase in developmental robustness might explain repeated evolution of similar transitions in animal gastrulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18318.001 PMID:27685537

  11. Ecotoxicity of sediments in rivers: Invertebrate community, toxicity bioassays and the toxic unit approach as complementary assessment tools.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Català, Núria; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià; Pérez, Sandra; Petrovic, Mira; Picó, Yolanda; Schuhmacher, Marta; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the real toxicity of sediments in aquatic ecosystems is challenging and necessary for an appropriate risk assessment. Different approaches have been developed and applied over the last several decades. Currently, the joint implementation of chemical, ecological and toxicological tools is recommended for an appropriate and successful toxicity risk assessment. We chose the combination of the toxic unit approach with acute pore water tests (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) and whole-sediment exposure tests (V. fischeri, Chironomus riparius), together with invertebrate community composition (multivariate analyses) to detect short and long-term responses of the organisms in four rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. High toxicity was detected in three sites (the downstream sites of the Llobregat and the Júcar, and the most upstream site of the Ebro). We identified organophosphate insecticides and metals as the main variables responsible for this toxicity, particularly in the whole-sediment tests. In particular, chlorpyrifos was mostly responsible for the toxicity (TUs) of D. magna, coinciding with the C. riparius mortality (long-term toxicity) in the mentioned sites, and copper was the main pollutant responsible for the short-term toxicity of P. subcapitata. The combination of the different approaches allowed us to detect ecotoxicological effects in organisms and identify the main contributors to the toxicity in these multi-stressed rivers. PMID:26118861

  12. Aquatic ecotoxicity of the fungicide pyrimethanil: effect profile under optimal and thermal stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Seeland, Anne; Oehlmann, Jörg; Müller, Ruth

    2012-09-01

    The aquatic ecotoxic profile of the fungicide pyrimethanil and its acute and chronic thermal dependence in two aquatic invertebrates Chironomus riparius and Daphnia magna were investigated. The ecotoxicity of pyrimethanil at optimal thermal conditions did not depend on the trophic level, but was species-specific. The acute pyrimethanil-toxicity on C. riparius increased with higher temperature. The chronic response of Daphnia magna to the NOEC of the fungicide was examined in a multigenerational experiment under three near-natural temperature regimes. A pyrimethanil-induced increase of total mortality was buffered by the strongly related increase of the general reproductive capacity, while population growth was stronger influenced by temperature than by the fungicide. At a LOEC, however, a second generation could not be established with D. magna at all thermal regimes. This clearly shows that thermal and multigenerational effects should be considered when appraising the ecotoxicity of pesticides and assessing their future risk for the environment. PMID:22622013

  13. Ecotoxicity of sediments in rivers: Invertebrate community, toxicity bioassays and the toxic unit approach as complementary assessment tools.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Català, Núria; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Roig, Neus; Sierra, Jordi; Ginebreda, Antoni; Barceló, Damià; Pérez, Sandra; Petrovic, Mira; Picó, Yolanda; Schuhmacher, Marta; Muñoz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the real toxicity of sediments in aquatic ecosystems is challenging and necessary for an appropriate risk assessment. Different approaches have been developed and applied over the last several decades. Currently, the joint implementation of chemical, ecological and toxicological tools is recommended for an appropriate and successful toxicity risk assessment. We chose the combination of the toxic unit approach with acute pore water tests (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna) and whole-sediment exposure tests (V. fischeri, Chironomus riparius), together with invertebrate community composition (multivariate analyses) to detect short and long-term responses of the organisms in four rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. High toxicity was detected in three sites (the downstream sites of the Llobregat and the Júcar, and the most upstream site of the Ebro). We identified organophosphate insecticides and metals as the main variables responsible for this toxicity, particularly in the whole-sediment tests. In particular, chlorpyrifos was mostly responsible for the toxicity (TUs) of D. magna, coinciding with the C. riparius mortality (long-term toxicity) in the mentioned sites, and copper was the main pollutant responsible for the short-term toxicity of P. subcapitata. The combination of the different approaches allowed us to detect ecotoxicological effects in organisms and identify the main contributors to the toxicity in these multi-stressed rivers.

  14. Measuring cytochrome P450 activity in aquatic invertebrates: a critical evaluation of in vitro and in vivo methods.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, Michele; Kretschmann, Andreas; Cedergreen, Nina

    2016-03-01

    The first step in xenobiotic detoxification in aquatic invertebrates is mainly governed by the cytochrome P450 mixed function oxidase system. The ability to measure cytochrome P450 activity provides an important tool to understand macroinvertebrates' responses to chemical stressors. However, measurements of P450 activity in small aquatic invertebrates have had variable success and a well characterized assay is not yet available. The general lack of success has been scarcely investigated and it is therefore the focus of the present work. In particular, the suitability of the substrate selected for the assay, the sensitivity of the assay and the possible inhibition/attenuation of enzymatic activity caused by endogenous substances were investigated. 7-ethoxycoumarin-O-dealkylation activity of Daphnia magna, Chironomus riparius larvae and Hyalella azteca was assessed in vivo and in vitro and possible inhibition of enzymatic activity by macroinvertebrates homogenate was investigated. Activities of D. magna and C. riparius larvae measured in vivo were 1.37 ± 0.08 and 2.2 ± 0.2 pmol h(-1) organism(-1), respectively, while activity of H. azteca could not be detected. In vitro activity could be measured in C. riparius larvae only (500-1000 pmol h(-1) mg microsomal protein(-1)). The optimization of the in vitro assay has been especially long and resource consuming and particularly for D. magna, substances that inhibited cytochrome P450 activity seemed to be released during tissue homogenization preventing activity measurements in vitro. We therefore recommend testing the P450 inhibition potential of homogenate preparations prior to any investigation of P450 activity in vitro in macroinvertebrates. PMID:26686507

  15. The toxicity of margosan-O, a product of neem seeds, to selected target and nontarget aquatic invertebrates

    PubMed

    Scott; Kaushik

    1998-10-01

    Margosan-O, an insecticide formulated from extracts of neem tree (Azadirachta indica) seed kernels, besides being toxic, also has feeding, oviposition-deterring, and growth-inhibitory effects on insects. This product, registered in the United States for ornamental plants, has been proposed for food crop use. However, little information exists on its effects on aquatic organisms. This study investigated toxicity of Margosan-O to the mosquito Culex spp., a possible target species, and to nontarget species-two crustaceans, Daphnia magna, Hyalella azteca, and a dipteran, Chironomus riparius. The 48-h EC50 value of 105 mg L-1 for Culex spp. was significantly more toxic than for C. riparius (281 mg L-1), not significantly different from D. magna (125 mg L-1) but was significantly less toxic than for H. azteca (71 mg L-1). A concentration of 20-30 mg L-1 caused growth inhibitory effects in Culex spp. and C. riparius larvae and 40 and 84 mg L-1 affected growth and reproduction in H. azteca and D. magna, respectively. Margosan-O may not be suitable for mosquito control since the concentrations required to control emergence may have some nontarget effects. Alternatively, the agricultural application of Margosan-O is also not expected to reduce the survival or produce growth and reproductive effects in nontarget aquatic organisms. However, based on estimated concentrations of less than 10 mg L-1 in adjacent shallow bodies of water and recommendations for repeated applications, there should be concern that the threshold for chronic toxicity is too narrow. PMID:9732473

  16. An evaluation of benthic community measures using laboratory-derived sediment effect concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, F.J.; Canfield, T.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Mount, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment effect concentrations (SECs) are contaminant sediment concentrations which are frequently associated with sediment toxicity. Recently, a number of different SECs have been calculated from laboratory toxicity tests with field collected sediments using Chironomus tentans, Chironomus riparius, and Hyalella azteca. Toxicity endpoints included (depending upon species) lethality, growth and sexual maturation. The authors selected the Effect Range Median (ERM) calculated for 28-d Hyalella azteca as an SEC for evaluating six different benthic community measures as indicators of contaminated sediment. The benthic measures included: taxa richness, chironomid genera richness, percent chironomid deformity, chironomid biotic index, ratio of chironomids/oligochaetes, and oligochaete biotic index. Benthic measures were obtained for 31 stations from the Great Lakes and 13 stations from Milltown Reservoir and Clark Fork River, MT. Each benthic measure was ranked from 1 to 100 and individual ranks and various combinations of ranks were plotted against the ratio of chemical concentration at the site/ERM calculated for that chemical (similar to a toxic unit approach) and the sum of the ERM ratios (sum of toxic units). Preliminary analysis indicates that, in general, benthic measures varied widely in relatively uncontaminated stations, confounding any underlying relationship that may have existed. The absence of chironomids, in areas with suitable habitat, seems to be indicative of grossly contaminated stations, but not an endpoint useful for discriminating stations with contaminant concentrations closer to the SEC. The usefulness of benthic measures as diagnostic tools for contaminated sediments and potential ways to improve these measures will be discussed.

  17. A comparison of sediment toxicity test methods at three Great Lake Areas of Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, G. Allen; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Burnett, LouAnn C.; Henry, Mary; Hinman, Mark L.; Klaine, Stephen J.; Landrum, Peter F.; Ross, Phillipe; Tuchman, Marc

    1996-01-01

    The significance of sediment contamination is often evaluated using sediment toxicity (bioassay) testing. There are relatively few “standardized” test methods for evaluating sediments. Popular sediment toxicity methods examine the extractable water (elutriate), interstitial water, or whole (bulk) sediment phases using test species spanning the aquatic food chain from bacteria to fish. The current study was designed to evaluate which toxicity tests were most useful in evaluations of sediment contamination at three Great Lake Areas of Concern. Responses of 24 different organisms including fish, mayflies, amphipods, midges, cladocerans, rotifers, macrophytes, algae, and bacteria were compared using whole sediment or elutriate toxicity assays. Sediments from several sites in the Buffalo River, Calumet River (Indiana Harbor), and Saginaw River were tested, as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Assessment and Remediation of Contaminated Sediments (ARCS) Project. Results indicated several assays to be sensitive to sediment toxicity and able to discriminate between differing levels of toxicity. Many of the assay responses were significantly correlated to other toxicity responses and were similar based on factor analysis. For most applications, a test design consisting of two to three assays should adequately detect sediment toxicity, consisting of various groupings of the following species: Hyalella azteca, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Chironomus riparius, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promelas, Hexagenia bilineata, Diporeia sp., Hydrilla verticillata, or Lemna minor.

  18. Genetic and phenotypic variation in central and northern European populations of Aedes (Aedimorphus) vexans (Meigen, 1830) (Diptera, Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Francuski, Ljubinka; Milankov, Vesna; Ludoški, Jasmina; Krtinić, Bosiljka; Lundström, Jan O; Kemenesi, Gábor; Ferenc, Jakab

    2016-06-01

    The floodwater mosquito Aedes vexans can be a massive nuisance in the flood plain areas of mainland Europe, and is the vector of Tahyna virus and a potential vector of Dirofilaria immitis. This epidemiologically important species forms three subspecies worldwide, of which Aedes vexans arabiensis has a wide distribution in Europe and Africa. We quantified the genetic and phenotypic variation in Ae. vexans arabiensis in populations from Sweden (northern Europe), Hungary, and Serbia (central Europe). A landscape genetics approach (FST , STRUCTURE, BAPS, GENELAND) revealed significant differentiation between northern and southern populations. Similar to genetic data, wing geometric morphometrics revealed two different clusters, one made by Swedish populations, while another included Hungarian and Serbian populations. Moreover, integrated genetic and morphometric data from the spatial analysis suggested groupings of populations into three clusters, one of which was from Swedish and Hungarian populations. Data on spatial analysis regarding an intermediate status of the Hungarian population was supported by observed Isolation-by-Distance patterns. Furthermore, a low proportion of interpopulation vs intrapopulation variance revealed by AMOVA and low-to-moderate FST values on a broader geographical scale indicate a continuous between-population exchange of individuals, including considerable gene flow on the regional scale, are likely to be responsible for the maintenance of the observed population similarity in Aе. vexans. We discussed data considering population structure in the light of vector control strategies of the mosquito from public health importance. PMID:27232139

  19. The Mycetophila ruficollis Meigen (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) group in Europe: elucidating species delimitation with COI and ITS2 sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Jürgenstein, Siiri; Kurina, Olavi; Põldmaa, Kadri

    2015-01-01

    Abstract European species of the Mycetophila ruficollis group are compared on the basis of morphology and sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit one (COI) and the ITS2 region of nuclear ribosomal DNA. The study represents the first evaluation of morphology-based species delimitation of closely related fungus gnat species by applying molecular information. Detailed descriptions and illustrations of the male terminalia are presented along with a key for the identification of all nine European species of the group. Phylogenetic analyses of molecular data generally supported the morphological species discrimination. The barcoding region of COI superseded ITS2 rDNA in resolving species. In the COI barcoding region interspecific differences ranged from 2.9 to 10.6% and the intraspecific distance from 0.08 to 0.8%. Only COI data distinguished between the similar and closely related Mycetophila ichneumonea and Mycetophila uninotata of which the latter was observed to include cryptic species. The host range of some species is suggested to be narrower than previously considered and to depend on the forest type. Presented evidence indicates the importance of analysing sequence data of morphologically very similar mycetophages reared from identified host fungi for elucidating species delimitation as well as their geographic and host ranges. New country records, viz. Estonia for Mycetophila evanida, Georgia for Mycetophila ichneumonea, Mycetophila idonea and Mycetophila ruficollis, and Norway for Mycetophila strobli, widen the known distribution ranges of these species. PMID:26167119

  20. Variation in developmental time for geographically distinct populations of the common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata (Meigen).

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Meagan B; Sandhu, Sonia; Kimsey, Robert

    2010-03-01

    Time between death and discovery of remains, or postmortem interval (PMI), can be assessed using blow fly maggot age. Forensic entomologists rely on published, often nonlocal, species-specific developmental tables to determine maggot age. In a series of common garden experiments, we investigated the developmental rate variation between populations of Lucilia sericata collected from Sacramento, CA, San Diego, CA, and Easton, MA at 16 degrees C, 26 degrees C, and 36 degrees C. For the 16 degrees C trial the time measurement started at egg hatch, while for the higher temperatures the experiment began at oviposition; the wandering stage signified the endpoint for all experiments. The distribution of developmental times differed significantly (ANOVA, p < 0.001) between the three populations within each temperature treatment. We discovered that regional variation of developmental times within a blow fly species exists. This study demonstrates the importance of assembling local population-specific developmental tables when estimating larval age to determine PMI. PMID:20102471

  1. Lucilia silvarum Meigen, 1826 (Diptera: Calliphoridae)--a new species of interest for forensic entomology in Europe.

    PubMed

    Fremdt, Heike; Szpila, Krzysztof; Huijbregts, Johannes; Lindström, Anders; Zehner, Richard; Amendt, Jens

    2012-10-10

    In Europe, the blowfly genus Lucilia is represented in Forensic Entomology mainly by the species L. ampullacea, L. caesar, L. illustris and L. sericata. In the US, Lucilia silvarum is rarely recorded as a carrion breeding species but usually as a more or less exclusive parasite of frogs and toads. We present three forensic cases from different European countries reporting, for the first time, L. silvarum on human bodies that were found close to lakes, wetlands, or riversides. To use this species for post-mortem interval estimations, thermal development data is needed. The first step is accurate identification by morphological and molecular means. Therefore, we analysed a 611 bp part of the mitochondrial COI region for 23 specimens of L. silvarum from 9 different geographical regions, all of which give the same haplotype. Differences within the haplotype varied by up to 0.2%. Comparison between the haplotype found and those published on GenBank showed up to 1.2% variance. Moreover, we present an updated key for the morphological identification of the third larval instars of European Lucilia spp. of forensic importance, adding not only L. silvarum, but also L. cuprina which was recorded in Europe for the first time about 20 years ago.

  2. The effect of the volatile oils of Chenopodium ambrosioides and Thymus vulgaris against the larvae of Lucilia sericata (Meigen).

    PubMed

    Morsy, T A; Shoukry, A; Mazyad, S A; Makled, K M

    1998-08-01

    Nowadays, there are many problems with the use of chemical insecticides as resistance, environmental pollution, toxicity to man and animal... etc. All these required the investigation of a new line for controlling arthropod pests of medical and agricultural importance. The volatile oils of Chenopodium ambrosioides (American wormseed) and Thymus vulgaris (Tyme) proved to be effective against the third stage larvae of Lucilia sericata. The LC50 confidence limits were 70 ppm and 130 ppm for both volatile oils respectively. No doubt, the use of these plant volatile oils, which are widely distributed in the Egyptian flora, more cheap, more safe and without any pollution or hazard, is recommended.

  3. Man-biting species of Chrysops meigen, Culicoides latreille and Simulium latreille in Ethiopia, with discussion of their vector potentialities.

    PubMed

    White, G B

    1977-01-01

    Human filariasis and its vectors are little known in Ethiopia. Wuchereia bancrofti is confined to the western lowlands and cannot be the aetiological agent of elephantiasis in the highlands. Onchocerca volvulus is widespread in the south-western highlands. Loa loa and Dipetalonema perstans are reported here for the first time and appear to be uncommon. Studies were conducted in 1973, mostly near Jimma in Kaffa Province, on potential vectors of all but the first of these parasites. Among Simuliidae, the only blackflies of apparent medical importance were S. woodi ethiopiense and a possibly new member of the S. damnosum complex. The former is less seasonal and much less numerous than the latter, but may be more widespread and important along smaller and higher streams. Onchocerca larvae were recovered from "damnosum", but not from the small number (46) of ethiopiense examined. In August, at the height of the rainy season, the biting-rate of ethiopiense at 1,710 m altitude on the Gilgil Ghibe river reached 9.5/man-hour at 10-1100 hours and about 12/man-hour at 14-1600 hours. At the same time and place, the attack of "damnosum" reached a midday climax of about 1,800/man-hour; this peak could be delayed or suppressed by rain. Another possibly anthropophilic blackfly, S. dentulosum, tended to become most common in December afer the rainy season had passed, but proved incompetent to bite man successfully. The only feasible loiasis vector found in Ethiopia was Chrysops streptobalius; however, this tabanid was not closely associated with man. Up to 34/man-day were caught in watermeadows by the Gojeb river (altitude 1,160 m) in October. Man-biting species of Ceratopogonidae in various parts of Ethiopia were Culicoides fulvithorax, C. grahamii, C. kingi and C. milnei. The first two of these were anthropophilic in lowlands, but apparently not so in highlands. C. milnei was extremely abundant biting man highlands. C. milnei was extremely abundant biting man and domestic animals both indoors and outdg cycle was irregular, usually displaying a succession of ill-define nocturnal peaks; sometimes it attacked in daylight. Up to 35,000 C. milnei per trap-night were caught in light traps. Most of the females entering light traps in a stable were already engorged with blood. It seemed very likely that C. milnei would prove to be of veterinary importance. No firm indication was obtained as to what may transmit D. perstans in Ethiopia.

  4. First report of external ophthalmomyiasis caused by Lucilia sericata Meigen in a healthy patient without predisposing risk factors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won; Kim, Ga Eon; Park, Seong Hwan; Shin, Sang Eon; Park, Ji Hye; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2015-10-01

    A 72-year-old man with no medical history initially presented to the emergency room with severe tearing, redness, foreign body sensation, and pain in the left eye. He reported no previous history of any periocular trauma, malignancy, surgery, or systemic illness. On presentation, the patient only showed left periorbital edema and erythema in the left eyelid with no evidence of any skin malignancy. On slit lamp examination, multiple small whitish motile organisms were observed on the left conjunctival fornices. The organisms were removed, preserved, and identified as the third-stage larvae of Lucilia sericata (green bottle fly). The patient was treated with topical antibiotic and steroid eye drops and the inflammation resolved 1 week after treatment initiation. This is the first report of external ophthalmomyiasis caused by facultative parasite, L. sericata maggots in a healthy patient without any predisposing factors.

  5. Effects of sediment-spiked lufenuron on benthic macroinvertebrates in outdoor microcosms and single-species toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Brock, T C M; Bas, D A; Belgers, J D M; Bibbe, L; Boerwinkel, M-C; Crum, S J H; Diepens, N J; Kraak, M H S; Vonk, J A; Roessink, I

    2016-08-01

    Sediment ecotoxicity studies were conducted with lufenuron to (i) complement the results of a water-spiked mesocosm experiment with this lipophilic benzoylurea insecticide, (ii) to explore the predictive value of laboratory single-species tests for population and community-level responses of benthic macroinvertebrates, and (iii) to calibrate the tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms. For this purpose the concentration-response relationships for macroinvertebrates between sediment-spiked microcosms and those of 28-d sediment-spiked single-species toxicity tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus were compared. Lufenuron persisted in the sediment of the microcosms. On average, 87.7% of the initial lufenuron concentration could still be detected in the sediment after 12 weeks. Overall, benthic insects and crustaceans showed treatment-related declines and oligochaetes treatment-related increases. The lowest population-level NOEC in the microcosms was 0.79μg lufenuron/g organic carbon in dry sediment (μg a.s./g OC) for Tanytarsini, Chironomini and Dero sp. Multivariate analysis of the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates revealed a community-level NOEC of 0.79μg a.s./g OC. The treatment-related responses observed in the microcosms are in accordance with the results of the 28-d laboratory toxicity tests. These tests showed that the insect C. riparius and the crustacean H. azteca were approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the oligochaete L. variegatus. In our laboratory tests, using field-collected sediment, the lowest 28-d EC10 (0.49μg a.s./g OC) was observed for C. riparius (endpoint survival), while for the standard OECD test with this species, using artificial sediment, a NOEC of 2.35μg a.s./g OC (endpoint emergence) is reported. In this particular case, the sediment tier-1 effect assessment using the chronic EC10 (field-collected sediment) or chronic NOEC (artificial sediment) of C

  6. Effects of sediment-spiked lufenuron on benthic macroinvertebrates in outdoor microcosms and single-species toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Brock, T C M; Bas, D A; Belgers, J D M; Bibbe, L; Boerwinkel, M-C; Crum, S J H; Diepens, N J; Kraak, M H S; Vonk, J A; Roessink, I

    2016-08-01

    Sediment ecotoxicity studies were conducted with lufenuron to (i) complement the results of a water-spiked mesocosm experiment with this lipophilic benzoylurea insecticide, (ii) to explore the predictive value of laboratory single-species tests for population and community-level responses of benthic macroinvertebrates, and (iii) to calibrate the tier-1 effect assessment procedure for sediment organisms. For this purpose the concentration-response relationships for macroinvertebrates between sediment-spiked microcosms and those of 28-d sediment-spiked single-species toxicity tests with Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus were compared. Lufenuron persisted in the sediment of the microcosms. On average, 87.7% of the initial lufenuron concentration could still be detected in the sediment after 12 weeks. Overall, benthic insects and crustaceans showed treatment-related declines and oligochaetes treatment-related increases. The lowest population-level NOEC in the microcosms was 0.79μg lufenuron/g organic carbon in dry sediment (μg a.s./g OC) for Tanytarsini, Chironomini and Dero sp. Multivariate analysis of the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates revealed a community-level NOEC of 0.79μg a.s./g OC. The treatment-related responses observed in the microcosms are in accordance with the results of the 28-d laboratory toxicity tests. These tests showed that the insect C. riparius and the crustacean H. azteca were approximately two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the oligochaete L. variegatus. In our laboratory tests, using field-collected sediment, the lowest 28-d EC10 (0.49μg a.s./g OC) was observed for C. riparius (endpoint survival), while for the standard OECD test with this species, using artificial sediment, a NOEC of 2.35μg a.s./g OC (endpoint emergence) is reported. In this particular case, the sediment tier-1 effect assessment using the chronic EC10 (field-collected sediment) or chronic NOEC (artificial sediment) of C

  7. Trait-based modelling of bioaccumulation by freshwater benthic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sidney, Livia Alvarenga; Diepens, Noël J; Guo, Xiaoying; Koelmans, Albert A

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the role of species traits in chemical exposure is crucial for bioaccumulation and toxicity assessment of chemicals. We measured and modelled bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus and Sphaerium corneum. We used a battery test procedure with multiple enclosures in one aquarium, which maximized uniformity of exposure for the different species, such that the remaining variability was due mostly to species traits. The relative importance of uptake from either pore water or sediment ingestion was manipulated by using 28 d aged standard OECD sediment with low (1%) and medium (5%) OM content and 13 months aged sediment with medium OM (5%) content. Survival was ≥76% and wet weight increased for all species. Reproduction of H. azteca and weight gain of H. azteca and S. corneum were significantly higher in the medium OM aged sediments than in other sediments, perhaps due to a more developed microbial community (i.e., increase in food resources). Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF) ranged from 3 to 114, depending on species and PCB congener, with C. riparius (3-10)

  8. TiO2 nanoparticles for the remediation of eutrophic shallow freshwater systems: Efficiency and impacts on aquatic biota under a microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Bessa da Silva, Márcia; Abrantes, Nelson; Nogueira, Verónica; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    The application of nanomaterials (NMs) in the remediation of eutrophic waters, particularly in the control of internal loading of nutrients, has been started, but limited investigations evaluated the effectiveness of these new treatment approaches and of their potential impacts on species from shallow freshwater lakes. The present work investigated, under a microcosm experiment, the application of a TiO2 nanomaterial both for reducing nutrient (mainly phosphorus and nitrogen forms) desorption and release from sediments (preventive treatment-PT) and for eliminating algal blooms (remediation treatment-RT). Furthermore, we also intended to assess the potential impacts of nano-TiO2 application on key freshwater species. The results showed the effectiveness of nano-TiO2 in controlling the release of phosphates from surface sediment and the subsequent reduction of total phosphorus in the water column. A reduction in total nitrogen was also observed. Such changes in nutrient dynamics contributed to a progressive inhibition of development of algae after the application of the NM in PT microcosms. Concerning the ability of nano-TiO2 to interact with algal cells, this interaction has likely occurred, mainly in RT, enhancing the formation of aggregates and their rapid settlement, thus reducing the algal bloom. Both treatments caused deleterious effects on freshwater species. In PT, Daphnia magna and Lemna minor showed a significant inhibition of several endpoints. Conversely, no inhibitory effect on the growth of Chironomus riparius was recorded. In opposite, C. riparius was the most affected species in RT microcosms. Such difference was probably caused by the formation of larger TiO2-algae aggregates in RT, under a high algal density, that rapidly settled in the sediment, becoming less available for pelagic species. In summary, despite the effectiveness of both treatments in controlling internal nutrient loading and in the mitigating algal bloom episodes, their negative

  9. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Jaana; Karjalainen, Anna K; Schultz, Eija; Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area.

  10. The significance of growth in Chironomus tentans sediment toxicity tests: Relationship to reproduction and demographic endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, P.K.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    This study assessed the biological relevance of growth, as used in sediment toxicity bioassessment, through evaluation of the relationship between growth and reproduction in the midge C. tentans. Newly-hatched larvae were fed one of six food levels (3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 mg Tetrafin fish food) on a daily basis for one complete generation. Larvae were exposed in 300 ml beakers containing 100 ml of 75/{micro}m sand housed within an intermittent water renewal system. Food supply had no effect on larval (65--82%), pupal (93--95%), or adult (90--98%) survivorship. Larval growth and adult weight decreased significantly (p{<=}0.05) with decreasing food supply (r{sup 2} = 0.92, 0.91 respectively). The data suggest that a threshold larval dry weight of approximately 0.6 mg must be obtained for emergence to occur. This value also corresponded to the approximate minimum adult weight observed in this study. Emergence rate and total emergence were delayed at lower feeding levels; however, total emergence was not less than 60% for any treatment. Egg mass production, oviposition rate, and mean number of eggs produced per female declined significantly with reduced food supply. Larval growth and adult weight were significantly correlated with age-specific fecundity (r{sup 2} = 0.96). Application of the reproductive data in a demographic model showed that the expected number of offspring recruited to subsequent generations declined significantly with a decrease in food supply. The results of this study demonstrate a direct relationship between growth and reproduction in C. tentans and clearly emphasize the biological and ecological relevance of the growth endpoint in sediment toxicity bioassessment.

  11. Responses of Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, A.C.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is affected by ultraviolet (UV) light and a number of interacting environmental variables. The effect of two photoinduced PAHs, anthracene and fluoranthene, was studied with the midge, C. tentans, and the amphipod H. azteca in water-only and sediment exposures. Reduced growth was observed in the presence of UV light at low (ug/L) concentrations. Mixtures showed approximately additive responses. The amphipod was slightly more sensitive to photoinduced toxicity. Responses were modified by exposure differences due to behavior patterns, which altered UV exposures. Results suggest natural factors such as inorganic and organic particulates, in combination with behavior, have a significant role in determining the ecological relevance of photoinduced PAH toxicity.

  12. Chironomus tentans bioassay for testing synthetic fuel products and effluents, with data on acridine and quinoline

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.M.; McKamey, M.I.

    1981-05-01

    Sensitive tests of toxicity to aquatic insects are useful for assessing the effects of potential pollutants on aquatic ecosystems. Within the last few years, research emphasis has included the toxicity of coal-related synthetic fuel products and effluents to aquatic biota. As part of an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) program to evaluate the environmental effects of synthetic fuel products and effluents, a series of tests is being used to measure the toxicity of whole and fractionated synthetic fuel products and effluents and representative pure compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, and azaarenes) to aquatic organisms. Synthetic fuel materials are complex mixtures of inorganic and organic substances, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, and N-, S-, and O-substituted aromatics. By testing fractions and components of whole materials, we can begin to explain observed toxic effects and recommend further treatment to reduce toxicity. Test organisms include freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia pulex and magna), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), blue-green algae (Microcystis aeruginosa), snails (Physa heterostropha and Helisoma sp.), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  13. Increase in developmental instability in a field-collected Chironomus population maintained under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Arambourou, Hélène; Branchu, Philippe; Beisel, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    In order to be a relevant indicator of exposure towards teratogenic stressors, morphological defects should not be passed on to the next generation. In this study, we compare morphological variations in Chironomids collected from a contaminated river stretch with those of their progeny, reared in uncontaminated sediment under laboratory conditions. We focused on mentum defects (deformities, fluctuating asymmetry and mean shape change), measured by geometric morphometrics. We observed no significant variation in deformity rate between the parental generation and its progeny. On the contrary, we observed a significant increase in fluctuating asymmetry and a significant decrease in mentum centroid size in the offspring. Our results suggest that shape defects are not caused by direct exposure to teratogenic stressors alone. We propose four hypotheses to explain this: (a) teratogenic contaminants are present in egg-clutches, (b) contaminants at the sampling site have mutagenic effects, (c) costs of tolerance, and (d) contamination-induced genetic impoverishment. PMID:25749504

  14. What food and feeding rates are optimum for the Chironomus dilutus sediment toxicity test method?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates conducted using standard toxicity test procedures are used to assess the potential toxicity of contaminated sediments. Results are compared across sites or for batches of samples, and the performance of organisms in control treatme...

  15. Freshwater in situ toxicity testing: Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The use of traditional laboratory toxicity test species in field exposures have proven to be a valuable assessment tool for monitoring effluent, water, sediment and storm water quality. Mimicking fluctuating exposures of stressors with associated interactions with differing physico-chemical variables is difficult. In situ exposures are conducted for similar time periods measuring similar response endpoints as in more traditional laboratory tests. However, organisms are transferred to the field and exposed in various types of test chambers. The author has observed responses which are similar and which are significantly different from simultaneous laboratory exposures. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, suspended solids, natural light, flow, and predation may affect in situ responses, but are often removed from laboratory exposures. The strengths and weaknesses observed with these test systems over the past few years will be reviewed.

  16. LABORATORY CULTURE OF CHIRONOMUS TENTANS FOR USE IN TOXICITY TESTING: OPTIMUM INITIAL EGG STOCKING DENSITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the effet of initial culture stocking density on: (1) post-hatch (larval) dry weight, body length and head-capsule width at 10 and 20 days; (2) time to emergence; (3) number and sex of emergent adults; (4) number of larvae and pupae at test t...

  17. Toxicity of solid residues resulting from wastewater treatment with nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Verónica; Lopes, Isabel; Rocha-Santos, Teresa; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth

    2015-08-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are widely recommended for wastewater treatments due to their unique properties. Several studies report the different advantages of nanotechnology in the remediation of wastewaters, but limited research has been directed toward the fate and potential impacts of the solid residues (SRs) produced after the application of such technologies. The present work aimed at investigating the ecotoxicity of SRs resulting from the treatment of three effluents (OOMW, kraft pulp mill, and mining drainage) with two NMs (TiO2 and Fe2O3). The invertebrate Chironomus riparius was selected as test organism and exposed to the residues. The effect on percentage of survival and growth was assessed. Results showed that the SRs from the treatments nano-TiO2(1.0gL(-1))/H2O2(0.5M) and nano-Fe2O3(1.0gL(-1))/H2O2(1.0M) from OOMW and nano-Fe2O3(0.75gL(-1))/H2O2(0.01M) from kraft pulp mill effluent exhibited lethal toxicity to C. riparius. Only the exposure to SRs resulting from the treatment with nano-Fe2O3(0.75gL(-1))/H2O2(0.01M) applied to the kraft pulp mill effluent significantly affected the growth rate based on the head capsule width. In terms of growth rate, based on the body length, it decreased significantly after exposure to the SRs from the treatments nano-TiO2 (1.0gL(-1)) and nano-Fe2O3(0.75gL(-1))/H2O2(0.01M) of kraft paper mill effluent and nano-Fe2O3(1.0gL(-1))/H2O2(1.0M) of OOMW. According to our study the SRs can promote negative effects on C. riparius. However, the effects are dependent on the type of effluent treated as well as on the organic and inorganic compounds attached to the NMs. PMID:26057932

  18. Improving sediment-quality guidelines for nickel: development and application of predictive bioavailability models to assess chronic toxicity of nickel in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Vangheluwe, Marnix L U; Verdonck, Frederik A M; Besser, John M; Brumbaugh, William G; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Schlekat, Christan E; Garman, Emily Rogevich

    2013-11-01

    Within the framework of European Union chemical legislations an extensive data set on the chronic toxicity of sediment nickel has been generated. In the initial phase of testing, tests were conducted with 8 taxa of benthic invertebrates in 2 nickel-spiked sediments, including 1 reasonable worst-case sediment with low concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and total organic carbon. The following species were tested: amphipods (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus), mayflies (Hexagenia sp.), oligochaetes (Tubifex tubifex, Lumbriculus variegatus), mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea), and midges (Chironomus dilutus, Chironomus riparius). In the second phase, tests were conducted with the most sensitive species in 6 additional spiked sediments, thus generating chronic toxicity data for a total of 8 nickel-spiked sediments. A species sensitivity distribution was elaborated based on 10% effective concentrations yielding a threshold value of 94 mg Ni/kg dry weight under reasonable worst-case conditions. Data from all sediments were used to model predictive bioavailability relationships between chronic toxicity thresholds (20% effective concentrations) and AVS and Fe, and these models were used to derive site-specific sediment-quality criteria. Normalization of toxicity values reduced the intersediment variability in toxicity values significantly for the amphipod species Hyalella azteca and G. pseudolimnaeus, but these relationships were less clearly defined for the mayfly Hexagenia sp. Application of the models to prevailing local conditions resulted in threshold values ranging from 126 mg to 281 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the AVS model, and 143 mg to 265 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the Fe model. PMID:23983116

  19. Improving sediment-quality guidelines for nickel: development and application of predictive bioavailability models to assess chronic toxicity of nickel in freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vangheluwe, Marnix L. U.; Verdonck, Frederik A. M.; Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Schlekat, Christan E.; Rogevich Garman, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of European Union chemical legislations an extensive data set on the chronic toxicity of sediment nickel has been generated. In the initial phase of testing, tests were conducted with 8 taxa of benthic invertebrates in 2 nickel-spiked sediments, including 1 reasonable worst-case sediment with low concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and total organic carbon. The following species were tested: amphipods (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus), mayflies (Hexagenia sp.), oligochaetes (Tubifex tubifex, Lumbriculus variegatus), mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea), and midges (Chironomus dilutus, Chironomus riparius). In the second phase, tests were conducted with the most sensitive species in 6 additional spiked sediments, thus generating chronic toxicity data for a total of 8 nickel-spiked sediments. A species sensitivity distribution was elaborated based on 10% effective concentrations yielding a threshold value of 94 mg Ni/kg dry weight under reasonable worst-case conditions. Data from all sediments were used to model predictive bioavailability relationships between chronic toxicity thresholds (20% effective concentrations) and AVS and Fe, and these models were used to derive site-specific sediment-quality criteria. Normalization of toxicity values reduced the intersediment variability in toxicity values significantly for the amphipod species Hyalella azteca and G. pseudolimnaeus, but these relationships were less clearly defined for the mayfly Hexagenia sp. Application of the models to prevailing local conditions resulted in threshold values ranging from 126 mg to 281 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the AVS model, and 143 mg to 265 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the Fe model

  20. Chronic toxicity of nickel-spiked freshwater sediments: variation in toxicity among eight invertebrate taxa and eight sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Kemble, Nile E.; Schlekat, Christian E.; Garman, Emily R.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the chronic toxicity of Ni-spiked freshwater sediments to benthic invertebrates. A 2-step spiking procedure (spiking and sediment dilution) and a 2-stage equilibration period (10 wk anaerobic and 1 wk aerobic) were used to spike 8 freshwater sediments with wide ranges of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS; 0.94–38 µmol/g) and total organic carbon (TOC; 0.42–10%). Chronic sediment toxicity tests were conducted with 8 invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, Chironomus riparius, Chironomus dilutus, Hexagenia sp., Lumbriculus variegatus, Tubifex tubifex, and Lampsilis siliquoidea) in 2 spiked sediments. Nickel toxicity thresholds estimated from species-sensitivity distributions were 97 µg/g and 752 µg/g (total recoverable Ni; dry wt basis) for sediments with low and high concentrations of AVS and TOC, respectively. Sensitive species were tested with 6 additional sediments. The 20% effect concentrations (EC20s) for Hyalella and Gammarus, but not Hexagenia, were consistent with US Environmental Protection Agency benchmarks based on Ni in porewater and in simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) normalized to AVS and TOC. For Hexagenia, sediment EC20s increased at less than an equimolar basis with increased AVS, and toxicity occurred in several sediments with Ni concentrations in SEM less than AVS. The authors hypothesize that circulation of oxygenated water by Hexagenia led to oxidation of AVS in burrows, creating microenvironments with high Ni exposure. Despite these unexpected results, a strong relationship between Hexagenia EC20s and AVS could provide a basis for conservative site-specific sediment quality guidelines for Ni.

  1. Improving sediment-quality guidelines for nickel: development and application of predictive bioavailability models to assess chronic toxicity of nickel in freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Vangheluwe, Marnix L U; Verdonck, Frederik A M; Besser, John M; Brumbaugh, William G; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Schlekat, Christan E; Garman, Emily Rogevich

    2013-11-01

    Within the framework of European Union chemical legislations an extensive data set on the chronic toxicity of sediment nickel has been generated. In the initial phase of testing, tests were conducted with 8 taxa of benthic invertebrates in 2 nickel-spiked sediments, including 1 reasonable worst-case sediment with low concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and total organic carbon. The following species were tested: amphipods (Hyalella azteca, Gammarus pseudolimnaeus), mayflies (Hexagenia sp.), oligochaetes (Tubifex tubifex, Lumbriculus variegatus), mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea), and midges (Chironomus dilutus, Chironomus riparius). In the second phase, tests were conducted with the most sensitive species in 6 additional spiked sediments, thus generating chronic toxicity data for a total of 8 nickel-spiked sediments. A species sensitivity distribution was elaborated based on 10% effective concentrations yielding a threshold value of 94 mg Ni/kg dry weight under reasonable worst-case conditions. Data from all sediments were used to model predictive bioavailability relationships between chronic toxicity thresholds (20% effective concentrations) and AVS and Fe, and these models were used to derive site-specific sediment-quality criteria. Normalization of toxicity values reduced the intersediment variability in toxicity values significantly for the amphipod species Hyalella azteca and G. pseudolimnaeus, but these relationships were less clearly defined for the mayfly Hexagenia sp. Application of the models to prevailing local conditions resulted in threshold values ranging from 126 mg to 281 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the AVS model, and 143 mg to 265 mg Ni/kg dry weight, based on the Fe model.

  2. Bee (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) and hoverfly (Diptera: Syrphidae) pollinators in Pannonian habitats of Serbia, with a description of a new Eumerus Meigen species (Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Markov, Zlata; Nedeljković, Zorica; Ricarte, Antonio; Vujić, Ante; Jovičić, Snežana; Józan, Zsolt; Mudri-Stojnić, Sonja; Radenković, Snežana; Ćetković, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of bee (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) and hoverfly (Diptera: Syrphidae) pollinators from ten localities in Vojvodina, Serbia was surveyed. Among different types of Pannonian habitat (grasslands, heathland and scrub, woodland and forest habitats) all localities were categorised as forest and steppe. They were in protected areas, mostly undisturbed by human activity. Censuses of pollinators took place from 30 March to 10 October, 2014. We recorded 218 pollinator species; 135 bee species (42 Halictidae; 32 Apidae; 29 Andrenidae; 24 Megachilidae; 7 Colletidae; 1 Melittidae) and 83 species of hoverflies. We describe a new species of hoverfly, Eumerus pannonicus sp. nov., and compare it to other similar species. Based on our study, the Special Nature Reserve of Pašnjaci Velike Droplje is critical for the conservation of this new Eumerus-being only found at this locality-and other species such as Chrysotoxum lineare (Zetterstedt), which is rare in Europe and protected under Serbian legislation. The highest numbers of bee species were recorded in the Deliblato and Subotica sand areas (40 and 32, respectively), while Fruška Gora Mountain and the Vršac Mountains harboured the highest number of hoverfly species. PMID:27615823

  3. First record in South Asia of deer throat bot fly larvae Pharyngomyia picta (Meigen, 1824) (Diptera: Oesteridae) from Sambar deer (Rusa unicolor), a new host record.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, Radhakrishnan; Ajithkumar, K G; Reghu, Ravindran; Kavitha, Rajagopal

    2012-06-01

    The Bot fly larvae, identified to be the third instars of the deer throat bot fly Pharyngomyia picta were recovered from the lumen of trachea and secondary bronchi during the necropsy of a female sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) in Kerala, India. This forms the first report of P. picta from India and the whole of South Asia. Sambar deer is a new host record for the larvae of this fly. Morphological description of the third stage larvae with supporting figures are presented. PMID:22735848

  4. First record in South Asia of deer throat bot fly larvae Pharyngomyia picta (Meigen, 1824) (Diptera: Oesteridae) from Sambar deer (Rusa unicolor), a new host record.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, Radhakrishnan; Ajithkumar, K G; Reghu, Ravindran; Kavitha, Rajagopal

    2012-06-01

    The Bot fly larvae, identified to be the third instars of the deer throat bot fly Pharyngomyia picta were recovered from the lumen of trachea and secondary bronchi during the necropsy of a female sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) in Kerala, India. This forms the first report of P. picta from India and the whole of South Asia. Sambar deer is a new host record for the larvae of this fly. Morphological description of the third stage larvae with supporting figures are presented.

  5. Lucilia sericata strain from Colombia: Experimental colonization, life tables and evaluation of two artificial diets of the blowfly Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Bogotá, Colombia strain.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Luis C; Ortega, Luis G; Segura, Nidya A; Acero, Víctor M; Bello, Felio

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to establish, under experimental laboratory conditions, a colony of Lucilia sericata, Bogotá-Colombia strain, to build life tables and evaluate two artificial diets. This blowfly is frequently used in postmortem interval studies and in injury treatment. The parental adult insects collected in Bogotá were maintained in cages at 22°C±1 average temperature, 60%±5 relative humidity and 12 h photoperiodicity. The blowflies were fed on two artificial diets that were evaluated over seven continuous generations. Reproductive and population parameters were assessed. The life cycle of the species was expressed in the number of days of the different stages: egg = 0.8±0.1, larvae I = 1.1±0.02, larvae II = 1.94±0.16, larvae III = 3.5±0.54, pupae = 6.55±0.47, male adult = 28.7±0.83 and female adult = 33.5±1.0. Total survival from egg stage to adult stage was 91.2% for diet 1, while for diet 2 this parameter was 40.5%. The lifetime reproductive output was 184.51±11.2 eggs per female. The population parameters, as well as the reproductive output of the blowflies that were assessed, showed relatively high values, giving evidence of the continuous increase of the strain over the different generations and making possible its maintenance as a stable colony that has lasted for more than two years.

  6. Assessing chironomid deformities in field- and laboratory-exposed organisms from organic- and metal-contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1994-12-31

    Benthic invertebrate samples were collected from three Great Lakes harbors classified as Areas of concern (AOC) and from the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (CFR) in Montana. Contamination consists of organic and inorganic contaminants at the AOC sites and primarily heavy metal tailings and mining wastes in the CFR sites. Samples were collected with a ponar grab sampler from stations in Indiana Harbor, IN (1989, n = 7), the Buffalo River, NY (1989, n = 10), the Saginaw River, MI (1989, n = 7; 1990, n = 7), and the Clark Fork River (1991, n = 13). Compared to literature values for incidence of deformities in uncontaminated sediments, frequency of Chironomid mouthpart deformities was significantly greater at most stations sampled from the AOC sites. In contrast, only a few stations sampled from the CFR sites had significantly greater incidence of mouthpart deformities. Occurrence of mouthpart deformities ranged from 0 to 100% at the stations from the AOC`s and from 0 to 18% at the CFR stations. These mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius laboratory exposures to contaminated sediments from all AOC and CFR sites were evaluated and compared to frequencies found in field collected samples. Preliminary analysis indicates that frequency of mouthpart deformities from laboratory exposed chironomids are generally lower than those found in field collected samples.

  7. Disturbance caused by freshwater releases of different magnitude on the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities of two coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel; Rieradevall, Maria

    2010-06-01

    The response of the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities to freshwater releases of different magnitude and persistence was investigated in two Mediterranean coastal lagoons (Ca l'Arana and Ricarda). The study was carried out during 14 months (June 2004-July 2005) in which different environmental variables and the macroinvertebrate communities associated with two different habitats, the Phragmites australis belt and the deep area of the lagoons, were sampled monthly. Additionally, potential colonizing sources were identified through the analysis of Chironomidae pupal exuviae. The initial response of the communities to the freshwater releases was similar, being characterized by a peak of opportunistic taxa (mainly Naididae), but the late response was different for each lagoon. In the Ca l'Arana, the magnitude of the freshwater release was higher (salinity dropped below five, which is the limit commonly established for most freshwater species) and its persistence was also higher, allowing the colonization of the lagoon by new insect taxa, which replaced the brackish water species. In the Ricarda, the salinity never dropped beyond five and pre-disturbance conditions were rapidly re-established. This, together with the acclimatizing mechanisms showed by the species Chironomus riparius and Hediste diversicolor, permitted the recovery of the pre-disturbance macroinvertebrate community.

  8. Assessment of the use of the AVS concept for the routine toxicity monitoring of contaminated freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Vangheluwe, M.L.; Janssen, C.R.; Goyvaerts, M.P.; Cooman, P.

    1995-12-31

    Acid volatile sulfides (AVS) have been shown to be an important factor mediating the bioavailability of heavy metals in sediments and have consequently been suggested as a possible predictive tool for toxicity assessment of these matrices. The potential use and limitations of the AVS method for predictive toxicity screening and priority setting was assessed in a large scale sediment monitoring study (Flanders, Belgium). The acute toxicity of 50 metal contaminated freshwater sediments, with varying metal concentrations and sediment characteristics, were tested using the Microtox{reg_sign} Solid Phase test and the 10 day test with Chironomus riparius and Hyalella azteca. Uni and multivariate statistical techniques were used to asses the relations between acute toxicity and SEM/AVS ratio`s and to evaluate the influence of sediment characteristics on metal bioavailability and toxicity. In general, the results of this study indicate that the AVS-toxicity relationship proposed in literature does have certain limitations. Finally, the potential use of a concentration-addition model for predicting metal-mixture toxicity in sediments will be presented and discussed.

  9. Structural changes in freshwater fish and chironomids exposed to bacterial exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Morley, N J; Ahmad, M; Challis, G L; Wright, R; Bicker, R; Morritt, D

    2012-06-01

    Mass fish mortalities have been reported in the past decade from British waters, often coinciding with blooms of filamentous actinobacteria, particularly strains of Streptomyces griseus. The present study has shown that some fractions of the exudate of S. griseus, prepared after a series of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) separations, and analysed with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), induced pathological changes to the gills of carp and/or tench fry following exposure under laboratory conditions up to 96 h Similar changes were induced by streptomycin, a secondary metabolite of S. griseus, and these included loss of microridging and fusion of secondary lamellae, with carp fry in the case of the exudate of S. griseus being more sensitive than tench fry, especially with exposure to fraction 9 and selected sub-fractions of 9. Some deformities using a severity index were also observed in the head capsule of larvae of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius, including loss and splitting of teeth on the mentum. The results are discussed in relation to further identification of metabolites derived from samples of the organic filtrate of S. griseus and implications for the functioning of freshwater ecosystems. PMID:22381615

  10. Deformities of chironomid larvae and heavy metal pollution: from laboratory to field studies.

    PubMed

    Di Veroli, A; Santoro, F; Pallottini, M; Selvaggi, R; Scardazza, F; Cappelletti, D; Goretti, E

    2014-10-01

    Mouthpart deformities of Chironomus riparius larvae (Diptera) have been investigated to evaluate the toxic effects of contamination by heavy metals in the Genna Stream (Central Italy), situated in an area subjected to intensive swine farms (40000 heads). The livestock farming (fertirrigation) contributes to metal pollution of the Genna Stream with an increase of copper, zinc, cadmium, chromium and nickel in the sediments of the downstream stations. The incidence of mentum deformities was very high at all sampling stations, about 56%. The highest values of deformities were found in the intermediate river reach (St. 3: 65%) and in March (66%), mainly due to an increase in severe deformities. The high incidence of severe deformities (30%) is attributed to the high pollution level by heavy metals in the sediments, in particular to copper and zinc, which showed the highest average value at St. 3 and in March. This field study reflected the relationships between sediment metal concentrations and chironomid mouthpart deformities, previously observed in laboratory tests, and highlighted these deformities as toxicity endpoints. This feature paves the way for their use as an effective tool in freshwater bioassessment monitoring programs to evaluate the toxic effects of metal contamination in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:25048882

  11. Evaluation of the resident-species procedure for developing site-specific water quality criteria for copper in Blaine Creek, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, M.G.; Farris, J.L.; Cherry, D.S.; Cairns, J. . Dept. of Biology); Reash, R.J. . Environmental Engineering Div.)

    1994-06-01

    Acute toxicity tests were performed on each of nine different organisms in Blaine Creek (Lawrence County, KY) water to determine 48-h LC50 values for copper (Cu). Blaine Creek is the receiving stream for Kentucky Power Company's Big Sandy Plant fly-ash pond discharge. Selection of the nine tested species and integration of the results were based on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) resident-species procedure. The following LC50 ([mu]g Cu/L) values were obtained: Daphnia pulex 37; Physella sp. 109; Isonychia bicolor 223; Pimephales promelas 284; Stenonema sp. 453; Eurycea bislineata 1,120; Chironomus riparius 1,170; Orconectes sp. 2,370; Lepomis macrochirus 4,300. A final acute value (FAV) of 10.1 [mu]g Cu/L was derived using the Blaine Creek database, which is lower than the EPA's national FAV. The differences in FAVs were due to the effect of database size, not differences in the relative sensitivity of test organisms. The findings provide caution for dischargers who may choose to use the resident-species procedure for future site-specific water-quality-criteria demonstrations. The resident-species procedure, because of the inherent conservative bias of the calculation process, tends to produce more stringent criteria when used on a site-specific basis. A modified recalculation procedure, in conduction with site-specific metal bioavailability data, was judged to be the most appropriate method for deriving site-specific Cu criteria for Blaine Creek.

  12. The toxicity of a neem insecticide to populations of culicidae and other aquatic invertebrates as assessed in in situ microcosms.

    PubMed

    Scott, I M; Kaushik, N K

    2000-10-01

    Microcosm trials were conducted with the botanical insecticide Margosan-O(R) to assess the potential hazards of the product to aquatic organisms. Laboratory chronic bioassays with water from the treated microcosms were conducted to provide an estimate of the residual effect of Margosan-O. Results from chronic tests showed Margosan-O toxicity to be greater in the laboratory exposures than in situ with Culicidae larvae exposed to the same concentrations. Residue analyses of the active ingredient, azadirachtin, determined that it had a half-life of 36 to 48 h in water exposed to natural sunlight. Two applications of Margosan-O at the recommended application rate for pests did not harm aquatic invertebrates that are categorized as planktonic and filter feeding (Culex sp. and Daphnia sp.). However, the benthic invertebrate (Chironomus riparius) was affected by multiple applications of neem. These results show that the use of Margosan-O and possibly other neem extracts in or near aquatic environments could lead to disturbances in benthic populations and may cause decreases in numbers of organisms that are important in food web and nutrient cycling processes. PMID:10948283

  13. Whole effluent toxicity assessment at a wastewater treatment plant upgraded with a full-scale post-ozonation using aquatic key species.

    PubMed

    Magdeburg, Axel; Stalter, Daniel; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Ozonation as final wastewater (WW) polishing step, following conventional activated sludge treatment is increasingly implemented in sewage treatment for contaminant degradation to prevent surface water pollution. While the oxidative degradation of chemicals has been extensively investigated, the in vivo toxicological characteristics of ozonated whole effluents are rarely a matter of research. In the present study, whole effluents were toxicologically evaluated with an in vivo test battery before and after full-scale ozonation and subsequent sand filtration on site at a treatment plant. One aquatic plant (duckweed, Lemna minor) and five invertebrate species of different systematic groups (Lumbriculus variegatus, Chironomus riparius, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Daphnia magna) were exposed to the effluents in a flow-through-designed test system with a test duration of 7-28 d. None of the considered toxicity endpoints correlated with the pollutant elimination. A tendency towards an increased toxicity after ozonation was apparent in three of the test systems showing [statistically] significant adverse effects in the L. variegatus toxicity test (decrease in reproduction and biomass). After sand filtration, adverse effects were reduced to a similar level like after conventional treatment. Solely the Daphnia reproduction test revealed beneficial effects after ozonation in combination with sand filtration. Results of the test battery indicate the formation of adverse oxidation products during WW ozonation. L. variegatus appeared to be the most sensitive of the five test species. Sand filtration effectively removes or detoxifies toxic oxidation products, as toxic effects were subsequently reduced to the level after conventional treatment. PMID:22560180

  14. Sediment toxicity screening with cost-effective microbiotests and conventional assays: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Vanciheluwe, M.L.; Janssen, C.R.; Persoone, G.

    1995-12-31

    A large monitoring study of freshwater sediments, using the TRIAD approach, was conducted in Flanders (Belgium). This paper reports on the results of the toxicity assessment of 80 sediment samples evaluated with a battery of microbiotests and conventional assays. Sediment pore waters, extracted by squeezing, were tested with the Microtox{reg_sign} (Vibrio fischerii) and Thamnotoxkit{trademark} F (Thamnocephalus platyurus) microbiotests and the conventional (acute) assays with algae (Selenastrum capricornutum) and daphnids (Daphnia magna). A newly developed 5 day ELS test with the catfish Clarias gariepinus was also applied to the pore waters. Solid-phase testing was performed with the Microtox Sp{reg_sign} assay and the 10 day tests with Chironomus riparius and Hyalella azteca. Uni- and multivariate statistical techniques were applied to the data matrix to select a minimal test battery from the water phase and solid phase assays and from all tests combined. The influence of sediment associated confounding factors on the validity of the test results obtained with the various assays will be discussed. Finally a comparison of the predictive power of the selected battery of signal tests and that of the complete battery will be made and the potential use of the minimal battery for the initial hazard assessment of contaminated sediments will be reviewed.

  15. Deformities of chironomid larvae and heavy metal pollution: from laboratory to field studies.

    PubMed

    Di Veroli, A; Santoro, F; Pallottini, M; Selvaggi, R; Scardazza, F; Cappelletti, D; Goretti, E

    2014-10-01

    Mouthpart deformities of Chironomus riparius larvae (Diptera) have been investigated to evaluate the toxic effects of contamination by heavy metals in the Genna Stream (Central Italy), situated in an area subjected to intensive swine farms (40000 heads). The livestock farming (fertirrigation) contributes to metal pollution of the Genna Stream with an increase of copper, zinc, cadmium, chromium and nickel in the sediments of the downstream stations. The incidence of mentum deformities was very high at all sampling stations, about 56%. The highest values of deformities were found in the intermediate river reach (St. 3: 65%) and in March (66%), mainly due to an increase in severe deformities. The high incidence of severe deformities (30%) is attributed to the high pollution level by heavy metals in the sediments, in particular to copper and zinc, which showed the highest average value at St. 3 and in March. This field study reflected the relationships between sediment metal concentrations and chironomid mouthpart deformities, previously observed in laboratory tests, and highlighted these deformities as toxicity endpoints. This feature paves the way for their use as an effective tool in freshwater bioassessment monitoring programs to evaluate the toxic effects of metal contamination in freshwater ecosystems.

  16. Bluegill growth as modified by plant density: an exploration of underlying mechanisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Stein, Roy A.

    1992-01-01

    Bluegill (Lepomis macrochira) growth varies inconsistently with plant density. In laboratory and field experiments, we explored mechanisms underlying bluegill growth as a function of plant and invertebrate density. In the laboratory, bluegills captured more chironomids (Chironomus riparius) than damselflies (Enallagma spp. and Ischnura spp.), but energy intake per time spent searching did not differ between damselfly and chironomid treatments. From laboratory data, we described prey encounter rates as functions of plant and invertebrate density. In Clark Lake, Ohio, we created 0.05-ha mesocosms of inshore vegetation to generate macrophyte densities of 125, 270, and 385 stems/m2 of Potamogeton and Ceratophyllum and added 46-mm bluegill (1/m2). In these mesocosms, invertebrate density increased as a function of macrophyte density. Combining this function with encounter rate functions derived from laboratory data, we predicted that bluegill growth should peak at a high macrophyte density, greater than 1000 stems/m2, even though growth should change only slightly beyond 100 stems/m2. Consistent with our predictions, bluegills did not grow differentially, nor did their use of different prey taxa differ, across macrophyte densities in the field. Bluegills preferred chironomid pupae, which were relatively few in numbers but vulnerable to predation, whereas more cryptic, chironomid larvae, which were associated with vegetation but were relatively abundant, were eaten as encountered. Bluegill avoided physid snails. Contrary to previous work, vegetation did not influence growth or diet of bluegill beyond relatively low densities owing to the interaction between capture probabilities and macroinvertebrate densities.

  17. The mode of bioturbation triggers pesticide remobilization from aquatic sediments.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Schletz, Marco; Goedkoop, Willem

    2016-08-01

    After their release into the aquatic environment, contaminants may - depending on the physicochemical properties - adsorb to sediments. From there these contaminants can either be buried or remobilised by abiotic factors (e.g., resuspension) as well as by the bioturbating activity of sediment dwelling invertebrates. Little is, however, know about the effects of bioturbation on the fate of pesticides. Therefore, the present study quantified the impact of the bioturbation mode of benthic invertebrate species (bio-diffusor vs. bio-irrigation), the invertebrate density (i.e. 0-8 individuals per replicate), and the substance-inherent properties (i.e. hydrophobicity, water solubility) on the remobilization of sediment-associated pesticides in a laboratory-based set-up over 13 days. We found that both the bioturbation mode (i.e., species identity) and species density, as well as pesticide properties (i.e., hydrophobicity) affected the direction and magnitude of remobilisation of sediment-bound pesticides. The oligochaeta Lumbriculus variegatus showed a density-dependent effect on the remobilization of lindane to the water phase, whereas those with the amphipod Monoporeia affinis and larvae of the midge Chironomus riparius did not. Although these findings show that sediments not per definition are a sink for pesticides, the rates of pesticide remobilization are limited. This observation, thus, suggests that the risk for aquatic communities posed by the remobilization of pesticides from the sediment due to bioturbation is low. PMID:27107774

  18. Behavioural responses of freshwater planarians after short-term exposure to the insecticide chlorantraniliprole.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Andreia C M; Henriques, Jorge F; Domingues, Inês; Golovko, Oksana; Žlábek, Vladimír; Barata, Carlos; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Pestana, João L T

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in video tracking technologies provide the tools for a sensitive and reproducible analysis of invertebrate activity under stressful conditions nurturing the field of behavioural ecotoxicology. This study aimed to evaluate behavioural responses of the freshwater planarian Dugesia subtentaculata exposed to a model compound, chlorantraniliprole (CAP). This compound is an anthranilic diamide insecticide and due to its neurotoxic action can, at low concentrations, impair behaviour of exposed organisms. Behavioural endpoints measured included feeding and locomotor activities. Feeding responses were based on planarian predatory behaviour using Chironomus riparius larvae as prey. Locomotion was measured by the traditional planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) assay and additionally using an automated video tracking system using a Zebrabox(®) (Viewpoint, France) device. While feeding and pLMV were significantly impaired at 131.7μg/L CAP, the video tracking system showed that total distance covered by planarians was significantly reduced at concentrations as low as 26.2μg/L CAP. Our results show that more advanced automated video recording systems can be used in the development of sensitive bioassays allowing a reliable, time- and cost-effective quantification of behaviour in aquatic invertebrates. Due to their ecological relevance, behavioural responses should not be disregarded in risk assessment strategies and we advocate the suitability of planarians as suitable organisms for behavioural ecotoxicological studies.

  19. Toxicity assessment of sediments from three European river basins using a sediment contact test battery.

    PubMed

    Tuikka, A I; Schmitt, C; Höss, S; Bandow, N; von der Ohe, P C; de Zwart, D; de Deckere, E; Streck, G; Mothes, S; van Hattum, B; Kocan, A; Brix, R; Brack, W; Barceló, D; Sormunen, A J; Kukkonen, J V K

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of four polluted sediments and their corresponding reference sediments from three European river basins were investigated using a battery of six sediment contact tests representing three different trophic levels. The tests included were chronic tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a sub-chronic test with the midge Chironomus riparius, an early life stage test with the zebra fish Danio rerio, and an acute test with the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The endpoints, namely survival, growth, reproduction, embryo development and light inhibition, differed between tests. The measured effects were compared to sediment contamination translated into toxic units (TU) on the basis of acute toxicity to Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas, and multi-substance Potentially Affected Fractions of species (msPAF) as an estimate for expected community effects. The test battery could clearly detect toxicity of the polluted sediments with test-specific responses to the different sediments. The msPAF and TU-based toxicity estimations confirmed the results of the biotests by predicting a higher toxic risk for the polluted sediments compared to the corresponding reference sediments, but partly having a different emphasis from the biotests. The results demonstrate differences in the sensitivities of species and emphasize the need for data on multiple species, when estimating the effects of sediment pollution on the benthic community.

  20. Whole effluent toxicity assessment at a wastewater treatment plant upgraded with a full-scale post-ozonation using aquatic key species.

    PubMed

    Magdeburg, Axel; Stalter, Daniel; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Ozonation as final wastewater (WW) polishing step, following conventional activated sludge treatment is increasingly implemented in sewage treatment for contaminant degradation to prevent surface water pollution. While the oxidative degradation of chemicals has been extensively investigated, the in vivo toxicological characteristics of ozonated whole effluents are rarely a matter of research. In the present study, whole effluents were toxicologically evaluated with an in vivo test battery before and after full-scale ozonation and subsequent sand filtration on site at a treatment plant. One aquatic plant (duckweed, Lemna minor) and five invertebrate species of different systematic groups (Lumbriculus variegatus, Chironomus riparius, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, Daphnia magna) were exposed to the effluents in a flow-through-designed test system with a test duration of 7-28 d. None of the considered toxicity endpoints correlated with the pollutant elimination. A tendency towards an increased toxicity after ozonation was apparent in three of the test systems showing [statistically] significant adverse effects in the L. variegatus toxicity test (decrease in reproduction and biomass). After sand filtration, adverse effects were reduced to a similar level like after conventional treatment. Solely the Daphnia reproduction test revealed beneficial effects after ozonation in combination with sand filtration. Results of the test battery indicate the formation of adverse oxidation products during WW ozonation. L. variegatus appeared to be the most sensitive of the five test species. Sand filtration effectively removes or detoxifies toxic oxidation products, as toxic effects were subsequently reduced to the level after conventional treatment.

  1. Swarm dynamics may give rise to Lévy flights

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Andrew M.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    “Continuous-time correlated random walks” are now gaining traction as models of scale-finite animal movement patterns because they overcome inherent shortcomings with the prevailing paradigm - discrete random walk models. Continuous-time correlated random walk models are founded on the classic Langevin equation that is driven by purely additive noise. The Langevin equation is, however, changed fundamentally by the smallest of multiplicative noises. The inclusion of such noises gives rise to Lévy flights, a popular but controversial model of scale-free movement patterns. Multiplicative noises have not featured prominently in the literature on biological Lévy flights, being seen, perhaps, as no more than a mathematical contrivance. Here we show how Langevin equations driven by multiplicative noises and incumbent Lévy flights arise naturally in the modelling of swarms. Model predictions find some support in three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. We hereby provide a new window on Lévy flights as models of movement pattern data, linking patterns to generative processes. PMID:27465971

  2. Swarm dynamics may give rise to Lévy flights.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andrew M; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    "Continuous-time correlated random walks" are now gaining traction as models of scale-finite animal movement patterns because they overcome inherent shortcomings with the prevailing paradigm - discrete random walk models. Continuous-time correlated random walk models are founded on the classic Langevin equation that is driven by purely additive noise. The Langevin equation is, however, changed fundamentally by the smallest of multiplicative noises. The inclusion of such noises gives rise to Lévy flights, a popular but controversial model of scale-free movement patterns. Multiplicative noises have not featured prominently in the literature on biological Lévy flights, being seen, perhaps, as no more than a mathematical contrivance. Here we show how Langevin equations driven by multiplicative noises and incumbent Lévy flights arise naturally in the modelling of swarms. Model predictions find some support in three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. We hereby provide a new window on Lévy flights as models of movement pattern data, linking patterns to generative processes. PMID:27465971

  3. PHOTO-INDUCED TOXICITY OF PAHS TO HYALELLA AZTECA AND CHIRONOMUS TENTANS: EFFECTS OF MIXTURES AND BEHAVIOR. (R823873)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the aquatic environment, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination can result from several anthropogenic sources such as petroleum runoff, industrial processes, and petroleum spills. When ultraviolet light (UV) is present at sufficient intensity, the acute toxicity o...

  4. Interlaboratory Evaluation of Hyalella Azteca and Chironomus Tentans Short-term and Long-term Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory toxicity tests on sediment toxicity methods for use in routine testing and this data has been presented in an EPA report and this is a summary of that data.

  5. Chronic effects of Cd on the reproduction of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) through Cd-accumulated midge larvae (Chironomus yoshimatsui)

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyama, S.; Yasuno, M.

    1987-12-01

    Chronic effects of Cd on the growth and reproduction of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) were studied using a food chain model, midge larvae as prey and guppy as predator. The transfer rate of Cd from the midge to the guppy was between 0.5 and 1% during the 30-day experiment. Growth rate of the guppy fed Cd-accumulated midge larvae (270 micrograms/g dry wt) for 30 days was not impaired. Cumulative numbers of fry produced by the guppy fed Cd-accumulated midge larvae (210 micrograms/g) for 2 months decreased to ca. 80% of the control. Guppies had been fed the Cd-accumulated midges from 30 days old for 7 months. Cumulative numbers of fry produced by the guppy fed midge larvae-accumulated 500, 800, and 1300 micrograms Cd/g for 6 months decreased to 79, 65, and 55% of the control, respectively. Similar effects of Cd on the reproduction of guppy were shown between the guppies fed the Cd-accumulated midge larvae (500 micrograms Cd/g) and exposed to 10 or 20 micrograms Cd/liter for the 6 months. The Cd concentrations of the digestive tract, liver, and kidney increased strongly, indicating that such Cd accumulation was brought on mainly through the Cd-accumulated midges. Mortality of the female guppies fed larvae-accumulated 1300 micrograms Cd/g increased abruptly from the 6 months of the experiment, whereas no male guppy died during the experiment.

  6. Particle size as a modifying factor in sediment toxicity tests: Effects on growth, reproduction, and behavior in Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, P.K.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    The potential for sediment grain size to interfere with the assessment of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity tests was evaluated using the midge C. tentans. Substrates, ranging in mean grain size from < 10 (clay) to 600 {micro}m, were used to evaluate growth in 2 and 10-day old larvae (10-day growth tests) and reproduction using newly hatched larvae (monitored through one complete generation). In a separate study, substrate selection behavior was evaluated using pair-wise choice experiments. Survivorship (> 85%) was not affected by grain size in any of the tests. Larval growth (10-day tests) was highest in substrates with mean grain size between 30 and 150 {micro}m, with maximum growth occurring at 75 pm. This relationship was observed for both 2 and 10 d old larvae, but was statistically significant only for 10 d old larvae. Reproductive potential (fecundity) was correlated with larval growth, being highest in smaller grain sizes (< 150 {micro}m). In pair-wise selection tests, larvae demonstrated only a slight preference (approximately 60:40) for the smaller of two particle sizes when the two substrates were supplied with equal amounts of food. However, when food was supplied to only one of the two grain sizes, larvae were significantly more abundant on the substrate containing food, independent of particle size. When the amount of available food was reduced, the proportion of larvae occurring on fed substrates declined. It is concluded that food availability is much more important than particle size in substrate selection by C. tentans, Together, the results of this study indicate that particle size can modify growth and reproductive potential in larval C. tentans and should be included in the interpretation of sediment toxicity tests results.

  7. The Influence of Test Conditions on the Performance of Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca in Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    In most all sediment toxicity assessments, the performance of organisms in control sediments is a key parameter in defining sediment toxicity, whether through direct statistical comparison to control or by normalizing to control performance to compare results across sites or batc...

  8. Use of chironomid deformities in field and laboratory assessments of contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T.J.; Kemble, N.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    Benthic invertebrate samples were collected from 23 pools in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR), the Saint Croix River (SCR), Wisconsin, the Clark Fork River (CFR)/Milltown Reservoir (MR) Superfund Site, Montana, and three Great Lakes rivers classified as Areas of Concern (AOC). Contamination consisted of organic and inorganic contaminants at the UMR and AOC sites, and primarily heavy metals in the CFR/MR sites. Samples were collected with a ponar grab sampler from stations in Indiana Harbor, IN (n = 7), Buffalo River, NY (n = 10), Saginaw River, MI (1989 n = 7; 1990, n = 7), Upper Mississippi River (n = 24), Clark Fork River (n = 6), and Milltown Reservoir (n = 7). Compared to literature values for incidence of deformities in uncontaminated sediments, frequency of chironomid mouthpart deformities was significantly greater at most stations sampled from the AOC sites, with only a few stations sampled from the CFR/MR and UMR sites having significantly greater incidence of mouthpart deformities. Occurrence of mouthpart deformities ranged from 0 to 100% at stations from the AOC`S, 0 to 18% at CFR/MR stations, and 0 to 13% at UMR stations. Sediment contamination was generally lowest in UMR samples and highest in AOC samples. These data show organic contaminants may have a greater potential for causing teratogenic effects in chironomid mouthparts. Frequency of mouthpart deformities in Chironomus riparius laboratory exposures to contaminated sediments from all AOC and CFR sites were evaluated and analysis shows that frequency of mouthpart deformities from laboratory-exposed chironomids are generally lower than those found in field-collected samples. Additional analysis of chironomid laboratory cultures background deformity levels which must be addressed before laboratory evaluations can be used with reliability.

  9. Comparison of whole-sediment, elutriate and pore-water exposures for use in assessing sediment-associated organic contaminants in bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Harkey, G.A. Clemson Univ., Pendleton, SC ); Landrum, P.F. ); Klaine, S.J. )

    1994-08-01

    Bioassays have frequently been used as tools to simulate exposure of benthos to sediment-associated contaminants in hazard assessments. Due to the problems involved with estimating bioavailability in whole-sediment bioassays, aqueous fractions such as elutriates and pore water have been substituted for whole-sediment exposures. The objective of this research was to compare and evaluate the bioavailability of representative neutral hydrophobic contaminants in whole sediments and in aqueous extracts of whole sediment in simultaneous bioassays, using three representative indicator species, Diporeia spp., Chironomus riparius larvae, and Lumbriculus variegatus. Aqueous extracts of whole sediment did not accurately represent the exposure observed in whole sediment. Generally, the aqueous extracts underexposed organisms compared to whole sediment, even after adjusting accumulation to the fraction of organic carbon in the test media. Accumulation comparisons among whole-sediment, elutriate, and pore-water exposures depended on sampling time. At some sampling times for some contaminants, differences in accumulation between a particular aqueous extract and whole sediment were not significant; however, these similarities were not observed for all species at the particular sampling time. Bioaccumulation and contaminant clearance data suggest that a number of factors such as the indicator species, exposure media, and chemical/physical properties of individual contaminants are responsible for the accumulation differences observed among the tested media. Normalizing bioaccumulation to the amount of organic carbon in a source compartment adjusted for bioavailability differences of only some contaminants. The authors suggest that the bioavailability of contaminants such as those tested cannot be accurately predicted in bioassays that expose organisms to aqueous representations of whole sediment.

  10. Harmonization of standard toxicity test methods used in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past two years, Environment Canada (EC) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have developed standard methods for conducting toxicity and bioaccumulation tests with freshwater, estuarine, and marine sediments. Existing ASTM methods were used as a basis to harmonize these methods for conducting testing with either field-collected or laboratory-spiked sediments. For freshwater toxicity tests, methods are described by EC and EPA for the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midges Chironomus tentans and C. riparius. Endpoints include 10- to 14-d survival of growth. Methods are also described by EPA for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. For estuarine and marine toxicity tests, methods are described for several amphipods (i.e., Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, Eohaustorius estuarius, Leptocheirus plumulosus). Endpoints include 10-d survival and reburial. EC is also developing methods for conducting toxicity tests with Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Canadian species of polychaetes. Methods are described by EPA for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with a variety of mollusks (i.e., Macoma spp.) and polychaetes (i.e., Nereis spp.). Slight inconsistencies in methods between freshwater and estuarine/marine testing or between EC and EPA testing include: (1) static vs. flow-through conditions, (2) sieving of sediment, (3) types and quantity of food, (4) age of test organisms, or (4) duration of the test and required endpoints. Additional research is in progress to: (1) develop chronic toxicity tests with amphipods and midges measuring survival, growth, or reproduction, (2) develop whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) procedures, (3) refine sediment spiking procedures, and (4) field-validate laboratory tests.

  11. Chemical stress and metabolic rate in aquatic invertebrates: Threshold, dose-response relationships, and mode of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Penttinen, O.P.; Kukkonen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Four automatic compounds were evaluated in laboratory studies to investigate their accumulation and toxicant-induced changes in the rate of heat dissipation in the freshwater invertebrates Chironomus riparius and Lumbriculus variegatus. The sublethal energetic response detected by direct calorimetry was related to tissue chemical concentration by the threshold model and an attempt was made to apply the critical body residue (CBR) concept. Below the compound-specific tissue threshold concentration or CBR, no correlations were found between the dose and the metabolic rate, and the slopes of the regression were close to zero. Above the threshold, depending on the chemical, metabolic rate either increased or decreased. An increase in heat output produced by 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) was closely correlated with the dose. The order of toxicity for these phenols was 2,4-DNP = PCP > 2,4,5-TCP, which reflects the interaction of compounds` lipophilicities and acidities and their combined influence on bioaccumulation and effects on the energy-transducing membrane by uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. A decrease in the heat output caused by 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB) was more variable relative to dose. Also, 1,2,4-TCB required a much higher molar tissue threshold concentration ({approximately}2.0 {micro}mol/g wet weight) than required by phenols to generate the response. Both the metabolic response and the chemical threshold value were those expected to result from narcosis. Results suggest that calorimetric measures can identify not only the integrated physiologic response but also have some resolution of the mechanism of toxic effects.

  12. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles at different trophic levels--effects on diatoms, chironomids and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Bour, Agathe; Mouchet, Florence; Verneuil, Laurent; Evariste, Lauris; Silvestre, Jérôme; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to provide wider information on the toxicity of cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) in aquatic environments, by studying the toxicity of two types of CeO2 NPs for four species (diatoms Nitzschia palea, the sediment-dwelling invertebrate Chironomus riparius, and the amphibian larvae Xenopus laevis and Pleurodeles waltl.). The two types of CeO2 NPs have different intrinsic properties: some of them are small citrate-coated spheres (2-5 nm), and the others are larger uncoated plates (20-60 nm). Acute toxicity (mortality at 48 or 96 h, depending on the test-organism) was assessed for the four species, from 0.1 to 100 mg L(-1) of NPs. Sub-lethal effects were assessed on chironomids exposed between 0.01 and 1 mg L(-1) of NPs. Mortality, growth inhibition and genotoxic effects were evaluated on amphibian larvae from 0.1 to 10 mg L(-1). Results reveal that no acute toxicity occurs on any species after short exposures, even at the highest concentrations. Mortality (35%) is observed on Xenopus larvae after 12d of exposure at the highest concentration of one type of NPs. No significant effects were observed on chironomids during chronic exposure. Xenopus larvae growth was inhibited from 1 mg L(-1) of both NPs while growth inhibition is observed on Pleurodeles only at the highest concentration of one type of NPs. No genotoxicity was observed on Xenopus but Pleurodeles exhibited dose-dependent genotoxic effects when exposed to one type of NPs. Observed differences in toxicity are discussed focusing on the studied compartment, routes of exposure, species and NPs.

  13. Persistence of Aquatic Insects across Managed Landscapes: Effects of Landscape Permeability on Re-Colonization and Population Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Galic, Nika; Hengeveld, Geerten M.; Van den Brink, Paul J.; Schmolke, Amelie; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; Baveco, Hans M.

    2013-01-01

    Human practices in managed landscapes may often adversely affect aquatic biota, such as aquatic insects. Dispersal is often the limiting factor for successful re-colonization and recovery of stressed habitats. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the effects of landscape permeability, assuming a combination of riparian vegetation (edge permeability) and other vegetation (landscape matrix permeability), and distance between waterbodies on the colonization and recovery potential of weakly flying insects. For this purpose, we developed two models, a movement and a population model of the non-biting midge, Chironomus riparius, an aquatic insect with weak flying abilities. With the movement model we predicted the outcome of dispersal in a landscape with several linear water bodies (ditches) under different assumptions regarding landscape-dependent movement. Output from the movement model constituted the probabilities of encountering another ditch and of staying in the natal ditch or perishing in the landscape matrix, and was used in the second model. With this individual-based model of midge populations, we assessed the implications for population persistence and for recovery potential after an extreme stress event. We showed that a combination of landscape attributes from the movement model determines the fate of dispersing individuals and, once extrapolated to the population level, has a big impact on the persistence and recovery of populations. Population persistence benefited from low edge permeability as it reduced the dispersal mortality which was the main factor determining population persistence and viability. However, population recovery benefited from higher edge permeability, but this was conditional on the low effective distance that ensured fewer losses in the landscape matrix. We discuss these findings with respect to possible landscape management scenarios. PMID:23365675

  14. Evaluation of numerical sediment quality targets for the St. Louis River Area of Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crane, J.L.; MacDonald, D.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Smorong, D.E.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Severn, C.G.; Berger, T.A.; Field, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical sediment quality targets (SQTs) for the protection of sediment-dwelling organisms have been established for the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC), 1 of 42 current AOCs in the Great Lakes basin. The two types of SQTs were established primarily from consensus-based sediment quality guidelines. Level I SQTs are intended to identify contaminant concentrations below which harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms are unlikely to be observed. Level II SQTs are intended to identify contaminant concentrations above which harmful effects on sediment-dwelling organisms are likely to be observed. The predictive ability of the numerical SQTs was evaluated using the matching sediment chemistry and toxicity data set for the St. Louis River AOC. This evaluation involved determination of the incidence of toxicity to amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and midges (Chironomus tentans) within five ranges of Level II SQT quotients (i.e., mean probable effect concentration quotients [PEC-Qs]). The incidence of toxicity was determined based on the results of 10-day toxicity tests with amphipods (endpoints: survival and growth) and 10-day toxicity tests with midges (endpoints: survival and growth). For both toxicity tests, the incidence of toxicity increased as the mean PEC-Q ranges increased. The incidence of toxicity observed in these tests was also compared to that for other geographic areas in the Great Lakes region and in North America for 10- to 14-day amphipod (H. azteca) and 10- to 14-day midge (C. tentans or C. riparius) toxicity tests. In general, the predictive ability of the mean PEC-Qs was similar across geographic areas. The results of these predictive ability evaluations indicate that collectively the mean PEC-Qs provide a reliable basis for classifying sediments as toxic or not toxic in the St. Louis River AOC, in the larger geographic areas of the Great Lakes, and elsewhere in North America.

  15. An Evaluation of Several In-Lake Restoration Techniques to Improve the Water Quality Problem (Eutrophication) of Saint-Augustin Lake, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez-Cloutier, Rosa; Saminathan, Sumathi K. M.; Boillot, Clotilde; Triffaut-Bouchet, Gaëlle; Bourget, Alexandre; Soumis-Dugas, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    Increasing phosphorus (P) content and decreasing water quality of Saint-Augustin Lake, Quebec City, Canada, has led to implementation of an Integrated Watershed Management Plan to restore the lake. As a part of the plan, the effects of different restoration techniques on lake water quality and biological community (i.e., biological compatibility) were assessed during an isolated water enclosure study and laboratory microcosm assay, respectively. The restoration techniques include: (i) coagulation of P by alum only (20 mg L-1), (ii) active capping of sediments using a calcite layer of 10 cm, and (iii) a complete method involving both alum coagulation and calcite capping. The results showed that the total P (TP) was greatly decreased (76-95 %) by alum + calcite, followed by calcite only (59-84 %). Secchi depth was 106 % greater and chlorophyll a concentrations were declined by 19-78 % in the enclosure which received both alum and calcite. Results of the biological compatibility test showed that total phytoplankton biomass declined by 31 % in microcosms composed of alum + calcite. No significant ( P > 0.05) toxic effect was found on the survival of Daphnia magna and Hyalella azteca in both alum only and alum + calcite microcosms. Although the alum + calcite technique impaired the survival of Chironomus riparius, the midge emergence was much higher compared to alum only and control. Overall, the alum + calcite application was effective in controlling P release from sediment and lowering water column P concentrations, and thus improving the water quality and aquatic life of Saint-Augustin Lake. However, the TP concentrations are still higher than the critical limit (20 μg L-1) for aquatic life and the water column remained in the eutrophic state even after treatment. Increased TP concentrations, to higher than ambient levels of the lake, in the water column of all four enclosures, due to bioturbation artefact triggered by the platform installation, likely cause

  16. Do natural rubber latex condoms pose a risk to aquatic systems?

    PubMed

    Lambert, Scott; Johnson, Catherine; Keller, Virginie D J; Sinclair, Chris J; Williams, Richard J; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2013-12-01

    The presence and potential adverse effects of plastic-polymers in the environment are receiving increasing attention in the popular and scientific press. However, quantifying emissions, exposure and effects of these materials remains a challenge. This paper describes the application of a questionnaire survey to quantify emissions of condom material from the domestic household to the sewage waste stream. Condoms are an important mainstay for birth control and the reduction of sexually transmitted infections. Survey participants were estimated to flush condoms down the toilet 2.96% of the time, and emissions were calculated as 0.99 mg of condom material per person per day. Using information on screening efficiencies at sewage treatment plants, the questionnaire data was combined with a GIS-based water quality model (LF2000-WQX) to predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) in a UK river basin catchment. Annual average PECs of condom material were 0.08-0.2 μg L(-1), under the model scenario used. To put these PECs into context, rubber latex condom material was degraded in outdoor microcosms. This resulted in the formation of a complex mixture of substances including chemical degradation products and particles in the nano range. The direct effects of the degradation mixture were investigated using two freshwater organisms with different life cycle traits, the water column crustacean Daphnia magna and the sediment-dwelling larval of Chironomus riparius. Ecotoxicity tests investigated both acute and chronic endpoints and were shown to exhibit no toxic effects. This precluded the derivation of a genuine no-effect concentration. Hence, the results suggest that limited risk to invertebrates is associated with latex condom degradation products to the organisms tested. Future studies should extend this risk framework to assess risks of condoms to other taxonomic groups as well as the risks of other polymer materials.

  17. Development of rearing and testing protocols for a new freshwater sediment test species: the gastropod Valvata piscinalis.

    PubMed

    Ducrot, Virginie; Cognat, Claudine; Mons, Raphaël; Mouthon, Jacques; Garric, Jeanne

    2006-03-01

    This paper aimed at proposing rearing and testing protocols for Valvata piscinalis, a new potential species for sediment toxicity testing. Such tests were developed since this species reliably represents the bio/ecological characteristics of other gastropods. It may thus be representative of their sensitivity to chemicals. V. piscinalis was successfully cultured in our laboratory for six generations. Cultures provided a high productivity for a low working time and low costs. The tests conditions we proposed seemed to be relevant for the development of reliable tests with this species. Indeed, hatching probability of egg-capsules, as well as embryo, newborn and juvenile survival rates, were close to 100%. Moreover, growth rates and fecundity were significantly higher than in field and in other laboratory studies. Partial life-cycle tests on clean sediments were achieved for various feeding levels to determine survival, growth and reproduction patterns, ad libitum feeding level and life cycle parameters values. Ad libitum feeding levels for newborn, juveniles and adults were 0.1, 0.4 and 0.8 mg Tetramin/individual/working day. Growth tests with zinc-spiked sediments provided a no-effect concentration and a lowest effect concentration of respectively 200 and 624 mg zinc/kg dry sediment. Other growth tests on spiked sediments we ran at our laboratory with second, third and fourth instars larvae of Chironomus riparius pointed out that V. piscinalis was more sensible to zinc than the chironomid, which is a routine test species in ecotoxicology. According to these results, V. piscinalis is a promising candidate species for sediment toxicity testing.

  18. Do natural rubber latex condoms pose a risk to aquatic systems?

    PubMed

    Lambert, Scott; Johnson, Catherine; Keller, Virginie D J; Sinclair, Chris J; Williams, Richard J; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2013-12-01

    The presence and potential adverse effects of plastic-polymers in the environment are receiving increasing attention in the popular and scientific press. However, quantifying emissions, exposure and effects of these materials remains a challenge. This paper describes the application of a questionnaire survey to quantify emissions of condom material from the domestic household to the sewage waste stream. Condoms are an important mainstay for birth control and the reduction of sexually transmitted infections. Survey participants were estimated to flush condoms down the toilet 2.96% of the time, and emissions were calculated as 0.99 mg of condom material per person per day. Using information on screening efficiencies at sewage treatment plants, the questionnaire data was combined with a GIS-based water quality model (LF2000-WQX) to predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) in a UK river basin catchment. Annual average PECs of condom material were 0.08-0.2 μg L(-1), under the model scenario used. To put these PECs into context, rubber latex condom material was degraded in outdoor microcosms. This resulted in the formation of a complex mixture of substances including chemical degradation products and particles in the nano range. The direct effects of the degradation mixture were investigated using two freshwater organisms with different life cycle traits, the water column crustacean Daphnia magna and the sediment-dwelling larval of Chironomus riparius. Ecotoxicity tests investigated both acute and chronic endpoints and were shown to exhibit no toxic effects. This precluded the derivation of a genuine no-effect concentration. Hence, the results suggest that limited risk to invertebrates is associated with latex condom degradation products to the organisms tested. Future studies should extend this risk framework to assess risks of condoms to other taxonomic groups as well as the risks of other polymer materials. PMID:24162606

  19. Development of methods for evaluating toxicity to freshwater ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Girling, A E; Pascoe, D; Janssen, C R; Peither, A; Wenzel, A; Schäfer, H; Neumeier, B; Mitchell, G C; Taylor, E J; Maund, S J; Lay, J P; Jüttner, I; Crossland, N O; Stephenson, R R; Persoone, G

    2000-02-01

    This article presents a summary of a collaborative research program involving five European research groups, that was partly funded by the European Commission under its Environmental Research Program. The objective of the program was to develop aquatic toxicity tests that could be used to obtain data for inclusion at Level 2 of the Risk Evaluation Scheme for the Notification of Substances as required by the 7th Amendment to EC Directive 79/831/EEC. Currently only a very limited number of test methods have been described that can be used for this purpose and these are based on an even smaller number of test species. Tests based upon algae (Chlamydomonas reinhardi, Scenedesmus subspicatus, and Euglena gracilis), protozoa (Tetrahymena pyriformis), rotifera (Brachionus calyciflorus), crustacea (Gammarus pulex), and diptera (Chironomus riparius) were developed. The tests encompassed a range of end points and were evaluated against four reference chemicals: lindane, 3, 4-dichloroaniline (DCA), atrazine, and copper. The capacity of the tests to identify concentrations that are chronically toxic in the field was addressed by comparing the effects threshold concentrations determined in the laboratory tests with those determined for similar and/or related species and end points in stream and pond mesocosm studies. The lowest no-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC), EC(x), or LC(x) values obtained for lindane, atrazine, and copper were comparable with the lowest values obtained in the mesocosms. The lowest chronic NOEC determined for DCA using the laboratory tests was approximately 200 times higher than the lowest NOEC in the mesocosms. PMID:10648133

  20. Neonicotinoids in the Canadian aquatic environment: a literature review on current use products with a focus on fate, exposure, and biological effects.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J C; Dubetz, C; Palace, V P

    2015-02-01

    Developed to replace organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, neonicotinoids are structurally similar to nicotine. The three main neonicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid, clothianidin, and thiamethoxam, are being re-evaluated by Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA). An important aspect of the re-evaluation is the potential for effects in non-target organisms, including aquatic organisms. Leaching into surface waters is one of the major concerns surrounding extensive use of neonicotinoids, especially in close proximity to water bodies. The PMRA has classified IMI as 'persistent' with a 'high' leaching potential. Globally, neonicotinoids have been detected in a variety of water bodies, typically at concentrations in the low μg/L range. While IMI has been included in some monitoring exercises, there are currently very few published data for the presence of CLO and THM in Canadian water bodies. The majority of neonicotinoid toxicity studies have been conducted with IMI due to its longer presence on the market and high prevalence of use. Aquatic insects are particularly vulnerable to neonicotinoids and chronic toxicity has been observed at concentrations of IMI below 1 μg/L. Acute toxicity has been reported at concentrations below 20 μg/L for the most sensitive species, including Hyalella azteca, ostracods, and Chironomus riparius. Fish, algae, amphibians, and molluscs are relatively insensitive to IMI. However, the biological effects of THM and CLO have not been as well explored. The Canadian interim water quality guideline for IMI is 0.23 μg/L, but there is currently insufficient use, fate, and toxicological information available to establish guidelines for CLO and THM. Based on concentrations of neonicotinoids reported in surface waters in Canada and globally, there is potential for aquatic invertebrates to be negatively impacted by neonicotinoids. Therefore, it is necessary to address knowledge gaps to inform decisions around guidelines

  1. Tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Dawson, T.D.; Norberg-King, T.J.

    1999-02-01

    A method is described for preparing formulated sediments for use in toxicity testing. Ingredients used to prepare formulated sediments included commercially available silt, clay, sand, humic acid, dolomite, and {alpha}-cellulose (as a source of organic carbon). {alpha}-Cellulose was selected as the source of organic carbon because it is commercially available, consistent from batch to batch, and low in contaminant concentrations. The tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity testing was evaluated. Sediment exposures were conducted for 10 d with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midges Chironomus riparius and C. tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and for 28 d with H. azteca. Responses of organisms in formulated sediments was compared with a field-collected control sediment that has routinely been used to determine test acceptability. Tolerance of organisms to formulated sediments was evaluated by determining responses to varying levels of {alpha}-cellulose, to varying levels of grain size, to evaluation of different food types, or to evaluation of different sources of overlying water. In the 10-d exposures, survival of organisms exposed to the formulated sediments routinely met or exceeded the responses of test organisms exposed to the control sediment and routinely met test acceptability criteria required in standard methods. Growth of amphipods and oligochaetes in 10-d exposures with formulated sediment was often less than growth of organisms in the field-collected control sediment. Additional research is needed, using the method employed to prepare formulated sediment, to determine if conditioning formulated sediments before starting 10-d tests would improve the growth of amphipods. In the 28-d exposures, survival of H. azteca was low when reconstituted water was used as the source of overlying water. However, when well water was used as the source of overlying water in

  2. Tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Dawson, T.D.; Norberg-King, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    A method is described for preparing formulated sediments for use in toxicity testing. Ingredients used to prepare formulated sediments included commercially available silt, clay, sand, humic acid, dolomite, and ??- cellulose (as a source of organic carbon). ??-Cellulose was selected as the source of organic carbon because it is commercially available, consistent from batch to batch, and low in contaminant concentrations. The tolerance of freshwater test organisms to formulated sediments for use as control materials in whole-sediment toxicity testing was evaluated. Sediment exposures were conducted for 10 d with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midges Chironomus riparius and C. tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and for 28 d with H. azteca. Responses of organisms in formulated sediments was compared with a field-collected control sediment that has routinely been used to determine test acceptability. Tolerance of organisms to formulated sediments was evaluated by determining responses to varying levels of ??-cellulose, to varying levels of grain size, to evaluation of different food types, or to evaluation of different sources of overlying water. In the 10-d exposures, survival of organisms exposed to the formulated sediments routinely met or exceeded the responses of test organisms exposed to the control sediment and routinely met test acceptability criteria required in standard methods. Growth of amphipods and oligochaetes in 10-d exposures with formulated sediment was often less than growth of organisms in the field-collected control sediment. Additional research is needed, using the method employed to prepare formulated sediment, to determine if conditioning formulated sediments before starting 10-d tests would improve the growth of amphipods. In the 28-d exposures, survival of H. azteca was low when reconstituted water was used as the source of overlying water. However, when well water was used as the source of overlying water in 28-d exposures

  3. Stasis and flux among Saturniidae and Sphingidae on Massachusetts' (USA) offshore islands and the possible role of Compsilura concinnata (Meigen) as an agent of mainland New England moth declines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lepidopteran fauna of Massachusetts’ offshore islands (USA), particularly Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket, has been well-characterized, and comprises intact assemblages of disjunct, regionally rare, habitat-specialized, and otherwise threatened species that have declined elsewhere in New England...

  4. Multi-scale approach to the environmental factors effects on spatio-temporal variability of Chironomus salinarius (Diptera: Chironomidae) in a French coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, V.; Claret, C.; Garnier, R.; Fayolle, S.; Franquet, E.

    2010-03-01

    The complexity of the relationships between environmental factors and organisms can be revealed by sampling designs which consider the contribution to variability of different temporal and spatial scales, compared to total variability. From a management perspective, a multi-scale approach can lead to time-saving. Identifying environmental patterns that help maintain patchy distribution is fundamental in studying coastal lagoons, transition zones between continental and marine waters characterised by great environmental variability on spatial and temporal scales. They often present organic enrichment inducing decreased species richness and increased densities of opportunist species like C hironomus salinarius, a common species that tends to swarm and thus constitutes a nuisance for human populations. This species is dominant in the Bolmon lagoon, a French Mediterranean coastal lagoon under eutrophication. Our objective was to quantify variability due to both spatial and temporal scales and identify the contribution of different environmental factors to this variability. The population of C. salinarius was sampled from June 2007 to June 2008 every two months at 12 sites located in two areas of the Bolmon lagoon, at two different depths, with three sites per area-depth combination. Environmental factors (temperature, dissolved oxygen both in sediment and under water surface, sediment organic matter content and grain size) and microbial activities (i.e. hydrolase activities) were also considered as explanatory factors of chironomid densities and distribution. ANOVA analysis reveals significant spatial differences regarding the distribution of chironomid larvae for the area and the depth scales and their interaction. The spatial effect is also revealed for dissolved oxygen (water), salinity and fine particles (area scale), and for water column depth. All factors but water column depth show a temporal effect. Spearman's correlations highlight the seasonal effect (temperature, dissolved oxygen in sediment and water) as well as the effect of microbial activities on chironomid larvae. Our results show that a multi-scale approach identifies patchy distribution, even when there is relative environmental homogeneity.

  5. High quality draft genome sequence of Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (DSM 19883T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laviad, Sivan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Pukall, Rüdiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; et al

    2015-05-08

    Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59:665-70 2009) is a Gram-positive, rod shaped, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. L. chironomi belongs to the family Microbacteriaceae, a family within the class Actinobacteria. Strain MM2LBT was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass that was sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. In a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MM2LBT formed a distinct branch within the radiation encompassing the genus Leucobacter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. We find thatmore » the DNA GC content is 69.90%. The chromosome length is 2,964,712 bp. It encodes 2,690 proteins and 61 RNA genes. L. chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.« less

  6. High quality draft genome sequence of Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (DSM 19883T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    SciTech Connect

    Laviad, Sivan; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Reddy, T. B. K.; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Pukall, Rüdiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Halpern, Malka

    2015-05-08

    Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59:665-70 2009) is a Gram-positive, rod shaped, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. L. chironomi belongs to the family Microbacteriaceae, a family within the class Actinobacteria. Strain MM2LBT was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass that was sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. In a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MM2LBT formed a distinct branch within the radiation encompassing the genus Leucobacter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. We find that the DNA GC content is 69.90%. The chromosome length is 2,964,712 bp. It encodes 2,690 proteins and 61 RNA genes. L. chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  7. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in long-term tests with the freshwater benthic invertebrates Chironomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.W.; Ankley, G.T.; Nichols, J.W.; Elonen, G.E.; Nessa, D.E.

    1997-06-01

    Two species of freshwater benthic invertebrates, Chronomus tentans and Lumbriculus variegatus, were exposed to three dietary concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and toxicity and bioaccumulation were determined. No toxic effects were observed in full life cycle tests with either species at tissue residue concentrations up to 9,533 ng TCDD/g lipid. The observed lack of sensitivity of the two species to TCDD was consistent with a presumed absence of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in aquatic invertebrates. Predictions of lipid-normalized tissue concentrations were made based on lipid-normalized TCDD concentrations in the food and were within 15% of targeted concentrations in both species. Depuration studies indicated that TCDD elimination followed first-order kinetics, with elimination rate constants of 0.0014 to 0.0022 h{sup {minus}1} for L. variegatus and 0.0070 to 0.0099 h{sup {minus}1} for C. tentans. Half-lives ranged from 315 to 495 h in L. variegatus and from 70 to 99 h in C. tentans. The ability of invertebrates to accumulate relatively high concentrations of TCDD in the absence of toxic effects may be relevant to the transfer of contaminants through aquatic food webs to potentially sensitive vertebrate species.

  8. Toxicity of bed sediments from the Niagara River Area of Concern and tributaries, New York, to Chironomus dilutus and Hyalella azteca, 2014-15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Scott D.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Duffy, Brian T.

    2016-09-20

    The Niagara River was designated as an Area of Concern in 1987 on both the United States and Canadian sides of the international boundary line because past industrial discharges and hazardous waste sites had caused extensive degradation of aquatic habitats. The degradation of the “benthos”, or the benthic macroinvertebrate community, was identified as one of seven beneficial use impairments caused by contaminated bed sediments. The U.S. Geological Survey and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted a study in 2014 and 2015 to gather more extensive data on (a) the toxicity of bed sediments and (b) the status of macroinvertebrate communities on the main stem and tributaries of the Niagara River. This report addresses the first component of that study (toxicity of bed sediments), and summarizes results from laboratory toxicity tests that compare the survival and growth of two macroinvertebrate species between bed sediments from study sites and laboratory controls. Sediment toxicity was negligible at most sites, however poor performance of one or both test species in bed sediments from several tributary sites suggests that the quality of sediments may be adversely affecting benthic macroinvertebrate communities in some tributaries to the Niagara River.

  9. High quality draft genome sequence of Brachymonas chironomi AIMA4T (DSM 19884T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    SciTech Connect

    Laviad, Sivan; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, TBK; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lang, Elke; Rohde, Manfred; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Halpern, Malka

    2015-05-27

    Brachymonas chironomi strain AIMA4T (Halpern et al., 2009) is a Gram-negative, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. B. chironomi is a member of the Comamonadaceae, a family within the class Betaproteobacteria. This species was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass, sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain AIMA4T in the genus Brachymonas. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. We find the DNA GC content is 63.5%. The chromosome length is 2,509,395 bp. It encodes 2,382 proteins and 68 RNA genes. Brachymonas chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.

  10. High quality draft genome sequence of Brachymonas chironomi AIMA4T (DSM 19884T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Laviad, Sivan; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, TBK; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lang, Elke; et al

    2015-05-27

    Brachymonas chironomi strain AIMA4T (Halpern et al., 2009) is a Gram-negative, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. B. chironomi is a member of the Comamonadaceae, a family within the class Betaproteobacteria. This species was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass, sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain AIMA4T in the genus Brachymonas. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. We find the DNA GC content is 63.5%. The chromosome length is 2,509,395 bp. It encodes 2,382 proteins andmore » 68 RNA genes. Brachymonas chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project.« less

  11. High quality draft genome sequence of Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (DSM 19883T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Leucobacter chironomi strain MM2LBT (Halpern et al., Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 59:665-70 2009) is a Gram-positive, rod shaped, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. L. chironomi belongs to the family Microbacteriaceae, a family within the class Actinobacteria. Strain MM2LBT was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass that was sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. In a phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MM2LBT formed a distinct branch within the radiation encompassing the genus Leucobacter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The DNA GC content is 69.90%. The chromosome length is 2,964,712 bp. It encodes 2,690 proteins and 61 RNA genes. L. chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project. PMID:26203333

  12. High quality draft genome sequence of Brachymonas chironomi AIMA4T (DSM 19884T) isolated from a Chironomus sp. egg mass

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Brachymonas chironomi strain AIMA4T (Halpern et al., 2009) is a Gram-negative, non-motile, aerobic, chemoorganotroph bacterium. B. chironomi is a member of the Comamonadaceae, a family within the class Betaproteobacteria. This species was isolated from a chironomid (Diptera; Chironomidae) egg mass, sampled from a waste stabilization pond in northern Israel. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain AIMA4T in the genus Brachymonas. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The DNA GC content is 63.5%. The chromosome length is 2,509,395 bp. It encodes 2,382 proteins and 68 RNA genes. Brachymonas chironomi genome is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project. PMID:26203340

  13. The chronic toxicity of molybdate to freshwater organisms. I. Generating reliable effects data.

    PubMed

    De Schamphelaere, K A C; Stubblefield, W; Rodriguez, P; Vleminckx, K; Janssen, C R

    2010-10-15

    The European Union regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemical substances (REACH) (EC, 2006) requires the characterization of the chronic toxicity of many chemicals in the aquatic environment, including molybdate (MoO(4)(2-)). Our literature review on the ecotoxicity of molybdate revealed that a limited amount of reliable chronic no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) for the derivation of a predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) existed. This paper presents the results of additional ecotoxicity experiments that were conducted in order to fulfill the requirements for the derivation of a PNEC by means of the scientifically most robust species sensitivity distribution (SSD) approach (also called the statistical extrapolation approach). Ten test species were chronically exposed to molybdate (added as sodium molybdate dihydrate, Na(2)MoO(4)·2H(2)O) according to internationally accepted standard testing guidelines or equivalent. The 10% effective concentrations (EC10, expressed as measured dissolved molybdenum) for the most sensitive endpoint per species were 62.8-105.6 (mg Mo)/L for Daphnia magna (21day-reproduction), 78.2 (mg Mo)/L for Ceriodaphnia dubia (7day-reproduction), 61.2-366.2 (mg Mo)/L for the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (72h-growth rate), 193.6 (mg Mo)/L for the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus (48h-population growth rate), 121.4 (mg Mo)/L for the midge Chironomus riparius (14day-growth), 211.3 (mg Mo)/L for the snail Lymnaea stagnalis (28day-growth rate), 115.9 (mg Mo)/L for the frog Xenopus laevis (4day-larval development), 241.5 (mg Mo)/L for the higher plant Lemna minor (7day-growth rate), 39.3 (mg Mo)/L for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (34day-dry weight/biomass), and 43.2 (mg Mo)/L for the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (78day-biomass). These effect concentrations are in line with the few reliable data currently available in the open literature. The data presented in this study can

  14. An Asiatic Chironomid in Brazil: morphology, DNA barcode and bionomics

    PubMed Central

    Amora, Gizelle; Hamada, Neusa; Fusari, Lívia Maria; Andrade-Souza, Vanderly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In most freshwater ecosystems, aquatic insects are dominant in terms of diversity; however, there is a disproportionately low number of records of alien species when compared to other freshwater organisms. The Chironomidae is one aquatic insect family that includes some examples of alien species around the world. During a study on aquatic insects in Amazonas state (Brazil), we collected specimens of Chironomidae that are similar, at the morphological level, to Chironomus kiiensis Tokunaga and Chironomus striatipennis Kieffer, both with distributions restricted to Asia. The objectives of this study were to provide morphological information on this Chironomus population, to investigate its identity using DNA barcoding and, to provide bionomic information about this species. Chironomus DNA barcode data were obtained from GenBank and Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) and, together with our data, were analyzed using the neighbor-joining method with 1000 bootstrap replicates and the genetic distances were estimated using the Kimura-2-parameter. At the morphological level, the Brazilian population cannot be distinguished either from Chironomus striatipennis or Chironomus kiiensis, configuring a species complex but, at the molecular level our studied population is placed in a clade together with Chironomus striatipennis, from South Korea. Bionomic characteristics of the Brazilian Chironomus population differ from the ones of Chironomus kiiensis from Japan, the only species in this species complex with bionomic information available. The Brazilian Chironomus population has a smaller size, the double of the number of eggs and inhabits oligotrophic water, in artificial container. In the molecular analysis, populations of Chironomus striatipennis and Chironomus kiiensis are placed in a clade, formed by two groups: Group A (which includes populations from both named species, from different Asiatic regions and our Brazilian population) and Group B (with populations of

  15. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns for species determination in five species of Sarcophaga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Niederegger, Senta; Szpila, Krzysztof; Mall, Gita

    2016-01-01

    To further establish species determination using the muscle attachment site (MAS) pattern method, third instar larvae of five forensically important species of Sarcophaga Meigen were investigated: Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt, Sarcophaga melanura Meigen, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen and Sarcophaga similis Meade. As in the previously investigated Calliphoridae, patterns were found to be species specific. The main feature of the Sarcophaga patterns is the divided central horizontal row of segment four. A genus pattern was established to be used as base for comparison in further species determination. PMID:26391172

  16. Muscle attachment site (MAS) patterns for species determination in five species of Sarcophaga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Niederegger, Senta; Szpila, Krzysztof; Mall, Gita

    2016-01-01

    To further establish species determination using the muscle attachment site (MAS) pattern method, third instar larvae of five forensically important species of Sarcophaga Meigen were investigated: Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt, Sarcophaga melanura Meigen, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen and Sarcophaga similis Meade. As in the previously investigated Calliphoridae, patterns were found to be species specific. The main feature of the Sarcophaga patterns is the divided central horizontal row of segment four. A genus pattern was established to be used as base for comparison in further species determination.

  17. A pictorial key to the species of the Aedes (Zavortinkius) in the Afrotropical Region (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiau-Min; Rueda, Leopoldo M

    2015-10-06

    Six species of the subgenus Zavortinkius of Aedes Meigen in the Afrotropical Region are treated in a pictorial key based on diagnostic morphological features. Images of the diagnostic morphological structures of the adult thorax and leg are included.

  18. FAMILY PIOPHILIDAE.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Marta; Pérez, Sandra; Grisales, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Piophilidae is a little family poorly known in Colombia, with only Piophila casei (L.) and Stearibia nigriceps Meigen reported so far. This catalogue expands the distribution of these species to other localities in the country. PMID:27395294

  19. Rhipidia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo; Kim, Sam-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Korean species of the crane fly genus Rhipidia Meigen, 1818 (Diptera: Limoniidae), are taxonomically revised. Rhipidia (Rhipidia) serena, new species, is described and figured. Rhipidia (R.) longa Zhang, Li, Yang, 2014, R. (R.) maculata Meigen, 1818 and R. (R.) sejuga Zhang, Li, Yang, 2014 are recorded for the first time in Korea. Previously known species, Rhipidia (R.) septentrionis Alexander, 1913 is redescribed and illustrated. Identification key for all Korean Rhipidia species is given. Most antennae, wings, male and female terminalia of all species are illustrated for the first time. PMID:27395731

  20. Comparisons of Sediment Test Volumes for Freshwater Solid Phase Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used to assess the potential toxicity of contaminated sediments, and detailed standard test procedures have been developed for various species. For freshwater, two benthic organisms, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dil...

  1. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE TOXICITY OF PHTHALATE ESTERS TO FRESHWATER BENTHOS. 1. AQUEOUS EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tests were performed with the freshwater invertebrates, Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus to determine the acute toxicity of six phthalate esters, including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butylbenzyl ph...

  2. IN SITU BIOASSAY CHAMBER FOR ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT TOXICITY AND BIOACCUMULATION USING BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we describe the construction of a simple, inexpensive bioassay chamber for testing sediment toxicity (survival and growth) and bioaccumulation under field conditions using the midge Chironomus tentans and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. The test chamber is ...

  3. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  4. Three species of blowfly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) collected from a human stillborn infant in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Adair, T W

    1999-05-01

    In July of 1997, the remains of a human stillborn infant were found at an elevation of 2,835 m in Summit County, CO. Larvae recovered from the infant were reared to adulthood and identified as Calliphora terraenovae (Macquart), Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy), and Phormia regina (Meigen). These represent new county records for high elevation species in Colorado. PMID:10337090

  5. Cryopreservation of embryos of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Embryos of Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), the green blowfly, were successfully cryopreserved by vitrification in liquid nitrogen and stored for 8 yr. Embryos incubated at 19 deg. C for 17 h after oviposition were found to be the most appropriate stage to cryopreserve...

  6. Life cycle and production of chironomidae (diptera) in Biandantang, a typical macrophytic lake (Hubei, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-Jun, Yan

    2000-09-01

    The life cycle and annual production of four dominant species of Chironomids ( Chironomus plumosus, Chironomus sp., Clinotanypus sp., Tokunagayusurika akamusi) were studied with samples taken monthly in Biandantang Lake at eight stations from April, 1996 to March, 1997. Instarfrequency data showed C. plumosus was univoltine, while the other three were bivoltine. Production in wet weight (g/(m2·a)) calculated by the size-frequency method for each species were: C. plumosus, 2.663; Chironomus sp., 1.161; Clinotanypus sp., 0.270; T. akamusi, 1.476. Based on the mean standing stock, their P/B ratios were 3.2, 4.0, 6.2, and 4.4, respectively.

  7. Metalimnobia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Korean species of the crane fly genus Metalimnobia Matsumura, 1911 (Diptera: Limoniidae), are taxonomically revised. Metalimnobia (Metalimnobia) channpayna new species, is described and figured, M. (M.) bifasciata (Schrank, 1781), M. (M.) quadrinotata (Meigen, 1818) and M. (M.) zetterstedti (Tjeder, 1968) are listed for the first time in Korea, new information for previously known species, M. (M.) quadrimaculata (Linnaeus, 1760) is added. Identification key for all Korean Metalimnobia species is given. Wings, male and female terminalia are illustrated for all species. PMID:27395675

  8. Utility of Multi-Gene Loci for Forensic Species Diagnosis of Blowflies

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Farrah; Wei, Shu-jun; Shi, Min; Chen, Xue-xin

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary studies in forensic entomology exhaustively evaluate gene sequences because these constitute the fastest and most accurate method of species identification. For this purpose single gene segments, cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) in particular, are commonly used. However, the limitation of such sequences in identification, especially of closely related species and populations, demand a multi-gene approach. But this raises the question of which group of genes can best fulfill the identification task? In this context the utility of five gene segments was explored among blowfly species from two distinct geographic regions, China and Pakistan. COI, cytochrome b (CYTB), NADH dehydrogenase 5 (ND5), nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), were sequenced for eight blowfly species including Chrysomya megacephala F. (Diptera: Calliphoidae), Ch. pinguis Walker, Lucilia sericata Meigen L. porphyrina Walker, L. illustris Meigen Hemipyrellia ligurriens Wiedemann, Aldrichina grahami Aldrich, and the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Muscidae), from Hangzhou, China; while COI, CYTB, and ITS2 were sequenced for four species, i.e. Ch. megacephala, Ch. rufifacies, L. cuprina, and the flesh fly, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen (Sarcophagidae), from Dera Ismail Khan Pakistan. The results demonstrate a universal utility of these gene segments in the molecular identification of flies of forensic importance. PMID:21864153

  9. Utility of multi-gene loci for forensic species diagnosis of blowflies.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Farrah; Wei, Shu-jun; Shi, Min; Chen, Xue-xin

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary studies in forensic entomology exhaustively evaluate gene sequences because these constitute the fastest and most accurate method of species identification. For this purpose single gene segments, cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) in particular, are commonly used. However, the limitation of such sequences in identification, especially of closely related species and populations, demand a multi-gene approach. But this raises the question of which group of genes can best fulfill the identification task? In this context the utility of five gene segments was explored among blowfly species from two distinct geographic regions, China and Pakistan. COI, cytochrome b (CYTB), NADH dehydrogenase 5 (ND5), nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), were sequenced for eight blowfly species including Chrysomya megacephala F. (Diptera: Calliphoidae), Ch. pinguis Walker, Lucilia sericata Meigen L. porphyrina Walker, L. illustris Meigen Hemipyrellia ligurriens Wiedemann, Aldrichina grahami Aldrich, and the housefly, Musca domestica L. (Muscidae), from Hangzhou, China; while COI, CYTB, and ITS2 were sequenced for four species, i.e. Ch. megacephala, Ch. rufifacies, L. cuprina, and the flesh fly, Sarcophaga albiceps Meigen (Sarcophagidae), from Dera Ismail Khan Pakistan. The results demonstrate a universal utility of these gene segments in the molecular identification of flies of forensic importance.

  10. Importance of DOC From Terrestrial Sources in Supporting Benthic Production in Arctic Lakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binkley, E.; Fortino, K.; Hershey, A.

    2005-05-01

    A prevailing paradigm in limnology has been that benthic organisms derive most of their food from pelagic productivity. However, chironomids are known to utilize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) via the microbial food web, and much DOC is derived from terrestrial sources. We tested whether supplements of various DOC and particulate organic carbon (POC) sources would support growth in Chironomus from arctic lakes. Eight treatments with five replicates were administered to Chironomus growing in sediment core microcosms over a twenty-four day period. Growth rates were calculated and stable isotope analysis of Chironomus δ13C data was performed. An overall ANOVA and a Tukey-Kramer's test were performed on the data. The stable isotope data established that Chironomus assimilated carbon from both pelagic algal-derived DOC and from benthic algae. However, only the terrestrial DOC supplement supported significantly positive growth. The terrestrial particulate detritus treatment showed lowest growth. We conclude that DOC-based production is important in supporting benthic food webs, and that much of this may be derived from terrestrial sources.

  11. Bioavailability of fluoranthene in freshwater sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Suedel, B.C.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr. ); Clifford, P.A. )

    1993-01-01

    To examine equilibrium-partitioning model predictions of interstitial water concentrations of fluoranthene as part of the equilibrium-partitioning (EqP) approach to sediment quality criteria development, the bioavailability (toxicity) of fluoranthene-amended sediment to Hyalella azteca, Daphnia magna, and Chironomus tentans was determined. Fluoranthene was added to three freshwater sediments with similar organic carbon content. Predicted interstitial water concentrations from the equilibrium-partitioning model were similar to measured interstitial water concentrations for WRFS and TR sediment, but the model underpredicted measured values for LF sediment by a factor of two. EC50s for Daphnia magna, Hyalella azteca, and Chironomus tentans in interstitial water were a factor of two to five greater for LF than for WRFS and TR sediments. Factors other than organic carbon content of sediments probably contributed to the variability in bioavailability of fluoranthene. Based on 10-d sediment toxicity tests with Hylella azteca, Daphnia magna, and Chironomus tentans, organic carbon-normalized sediment concentrations were better predictors of toxicity than interstitial water and bulk sediment fluoranthene concentrations. In 10-d aqueous-phase tests with fluoranthene, Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca were twice as sensitive as Daphnia magna.

  12. Development of formulated reference sediments for freshwater and estuarine sediment testing

    SciTech Connect

    Suedel, B.C.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-07-01

    Sediments collected at various field locations may have chemical and physical constituents that influence test results and may contain organisms that cannot be readily removed. Thus, reference sediments are needed that can be formulated to match diverse freshwater and estuarine sediments encountered in comprehensive testing programs. This research evaluated formulated reference sediments in terms of (a) their ability to match field-collected sediments both chemically and physically; (b) their suitability as habitant (survival and reproduction) for typical invertebrate toxicity testing species (Hyalella azteca Saussure, Chironomus tentans Fabricius, and Daphnia magna Straus) during chronic exposures; and (c) their suitability as a substrate for Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard, and Pimephales promelas Rafinesque in 14-d whole-sediment exposures. Formulated reference sediments were prepared to match naturally occurring sediments with respect to particle-size distribution, organic matter, organic carbon, pH, solids, CEC, but not redox potential. After preparation, a conditioning period of at least 7 d was required for pH stabilization of formulated reference sediments. In culture experiments, formulated reference sediments was suitable for Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Daphnia magna survival and reproduction for 56,40, and 28 d, respectively. Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas survival was [>=] 88% in 14-d exposures to formulated reference sediment. Formulated reference sediments may reduce some unexplained physical, chemical, or biological toxicity'' of field-collected sediments (e.g., organic matter) that may influence toxicity testing results.

  13. Evaluation of potential confounding factors in sediment toxicity tests with three freshwater benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Benoit, D.A. ); Balogh, J.C. ); Reynoldson, T.B.; Day, K.E. ); Hoke, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    The authors examined the effects of natural sediment physicochemical properties on the results of lab tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten-day exposures with the three species were conducted with 50 uncontaminated sediment samples from Lakes Erie, Huron, Superior, and Ontario, which differed markedly with regard to characteristics such as grain-size distribution, organic carbon content, and mineralogical composition. Tests were conducted both with and without the addition of exogenous food. Survival of Hyalella azteca, survival and growth of Chironomus tentans, and survival/reproduction and growth of Lumbriculus variegatus were significantly greater in tests in which the animals were fed vs, those in which they were not. Approximately 10% of the tests in which Hyalella azteca was not fed and 80% of tests in which the amphipods were fed resulted in >80% survival, a common criterion for defining the acceptability of tests with Hyalella azteca in clean control sediments. Similarly, a relatively high percentage of the tests in which Chironomus tentans was not fed would have failed a control survival criterion of 70% for the midge. Hence, there is significant potential for false positive results if Hyalella azteca or Chironomus tentans is not fed during sediment tests. Predictive modeling of the assay results in relationship to sediment physicochemical characteristics failed to reveal any additional factors that influenced survival of Hyalella azteca and Chrionomus tentans, or reproduction and growth of Lumbriculus variegatus in tests in which the organisms were fed. However, linear modeling did suggest that growth of fed as well as unfed Chironomus tentans may have been influenced by grain-size distribution of the test sediments.

  14. Mosquito species richness, composition, and abundance along habitat-climate-elevation gradients in the northern Colorado Front Range.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Bolling, Bethany G; Blair, Carol D; Beaty, Barry J; Moore, Chester G

    2008-07-01

    We exploited elevation gradients (1,500-2,400 m) ranging from plains to montane areas along the Poudre River and Big Thompson River in the northern Colorado Front Range to determine how mosquito species richness, composition, and abundance change along natural habitat-climate-elevation gradients. Mosquito collections in 26 sites in 2006 by using CO2-baited CDC light traps yielded a total of 7,136 identifiable mosquitoes of 27 species. Commonly collected species included Aedes vexans (Meigen) (n = 4,722), Culex tarsalis Coquillett (n = 825), Ochlerotatus increpitus (Dyar) (n = 546), Ochlerotatus trivittatus (Coquillett) (n = 303), Aedes cinereus Meigen (n = 280), Ochlerotatus melanimon (Dyar) (n = 146), Ochlerotatus dorsalis (Meigen) (n = 67), Culiseta inornata (Williston) (n = 52), Ochlerotatus pullatus (Coquillett) (n = 38), Ochlerotatus spencerii idahoensis (Theobald) (n = 37), and Culex pipiens L. (n = 29). Species richness was highest in plains habitats at elevations below 1,600 m. Numerous species were found exclusively or predominantly at low elevations below 1,700 m [Anopheles earlei Vargas, Anophelesfreeborni Aitken, Coquilletidia perturbans (Walker), Culex erythrothorax (Dyar), Cx. pipiens, Culex territans Walker, Oc. dorsalis, Ochlerotatus hendersoni (Cockerell), Oc. melanimon, and Oc. trivittatus], whereas others occurred predominantly at high elevations above 2,300 m [Ae. cinereus, Culiseta incidens (Thomson), Culiseta morsitans (Theoblad), Ochlerotatus cataphylla (Dyar), Ochlerotatus intrudens (Dyar), Oc. pullatus, and Ochlerotatus punctor (Kirby)]. Ae. vexans and Cx. tarsalis were abundant in the plains (< 1,600 m; mean June-August temperature > 19.5 degrees C), occurred at low abundances in foothills and low montane areas (1,610-1,730 m; 18.0-19.5 degrees C), and they were collected only sporadically in montane areas above 1,750 m (mean June-August temperature < 17.5 degrees C). These findings suggest that future climate warming may lead to shifts in

  15. Diversity and ecology survey of mosquitoes potential vectors in Belgian equestrian farms: A threat prevention of mosquito-borne equine arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Boukraa, Slimane; de La Grandiere, Maria A; Bawin, Thomas; Raharimalala, Fara N; Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Haubruge, Eric; Thiry, Etienne; Francis, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of West Nile Virus was recently recorded in several European countries, which can lead to severe health problems in horse populations. Europe is also at risk of introduction of mosquito-borne equine alphavirus from Americas. Prevention of these arboviruses requires a clear understanding of transmission cycles, especially their vectors. To characterize mosquito fauna, their ecology and identify potential vectors of equine arboviruses in Belgium, entomological surveys of six equestrian farms located in the Wolloon Region were conducted during 2011-2012. The harvest of mosquitoes was based on larval sampling (272 samples from 111 breeding sites) and monthly adults trapping (CO2-baited traps, Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus). Among 51,493 larvae and 319 adult mosquitoes collected, morphological identification showed the presence of 11 species: Anopheles claviger (Meigen), An. maculipennis s.l. (Meigen), An. plumbeus (Stephens), Culex hortensis (Ficalbi), Cx. territans (Walker), Cx. pipiens s.l. L., Cx. torrentium (Martini), Coquillettidia richiardii (Ficalbi), Culiseta annulata (Schrank), Aedes cantans (Meigen), Ae. geniculatus (Olivier). Molecular identification of Cx. pipiens species complex allowed the detection of three molecular forms, Pipiens (92.3%), Molestus (4.6%) and Hybrid (3.1%). Larvae of Cx. pipiens sl and Cx. torrentium were omnipresent and the most abundant species. Water troughs, ponds and slurry (liquid manure) were the most favorable breeding sites of mosquito larvae. Based upon behavior and ecology of the identified mosquito species, Studied Belgian equestrian farms seem to provide a suitable environment and breeding sites for the proliferation of potential vectors of arboviruses and those being a real nuisance problem for horses and neighboring inhabitants.

  16. Diversity and ecology survey of mosquitoes potential vectors in Belgian equestrian farms: A threat prevention of mosquito-borne equine arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Boukraa, Slimane; de La Grandiere, Maria A; Bawin, Thomas; Raharimalala, Fara N; Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Haubruge, Eric; Thiry, Etienne; Francis, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of West Nile Virus was recently recorded in several European countries, which can lead to severe health problems in horse populations. Europe is also at risk of introduction of mosquito-borne equine alphavirus from Americas. Prevention of these arboviruses requires a clear understanding of transmission cycles, especially their vectors. To characterize mosquito fauna, their ecology and identify potential vectors of equine arboviruses in Belgium, entomological surveys of six equestrian farms located in the Wolloon Region were conducted during 2011-2012. The harvest of mosquitoes was based on larval sampling (272 samples from 111 breeding sites) and monthly adults trapping (CO2-baited traps, Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus). Among 51,493 larvae and 319 adult mosquitoes collected, morphological identification showed the presence of 11 species: Anopheles claviger (Meigen), An. maculipennis s.l. (Meigen), An. plumbeus (Stephens), Culex hortensis (Ficalbi), Cx. territans (Walker), Cx. pipiens s.l. L., Cx. torrentium (Martini), Coquillettidia richiardii (Ficalbi), Culiseta annulata (Schrank), Aedes cantans (Meigen), Ae. geniculatus (Olivier). Molecular identification of Cx. pipiens species complex allowed the detection of three molecular forms, Pipiens (92.3%), Molestus (4.6%) and Hybrid (3.1%). Larvae of Cx. pipiens sl and Cx. torrentium were omnipresent and the most abundant species. Water troughs, ponds and slurry (liquid manure) were the most favorable breeding sites of mosquito larvae. Based upon behavior and ecology of the identified mosquito species, Studied Belgian equestrian farms seem to provide a suitable environment and breeding sites for the proliferation of potential vectors of arboviruses and those being a real nuisance problem for horses and neighboring inhabitants. PMID:26775817

  17. New Black Fungus Gnats (Diptera, Sciaridae) of North America. Part II. Genus Bradysiopsis Tuomikoski, 1960.

    PubMed

    Mohrig, Werner; Kauschke, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    The genus Bradysiopsis Tuomikoski is new for the sciarid fauna of North America. It includes 6 species. Four of them are new for science. These are Bradysiopsis postvittigera sp. n., Br. praevittata sp. n., Br. praevittigera sp. n. and Br. subvittigera sp. n.. Two species, Br. vittata (Meigen, 1830) and Br. vittigera (Zetterstedt, 1851), are distributed in the Holarctic but new for North America. In this paper species are described, illustrated by figures and a key for classification as well as distribution data are given. PMID:27615840

  18. Detection of eastern equine encephalitis virus antibodies in moose (Alces americana), Maine, 2010.

    PubMed

    Lubelczyk, Charles; Elias, Susan P; Kantar, Lee; Albert, Jennifer; Hansen, Stephen; Saxton-Shaw, Kali; MacMillan, Katharine; Smith, Leticia B; Eisen, Rebecca; Swope, Bethany; Smith, Robert Pease; Mutebi, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Moose sera were collected from harvested animals during the 2010 hunting season in Maine. Of the 145 serum samples screened by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), 16 (11%) had antibodies to eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Positive samples were collected from Aroostook County (n=13), Somerset County (n=2), and Piscataquis County (n=1) in northern and central Maine. Preliminary mosquito surveillance revealed the presence of enzootic and bridge vectors mosquitoes, including Culiseta (Climacura) melanura (Coquillett), Aedes (Aedimorphus) vexans (Meigen), and Coquillettidia (Coquillettidia) perturbans (Walker). Select mosquito species were tested by RT-PCR for the presence of EEEV. None were positive. This is the first report of EEEV in moose from Maine.

  19. A new record of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera:Fanniidae) from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Omar, B; Kurahashi, H; Jeffery, J; Yasohdha, N; Lau, S Y; John, M C; Marwi, M A; Zuha, R M; Ahmad, M S

    2007-12-01

    Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Fanniidae) is newly recorded from Malaysia. This record is based on 1male symbol 1female symbol from Sarawak, east Malaysia and 1male symbol 2female symbol from Selangor, peninsular Malaysia. It is included in the pusio group of Fannia wherein are included Fannia femoralis (Stein), Fannia howardi Malloch, Fannia trimaculata (Stein), Fannia leucosticta (Meigen) and Fannia punctiventris Malloch. The male of Fannia pusio is differentiated from other members of the group by the following features: hind femur with a swelling bearing a number of setae that are usually curled at tip; squamae creamy; tergite 1+2 broadly grey dusted at sides.

  20. ULTRASTRUCTURE AND PERMEABILITY OF NUCLEAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Joseph; Spiro, David; Loewenstein, Werner R.

    1965-01-01

    The fine structures of nuclear envelopes known to have different permeability properties were compared. Membranes of salivary gland cell nuclei of Drosophila (third instar) and Chironomus (prepupae), which are strong barriers to ion diffusion, and membranes of oocyte nuclei (germinal vesicle) of Xenopus and Triturus, which are much more ion-permeable, show no essential difference in size, frequency, and distribution of their membrane gaps ("pores") which could account for the marked disparities in membrane permeability. The gaps are occupied by diffuse electron-opaque material with occasional central regions of strong opacity. This material may possibly account for the high diffusion resistance of Drosophila and Chironomus nuclear envelopes, where the resistance is far too great to allow free diffusion through the gaps. But material of this kind is also present in the more permeable nuclear envelopes of Xenopus and Triturus oocytes, and there are no convincing structural differences discernible with the techniques employed. PMID:5892850

  1. Do aquatic insects avoid cadmium-contaminated sediments?

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, L.; Shooner, F.

    1995-06-01

    The long-term colonization of profundal lake sediments having a range of spiked cadmium (Cd) concentrations (0.007 to 2.7 {mu}mol/g dry wt.) was measured in the field. Population densities of two of the most abundant colonizing insects (the chironomids Procladius [Holotanypus] sp., and Sergentia coracina) were unrelated to the Cd gradient, even though both taxa accumulated Cd in direct relation to its concentration in sediment Cd gradient Cd gradient. Cadmium concentrations in Chironomus (salinarius gp.) sp. larvae also responded positively to the sediment Cd gradient and ranged from 0.2 to 50 {mu}g/g. In contrast with the two other taxa, the abundance of Chironomus (salinarius gp.) sp. was the result of a behavioral or a toxic response, larvae of the three chironomid taxa were given a choice between field-control and Cd-spiked sediments in the laboratory. None of the taxa avoided the Cd-spiked sediments, suggesting that the lower abundance of Chironomus (salinarius gp.) sp. at high Cd concentrations in the field was due to Cd toxicity and not to avoidance of the Cd-rich sediments.

  2. Developing acute-to-chronic toxicity ratios for lead, cadmium, and zinc using rainbow trout, a mayfly, and a midge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mebane, C.A.; Hennessy, D.P.; Dillon, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    In order to estimate acute-to-chronic toxicity ratios (ACRs) relevant to a coldwater stream community, we exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in 96-h acute and 60+ day early-life stage (ELS) exposures. We also tested the acute and sublethal responses of a mayfly (Baetis tricaudatus) and a midge (Chironomus dilutus, formerly C. tentans) with Pb. We examine the statistical interpretation of test endpoints and the acute-to-chronic ratio concept. Increasing the number of control replicates by 2 to 3x decreased the minimum detectable differences by almost half. Pb ACR estimates mostly increased with increasing acute resistance of the organisms (rainbow trout ACRs Chironomus). The choice of test endpoint and statistical analysis influenced ACR estimates by up to a factor of four. When calculated using the geometric means of the no- and lowest-observed effect concentrations, ACRs with rainbow trout and Cd were 0.6 and 0.95; Zn about 1.0; and for Pb 3.3 and 11. The comparable Pb ACRs for the mayfly and Chironomus were 5.2 and 51 respectively. Our rainbow trout ACRs with Pb were about 5-20x lower than earlier reports with salmonids. We suggest discounting previous ACR results that used larger and older fish in their acute tests. ?? 2007 GovernmentEmployee: U.S. Geological Survey.

  3. Comparing the impacts of sediment-bound bifenthrin on aquatic macroinvertebrates in laboratory bioassays and field microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Rhianna L; Hoak, Molly N; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Long, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two laboratory bioassays and two field microcosm exposures with bifenthrin (a synthetic pyrethroid) in order to evaluate the capacity of single-species laboratory bioassays to predict lethal and sublethal impacts on aquatic invertebrates in microcosms. For the laboratory species, Chironomus tepperi, larval survival was reduced by 24% at 53.66µg/g OC, while adult emergence was reduced at concentrations of 33.33µg/g OC and higher, with a 61% decrease at 77.78µg/g OC and no emergence at 126.67µg/g OC. The abundance of several other microcosm taxa was reduced in the microcosms at a similar concentration range (33.33µg/g OC and above), however there was no impact on the abundance of the congeneric species, Chironomus oppositus. The differences in impacts between test systems were potentially due to both differing species sensitivity and the interaction of ambient temperature with bifenthrin toxicity. Bifenthrin also was associated with early emergence of Chironomus sp. in both test systems, at concentrations of 10µg/g OC and higher (laboratory) and 43.90µg/g OC (microcosm), and with a significant decrease in the proportion of C. oppositus males in a microcosm. These findings indicate that while laboratory bioassays accurately predict many impacts in the field, there are some limitations to the predictive capacity of these tests. PMID:27544659

  4. Comparing the impacts of sediment-bound bifenthrin on aquatic macroinvertebrates in laboratory bioassays and field microcosms.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Rhianna L; Hoak, Molly N; Pettigrove, Vincent J; Hoffmann, Ary A; Long, Sara M

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two laboratory bioassays and two field microcosm exposures with bifenthrin (a synthetic pyrethroid) in order to evaluate the capacity of single-species laboratory bioassays to predict lethal and sublethal impacts on aquatic invertebrates in microcosms. For the laboratory species, Chironomus tepperi, larval survival was reduced by 24% at 53.66µg/g OC, while adult emergence was reduced at concentrations of 33.33µg/g OC and higher, with a 61% decrease at 77.78µg/g OC and no emergence at 126.67µg/g OC. The abundance of several other microcosm taxa was reduced in the microcosms at a similar concentration range (33.33µg/g OC and above), however there was no impact on the abundance of the congeneric species, Chironomus oppositus. The differences in impacts between test systems were potentially due to both differing species sensitivity and the interaction of ambient temperature with bifenthrin toxicity. Bifenthrin also was associated with early emergence of Chironomus sp. in both test systems, at concentrations of 10µg/g OC and higher (laboratory) and 43.90µg/g OC (microcosm), and with a significant decrease in the proportion of C. oppositus males in a microcosm. These findings indicate that while laboratory bioassays accurately predict many impacts in the field, there are some limitations to the predictive capacity of these tests.

  5. Sarcosaprophagous Diptera assemblages in natural habitats in central Spain: spatial and seasonal changes in composition.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vega, D; Baz, A

    2013-03-01

    The composition and spatial distribution of sarcosaprophagous Diptera assemblages were studied using carrion-baited traps along a bioclimatic gradient of natural habitats in central Spain throughout the different seasons during 1 year. Calliphoridae and Muscidae were the most abundant families, accounting for, respectively, 41.9% and 35.1% of all Diptera specimens collected. Other abundant families were Heleomyzidae (8.4%), Sarcophagidae (6.9%) and Piophilidae (5.1%). Fly assemblage compositions differed among bioclimatic levels, with Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) being the dominant species in mesomediterranean habitats, Muscina levida (Harris) (Diptera: Muscidae) the dominant species in supramediterranean habitats, and Prochyliza nigrimana (Meigen) (Diptera: Piophilidae) the dominant species in oromediterranean habitats. Differences in assemblage composition were also found among seasons. Thermophobic species such as Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and some species of Heleomyzidae were well represented during autumn, winter and spring in the three bioclimatic levels sampled. By contrast, thermophilic species such as Ch. albiceps and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and most Muscidae and Sarcophagidae species were more abundant during summer and in mesomediterranean habitats located at lower elevations. Knowledge of the preferences of some species for certain habitats may be of ecological and forensic value and may establish a starting point for further research.

  6. The mermithid species Isomermislairdi (Nematoda, Mermithidae), previously only known in Africa, found in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gradinarov, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The present work contributs to the knowledge on the aquatic mermithids (Nematoda, Mermithidae) occurring in black flies - an insufficiently studied group of parasitic nematodes. Isomermislairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou, 1977, described from larvae of Simuliumdamnosum Theobald, 1903 in Western Africa, is reported to occur in Bulgaria. The species was isolated from larvae of Simuliumornatum Meigen, 1818 in a local population of simuliids in a mountain stream near Jeleznitsa Village, Sofia district. Postparasitic juveniles of mermithids were obtained from the hosts and reared to the adult stage. The species was identified by morphological and morphometrical characters of postparasitic juveniles, and of male and female individuals. In the summer of 2012 a relatively high rate of mermithid infection in a local host population was detected (prevalence up to 44.1%). In August of the next year host abundance had considerably declined and other simuliid species, Simuliumvariegatum Meigen, 1818 and Simuliumreptans (Linnaeus, 1758), predominated in the investigated locality. In West Africa, Isomermislairdi is considered to be a potential biological agent for reducing the population density of the Simuliumdamnosum complex - the main vector of human onchocerciasis. In Europe, species of the Simuliumornatum complex are among the vectors of onchocerciasis of cattle and deer. The mermithids presumably play a certain role in the epidemiology of these diseases. A brief discussion on the taxonomy of the genus Isomermis Coman, 1953, and of the feasibility of molecular methods in mermithid taxonomy is provided. The species Isomermislairdi is reported for the first time from Europe. PMID:25493063

  7. Notes on the first instar larvae of Ctenophora and Nephrotoma (Diptera, Tipulidae).

    PubMed

    Podeniene, Virginija; Naseviciene, Nijole; Podenas, Sigitas

    2014-01-01

    1830 egg-larvae of 7 species belonging to long palped crane flies (Tipulidae): Ctenophora guttata Meigen, Nephrotoma pratensis Linnaeus, N. dorsalis Fabricius, N. scurra Meigen, N. flavescens Linnaeus, N. submaculosa Edwards and N. crocata Linnaeus were obtained from 22 females captured in Lithuania in 2011-2012. It took from five days to more than three weeks for eggs to hatch. Crane flies have four instars of larvae. Second, third and the last instar larvae are very similar, when the first instar or egg-larvae differs radically. Descriptions and illustrations of external morphology, chaetotaxy of abdominal segments, characters of head capsules and last abdominal segments are given for the previously unknown first instar larvae of Ct. guttata, N. crocata, N. dorsalis, N. flavescens, N. pratensis, N. scurra and poorly known N. submaculosa. It was found out that difference of head capsule and last abdominal segment among the first instar larvae of above mentioned species of genus Nephrotoma are more obvious than in last instar. During this study it was found, that such characters as shape of apical teeth of mandible, shape of basal segment of antenna and number of sensillae, shape of hypostomium and arrangement of sensory structures on labrum, differ among egg-larvae of Nephrotoma. It was found, that pads on frontal part of prothorax and shape of lateral plates of egg-larvae labrum of Nephrotoma differ significantly from that of Ctenophora and could be used as genus separating characters.  PMID:24870629

  8. The mermithid species Isomermislairdi (Nematoda, Mermithidae), previously only known in Africa, found in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gradinarov, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The present work contributs to the knowledge on the aquatic mermithids (Nematoda, Mermithidae) occurring in black flies - an insufficiently studied group of parasitic nematodes. Isomermislairdi Mondet, Poinar & Bernadou, 1977, described from larvae of Simuliumdamnosum Theobald, 1903 in Western Africa, is reported to occur in Bulgaria. The species was isolated from larvae of Simuliumornatum Meigen, 1818 in a local population of simuliids in a mountain stream near Jeleznitsa Village, Sofia district. Postparasitic juveniles of mermithids were obtained from the hosts and reared to the adult stage. The species was identified by morphological and morphometrical characters of postparasitic juveniles, and of male and female individuals. In the summer of 2012 a relatively high rate of mermithid infection in a local host population was detected (prevalence up to 44.1%). In August of the next year host abundance had considerably declined and other simuliid species, Simuliumvariegatum Meigen, 1818 and Simuliumreptans (Linnaeus, 1758), predominated in the investigated locality. In West Africa, Isomermislairdi is considered to be a potential biological agent for reducing the population density of the Simuliumdamnosum complex - the main vector of human onchocerciasis. In Europe, species of the Simuliumornatum complex are among the vectors of onchocerciasis of cattle and deer. The mermithids presumably play a certain role in the epidemiology of these diseases. A brief discussion on the taxonomy of the genus Isomermis Coman, 1953, and of the feasibility of molecular methods in mermithid taxonomy is provided. The species Isomermislairdi is reported for the first time from Europe.

  9. Does covering of farm-associated Culicoides larval habitat reduce adult populations in the United Kingdom?☆

    PubMed Central

    Harrup, L.E.; Gubbins, S.; Barber, J.; Denison, E.; Mellor, P.S.; Purse, B.V.; Carpenter, S.

    2014-01-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important arboviruses of livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recently emerging Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Culicoides species in the subgenus Avaritia (in the UK: Culicoides obsoletus Meigen, Culicoides scoticus Downes & Kettle, Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer and Culicoides chiopterus Meigen) have been implicated in BTV transmission in northern Europe and to a varying degree utilise cattle dung as a larval development substrate. The collection of cattle dung into heaps on farms provides a localised source of Culicoides emergence in close proximity to livestock. This study assesses the impact of covering dung heaps prior to the onset of adult Culicoides activity with the aim of reducing recruitment to the local adult populations at four livestock farms in England. Light suction trap catches of adult Culicoides from these farms were compared with those from four untreated control farms from a wide geographic range across the UK. It was demonstrated that implementing control of emergence from dung heaps did not have a significant impact upon the local adult subgenus Avaritia abundance at the treated farm holdings and that the onset of Culicoides activity was similarly unaffected. Use of this method in isolation is unlikely to have an effect in reducing the risk of BTV and SBV transmission. The implications of these results for control of farm-associated Culicoides in Europe are discussed. PMID:24472769

  10. Dataset of traumatic myiasis observed for three dominant screw worm species in North West Pakistan with first report of Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner).

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Farrah; Fatima, Syeda Hira; Gul, Ayesha

    2016-09-01

    Regional surveys were carried out in different parts of North West Pakistan among domestic animals (N=57,921) including pets and livestock identifying cases of traumatic myiasis (n=1037). A total of four surveys focused general livestock population during Eid ul Adha (Eid surveys; incidence=1.21%) while another four surveys (Miscellaneous surveys; incidence=7.34%) targeted animal population brought to veterinary hospitals and dispensaries. Timeframe spanned four years from 2012 to 2015. Maggots were sampled and location of the wound was recorded for each host. Taxonomic identification used light and electron microscopic techniques. Our dataset shows three species as principle agents of myiasis (n=882) including Chrysomya bezziana Villeneuve (n=394), Wohlfahrtia magnifica (n=244) and Lucilia cuprina Wiedemann (n=244). Others (n=155) including Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), Lucilia sericata (Meigen), Lucilia illustris (Meigen), Lucilia porphyrina (Walker), Hemipyrellia ligguriens (Wiedemann), Calliphora vicina (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga crassipalpalis (Macquart) and Sarcophaga species were identified as species of minor importance. The obligatory screwworm species W. magnifica is a first report from Pakistan. The results based on this dataset are presented in a recent publication "Distribution Modeling of three screwworm species in the ecologically diverse landscape of North West Pakistan" (Zaidi et al., 2016) [1].

  11. Seasonal and Daily Activity Patterns of Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) Vectors of Pathogens in Northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Montarsi, Fabrizio; Mazzon, Luca; Cazzin, Stefania; Ciocchetta, Silvia; Capelli, Gioia

    2015-01-01

    The seasonal and daily activity of mosquito vectors of pathogens affecting animals and humans were studied in northeastern Italy at a site within the Po River Delta Park. A CDC-CO2 trap and a gravid trap were operated at 2-h intervals for 24 h every 15 d from May to October 2010. Overall, 5,788 mosquitoes comprising six species were collected, namely Culex pipiens L. (75.1% of total), Aedes caspius (Pallas) (15.2%), Aedes vexans (Meigen) (6.9%), Anopheles maculipennis s.l. Meigen (2.6%), Culiseta annulata (Schrank) (0.2%), and Culex modestus Ficalbi (<0.1%). The relative abundance of these species increased from May until the beginning of July and then decreased, disappearing at the beginning of October. The diel host-seeking patterns and oviposition site-seeking patterns were species specific and were differentially affected by the ecological variables recorded at the day and hour of mosquito collection or two weeks before collection. Knowledge of the seasonal and daily host-seeking patterns of mosquitoes highlights the time periods of the day and the seasons of potential exposure for animals and humans to mosquito-borne pathogens, therefore delineating the best time for the application of preventive measures. Furthermore, knowledge of the oviposition site-seeking activity of the mosquitoes optimizes the capture of gravid females, thereby enhancing the likelihood of detecting pathogens.

  12. Estimating the Number of Eggs in Blow Fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Egg Masses Using Photographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosati, J Y; Pacheco, V A; Vankosky, M A; Vanlaerhoven, S L

    2015-07-01

    Little work has been done to quantify the number of eggs oviposited by blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in studies examining colonization behavior. Egg counting methods currently available are time-consuming and destructive. This study used ImageJ software and analysis of covariance to relate the volume of egg masses to the number of eggs laid by three different blow fly species: Lucilia sericata (Meigen), Phormia regina (Meigen), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart). Egg mass volume, species, and the interaction of species and egg mass volume all affected the number of blow fly eggs deposited in egg masses. Both species identity and egg mass volume are important when predicting egg number, as such a single regression equation cannot be used to estimate egg number for these three species. Therefore, simple linear regression equations were determined for each species. The volume of individual eggs was incorporated into the model, yet differences between species were observed, suggesting that the orientation of the eggs oviposited by multiple conspecific females within egg masses influences egg estimates. Based on our results, we expect that imaging software can be used for other blow fly species, as well as other insect species; however, equations specific to each species must be developed. This study describes an important tool for quantifying egg deposition in a nondestructive manner, which is important in studying the colonization behavior and life history of insects of ecological and forensic importance.

  13. Notes on the first instar larvae of Ctenophora and Nephrotoma (Diptera, Tipulidae).

    PubMed

    Podeniene, Virginija; Naseviciene, Nijole; Podenas, Sigitas

    2014-02-10

    1830 egg-larvae of 7 species belonging to long palped crane flies (Tipulidae): Ctenophora guttata Meigen, Nephrotoma pratensis Linnaeus, N. dorsalis Fabricius, N. scurra Meigen, N. flavescens Linnaeus, N. submaculosa Edwards and N. crocata Linnaeus were obtained from 22 females captured in Lithuania in 2011-2012. It took from five days to more than three weeks for eggs to hatch. Crane flies have four instars of larvae. Second, third and the last instar larvae are very similar, when the first instar or egg-larvae differs radically. Descriptions and illustrations of external morphology, chaetotaxy of abdominal segments, characters of head capsules and last abdominal segments are given for the previously unknown first instar larvae of Ct. guttata, N. crocata, N. dorsalis, N. flavescens, N. pratensis, N. scurra and poorly known N. submaculosa. It was found out that difference of head capsule and last abdominal segment among the first instar larvae of above mentioned species of genus Nephrotoma are more obvious than in last instar. During this study it was found, that such characters as shape of apical teeth of mandible, shape of basal segment of antenna and number of sensillae, shape of hypostomium and arrangement of sensory structures on labrum, differ among egg-larvae of Nephrotoma. It was found, that pads on frontal part of prothorax and shape of lateral plates of egg-larvae labrum of Nephrotoma differ significantly from that of Ctenophora and could be used as genus separating characters. 

  14. Worthy of their name: how floods drive outbreaks of two major floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Berec, Ludĕk; Gelbic, Ivan; Sebesta, Oldrich

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how climate variables drive seasonal dynamics of mosquito populations is critical to mitigating negative impacts of potential outbreaks, including both nuisance effects and risk of mosquito-borne infectious disease. Here, we identify climate variables most affecting seasonal dynamics of two major floodwater mosquitoes, Aedes vexans (Meigen, 1830) and Aedes sticticus (Meigen, 1838) (Diptera: Culicidae), along the lower courses of the Dyje River, at the border between the Czech Republic and Austria. Monthly trap counts of both floodwater mosquitoes varied both across sites and years. Despite this variability, both models used to fit the observed data at all sites (and especially that for Ae. sticticus) and site-specific models fitted the observed data quite well. The most important climate variables we identified-temperature and especially flooding-were driving seasonal dynamics of both Aedes species. We suggest that flooding determines seasonal peaks in the monthly mosquito trap counts while temperature modulates seasonality in these counts. Hence, floodwater mosquitoes indeed appear worthy of their name. Moreover, the climate variables we considered for modeling were able reasonably to predict mosquito trap counts in the month ahead. Our study can help in planning flood management; timely notification of people, given that these mosquitoes are a real nuisance in this region; public health policy management to mitigate risk from such mosquito-borne diseases as that caused in humans by the Tahyna virus; and anticipating negative consequences of climate change, which are expected only to worsen unless floods, or the mosquitoes themselves, are satisfactorily managed.

  15. Biting activity and host attractancy of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Manzhouli, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-Ming; Xing, Dan; Wu, Zhi-Ming; Yao, Wen-Jing; Gang, Wang; Xin, Dong-Sheng; Jiang, Yue-Fen; Xue, Rui-De; Dong, Yang-De; Li, Chun-Xiao; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2012-11-01

    The biting activity and host attractancy of vector mosquitoes are important in assessing the risk of arbovirus transmission, especially where migratory and nonmigrating bird species congregate, such as in Hulun Lake, Manzhouli. In 2009, the population distribution, species diversity, biting activity, and host attractancy of mosquitoes were investigated in Hulan Lake and its associated prairie area. The adult mosquitoes were captured either by human volunteers using aspirators in mosquito nets, by CO2-baited light traps, or by animal-baited traps. In total, 27,004 mosquitoes, representing three genera and 10 species, were collected from Manzhouli, China, in July 2009, of which Aedes dorsalis (Meigen) were most predominant species, followed by Ae. vexans (Meigen). Biting activity peaks by Ae.flavescens (Muller), Ae. dorsalis, and Culex modestus (Facalbi) on human subjects were investigated. Four mosquito species were captured from different animal sheds (sheep, cattle, and goose). Ae. flavescens was more abundant in the cattle shed than in the other two sheds. The Ae. dorsalis in the sheep shed was much higher than in the other animal sheds. The Ae.flavescens collected via chicken-baited traps were significantly higher than those collected via rabbit-baited and pigeon-baited traps. There were no significant differences in the number of Ae. dorsalis and Ae. vexans collected using the three different animal traps.

  16. Dataset of traumatic myiasis observed for three dominant screw worm species in North West Pakistan with first report of Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner).

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Farrah; Fatima, Syeda Hira; Gul, Ayesha

    2016-09-01

    Regional surveys were carried out in different parts of North West Pakistan among domestic animals (N=57,921) including pets and livestock identifying cases of traumatic myiasis (n=1037). A total of four surveys focused general livestock population during Eid ul Adha (Eid surveys; incidence=1.21%) while another four surveys (Miscellaneous surveys; incidence=7.34%) targeted animal population brought to veterinary hospitals and dispensaries. Timeframe spanned four years from 2012 to 2015. Maggots were sampled and location of the wound was recorded for each host. Taxonomic identification used light and electron microscopic techniques. Our dataset shows three species as principle agents of myiasis (n=882) including Chrysomya bezziana Villeneuve (n=394), Wohlfahrtia magnifica (n=244) and Lucilia cuprina Wiedemann (n=244). Others (n=155) including Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), Lucilia sericata (Meigen), Lucilia illustris (Meigen), Lucilia porphyrina (Walker), Hemipyrellia ligguriens (Wiedemann), Calliphora vicina (Robineau-Desvoidy), Sarcophaga crassipalpalis (Macquart) and Sarcophaga species were identified as species of minor importance. The obligatory screwworm species W. magnifica is a first report from Pakistan. The results based on this dataset are presented in a recent publication "Distribution Modeling of three screwworm species in the ecologically diverse landscape of North West Pakistan" (Zaidi et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27570812

  17. Emergence of Culicoides obsoletus group species from farm-associated habitats in Germany.

    PubMed

    Steinke, S; Lühken, R; Balczun, C; Kiel, E

    2016-06-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) may transmit several arboviruses to ruminant livestock. The species of the Obsoletus group are considered to be among the most important vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) in northern Europe. As agricultural environments offer suitable habitats for the development of their immature stages, the emergence of adult Culicoides from potential breeding sites was investigated at 20 cattle farms throughout Germany in 2012 and 2013. In analyses of species-specific habitat preferences and relationships between Culicoides abundance in breeding substrates and their physicochemical characteristics, dungheaps emerged as the most important substrate for the development of Culicoides obsoletus sensu stricto (s.s.) (Meigen), whereas Culicoides chiopterus (Meigen) and Culicoides dewulfi Goetghebuer were generally restricted to cowpats. A decreasing pH value was associated with a higher abundance or a higher probability of observing these three species. Furthermore, the abundance of C. obsoletus s.s. was positively related to increasing moisture. Dungheaps were very productive breeding sites for this species and are therefore suggested as a target for potential control measures. PMID:26744290

  18. Conditions for the return and simulation of the recovery of burrowing mayflies in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolar, Cynthia S.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Savino, Jacqueline F.

    1997-01-01

    In the 1950s, burrowing mayflies, Hexagenia spp. (H. Limbata and H. Rigida), were virtually eliminated from the western basin of Lake Erie (a 3300 kmA? area) because of eutrophication and pollution. We develop and present a deterministic model for the recolonization of the western basin by Hexagenia to pre-1953 densities. The model was based on the logistic equation describing the population growth of Hexagenia and a presumed competitor, Chironomus (dipteran larvae). Other parameters (immigration, low oxygen, toxic sediments, competition with Chironomus, and fish predation) were then individually added to the logistic model to determine their effect at different growth rates. The logistic model alone predicts 10-41 yr for Hexagenia to recolonize western Lake Erie. Immigration reduced the recolonization time by 2-17 yr. One low-oxygen event during the first 20 yr increased recovery time by 5-17 yr. Contaminated sediments added 5-11 yr to the recolonization time. Competition with Chironomus added 8-19 yr to recovery. Fish predators added 4-47 yr to the time required for recolonization. The full model predicted 48-81 yr for Hexagenia to reach a carrying capacity of approximately 350 nymphs/mA?, or not until around the year 2038 if the model is started in 1990. The model was verified by changing model parameters to those present in 1970, beginning the model in 1970 and running it through 1990. Predicted densities overlapped almost completely with actual estimated densities of Hexagenia nymphs present in the western basin in Lake Erie in 1990. The model suggests that recovery of large aquatic ecosystems may lag substantially behind remediation efforts.

  19. Evaluation of long term effects of thermal effluents on stream biota

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, J.E.

    1980-10-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of energy related developments in aquatic ecosystems, a normal water data base must be established. One approach used is the selection of indicator communities on species with fairly well known environmental tolerances and requirements. The Chironomidae (Order Diptera) dominate the macrobenthic assemblages of many streams. The group offers great potential for water quality assessment. The studies in this report determine the species composition of Chironomidae at stream sites in New Mexico, across the relationship of species composition to water quality parameters, and map karyotypes for the chironomus decorus group. (ACR)

  20. Use of sediment serial dilution series to establish biological effect levels and clean-up goals

    SciTech Connect

    Timmer, E.; DeLong, T.; Millard, J.; Dobroski, C.

    1995-12-31

    A sediment serial dilution study was used to determine biological effect levels for two freshwater invertebrates, Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca. The sediments for the test were collected from a New England brook which contained elevated levels of lead and polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. The objective of the sediment dilution study was two-fold: (1 ) to provide a site-specific estimation of biological effect levels, thus reducing uncertainties associated with using literature-based values, and (2) to establish clean-up goals specific to this freshwater system.

  1. Comparative study of ecotoxicological effect of triorganotin compounds on various biological subjects.

    PubMed

    Fargasová, A

    1997-02-01

    The toxic and inhibitory effect of 10 triorganotin compounds (triphenlyl-, tribenzyl-, and tributyltins) were determined under standardized conditions on four biological subjects: Tubifex tubifex, Chironomus plumosus, Sinapis alba seeds, and the alga Scenedesmus quadricauda. Observed were the mortality of T. tubifex and Ch. plumosus after 96 hr, the root growth inhibition of S. alba seeds after 72 hr, and the inhibition of growth, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll a content of S. quadricauda after 12 days of cultivation. The effect of triorganotins was expressed as LC50 values for mortality and EC50 values for inhibition. For each subject and observed parameter the rank order of toxicity/or inhibition was arranged.

  2. New records of mites (Acari: Spinturnicidae) associated with bats (Mammalia, Chiroptera) in two Brazilian biomes: Pantanal and Caatinga.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Juliana Cardoso; Martins, Mayara Almeida; Guedes, Patrícia Gonçalves; Peracchi, Adriano Lucio; Serra-Freire, Nicolau Maues

    2016-01-01

    A first survey of mite species that ectoparasitize bats in the states of Ceará and Mato Grosso was conducted. The specimens of bats and their mites were collected in areas of the Caatinga and Pantanal biomes. A total of 450 spinturnicids representing two genera and ten species was collected from 15 bat species in the Private Reserve of the Natural Patrimony Serra das Almas, Ceará State, Northeast Brazil and 138 spinturnicids represented by two genera and four species were found in seven bats species collected in Private Reserve of the Natural Patrimony Sesc Pantanal, Mato Grosso State, Central-Western Brazil. The occurrence of Cameronieta genus and the species Mesoperiglischrus natali as well as four new associations (Periglischrus iheringi - Chiroderma vizottoi; P. micronycteridis - Micronycteris sanborni; P. paracutisternus - Trachops cirrhosus; Spinturnix americanus - Myotis riparius) are registered for the first time in Brazil.

  3. Traumatic Myiasis Caused by an Association of Sarcophaga tibialis (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Domestic Cat in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Pezzi, Marco; Whitmore, Daniel; Chicca, Milvia; Lanfredi, Margherita; Leis, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    We describe here a rare case of traumatic myiasis occurred in August 2014, caused by an association of 2 Diptera species, Sarcophaga tibialis Macquart (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in a domestic cat in northern Italy. Species identification was based on adult male morphology. The present case is the first report of S. tibialis as an agent of myiasis in Italy, and also the first ever report of myiasis caused by an association of S. tibialis and L. sericata. The cat developed an extensive traumatic myiasis in a large wound on the rump, which was treated pharmacologically and surgically. The biology, ecology, and distribution of S. tibialis and L. sericata are also discussed. A literature review is provided on cases of myiasis caused by S. tibialis, and cases of myiasis by L. sericata involving cats worldwide and humans and animals in Italy. PMID:26323846

  4. Ecology of Aedes dorsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) in relation to western equine encephalomyelitis virus in the Coachella Valley of California.

    PubMed

    Reisen, W K; Lothrop, H D; Chiles, R E

    1998-07-01

    The ecology of western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEE) was studies during 1994-1996 along a portion of the north shore of the Salton Sea in Coachella Valley, California, known to support a focal Aedes dorsalis (Meigen) population. WEE was detected during 1995 by the seroconversion of sentinel chickens concurrently at sites within and outside of the area supporting Ae. dorsalis. WEE was not detected during 1994 or 1996; neither was WEE detected by seroconversion of sentinel rabbits nor by isolation from host-seeking females of either the primary vector, Culex tarsalis Coquillett (42,083 females tested in 913 pools), or Ae. dorsalis (10,804 females tested in 245 pools and 1,940 adults reared from field-collected immatures tested in 72 pools). Collectively, the results of this and previous investigations indicate that Ae. dorsalis may not be essential for the maintenance or amplification of WEE virus in southeastern California. PMID:9701945

  5. Biologically active components against Drosophila melanogaster from Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Fukuyama, M; Yoshio, K; Kato, T; Ishikawa, Y

    1999-12-01

    In the course of screening for novel naturally occurring insecticides from Chinese crude drugs, a dichloromethane extract of Podophyllum hexandrum was found to give an insecticidal activity against larvae of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. From the extract, an insecticidal compound was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation. The compound was identified as podophyllotoxin (1) by comparison of its spectroscopic characteristics with literature data. In bioassays for insecticidal activity, 1 showed a LC(50) value of 0.24 micromol/mL diet against larvae of D. melanogaster and a LD(50) value of 22 microg/adult against adults. Acetylpodophyllotoxin (1A), however showed slight insecticidal activity in both assays, indicating that the 4-hydroxyl group was an important function for enhanced activity of 1.

  6. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  7. Effect of Channel Blockers on the Smooth Muscle of the Adult Crop of the Queen Blowfly, Phormia regina

    PubMed Central

    Stoffolano, John G.; Danai, Laura; Chambers, James

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined the various factors affecting the rate of contraction of the supercontractile muscles of the crop lobes of adult Phormia regina Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Using an in situ bioassay of the crop organ, various ion channel blockers were tested and it was demonstrated that in all cases the blockers (i.e., against the following conductances: Cl- , Ca2+ , Na+, and a FMRF-amide action) significantly reduced the contraction rates of the crop lobes, which were filled with 4.5 µL of 1.0 M sucrose containing 10 mM of the dye amaranth. Benzyltrimethylammonium chloride, never before reported for its effect on insect muscle, was as effective in suppressing crop muscle contraction as benzethonium chloride, which is a reported agonist of dromyosuppressin. PMID:24205919

  8. A de novo transcriptome assembly of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) with predicted alternative splices, single nucleotide polymorphisms and transcript expression estimates.

    PubMed

    Sze, S-H; Dunham, J P; Carey, B; Chang, P L; Li, F; Edman, R M; Fjeldsted, C; Scott, M J; Nuzhdin, S V; Tarone, Aaron M

    2012-04-01

    The blow fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) (Meigen) is a nonmodel organism with no reference genome that is associated with numerous areas of research spanning the ecological, evolutionary, medical, veterinary and forensic sciences. To facilitate scientific discovery in this species, the transcriptome was assembled from more than six billion bases of Illumina and twenty-one million bases of 454 sequence derived from embryonic, larval, pupal, adult and larval salivary gland libraries. The assembly was carried out in a manner that enabled identification of putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and alternative splices, and that provided expression estimates for various life history stages and for salivary tissue. The assembled transcriptome was also used to identify transcribed transposable elements in L. sericata. The results of this study will enable blow fly biologists, dipterists and comparative genomicists to more rapidly develop and test molecular and genetic hypotheses, especially those regarding blow fly development and salivary gland biology.

  9. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  10. Comments on the association of immatures of Hemerodromia (Diptera, Empididae) and Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae), and first record of this association in the Atlantic Forest (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Sánchez Molina, Óscar; Gil-Azevedo, Leonardo Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Larvae of Empididae (Diptera) prey on black fly immatures and its pupae can be collected from pupal cases of Simuliidae (Diptera). The aim of our work was to report the second record of association between immatures of Empididae and Simuliidae in the Neotropical Region and the first for the Atlantic Forest (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). We collected 4982 pupae and exuviae of Simulium Latreille, (Diptera, Simuliidae) and found three with a pupa of Hemerodromia Meigen (Diptera, Empididae) inside. This shows that the use of black flies cocoons by dance flies occurs at extremely low frequencies, which might explain why this association is so rarely recorded. Our results are relevant for a better comprehension of the predator-prey relationship between these families.

  11. Biology and immature stages of Pherbellia limbata (Diptera: Sciomyzidae), a parasitoid of the terrestrial snail Granaria frumentum.

    PubMed

    Nerudová-Horsáková, Jana; Murphy, William L; Vala, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The very rare Palaearctic Pherbellia limbata (Meigen, 1830) lives in limestone steppes and other xerothermic habitats in central and southern Europe. For the first time, the egg, first-, second- and third-instar larvae and the puparium are described. Scanning electron micrographs of various morphological features of immature stages are provided. Larvae of P. limbata are parasitoids exclusively of the terrestrial snail Granaria frumentum (Draparnaud, 1801). Results of this study are integrated with those of previous studies of the biology, ecology, immature stages, and mollusc-prey habitat of the other 28 (of 96) Pherbellia species for which life cycles have been completely or partially elucidated. Recent published taxonomic approaches to clarifying the phylogeny of the Sciomyzidae are discussed, particularly those involving DNA analyses of Pherbellia species. PMID:27395157

  12. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities. PMID:26921228

  13. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster.

  14. Identification of Blood Meal Sources in Aedes vexans and Culex quinquefasciatus in Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jacob A.; Lujan, Daniel A.; DiMenna, Mark A.; Wearing, Helen J.; Hofkin, Bruce V.

    2013-01-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) and Aedes vexans Meigen are two of the most abundant mosquitoes in Bernalillo County, New Mexico, USA. In this study, a polymerase chain reaction based methodology was used to identify the sources of blood meals taken by these two species. Ae. vexans was found to take a large proportion of its meals from mammals. Although less specific in terms of its blood meal preferences, Cx. quinquefasciatus was found to feed more commonly on birds. The results for Ae. vexans are similar to those reported for this species in other parts of their geographic range. Cx. quinquefasciatus appears to be more variable in terms of its host feeding under different environmental or seasonal circumstances. The implications of these results for arbovirus transmission are discussed. PMID:24224615

  15. Comments on the association of immatures of Hemerodromia (Diptera, Empididae) and Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae), and first record of this association in the Atlantic Forest (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Sánchez Molina, Óscar; Gil-Azevedo, Leonardo Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Larvae of Empididae (Diptera) prey on black fly immatures and its pupae can be collected from pupal cases of Simuliidae (Diptera). The aim of our work was to report the second record of association between immatures of Empididae and Simuliidae in the Neotropical Region and the first for the Atlantic Forest (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). We collected 4982 pupae and exuviae of Simulium Latreille, (Diptera, Simuliidae) and found three with a pupa of Hemerodromia Meigen (Diptera, Empididae) inside. This shows that the use of black flies cocoons by dance flies occurs at extremely low frequencies, which might explain why this association is so rarely recorded. Our results are relevant for a better comprehension of the predator-prey relationship between these families. PMID:27456938

  16. Insect Visitors and Potential Pollinators of Orchis militaris (Orchidaceae) in Southern Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Henneresse, Thomas; Tyteca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As part of a research project on the food deception strategy in Orchis militaris (L.), the objective of this study was to identify insect visitors and potential pollinators of this orchid species in Belgium. In 2013, insects were collected over 2 d per site in five localities distributed in Southern Belgium (Wallonia). A total of 104 insects belonging to 49 species were caught. Dipterans were the most abundant visitors (50% of total specimens), followed by Hymenopterans (32%). Rhingia campestris Meigen, Bombylius venosus Mikan, Apis mellifera (L.), and Bombus lapidarius (L.) were the most abundant species. Only five specimens bore one to more than 10 pollinia: four honeybees (A. mellifera) and one bumblebee worker (B. lapidarius). These two species should be considered as potential pollinators in the study area, but probably not confirmed ones.

  17. Review of the Psychodinae from Mallorca, Spain, with description of Pericoma unipennata, sp. n. (Diptera, Psychodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kvifte, Gunnar Mikalsen; Stokkan, Morten; Wagner, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We review the Psychodinae of Mallorca, recognising fifteen species based on recent collections and available literature. Previously unpublished data is presented for eleven species, of which Neoarisemus ibericus Wagner, 1978, Mormia tenebricosa (Vaillant, 1954), Clogmia albipunctata (Williston, 1893), Lepiseodina rothschildi (Eaton, 1913), Paramormia ustulata (Walker, 1856), Philosepedon pyrenaicus Vaillant, 1974 and Psychoda (Psycha) grisescens Tonnoir, 1922 are first records for Mallorca. An old record of Pericoma trifasciata (Meigen, 1804) is considered doubtful. Pericoma unipennata sp. n is described and illustrated based on a male collected at Deía. Distributional data are reviewed for all newly recorded species. Based on the Psychodinae fauna, the zoogeographical affinities of Mallorca are briefly discussed. PMID:27110192

  18. Comparative Mt Genomics of the Tipuloidea (Diptera: Nematocera: Tipulomorpha) and Its Implications for the Phylogeny of the Tipulomorpha

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Meng; Li, Xuankun; Cameron, Stephen L.; de Jong, Herman; Wang, Mengqing; Yang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    A traditionally controversial taxon, the Tipulomorpha has been frequently discussed with respect to both its familial composition and relationships with other Nematocera. The interpretation of internal relationships within the Tipuloidea, which include the Tipulidae sensu stricto, Cylindrotomidae, Pediciidae and Limoniidae, is also problematic. We sequenced the first complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of Symplecta hybrida (Meigen, 1804), which belongs to the subfamily Chioneinae of family Limoniidae, and another five nearly complete mt genomes from the Tipuloidea. We did a comparative analysis of these mt genomics and used them, along with some other representatives of the Nematocera to construct phylogenetic trees. Trees inferred by Bayesian methods strongly support a sister-group relationship between Trichoceridae and Tipuloidea. Tipulomorpha are not supported as the earliest branch of the Diptera. Furthermore, phylogenetic trees indicate that the family Limoniidae is a paraphyletic group. PMID:27341029

  19. Indoors forensic entomology: colonization of human remains in closed environments by specific species of sarcosaprophagous flies.

    PubMed

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Saukko, Pekka; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2010-06-15

    Fly species that are commonly recovered on human corpses concealed in houses or other dwellings are often dependent on human created environments and might have special features in their biology that allow them to colonize indoor cadavers. In this study we describe nine typical cases involving forensically relevant flies on human remains found indoors in southern Finland. Eggs, larvae and puparia were reared to adult stage and determined to species. Of the five species found the most common were Lucilia sericata Meigen, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Protophormia terraenovae Robineau-Desvoidy. The flesh fly Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt is reported for the first time to colonize human cadavers inside houses and a COI gene sequence based DNA barcode is provided for it to help facilitate identification in the future. Fly biology, colonization speed and the significance of indoors forensic entomological evidence are discussed.

  20. Traumatic Myiasis Caused by an Association of Sarcophaga tibialis (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Domestic Cat in Italy.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Marco; Whitmore, Daniel; Chicca, Milvia; Lanfredi, Margherita; Leis, Marilena

    2015-08-01

    We describe here a rare case of traumatic myiasis occurred in August 2014, caused by an association of 2 Diptera species, Sarcophaga tibialis Macquart (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in a domestic cat in northern Italy. Species identification was based on adult male morphology. The present case is the first report of S. tibialis as an agent of myiasis in Italy, and also the first ever report of myiasis caused by an association of S. tibialis and L. sericata. The cat developed an extensive traumatic myiasis in a large wound on the rump, which was treated pharmacologically and surgically. The biology, ecology, and distribution of S. tibialis and L. sericata are also discussed. A literature review is provided on cases of myiasis caused by S. tibialis, and cases of myiasis by L. sericata involving cats worldwide and humans and animals in Italy.

  1. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  2. Insect Visitors and Potential Pollinators of Orchis militaris (Orchidaceae) in Southern Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Henneresse, Thomas; Tyteca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As part of a research project on the food deception strategy in Orchis militaris (L.), the objective of this study was to identify insect visitors and potential pollinators of this orchid species in Belgium. In 2013, insects were collected over 2 d per site in five localities distributed in Southern Belgium (Wallonia). A total of 104 insects belonging to 49 species were caught. Dipterans were the most abundant visitors (50% of total specimens), followed by Hymenopterans (32%). Rhingia campestris Meigen, Bombylius venosus Mikan, Apis mellifera (L.), and Bombus lapidarius (L.) were the most abundant species. Only five specimens bore one to more than 10 pollinia: four honeybees (A. mellifera) and one bumblebee worker (B. lapidarius). These two species should be considered as potential pollinators in the study area, but probably not confirmed ones. PMID:27694346

  3. New Tachinidae (Diptera) host records of eastern North American forest canopy Lepidoptera: baseline data in a Bacillus thuriengiensis variety kurstaki nontarget study.

    PubMed

    Strazanac, J S; Plaugher, C D; Petrice, T R; Butler, L

    2001-10-01

    Macrolepidopteran caterpillars collected in 1995 and 1996 in the Monongahela National forest, Pocahontas County, WV, and the George Washington National forest, Augusta County, VA, yielded 60 previously unreported tachinid host associations. Most associations were between native species, but the introduced polyphagous tachinid Compsilura concinnata (Meigen) produced eight new associations with native hosts. The tachinids collected were slightly broader in their host preferences than associated Braconidae and Ichneumonidae, illustrating their potential importance in regulating foliage-feeding macrolepidopteran populations in the region studied. The sample years reported herein are the pretreatment baseline portion of a long-term study on the effects of Lymantria dispar (L.) defoliation, efficacy of applied Bacillus thuringiensis variety kurstaki Berliner, and the natural occurrence of the L. dispar pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga Humber, Shimazu & Soper on nontarget organisms.

  4. New records of Trichoceridae (Diptera) from the island of Mallorca ​

    PubMed Central

    Petrašiūnas, Andrius

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The Trichoceridae are a small family distributed mainly in the Holarctic Region, most of which are associated with cold seasons and even snow. From the Iberian peninsula, 5 species have been recorded; however only a single previous occurence record exists from the Balearic islands. New information In this paper we present new records of two species from Mallorca, of which Trichocera (Saltrichocera) saltator (Harris, 1776) has not previously been recorded from the Balearic islands. Trichocera (Saltrichocera) annulata Meigen, 1818 is recorded for the first time from Mallorca. We furthermore discuss the species' distributions within the Mediterranean region and report new morphological data for the Mallorca island form of T. saltator. PMID:26929719

  5. Five new records of bee flies (Bombyliidae, Diptera) from Saudi Arabia with zoogeographical remarks

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawagry, Magdi S.; Dhafer, Hathal M. Al

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Five bee-fly species (Bombyliidae, Diptera) have been listed in this paper as new to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Four of the recorded species have been identified to the level of species, namely: Bombomyia discoidea (Fabricius, 1794), Spogostylum candidum (Sack, 1909), Exoprosopa linearis Bezzi, 1924, and Exoprosopa minos (Meigen, 1804), while the fifth one only to genus, Desmatoneura sp. The species have been collected from Al-Baha and Asir Provinces in the south-western part of the Kingdom. One of the four identified species, Exoprosopa linearis, has an Afrotropical affinity, and another two, Spogostylum candidum and Bombomyia discoidea, have considerable Afrotropical distributions, and this result agrees to some extent with studies considering these parts of the Arabian Peninsula, including Al-Baha and Asir Provinces, having Afrotropical influences and may be included in the Afrotropical Region rather than in the Palaearctic Region or the Eremic zone. PMID:25878533

  6. Annotated catalogue of the Tachinidae (Insecta, Diptera) of the Afrotropical Region, with the description of seven new genera.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, James E; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    . n. (South Africa), and Myxophryxe satanas Cerretti & O'Hara, sp. n. (South Africa) (Exoristinae, Goniini); and Stiremania Cerretti & O'Hara with type species Stiremania karoo Cerretti & O'Hara, gen. n. and sp. n. (South Africa), and Stiremania robusta Cerretti & O'Hara, sp. n. (South Africa) (Exoristinae, Goniini). Paraclara Bezzi, 1908 is transferred from the Cylindromyiini to the Hermyini, comb. n. Sarrorhina Villeneuve, 1936 is transferred from the Minthoini to the Graphogastrini, comb. n. Three genera are newly recorded from the Afrotropical Region: Madremyia Townsend, 1916 (Eryciini); Paratrixa Brauer & Bergenstamm, 1891 (Blondeliini); and Simoma Aldrich, 1926 (Goniini). Three genera previously recorded from the Afrotropical Region are no longer recognized from the region: Calozenillia Townsend, 1927 (Palaearctic, Oriental and Australasian regions); Eurysthaea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1863 (Palaearctic, Oriental and Australasian regions); and Trixa Meigen, 1824 (Palaearctic and Oriental regions). Two species are newly recorded from the Afrotropical Region: Amnonia carmelitana Kugler, 1971 (Ethiopia, Kenya); and Simoma grahami Aldrich, 1926 (Namibia). Three species previously recorded from the Afrotropical Region are no longer recognized from the region: Euthera peringueyi Bezzi, 1925 (Oriental Region); Hamaxia incongrua Walker, 1860 (Palaearctic, Oriental and Australasian regions); Leucostoma tetraptera (Meigen, 1824) (Palaearctic Region). New replacement names are proposed for five preoccupied names of Afrotropical species: Billaea rubida O'Hara & Cerretti for Phorostoma rutilans Villeneuve, 1916, preoccupied in the genus Billaea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 by Musca rutilans Fabricius, 1781, nom. n.; Cylindromyia braueri O'Hara & Cerretti for Ocyptera nigra Villeneuve, 1918, preoccupied in the genus Cylindromyia Meigen, 1803 by Glossidionophora nigra Bigot, 1885, nom. n.; Cylindromyia rufohumera O'Hara & Cerretti for Ocyptera scapularis Villeneuve, 1944, preoccupied in

  7. Checklist and pictorial key to fourth-instar larvae of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmad, Azzam M; Sallam, Mohamed F; Khuriji, Mohamed A; Kheir, Salah M; Azari-Hamidian, Shahyad

    2011-07-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia includes fauna from three zoogeographic regions: the Afrotropical, Oriental, and Palaearctic regions. To study the mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) fauna of these regions in Saudi Arabia, larval collections were made at 15 sites during 2005-2006. Thirty-three species representing nine genera were found. Six species, Anopheles culicifacies Giles s.l., Anopheles subpictus Grassi s.l., Culex arbieeni Salem, Culex simpsoni Theobald, Culex univittatus Theobald, and Ochlerotatus detritus Haliday are reported for the first time for Saudi Arabia. An annotated checklist and an illustrated key to the fourth-instar larvae of the 33 species are presented, along with some remarks about problematic species. Eleven species of genus Anopheles Meigen, five species of tribe Aedini, 13 species of genus Culex L., two species of genus Culiseta Felt, one species of genus Lutzia Theobald, and one species of genus Uranotaenia Lynch Arribátlzaga were recorded during the study.

  8. Biting midges of the genus Culicoides in South Carolina zoos.

    PubMed

    Nelder, Mark P; Swanson, Dustin A; Adler, Peter H; Grogan, William L

    2010-01-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected during the summer of 2007 at the Greenville and Riverbanks Zoos in South Carolina with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traps equipped with ultraviolet or incandescent lights and baited with carbon dioxide. Sixteen species of Culicoides were collected, four of which represented more than 80%. They were Culicoides guttipennis (Coquillett), Culicoides mulrenanni Beck, Culicoides obsoletus (Meigen), and Culicoides sanguisuga (Coquillett). C. guttipennis was found on a dead colobus monkey and a dead golden-headed lion tamarin; Culicoides husseyi Wirth & Blanton was collected from an unidentified, abandoned bird's nest. Ultraviolet light-equipped traps captured significantly more Culicoides specimens than traps with incandescent light. Half of the collected species previously have been associated with vertebrate pathogens, indicating a potential risk to captive animals.

  9. Insecticidal sesquiterpene from Alpinia oxyphylla against Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishikawa, Y

    2000-08-01

    In the course of screening for novel naturally occurring insecticides from Chinese crude drugs, an MeOH extract of Alpinia oxyphylla was found to possess insecticidal activity against larvae of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. From the extract, an insecticidal compound was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as nootkatone (1) by GC, GC-MS, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In bioassays for insecticidal activity, 1 showed an LC(50) value of 11.5 micromol/mL of diet against larvae of D. melanogaster and an LD(50) value of 96 microg/adult against adults. Epinootkatol (1A), however, showed slight insecticidal activity in both assays, indicating that the carbonyl group at the 2-position in 1 was the important function for enhanced activity of 1. PMID:10956162

  10. History of tachinid classification (Diptera, Tachinidae).

    PubMed

    O'Hara, James E

    2013-01-01

    The history of the classification of the Tachinidae (Diptera) is traced from Meigen to the present. The contributions of Robineau-Desvoidy, Townsend, Villeneuve, Mesnil, Herting, Wood and many others are discussed within a chronological, taxonomic, and geographic context. The gradual development of the Tachinidae into its modern concept as a family of the Oestroidea and the emergence of the classificatory scheme of tribes and subfamilies in use today are reviewed. Certain taxa that have in the past been difficult to place, or continue to be of uncertain affinity, are considered and some are given in a table to show their varied historical treatments. The more significant systematic works published on the Tachinidae in recent decades are enumerated chronologically. PMID:23878512

  11. Lucifensin II, a defensin of medicinal maggots of the blowfly Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    El Shazely, Baydaa; Veverka, V; Fucík, V; Voburka, Z; Zdárek, J; Cerovský, V

    2013-05-01

    A novel homolog of insect defensin, designated lucifensin II (Lucilia cuprina Wiedemann [Diptera: Calliphoridae] defensin), was purified from hemolymph extract from larvae of the blowfly L. cuprina. The full-length primary sequence of this peptide of 40 amino acid residues and three intramolecular disulfide bridges was determined by electrospray ionization-orbitrap mass spectrometry and Edman degradation and is almost identical to the previously identified sequence of lucifensin (Lucilia sericata Meigen defensin). Lucifensin II sequence differs from that of lucifensin by only one amino acid residue, that is, by isoleucine instead of valine at position 11. The presence of lucifensin II also was detected in the extracts of other larval tissues, such as gut, salivary glands, fat body, and whole body extract.

  12. The Drosophila melanogaster cinnabar gene is a cell autonomous genetic marker in Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Nagaraja; O'Brochta, David A

    2005-07-01

    The cinnabar gene of Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) encodes for kynurenine hydroxylase, an enzyme involved in ommochrome biosynthesis. This gene is commonly included as a visible genetic marker in gene vectors used to create transgenic Aedes aegypti (L.) that are homozygous for the khw allele, the mosquito homolog of cinnabar. Unexpectedly, the phenotype of cells expressing kynurenine hydroxylase in transgenic Ae. aegypti is cell autonomous as demonstrated by the recovery of insects heterozygous for the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene with mosaic eye color patterns. In addition, a transgenic gynandromorph was recovered in which one-half of the insect was expressing the kynurenine hydroxylase transgene, including one eye with red pigmentation, whereas the other half of the insect was homozygous khw and included a white eye. The cell autonomous behavior of cinnabar in transgenic Ae. aegypti is unexpected and increases the utility of this genetic marker. PMID:16119567

  13. Seasonal and Geographic Variation in Biodiversity of Forensically Important Blow Flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in New Jersey, USA.

    PubMed

    Weidner, L M; Jennings, D E; Tomberlin, J K; Hamilton, G C

    2015-09-01

    Determining the time of colonization of human or other animal remains by blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) can play an important role in criminal investigations. However, blow fly presence in a given area is strongly influenced by abiotic and biotic variables such as temperature and habitat. We wanted to assess the biodiversity of adult blow flies in New Jersey, USA, where very little is known about these taxa. Toward that end we collected adult blow flies biweekly from traps baited with bovine liver and placed across three regions in New Jersey over a 2-yr period (2011-2013). We collected and identified 9,257 adult calliphorids, comprising six genera and 12 species. Blow fly assemblages composed of these species varied by season, but community composition did not vary among regions within a given season. Three species, Lucilia coeruleiviridis (Macquart), Lucilia sericata (Meigen), and Phormia regina (Meigen) comprised 88.5% of all adult blow flies collected (42.6, 25.9, 20.0%, respectively). Combining all regions, the dominant species for both spring and summer was L. coeruleiviridis comprising 35.1% of all adults caught in spring and 64.1% in summer. P. regina was the dominant species in fall, totaling 40.1% of all adults caught and Calliphora vicina (Robineau-Desvoidy) was the dominant species for winter, totaling 44.8% of all adults caught. Our findings provide the first assessment of blow fly communities in New Jersey, and these results can be applied to surrounding states where data are severely lacking for forensic application.

  14. Worthy of their name: how floods drive outbreaks of two major floodwater mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Berec, Ludĕk; Gelbic, Ivan; Sebesta, Oldrich

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of how climate variables drive seasonal dynamics of mosquito populations is critical to mitigating negative impacts of potential outbreaks, including both nuisance effects and risk of mosquito-borne infectious disease. Here, we identify climate variables most affecting seasonal dynamics of two major floodwater mosquitoes, Aedes vexans (Meigen, 1830) and Aedes sticticus (Meigen, 1838) (Diptera: Culicidae), along the lower courses of the Dyje River, at the border between the Czech Republic and Austria. Monthly trap counts of both floodwater mosquitoes varied both across sites and years. Despite this variability, both models used to fit the observed data at all sites (and especially that for Ae. sticticus) and site-specific models fitted the observed data quite well. The most important climate variables we identified-temperature and especially flooding-were driving seasonal dynamics of both Aedes species. We suggest that flooding determines seasonal peaks in the monthly mosquito trap counts while temperature modulates seasonality in these counts. Hence, floodwater mosquitoes indeed appear worthy of their name. Moreover, the climate variables we considered for modeling were able reasonably to predict mosquito trap counts in the month ahead. Our study can help in planning flood management; timely notification of people, given that these mosquitoes are a real nuisance in this region; public health policy management to mitigate risk from such mosquito-borne diseases as that caused in humans by the Tahyna virus; and anticipating negative consequences of climate change, which are expected only to worsen unless floods, or the mosquitoes themselves, are satisfactorily managed. PMID:24605456

  15. Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) surveillance for arboviruses in an area endemic for West Nile (Lineage Rabensburg) and Tahyna viruses in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Z; Rudolf, I; Bakonyi, T; Kazdová, K; Halouzka, J; Sebesta, O; Sikutová, S; Juricová, Z; Nowotny, N

    2010-05-01

    Six viral isolates were obtained from 23,243 female mosquitoes (examined in 513 pools) belonging to 16 species and collected along the lower reaches of the Dyje River in South Moravia (Czech Republic, central Europe) during 2006-2008: five isolates of Orthobunyavirus Tahyna (TAHV, California group, family Bunyaviridae: three isolations from Aedes vexans (Meigen), one from Ae. sticticus (Meigen), one from Culex modestus Ficalbi); and one isolation of Flavivirus West Nile (WNV, Japanese encephalitis group, family Flaviviridae)-strain Rabensburg (proposed lineage 3 of WNV) from Ae. rossicus (Dolbeshkin et al). All viral isolates were recovered from mosquitoes collected in 2006 (15,882 mosquitoes examined), while no virus was isolated from mosquitoes trapped in 2007 and 2008, when 1,555 and 5,806 mosquitoes were examined, respectively. The population density of local mosquitoes was very low in 2007 and 2008 because of warm and dry summer including a considerably low water table, compared with environmental conditions favorable for mosquito development in 2006. The virus isolation procedure was based on intracerebral inoculation of newborn mice. In parallel, more than one-third of the samples (183 pools consisting of 8,470 individual mosquitoes) were also examined by inoculating Vero cell cultures in Leighton tubes. However, the latter method detected only three of the six virus isolates (including WNV-Rabensburg). Ae. rossicus is a new potential vector for WNV-Rabensburg. This species feeds mostly on mammals including man; this raises the question whether this virus lineage is not adapted to an alternative mosquito-mammal cycle in the South-Moravian natural focus.

  16. Plant extracts, isolated phytochemicals, and plant-derived agents which are lethal to arthropod vectors of human tropical diseases--a review.

    PubMed

    Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Rezende, Alex Ribeiro; Lopes Baldin, Edson Luiz; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Neto, Valter Ferreira de Andrade

    2011-04-01

    The recent scientific literature on plant-derived agents with potential or effective use in the control of the arthropod vectors of human tropical diseases is reviewed. Arthropod-borne tropical diseases include: amebiasis, Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), cholera, cryptosporidiosis, dengue (hemorrhagic fever), epidemic typhus (Brill-Zinsser disease), filariasis (elephantiasis), giardia (giardiasis), human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), isosporiasis, leishmaniasis, Lyme disease (lyme borreliosis), malaria, onchocerciasis, plague, recurrent fever, sarcocystosis, scabies (mites as causal agents), spotted fever, toxoplasmosis, West Nile fever, and yellow fever. Thus, coverage was given to work describing plant-derived extracts, essential oils (EOs), and isolated chemicals with toxic or noxious effects on filth bugs (mechanical vectors), such as common houseflies (Musca domestica Linnaeus), American and German cockroaches (Periplaneta americana Linnaeus, Blatella germanica Linnaeus), and oriental latrine/blowflies (Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius) as well as biting, blood-sucking arthropods such as blackflies (Simulium Latreille spp.), fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis Rothschild), kissing bugs (Rhodnius Stål spp., Triatoma infestans Klug), body and head lice (Pediculus humanus humanus Linnaeus, P. humanus capitis De Geer), mosquitoes (Aedes Meigen, Anopheles Meigen, Culex L., and Ochlerotatus Lynch Arribálzaga spp.), sandflies (Lutzomyia longipalpis Lutz & Neiva, Phlebotomus Loew spp.), scabies mites (Sarcoptes scabiei De Geer, S. scabiei var hominis, S. scabiei var canis, S. scabiei var suis), and ticks (Ixodes Latreille, Amblyomma Koch, Dermacentor Koch, and Rhipicephalus Koch spp.). Examples of plant extracts, EOs, and isolated chemicals exhibiting noxious or toxic activity comparable or superior to the synthetic control agents of choice (pyrethroids, organophosphorous compounds, etc.) are provided in the text for many arthropod vectors of tropical

  17. The problem of variability in assessing sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, A.; Watzin, M.; Lacey, R.; Newbrough, K.; Williams, A.; King, J.

    1995-12-31

    An assessment of sediment-associated contaminants at 20 sites in Inner Burlington Harbor, Lake Champlain, underscores the challenges posed by working in highly variable environments. Chemical analyses revealed levels of several trace metals, including lead, silver and zinc, and total PAHs exceeding available severe effects guidelines. Biological measures, however, did not correlate strongly with areas of highest chemical contamination. In particular, the 48-hr Ceriodaphnia dubia test was a poor predictor of contaminant concentration, while the 10-day growth test with Chironomus tentans proved a stronger indicator. Additional tests in which larval fathead minnows were exposed to pore water proved inconclusive. Infaunal communities seemed to be responding to concentrations of organic matter, not contaminant levels. There was no demonstrable relationship between any taxonomic group, such as the number of genera of Chironomus, and contaminant level. Sites where the AVS/SEM ratios exceeded one did generally correspond with the sites where positive toxicity tests results occurred. Results of the study argue for the use of a weight-of-evidence approach when working in highly disturbed, highly variable environments.

  18. Benthic macroinvertebrate associations in relation to environmental factors in Georgian Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.G.; McNeil, O.C.; George, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Association analysis of data on benthic macroinvertebrates in 257 samples from Georgian Bay, followed by discriminant analysis of water and sediment characteristics, facilitated a quantitative description of trophic variability within a relatively unpolluted system. Discriminating variables were bottom water temperature, water pH and Ca, sediment organic matter, sand, silt, clay, total P, Zn, Pb, and Hg. Four discriminating functions, accounting for 86% of variance, indicated the importance of temperature, concentrations of organic matter and silt, water pH and Ca. Associations which occurred at cooler temperatures consisted of Pontoporeia hoyi with dominant oligochaetes and chironomids generally determined by sediment richness. These associations were P. hoyi - Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri - Chironomus spp, and Procladius spp. at highest sediment richness, P. hoyi - Spirosperma ferox - Micropsectra spp, at intermediate richness and P. hoyi - Stylodrilus heringianus - Heterotrissocladius sp. at lowest richness. Associations in warmer waters consisted of a Chironomus spp. - Chaoborus spp. association in richer sediments and an association of Caecidotea racovitzae and Amnicola spp. at lower sediment richness. A Hexagenia limbata - Hyalella azteca association occurred over a broad range in concentrations of organic matter and silt, but, in terms of sediment texture represented by sand content, this association was intermediate between the other two groups in warmer waters. Finally, a Zalutschia zalutschia zalutschicola - Chaoborus spp. association was related to water pH and Ca in discriminant analysis. 33 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Sediment toxicity in the Duluth-Superior Harbor: Use of Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} as screening assays

    SciTech Connect

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.; Hubbard, C.; Schubauer-Berigan, J.; Tesser, G.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted in the Duluth-Superior Harbor at 40 sites as part of an integrated sediment assessment during the fall of 1993. Two rapid assays conducted with Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign}) were compared with three standard US EPA sediment toxicity tests: Hyalella azteca (acute tests) and Chironomus tentans (acute and sub-lethal tests). The response in the two microbial assays was also evaluated for sensitivity to various contaminants analyzed simultaneously in the Duluth-Superior Harbor sediments. Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} were found to be sensitive to approximately one-third and one-half the sediments, respectively; Chironomus tentans was sensitive to 15% of the sediments (either acutely or sub-lethally), while Hyalella azteca was not sensitive to any of the sediments. In almost all cases, Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} correctly identified samples that were toxic to the chironomid, making it useful as a screening tool for toxicity, to reduce the number of sites to be tested with the benthic organisms. The subsequent application of Microtox{reg_sign} as a screen for sediment toxicity in an EMAP survey in the St. Louis River (MN) estuary will be discussed. Correlation of Microtox{reg_sign} and Mutatox{reg_sign} toxicity to environmental contaminants found in the sediments will be presented.

  20. Toxicity of ammonia in pore-water and in the water column to freshwater benthic invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, F.W.; Kahl, M.D.; Rau, D.M.; Balcer, M.D.; Ankley, G.T.

    1994-12-31

    Ammonia has been mentioned as both a primary toxicant and a factor that can produce false positive results in laboratory sediment tests using benthic invertebrates. This study developed a sediment dosing system that percolates an ammonia solution through sediment to achieve target porewater ammonia concentrations that remain stable over four and ten day spiked sediment tests. Ten day flow-through water-only tests and ten day spiked sediment tests were used to determine the toxicity of ammonia in the water column and in the sediment pore-water to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and the midge Chironomus tentans. Four-day tests were run with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. The relationship between water column ammonia toxicity and sediment pore-water ammonia toxicity is influenced by the organism`s association with the sediment. For Lumbriculus variegatus and Chironomus tentans that burrow into the sediment and are in direct contact with the porewater, the pore-water LC50 for ammonia is 30--40% higher than the water-only LC50 for each species. Hyalella azteca is epibenthic and avoids ammonia spiked sediment, thus ammonia in the water column is considerably more toxic than the pore-water ammonia with the porewater LC50 about 800% higher than the water only LC50.

  1. Spatial variation in incidence of mouthpart deformities in larval chironomids (Diptera) from western Lake Erie

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, L.A.; Ciborowski, J.J.H.; Corkum, L.D.

    1995-12-31

    The major source of contaminants to the sediments of the western basin of Lake Erie is the Detroit River. In order to determine if contaminant levels are reflected in incidences of genotoxicity of benthic invertebrates, the authors examined larvae of chironomids for mouthpart (mentum) deformities. Sediment genotoxicity is indicated when incidence of deformities in susceptible genera exceeds 5%. Samples were collected from three locations along the contaminant gradient extending from the Detroit River along the main shipping channel of the western basin. A composite sample was taken from several central locations in the western basin. Chironomids were hand-picked from ponar grab or box core samples. The heads were mounted, identified to genus and examined for mentum deformities (extra or missing teeth). Chironomus dominated all samples. The incidence of deformities ({+-}SE) in Chironomus was greatest in the Trenton Channel of the Detroit River (7.8 {+-} 2.2%, n = 153), declined to 5.2 {+-} 1.4% (n = 233) in the center of the basin and was the lowest off East Sister Island (1.9 {+-} 0.9%, n = 210). The incidence of deformities was 4.4 {+-} 0.8% (n = 610) at a reference site on the Canadian side of the Detroit River (Crystal Bay). The spatial pattern of chironomid mentum deformities suggests that sediment genotoxicity declines from west to east in western Lake Erie.

  2. Conversion of carotenoids into vitamins A(1) and A(2) in two species of freshwater fish.

    PubMed

    Gross, J; Budowski, P

    1966-12-01

    1. Examination of two zooplankton species predominating in fish ponds, Daphnia magna and Chironomus larvae, revealed the presence of alpha- and beta-carotene, echinenone, canthaxanthin and 3-hydroxy-4-oxo-beta-carotene in Daphnia, and beta-carotene and cryptoxanthin ester in Chironomus. No specific provitamins A(2) (containing a 3,4-dehydro-beta-ionone ring) were detected. 2. Guppies (Lebistes reticulatus) and platies (Xiphophorus variatus) were found to form vitamin A from beta-carotene and from its oxygen-containing derivatives isozeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin. Slight conversion into vitamin A(2) seemed to occur simultaneously. 3,4-Dehydro-3'-hydroxy-beta-carotene formed little vitamin A, and the latter was mainly of the A(2) type. Lutein was devoid of provitamin A properties. 3. In addition to vitamin A, beta-carotene was detected in fish receiving the 4-oxo- and 4-hydroxy-carotenoids. A reaction scheme for the conversion of carotenoids into retinal and and 3,4-dehydroretinal is presented. 4. It is concluded that natural 4-oxo derivatives of beta-carotene may play a significant role as vitamin A precursors for fish. PMID:16742455

  3. Conversion of carotenoids into vitamins A1 and A2 in two species of freshwater fish

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jeana; Budowski, P.

    1966-01-01

    1. Examination of two zooplankton species predominating in fish ponds, Daphnia magna and Chironomus larvae, revealed the presence of α- and β-carotene, echinenone, canthaxanthin and 3-hydroxy-4-oxo-β-carotene in Daphnia, and β-carotene and cryptoxanthin ester in Chironomus. No specific provitamins A2 (containing a 3,4-dehydro-β-ionone ring) were detected. 2. Guppies (Lebistes reticulatus) and platies (Xiphophorus variatus) were found to form vitamin A from β-carotene and from its oxygen-containing derivatives isozeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and astaxanthin. Slight conversion into vitamin A2 seemed to occur simultaneously. 3,4-Dehydro-3′-hydroxy-β-carotene formed little vitamin A, and the latter was mainly of the A2 type. Lutein was devoid of provitamin A properties. 3. In addition to vitamin A, β-carotene was detected in fish receiving the 4-oxo- and 4-hydroxy-carotenoids. A reaction scheme for the conversion of carotenoids into retinal and and 3,4-dehydroretinal is presented. 4. It is concluded that natural 4-oxo derivatives of β-carotene may play a significant role as vitamin A precursors for fish. PMID:16742455

  4. Does biodiversity of macroinvertebrates and genome response of Chironomidae larvae (Diptera) reflect heavy metal pollution in a small pond?

    PubMed

    Michailova, Paraskeva; Warchałowska-Śliwa, Elzbieta; Szarek-Gwiazda, Ewa; Kownacki, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The investigation was carried out on a small pond situated on a recent mine spoil at Bolesław in the Olkusz region with Zn-Pb ore deposits. Water of the pond had pH 7.2-8.5 and low concentrations of heavy metals. Concentrations of Pb (487 μg g( - 1)) and Zn (1,991 μg g( - 1)) in the sediment were very high and potentially could lead to toxicological effects. In the pond, 48 taxa of macroinvertebrates belonging to Oligochaeta and water stages of Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Megaloptera, Trichoptera, Heteroptera, Coleoptera and Diptera (mainly Chironomidae family) were found. The influence of heavy metals on macroinvertebrates diversity was not found. Effect of heavy metal pollution was observed on the appearance of chromosome aberrations in the polytene chromosomes of Chironomidae larvae. It was manifested by two ways: (1) in Kiefferulus tendipediformis and Chironomus sp. chromosome rearrangements in fixed state (tandem fusion and homozygous inversions), indicated intensive process of speciation; (2) in Chironomus sp., K. tendipediformis, Glyptotendipes gripekoveni (Chironomidae) somatic chromosome rearrangements (inversions, deficiencies, specific puffs, polyploidy) affected few cells of every individual. The somatic functional and structural alterations in Chironomidae species are particular suitable as biomarkers-they can be easily identified and used for detecting toxic agents in the environment.

  5. Nomenclatural Studies Toward a World List of Diptera Genus-Group Names. Part IV: Charles Henry Tyler Townsend.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pont, Adrian C; Whitmore, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    -Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Kurintjimyia Townsend, 1926 under Tachina Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Labidigaster Macquart, 1844 under Labigastera Macquart, 1834, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Mellanactia Guimarães, 1971 under Oxynops Townsend, 1912, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Ochromia Townsend, 1935 under Bengalia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Pachyrrhina Osten Sacken, 1881 under Nephrotoma Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tipulidae]; Procraspedothrix Townsend, 1932 under Phytomyptera Rondani, 1844, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Pseudogymnosoma Townsend, 1918 under Neomyia Walker, 1859, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Pseudoservillia Townsend, 1916 under Tachina Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Rhymosia Mik, 1886 under Rymosia Winnertz, 1863, n. syn. [Mycetophilidae]; Rhynchomyia Macquart, 1835 under Rhyncomya Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Rhiniidae]; Servillioides Townsend, 1926 under Tachina Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Servilliopsis Townsend, 1916 under Tachina Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Tachinidae]; Stephanostoma Cole, 1923 under Bercaea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1863, n. syn. [Sarcophagidae]; Stomatorhinia Townsend, 1935 under Stomorhina Rondani, 1861, n. syn. [Rhiniidae]; Toxorrhina Osten Sacken, 1869 under Toxorhina Loew, 1850, n. syn. [Limoniidae]; Trichoneura Townsend, 1935 under Stevenia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830, n. syn. [Rhinophoridae]; Trichopticus Schnabl, 1889 under Thricops Rondani, 1856, n. syn. [Muscidae]; Tricyclopsis Townsend, 1916 under Paracalliphora Townsend, 1916, n. syn. [Calliphoridae].

  6. Annotated catalogue of the Tachinidae (Insecta, Diptera) of the Afrotropical Region, with the description of seven new genera

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, James E.; Cerretti, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    regalis Cerretti & O’Hara, sp. n. (South Africa), and Myxophryxe satanas Cerretti & O’Hara, sp. n. (South Africa) (Exoristinae, Goniini); and Stiremania Cerretti & O’Hara with type species Stiremania karoo Cerretti & O’Hara, gen. n. and sp. n. (South Africa), and Stiremania robusta Cerretti & O’Hara, sp. n. (South Africa) (Exoristinae, Goniini). Paraclara Bezzi, 1908 is transferred from the Cylindromyiini to the Hermyini, comb. n. Sarrorhina Villeneuve, 1936 is transferred from the Minthoini to the Graphogastrini, comb. n. Three genera are newly recorded from the Afrotropical Region: Madremyia Townsend, 1916 (Eryciini); Paratrixa Brauer & Bergenstamm, 1891 (Blondeliini); and Simoma Aldrich, 1926 (Goniini). Three genera previously recorded from the Afrotropical Region are no longer recognized from the region: Calozenillia Townsend, 1927 (Palaearctic, Oriental and Australasian regions); Eurysthaea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1863 (Palaearctic, Oriental and Australasian regions); and Trixa Meigen, 1824 (Palaearctic and Oriental regions). Two species are newly recorded from the Afrotropical Region: Amnonia carmelitana Kugler, 1971 (Ethiopia, Kenya); and Simoma grahami Aldrich, 1926 (Namibia). Three species previously recorded from the Afrotropical Region are no longer recognized from the region: Euthera peringueyi Bezzi, 1925 (Oriental Region); Hamaxia incongrua Walker, 1860 (Palaearctic, Oriental and Australasian regions); Leucostoma tetraptera (Meigen, 1824) (Palaearctic Region). New replacement names are proposed for five preoccupied names of Afrotropical species: Billaea rubida O’Hara & Cerretti for Phorostoma rutilans Villeneuve, 1916, preoccupied in the genus Billaea Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 by Musca rutilans Fabricius, 1781, nom. n.; Cylindromyia braueri O’Hara & Cerretti for Ocyptera nigra Villeneuve, 1918, preoccupied in the genus Cylindromyia Meigen, 1803 by Glossidionophora nigra Bigot, 1885, nom. n.; Cylindromyia rufohumera O’Hara & Cerretti for Ocyptera

  7. Patent literature on mosquito repellent inventions which contain plant essential oils--a review.

    PubMed

    Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Gama, Renata Antonaci; Tadei, Wanderli Pedro; Neto, Valter Ferreira de Andrade

    2011-04-01

    Bites Bites of mosquitoes belonging to the genera Anopheles Meigen, Aedes Meigen, Culex L. and Haemagogus L. are a general nuisance and are responsible for the transmission of important tropical diseases such as malaria, hemorrhagic dengue and yellow fevers and filariasis (elephantiasis). Plants are traditional sources of mosquito repelling essential oils (EOs), glyceridic oils and repellent and synergistic chemicals. A Chemical Abstracts search on mosquito repellent inventions containing plant-derived EOs revealed 144 active patents mostly from Asia. Chinese, Japanese and Korean language patents and those of India (in English) accounted for roughly 3/4 of all patents. Since 1998 patents on EO-containing mosquito repellent inventions have almost doubled about every 4 years. In general, these patents describe repellent compositions for use in topical agents, cosmetic products, incense, fumigants, indoor and outdoor sprays, fibers, textiles among other applications. 67 EOs and 9 glyceridic oils were individually cited in at least 2 patents. Over 1/2 of all patents named just one EO. Citronella [Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle, C.winterianus Jowitt ex Bor] and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus LʼHér. spp.) EOs were each cited in approximately 1/3 of all patents. Camphor [Cinnamomum camphora (L.) J. Presl], cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume), clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry], geranium (Pelargonium graveolens LʼHér.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.), lemon [Citrus × limon (L.) Osbeck], lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf] and peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) EOs were each cited in > 10% of patents. Repellent chemicals present in EO compositions or added as pure “natural” ingredients such as geraniol, limonene, p-menthane-3,8-diol, nepetalactone and vanillin were described in approximately 40% of all patents. About 25% of EO-containing inventions included or were made to be used with synthetic insect control agents having mosquito

  8. Patent literature on mosquito repellent inventions which contain plant essential oils--a review.

    PubMed

    Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Gama, Renata Antonaci; Tadei, Wanderli Pedro; Neto, Valter Ferreira de Andrade

    2011-04-01

    Bites Bites of mosquitoes belonging to the genera Anopheles Meigen, Aedes Meigen, Culex L. and Haemagogus L. are a general nuisance and are responsible for the transmission of important tropical diseases such as malaria, hemorrhagic dengue and yellow fevers and filariasis (elephantiasis). Plants are traditional sources of mosquito repelling essential oils (EOs), glyceridic oils and repellent and synergistic chemicals. A Chemical Abstracts search on mosquito repellent inventions containing plant-derived EOs revealed 144 active patents mostly from Asia. Chinese, Japanese and Korean language patents and those of India (in English) accounted for roughly 3/4 of all patents. Since 1998 patents on EO-containing mosquito repellent inventions have almost doubled about every 4 years. In general, these patents describe repellent compositions for use in topical agents, cosmetic products, incense, fumigants, indoor and outdoor sprays, fibers, textiles among other applications. 67 EOs and 9 glyceridic oils were individually cited in at least 2 patents. Over 1/2 of all patents named just one EO. Citronella [Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle, C.winterianus Jowitt ex Bor] and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus LʼHér. spp.) EOs were each cited in approximately 1/3 of all patents. Camphor [Cinnamomum camphora (L.) J. Presl], cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume), clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry], geranium (Pelargonium graveolens LʼHér.), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill.), lemon [Citrus × limon (L.) Osbeck], lemongrass [Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf] and peppermint (Mentha × piperita L.) EOs were each cited in > 10% of patents. Repellent chemicals present in EO compositions or added as pure “natural” ingredients such as geraniol, limonene, p-menthane-3,8-diol, nepetalactone and vanillin were described in approximately 40% of all patents. About 25% of EO-containing inventions included or were made to be used with synthetic insect control agents having mosquito

  9. Nomenclatural studies toward a world catalog of Diptera genus-group names. III. Christian Rudolph Wilhelm Wiedemann.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pont, Adrian C

    2013-01-01

    Latreille, 1797 of Mydas Fabricius, 1794, n. syn. [Mydidae]; Nemestrina Latreille, 1809 of Nemestrinus Latreille, 1802, n. syn. [Nemestrinidae]; Pangonia Latreille, 1809 of Pangonius Latreille, 1802, n. syn. [Tabanidae]; Scatophaga Wiedemann, 1828 of Scathophaga Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Scathophagidae]; Threneste Wiedemann, 1830 of Penthetria Meigen, 1803, n. syn. [Bibionidae].

  10. Rrp6 is recruited to transcribed genes and accompanies the spliced mRNA to the nuclear pore.

    PubMed

    Hessle, Viktoria; von Euler, Anne; González de Valdivia, Ernesto; Visa, Neus

    2012-08-01

    Rrp6 is an exoribonuclease involved in the quality control of mRNA biogenesis. We have analyzed the association of Rrp6 with the Balbiani ring pre-mRNPs of Chironomus tentans to obtain insight into the role of Rrp6 in splicing surveillance. Rrp6 is recruited to transcribed genes and its distribution along the genes does not correlate with the positions of exons and introns. In the nucleoplasm, Rrp6 is bound to both unspliced and spliced transcripts. Rrp6 is released from the mRNPs in the vicinity of the nuclear pore before nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation. We show that Rrp6 is associated with newly synthesized transcripts during all the nuclear steps of gene expression and is associated with the transcripts independently of their splicing status. These observations suggest that the quality control of pre-mRNA splicing is not based on the selective recruitment of the exoribonuclease Rrp6 to unprocessed mRNAs.

  11. Influence of He-Ne laser irradiation on giant chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Gregory E.; Panina, Nadezda P.; Sonin, Vadim K.; Belyanina, Svetlana I.

    1996-01-01

    Influence of He-Ne laser irradiation (lambda - 632.8 nm, power density - 1.5 mW/cm2) on polytene chromosomes of salivary glands cells of Chironomus plumosus in different conditions of exposure was studied. Living larvae or isolated salivary glands were exposed to irradiation. He-Ne laser irradiation was stated to influence the functional activity of polytene chromosomes. The response of the genetic apparatus to the laser light action was shown to depend on the irradiation dose and fractional character of the dose exposure, on the initial functional state of chromosome loci and may be manifested both by activation and inhibition of definite regions of the genome. The phenomenon of adaptation of the genetic system to He- Ne laser irradiation is revealed.

  12. A comprehensive assessment of aquatic ecosystem quality: The role of sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.A. Jr.; Rowland, C.; Monzingo, R.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive multi-level ecosystem was conducted on 55 miles of the upper Illinois waterway. A sub-component of this assessment included measures of sediment contamination. A species sensitivity comparison of Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans whole sediment exposures showed C. tentans to be the most sensitive species. Acute to chronic level toxicity was observed throughout the waterway, and was greatest in high deposition areas and at the mouth of tributaries to the main channel. Toxicity responses were significantly correlated with several parameters, including ammonia, particle size, total volatile solids, chromium, zinc, and fluorene. Ammonia concentrations were related to several synthetic organic compounds, moisture, silt, and TVS. Follow-up Toxicity Identification Evaluations showed ammonia to dominate toxicity at one key location with some effects from photoinduced toxicity (implicating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Contaminated sediments appear to be a major stressor in this system.

  13. Evaluations of bioavailable copper in amended wetland sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Deaver, E.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Copper sulfate was added to the water column of six of twelve wetland mesocosms. In successive 10d experiments using invertebrates Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans, sediment toxicity and copper bioavailability were examined in sediments collected monthly from wetlands amended with copper sulfate, untreated wetlands, and control sediments. Evaluations included examinations of temporal changes in toxicity, bioavailability of aqueous and sediment associated copper, and comparison of organism responses to copper. In some cases copper remained acutely toxic over the 6 month study period, however, total copper concentrations in sediment had no relation to bioavailable copper. The relationship of copper speciation to bioavailability was discerned by measuring total copper (AA), labile copper (ASV) and copper ion activity (ISE) during these sediment toxicity experiments.

  14. Thermal tolerance of aquatic insects inhabiting the Tennessee river-reservoir system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tennessen, K.J.; Miller, J.L.

    1983-05-01

    In laboratory tests, nymphs of Hexagenia bilineata (Ephemeroptera) and larvae of Chironomus crassicaudatus (Diptera) were highly tolerant of short term thermal shocks (six hour duration, simulating entrainment in a thermal plume and drifting to ambient). TL/sup 50/ values increased from 35C at an acclimation temperature of 5C to 38-40C at an acclimation temperature of 20-25C. However, survivors of these treatments experienced higher percentages of delayed mortality compared to controls after being held for ten days to four weeks at the original acclimation temperature. Field data generated indicated that aquatic insect species inhabiting TVA's large warm-water reservoirs are living close to their thermal maximu, and that an upper limit of 33C would ensure the maintenance of sizeable populations of the species studied.

  15. Fluctuating asymmetry as an indicator of mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, L.A. |; Newman, M.C.; Mulvey, M.

    1995-12-31

    Developmental stability is the ability of a developing organism to produce a consistent phenotype in a given environment. It provides a simple method of detecting stressed populations and monitoring their recovery. Laboratory experiments have documented the effect of environmental stress on developmental stability as demonstrated by amounts of fluctuating asymmetry. Fluctuating asymmetry assesses the amount of deviation from perfect bilateral symmetry in traits that would normally be symmetrical. Fluctuating asymmetry was examined for chironomid larvae (Chironomus plumosus) collected from a mercury contaminated lake. Larvae were collected from a gradient of mercury concentrations ranging from 2.6--106 mg/kg (DW). Numerous characters were examined for evidence of fluctuating asymmetry and for their utility as indicators of chronic mercury stress.

  16. Annual production of five species of Chironomidae (Diptera) in Houhu Lake, a typical algal lake (Wuhan, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun-Jun, Yan; Yan-Ling, Liang; Hong-Zhu, Wang

    1999-06-01

    Annual production and life cycle of five dominant species of Chironomidae ( Chironomus plumosus, Cryptochironomus sp., Tokunagayusurika akamusi, Procladius sp., Clinotanypus sp.) were studied with samples collected monthly from April, 1996 to March, 1997 in Houhu Lake at four stations. Based on instar-frequency data, C. plumosus was univoltine, while the other four were bivoltine. Production rates in grams wet weight m-2a-1 calculated by the size-frequency method were C. plumosus, 2.170; Cryptochironomus sp., 0.602; T. akamusi, 3.160; Procladius sp., 0.964; Clinotanypus sp., 0.390. Their P/B ratios were 3.9, 4.9, 4.4, 5.3 and 6.6, respectively.

  17. Potential ecological risk of heavy metal contamination in sediments and macrobenthos in coastal wetlands induced by freshwater releases: A case study in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Yang, Wei; Sun, Tao; Jin, Yuwan

    2016-02-15

    We investigated the nine heavy metal contents in the sediments and macrobenthos of the Yellow River Delta Wetlands using three experimental areas that received freshwater releases and one reference area that did not. Heavy metal contents, the single-factor contamination index (SFCI), the metal contamination index (MCI), and the biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) were used to evaluate the potential ecological risk and bioaccumulation. We found that As exceeded the national standard value by more than 50%, and that the ranges of SFCI for each metal were generally larger in autumn than in spring. MCI showed no clear pattern, but the BSAF results suggest that Cd bioaccumulates from sediments to macrobenthos. Pollution-resistant species such as Corophium sinense, Chironomus sp., and Einfeldia sp. became dominant in the areas receiving freshwater releases, and provide direct evidence of ecological risk in the wetlands. Our results provide preliminary information to guide managers for ecological risk assessments. PMID:26719069

  18. Sediment testing intermittent renewal system for the automated renewal of overlying water in toxicity tests with contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, D.A.; Phipps, G.L.; Ankley, G.T.

    1993-01-01

    A sediment testing intermittent renewal (STIR) system (stationary or portable) for invertebrate toxicity testing with contaminated sediments has been successfully developed and thoroughly tested at ERL-Duluth. Both the stationary and portable systems enable the maintenance of acceptable water quality (e.g. DO) through the capability of automatically renewing overlying water in sediment tests at rates ranging from 1 to 21 volume renewals/day. The STIR system not only significantly reduces the labor associated with renewal of overlying water but also affords a gentle exchange of water that results in virtually no sediment resuspension. Both systems can also be installed in a compact vented enclosure to permit safe testing of hazardous contaminated sediments. To date the STIR system has been used extensively for conducting 10-day bulk sediment tests with Chironomus tentans, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus.

  19. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  20. Derivation and selection of freshwater sediment quality values in Washington state

    SciTech Connect

    Cubbage, J.; Breidenbach, S.; Batts, D.

    1995-12-31

    To derive chemical-based Freshwater Sediment Quality Values (FSQV), bioassay data (Hyalella azteca, Microtox, Chironomus tentans, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Hexagenia limbata) and chemistry data (metals, PAH, pesticide/PCBs, and phenols) were merged from 33 studies and 245 sites in Washington and Oregon into a single database. Apparent Effects Thresholds (AET) and Probable AETs (PAET: 95th percentile of no effects sites) were calculated for Hyalella azteca (n = 228) and Microtox. The efficiency and sensitivity of these values in predicting biological response from chemical concentrations were compared with Ontario`s Severe Effects Level (SEL), Environment Canada`s Probable Effects Level (PEL) and Threshold Effects Level (TEL), EPA`s Equilibrium Partitioning (EQP), and Washington`s marine Sediment management Standards (SMS). For PAH, dry weight normalized values for AETs and PAETs were significantly more sensitive and efficient than organic carbon normalized values. TEL was always the most sensitive and least efficient.

  1. Methods for measuring the toxicity and bioaccumulation of sediment-associated contaminants with freshwater invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The procedures are described for testing freshwater organisms in the laboratory to evaluate the toxicity or bioaccumulation of contaminants associated with whole sediments. Sediments may be collected from the field or spiked with compounds in the laboratory. Toxicity methods are outlined for two organisms, the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus tentans. The toxicity tests are conducted for 10 d in 300 ml chambers containing 100 ml of sediment and 175 ml of overlying water. Overlying water is renewed daily and test organisms are fed during the toxicity tests. The endpoint in the toxicity test with H. azteca is survival and the endpoints in the toxicity test with C. tentans are survival and growth. Procedures are primarily described for testing freshwater sediments; however, estaurine sediments (up to 15%) can also be tested with H. azteca. Guidance for conducting 28-d bioaccumulation tests with the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus is provided in the manual.

  2. Light Sheet Microscopy for Single Molecule Tracking in Living Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Jörg Gerhard; Veith, Roman; Veenendaal, Andreas; Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule observation in cells and tissue allows the analysis of physiological processes with molecular detail, but it still represents a major methodological challenge. Here we introduce a microscopic technique that combines light sheet optical sectioning microscopy and ultra sensitive high-speed imaging. By this approach it is possible to observe single fluorescent biomolecules in solution, living cells and even tissue with an unprecedented speed and signal-to-noise ratio deep within the sample. Thereby we could directly observe and track small and large tracer molecules in aqueous solution. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility to visualize the dynamics of single tracer molecules and native messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) in salivary gland cell nuclei of Chironomus tentans larvae up to 200 µm within the specimen with an excellent signal quality. Thus single molecule light sheet based fluorescence microscopy allows analyzing molecular diffusion and interactions in complex biological systems. PMID:20668517

  3. Aquatic invertebrate ecology during a simulated botulism epizootic in a Sacramento Valley wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Jane M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Harris, Stanley W.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effect of decomposing duck carcasses on aquatic invertebrate numbers, biomass, and taxonomic composition in a seasonally flooded, impounded wetland in the Sacramento Valley, California during August–November 1988 and 1989. Major invertebrate taxa were copepods (Cyclopoida, occurred in 8.3% of samples), water fleas (Daphnidae, 8.9%), water boatmen (Corisella, 10.4%), and midge larvae (Goeldichironomus, 9.3%;Chironomus, 11.5%;Tanypus, 17.2%). We found no treatment (carcass present or no carcass) by sampling day interaction for these taxa. We found a significant difference between sample plots with carcasses and those without carcasses only for Daphnidae counts andCorisella wet weights. We found significant differences among sampling days for these taxa that were probably statistical artifacts. We were unable to detect any effect of duck carcasses on aquatic invertebrate community structure and the potential availability of invertebrates as waterfowl food.

  4. Feeding habits of Solea senegalensis in earthen ponds in Sado estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo Branco, Maria Ana; Arruda, Marco A.; Gamito, Sofia

    2010-11-01

    The senegale sole, Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858, is a commercially valuable fish and it is beginning to be cultured in a semi-intensive way in fish farms in southern European countries. The present study was initiated to investigate the diet of S. senegalensis under semi-extensive conditions. The feeding habits of sole were studied in two earthen ponds of a fish farm in the Sado estuary. In one earthen pond, artificial fish ration was given. S. senegalensis feeds on few prey items, its diet is mainly composed of insect larvae ( Chironomus salinarus) and polychaeta ( Hediste diversicolor). The diet composition of this species suggests feeding specialization, by consuming mainly annelids and insect larvae and by avoiding other items, extremely abundant in the environment, such as gastropods. In the water reservoir where ration was given, some fish consumed simultaneously benthic organism together with ration. However, benthic organisms seem to be the most important component of S. senegalensis diet.

  5. Validation and sensitivity comparisons of micro-scale toxicity tests for the evaluation of freshwater sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Riebel, P.; Bureau, J.; Blaise, C.; Michaud, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A three-year study is currently underway to develop a representative and cost-effective battery of toxicity tests for evaluating freshwater sediment and porewater toxicity. Among the tests currently being evaluated are the following: Microtox{trademark} chronic test, Microtox{trademark} solid-phase test, Microtox{trademark} liquid phase test, Thamnotoxkit F{trademark}, Rotoxkit F{trademark}, Daphnia magna IQ test{trademark}, Sediment Toxkit, SOS Chromotest, a Selenastrum capricornutum short exposure assay, and trout hepatocyte assays. Conventional sediment tests with Chironomus tentans, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus, as well as benthic macroinvertebrate community assessments and sediment chemical characterizations are being conducted at two contaminated sites. Toxicity test reproducibility, sensitivity, practicality, cost and ecological relevance are discussed.

  6. Organic waste compounds in streams: Occurrence and aquatic toxicity in different stream compartments, flow regimes, and land uses in southeast Wisconsin, 2006–9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, Austin K.; Corsi, Steven R.; Richards, Kevin D.; Geis, Steven W.; Magruder, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    -water-indicator compounds, among others. Urban runoff and storm-related leaks of sanitary sewers and (or) septic systems may be important sources of these and other compounds to the streams. The Kinnickinnic River, a highly urbanized site, had the highest detection rates and concentrations of compounds of all the sampled sites. The Milwaukee River near Cedarburg—one of the least urban sites—and the Outer Milwaukee Harbor site had the lowest detection rates and concentrations. Aquatic-toxicity benchmarks were exceeded for 12 of the 25 compounds with known benchmarks. The compounds with the greatest benchmark exceedances were the PAHs, both in terms of exceedance frequency (up to 93 percent for some compounds in sediment samples) and magnitude (concentrations up to 1,024 times greater than the benchmark value). Other compounds with toxicity-benchmark exceedances include Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (a plasticizer), 2-Methylnapthalene (a component of fuel and oil), phenol (an antimicrobial disinfectant with diverse uses), and 4-Nonylphenol (sum of all isomers; a detergent metabolite, among other uses). Analyzed as a mixture, the suite of PAH compounds were found to be potentially toxic for most non-base-flow samples. Bioassay tests were conducted on samples from 14 streams: Ceriodaphnia dubia in base-flow samples, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyallela azteca in pore-water samples, and Hyallela azteca and Chironomus tentans in sediment samples. The greatest adverse effect was observed in tests with Chironomus tentans from sediment samples. The weight of Chironomus tentans after exposure to sediments decreased with increased OWC concentrations. This was most evident in the relation between PAH results and Chironomus tentans bioassay results for the majority of samples; however, solvents and flame retardants appeared to be important for one site each. These results for PAHs were consistent with assessment of PAH potency factors for sediment, indicating that PAHs were likely to have adverse effects

  7. Acute and chronic toxicity testing of bisphenol A with aquatic invertebrates and plants.

    PubMed

    Mihaich, Ellen M; Friederich, Urs; Caspers, Norbert; Hall, A Tilghman; Klecka, Gary M; Dimond, Stephen S; Staples, Charles A; Ortego, Lisa S; Hentges, Steven G

    2009-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA, 4,4'-isopropylidine diphenol) is a commercially important chemical used primarily as an intermediate in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Extensive effect data are currently available, including long-term studies with BPA on fish, amphibians, crustaceans, and mollusks. The aim of this study was to perform additional tests with a number of aquatic invertebrates and an aquatic plant. These studies include acute tests with the midge (Chironomus tentans) and the snail (Marisa cornuarietis), and chronic studies with rotifers (Brachionus calyciflorus), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and plants (Lemna gibba). The effect data on different aquatic invertebrate and plant species presented in this paper correspond well with the effect and no-effect concentrations (NOECs) available from invertebrate studies in the published literature and are within the range found for other aquatic species tested with BPA. PMID:19327838

  8. Toxicity of fluoride to aquatic species and evaluation of toxicity modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Krysta; Elphick, James; Burnett-Seidel, Charlene

    2015-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of fluoride to a variety of freshwater aquatic organisms and to establish whether water quality variables contribute substantively to modifying its toxicity. Water hardness, chloride, and alkalinity were tested as possible toxicity modifying factors for fluoride using acute toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca and Oncorhynchus mykiss. Chloride appeared to be the major toxicity modifying factor for fluoride in these acute toxicity tests. The chronic toxicity of fluoride was evaluated with a variety of species, including 3 fish (Pimephales promelas, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus namaycush), 3 invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia, H. azteca, and Chironomus dilutus), 1 plant (Lemna minor), and 1 alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Hyalella azteca was the most sensitive species overall, and O. mykiss was the most sensitive species of fish. The role of chloride as a toxicity modifying factor was inconsistent between species in the chronic toxicity tests.

  9. A stable isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Gan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Methods for determining bioavailability of organic contaminants suffer various operational limitations. We explored the use of stable isotope labeled references in developing an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measure the exchangeable pool (E) of pyrene and bifenthrin as an approximation of their bioavailability in sediments. The exchange of deuterated bifenthrin or pyrene with its native counterpart was completed within 48 h. The derived E was 38–82% for pyrene and 28–59% for bifenthrin. Regression between E and the sum of rapid and slow desorption fractions obtained from sequential desorption showed a slope close to 1.0. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a strong relationship (r2 > 0.93) between E and bioaccumulation into Chironomus tentans. Given the abundance of stable isotope labeled references and their relatively easy analysis, the IDM has the potential to become a readily adoptable tool for estimating organic contaminants bioaccessibility in various matrices. PMID:23434573

  10. Toxicity of fluoride to aquatic species and evaluation of toxicity modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Krysta; Elphick, James; Burnett-Seidel, Charlene

    2015-07-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the toxicity of fluoride to a variety of freshwater aquatic organisms and to establish whether water quality variables contribute substantively to modifying its toxicity. Water hardness, chloride, and alkalinity were tested as possible toxicity modifying factors for fluoride using acute toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca and Oncorhynchus mykiss. Chloride appeared to be the major toxicity modifying factor for fluoride in these acute toxicity tests. The chronic toxicity of fluoride was evaluated with a variety of species, including 3 fish (Pimephales promelas, O. mykiss, and Salvelinus namaycush), 3 invertebrates (Ceriodaphnia dubia, H. azteca, and Chironomus dilutus), 1 plant (Lemna minor), and 1 alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). Hyalella azteca was the most sensitive species overall, and O. mykiss was the most sensitive species of fish. The role of chloride as a toxicity modifying factor was inconsistent between species in the chronic toxicity tests. PMID:25732700

  11. Disulfide bonds in a recombinant protein modeled after a core repeat in an aquatic insect's silk protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. V.; Correia, J. J.; Case, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    We constructed a gene encoding rCAS, recombinant constant and subrepeat protein, modeled after tandem repeats found in the major silk proteins synthesized by aquatic larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Bacterially synthesized rCAS was purified to near homogeneity and characterized by several biochemical and biophysical methods including amino-terminal sequencing, amino acid compositional analysis, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and mass spectrometry. Complementing these techniques with quantitative sulfhydryl assays, we discovered that the four cysteines present in rCAS form two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mapping studies revealed that the disulfide bonds are heterogeneous. When reduced and denatured rCAS was allowed to refold and its disulfide bonding state monitored, it again adopted a conformation with two intramolecular disulfide bonds. The inherent ability of rCAS to quantitatively form two intramolecular disulfide bonds may reflect a previously unknown feature of the in vivo silk proteins from which it is derived. PMID:7663350

  12. Heavy metal bioaccumulation in sediment, common reed, algae, and blood worm from the Shoor river, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hamidian, Amir Hossein; Zareh, Maryam; Poorbagher, Hadi; Vaziri, Leila; Ashrafi, Sohrab

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations of 11 metals (cadmium, zinc, copper (Cu), vanadium (V), lead, magnesium (Mg), manganese, aluminum, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), and nickel), and one metalloid (arsenic (As)) were measured in sediment, common reed (Phragmites australis), algae (Spirogyra sp.), and blood worm (Chironomus sp.) tissues of samples collected from the Shoor river. Samples were dried, acid digested, and the concentrations of metals were measured using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer. A higher concentration of heavy metals was accumulated in Spirogyra and Chironomids than sediment and common reed. The highest rate of accumulation was found for Mg, V, Fe, As, Cu, and Cr. Spirogyra and Chironomids are capable of accumulating and thereby removing metals from polluted water bodies and are suitable for biomonitoring purposes.

  13. How are macroinvertebrates of slow flowing lotic systems directly affected by suspended and deposited sediments?

    PubMed

    Kefford, Ben J; Zalizniak, Liliana; Dunlop, Jason E; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Choy, Satish C

    2010-02-01

    The effects of suspended and deposited sediments on the macroinvertebrates are well documented in upland streams but not in slower flowing lowland rivers. Using species found in lowland lotic environments, we experimentally evaluate mechanisms for sediments to affect macroinvertebrates, and in one experiment whether salinity alters the effect of suspended sediments. Suspended kaolin clay reduced feeding of Ischnura heterosticta (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) at high turbidity (1000-1500 NTU) but had no effects on feeding of Hemianax papuensis (Odonata: Aeshnidae) and Micronecta australiensis (Hemiptera: Corixidae). In freshwater (0.1 mS/cm), survival of Ischnura aurora was poor in clear water, but improved with suspended kaolin. Growth and feeding of I. aurora were unaffected by suspended sediments and salinity. Burial (1-5 mm) of eggs with kaolin or sand reduced hatching in Physa acuta (Gastropoda: Physidae), Gyraulus tasmanica (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) and Chironomus cloacalis (Diptera: Chironomidae). Settling sediments may pose greater risk to lowland lotic invertebrates than suspended sediments.

  14. Invasive alien species water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes as abode for macroinvertebrates in hypertrophic Ramsar Site, Lake Xochimilco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Ramirez, A; Robles-Valderrama, E; Ramirez-Flores, E

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents information on the density, diversity and functional feeding groups of macroinvertebrate assemblages associated with water hyacinth in Antiguo Canal Cuemanco, part of Lake Xochimilco in Mexico City. Rare (low frequency and density) and dominant (high frequency and density) taxa prevailed in the assemblages, with the most predominant being Hyalella azteca, Chironomus plumosus and Ischnura denticollis. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling confirmed two climatic seasons: warm-rainy and cold-dry; the former with the highest diversity and density of taxa. Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed that conductivity, nitrates and turbidity explained the density variations of taxa. Antiguo Canal Cuemanco waters are spatially homogeneous with the characteristics of hypertrophic shallow lakes, inhabited by scrapers and gathering-collectors. The species found were tolerant to organic pollution.

  15. Factors Influencing the Stable Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotopic Composition (δ 18O and δ D) of a Subarctic Freshwater Lake Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wooller, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions (δ 18O and δD) in various animal tissues can be used to examine past climates and animal migration pattern. Little attention has been paid to the relative roles of diet and water influencing the overall δ 18O and δD of animal tissues in freshwater ecosystems. It is unclear whether different trophic levels in a freshwater lake ecosystem have an identical relationship to the water that surrounds them. The δ18O and δD values of animal tissues may be controlled by numerous different factors, including metabolic and biosynthetic isotopic fractionation and variations of δ 18O and δD in the food available. We began to examine these issues by analyzing the δ 18O and δD throughout a freshwater aquatic ecosystem at Smith Lake in Alaska. We collected samples representing primary producers and consumers (primary and secondary). Samples included green algae, various aquatic plants, such as Nuphar variegatum (water lily), Polygonum amphibium (water smartweed), Carex utriculata (sedge), Utricularia vulgaris (common bladderwort), Typha latifolia (common cattail), and a range of aquatic invertebrates, including Chironomus. sp (midge), Zygoptera (damselfly), Anisoptera (dragonfly), Dytiscidae (diving beetle) and Euhirudinea (leeches). The δ 18O and δD of Smith Lake water were ~-13.5e and -129.0e, respectively, and we present the δ 18O and δD of the rest of the ecosystem relative to these data. For instance, the δ 18O of chironomus sp. was ~12.1, which is greater than the of the lake water. Preliminary results suggest the extent of the fractionation between δ 18O of chironomids vs. lake water δ 18O is consistent with previous studies. Our data provide an insight into the range of variations that could be expected within a single freshwater ecosystem.

  16. Is the chronic Tier-1 effect assessment approach for insecticides protective for aquatic ecosystems?

    PubMed

    Brock, Theo Cm; Bhatta, Ranjana; van Wijngaarden, René Pa; Rico, Andreu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the appropriateness of several methods, including those recommended in the Aquatic Guidance Document of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), for the derivation of chronic Tier-1 regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) for insecticides and aquatic organisms. The insecticides represented different chemical classes (organophosphates, pyrethroids, benzoylureas, insect growth regulators, biopesticides, carbamates, neonicotinoids, and miscellaneous). Chronic Tier-1 RACs derived using toxicity data for the standard species Daphnia magna, Chironomus spp., and/or Americamysis bahia, were compared with Tier-3 RACs derived from micro- and mesocosm studies on basis of the ecological threshold option (ETO-RACs). ETO-RACs could be derived for 31 insecticides applied to micro- and mesocosms in single or multiple applications, yielding a total number of 36 cases for comparison. The chronic Tier-1 RACs calculated according to the EFSA approach resulted in a sufficient protection level, except for 1 neonicotinoid (slightly underprotective) and for several pyrethroids if toxicity data for A. bahia were not included. This latter observation can be explained by 1) the fact that A. bahia is the most sensitive standard test species for pyrethroids, 2) the hydrophobic properties of pyrethroids, and 3) the fact that long-term effects observed in (epi) benthic arthropods may be better explained by exposure via the sediment than via overlying water. Besides including toxicity data for A. bahia, the protection level for pyrethroids can be improved by selecting both D. magna and Chironomus spp. as standard test species for chronic Tier-1 derivation. Although protective in the majority of cases, the conservativeness of the recommended chronic Tier-1 RACs appears to be less than an order of magnitude for a relatively large proportion of insecticides when compared with their Tier-3 ETO-RACs. This may leave limited options for refinement of the chronic effect assessment

  17. Distribution of chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) in polluted rivers of the Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shami, Salman A; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; HassanAhmad, Abu; Nor, Siti Azizah Mohd

    2010-01-01

    The influence of physical and chemical parameters on the abundance and diversity of chironomids was studied in six rivers with moderate to highly polluted water in the Juru River Basin. The rivers: Ceruk Tok Kun (CTKR) as reference site, and polluted rivers of Pasir (PR), Juru (JR), Permatang Rawa (PRR), Ara (AR) and Kilang Ubi (KUR) were sampled over a period of five months (November 2007-March 2008). Nine chirnomid species: Chironimus kiiensis, C. javanus, Polypedilum trigonus, Microchironomus sp., Dicrotendipes sp., Tanytarsus formosanus, Clinotanypus sp., Tanypus punctipennis and Fittkauimyia sp. were identified. Assessment of their relationships with several environmental parameters was performed using the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Tanytarsus formosanus was the most dominant in the relatively clean CTKR and moderately polluted JR with mean densities of 19.66 and 25.32 m(-2), respectively while C. kiiensis was abundant in more polluted rivers. Tanytarsus formosanus, Dicrotendipes sp. and Microchironomus sp. were grouped under moderate to high water temperature, total organic matter (TOM), total suspended solids (TSS), velocity, pH, phosphates and sulphates. However, Tanypus punctipennis, Fittkauimyia sp., and Clinotanypus sp. were associated with high contents of river sediment such as TOM, Zn and Mn and water ammonium-N and nitrate-N and they were associated with higher dissolved oxygen (DO) content in the water. Chironomus kiiensis, C. javanus and P. trigonus showed positive relationships with TOM, ammonium-N and nitrate-N as well as trace metals of Zn, Cu and Mn. These three species could be considered as tolerant species since they have the ability to survive in extreme environmental conditions with low DO and high concentrations of pollutants. Based on the water parameter scores in all rivers, the highest diversity of chironomid larvae was reported in CTKR. With higher concentrations of organic and/or inorganic pollutants as reported in PPR

  18. The legacy of pesticide pollution: An overlooked factor in current risk assessments of freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jes J; Wiberg-Larsen, Peter; Baattrup-Pedersen, Annette; Cedergreen, Nina; McKnight, Ursula S; Kreuger, Jenny; Jacobsen, Dean; Kristensen, Esben A; Friberg, Nikolai

    2015-11-01

    We revealed a history of legacy pesticides in water and sediment samples from 19 small streams across an agricultural landscape. Dominant legacy compounds included organochlorine pesticides, such as DDT and lindane, the organophosphate chlorpyrifos and triazine herbicides such as terbutylazine and simazine which have long been banned in the EU. The highest concentrations of legacy pesticides were found in streams draining catchments with a large proportion of arable farmland suggesting that they originated from past agricultural applications. The sum of toxic units (SumTUD.magna) based on storm water samples from agriculturally impacted streams was significantly higher when legacy pesticides were included compared to when they were omitted. Legacy pesticides did not significantly change the predicted toxicity of water samples to algae or fish. However, pesticide concentrations in bed sediment and suspended sediment samples exceeded safety thresholds in 50% of the samples and the average contribution of legacy pesticides to the SumTUC.riparius was >90%. Our results suggest that legacy pesticides can be highly significant contributors to the current toxic exposure of stream biota, especially macroinvertebrate communities, and that those communities were primarily exposed to legacy pesticides via the sediment. Additionally, our results suggest that neglecting legacy pesticides in the risk assessment of pesticides in streams may severely underestimate the risk of ecological effects.

  19. Aquatic hazard assessment of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, James F.; Little, Edward E.; Huckins, James N.

    1992-01-01

    This study determined the acute and chronic toxicity of the organophosphate insecticide fonofos to standard freshwater aquatic organisms under laboratory conditions. Fonofos was acutely toxic to bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), Daphnia (D. magna), and midge (Chironomous riparius) at 5.3, 2.7, and 39 μg/L, respectively. Three fonofos formulations (technical, 94.8% A.I.; 20G, field granular 20% A.I.; and 4E, field liquid 4#/gal A.I.) exhibited similar acute toxicities to bluegill. Exposure to fonofos delayed reproduction and decreased the intrinsic rate of increase of Daphnia during 21-d chronic exposure at the lowest tested concentration (0.08 μg/L). The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for Daphnia survival was 0.42 μg/L; 0% survival occurred at the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC) of 1.45 μg/L. The NOEC for midge emergence was 3.42 μg/L; only 34% emergence occurred at the LOEC of 8.24 μg/L. Chronic 30-d exposure of juvenile bluegills decreased growth and survival at 5.65 μg/L (LOEC), but no effects occurred at 2.33 μg/L (NOEC). The relative hazard of fonofos to aquatic life is similar to other carbamate and organophosphate corn insecticides.

  20. Range extension of Myotis midastactus​ (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) to Paraguay

    PubMed Central

    Idárraga, Liu; Wilson, Don Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Myotis midastactus Moratelli and Wilson, 2014 (Vespertilionidae, Myotinae) was described from the Myotis simus Thomas, 1901 complex based on collections from the Bolivian Savannah. New information Four vouchers previously assigned to M. simus from the Alto Chaco in Paraguay (West of the Paraguay River) are reassigned here to M. midastactus. These specimens extend the geographic distribution of M. midastactus 1200 km southward, and constitute the first evidence of the species in the country. Based on other material from the Brazilian Pantanal and Cerrado, Central Paraguay and north-eastern Argentina, we also discuss the identity of simus-like populations south of the Amazon Basin. The status of these populations is still unclear, but the little evidence we have at hand indicates that these populations may represent another taxon—M. guaycuru Proença, 1943; whereas M. simus seems to be restricted to the Amazon basin. This hypothesis is still very speculative and requires further investigation. With the assignment of material from Alto Chaco to M. midastactus, seven species of Myotis are confirmed for Paraguay: M. albescens, M. lavali, M. levis, M. midastactus, M. nigricans, M. riparius, and M. ruber. PMID:26379462