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Sample records for chlamydial lung infection

  1. Interleukin-22 Promotes T Helper 1 (Th1)/Th17 Immunity in Chlamydial Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Wang, Shuhe; Fan, Yijun; Zhao, Weiming; Yang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    The role of interleukin-22 (IL-22) in intracellular bacterial infections is a controversial issue, although the contribution of this cytokine to host defense against extracellular bacterial pathogens has been well established. In this study, we focused on an intra-cellular bacterium, Chlamydia, and evaluated the production and function of IL-22 in host defense against chlamydial lung infection using a mouse model. We found that Chlamydia muridarum infection elicited quick IL-22 responses in the lung, which increased during infection and were reduced when bacterial loads decreased. More importantly, blockade of endogenous IL-22 using neutralizing anti-IL-22 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) resulted in more severe disease in the mice, leading to significantly higher weight loss and bacterial growth and much more severe pathological changes than treatment with isotype control antibody. Immunological analyses identified significantly lower T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 responses in the IL-22–neutralized mice. In contrast, intranasal administration of exogenous IL-22 significantly enhanced protection following chlamydial lung infection, which was associated with a significant increase of Th17 response. The data demonstrate that IL-22 is a critical cytokine, mediating host defense against chlamydial lung infection and coordinating the function of distinct Th-cell subsets, particularly Th1 and Th17, in the process. PMID:24531835

  2. Natural killer cells regulate Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance in chlamydial lung infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Dong, Xiaojing; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xi; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell is an important component in innate immunity, playing a critical role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by modulating the function of other immune cells including T cells. In this study, we focused on the role of NK cells in regulating Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance during chlamydial lung infection. We found that NK cell-depleted mice showed decreased Th1 and Th17 cells, which was correlated with reduced interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17 and IL-22 production as well as T-bet and receptor-related orphan receptor gamma t expression compared with mice treated with the isotype control antibody. In contrast, NK cell depletion significantly increased Treg in cell number and related transcription factor (Foxp3) expression. The opposite trends of changes of Th1/Th17 and Treg led to significant reduction in the Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg ratios. The data implicate that NK cells play an important role in host defence against chlamydial lung infection, mainly through maintaining Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance.

  3. Emerging chlamydial infections.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important intracellular bacterial pathogens of vertebrates. In the last years, novel members of this group have been discovered: Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis seems to be emerging respiratory human pathogens, while Waddlia chondrophila might be a new agent of bovine abortion. Various species have been showed to infect also the herpetofauna and fishes, and some novel chlamydiae are endosymbionts of arthropods. In addition, molecular studies evidenced a huge diversity of chlamydiae from both environmental and clinical samples, most of such a diversity could be formed by novel lineages of chlamydiae. Experimental studies showed that free-living amoebae may support multiplication of various chlamydiae, then could play an important role as reservoir/vector of chlamydial infections. Here we reviewed literature data concerning chlamydial infections, with a particular emphasis on the novely described chlamydial organisms.

  4. Chlamydial lung infection induces transient IL-9 production which is redundant for host defense against primary infection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Wang, Shuhe; Fan, Yijun; Yang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    IL-9/Th9 responses are recently found to be important for innate and adaptive immunity particularly in parasitic infections. To date, the study on the role of IL-9 in bacterial infections is limited and the reported data are contradictory. One reported function of IL-9/Th9 is to modulate Th1/Th17 responses. Since our and others' previous work has shown a critical role of Th1 and Th17 cells in host defense against chlamydial lung infection, we here examined the role of IL-9 responses in Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) lung infection, particularly its effect on Th1 and Th17 responses and outcome infection. Our data showed quick but transient IL-9 production in the lung following infection, peaking at day 3 and back to baseline around day 7. CD4+ T cell was the major source of IL-9 production in the lung infection. Blockade of endogenous IL-9 using neutralizing antibody failed to change Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 production by cultured spleen mononuclear cells isolated from Cm infected mice. Similarly, in vivo neutralization of IL-9 failed to show significant effect on T cell (Th1 and Th17) and antibody responses (IgA, IgG1 and IgG2a). Consistently, the neutralization of IL-9 had no significant effect on disease process, including body weight change, bacterial burden and histopathological score. The data suggest that IL-9 production following chlamydial lung infection is redundant for host defense against the intracellular bacteria.

  5. Chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Kalmar, I D; Boden, J; Vanrompay, D

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence and impact of chlamydial infections in Western livestock is well documented in the international literature, but less is known aboutthese infections in livestock in the People's Republic of China. China's livestock production and its share in the global market have increased significantly in recent decades. In this review, the relevant English and Chinese literature on the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in Chinese livestock is considered, and biosecurity measures, prophylaxis and treatment of these infections in China's livestock are compared with Western practices. Chlamydial infections are highly prevalent in Chinese livestock and cause important economic losses, as they do in the rest of the world. Surveillance data and diagnostic results of abortion outbreaks in cattle, sheep and goats highlight the importance of virulent chlamydial infections in China's major ruminant species in many of China's provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. Data from many of China's provincial divisions also indicate the widespread presence of chlamydial infections in industrially reared swine across the country. Less is known about chlamydial infections in yak, buffalo and horses, but available reports indicate a high prevalence in China's populations. In these reports, chlamydiosis was related to abortions in yak and pneumonia in horses. In Western countries, chlamydial infections are principally treated with antibiotics. In China, however, traditional medicine is often used in conjunction with antibiotics or used as an alternative treatment.

  6. Inefficiency of C3H/HeN Mice to Control Chlamydial Lung Infection Correlates with Downregulation of Neutrophil Activation During the Late Stage of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaofei; Bu, Xiaokun; Zhang, Naihong; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Huanjun; Bai, Hong; Yang, Xi

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that massive infiltration of neutrophils in C3H/HeN (C3H) mice could not efficiently control Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) infection and might contribute to the high susceptibility of these mice to lung infection. To further define the nature of neutrophil responses in C3H mice during chlamydial infection, we examine the expression of adhesion molecules and CD11b related to neutrophils infiltration and activation, respectively, following intranasal Cm infection. The results showed that the expression of selectins (E-selectin, P-selectin and L-selectin), and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the lung of C3H mice increased more significantly than in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, the more resistant strain. These results correlated well with the massive neutrophils infiltration in C3H mice. In contrast, CD11b expression on peripheral blood and lung neutrophils in C3H mice exhibited a significant reduction compared with B6 mice during the late phage of infection (day 14). These findings suggest that the high-level expression of adhesion molecules in C3H mice may enhance neutrophils recruitment to the lung, but the decline of CD11b expression on neutrophils may attenuate neutrophil function. Therefore, CD11b down-regulation on neutrophils may contribute to the failure of C3H mice to control chlamydial lung infection. PMID:19728926

  7. Chlamydial Infection in Animals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shewen, Patricia E.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the literature concerning chlamydial infection in birds and animals, particularly domestic animals is presented. Following a general discussion of the agent, the nature of chlamydial infection and diagnostic criteria, information regarding disease is summarized for each species. The possibility of zoonotic transmission is also discussed. PMID:6988075

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of human chlamydial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, R C

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a human pathogen that causes ocular disease (trachoma and inclusion conjunctivitis), genital disease (cervicitis, urethritis, salpingitis, and lymphogranuloma venereum), and respiratory disease (infant pneumonitis). Respiratory chlamydioses also occur with infection by avian strains of C. psittaci or infection by the newly described TWAR agent. Diagnosis of most acute C. trachomatis infections relies on detection of the infecting agent by cell culture, fluorescent antibody, immunoassay, cytopathologic, or nucleic acid hybridization methods. Individual non-culture tests for C. trachomatis are less sensitive and specific than the best chlamydial cell culture system but offer the advantages of reduced technology and simple transport of clinical specimens. Currently available nonculture tests for C. trachomatis perform adequately as screening tests in populations in which the prevalence of infection is greater than 10%. A negative culture or nonculture test for C. trachomatis does not, however, exclude infection. The predictive value of a positive nonculture test may be unsatisfactory when populations of low infection prevalence are tested. Tests that detect antibody responses to chlamydial infection have limited utility in diagnosis of acute chlamydial infection because of the high prevalence of persistent antibody in healthy adults and the cross-reactivity due to infection by the highly prevalent C. trachomatis and TWAR agents. Assays for changes in antibody titer to the chlamydial genus antigen are used for the diagnosis of respiratory chlamydioses. A single serum sample that is negative for chlamydial antibody excludes the diagnosis of lymphogranuloma venereum. PMID:2650858

  9. Chlamydial Infection: A Common Sexually Transmitted Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sorbie, Janet

    1982-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is more prevalent than gonorrhea and causes a similar clinical picture. It is the prime cause of non-gonococcal urethritis in men and pelvic inflammatory disease in women. Its sequelae in women are ectopic pregnancy and infertility. It can be transmitted from an infected mother to her newborn child, leading to inclusion conjunctivitis and pneumonia. Tetracycline and erythromycin are effective in eradicating chlamydial infections, but the penicillins are not. Screening of high risk groups and special diagnostic facilities would help control this common sexually transmitted disease. PMID:20469385

  10. Chlamydial infections in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Nietfeld, J C

    2001-07-01

    Chlamydophila abortus (formerly Chlamydia psittaci) is one of the most important causes of reproductive failure in sheep and goats, especially in intensively managed flocks. The disease is usually manifested as abortion in the last 2 to 3 weeks of gestation, regardless of when the animal was infected. Ewes that abort are resistant to future reproductive failure due to C. abortus, but they become inapparent carriers and persistently shed the organism from their reproductive tracts during estrus. Chlamydophila pecorum is the other member of the genus that affects small ruminants, and it is recognized as a primary cause of keratoconjunctivitis in sheep and goats and of polyarthritis in sheep.

  11. Chlamydial infections in free-living birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brand, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Most studies of chlamydial infections in free-living wild birds have been limited to surveys for the presence of Chlamydia psittaci or antibody to C psittaci and have largely been done in association with the identification of chlamydiosis in human beings, commercial fowl, or pet birds. The emphasis of these studies has been to determine the prevalence of infection and the potential role of wild birds in the spread of chlamydiae to domestic birds and human beings. Little is known about the epizootiology of chlamydiosis in free-living birds or its affect on their population dynamics. The following article is a summary of reported studies of chlamydiosis in free-living wild birds in relation to host range, ecologic aspects of transmission and maintenance, and the prevalence of disease.

  12. Chlamydial infection induces host cytokinesis failure at abscission.

    PubMed

    Brown, Heather M; Knowlton, Andrea E; Grieshaber, Scott S

    2012-10-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacteria and the infectious agent responsible for the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia. Infection with Chlamydia can lead to serious health sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease and reproductive tract scarring contributing to infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Additionally, chlamydial infections have been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in patients with a prior human papilomavirus (HPV) infection. Chlamydial infection of cultured cells causes multinucleation, a potential pathway for chromosomal instability. Two mechanisms that are known to initiate multinucleation are cell fusion and cytokinesis failure. This study demonstrates that multinucleation of the host cell by Chlamydia is entirely due to cytokinesis failure. Moreover, cytokinesis failure is due in part to the chlamydial effector CPAF acting as an anaphase promoting complex mimic causing cells to exit mitosis with unaligned and unattached chromosomes. These lagging and missegregated chromosomes inhibit cytokinesis by blocking abscission, the final stage of cytokinesis.

  13. Chlamydial Infection Induces Host Cytokinesis Failure at Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Heather M.; Knowlton, Andrea E.; Grieshaber, Scott S.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacteria and the infectious agent responsible for the sexually transmitted disease Chlamydia. Infection with Chlamydia can lead to serious health sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease and reproductive tract scarring contributing to infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Additionally, chlamydial infections have been epidemiologically linked to cervical cancer in patients with a prior human papilomavirus (HPV) infection. Chlamydial infection of cultured cells causes multinucleation, a potential pathway for chromosomal instability. Two mechanisms that are known to initiate multinucleation are cell fusion and cytokinesis failure. This study demonstrates that multinucleation of the host cell by Chlamydia is entirely due to cytokinesis failure. Moreover, cytokinesis failure is due in part to the chlamydial effector CPAF acting as an anaphase promoting complex mimic causing cells to exit mitosis with unaligned and unattached chromosomes. These lagging and missegregated chromosomes inhibit cytokinesis by blocking abscission, the final stage of cytokinesis. PMID:22646503

  14. Interleukin-13 promotes susceptibility to chlamydial infection of the respiratory and genital tracts.

    PubMed

    Asquith, Kelly L; Horvat, Jay C; Kaiko, Gerard E; Carey, Alison J; Beagley, Kenneth W; Hansbro, Philip M; Foster, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    Chlamydiae are intracellular bacteria that commonly cause infections of the respiratory and genital tracts, which are major clinical problems. Infections are also linked to the aetiology of diseases such as asthma, emphysema and heart disease. The clinical management of infection is problematic and antibiotic resistance is emerging. Increased understanding of immune processes that are involved in both clearance and immunopathology of chlamydial infection is critical for the development of improved treatment strategies. Here, we show that IL-13 was produced in the lungs of mice rapidly after Chlamydia muridarum (Cmu) infection and promoted susceptibility to infection. Wild-type (WT) mice had increased disease severity, bacterial load and associated inflammation compared to IL-13 deficient (-/-) mice as early as 3 days post infection (p.i.). Intratracheal instillation of IL-13 enhanced bacterial load in IL-13-/- mice. There were no differences in early IFN-g and IL-10 expression between WT and IL-13-/- mice and depletion of CD4+ T cells did not affect infection in IL-13-/- mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate a lack of CD4+ T cell involvement and a novel role for IL-13 in innate responses to infection. We also showed that IL-13 deficiency increased macrophage uptake of Cmu in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the depletion of IL-13 during infection of lung epithelial cells in vitro decreased the percentage of infected cells and reduced bacterial growth. Our results suggest that enhanced IL-13 responses in the airways, such as that found in asthmatics, may promote susceptibility to chlamydial lung infection. Importantly the role of IL-13 in regulating infection was not limited to the lung as we showed that IL-13 also promoted susceptibility to Cmu genital tract infection. Collectively our findings demonstrate that innate IL-13 release promotes infection that results in enhanced inflammation and have broad implications for the treatment of chlamydial infections and IL

  15. Chlamydiaceae and chlamydial infections in sheep or goats.

    PubMed

    Rodolakis, A; Laroucau, K

    2015-12-14

    Chlamydiae induce a range of pathological syndromes in small ruminants. Abortion is the most common clinical expression of the infection that causes important economic losses and presents a risk to human health, particularly in pregnant women. The present paper gives an overview of chlamydial infections in sheep and goats, focusing specifically on abortion and on recent data brought by cellular and genomic approaches regarding genotyping, virulence of strains, epidemiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis and control of the disease.

  16. Molecular mimicry and horror autotoxicus: do chlamydial infections elicit autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Swanborg, Robert H; Boros, Dov L; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-11-30

    All species of the order Chlamydiales are obligate intracellular eubacterial pathogens of their various hosts. Two chlamydial species, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, are primarily human pathogens, and each is known to cause important diseases. Some strains of C. trachomatis are sexually transmitted and frequently cause severe reproductive problems, primarily in women. Other strains of the organism serve as the aetiological agents for blinding trachoma, still the leading cause of preventable blindness in underdeveloped nations. C. pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen known to cause community-acquired pneumonia. Importantly, both organisms engender an immunopathogenic response in the human host, and both have been associated with widely diverse, relatively common and currently idiopathic chronic diseases, most of which include an important autoimmune component. In this article, we explore the available experimental data regarding the possible elicitation of autoimmunity in various contexts by chlamydial infection, and we suggest several avenues for research to explore this potentially important issue further.

  17. Recognition and treatment of chlamydial infections from birth to adolescence.

    PubMed

    Darville, Toni

    2013-01-01

    The "silent epidemic" of Chlamydia trachomatis threatens to cause reproductive damage and infertility in many of the 50 million women who acquire it each year. Female reproductive tract infection has more recently been linked to stillbirth and premature delivery. Innate immune cells and mediators appear to be the primary players in pathogenesis, with neutrophils playing a prominent role in disease development. Although adaptive antibody and CD4 T cell responses appear primarily protective, these responses are inefficient. Infections are frequently chronic as a result, and when infection is diagnosed and treated with appropriate antibiotics, repeated infection is the rule. The lack of acute symptoms in many infected individuals contributes to the high prevalence of chlamydial infection. Although chronic sequelae are relatively rare in men, and many women sustain infection without developing pelvic inflammatory disease or chronic sequelae, the extremely high prevalence of chlamydial infection leads to significant morbidity and healthcare costs. A vaccine is urgently needed to prevent infection, but given the difficulties of inducing a CD4 T cell memory response that can home quickly to the genital tract, induction of sterilizing immunity may not be possible. A vaccine that prevents disease by lowering bacterial burden and dampening production of tissue-damaging responses may be possible. Until an efficacious vaccine is developed, screening and treatment programs appear to be the best method of disease prevention.

  18. Male genital tract chlamydial infection: implications for pathology and infertility.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Kelly A; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2008-08-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infections are prevalent worldwide, but current research, screening, and treatment are focused on females, with the burden of disease and infertility sequelae considered to be a predominantly female problem. The prevalence of chlamydial infection, however, is similar in males and females. Furthermore, a role for this pathogen in the development of male urethritis, epididymitis, and orchitis is widely accepted. The role of Chlamydia in the development of prostatitis is controversial, but we suggest that Chlamydia is an etiological agent, with incidences of up to 39.5% reported in patients with prostatitis. Infection of the testis and prostate is implicated in a deterioration of sperm, possibly affecting fertility. Chlamydia infections also may affect male fertility by directly damaging the sperm, because sperm parameters, proportion of DNA fragmentation, and acrosome reaction capacity are impaired with chlamydial infection. Furthermore, the proportion of male partners of infertile couples with evidence of a Chlamydia infection is greater than that documented in the general population. An effect of male chlamydial infection on the fertility of the female partner also has been reported. Thus, the need for a vaccine to protect both males and females is proposed. The difficulty arises because the male reproductive tract is an immune-privileged site that can be disrupted, potentially affecting spermatogenesis, if inappropriate inflammatory responses are provoked. Examination of responses to infection in humans and in experimental animal models suggest that an immunoglobulin A-inducing vaccine will be able to target the male reproductive tract effectively while avoiding harmful inflammatory responses that may impair fertility.

  19. Chemokine and chemokine receptor dynamics during genital chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Belay, Tesfaye; Eko, Francis O; Ananaba, Godwin A; Bowers, Samera; Moore, Terri; Lyn, Deborah; Igietseme, Joseph U

    2002-02-01

    Current design strategies for vaccines against certain microbial pathogens, including Chlamydia trachomatis, require the induction and targeting of specific immune effectors to the local sites of infection known as the mucosal effector sites. Chemokines and their receptors are important mediators of leukocyte trafficking and of the controlled recruitment of specific leukocyte clonotypes during host defense against infections and during inflammation. We analyzed the dynamics of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in genital mucosae during genital chlamydial infection in a murine model to determine how these molecular entities influence the development of immunity and the clearance of infection. A time course study revealed an increase of up to threefold in the levels of expression of RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), gamma-interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), and intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) after genital infection with the C. trachomatis agent of mouse pneumonitis. Peak levels of expression of RANTES, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha occurred by day 7 after primary infection, while those of IP-10 and ICAM-1 peaked by day 21. Expression levels of these molecules decreased by day 42 after primary infection, by which time all animals had resolved the infection, suggesting an infection-driven regulation of expression. A rapid upregulation of expression of these molecules was observed after secondary infection. The presence of cells bearing the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3, known to be preferentially expressed on Th1 and dendritic cells, was also synchronous with the kinetics of immune induction in the genital tract and clearance of infection. Results demonstrated that genital chlamydial infection is associated with a significant induction of chemokines and chemokine receptors that are involved in the recruitment of Th1 cells into the site of infection. Future studies will focus

  20. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    PubMed

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Sexual behavior, communication, and chlamydial infections among college women.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, S L; Coons, S J; Seabolt, J P; Churchill, L; Dale, T

    1994-01-01

    The sexual practices, partner communication patterns, and prevalence of chlamydial infection were determined in a sample of college women. Specific inclusion criteria were used to screen 146 participants. The presence of a mucopurulent cervical discharge was the only criterion significantly associated with infection. Only 12% of the sample used condoms alone or in combination with another birth control method, and only 31% of the women discussed with their partner their own or their partner's sexual history. Thirty-eight percent of the sample reported a history of one to four episodes of a sexually transmitted disease, and 21% of the women stated they had had two or more sexual partners within the past 6 months. Health providers, counselors, and women themselves must address this health issue with more assertive behavior and communication skills.

  2. Factors associated with genital chlamydial and gonococcal infection in males.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, G

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Predictors of chlamydia and gonorrhoea can be used to increase the cost-effectiveness and acceptability of screening programmes, and allow targeting of control strategies. METHOD--All men attending an STD clinic in 1988-1990 were offered screening for chlamydia and gonorrhoea, and the test results correlated with a wide range of potential predictors using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS--Of 9622 attenders, 7992 (82.3%) were tested over a total of 10,110 episodes for chlamydia and 10,090 episodes for gonorrhoea, yielding 729 (7.2%) chlamydial and 123 (1.2%) gonococcal infections. Having urethral discharge and/or dysuria, being heterosexual, and STD contact, unmarried, uncircumcised, tattooed and not having had an STD previously were independently associated with chlamydial infection. Having urethral discharge and/or dysuria, being Aboriginal, an STD contact, homosexual, uncircumcised, tattooed and having sex outside the state in the past three months, no steady partner in the past three months and multiple partners in the past month were associated with urethral gonococcal infection. Selective screening criteria for gonorrhoea provided 90% of positives, eliminated the need for 58% of tests and resulted in an increased yield ratio of 2.2 whereas the corresponding outcomes for screening criteria for chlamydia were 93% 20% and 1.2 respectively. CONCLUSIONS--The widespread influence of confounding on potential predictors for both gonorrhoea and chlamydia may provide misleading indicators of risk factors by univariate analysis. In the setting studied the benefits of selective screening for gonorrhoea in men would be substantial, whereas satisfactory criteria for selective screening for chlamydia could not be identified. PMID:8244361

  3. Recent advances in understanding the biology, epidemiology and control of chlamydial infections in koalas.

    PubMed

    Polkinghorne, Adam; Hanger, Jon; Timms, Peter

    2013-08-30

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is recognised as a threatened wildlife species in various parts of Australia. A major contributing factor to the decline and long-term viability of affected populations is disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacteria, Chlamydia. Two chlamydial species infect the koala, Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia pneumoniae, and have been reported in nearly all mainland koala populations. Chlamydial infections of koalas are associated with ocular infections leading to blindness and genital tract infections linked to infertility, among other serious clinical manifestations. Diagnosis can be based on clinical presentation alone, however, it is complicated by the observation that many koala chlamydial infections occur with no overt signs of clinical disease. Instead, accurate diagnosis requires detailed clinical assessment and confirmatory testing by a range of PCR-based assays. Antibiotic treatment for koala chlamydial infection is possible, however, results on its success are mixed. A more practical solution for the protection of diseased populations is the application of a koala Chlamydia vaccine, with recent trials indicating promising results. Interestingly, molecular epidemiology studies of koala C. pecorum infections and recent comparative genomic analyses of koala C. pneumoniae have revealed potential differences in their origin that will have wider ramifications for our understanding of human chlamydial infections and host adaptation of the chlamydiae. This review summarises changes to the taxonomy of koala chlamydial infections and recent advances in our understanding of the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, control and evolution of Chlamydia infections in this iconic wildlife species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaginal chlamydial clearance following primary or secondary infection in mice occurs independently of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Chaganty, Bharat K. R.; Gupta, Rishein; Guentzel, M. Neal; Chambers, James P.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of TNF-α in chlamydial clearance is uncertain. Antibody-mediated depletion of TNF-α in mice and guinea pigs has been shown not to significantly affect chlamydial clearance, whereas production of TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ from T cells has been shown to correlate with enhanced clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the mechanistic role of TNF-α in clearance of primary and secondary chlamydial infection from the genital tract (GT) using C57BL/6 TNF-α deficient (TNF-α−/−) and wild type (WT) mice. Chlamydial shedding from the lower GT was evaluated following primary and secondary intravaginal challenge. Also, antibody and antigen specific cytokine responses were analyzed from the infected GT and spleens, and oviduct pathology determined to analyze the role of TNF-α in upper GT pathological sequelae. MHC II−/− mice, known to display muted adaptive immune responses and failure to resolve genital chlamydial infections, were used as a negative control. Following both primary and secondary genital chlamydial infection, TNF-α−/− mice exhibited elevated granzyme B production, but similar IFN-γ and antibody responses. Importantly, absence of TNF-α did not significantly alter the resolution of infection. However, TNF-α−/− mice displayed significantly reduced upper genital tract (UGT) pathology compared to WT mice. This study demonstrates mechanistically that optimal chlamydial clearance following primary and secondary chlamydial genital infection can occur in the complete absence of TNF-α, and considered with the reduction of upper GT pathology in TNF-α−/− mice, suggests that targeted induction of anti-chlamydial TNF-α responses by vaccination may be unnecessary, and moreover could be potentially pathogenic. PMID:23483844

  5. Vaginal chlamydial clearance following primary or secondary infection in mice occurs independently of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Gupta, Rishein; Guentzel, M Neal; Chambers, James P; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2013-01-01

    The role of TNF-α in chlamydial clearance is uncertain. Antibody-mediated depletion of TNF-α in mice and guinea pigs has been shown not to significantly affect chlamydial clearance, whereas production of TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ from T cells has been shown to correlate with enhanced clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the mechanistic role of TNF-α in clearance of primary and secondary chlamydial infection from the genital tract (GT) using C57BL/6 TNF-α deficient (TNF-α(-/-)) and wild type (WT) mice. Chlamydial shedding from the lower GT was evaluated following primary and secondary intravaginal challenge. Also, antibody and antigen specific cytokine responses were analyzed from the infected GT and spleens, and oviduct pathology determined to analyze the role of TNF-α in upper GT pathological sequelae. MHC II(-/-) mice, known to display muted adaptive immune responses and failure to resolve genital chlamydial infections, were used as a negative control. Following both primary and secondary genital chlamydial infection, TNF-α(-/-) mice exhibited elevated granzyme B production, but similar IFN-γ and antibody responses. Importantly, absence of TNF-α did not significantly alter the resolution of infection. However, TNF-α(-/-) mice displayed significantly reduced upper genital tract (UGT) pathology compared to WT mice. This study demonstrates mechanistically that optimal chlamydial clearance following primary and secondary chlamydial genital infection can occur in the complete absence of TNF-α, and considered with the reduction of upper GT pathology in TNF-α(-/-) mice, suggests that targeted induction of anti-chlamydial TNF-α responses by vaccination may be unnecessary, and moreover could be potentially pathogenic.

  6. Chlamydial infections of fish: diverse pathogens and emerging causes of disease in aquaculture species.

    PubMed

    Stride, M C; Polkinghorne, A; Nowak, B F

    2014-05-14

    Chlamydial infections of fish are emerging as an important cause of disease in new and established aquaculture industries. To date, epitheliocystis, a skin and gill disease associated with infection by these obligate intracellular pathogens, has been described in over 90 fish species, including hosts from marine and fresh water environments. Aided by advances in molecular detection and typing, recent years have seen an explosion in the description of these epitheliocystis-related chlamydial pathogens of fish, significantly broadening our knowledge of the genetic diversity of the order Chlamydiales. Remarkably, in most cases, it seems that each new piscine host studied has revealed the presence of a phylogenetically unique and novel chlamydial pathogen, providing researchers with a fascinating opportunity to understand the origin, evolution and adaptation of their traditional terrestrial chlamydial relatives. Despite the advances in this area, much still needs to be learnt about the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in fish if these pathogens are to be controlled in farmed environments. The lack of in vitro methods for culturing of chlamydial pathogens of fish is a major hindrance to this field. This review provides an update on our current knowledge of the taxonomy and diversity of chlamydial pathogens of fish, discusses the impact of these infections on the health, and highlights further areas of research required to understand the biology and epidemiology of this important emerging group of fish pathogens of aquaculture species.

  7. Chlamydial infections of fish: diverse pathogens and emerging causes of disease in aquaculture species.

    PubMed

    Stride, M C; Polkinghome, A; Nowak, B F

    2014-06-25

    Chlamydial infections of fish are emerging as an important cause of disease in new and established aquaculture industries. To date, epitheliocystis, a skin and gill disease associated with infection by these obligate intracellular pathogens, has been described in over 90 fish species, including hosts from marine and fresh water environments. Aided by advances in molecular detection and typing, recent years have seen an explosion in the description of these epitheliocystis-related chlamydial pathogens of fish, significantly broadening our knowledge of the genetic diversity of the order Chlamydiales. Remarkably, in most cases, it seems that each new piscine host studied has revealed the presence of a phylogenetically unique and novel chlamydial pathogen, providing researchers with a fascinating opportunity to understand the origin, evolution and adaptation of their traditional terrestrial chlamydial relatives. Despite the advances in this area, much still needs to be learnt about the epidemiology of chlamydial infections in fish if these pathogens are to be controlled in farmed environments. The lack of in vitro methods for culturing of chlamydial pathogens of fish is a major hindrance to this field. This review provides an update on our current knowledge of the taxonomy and diversity of chlamydial pathogens of fish, discusses the impact of these infections on the health, and highlights further areas of research required to understand the biology and epidemiology of this important emerging group of fish pathogens of aquaculture species.

  8. Comparison of Murine Cervicovaginal Infection by Chlamydial Strains: Identification of Extrusions Shed In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jennifer H.; Behar, Amanda R.; Snider, Timothy A.; Allen, Noah A.; Lutter, Erika I.

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and preventable blindness. Untreated, asymptomatic infection as well as frequent re-infection are common and may drive pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. In vivo models of chlamydial infection continue to be instrumental in progress toward a vaccine and further elucidating the pathogenesis of this intracellular bacterium, however significant gaps in our understanding remain. Chlamydial host cell exit occurs via two mechanisms, lysis and extrusion, although the latter has yet to be reported in vivo and its biological role is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate whether chlamydial extrusions are shed in vivo following infection with multiple strains of Chlamydia. We utilized an established C3H/HeJ murine cervicovaginal infection model with C. trachomatis serovars D and L2 and the Chlamydia muridarum strain MoPn to monitor the (i) time course of infection and mode of host cell exit, (ii) mucosal and systemic immune response to infection, and (iii) gross and histopathology following clearance of active infection. The key finding herein is the first identification of chlamydial extrusions shed from host cells in an in vivo model. Extrusions, a recently appreciated mode of host cell exit and potential means of dissemination, had been previously observed solely in vitro. The results of this study demonstrate that chlamydial extrusions exist in vivo and thus warrant further investigation to determine their role in chlamydial pathogenesis. PMID:28217555

  9. Screening for chlamydial infection: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    PubMed

    2007-07-17

    Update of 2001 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations about screening sexually active adolescents and adults for chlamydial infection. The USPSTF weighed the benefits (improved fertility, pregnancy outcomes, and infection transmission) and harms (anxiety, relationship problems, and unnecessary treatment of false-positive results) of chlamydial screening identified in their 2001 recommendations and the accompanying systematic review of English-language articles published between July 2000 and July 2005. Screen for chlamydial infection in all sexually active nonpregnant young women age 24 years or younger and for older nonpregnant women who are at increased risk. (A recommendation) Screen for chlamydial infection in all pregnant women age 24 years or younger and in older pregnant women who are at increased risk. (B recommendation) Do not routinely screen for chlamydial infection in women age 25 years or older, regardless of whether they are pregnant, if they are not at increased risk. (C recommendation) Current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydial infection for men. (I statement).

  10. Genital chlamydial infection: association between clinical features, organism genotype and load.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Hamid; Verlander, Neville Q; Kumar, Navin; Bentley, Neil; Carne, Christopher; Sonnex, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    The association between the clinical features of genital chlamydial infection and organism genotype and load was evaluated. Chlamydial DNA was detected and quantified in genital swabs from 233 (7 %) of 3384 consecutive patients attending a genitourinary medicine clinic. The chlamydia-positive subcohort comprised 132 (57 %) females and 101 (43 %) males. Clinical features were present in 33 % women and 72 % men. The chlamydial load was found to be higher in women (median load: 5.6 log) than men (median load: 3.5 log). Single variable analysis failed to show a significant association between chlamydial load and clinical features (P value = 0.3). Owing to the limited amount of clinical material, information on chlamydial genotypes was available for 70 % (n = 162) of chlamydia-positive patients. However, multivariable analysis of these samples did show a significant association between chlamydial load and clinical features (P value = 0.02). This discrepancy is most probably due to the difference in the amount of data analysed by single variable (data from 233 patients) and multivariable (data from 162 patients) analysis. The distribution of chlamydia genotypes was as follows: type E (46 %), F (22 %), D (8 %), K (8 %), G (7 %), J (4 %), I (1 %) and H (0.6 %). No statistically significant association was observed between chlamydial genotype and clinical features in either single variable (P value = 0.6) or multivariable (P value = 0.4) analysis. These findings suggest that chlamydial load and diversity in the ompA gene plays little, if any, role in the pathogenesis of genital chlamydial infection.

  11. Chlamydial Variants Differ in Ability To Ascend the Genital Tract in the Guinea Pig Model of Chlamydial Genital Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Bowlin, Anne K.; Spencer, Nicole; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    An important question in the study of chlamydial genital tract disease is why some women develop severe upper tract disease while others have mild or even “silent” infections with or without pathology. Animal studies suggest that the pathological outcome of an infection is dependent upon both the composition of the infecting chlamydial population and the genotype of the host, along with host physiological effects, such as the cyclical production of reproductive hormones and even the size of the infecting inoculum or the number of repeated infections. In this study, we compared two variants of Chlamydia caviae, contrasting in virulence, with respect to their abilities to ascend the guinea pig genital tract. We then determined the effect of combining the two variants on the course of infection and on the bacterial loads of the two variants in the genital tract. Although the variants individually had similar infection kinetics in the cervix, SP6, the virulent variant, could be isolated from the oviducts more often and in greater numbers than the attenuated variant, AZ2. SP6 also elicited higher levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) in the lower genital tract and increased leukocyte infiltration in the cervix and uterus compared to AZ2. When the two variants were combined in a mixed infection, SP6 outcompeted AZ2 in the lower genital tract; however, AZ2 was able to ascend the genital tract as readily as SP6. These data suggest that the ability of SP6 to elicit an inflammatory response in the lower genital tract facilitates the spread of both variants to the oviducts. PMID:26015484

  12. Factors associated with genital chlamydial and gonococcal infection in females.

    PubMed

    Hart, G

    1992-08-01

    Predictors of chlamydia and gonorrhoea can be used to increase the cost-effectiveness and acceptability of screening programmes, and allow targeting of control strategies. All women attending an STD clinic in 1988-1990 were offered screening for chlamydia and gonorrhoea, and the test results correlated with a wide range of potential predictors using multiple logistic regression. Of 4822 attenders, 3533 (73.3%) were tested for chlamydia over a total of 5430 episodes, yielding 348 (6.4%) positives, and 3510 (72.8%) were tested for gonorrhoea over a total of 5450 episodes, yielding 100 (1.0%) positives. Independent predictors of chlamydial infection were being an STD contact, having endocervical gonorrhoea, being under 25, not having genital herpes, being Aboriginal, using oral contraception, not having a steady partner and having vaginal discharge or dysuria. For gonorrhoea such predictors were being Aboriginal, an STD contact, under 25, tattooed, having vaginal discharge or dysuria, and having had sex outside the state in the past three months. Selective screening criteria for gonorrhoea provided 91% of positives, eliminated the need for 42% of tests and resulted in an increased yield ratio of 1.5 whereas the corresponding outcomes for screening criteria for chlamydia were 91%, 29% and 1.3, respectively. The diversity of STD epidemiology requires development of empirical screening guidelines for diverse settings. Standardisation of methodology to facilitate comparisons and extrapolation should include investigation of a wide range of variables, available before patient examination, by multivariate analysis, and choice of selective criteria to cover at least 90% of the infected population as well as resulting in a substantially increased yield (preferably an increased yield ratio of at least 1.5).

  13. Factors associated with genital chlamydial and gonococcal infection in females.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, G

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Predictors of chlamydia and gonorrhoea can be used to increase the cost-effectiveness and acceptability of screening programmes, and allow targeting of control strategies. METHODS--All women attending an STD clinic in 1988-1990 were offered screening for chlamydia and gonorrhoea, and the test results correlated with a wide range of potential predictors using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS--Of 4822 attenders, 3533 (73.3%) were tested for chlamydia over a total of 5430 episodes, yielding 348 (6.4%) positives, and 3510 (72.8%) were tested for gonorrhoea over a total of 5450 episodes, yielding 100 (1.0%) positives. Independent predictors of chlamydial infection were being an STD contact, having endocervical gonorrhoea, being under 25, not having genital herpes, being Aboriginal, using oral contraception, not having a steady partner and having vaginal discharge or dysuria. For gonorrhoea such predictors were being Aboriginal, an STD contact, under 25, tattooed, having vaginal discharge or dysuria, and having had sex outside the state in the past three months. Selective screening criteria for gonorrhoea provided 91% of positives, eliminated the need for 42% of tests and resulted in an increased yield ratio of 1.5 whereas the corresponding outcomes for screening criteria for chlamydia were 91%, 29% and 1.3, respectively. CONCLUSIONS--The diversity of STD epidemiology requires development of empirical screening guidelines for diverse settings. Standardisation of methodology to facilitate comparisons and extrapolation should include investigation of a wide range of variables, available before patient examination, by multivariate analysis, and choice of selective criteria to cover at least 90% of the infected population as well as resulting in a substantially increased yield (preferably an increased yield ratio of at least 1.5). PMID:1398655

  14. Risk Behaviors, Medical Care, and Chlamydial Infection Among Young Men in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Leighton; St. Louis, Michael; Farshy, Carol; Aral, Sevgi; Turner, Charles F.; Lindberg, Laura D.; Sonenstein, Freya

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed factors related to chlamydial infection among young men in the United States. Methods. Data were from interviews of nationally representative samples of 470 men aged 18 to 19 years (teenagers) and 995 men aged 22 to 26 years (young adults) and from urine specimens tested by means of polymerase chain reaction. Results. Although a majority of the men reported occasional unprotected intercourse, only a minority perceived themselves to be at risk for contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Chlamydial infection was detected in 3.1% of the teenagers and 4.5% of the young adults. A minority of those infected had symptoms or had been tested for STDs; very few had been diagnosed with STDs. Conclusions. Chlamydial infection is common but usually asymptomatic and undiagnosed. Primary and secondary prevention efforts should be increased, particularly among young adult men. (Am J Public Health. 2002;92:1140–1143) PMID:12084698

  15. PCR-based detection of chlamydial infection in swine and subsequent PCR-coupled genotyping of chlamydial omp1-gene amplicons by DNA-hybridization, RFLP-analysis, and nucleotide sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoelzle, L. E.; Steinhausen, G.; Wittenbrink, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Lung and intestine of 49 pigs with respiratory diseases and endocervical swabs from 205 sows with reproductive disorders were investigated for chlamydial infection by polymerase chain reaction. PCR primers targeted DNA sequences on the chlamydial omp1 or omp2 genes. PCR amplicons were generated from 49.0% of pigs with respiratory disease, from 60.0% of sows with reproductive disorders, from 24.5% of respiratory healthy controls, but from no endocervical swabs from fertile sows. By DNA hybridization, a high prevalence of mixed infections with Chlamydophila abortus and Chlamydia suis in the porcine lung and intestine was found and confirmed by RFLP and nucleotide analysis. Of the omp1-PCR amplicons from endocervical swabs 81.3% were identified as Chlamydophila abortus, indicating an association of this chlamydial species with reproductive disorders in sows. Nucleotide sequence analysis of omp1-amplicons identified as deriving from Chlamydia suis shared a maximum of 82.7% homology with the reference strain S45. PMID:11117968

  16. Lack of an effect of antibiotic treatment on prolonged detection of chlamydial DNA in murine genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Dawn M; Nagarajan, Uma; O'Connell, Catherine; Andrews, Charles W; Darville, Toni

    2007-07-01

    Mice treated with antibiotics early or late after active infection had resolved were examined for chlamydial DNA in endocervical swabs. The early eradication of infection limited oviduct pathology, despite the continued detection of chlamydial DNA by nested PCR. Late antibiotic treatment had no effect on the ability to detect DNA or oviduct pathology.

  17. Laboratory techniques for the diagnosis of chlamydial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Thomas, B J

    1991-01-01

    value of examining urine may be less, but needs to be thoroughly tested. However, there is little doubt that a Cytobrush used to obtain cervical specimens holds no practical advantage over a swab. Serological tests are reliant on the provision of paired sera for making a diagnosis; high antibody titres in single sera may be suggestive of an aetiological association in deep-seated chlamydial infections (epididymitis, arthritis, salpingitis, etc), but unequivocal interpretation is unusual, particularly in an individual case, since the distinction between a current and past infection is problematical. PMID:2071132

  18. Effect of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection of female guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Rank, R G; White, H J; Hough, A J; Pasley, J N; Barron, A L

    1982-01-01

    Female guinea pigs were treated daily with 1 mg of beta-estradiol-3-benzoate intramuscularly beginning 14 days before intravaginal inoculation with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis and continuing during the course of the infection. Treatment with estradiol was found to markedly influence the course of genital infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis, producing infections of greater intensity and longer duration than those in control animals. Moreover, pathogenesis was altered in that ascending infection was observed, resulting in endometritis, cystic salpingitis, and cystitis. Infection in the controls was limited to the cervix and vagina. Estradiol treatment increased the apparent number of infected cells in the cervix and vagina as detected by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis were comparable in estradiol-treated and untreated animals. These data indicate that hormonal manipulation may have profound effects on the course of chlamydial genital infections. Images PMID:7141709

  19. Effect of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection of female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Rank, R G; White, H J; Hough, A J; Pasley, J N; Barron, A L

    1982-11-01

    Female guinea pigs were treated daily with 1 mg of beta-estradiol-3-benzoate intramuscularly beginning 14 days before intravaginal inoculation with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis and continuing during the course of the infection. Treatment with estradiol was found to markedly influence the course of genital infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis, producing infections of greater intensity and longer duration than those in control animals. Moreover, pathogenesis was altered in that ascending infection was observed, resulting in endometritis, cystic salpingitis, and cystitis. Infection in the controls was limited to the cervix and vagina. Estradiol treatment increased the apparent number of infected cells in the cervix and vagina as detected by histopathology and immunofluorescent staining. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis were comparable in estradiol-treated and untreated animals. These data indicate that hormonal manipulation may have profound effects on the course of chlamydial genital infections.

  20. Chlamydial infections in wildlife-conservation threats and/or reservoirs of 'spill-over' infections?

    PubMed

    Burnard, Delaney; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2016-11-30

    Members of the order Chlamydiales are biphasic intracellular pathogens known to cause disease in both humans and animals. As we learn more about the genetic diversity of this group of pathogens, evidence is growing that these bacteria infect a broader range of animal hosts than previously thought. Over 400 host species are now documented globally with the majority of these being wild animals. Given the impact of chlamydial infections on humans and domesticated animals, the identification of members of the order Chlamydiales in wildlife raises significant questions over a) their impact on animal health and b) the relationships to those strains also found in humans and domestic animals. In some species such as the iconic marsupial, the koala, the conservation impact is known with chlamydial infections associated with debilitating disease, however, in general, little is known about the pathogenic potential of Chlamydiae infecting most wildlife hosts. Accumulating evidence suggests contact with wild animals is a risk factor for infections in domestic animals and/or humans. Beyond the well-recognised zoonotic pathogen, Chlamydia psittaci, a range of studies have now reported traditional pathogens in the family Chlamydiaceae such as Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Chlamydia abortus in wild animals. The spectre of cross-host transmission 'spill-over' and 'spill-back' in the epidemiology of infections is of potential concern, however, comprehensive epidemiological studies are lacking for most of these. Accurate evaluation of the significance of chlamydial infections in wildlife is otherwise hampered by i) the cross-sectional nature of most impact studies, ii) a lack of standardised diagnostic approaches, iii) limited study sizes, and iv) biases associated with opportunistic sampling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Imbalanced oxidative stress causes chlamydial persistence during non-productive human herpes virus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Bhupesh K; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance.

  2. Recommendations for partner services programs for HIV infection, syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    2008-11-07

    This report provides updated, integrated recommendations for services provided to partners of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and three other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) (i.e., syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydial infection) and replaces the CDC 2001 Program Operations Guidelines for STD Prevention---Partner Services and the 1998 HIV Partner Counseling and Referral Services Guidance. These recommendations are intended for health department program managers responsible for overseeing partner services programs for HIV infection and the three other STDs at the state and local levels. The recommendations also might be beneficial for HIV prevention community planning groups, STD program advisory bodies, technical assistance providers, community-based organizations, and clinical care providers. The value of partner services in the control of syphilis and gonorrhea is widely accepted. However, such services are underused among partners of persons with HIV infection. On the basis of evidence of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these services, CDC strongly recommends that all persons with newly diagnosed or reported HIV infection or early syphilis receive partner services with active health department involvement. Persons with a diagnosis of, or who are reported with, gonorrhea or chlamydial infection also are suitable candidates for partner services; however, resource limitations and the numerous cases of these infections might preclude direct health department involvement in certain instances. Health departments might need to limit direct involvement in partner services for gonorrhea and chlamydial infection to selected high-priority cases and use other strategies for the remainder (e.g., expedited partner therapy). These recommendations highlight the importance of program collaboration and service integration in the provision of partner services. Because coinfection with HIV and one or more other STDs is common, all persons with a

  3. [Treatment of chronic prostatitis caused by chlamydial and ureaplasmic infection and complicated with male infertility].

    PubMed

    Kalinina, S N; Tiktinskiĭ, O L

    2010-01-01

    Etiologically, chronic prostatitis can result from urogenital latent infections caused by chlamydia, ureaplasma and others. First of all, such patients should be examined for urethritis. We examined 306 patients aged 23-45 years with chronic prostatitis caused by chlamydial and ureaplasmic infection. The samples were taken from the urethra, urine, prostatic secretion, ejaculate and were examined using direct immunofluorescence, polymerase chain reaction, culturing. We found spermatogenetic disorders in 50% patients, 35 (11.4%) patients had a deferent duct obstruction. The patients had also immunointerferon deficiency and alterations in prostatic echostructure. In chronic prostatitis caused by chlamydial-ureaplasmic infection the treatment must combine antibacterial drugs (vilprophen, unidox, solutab) with interferons (lavomax, genferon). Male infertility treatment should be started only after elimination of the bacterial infection.

  4. Management of genital chlamydial infections at termination of pregnancy services in England and Wales: where are we now?

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, D Scott; Pimenta, Jeanne M; Fenton, Kevin A; Mallinson, Harry; Hopwood, Jenny

    2004-12-01

    To determine the range of policies and practices related to the management of genital chlamydial infection employed at termination of pregnancy services in England and Wales. Cross-sectional descriptive study. England and Wales. Termination of pregnancy providers. Survey questionnaire administered to termination of pregnancy providers. Policies and practices for the management of genital chlamydial infection in women seeking termination of pregnancy with comparison to the national guidelines of the chief medical officer (CMO) and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). One hundred and thirty-eight (48%) practices responded to the survey, with representation across England and Wales. Policies for screening and/or treatment of chlamydial infection existed for 70% of providers. We found three practice patterns for the management of genital chlamydial infection among termination of pregnancy attenders: 70% of providers tested their own attenders prior to termination and treated if necessary; about 25% of providers administered prophylaxis without testing; and a small number of providers (< 5%) neither tested nor treated attenders. These patterns may be the result of differences in the CMO and RCOG guidelines. Given the impact of untreated genital chlamydial infection in women attending for termination, consistent recommendations from the CMO and RCOG may encourage uniform practice for the management of chlamydial infection in this vulnerable population.

  5. Prevalence of Chlamydial Infections in Fattening Pigs and Their Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Karolin; Schott, Franziska; Donati, Manuela; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Hässig, Michael; Wanninger, Sabrina; Sidler, Xaver; Borel, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydial infections in pigs are associated with respiratory disease, diarrhea, conjunctivitis and other pathologies. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of Chlamydiaceae in Swiss fattening pigs by applying sensitive and specific detection methods and to correlate prior antibiotic treatment and farm related factors with differences in prevalence. Conjunctival and fecal swabs were collected from 636 pigs in 29 Swiss fattening pig farms with and without antibiotic treatment, at the beginning and the end of the fattening period. The swabs were screened by real-time PCR for Chlamydiaceae. For the chlamydial detection and species-identification, a DNA-microarray analysis was performed. All farms were positive for Chlamydiaceae with 94.3 and 92.0% prevalence in fecal swabs as well as 45.9 and 32.6% in conjunctival swabs at the first and second time points, respectively. Antibiotic treatment could not clear the infection on herd level. Potential contact with wild boars was a significant risk factor, while hygiene criteria did not influence chlamydial prevalence. A correlation of chlamydial positivity to diarrhea, but not to conjunctivitis was evident. Chlamydia suis was the predominant species. Mixed infections with C. suis and C. pecorum were common, with a substantial increase in C. pecorum positivity at the end of the fattening period, and this finding was associated with ruminant contact. C. abortus was detected in one conjunctival swab. In this study, C. suis inhabited the intestinal tract of nearly all examined pigs, implying a long-term infection. C. pecorum was also common and might be transmitted to pigs by ruminants. PMID:26619187

  6. Persistent and acute chlamydial infections induce different structural changes in the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiling; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Pu; Chen, Mukai; Huang, Zengwei; Li, Kunpeng; Li, Yinyin; He, Jian; Han, Jiande; Zhang, Qinfen

    2014-07-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes a wide range of diseases that have a significant impact on public health. Acute chlamydial infections can cause fragmentation of the Golgi compartment ensuring the lipid transportation from the host cell. However, the changes that occur in the host cell Golgi apparatus after persistent infections are unclear. Here, we examined Golgi-associated gene (golga5) transcription and expression along with the structure of the Golgi apparatus in cells persistently infected with Chlamydia trachomatis. The results showed that persistent infections caused little fragmentation of the Golgi. The results also revealed that Golgi fragmentation might be associated with the suppression of transcription of the gene golga5.

  7. Chlamydial infection of the gastrointestinal tract: a reservoir for persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Spencer, Nicole; Bowlin, Anne K.; Wang, Yin; Rank, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which chlamydiae persist in vivo remains undefined; however, chlamydiae in most animals persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and are transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Oral infection of mice with Chlamydia muridarum was previously shown to establish a long-term persistent infection in the GI tract. In this study, BALB/c, DBA/2 and C57Bl/6 mice, infected orally with C. muridarum, were infected in the cecum for as long as 100 days in the absence of pathology. The primary target tissue was the cecum although the large intestine was also infected in most animals. A strong serum IgG and cecal IgA antibody response developed. Lymphocyte proliferation assays to chlamydial antigen on mesenteric lymph node cells were positive by day 10 and peaked on days 15–21, but the response returned to baseline levels by 50 days, despite the ongoing presence of the organism in the cecum. Since studies have shown that women and men become infected orally with chlamydiae, we propose that the GI tract is a site of persistent infection and that immune down-regulation in the gut allows chlamydiae to persist indefinitely. As a result, women may become reinfected via contamination of the genital tract from the lower GI tract. PMID:23843274

  8. Water-Filtered Infrared A Irradiation in Combination with Visible Light Inhibits Acute Chlamydial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Hanna; Koschwanez, Maria; Pesch, Theresa; Blenn, Christian; Borel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome drawbacks in treatment of infections with intracellular bacteria. Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative bacteria implicated in acute and chronic diseases such as abortion in animals and trachoma in humans. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) is short wavelength infrared radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. In clinical settings, wIRA alone and in combination with visible light (VIS) has proven its efficacy in acute and chronic wound healing processes. This is the first study to demonstrate that wIRA irradiation combined with VIS (wIRA/VIS) diminishes recovery of infectious elementary bodies (EBs) of both intra- and extracellular Chlamydia (C.) in two different cell lines (Vero, HeLa) regardless of the chlamydial strain (C. pecorum, C. trachomatis serovar E) as shown by indirect immunofluorescence and titration by subpassage. Moreover, a single exposure to wIRA/VIS at 40 hours post infection (hpi) led to a significant reduction of C. pecorum inclusion frequency in Vero cells and C. trachomatis in HeLa cells, respectively. A triple dose of irradiation (24, 36, 40 hpi) during the course of C. trachomatis infection further reduced chlamydial inclusion frequency in HeLa cells without inducing the chlamydial persistence/stress response, as ascertained by electron microscopy. Irradiation of host cells (HeLa, Vero) neither affected cell viability nor induced any molecular markers of cytotoxicity as investigated by Alamar blue assay and Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection, irradiation, and the combination of both showed a similar release pattern of a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines (MIF/GIF, Serpin E1, RANTES, IL-6, IL-8) and chemokines (IL-16, IP-10, ENA-78, MIG, MIP-1α/β) from host cells. Initial investigation into the mechanism indicated possible thermal effects on Chlamydia due to irradiation. In summary, we demonstrate a non-chemical reduction of chlamydial infection using the combination of water

  9. Water-filtered infrared a irradiation in combination with visible light inhibits acute chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Marti, Hanna; Koschwanez, Maria; Pesch, Theresa; Blenn, Christian; Borel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed to overcome drawbacks in treatment of infections with intracellular bacteria. Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative bacteria implicated in acute and chronic diseases such as abortion in animals and trachoma in humans. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) is short wavelength infrared radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. In clinical settings, wIRA alone and in combination with visible light (VIS) has proven its efficacy in acute and chronic wound healing processes. This is the first study to demonstrate that wIRA irradiation combined with VIS (wIRA/VIS) diminishes recovery of infectious elementary bodies (EBs) of both intra- and extracellular Chlamydia (C.) in two different cell lines (Vero, HeLa) regardless of the chlamydial strain (C. pecorum, C. trachomatis serovar E) as shown by indirect immunofluorescence and titration by subpassage. Moreover, a single exposure to wIRA/VIS at 40 hours post infection (hpi) led to a significant reduction of C. pecorum inclusion frequency in Vero cells and C. trachomatis in HeLa cells, respectively. A triple dose of irradiation (24, 36, 40 hpi) during the course of C. trachomatis infection further reduced chlamydial inclusion frequency in HeLa cells without inducing the chlamydial persistence/stress response, as ascertained by electron microscopy. Irradiation of host cells (HeLa, Vero) neither affected cell viability nor induced any molecular markers of cytotoxicity as investigated by Alamar blue assay and Western blot analysis. Chlamydial infection, irradiation, and the combination of both showed a similar release pattern of a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines (MIF/GIF, Serpin E1, RANTES, IL-6, IL-8) and chemokines (IL-16, IP-10, ENA-78, MIG, MIP-1α/β) from host cells. Initial investigation into the mechanism indicated possible thermal effects on Chlamydia due to irradiation. In summary, we demonstrate a non-chemical reduction of chlamydial infection using the combination of water

  10. Immunobiological outcomes of repeated chlamydial infection from two models of within-host population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vickers, David M; Zhang, Qian; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2009-09-03

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a common human pathogen that mediates disease processes capable of inflicting serious complications on reproduction. Aggressive inflammatory immune responses are thought to not only direct a person's level of immunity but also the potential for immunopathology. With human immunobiology being debated as a cause of prevailing epidemiological trends, we examined some fundamental issues regarding susceptibility to multiple chlamydial infections that could have implications for infection spread. We argue that, compared to less-frequent exposure, frequent exposure to chlamydia may well produce unique immunobiological characteristics that likely to have important clinical and epidemiological implications. As a novel tool for studying chlamydia, we applied principles of modeling within-host pathogen dynamics to enable an understanding of some fundamental characteristics of an individual's immunobiology during multiple chlamydial infections. While the models were able to reproduce shorter-term infection kinetics of primary and secondary infections previously observed in animal models, it was also observed that longer periods between initial and second infection may increase an individual's chlamydial load and lengthen their duration of infectiousness. The cessation of short-term repeated exposure did not allow for the formation of long-lasting immunity. However, frequent re-exposure non-intuitively linked the formation of protective immunity, persistent infection, and the potential for immunopathology. Overall, these results provide interesting insights that should be verified with continued study. Nevertheless, these results appear to raise challenges for current evidence of the development of long-lasting immunity against chlamydia, and suggest the existence of a previously unidentified mechanism for the formation of persistent infection. The obvious next goal is to investigate the qualitative impact of these results on the spread of chlamydia.

  11. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and the risk of incident gonococcal or chlamydial genital infection in a predominantly black population.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B; Kip, Kevin E; Soper, David E; Hillier, Sharon; Stamm, Carol A; Sweet, Richard L; Rice, Peter; Richter, Holley E

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess in prospective data whether bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with gonococcal/chlamydial cervicitis. A total of 1179 women at high risk for sexually transmitted infections was followed for a median of 3 years. Every 6 to 12 months, vaginal swabs were obtained for Gram stain, culture of microflora, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. A Gram stain score of 7 to 10 based on the Nugent criteria categorized BV. Baseline BV was associated with concurrent gonococcal/chlamydial infection (adjusted odds ratio, 2.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81-4.42). However, the association between BV and subsequent, incident gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection was not significant (adjusted relative risk [RR], 1.52; 95% CI, 0.74-3.13). Dense growth of pigmented, anaerobic Gram-negative rods (adjusted RR, 1.93; 95% CI, 0.97-3.83) appeared to elevate the risk for newly acquired gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection. BV was common among a predominantly black group of women with concurrent gonococcal/chlamydial infection but did not elevate the risk for incident infection.

  12. The contribution of temperature, exposure intensity and visible light to the inhibitory effect of irradiation on acute chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Marti, Hanna; Blenn, Christian; Borel, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) is radiation with a spectrum ranging from 780 to 1400 nm. Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacteria associated with various diseases in both animals and humans. A recent in vitro study demonstrated that wIRA combined with visible light (wIRA/VIS) has potential as a non-chemical method for the treatment of chlamydial infections without adversely affecting the cell viability. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of various factors on the effect of wIRA/VIS on acute chlamydial infection, namely the impact of temperature, exposure intensity and infectious dose (multiplicity of infection) as well as the efficacy of the visible light component.We demonstrate that non-thermal effects contribute to the inhibition of acute chlamydial infection. Visible light enhances the inhibitory effect of wIRA on extracellular bacteria (elementary bodies or EBs).Moreover, the inhibitory effect of wIRA/VIS following treatment of EBs prior to infection correlated with increased irradiation intensity. The infectivity of mature chlamydial inclusions was significantly reduced upon wIRA/VIS exposure at all irradiation intensities investigated, suggesting the contribution of host cell factors to the anti-chlamydial effect of wIRA/VIS in the late stage of the developmental cycle. The effect of irradiation was not influenced by the infectious dose.

  13. Douching, pelvic inflammatory disease, and incident gonococcal and chlamydial genital infection in a cohort of high-risk women.

    PubMed

    Ness, Roberta B; Hillier, Sharon L; Kip, Kevin E; Richter, Holly E; Soper, David E; Stamm, Carol A; McGregor, James A; Bass, Debra C; Rice, Peter; Sweet, Richard L

    2005-01-15

    Douching has been linked to gonococcal or chlamydial cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in retrospective studies. The authors conducted a 1999-2004 prospective observational study of 1,199 US women who were at high risk of acquiring chlamydia and were followed for up to 4 years. Cervical Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis were detected from vaginal swabs by nucleic acid amplification. PID was characterized by histologic endometritis or pelvic pain and tenderness plus one of the following: oral temperature >38.3 degrees C, leukorrhea or mucopus, erythrocyte sedimentation rate >15 mm/hour, white blood cell count >10,000, or gonococcal/chlamydial lower genital tract infection. Associations between douching and PID or gonococcal/chlamydial genital infections were assessed by proportional hazards models. The 4-year incidence rate of PID was 10.9% and of gonococcal and/or chlamydial cervicitis was 21.9%. After adjustment for confounding factors, douching two or more times per month at baseline was associated with neither PID (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.76, 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 1.38) nor gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.16, 95% confidence interval: 0.76, 1.78). Frequency of douching immediately preceding PID or gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection was not different between women who developed versus did not develop outcomes. These data do not support an association between douching and development of PID or gonococcal/chlamydial genital infection among predominantly young, African-American women.

  14. High frequency of chlamydial co-infections in clinically healthy sheep flocks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidemiological situation of ovine chlamydial infections in continental Europe, especially Germany is poorly characterised. Using the German state of Thuringia as a model example, the chlamydial sero- and antigen prevalence was estimated in thirty-two randomly selected sheep flocks with an average abortion rate lower than 1%. Seven vaccinated flocks were reviewed separately. Results A wide range of samples from 32 flocks were examined. Assumption of a seroprevalence of 10% (CI 95%) at flock level, revealed that 94% of the tested flocks were serologically positive with ongoing infection (i.e. animals with seroconversion) in nearly half (47%) of the flocks. On the basis of an estimated 25% antigen prevalence (CI 95%), PCR and DNA microarray testing, together with sequencing revealed the presence of chlamydiae in 78% of the flocks. The species most frequently found was Chlamydophila (C.) abortus (50%) followed by C. pecorum (47%) and C. psittaci genotype A (25%). Mixed infections occurred in 25% of the tested flocks. Samples obtained from the vaccinated flocks revealed the presence of C. abortus field samples in 4/7 flocks. C. pecorum was isolated from 2/7 flocks and the presence of seroconversion was determined in 3/7 flocks. Conclusions The results imply that chlamydial infections occur frequently in German sheep flocks, even in the absence of elevated abortion rates. The fact that C. pecorum and the potentially zoonotic C. psittaci were found alongside the classical abortifacient agent C. abortus, raise questions about the significance of this reservoir for animal and human health and underline the necessity for regular monitoring. Further studies are needed to identify the possible role of C. psittaci infections in sheep. PMID:21679409

  15. Imbalanced Oxidative Stress Causes Chlamydial Persistence during Non-Productive Human Herpes Virus Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Bhupesh K.; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance. PMID:23077614

  16. Targeted Delivery of Antibiotics to Intracellular Chlamydial Infections using PLGA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Toti, Udaya S.; Guru, Bharath R.; Hali, Mirabela; McPharlin, Christopher; Wykes, Susan M.; Panyam, Jayanth; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and C pneumoniae are intracellular bacterial pathogens that have been shown to cause, or are strongly associated with, diverse chronic diseases. Persistent infections by both organisms are refractory to antibiotic therapy. The lack of therapeutic efficacy results from the attenuated metabolic rate of persistently infecting chlamydiae in combination with the modest intracellular drug concentrations achievable by normal delivery of antibiotics to the inclusions within which chlamydiae reside in the host cell cytoplasm. In this research, we evaluated whether nanoparticles formulated using the biodegradable poly(d-L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymer can enhance the delivery of antibiotics to the chlamydial inclusion complexes. We initially studied the trafficking of PLGA nanoparticles in Chlamydia-infected cells. We then evaluated nanoparticles for the delivery of antibiotics to the inclusions. Intracellular trafficking studies show that PLGA nanoparticles efficiently concentrate in inclusions in both acutely and persistently infected cells. Further, encapsulation of rifampin and azithromycin antibiotics in PLGA nanoparticles enhanced the effectiveness of the antibiotics in reducing microbial burden. Combination of rifampin and azithromycin was more effective than the individual drugs. Overall, our studies show that PLGA nanoparticles can be effective carriers for targeted delivery of antibiotics to intracellular chlamydial infections. PMID:21652065

  17. Absence of progesterone effects on chlamydial genital infection in female guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of progesterone alone and in combination with estradiol was investigated in ovariectomized and gonadally intact female guinea pigs infected with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). The course of the infection, as determined by the percentage of cells with GPIC (chlamydia) inclusions in Giemsa-stained vaginal scrapings, was not affected in animals receiving 5.0 mg of progesterone daily. Progesterone had no influence on the enhancement of infection by estradiol. In comparison with sesame oil-treated controls, infection was prolonged by four to six days (P less than .05) in animals receiving a combination of 5.0 mg of progesterone plus 1.0 microgram of estradiol or 1.0 microgram of estradiol alone each day. In ovariectomized animals, estradiol delayed the appearance of IgA antibody in genital secretions, whereas progesterone alone had no effect. Guinea pigs treated with estradiol or progesterone plus estradiol manifested an acute endometritis not observed in animals treated with progesterone alone or in controls receiving sesame oil. Although cervical ectopy, analogous to that seen in women with high levels of progesterone, was identified by histopathology in animals treated with progesterone, no enhancement of the chlamydial infection was observed.

  18. The frequency of gonorrheal and chlamydial infections in Zanjanian women in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Behnaz; Mohmmadian, Farnaz; Eftekhar, Maryam; Hatami, Robabeh; Tirkan, Atefe; Kiani, Mahsa

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in women. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of gonorrheal and chlamydial infections and determination of related risk factors in married women with vaginal discharge attending gynecological outpatient department (OPD) in Zanjan in 2013-2014. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 100 married women aged 18-49 years with vaginal discharge were evaluated for signs and symptoms of gonococcal and chlamydial infections. Then cervical discharge samples and blood samples were collected from each subject for the detection of Nisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis by bacterial culture and serological tests, respectively. Results: The overall prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and Nisseria gonorrhoeae were 16% and 4%, respectively. There was no significant relationship between the contraception methods, previous history of vaginal infections, previous history of urinary tract infections, number of coitus per week and self-reported symptoms (itching, burning, abdominal pain) with prevalence of Nisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Conclusion: According to our results, the prevalence of gonococci infection in Zanjan was remarkable and relatively was higher than other parts of Iran, therefore it is necessary to put emphasis on education and further preventive and therapeutic programs. PMID:28462398

  19. Efficacy and safety of azithromycin versus lymecyline in the treatment of genital chlamydial infections in women.

    PubMed

    Brihmer, C; Mårdh, P A; Kallings, I; Osser, S; Röbech, M; Sikström, B; Wanger, L

    1996-01-01

    To compare the clinical and microbiological efficacy of azithromycin in curing chlamydial infections in women with that of lymecycline, and with a view of the possibility of minimizing the problem of compliance by means of single-dose administration, 146 women with culture-positive Chlamydia trachomatis infections were randomly assigned to treatment with a 1 g bolus dose of azithromycin or a 10-day course of lymecycline 300 mg twice daily. Clinical and microbiological evaluations were performed and adverse effects monitored at check-ups after 15-35 and 40-65 days. Of the 146 patients enrolled in the study, 120 were evaluable. At the second check-up, C. trachomatis was found to have been eradicated in all patients in both treatment groups. Of the 51 patients who had clinical signs and symptoms of genital infection at enrolment, 96% (22/23) of those in the azithromycin group were considered cured (n = 18) or improved (n = 4), as compared with 100% (28/28) of those considered cured (n = 22) or improved (n = 6) in the lymecycline group. Adverse events related, or possibly related, to treatment were reported by 16 (21.6%) of the lymecycline group, but by only 6 (8.3%) of the azithromycin group. The 2 drugs were comparable with regard to microbiological and clinical efficacy in the treatment of genital chlamydial infection in women. The markedly lower rate of side-effects associated with azithromycin may be a feature conducive to patient compliance.

  20. [Analysis of parameters of reproductive tract mucosal immunity in women with chlamydial infection before and after local magnetolaserotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gizinger, O A; Dolgushin, I I; Letiaeva, O I

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of combined treatment with low-intensity laser radiation and magnetic field on neutrophil function in women presenting with Chlamydial infection. Dysfunction of neutrophil granulocytes in these patients was manifest in the first place as the decreased number of phagocytes and the low rate of phagocytosis. It was shown that the concentration of active oxygen species in neutrophils in the patients with Chlamydial infection was significantly smaller than in healthy women. The concurrent application of low-intensity laser radiation and a magnetic field not only stimulated phagocytosis but also increased intracellular production of active oxygen species especially under in vitro conditions. It is concluded that combined treatment with low-intensity laser radiation and magnetic field has beneficial effect on the parameters of mucosal immunity in the reproductive tract of women with Chlamydial infection.

  1. Trachoma and Ocular Chlamydial Infection in the Era of Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Derrick, Tamsyn; Roberts, Chrissy h.; Last, Anna R.; Burr, Sarah E.; Holland, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Trachoma is a blinding disease usually caused by infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) serovars A, B, and C in the upper tarsal conjunctiva. Individuals in endemic regions are repeatedly infected with Ct throughout childhood. A proportion of individuals experience prolonged or severe inflammatory episodes that are known to be significant risk factors for ocular scarring in later life. Continued scarring often leads to trichiasis and in-turning of the eyelashes, which causes pain and can eventually cause blindness. The mechanisms driving the chronic immunopathology in the conjunctiva, which largely progresses in the absence of detectable Ct infection in adults, are likely to be multifactorial. Socioeconomic status, education, and behavior have been identified as contributing to the risk of scarring and inflammation. We focus on the contribution of host and pathogen genetic variation, bacterial ecology of the conjunctiva, and host epigenetic imprinting including small RNA regulation by both host and pathogen in the development of ocular pathology. Each of these factors or processes contributes to pathogenic outcomes in other inflammatory diseases and we outline their potential role in trachoma. PMID:26424969

  2. Effects of various doses of estradiol on chlamydial genital infection in ovariectomized guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Pasley, J N; Rank, R G; Hough, A J; Cohen, C; Barron, A L

    1985-01-01

    The effect of various doses of estradiol on genital tract infection by the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) was investigated in ovariectomized guinea pigs. Prolongation of infection, as determined by chlamydial inclusion counts of cells in Giemsa-stained smears of vaginal scrapings, was observed in animals receiving daily doses of 1.0, 10.0, 100.0, or 1000 micrograms of estradiol. In contrast to controls, ascending infection resulting in endometritis was found in animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram of estradiol per day. Response to estradiol treatment was reflected in an increase in cervical-uterine wet weight and uterine wall thickness. No differences were observed in time of appearance of antibody titers to GPIC in serum, but a delay in appearance of IgA antibody to GPIC in genital secretions was found in estradiol-treated animals receiving doses of greater than or equal to 1.0 microgram per day.

  3. Infectivity acts as in vivo selection for maintenance of the chlamydial cryptic plasmid.

    PubMed

    Russell, Marsha; Darville, Toni; Chandra-Kuntal, Kumar; Smith, Bennett; Andrews, Charles W; O'Connell, Catherine M

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis contains a conserved ∼7.5-kb plasmid. Loss of the plasmid results in reduced glycogen accumulation, failure to activate TLR2, and reduced infectivity. We hypothesized that reduced infectivity functions as a means of selection for plasmid maintenance. We directly examined the biological significance of the reduced infectivity associated with plasmid deficiency by determining the relative fitness of plasmid-deficient CM972 versus that of wild-type C. muridarum Nigg in mixed inocula in vitro and in vivo. C. muridarum Nigg rapidly out-competed its plasmid-cured derivative CM972 in vitro but was not competitive with CM3.1, a derivative of CM972 that has reverted to a normal infectivity phenotype. C. muridarum Nigg also effectively competed with CM972 during lower and upper genital tract infection in the mouse, demonstrating that strong selective pressure for plasmid maintenance occurs during infection. The severity of oviduct inflammation and dilatation resulting from these mixed infections correlated directly with the amount of C. muridarum Nigg in the initial inoculum, confirming the role of the plasmid in virulence. Genetic characterization of CM972 and CM3.1 revealed no additional mutations (other than loss of the plasmid) to account for the reduced infectivity of CM972 and detected a single base substitution in TC_0236 in CM3.1 that may be responsible for its restored infectivity. These data demonstrate that a chlamydial strain that differs genetically from its wild-type parent only with respect to the lack of the chlamydial plasmid is unable to compete in vitro and in vivo, likely explaining the rarity of plasmid-deficient isolates in nature.

  4. Lubricant Use and Rectal Chlamydial and Gonococcal Infections Among Men Who Engage in Receptive Anal Intercourse.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Courtney; Rice, Cara E; Wang, Shu-Hua; Fields, Karen S; Ervin, Melissa; Turner, Abigail Norris

    2016-07-01

    Use of lubricants during anal intercourse is very common among men who have sex with men. However, few studies have evaluated associations between specific lubricants and rectal sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Between July 2012 and October 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of men who have sex with men recruited from an urban, public sexual health clinic. In a self-administered survey, participants identified the lubricants used and frequency of lubricant use in the previous three months. Among men reporting any receptive anal intercourse (RAI) in the previous 3 months, we used multivariable binomial regression models to analyze associations between recent use of 9 specific lubricants and prevalent rectal chlamydia, rectal gonorrhea, and either rectal infection. Twenty-five percent of the 146 participants had rectal chlamydial infection and 21% had rectal gonococcal infection; 37% had either (chlamydial or gonococcal) infection. Three-quarters reported always or almost always using lubricant during recent receptive anal intercourse. After adjustment for age, race, human immunodeficiency virus status, and condom use, Gun Oil (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR], 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-3.80) and Slick (aPR, 3.55; 95% CI, 1.38-9.12) were significantly associated with prevalent gonococcal infection. No lubricants were significantly associated with prevalent rectal chlamydia, but in analyses of either rectal infection, precum (aPR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.06-2.66), Vaseline (aPR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.10-2.64), and baby oil (aPR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.43-3.57) were all significantly associated with prevalent rectal infection. Several lubricants were significantly associated with increased prevalence of rectal STI. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine any causal relationship between specific lubricants and STI acquisition.

  5. [Measurement of antibody titers to chlamydial infection and effects of levofloxacin in cystic cervicitis and chlamydial infection].

    PubMed

    Chimura, T

    1997-05-01

    Generally, clinical symptoms such as abnormal leukorrhea are caused by C. trachomatis, an ordinary bacteria in cervical infection. The effects of levofloxacin administration at a dose of 300 mg/day for 5-14 days were investigated in the subjects (n = 66) after the discussion of cystic cervicitis. The treatment was made in combination with chloramphenicol-solcoseryl tablet for vaginal use. And it was demonstrated that treatment was effective in all subjects. Then, Sero IPALISA, an examination of IgA/IgG antibody was conducted for the screening of Chlamydia infection (n = 258). The rate of antibody-positive case was 48/160 (30.0%) for the non-pregnant women and 26/98 (26.5%) for the pregnant. The occurrence rates for the women singing in 15-24 and 35-39 years of age were 50 and 41%, respectively. The results from the measurement of the antibody titer were as follows: the rate of IgA/IgG positive care was 61/87 for IgA and 56/87 for IgG when the cut-off index was 1.11 or more. The rates for both antibody were 11/87 (12.6%) and 24/87 (27.6%) for the indexes of 1.11-3.00 and 3.01 or more, respectively. Next, one to three courses levofloxacin at 300 mg/day for 14 days were given to 48 non-pregnant subjects infected with Chlamydia and one to two courses of clarithromycin at 400 mg/day for 14 days were given to 26 pregnant subjects. Side effects have not been noted in any care and there was no changes in the IgA/IgG antibody titer depending on these treatments.

  6. Noninvasive screening for genital chlamydial infections in asymptomatic men: Strategies and costs using a urine PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Peeling, Rosanna W; Toye, Baldwin; Jessamine, Peter; Gemmill, Ian

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cost saving strategies to screen for genital chlamydial infection in men using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology. METHODS: Men with no urethral symptoms presenting to a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic were recruited. Study participants underwent a questionnaire interview. Urethral swabs were taken to perform a smear for polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis by culture and PCR. First-catch urine was collected for a leukocyte esterase test (LET) and PCR. RESULTS: C trachomatis infection was detected in 36 of 463 (7.8%) men. LET and PMN were positive in 10 (28%) and 12 (33%) infected men, respectively. Risk factors for chlamydial infection were younger than age 25 years, LET-positive, PMN-positive and STD contact (P<0.001). The direct cost of genital chlamydial infection in men in Canada has been previously estimated at $381/case. Based on a sensitivity of 90% for urine PCR, the estimated direct cost of testing all participants to detect 32 cases was $453/case. Using risk factors recommended in the Canadian STD Guidelines (age younger than 25 years, new partner, STD contact or unprotected sex), the same number of cases would have been detected by testing only 384 men at $376/case. Using age younger than 25 years or STD contact as the screening criterion, 78% of those infected would have been detected at $259/case, and no new cases would have been detected by adding LET-positive or PMN-positive as risk factors. CONCLUSION: Targeted screening for chlamydial infection using urine PCR assay and risk factors recommended in the Canadian guidelines could substantially reduce the cost of screening at a STD clinic setting. LET and PMN smear did not appear to be useful indicators of chlamydial infection in this population. PMID:22346549

  7. [Pathomorphological research on chlamydial abortion in sheep].

    PubMed

    Neĭkov, P; Genchev, G G

    1987-01-01

    Serologic and morphologic studies were carried out with ewes and aborted fetuses, respectively, with regard to the Chlamydial infection in the flocks of some farms. The complement-fixation test was employed to examine a total of 656 blood serum samples. It was found that 20.2 per cent of these contained Chlamydial antibodies. Abortions were established with 6 to 8 per cent of the sheep in each flock. Material was sampled from 35 aborted fetuses. Featuring in the gross lesions of the fetal placenta in Chlamydial abortions were the wheat-bran type of whitish coatings on the surface. Characteristic histologic findings were desquamation, necroses, lympho-leukocytic infiltrations, and the partial deposits of calcium salts. Definite diagnostic value with the aborted fetuses were shown to have the lympho-histiocytic proliferations in the liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, lungs as well as the reticuloendothelial hyperplasia with the presence of gigantic cells of Langhans type in the mesenterial lymph nodes.

  8. Chlamydial infection in vitamin D receptor knockout mice is more intense and prolonged than in wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Ananaba, Godwin A.; Patrickson, John; Pitts, Sidney; Yi, Yeming; Yan, Fengxia; Eko, Francis O.; Lyn, Deborah; Black, Carolyn M.; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D hormone (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) is involved in innate immunity and induces host defense peptides in epithelial cells, suggesting its involvement in mucosal defense against infections. Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease worldwide. We tested the hypothesis that the vitamin D endocrine system would attenuate chlamydial infection. Vitamin D receptor knock-out mice (VDR−/−) and wild-type mice (VDR+/+) were infected with 103 inclusion forming units of Chlamydia muridarum and cervical epithelial cells (HeLa cells) were infected with C. muridarum at multiplicity of infection 5:1 in the presence and absence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.VDR−/− mice exhibited significantly higher bacterial loading than wild-type VDR+/+ mice (P<0.01) and cleared the chlamydial infection in 39 days, compared with 18 days for VDR+/+ mice. Monocytes and neutrophils were more numerous in the uterus and oviduct of VDR−/− mice than in VDR+/+ mice (P< 0.05) at d 45 after infection. Pre-treatment of HeLa cells with 10nM or 100nM 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 decreased the infectivity of C. muridarum (P< 0.001). Several differentially expressed protein spots were detected by proteomic analysis of chlamydial-infected HeLa cells pre-treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Leukocyte elastase inhibitor (LEI), an anti-inflammatory protein, was up-regulated. Expression of LEI in the ovary and oviduct of infected VDR+/+ mice was greater than that of infected VDR−/− mice. We conclude that the vitamin D endocrine system reduces the risk for prolonged chlamydial infections through regulation of several proteins and that LEI is involved in its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:23201171

  9. Electron Microscopy of Cell Cultures Infected with a Chlamydial Agent Causing Polyarthritis of Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Cutlip, Randall C.

    1970-01-01

    McCoy cell cultures infected with the agent of ovine chlamydial polyarthritis were examined with the electron microscope. The agent was seen as small dense particles (250 to 450 nm) with an eccentric nucleoid and a multilaminated cell wall, as large (800 to 1,200 nm) granular particles surrounded by two unit membranes and as intermediate particles. Replication, which occurred throughout the cytoplasm, was initiated by phagocytosis of a small dense particle and terminated by rupture of the plasma membrane. Upon entering a cell, the small dense particles developed into large granular particles which divided by binary fission. Daughter particles either repeated the division or condensed to form new small dense particles. Images PMID:16557765

  10. Comparison of antigen detection and quantitative PCR in the detection of chlamydial infection in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Hanger, Jon; Loader, Joanne; Wan, Charles; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2013-03-01

    The gold standard method for detecting chlamydial infection in domestic and wild animals is PCR, but the technique is not suited to testing animals in the field when a rapid diagnosis is frequently required. The objective of this study was to compare the results of a commercially available enzyme immunoassay test for Chlamydia against a quantitative Chlamydia pecorum-specific PCR performed on swabs collected from the conjunctival sac, nasal cavity and urogenital sinuses of naturally infected koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). The level of agreement for positive results between the two assays was low (43.2%). The immunoassay detection cut-off was determined as approximately 400 C. pecorum copies, indicating that the test was sufficiently sensitive to be used for the rapid diagnosis of active chlamydial infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Susceptibility of Muskrats and Snowshoe Hares to Experimental Infection with a Chlamydial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, J. O.; Spalatin, J.; Fraser, C. E. O.; Hanson, R. P.; Berman, D. T.

    1970-01-01

    Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) and snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) were exposed experimentally by various routes to a chlamydial agent (designated strain M56) originally isolated during a die-off of muskrats and snowshoe hares which occurred in Saskatchewan during 1961. Both species were susceptible to experimental infection. Whereas M56 was highly lethal for snowshoe hares (18 deaths/19 exposed), it was less virulent for muskrats (6 deaths/20 exposed). The degree of susceptibility of muskrats to induced infections with M56 was influenced by the presence or absence of specific antibodies at the time of exposure. A febrile illness was observed in 11 of 20 muskrats. In the six that died, widespread focal necrosis was found in the liver. Following intraperitoneal or oral exposures, chronic infections were established and the agent was recovered from the brain and the small intestine up to 96 days post-infection. Specific antibodies were found in 11.8% of 127 sera of muskrats trapped form the wild in Saskatchewan, the Canadian Arctic, and Wisconsin. In snowshoe hares, M56 induced an acute, febrile, emaciating illness, and the almost invariable fatal course was short with terminal signs of opisthotonos, convulsions, and hypoglycemia. Snowshoe hares succumbed with intravenous doses of less than ten mouse intracerebral LD50 of M56. The same syndrome was produced by intravenous, subcutaneous, and oral infections. M56 was found in high titers in all tissues examined. The highest titers were found in the liver and spleen which correlated with the pathology observed. M56 was recovered from female rabbit ticks (Haemaphysalis leporispalustris) engorging on experimentally infected snowshoe hares. ImagesFig. 4. PMID:4246008

  12. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Imaging Reveals a Long-Lasting Chlamydial Infection in the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract following Genital Tract Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yumeng; Gong, Siqi; Yang, Zhangsheng; Sun, Xin; Schenken, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Intravaginal infection with Chlamydia muridarum in mice can ascend to the upper genital tract, resulting in hydrosalpinx, a pathological hallmark for tubal infertility in women infected with C. trachomatis. Here, we utilized in vivo imaging of C. muridarum infection in mice following an intravaginal inoculation and confirmed the rapid ascent of the chlamydial organisms from the lower to upper genital tracts. Unexpectedly, the C. muridarum-derived signal was still detectable in the abdominal area 100 days after inoculation. Ex vivo imaging of the mouse organs revealed that the long-lasting presence of the chlamydial signal was restricted to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which was validated by directly measuring the chlamydial live organisms and genomes in the same organs. The C. muridarum organisms spreading from the genital to the GI tracts were detected in different mouse strains and appeared to be independent of oral or rectal routes. Mice prevented from orally taking up excretions also developed the long-lasting GI tract infection. Inoculation of C. muridarum directly into the upper genital tract, which resulted in a delayed vaginal shedding of live organisms, accelerated the chlamydial spreading to the GI tract. Thus, we have demonstrated that the genital tract chlamydial organisms may use a systemic route to spread to and establish a long-lasting infection in the GI tract. The significance of the chlamydial spreading from the genital to GI tracts is discussed. PMID:26099591

  13. Committee opinion no 632: Expedited partner therapy in the management of gonorrhea and chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) disproportionately affect women and create a preventable threat to their fertility. One factor that contributes to young women's high rates of STIs is reinfection from an untreated sexual partner. One way to address this problem is through expedited partner therapy, the practice of treating the sexual partners of patients in whom STIs are diagnosed. Expedited partner therapy enables the obstetrician-gynecologist or other provider to give prescriptions or medications to patients to take to their partners without first examining these partners. Despite the effectiveness of expedited partner therapy, numerous legal, medical, practical, and administrative barriers hinder its routine use by obstetrician-gynecologists. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the use of expedited partner therapy as a method of preventing gonorrhea and chlamydial reinfection when a patient's partners are unable or unwilling to seek medical care. Expedited partner therapy should be accompanied by patient counseling and written treatment instructions for the patient's partner(s). Partners receiving expedited partner therapy should be encouraged to seek additional medical evaluation as soon as possible to discuss screening for other STIs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  14. UK National Audit of chlamydial infection management in sexual health clinics. case notes audit: demography, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    McClean, Hugo; Carne, Chris; Bunting, Paul; Bhaduri, Sumit; Fernandes, Arnold; Dhar, Jyoti; Estreich, Steve; Daniels, David

    2008-07-01

    The case notes of cases of genital chlamydial infection were audited against the UK National Guideline. This was the first web-based and the largest national audit to date, with 193 clinics in all UK Regions contributing data. About half of all cases had no symptoms, with about one-third attending for routine or asymptomatic screens; suggesting significant provision of screening by clinics that might be managed differently to reduce workload. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) are now well established for chlamydial detection in UK clinics, with 93% of cases having genital NAATs. Azithromycin is now more commonly used than doxycycline (54% vs. 37%). Of 26 pregnant women, 20 were treated with azithromycin, suggesting that most prescribers treating pregnant women consider that erythromycin is not an adequate alternative to azithromycin. Most women had NAATs obtained from sites recommended by the Guideline, with 93% of women who had genital NAATs having these from the cervix or vulvovaginal area.

  15. Retesting for repeat chlamydial infection: family planning provider knowledge, attitudes, and practices.

    PubMed

    Park, Ina U; Amey, Annette; Creegan, Linda; Barandas, Aileen; Bauer, Heidi M

    2010-06-01

    Repeated genital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis are common and associated with serious adverse reproductive sequelae in women such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. Retesting for repeat chlamydial infection is recommended 3 months after treatment for an initial infection; however, retesting rates in various settings are low. In order to design interventions to increase retesting rates, understanding provider barriers and practices around retesting is crucial. Therefore, in this survey of family planning providers we sought to describe: (1) knowledge about retesting for chlamydia; (2) attitudes and barriers toward retesting; (3) practices currently utilized to ensure retesting, and predictors associated with their use. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-administered, Internet-based survey of a convenience sample of family planning providers in California inquiring about strategies utilized to ensure retesting in their practice setting. High-intensity strategies included chart flagging, tickler (reminder) systems, follow-up appointments, and phone/mail reminders. Of 268 respondents, 82% of providers reported at least 1 barrier to retesting, and only 44% utilized high-intensity interventions to ensure that patients returned. Predictors associated with use of high-intensity interventions included existence of clinic-level retesting policies (OR 3.95, 95% CI 1.98-7.88), and perception of a high/moderate level of clinic priority toward retesting (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.12-.6.63). Emphasizing the importance of retesting to providers through adoption of clinic policies will likely be an important component of a multimodal strategy to ensure that patients are retested and that provider/clinic staff take advantage of opportunities to retest patients. Innovative approaches such as home-based retesting with self-collected vaginal swabs and use of cost-effective technologies to generate patient reminders should also be considered.

  16. Infection with koala retrovirus subgroup B (KoRV-B), but not KoRV-A, is associated with chlamydial disease in free-ranging koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Waugh, Courtney A; Hanger, Jonathan; Loader, Joanne; King, Andrew; Hobbs, Matthew; Johnson, Rebecca; Timms, Peter

    2017-03-09

    The virulence of chlamydial infection in wild koalas is highly variable between individuals. Some koalas can be infected (PCR positive) with Chlamydia for long periods but remain asymptomatic, whereas others develop clinical disease. Chlamydia in the koala has traditionally been studied without regard to coinfection with other pathogens, although koalas are usually subject to infection with koala retrovirus (KoRV). Retroviruses can be immunosuppressive, and there is evidence of an immunosuppressive effect of KoRV in vitro. Originally thought to be a single endogenous strain, a new, potentially more virulent exogenous variant (KoRV-B) was recently reported. We hypothesized that KoRV-B might significantly alter chlamydial disease outcomes in koalas, presumably via immunosuppression. By studying sub-groups of Chlamydia and KoRV infected koalas in the wild, we found that neither total KoRV load (either viraemia or proviral copies per genome), nor chlamydial infection level or strain type, was significantly associated with chlamydial disease risk. However, PCR positivity with KoRV-B was significantly associated with chlamydial disease in koalas (p = 0.02961). This represents an example of a recently evolved virus variant that may be predisposing its host (the koala) to overt clinical disease when co-infected with an otherwise asymptomatic bacterial pathogen (Chlamydia).

  17. Lung transplant infection.

    PubMed

    Burguete, Sergio R; Maselli, Diego J; Fernandez, Juan F; Levine, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become an accepted therapeutic procedure for the treatment of end-stage pulmonary parenchymal and vascular disease. Despite improved survival rates over the decades, lung transplant recipients have lower survival rates than other solid organ transplant recipients. The morbidity and mortality following lung transplantation is largely due to infection- and rejection-related complications. This article will review the common infections that develop in the lung transplant recipient, including the general risk factors for infection in this population, and the most frequent bacterial, viral, fungal and other less frequent opportunistic infections. The epidemiology, diagnosis, prophylaxis, treatment and outcomes for the different microbial pathogens will be reviewed. The effects of infection on lung transplant rejection will also be discussed.

  18. Mixed infections with Chlamydia and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus - a new in vitro model of chlamydial persistence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chlamydiae induce persistent infections, which have been associated with a wide range of chronic diseases in humans and animals. Mixed infections with Chlamydia and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) may result in generation of persistent chlamydial infections. To test this hypothesis, an in vitro model of dual infection with cell culture-adapted PEDV and Chlamydia abortus or Chlamydia pecorum in Vero cells was established. Results Infected cultures were investigated by immunofluorescence (IF), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and re-infection experiments. By IF, Chlamydia-infected cells showed normal inclusions after 39 hpi. Dual infections with Chlamydia abortus revealed a heterogenous mix of inclusion types including small inclusions consisting of aberrant bodies (ABs), medium-sized inclusions consisting of ABs and reticulate bodies and normal inclusions. Only aberrant inclusions were observable in dual infection experiments with Chlamydia pecorum and PEDV. TEM examinations of mixed infections with Chlamydia abortus and Chlamydia pecorum revealed aberrant chlamydial inclusions containing reticulate-like, pleomorphic ABs, which were up to 2 μm in diameter. No re-differentiation into elementary bodies (EBs) was detected. In re-infection experiments, co-infected cells produced fewer EBs than monoinfected cells. Conclusions In the present study we confirm that PEDV co-infection alters the developmental cycle of member species of the family Chlamydiaceae, in a similar manner to other well-described persistence induction methods. Interestingly, this effect appears to be partially species-specific as Chlamydia pecorum appears more sensitive to PEDV co-infection than Chlamydia abortus, as evidenced by TEM and IF observations of a homogenous population of aberrant inclusions in PEDV - Chlamydia pecorum co-infections. PMID:20663197

  19. Usefulness of quantifying leukocytes in first-voided urine to predict positivity for Chlamydia trachomatis in asymptomatic men at high risk for chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shin; Horie, Kengo; Seike, Kensaku; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis causes acute non-gonococcal urethritis, but some infected men are asymptomatic. We examined leukocytes in uncentrifuged first-voided urine (FVU) from asymptomatic men at high risk for chlamydial infection by automated urine particle analyzers to assess whether the quantification of urinary leukocytes could predict chlamydial infection in these men. We enrolled 209 asymptomatic men, whose female sexual partners had been diagnosed as having a genital chlamydial infection. Their FVU specimens were examined for quantification of leukocytes with automated urine particle analyzers and tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum, and Ureaplasma urealyticum by nucleotide acid amplification tests. Eleven men positive for N. gonorrhoeae or M. genitalium were excluded from further analysis. In the remaining 198 men, 84 positive for C. trachomatis (42.4%) had 1.8-1666.9 white blood cells (WBCs)/μl (median, 43.3 WBCs/μl) in their FVU, whereas 114 negative for C. trachomatis had 0.1-1378 WBCs/μl (median, 4.8 WBCs/μl). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed to examine the sensitivity and specificity of leukocytes counts for predicting chlamydial infection. A cut-off point of leukocyte counts of 12.5 WBCs/μl was determined from the ROC curve, resulting in a sensitivity of 86.9% and specificity of 88.6% for predicting chlamydial infection. Leukocyte quantification in FVU by automated urine particle analyzers showed good performance in predicting the positivity and negativity for chlamydial infection in asymptomatic men. This test could potentially develop into a relevant tool for preselecting asymptomatic men prior to C. trachomatis screening.

  20. Inhibition of Chlamydial Infection in the Genital Tract of Female Mice by Topical Application of a Peptide Deformylase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Amit; Wang, Lingling; Li, Xiaojin; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Malatesta, Paul; Fan, Huizhou

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for a number of health problems, including sexually transmitted infection in humans. We recently discovered that C. trachomatis infection in cell culture is highly susceptible to inhibitors of peptide deformylase, an enzyme that removes the N-formyl group from newly synthesized polypeptides. In this study, one of the deformylase inhibitors, GM6001, was tested for potential antichlamydial activity using a murine genital C. muridarum infection model. Topical application of GM6001 significantly reduced C. muridarum loading in BALB/c mice that were vaginally infected with the pathogen. In striking contrast, growth of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum is strongly resistant to the PDF inhibitor. GM6001 demonstrated no detectable toxicity against host cells. On the basis of these data and our previous observations, we conclude that further evaluation of PDF inhibitors for prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted chlamydial infection is warranted. PMID:17936604

  1. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to chlamydial antigens in guinea pigs infected ocularly with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Senyk, G; Kerlan, R; Stites, D P; Schanzlin, D J; Ostler, H B; Hanna, L; Keshishyan, H; Jawetz, E

    1981-04-01

    Cell-mediated immune response and humoral response to chlamydial antigens were investigated in guinea pigs infected with the agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). Pronounced cell-mediated immune response to the homologous antigen, as well as to two other chlamydial antigens, 6BC (Chlamydia psittaci) and LB-1 (C. trachomatis), occurred in all infected animals. Cell-mediated immune response to GPIC, and to a lesser extent to 6BC and LB-1 as well, was enhanced with time after infection even without the re-inoculation of the infectious agent. Extensive cross-reactions among the three chlamydial antigens during the cell-mediated immune response appeared to be due to shared species-specific and group-reactive antigens. Serum antibody response was pronounced and uniform to GPIC; it was less marked to 6BC and LB-1, with fewer cross-reactions than seen in tests for cell-mediated immunity.

  2. Characterization of chlamydial genital infection resulting from sexual transmission from male to female guinea pigs and determination of infectious dose.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Bowlin, Anne K; Reed, Ronald L; Darville, Toni

    2003-11-01

    A major problem in the study of chlamydial genital infections in animal models has been the use of varied doses of chlamydiae for infection in different laboratories. It is clearly desirable to use a dose which approximates that of natural sexual infection, but that dose to date has not been determined because of the inability of researchers to quantify chlamydiae in semen. Fortunately, sexual transmission of chlamydiae has been described for the guinea pig model of infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). In this study, we undertook to determine the approximate infection dose in actual sexual transmission by comparing the kinetics of infection in female guinea pigs acquired via sexual contact to those of genital infections induced artificially with known quantities of chlamydiae. Groups of guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with 10(4), 10(3), 10(2), and 10(1) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of GPIC, and the kinetics of the infection were determined. Infection with 10(2) IFU produced infections with lower peak levels than those in animals receiving 10(4) or 10(3) IFU. Seventy percent of animals receiving 10(2) IFU became infected, while 100 and 79% of animals receiving 10(4) and 10(3) IFU, respectively, became infected. Animals receiving 10(2) IFU also had a longer incubation period. Of 19 animals that mated with infected males, 63.2% became infected, with an infection course which was not significantly different than that of the 10(2)-IFU-infected group. The data suggest that female guinea pigs received approximately 10(2) IFU by sexual transmission. Of interest was the observation that the guinea pigs infected by sexual transmission shed organisms for a significantly shorter time period than that of any group that was artificially infected. This result suggests that there may be factors associated with semen which passively transfer antimicrobial activity to the female or enhance the innate host response in the female

  3. Characterization of Chlamydial Genital Infection Resulting from Sexual Transmission from Male to Female Guinea Pigs and Determination of Infectious Dose

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Roger G.; Bowlin, Anne K.; Reed, Ronald L.; Darville, Toni

    2003-01-01

    A major problem in the study of chlamydial genital infections in animal models has been the use of varied doses of chlamydiae for infection in different laboratories. It is clearly desirable to use a dose which approximates that of natural sexual infection, but that dose to date has not been determined because of the inability of researchers to quantify chlamydiae in semen. Fortunately, sexual transmission of chlamydiae has been described for the guinea pig model of infection with the chlamydial agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC). In this study, we undertook to determine the approximate infection dose in actual sexual transmission by comparing the kinetics of infection in female guinea pigs acquired via sexual contact to those of genital infections induced artificially with known quantities of chlamydiae. Groups of guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with 104, 103, 102, and 101 inclusion-forming units (IFU) of GPIC, and the kinetics of the infection were determined. Infection with 102 IFU produced infections with lower peak levels than those in animals receiving 104 or 103 IFU. Seventy percent of animals receiving 102 IFU became infected, while 100 and 79% of animals receiving 104 and 103 IFU, respectively, became infected. Animals receiving 102 IFU also had a longer incubation period. Of 19 animals that mated with infected males, 63.2% became infected, with an infection course which was not significantly different than that of the 102-IFU-infected group. The data suggest that female guinea pigs received approximately 102 IFU by sexual transmission. Of interest was the observation that the guinea pigs infected by sexual transmission shed organisms for a significantly shorter time period than that of any group that was artificially infected. This result suggests that there may be factors associated with semen which passively transfer antimicrobial activity to the female or enhance the innate host response in the female. Immunization of females

  4. Does inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha affect chlamydial genital tract infection in mice and guinea pigs?

    PubMed

    Darville, T; Andrews, C W; Rank, R G

    2000-09-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in host defense against chlamydial infection remains unclear. In order to further evaluate the relevance of TNF-alpha to host resistance in chlamydial genital tract infection, we examined the effect of local inhibition of the TNF-alpha response in normal C57 mice and in interferon gamma gene-deficient C57 mice infected intravaginally with the mouse pneumonitis agent of Chlamydia trachomatis. Since the guinea pig model of female genital tract infection more closely approximates the human in terms of ascending infection and development of pathology, we also examined the effect of local inhibition of the TNF-alpha response in guinea pigs infected intravaginally with the guinea pig strain of Chlamydia psittaci. We successfully blocked the early TNF-alpha response in the respective animal models. This blockade had no effect on the numbers of organisms isolated from the genital tract during the time of TNF-alpha inhibition in mice or guinea pigs. Analysis of interleukin-1beta, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in the mouse model revealed that blockade of the TNF-alpha response did not alter the release of these proinflammatory proteins. Yet, in TNF-alpha-depleted mice, increased numbers of neutrophils were detected in the genital tract, and, in TNF-alpha-depleted guinea pigs, increased numbers of neutrophils as well as infiltrating lymphocytes were seen in the endocervix. Blockade of TNF-alpha does not affect the level of infection in mice or guinea pigs, but it may decrease TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis of infiltrating inflammatory cells.

  5. Ca. Similichlamydia in Epitheliocystis Co-infection of Gilthead Seabream Gills: Unique Morphological Features of a Deep Branching Chlamydial Family

    PubMed Central

    Seth-Smith, Helena M. B.; Katharios, Pantelis; Dourala, Nancy; Mateos, José M.; Fehr, Alexander G. J.; Nufer, Lisbeth; Ruetten, Maja; Guevara Soto, Maricruz; Vaughan, Lloyd

    2017-01-01

    The Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum constitutes a broad range of organisms with an intriguing array of ultrastructural morphologies, including intracellular membranes and compartments and their corresponding complex genomes encoding these forms. The phylum Chlamydiae are all obligate intracellular bacteria and, although much is already known of their genomes from various families and how these regulate the various morphological forms, we know remarkably little about what is likely the deepest rooting clade of this phylum, which has only been found to contain pathogens of marine and fresh water vertebrates. The disease they are associated with is called epitheliocystis; however, analyses of the causative agents is hindered by an inability to cultivate them for refined in vitro experimentation. For this reason, we have developed tools to analyse both the genomes and the ultrastructures of bacteria causing this disease, directly from infected tissues. Here we present structural data for a member of the family Ca. Similichlamydiaceae from this deep-rooted clade, which we have identified using molecular tools, in epitheliocystis lesions of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) in Greece. We present evidence that the chlamydial inclusions appear to develop in a perinuclear location, similar to other members of the phylum and that a chlamydial developmental cycle is present, with chlamydial forms similar to reticular bodies (RBs) and elementary bodies (EBs) detected. Division of the RBs appeared to follow a budding process, and larger RBs with multiple condensed nucleoids were detected using both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by focused-ion beam, scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). As model hosts, fish offer many advantages for investigation, and we hope by these efforts to encourage others to explore the biology of fish pathogens from the PVC. PMID:28424665

  6. UK National Audit of chlamydial infection management in sexual health clinics. clinic policies audit.

    PubMed

    Carne, Chris; McClean, Hugo; Bhaduri, Sumit; Bunting, Paul; Fernandes, Arnold; Dhar, Jyoti; Estreich, Steve; Daniels, David

    2008-07-01

    There was a wide range of activity and chlamydial diagnoses between the 177 clinics that responded. Most (92%) clinics have nucleic acid tests for chlamydial diagnosis. Different practitioners largely share roles in providing advice to patients about partner notification, treatment adherence, safer sex advice and abstinence. Most (97%) clinics have information leaflets about chlamydia, although about 30% of clinics lack leaflets containing information about antibiotics and hormonal contraception. About two-third clinics follow the National Guideline recommended interval for providing a test of cure where this is indicated. Only 18% of clinics routinely ask patients to reattend, with 40% having a policy of no routine follow-up and 62% using telephone or text follow-up. These categories were not mutually exclusive. Most (86%) of the 146 English clinics had a local Chlamydia Screening Programme coordinator for their Primary Care Trust area, although cooperation varies, with cooperation over treatment of 70% and Programme policy of 62%.

  7. Recombinant outer membrane vesicles carrying Chlamydia muridarum HtrA induce antibodies that neutralize chlamydial infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Erika; Ianni, Elvira; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Petracca, Roberto; Galli, Giuliano; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Laera, Donatello; Giusti, Fabiola; Pierleoni, Andrea; Donati, Manuela; Cevenini, Roberto; Finco, Oretta; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spheroid particles released by all Gram-negative bacteria as a result of the budding out of the outer membrane. Since they carry many of the bacterial surface-associated proteins and feature a potent built-in adjuvanticity, OMVs are being utilized as vaccines, some of which commercially available. Recently, methods for manipulating the protein content of OMVs have been proposed, thus making OMVs a promising platform for recombinant, multivalent vaccines development. Chlamydia muridarum DO serine protease HtrA, an antigen which stimulates strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and humans, was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the OmpA leader sequence to deliver it to the OMV compartment. Purified OMVs carrying HtrA (CM rHtrA-OMV) were analyzed for their capacity to induce antibodies capable of neutralizing Chlamydia infection of LLC-MK2 cells in vitro. CM rHtrA-OMV immunization in mice induced antibodies that neutralize Chlamydial invasion as judged by an in vitro infectivity assay. This was remarkably different from what observed with an enzymatically functional recombinant HtrA expressed in, and purified from the E. coli cytoplasm (CM rHtrA). The difference in functionality between anti-CM rHtrA and anti-CM rHtrA-OMV antibodies was associated to a different pattern of protein epitopes recognition. The epitope recognition profile of anti-CM HtrA-OMV antibodies was similar to that induced in mice during Chlamydial infection. When expressed in OMVs HtrA appears to assume a conformation similar to the native one and this results in the elicitation of functional immune responses. These data further support the potentiality of OMVs as vaccine platform.

  8. Recombinant outer membrane vesicles carrying Chlamydia muridarum HtrA induce antibodies that neutralize chlamydial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Erika; Ianni, Elvira; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Petracca, Roberto; Galli, Giuliano; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Norais, Nathalie; Laera, Donatello; Giusti, Fabiola; Pierleoni, Andrea; Donati, Manuela; Cevenini, Roberto; Finco, Oretta; Grandi, Guido; Grifantini, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are spheroid particles released by all Gram-negative bacteria as a result of the budding out of the outer membrane. Since they carry many of the bacterial surface-associated proteins and feature a potent built-in adjuvanticity, OMVs are being utilized as vaccines, some of which commercially available. Recently, methods for manipulating the protein content of OMVs have been proposed, thus making OMVs a promising platform for recombinant, multivalent vaccines development. Methods Chlamydia muridarum DO serine protease HtrA, an antigen which stimulates strong humoral and cellular responses in mice and humans, was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the OmpA leader sequence to deliver it to the OMV compartment. Purified OMVs carrying HtrA (CM rHtrA-OMV) were analyzed for their capacity to induce antibodies capable of neutralizing Chlamydia infection of LLC-MK2 cells in vitro. Results CM rHtrA-OMV immunization in mice induced antibodies that neutralize Chlamydial invasion as judged by an in vitro infectivity assay. This was remarkably different from what observed with an enzymatically functional recombinant HtrA expressed in, and purified from the E. coli cytoplasm (CM rHtrA). The difference in functionality between anti-CM rHtrA and anti-CM rHtrA-OMV antibodies was associated to a different pattern of protein epitopes recognition. The epitope recognition profile of anti-CM HtrA-OMV antibodies was similar to that induced in mice during Chlamydial infection. Conclusions When expressed in OMVs HtrA appears to assume a conformation similar to the native one and this results in the elicitation of functional immune responses. These data further support the potentiality of OMVs as vaccine platform. PMID:24009891

  9. Use of a Guinea Pig-Specific Transcriptome Array for Evaluation of Protective Immunity against Genital Chlamydial Infection following Intranasal Vaccination in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Veselenak, Ronald L.; Li, Yansong; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Cap, Andrew P.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Chambers, James P.; Zhong, Guangming; Rank, Roger G.; Pyles, Richard B.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2014-01-01

    Guinea pigs have been used as a second animal model to validate putative anti-chlamydial vaccine candidates tested in mice. However, the lack of guinea pig-specific reagents has limited the utility of this animal model in Chlamydia sp. vaccine studies. Using a novel guinea pig-specific transcriptome array, we determined correlates of protection in guinea pigs vaccinated with Chlamydia caviae (C. caviae) via the intranasal route, previously reported by us and others to provide robust antigen specific immunity against subsequent intravaginal challenge. C. caviae vaccinated guinea pigs resolved genital infection by day 3 post challenge. In contrast, mock vaccinated animals continued to shed viable Chlamydia up to day 18 post challenge. Importantly, at day 80 post challenge, vaccinated guinea pigs experienced significantly reduced genital pathology - a sequelae of genital chlamydial infections, in comparison to mock vaccinated guinea pigs. Sera from vaccinated guinea pigs displayed antigen specific IgG responses and increased IgG1 and IgG2 titers capable of neutralizing GPIC in vitro. Th1-cellular/inflammatory immune genes and Th2-humoral associated genes were also found to be elevated in vaccinated guinea pigs at day 3 post-challenge and correlated with early clearance of the bacterium. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of guinea pig-specific genes involved in anti-chlamydial vaccination and illustrates the enhancement of the utility of this animal model in chlamydial pathogenesis. PMID:25502875

  10. Use of a Guinea pig-specific transcriptome array for evaluation of protective immunity against genital chlamydial infection following intranasal vaccination in Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Wali, Shradha; Gupta, Rishein; Veselenak, Ronald L; Li, Yansong; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Cap, Andrew P; Guentzel, M Neal; Chambers, James P; Zhong, Guangming; Rank, Roger G; Pyles, Richard B; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2014-01-01

    Guinea pigs have been used as a second animal model to validate putative anti-chlamydial vaccine candidates tested in mice. However, the lack of guinea pig-specific reagents has limited the utility of this animal model in Chlamydia sp. vaccine studies. Using a novel guinea pig-specific transcriptome array, we determined correlates of protection in guinea pigs vaccinated with Chlamydia caviae (C. caviae) via the intranasal route, previously reported by us and others to provide robust antigen specific immunity against subsequent intravaginal challenge. C. caviae vaccinated guinea pigs resolved genital infection by day 3 post challenge. In contrast, mock vaccinated animals continued to shed viable Chlamydia up to day 18 post challenge. Importantly, at day 80 post challenge, vaccinated guinea pigs experienced significantly reduced genital pathology - a sequelae of genital chlamydial infections, in comparison to mock vaccinated guinea pigs. Sera from vaccinated guinea pigs displayed antigen specific IgG responses and increased IgG1 and IgG2 titers capable of neutralizing GPIC in vitro. Th1-cellular/inflammatory immune genes and Th2-humoral associated genes were also found to be elevated in vaccinated guinea pigs at day 3 post-challenge and correlated with early clearance of the bacterium. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of guinea pig-specific genes involved in anti-chlamydial vaccination and illustrates the enhancement of the utility of this animal model in chlamydial pathogenesis.

  11. Water-filtered infrared A reduces chlamydial infectivity in vitro without causing ex vivo eye damage in pig and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Carolin; Marti, Hanna; Frohns, Antonia; Frohns, Florian; Blenn, Christian; Leonard, Cory Ann; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin; Stein, Elisabeth; Borel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    Repeated ocular infections with Chlamydia trachomatis trigger the development of trachoma, the most common cause of infectious blindness worldwide. Water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) has shown positive effects on cultured cells and human skin. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of wIRA as a possible non-chemical treatment for trachoma patients. We both modeled ocular chlamydial infections using C. trachomatis B to infect human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjE) and studied the effects of wIRA on non-infected ocular structures with two ex vivo eye models. We focused on the temperature development during wIRA irradiation in cell culture and perfused pig eyes to exclude potentially harmful side effects. Furthermore, cell viability of HCjE and cytotoxicity in mouse retina explants was analyzed. We demonstrated a significant wIRA-dependent reduction of chlamydial infectivity in HCjE cells. Moreover, we observed that wIRA treatment of HCjE prior to infection was sufficient to inhibit chlamydial infectivity and that visible light enhances the effect of wIRA. Irradiation did not reduce cell viability and there was no indication of retinal damage post treatment. Additionally, temperatures during wIRA exposure did not markedly exceed physiological eye temperatures, suggesting that hyperthermia-related lesions are unlikely. For clinical applications, further exploration of wIRA as a non-chemical treatment device in an experimental animal model is essential.

  12. Humoral immune responses in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) either naturally infected with Chlamydia pecorum or following administration of a recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein vaccine.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Polkinghorne, Adam; Waugh, Courtney; Hanger, Jon; Loader, Jo; Beagley, Kenneth; Timms, Peter

    2016-02-03

    The development of a vaccine is a key strategy to combat the widespread and debilitating effects of chlamydial infection in koalas. One such vaccine in development uses recombinant chlamydial major outer membrane protein (rMOMP) as an antigen and has shown promising results in several koala trials. Previous chlamydial vaccine studies, primarily in the mouse model, suggest that both cell-mediated and antibody responses will be required for adequate protection. Recently, the important protective role of antibodies has been highlighted. In our current study, we conducted a detailed analysis of the antibody-mediated immune response in koalas that are either (a) naturally-infected, and/or (b) had received an rMOMP vaccine. Firstly, we observed that naturally-infected koalas had very low levels of Chlamydia pecorum-specific neutralising antibodies. A strong correlation between low IgG total titers/neutralising antibody levels, and higher C. pecorum infection load was also observed in these naturally-infected animals. In vaccinated koalas, we showed that the vaccine was able to boost the humoral immune response by inducing strong levels of C. pecorum-specific neutralising antibodies. A detailed characterisation of the MOMP epitope response was also performed in naturally-infected and vaccinated koalas using a PepScan epitope approach. This analysis identified unique sets of MOMP epitope antibodies between naturally-infected non-protected and diseased koalas, versus vaccinated koalas, with the latter group of animals producing a unique set of specific epitope-directed antibodies that we demonstrated were responsible for the in vitro neutralisation activity. Together, these results show the importance of antibodies in chlamydial infection and immunity following vaccination in the koala. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the Amplicor Chlamydia trachomatis test and cell culture for the detection of urogenital chlamydial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Catry, M A; Borrego, M J; Cardoso, J; Azevedo, J; Santo, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) Amplicor Chlamydia trachomatis test with the cell culture method, in diagnosing urogenital chlamydial infections. SUBJECTS--439 patients (327 women and 112 men) attending one STD clinic and Family Planning and Gynaecological Clinics in Lisbon, Portugal, between November 1993 and March 1994. METHODS--In women, two endocervical swab samples were collected: one for PCR Amplicor and one for standard culture technique. Men were asked to submit 20 ml of urine (first pass urine) for PCR Amplicor and one urethral specimen was taken for culture. The order of collection of the specimens was rotated every 50 patients. Discrepant results were further analysed by a second PCR with primers directed against the C trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA). RESULTS--After analysis of discrepancies, the adjusted sensitivity and specificity of PCR on endocervical specimens were 92.9% and 100% and the positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 99.7% respectively; on the urine samples these values were 100%, 99.1%, 100% and 99.1%, respectively. CONCLUSION--These results indicate that the PCR Amplicor test is a rapid sensitive and specific assay for the detection of C trachomatis in urogenital infections and provides a non-invasive technique for screening chlamydia infection in men. PMID:7590718

  14. Immunization against chlamydial genital infection in guinea pigs with UV-inactivated and viable chlamydiae administered by different routes

    SciTech Connect

    Rank, R.G.; Batteiger, B.E.; Soderberg, L.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Female guinea pigs were immunized with viable or UV light-inactivated chlamydiae, belonging to the species Chlamydia psittaci, by intravenous, subcutaneous, oral, or ocular routes. All animals were then inoculated vaginally with viable chlamydiae to determine the extent of protection against challenge infection induced by the various regimens. The course of genital infection was significantly reduced in intensity in all groups of animals except the unimmunized controls and those animals immunized orally with inactivated antigen. Guinea pigs immunized with viable antigen were more likely to develop resistance to challenge infection and, in general, had a significantly greater degree of protection than animals immunized with inactivated antigen. No one route seemed superior in producing a protective response. Animals in all groups demonstrating protection developed serum and secretion immunoglobulin G antibody responses to chlamydiae. Lymphocyte proliferative reactions to chlamydial antigen were variable among groups. Immunoblot analysis of serum and secretions indicated a wide range of antibody specificities, but most protected animals produced antibodies to the major outer membrane protein, lipopolysaccharide, and the 61-kilodalton protein. No definitive associations could be made between the increased ability of immunization with viable organisms to produce resistance to challenge infection and a particular immune parameter. These data indicate that viable chlamydiae given by various routes are able to induce a strong immune response which can provide resistance against reinfection in some cases or at least reduce the degree of infection to a greater degree than inactivated antigen. However, complete resistance to genital tract infection may be difficult to obtain and alternate immunizations strategies may have to be developed.

  15. Syndromic treatment of gonococcal and chlamydial infections in women seeking primary care for the genital discharge syndrome: decision-making.

    PubMed Central

    Behets, F. M.; Miller, W. C.; Cohen, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    The syndromic treatment of gonococcal and chlamydial infections in women seeking primary care in clinics where resources are scarce, as recommended by WHO and implemented in many developing countries, necessitates a balance to be struck between overtreatment and undertreatment. The present paper identifies factors that are relevant to the selection of specific strategies for syndromic treatment in the above circumstances. Among them are the general aspects of decision-making and caveats concerning the rational decision-making approach. The positive and negative implications are outlined of providing or withholding treatment following a specific algorithm with a given accuracy to detect infection, i.e. sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Other decision-making considerations that are identified are related to implementation and include the stability of risk factors with regard to time, space and the implementer, acceptability by stakeholders, and environmental constraints. There is a need to consider empirically developed treatment algorithms as a basis for policy discourse, to be evaluated together with the evidence, alternatives and arguments by the stakeholders. PMID:11731816

  16. Association of uterine and salpingeal fibrosis with chlamydial hsp60 and hsp10 antigen-specific antibodies in Chlamydia-infected koalas.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Damien P; Hemsley, Susan; Canfield, Paul J

    2005-05-01

    Infection by Chlamydia pneumoniae or Chlamydia pecorum commonly causes chronic, fibrotic disease of the urogenital tracts of female koalas. Studies of humans have associated titers of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) against chlamydial hsp60 and hsp10 antigens with chronic infection, salpingeal fibrosis, and tubal infertility. To determine whether a similar relationship exists in Chlamydia-infected koalas, samples were collected opportunistically from 34 wild female koalas and examined by gross pathology and histopathology, PCR, and immunohistochemistry for Chlamydia spp. and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serological responses to chlamydial hsp10 and hsp60 antigens. Greater anti-hsp titers occurred in Chlamydia-infected koalas with fibrous occlusion of the uterus or uterine tube than in other Chlamydia-infected koalas (for hsp10 IgG, P = 0.005; for hsp60 IgG, P = 0.001; for hsp10 IgA, P = 0.04; for hsp60 IgA, P = 0.09). However, as in humans, some koalas with tubal occlusion had low titers. Among Chlamydia-infected koalas with tubal occlusion, those with low titers were more likely to have an active component to their ongoing uterine or salpingeal inflammation (P = 0.007), such that the assay predicted, with 79% sensitivity and 92% specificity, tubal occlusion where an active component of inflammation was absent. Findings of this study permit advancement of clinical and epidemiological studies of host-pathogen-environment interactions and pose intriguing questions regarding the significance of the Th1/Th2 paradigm and antigen-presenting and inflammation-regulating capabilities of uterine epithelial cells and the roles of latency and reactivation of chlamydial infections in pathogenesis of upper reproductive tract disease of koalas.

  17. High prevalence of extra-genital chlamydial or gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Allan-Blitz, Lao-Tzu; Leon, Segundo R; Bristow, Claire C; Konda, Kelika A; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Brown, Brandon J; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are among the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections in the world. Data are limited, however, on the burden of extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru. Data were gathered from self-collected anal or pharyngeal swabs from participants in Lima, Peru, and analyzed via cross-sectional methods. Prevalence ratios for the association between extra-genital infection with socio-demographic and sexual behaviors were determined. Overall, 127 (32.8%) participants had anal or pharyngeal infections. On multivariate modeling, anal infection was positively associated with practicing both receptive and insertive anal sex, when compared to insertive alone (PR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.32-4.71), and negatively associated with any antibiotic use in the prior three months (PR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.39-0.91). Pharyngeal infection was negatively associated with age greater than 30 years compared to 18-30 years (PR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.30-0.96), and positively associated with gender identity of transgender women (PR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.20-3.73). This study demonstrates considerable burden of extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

  18. A chlamydial type III-secreted effector protein (Tarp) is predominantly recognized by antibodies from humans infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and induces protective immunity against upper genital tract pathologies in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Lili; Chen, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yingqian; Baseman, Joel; Perdue, Sondra; Yeh, I-Tien; Shain, Rochelle; Holland, Martin; Bailey, Robin; Mabey, David; Yu, Ping; Zhong, Guangming

    2009-05-14

    Chlamydia trachomatis genome is predicted to encode a type III secretion system consisting of more than 40 open reading frames (ORFs). To test whether these ORFs are expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans, we expressed 55 chlamydial ORFs covering all putative type III secretion components plus control molecules as fusion proteins and measured the reactivity of these fusion proteins with antibodies from patients infected with C. trachomatis in the urogenital tract (24 antisera) or in the ocular tissue (8 antisera). Forty-five of the 55 proteins were recognized by at least 1 of the 32 human antisera, suggesting that these proteins are both expressed and immunogenic during chlamydial infection in humans. Tarp, a putative type III secretion effector protein, was identified as a novel immunodominant antigen due to its reactivity with the human antisera at high frequency and titer. The expression and immunogenicity of Tarp were confirmed in cell culture and mouse systems. Tarp was mainly associated with the infectious form of chlamydial organisms and became undetectable between 13 and 24 h during the infection cycle in cell culture. Mice intravaginally infected with C. muridarum developed Tarp-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. More importantly, immunization of mice with Tarp induced Th1-dominant immunity that significantly reduced the shedding of live organisms from the lower genital tract and attenuated inflammatory pathologies in the fallopian tube tissues. These observations have demonstrated that Tarp, an immunodominant antigen identified by human antisera, can induce protective immunity against chlamydial infection and pathology in mice.

  19. Immune responses to chlamydial antigens in humans.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L; Kerlan, R; Senyk, G; Stites, D P; Juster, R P; Jawetz, E

    1982-01-01

    Antibody titer, lymphocyte stimulation and leukocyte migration inhibition with chlamydial antigens were determined repeatedly over many months on human subjects. The volunteers were retrospectively placed into four groups on the basis of clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic criteria. Group A consisted of persons with proven or probable chlamydial infection, including an illness confirmed by chlamydial isolation or seroconversion, or a clinically compatible illness with positive serologic results. Group B were sexual partners or close contacts of group A individuals. Group C were laboratory workers with prolonged exposure to viable chlamydiae or their antigens. Group D included persons of comparable age as those in groups A and B, but lacking a history of symptomatic chlamydial infection or of contact with chlamydiae. Individual cases illustrated the rise of antibody and some cell mediated immunity reactions (CMI) with active chlamydial infection. By contrast, laboratory exposure resulted in elevation of CMI but not of antibody. Statistical analysis of the results in 46 volunteers tested repeatedly indicated a strong association of specific antibody with lymphocyte stimulation, but not with leukocyte migration inhibition. Regression analysis suggested that the type of exposure markedly influenced the relationship between antibody and lymphocyte stimulation. Measurement of immunotype-specific antibody titer by microimmunofluorescence (or an equally sensitive method) remains the best laboratory indicator of past chlamydial infection. Neither antibody nor CMI can, as yet, be definitely related to resistance to re-infection in humans.

  20. Respiratory Viral Infections in Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Britto, Clemente J; Brady, Virginia; Lee, Seiwon; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2017-03-01

    Chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF) and interstitial lung diseases (ILD), affect many individuals worldwide. Patients with these chronic lung diseases are susceptible to respiratory lung infections and some of these viral infections can contribute to disease pathogenesis. This review highlights the associations of lung infections and the respective chronic lung diseases and how infection in the different lung diseases affects disease exacerbation and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Opportunistic screening for genital chlamydial infection. I: Acceptability of urine testing in primary and secondary healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, J; Catchpole, M; Rogers, P; Perkins, E; Jackson, N; Carlisle, C; Randall, S; Hopwood, J; Hewitt, G; Underhill, G; Mallinson, H; McLean, L; Gleave, T; Tobin, J; Harindra, V; Ghosh, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the acceptability of opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in young people in a range of healthcare settings. Design: An opportunistic screening programme (1 September 1999 to 31 August 2000) using urine samples tested by ligase chain reaction (LCR). Data on uptake and testing were collected and in-depth interviews were used for programme evaluation. Setting: General practice, family planning, genitourinary medicine clinics, adolescent sexual health clinics, termination of pregnancy clinics, and women's services in hospitals (antenatal, colposcopy, gynaecology and infertility clinics) in two health authorities (Wirral and Portsmouth and South East Hampshire). Main participants: Sexually active women aged between 16 and 24 years attending healthcare settings for any reason. Main outcome measures: Uptake data: proportion of women accepting a test by area, healthcare setting, and age; overall population coverage achieved in 1 year. Evaluation data: participants' attitudes and views towards opportunistic screening and urine testing. Results: Acceptance of testing by women (16–24 years) was 76% in Portsmouth and 84% in Wirral. Acceptance was lower in younger women (Portsmouth only) and varied by healthcare setting within each site. 50% of the target female population were screened in Portsmouth and 39% in Wirral. Both the opportunistic offer of screening and the method of screening were universally acceptable. Major factors influencing a decision to accept screening were the non-invasive nature of testing and treatment, desire to protect future fertility, and the experimental nature of the screening programme. Conclusions: An opportunistic model of urine screening for chlamydial infection is a practical, universally acceptable method of screening. PMID:12576607

  2. Is there a need for rescreening of patients treated for genital chlamydial infections?

    PubMed

    Mårdh, Per-Anders; Persson, Kenneth

    2002-06-01

    The present communication reviews reasons to perform rescreening of chlamydia-infected persons. It brings up difficulties to differentiate between relapse and reinfection. Studies on follow-up of chlamydia-positive cases after therapy are reviewed. It also highlights reasons for therapeutic failure, like compliance, pharmacological factors, including poor bioavailability, wrong dose regimens, lack of adherence to drug intake, neglect of partner notification and concomitant therapy in consorts, possible development of resistance to drugs generally prescribed, false negative or false positive diagnostic tests and reinfection from extra-genital not 'cured' sites. The review points to the need to establish programmes for routine rescreening of chlamydia-infected persons.

  3. Study of the prevalence and association of ocular chlamydial conjunctivitis in women with genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans attending outpatient clinic

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Rania Abdelmonem; Abdelfattah, Maha Mohssen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between chlamydial conjunctivitis and genital infection by Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium and Candida albicans, in addition to the possible relationship between cultured bacterial pathogens and oculogenital chlamydial infection. METHODS This study was performed on 100 (50 symptomatic and 50 asymptomatic) women attending the Gynecological and Obstetric outpatient clinic of Alzahra hospital, Alazhar University. Simultaneously a conjunctival swab was taken from these patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done on DNA extracted from both vaginal and conjunctival swab samples. Culture for both vaginal and conjunctival swabs was also done. RESULTS Candida albicans was the predominant organism isolated by culture in 20% and 40% of conjunctival and vaginal swabs respectively. By the PCR method, ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was present in 60% of symptomatic women, while genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection was present in 30% of symptomatic women. The results of this method also indicated that 25/50 (50%) vaginal swabs were positive with PCR for Candida albicans versus 15/50 (30%) were PCR positive in conjunctival swab. Mycoplasma genitalium was present in only 10% of vaginal swabs. Concomitant oculogenital PCR positive results for Chlamydia trachomatis and Candida albicans were 30% and 28% respectively. CONCLUSION Ocular Chlamydia trachomatis was associated with genital Chlamydia trachomatis in a high percentage of women followed by Candida albicans. Cultured bacterial organisms do not play a role in enhancement of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. PMID:27588273

  4. Early local cytokine profiles in strains of mice with different outcomes from chlamydial genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Darville, T; Andrews, C W; Sikes, J D; Fraley, P L; Rank, R G

    2001-06-01

    In this study, we expand on the examination of genetically determined differences in host responses that correlate with clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis from the genital tract. We infected C57BL/6, BALB/c, and C3H/HeN mice with the mouse pneumonitis agent of C. trachomatis (MoPn). C57BL/6 mice had the shortest course of infection (22 days) and the lowest incidence of severe hydrosalpinx. BALB/c mice also had a short course of infection (25 days), but all developed hydrosalpinx. C3H/HeN mice had the longest course of infection (38 days), and all developed severe hydrosalpinx. Determination of local cytokine responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of genital tract secretions revealed that the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) were significantly increased in the C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains compared to those in the C3H/HeN strain whereas the level of IL-6 was not different. The level of the neutrophil chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) was increased during the first week of infection in all three strains but was significantly higher in the BALB/c strain, the strain with the most rapid influx of neutrophils into the genital tract. Prolonged detection of MIP-2 in C3H/HeN mice was associated with a protracted presence of neutrophils in the genital tract. Early increases in the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta are associated with earlier eradication of infection in the C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains than in the C3H/HeN strain. Increased levels of MIP-2 and neutrophils in BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice relative to C57BL/6 mice suggest that these responses may contribute to pathology.

  5. Natural Cross Chlamydial Infection between Livestock and Free-Living Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Lemus, Jesús A.; Fargallo, Juan A.; Vergara, Pablo; Parejo, Deseada; Banda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The study of cross-species pathogen transmission is essential to understanding the epizootiology and epidemiology of infectious diseases. Avian chlamydiosis is a zoonotic disease whose effects have been mainly investigated in humans, poultry and pet birds. It has been suggested that wild bird species play an important role as reservoirs for this disease. During a comparative health status survey in common (Falco tinnunculus) and lesser (Falco naumanni) kestrel populations in Spain, acute gammapathies were detected. We investigated whether gammapathies were associated with Chlamydiaceae infections. We recorded the prevalence of different Chlamydiaceae species in nestlings of both kestrel species in three different study areas. Chlamydophila psittaci serovar I (or Chlamydophila abortus), an ovine pathogen causing late-term abortions, was isolated from all the nestlings of both kestrel species in one of the three studied areas, a location with extensive ovine livestock enzootic of this atypical bacteria and where gammapathies were recorded. Serovar and genetic cluster analysis of the kestrel isolates from this area showed serovars A and C and the genetic cluster 1 and were different than those isolated from the other two areas. The serovar I in this area was also isolated from sheep abortions, sheep faeces, sheep stable dust, nest dust of both kestrel species, carrion beetles (Silphidae) and Orthoptera. This fact was not observed in other areas. In addition, we found kestrels to be infected by Chlamydia suis and Chlamydia muridarum, the first time these have been detected in birds. Our study evidences a pathogen transmission from ruminants to birds, highlighting the importance of this potential and unexplored mechanism of infection in an ecological context. On the other hand, it is reported a pathogen transmission from livestock to wildlife, revealing new and scarcely investigated anthropogenic threats for wild and endangered species. PMID:20976071

  6. Natural cross chlamydial infection between livestock and free-living bird species.

    PubMed

    Lemus, Jesús A; Fargallo, Juan A; Vergara, Pablo; Parejo, Deseada; Banda, Eva

    2010-10-19

    The study of cross-species pathogen transmission is essential to understanding the epizootiology and epidemiology of infectious diseases. Avian chlamydiosis is a zoonotic disease whose effects have been mainly investigated in humans, poultry and pet birds. It has been suggested that wild bird species play an important role as reservoirs for this disease. During a comparative health status survey in common (Falco tinnunculus) and lesser (Falco naumanni) kestrel populations in Spain, acute gammapathies were detected. We investigated whether gammapathies were associated with Chlamydiaceae infections. We recorded the prevalence of different Chlamydiaceae species in nestlings of both kestrel species in three different study areas. Chlamydophila psittaci serovar I (or Chlamydophila abortus), an ovine pathogen causing late-term abortions, was isolated from all the nestlings of both kestrel species in one of the three studied areas, a location with extensive ovine livestock enzootic of this atypical bacteria and where gammapathies were recorded. Serovar and genetic cluster analysis of the kestrel isolates from this area showed serovars A and C and the genetic cluster 1 and were different than those isolated from the other two areas. The serovar I in this area was also isolated from sheep abortions, sheep faeces, sheep stable dust, nest dust of both kestrel species, carrion beetles (Silphidae) and Orthoptera. This fact was not observed in other areas. In addition, we found kestrels to be infected by Chlamydia suis and Chlamydia muridarum, the first time these have been detected in birds. Our study evidences a pathogen transmission from ruminants to birds, highlighting the importance of this potential and unexplored mechanism of infection in an ecological context. On the other hand, it is reported a pathogen transmission from livestock to wildlife, revealing new and scarcely investigated anthropogenic threats for wild and endangered species.

  7. [Chlamydial infection of the central nervous system. Laboratory diagnosis and clinic and morphological features].

    PubMed

    Vaĭnshenker, Iu I; Nuralova, I V; Onishenko, L S

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents data on the diagnosis, clinical and pathomorphological changes in the central nervous system (CNS) in neurochlamydiasis according to clinical, autoptic, and experimental evidence. It discusses the possible implication of Ch. trachomatis, Ch. pneumoniae, and Ch. psittaci in the development and course of different diseases with CNS involvement: atherosclerosis, vasculitis, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, autism, vegetative state, sequels of perinatal lesions in childhood and adolescence, HIV infection, etc. Considerable attention is paid to the specific features of diagnosis of Chlamydia-induced CNS lesions. Purposeful pathomorphological investigations are shown to be needed.

  8. Hepatitis B virus core antigen as a carrier for Chlamydia trachomatis MOMP multi-epitope peptide enhances protection against genital chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pengfei; Du, Wangqi; Xiong, Yirong; Lv, Yan; Feng, Juan; Zhu, Shanli; Xue, Xiangyang; Chen, Shao; Zhang, Lifang

    2015-12-22

    Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. There is no safe and effective vaccine to control the spread of Ct. In development of Ct vaccine, selection of appropriate candidate antigens and an effective delivery system may be the main challenges. Multi-epitope of major outer membrane protein (MOMPm) is the most suitable candidate for a Ct vaccine, while hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) has unique advantages as vaccine delivery system. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective immune response of a novel candidate vaccine in a murine model of chlamydial genital infection. This candidate vaccine comprises MOMPm peptide delivered with HBcAg. Our results of Ct-specific serum IgG and secretory IgA assay, cytokine assay, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay revealed that immunogenicity of the candidate vaccine was much better than that of the corresponding synthetic MOMPm peptide. Furthermore, the protective effect of the candidate vaccine was also shown much better than that of the synthetic peptide by calculating the isolation of Chlamydia from vaginal swabs and histopathological analysis. Taken together, our results indicate that HBcAg carrying Ct MOMPm could be an effective immune prophylactic for chlamydial infection.

  9. The potential for the noninvasive delivery of polymeric nanocarriers using propellant-based inhalers in the treatment of Chlamydial respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Bharatwaj, Balaji; Wu, Libo; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2010-10-01

    A novel strategy for pulmonary delivery of polymeric nanocarriers (NCs) pressurized-metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) is reported in this work. Core-shell particles consisting of a water soluble, hydrofluoroalkane(HFA)-philic biodegradable copolymer of chitosan and poly(lactic acid), and a core of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NCs were prepared by a modified emulsification-diffusion methodology. Dispersions of the core-shell particles in HFA propellant revealed enhanced physical stability compared to polymeric NCs alone, and more importantly, excellent aerosol characteristics as determined by inertial impaction studies. Confocal microscopy revealed that the polymeric NCs from such core-shell particles are capable not only to be taken up by Calu-3 (airway epithelial) cells that have been infected with Chlamydia pneumoniae, an intracellular pathogen, but are also internalized within chlamydial inclusions. Our results suggest that the proposed methodology can be used as a general platform for the delivery of polymeric NCs to the respiratory tract using the inexpensive pMDIs, and that such an approach may be used to target and deliver drugs to treat chlamydial-related infections.

  10. Early microRNA expression profile as a prognostic biomarker for the development of pelvic inflammatory disease in a mouse model of chlamydial genital infection.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Myers, Garry S A; Spencer, Nicole; Creasy, Heather Huot; Adams, Nancy E; Maurelli, Anthony T; McChesney, Grant R; Cleves, Mario A; Ravel, Jacques; Bowlin, Anne; Rank, Roger G

    2014-06-24

    It is not currently possible to predict the probability of whether a woman with a chlamydial genital infection will develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). To determine if specific biomarkers may be associated with distinct chlamydial pathotypes, we utilized two Chlamydia muridarum variants (C. muridarum Var001 [CmVar001] and CmVar004) that differ in their abilities to elicit upper genital tract pathology in a mouse model. CmVar004 has a lower growth rate in vitro and induces pathology in only 20% of C57BL/6 mouse oviducts versus 83.3% of oviducts in CmVar001-infected mice. To determine if chemokine and cytokine production within 24 h of infection is associated with the outcome of pathology, levels of 15 chemokines and cytokines were measured. CmVar004 infection induced significantly lower levels of CXCL1, CXCL2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CCL2 in comparison to CmVar001 infection with similar rRNA (rs16) levels for Chlamydiae. A combination of microRNA (miRNA) sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of 134 inflammation-related miRNAs was performed 24 h postinfection to determine if the chemokine/cytokine responses would also be reflected in miRNA expression profiles. Interestingly, 12 miRNAs (miR-135a-5p, miR298-5p, miR142-3p, miR223-3p, miR299a-3p, miR147-3p, miR105, miR325-3p, miR132-3p, miR142-5p, miR155-5p, and miR-410-3p) were overexpressed during CmVar004 infection compared to CmVar001 infection, inversely correlating with the respective chemokine/cytokine responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that early biomarkers elicited in the host can differentiate between two pathological variants of chlamydiae and be predictive of upper tract disease. It is apparent that an infecting chlamydial population consists of multiple genetic variants with differing capabilities of eliciting a pathological response; thus, it may be possible to identify biomarkers specific for a given virulence pathotype. mi

  11. [Mold infections in lung transplants].

    PubMed

    Solé, Amparo; Ussetti, Piedad

    2014-01-01

    Invasive infections by molds, mainly Aspergillus infections, account for more than 10% of infectious complications in lung transplant recipients. These infections have a bimodal presentation: an early one, mainly invading bronchial airways, and a late one, mostly focused on lung or disseminated. The Aspergillus colonization at any time in the post-transplant period is one of the major risk factors. Late colonization, together with chronic rejection, is one of the main causes of late invasive forms. A galactomannan value of 0.5 in bronchoalveolar lavage is currently considered a predictive factor of pulmonary invasive infection. There is no universal strategy in terms of prophylaxis. Targeted prophylaxis and preemptive treatment instead of universal prophylaxis, are gaining more followers. The therapeutic drug monitoring level of azoles is highly recommended in the treatment. Monotherapy with voriconazole is the treatment of choice in invasive aspergillosis; combined antifungal therapies are only recommended in severe, disseminated, and other infections due to non-Aspergillus molds.

  12. Chlamydial infections - male

    MedlinePlus

    ... condom will break. Use only water-based lubricants. Oil-based or petroleum-type lubricants can cause latex to weaken and tear. Polyurethane condoms are less prone to breaking than latex condoms, but they cost more. Using condoms with nonoxynol-9 (a spermicide) ...

  13. Chlamydial and Rickettsial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    with other free-living bacteria (Bovarnick and Allen, 1957). The rickettsiae can, however, transport preformed ATP across their cell membrane, a process...replication of rickett- siae ;s that charcteristic of all bacteria : division by binary fission. The generation time for each of the rickettsiae is quite...shortly after the onset of intracellular replication (10-15 hours for R. rickettsii ; 18-24 h for R. tsutsugamushi) one or more rickettsiae begin migrating

  14. Genetic diversity and identification of human infection by amplification of the chlamydial 60-kilodalton cysteine-rich outer membrane protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, M W; Lambden, P R; Clarke, I N

    1991-01-01

    The 60-kDa cysteine-rich outer membrane protein genes of Chlamydia psittaci, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Chlamydia trachomatis have very different 5' ends, but two areas flanking this variable region show absolute sequence conservation. This observation permitted differentiation of the three species of Chlamydia by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), forming the basis of a diagnostic test for chlamydial infections. The PCR product containing the variable region of the respective 60-kDa CrP genes was also subjected to restriction endonuclease digestion, enabling differentiation of individual type strains of C. psittaci. Differentiation was possible between lymphogranuloma venereum and trachoma isolates of C. trachomatis. The PCR-based diagnostic test was successful with all strains of chlamydiae studied. The PCR primers showed high specificity and did not produce any product with common bacterial pathogens that may share the same sites of infection. Images PMID:1864938

  15. Infectious dose and repeated infections are key factors influencing immune response characteristics in guinea pig ocular chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Belij-Rammerstorfer, Sandra; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Stojanovic, Marijana; Marinkovic, Emilija; Lukic, Ivana; Stein, Elisabeth; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Bintner, Nora; Schürer, Nadine; Ghasemian, Ehsan; Kundi, Michael; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether infectious dose of Chlamydia caviae after repeated infections influences the immunological responses and subsequent clearance of pathogen at the ocular surface of guinea pigs. Animals were infected three times via the conjunctiva at six- and twelve-week intervals by applying either 1 × 10(4) or 1 × 10(6) inclusion-forming units (IFUs) of C. caviae. Ocular pathology, infection course, C. caviae-specific serum IgG levels and their capacity to bind and neutralize infection ex vivo were assessed. Animals infected with 1 × 10(4) IFUs had completely diminished ocular infection and pathology after the 2nd infection with increased levels of C. caviae-specific serum IgG and their effective capacity to bind and neutralize C. caviae. Only partial protection was observed in animals infected with 1 × 10(6) IFUs after the 2nd and 3rd infections. Our findings show that full protection was observed in animals repeatedly infected with the lower dose. The lower dose appeared not to compromise the host immune system, thereby enabling fast clearance of the pathogen and the establishment of competent neutralizing antibodies.

  16. CD103+ lung dendritic cells (LDCs) induce stronger Th1/Th17 immunity to a bacterial lung infection than CD11b(hi) LDCs.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Peng, Ying; Wang, Shuhe; Yang, Xi

    2017-02-13

    Recent studies suggest differential roles for CD103+ and CD11b(hi) lung dendritic cells (LDCs) in host defense against viral and bacterial infections. In this study, we examined the contribution of these LDC subsets in protective immunity to chlamydial lung infection using a Chlamydia muridarum mouse infection model. We found that CD103+ LDCs showed higher expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 and CD86) and increased production of cytokines (IL-12p70, IL-10, IL-23 and IL-6) compared with CD11b(hi) LDCs, but the expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) was similar between the two subsets. More importantly, we found, in adoptive transfer experiments, that the mice receiving CD103+ LDCs from Chlamydia-infected mice exhibited better protection than the recipients of CD11b(hi) LDCs, which was associated with more robust Th1/Th17 cytokine responses. In addition, in vitro experiments showed that CD103+ LDCs induced stronger IFN-γ and IL-17 responses, when cocutured with chlamydial antigen-primed CD4+ T cells, than CD11b(hi) LDCs. Furthermore, the blockade of PD1 in the culture of CD4+ T cells with either CD103+ or CD11b(hi) LDCs enhanced production of IFN-γ and IL-17. In conclusion, our data provide direct evidence that CD103+ LDCs are more potent in promoting Th1/Th17 immunity to chlamydial lung infection than CD11b(hi) LDCs.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 13 February 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2016.68.

  17. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  18. Bacterial vaginosis, gonorrhea, and chlamydial infection among women attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic: a longitudinal analysis of possible causal links.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Maria F; Macaluso, Maurizio; Warner, Lee; Fleenor, Michael E; Hook, Edward W; Brill, Ilene; Weaver, Mark A

    2012-03-01

    Interactions between bacterial vaginosis (BV) and inflammatory sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea and chlamydial infection, are not well understood. Furthermore, evidence regarding the sexual transmission of BV is equivocal. We assessed associations between incident BV and incidences of gonorrhea and/or chlamydial infection ("gonorrhea/chlamydia"), as well as similarities in associations for the two processes, among 645 female patients at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Alabama followed prospectively for 6 months from 1995 to 1998. We identified predictors of both incident BV and gonorrhea/chlamydia and used bivariate logistic regression to determine whether these predictors differed. Participants completed 3188 monthly, follow-up visits. Several factors associated with incident BV involved sexual intercourse: young age (<16 years) at first intercourse (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.9), recent drug use during sex (aOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.5), prevalent trichomoniasis (aOR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6) and incident syphilis (aOR, 9.7; 95% CI, 1.9-48.4). Few statistical differences between potential factors for BV and gonorrhea/chlamydia emerged. BV appeared to precede the acquisition of gonorrhea/chlamydia (pairwise odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.3), and vice versa (pairwise odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.5). Findings are consistent with a causal role of sexual behavior in the acquisition of BV and confirm that BV facilitates acquisition of gonorrhea/chlamydia and vice versa independently from other risk factors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Peri-emphysematous lung infection.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D A; D'Esopo, N D

    1981-01-01

    The difficulty in classifying pulmonary infection within areas of bullous emphysema may have contributed to the lack of appreciation of this entity. This process is important to recognize because: (1) the clinical picture is usually benign:; (2) it may be confused with tuberculosis, fungal disease, and carcinoma of the lung; and (3) radiographic resolution may be slow. For these reasons, pneumonitis which occurs within emphysematous lung may have been previously considered as slowly resolving pneumonias. The development of air-fluid levels within bullae has been called "infected emphysematous bullae." We believe that this phrase is misleading since there are no bacteriologic data to support the presence of infection within the bullae containing fluid. In fact, direct sampling of intrabullous fluid has been rarely reported and, if obtained, has been generally negative for bacteria. Furthermore, the clinical course in our patients is alos not consistent with infection within a space. Once fiberoptic bronchoscopy has excluded an obstructing endobronchial lesion, the physician may patiently follow the anticipated gradual resolution. We suggest that the phrase, "periemphysematous lung infection" best describes these related clinical-radiological conditions.

  20. Transient detection of Chlamydial-specific Th1 memory cells in the peripheral circulation of women with history of Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D; Reighard, Seth D; Chavez, Jean M; Rabe, Lorna K; Maryak, Samantha A; Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Cherpes, Thomas L

    2012-12-01

    Development of safe and effective Chlamydia trachomatis vaccines requires better understanding of the host immune responses elicited by natural infection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from women with or without history of genital tract chlamydial infection were stimulated with inactivated C. trachomatis elementary bodies (EB) in ELISPOT assays that enumerated frequencies of cells producing interferon (IFN)-γ or interleukin (IL)-17. IFN-γ-positive cells were highest among women sampled 30-60 days after diagnosis of C. trachomatis infection and treatment initiation, while the numbers of IFN-γ-positive cells were equally low among uninfected women and women sampled <30 or >60 days after diagnosis of infection. Conversely, IL-17-positive cell numbers were uniformly low among all participants. Dramatically reduced numbers of Chlamydia-specific Th1 memory cells in the peripheral circulation of study participants sampled more than 2 months after diagnosis, and initiation of treatment provides new insight into the results from C. trachomatis vaccine trials, in which immunization with EB provided only short-lived protection. Our results also suggest that an effective vaccine against this weakly antigenic intracellular pathogen will need to generate immunological memory more durable than that elicited by natural infection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Chlamydial disease pathogenesis. The 57-kD chlamydial hypersensitivity antigen is a stress response protein

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection of humans is commonly a localized inflammation that can result in infertility, blindness, and perhaps arthritis. The pathogenic process(es) that cause these sequelae are thought to be immunological. A 57-kD protein that is common among Chlamydia elicits ocular inflammation when introduced onto the conjunctivae of guinea pigs or nonhuman primates previously sensitized by chlamydial infection. This protein is thought to mediate the immunopathology that follows chlamydial infection. To more thoroughly characterize this chlamydial component, we cloned its gene from a C. psittaci strain and identified a particular recombinant that produced the 57-kD polypeptide. The recombinant gene product was immunoreactive with a monospecific anti-57-kD serum, and elicited an ocular inflammation similar to that produced by the 57-kD antigen isolated from chlamydiae. Sequencing identified two ORFs that encode polypeptides of 11.2 and 58.1 kD and are co-transcribed. These two polypeptides show homology with Escherichia coli groE and Coxiella burnetii htp heat-shock proteins. Striking homology (greater than 50%) was found between the 57-kD protein and the HtpB, GroEL, 65-k Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Hsp60 proteins. Thus, the 57-kD chlamydial protein, previously implicated as mediating a deleterious immunologic response to chlamydial infections, is a stress-induced protein similar to those that occur universally in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:2571668

  2. The role of peptidoglycan in chlamydial cell division: towards resolving the chlamydial anomaly.

    PubMed

    Jacquier, Nicolas; Viollier, Patrick H; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-03-01

    Chlamydiales are obligate intracellular bacteria including some important pathogens causing trachoma, genital tract infections and pneumonia, among others. They share an atypical division mechanism, which is independent of an FtsZ homologue. However, they divide by binary fission, in a process inhibited by penicillin derivatives, causing the formation of an aberrant form of the bacteria, which is able to survive in the presence of the antibiotic. The paradox of penicillin sensitivity of chlamydial cells in the absence of detectable peptidoglycan (PG) was dubbed the chlamydial anomaly, since no PG modified by enzymes (Pbps) that are the usual target of penicillin could be detected in Chlamydiales. We review here the recent advances in this field with the first direct and indirect evidences of PG-like material in both Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-related bacteria. Moreover, PG biosynthesis is required for proper localization of the newly described septal proteins RodZ and NlpD. Taken together, these new results set the stage for a better understanding of the role of PG and septal proteins in the division mechanism of Chlamydiales and illuminate the long-standing chlamydial anomaly. Moreover, understanding the chlamydial division mechanism is critical for the development of new antibiotics for the treatment of chlamydial chronic infections.

  3. Human lung ex vivo infection models.

    PubMed

    Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is counted among the leading causes of death worldwide. Viruses, bacteria and pathogen-related molecules interact with cells present in the human alveolus by numerous, yet poorly understood ways. Traditional cell culture models little reflect the cellular composition, matrix complexity and three-dimensional architecture of the human lung. Integrative animal models suffer from species differences, which are of particular importance for the investigation of zoonotic lung diseases. The use of cultured ex vivo infected human lung tissue may overcome some of these limitations and complement traditional models. The present review gives an overview of common bacterial lung infections, such as pneumococcal infection and of widely neglected pathogens modeled in ex vivo infected lung tissue. The role of ex vivo infected lung tissue for the investigation of emerging viral zoonosis including influenza A virus and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus is discussed. Finally, further directions for the elaboration of such models are revealed. Overall, the introduced models represent meaningful and robust methods to investigate principles of pathogen-host interaction in original human lung tissue.

  4. Risk assessment and other screening options for gonorrhoea and chlamydial infections in women attending rural Tanzanian antenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Mayaud, P.; Grosskurth, H.; Changalucha, J.; Todd, J.; West, B.; Gabone, R.; Senkoro, K.; Rusizoka, M.; Laga, M.; Hayes, R.

    1995-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries and may play a key role in enhancing the heterosexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment of STDs is one of the most cost-effective of all health interventions in developing countries; however, STDs among women in rural populations have received little attention. In this study, we report that prevalences of STDs among 964 women attending antenatal clinics in a rural area of the United Republic of Tanzania. A total of 378 (39%) of these women were infected with at least one STD pathogen, 97 (10%) had syphilis, and 81 (8%) has Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and/or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection. The recommended syndromic approach to screening for NG/CT infection, based on reported genital symptoms, had a low sensitivity (43%) and failed to discriminate between infected and uninfected women. A risk score approach that we developed, based on sociodemographic and other factors associated with NG/CT infection, had a higher sensitivity and lower cost per true case treated than other approaches, although its positive predictive value was only about 20%. PMID:8846488

  5. Mold infections in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Archana; Hosseini-Moghaddam, S M; Rotstein, Coleman; Husain, Shahid

    2013-06-01

    Fungal infections continue to produce morbidity and mortality in lung transplant recipients despite the widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis. There has been a decline in Candida infections but Aspergillus species predominate. Other mold pathogens including Fusarium, Scedosporium, and Zygomycetes also cause infections in lung transplant recipients. Furthermore, the widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis has prompted a delay in onset of Aspergillus infection in lung transplant recipients. Pulmonary parenchymal disease has become the most common manifestation of invasive aspergillosis. Among the risk factors pre- or posttransplant Aspergillus colonization is the most important risk factor reported in several retrospective studies. Recently posttransplant colonization has been implicated in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Other factors that have been reported include preceding cytomegalovirus infections, hypogammaglobulinemia, and single-lung transplantation. The risk factors for other mold infections such as Scedosporium, Fusarium, and Zygomycetes are not well studied. The best antimold prophylaxis strategy and choice of drug remains to be elucidated. Most lung transplant centers use either voriconazole or inhaled amphotericin preparations. However, data have emerged regarding the increased risk of squamous cell cancer in lung transplant recipients on voriconazole prophylaxis. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis have resulted in a significant decrease in mortality. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  6. Cervicovaginal levels of proinflammatory cytokines are increased during chlamydial infection in bacterial vaginosis but not in lactobacilli-dominated flora.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Camila; Santos-Greatti, Mariana M V; Parada, Cristina M G L; Pontes, Anagloria; Pontes, Ana G; Giraldo, Paulo C; Donders, Gilbert G G; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cervicovaginal levels of proinflammatory cytokines in women with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection in the presence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and normal flora and to compare with those negative for CT. In this cross-sectional study, nonpregnant women were enrolled at 2 outpatient clinics and at 1 primary medical care unit in São Paulo State, Brazil. Cervicovaginal samples from 256 women with BV, of which 68 (26.6%) had concomitant CT infection and 188 (73.4%) were CT-negative, were measured for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-8 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A matching number of samples from women with normal flora, CT-positive (n = 68) and negative (n = 188), were evaluated as control. Cytokine levels were compared by Mann-Whitney test and differences were considered significant at p < .05. In CT-negative women, IL-1β was increased in BV (p < .001) when compared to normal flora, while the levels of IL-6 and IL8 were unchanged. The presence of CT infection was not associated with differences on cytokine levels in women with normal flora. However, women with BV had higher levels of IL-1β (p = .02), IL-6 (p = .02), and IL-8 (p = .03) in the presence of CT when compared to those who tested negative for CT. Detection of endocervical CT is associated with increased cervicovaginal IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in women with concomitant BV but not in those with normal flora.

  7. Genital chlamydial infection among women in Nicaragua: validity of direct fluorescent antibody testing, prevalence, risk factors and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, B; Espinoza, F; Villegas, R R; Smith, G D; Ramos, A; Egger, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate the performance of a direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and to determine the prevalence, risk factors and clinical manifestations of cervical chlamydia infection in different groups of women in Nicaragua. STUDY POPULATION: 926 women, 863 routine clinic attenders (mean age 27 years) and 63 sex workers (mean age 25 years) attending health centres in León, Corinto, Matagalpa and Bluefields. METHODS: Cervical specimens were examined using the Syva MicroTrak test system with a cut-off of 10 or more elementary bodies (EBs). The DFA results were validated by a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Discordant results were further examined in nested PCR assays directed at two different target genes. An interviewer-administered questionnaire and a standard gynaecological examination were completed. RESULTS: Sensitivity of DFA was 80.1%, specificity 98.3%, and positive and negative predictive values 62.5% and 99.3%, respectively. Values were lower in locations where samples thawed because of electricity breaks and higher among sex workers. The majority of discordant results was confirmed as positive in nested PCR assays. Prevalence of cervical chlamydia infection based on positivity in DFA and/or PCR ranged from 2% among routine clinic attenders aged 35 years or older, to 8% among adolescent clinic attenders, and to 14% among sex workers. Among routine clinic attenders, young age (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] 1.4-8.9 for women aged 15-19 years as compared with 1 in women 25 years of age or older) and use of oral contraceptives (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.6) were the only statistically significant risk factors identified in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Presence of mucopurulent cervical discharge (OR 5.9, 95% CI 3.0-11.5) and presence of ectropion (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.5) were the clinical signs independently associated with infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the DFA test was sensitive and

  8. Incidence of severe reproductive tract complications associated with diagnosed genital chlamydial infection: the Uppsala Women's Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Low, N; Egger, M; Sterne, J A C; Harbord, R M; Ibrahim, F; Lindblom, B; Herrmann, B

    2006-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cumulative incidence of severe complications associated with genital chlamydia infection in the general female population. Methods The Uppsala Women's Cohort Study was a retrospective population based cohort study in Sweden, linking laboratory, hospital, and population registers. We estimated the cumulative incidence of hospital diagnosed pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility, and used multivariable regression models to estimate hazard ratios according to screening status. Results We analysed complete data from 43 715 women in Uppsala aged 15–24 years between January 1985 and December 1989. Follow up until the end of 1999 included 709 000 woman years and 3025 events. The cumulative incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease by age 35 years was 3.9% (95% CI 3.7% to 4.0%) overall: 5.6% (4.7% to 6.7%) in women who ever tested positive for chlamydia, 4.0% (3.7% to 4.4%) in those with negative tests, and 2.9% (2.7% to 3.2%) in those who were never screened. The corresponding figures were: for ectopic pregnancy, 2.3% (2.2% to 2.5%) overall, 2.7% (2.1% to 3.5%), 2.0% (1.8% to 2.3%), and 1.9% (1.7% to 2.1%); and for infertility, 4.1% (3.9% to 4.3%) overall, 6.7% (5.7% to 7.9%), 4.7% (4.4% to 5.1%), and 3.1% (2.8% to 3.3%). Low educational attainment was strongly associated with the development of all outcomes. Conclusions The incidence of severe chlamydia associated complications estimated from ours, and other population based studies, was lower than expected. Studies that incorporate data about pelvic inflammatory disease diagnosed in primary care and behavioural risk factors would further improve our understanding of the natural history of chlamydia. Our results provide reassurance for patients, but mean that the benefits of chlamydia screening programmes might have been overestimated. PMID:16731670

  9. Lung Cancer in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Mena, Álvaro; Meijide, Héctor; Marcos, Pedro J

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of HAART for persons living with HIV since 1996 has resulted in a dramatic decline in AIDS-related mortality. However, other comorbidities are increasing, such as metabolic disturbances or cancers, including solid organ malignancies. Among the latest, lung cancer, especially the adenocarcinoma subtype, is on the rise. HIV infection, even controlling for smoking, is an independent risk factor for developing lung cancer. HIV could promote lung cancers through immunosuppression, chronic inflammation, and a direct oncogenic effect. Smoking, lung infections, and chronic pulmonary diseases are risk factors for lung cancer. All may contribute to the cumulative incidence of lung cancer in persons living with HIV. It is double that in the general population. The role of HAART in lung cancer development in persons living with HIV is not well established. Although data supporting it could be too preliminary, persons living with HIV should be considered within high-risk groups that could benefit from screening strategies with low-dose computed tomography, especially those with airway obstruction and emphysema. Current evidence suggests that quitting smoking strategies in persons living with HIV achieve abstinence rates comparable to those in healthy HIV-negative smokers.

  10. Gallium scintigraphic pattern in lung CMV infections

    SciTech Connect

    Ganz, W.I.; Cohen, D.; Mallin, W.

    1994-05-01

    Due to extensive use of prophylactic therapy for Pneumonitis Carinii Pneumonia (PCP), Cytomegalic Viral (CMV) infection may now be the most common lung infection in AIDS patients. This study was performed to determine Gallium-67 patterns in AIDS patients with CMV. Pathology reports were reviewed in AIDS patients who had a dose of 5 to 10 mCi of Gallium-67 citrate. Analysis of images were obtained 48-72 hours later of the entire body was performed. Gallium-67 scans in 14 AIDS patients with biopsy proven CMV, were evaluated for eye, colon, adrenal, lung and renal uptake. These were compared to 40 AIDS patients without CMV. These controls had infections including PCP, Mycobacterial infections, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis. 100% of CMV patients had bowel uptake greater than or equal to liver. Similar bowel activity was seen in 50% of AIDS patients without CMV. 71% had intense eye uptake which was seen in only 10% of patients without CMV. 50% of CMV patients had renal uptake compared to 5% of non-CMV cases. Adrenal uptake was suggested in 50%, however, SPECT imaging is needed for confirmation. 85% had low grade lung uptake. The low grade lung had perihilar prominence. The remaining 15% had high grade lung uptake (greater than sternum) due to superimposed PCP infection. Colon uptake is very sensitive indicator for CMV infection. However, observing eye, renal, and or adrenal uptake improved the diagnostic specificity. SPECT imaging is needed to confirm renal or adrenal abnormalities due to intense bowel activity present in 100% of cases. When high grade lung uptake is seen superimposed PCP is suggested.

  11. Persistent chlamydiae: from cell culture to a paradigm for chlamydial pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Beatty, W L; Morrison, R P; Byrne, G I

    1994-12-01

    Chlamydiae are medically important bacteria responsible for a wide range of human infections and diseases. Repeated episodes of infection promote chronic inflammation associated with detrimental immune system-mediated pathologic changes. However, the true nature of chlamydial pathogenesis may encompass repeated infection superimposed upon persistent infection, which would allow for heightened immune reactivity. During the course of chlamydial infection, numerous host elaborated factors with inhibitory or modifying effects may cause alterations in the chlamydia-host cell relationship such that the organism is maintained in a nonproductive stage of growth. Abnormal or persistent chlamydiae have been recognized under a variety of cell culture systems. The numerous factors associated with altered growth suggest an innate flexibility in the developmental cycle of chlamydiae. This review evaluates in vitro studies of chlamydial persistence and correlates these model systems to features of natural chlamydial disease.

  12. Fusarium Infection in Lung Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Herman A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Restrepo, Alejandro; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium is a fungal pathogen of immunosuppressed lung transplant patients associated with a high mortality in those with severe and persistent neutropenia. The principle portal of entry for Fusarium species is the airways, and lung involvement almost always occurs among lung transplant patients with disseminated infection. In these patients, the immunoprotective mechanisms of the transplanted lungs are impaired, and they are, therefore, more vulnerable to Fusarium infection. As a result, fusariosis occurs in up to 32% of lung transplant patients. We studied fusariosis in 6 patients following lung transplantation who were treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during an 8-year period and reviewed 3 published cases in the literature. Cases were identified by the microbiology laboratory and through discharge summaries. Patients presented with dyspnea, fever, nonproductive cough, hemoptysis, and headache. Blood tests showed elevated white blood cell counts with granulocytosis and elevated inflammatory markers. Cultures of Fusarium were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage, blood, and sputum specimens. Treatments included amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin, voriconazole, and posaconazole, either alone or in combination. Lung involvement occurred in all patients with disseminated disease and it was associated with a poor outcome. The mortality rate in this group of patients was high (67%), and of those who survived, 1 patient was treated with a combination of amphotericin B and voriconazole, 1 patient with amphotericin B, and 1 patient with posaconazole. Recommended empirical treatment includes voriconazole, amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B first-line, and posaconazole for refractory disease. High-dose amphotericin B is recommended for treatment of most cases of fusariosis. The echinocandins (for example, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin) are generally avoided because Fusarium species have intrinsic resistance to them. Treatment

  13. Screening for Chlamydial Cervicitis in a Sexually Active University Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malotte, C. Kevin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assays to detect chlamydial cervicitis were performed on samples from 1,320 sexually active university women. Seventy-five had positive tests. Demographic, history, symptom, and physical examination variables were insufficient to predict infection accurately. Concludes that screening during routine visits with this…

  14. Influence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis on pregnancy outcome, infant health and life-long sequelae in infected offspring.

    PubMed

    Mårdh, Per-Anders

    2002-12-01

    This chapter deals with genital chlamydial infections in pregnancy and postpartum. There is increasing evidence that Chlamydia trachomatis infection may result in a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including early and late abortion, intrauterine infections of the fetus, stillbirth, prematurity, premature rupture of the membranes (PROM) and postpartum endometritis. Ectopic pregnancy is commonly associated with a previous tubal chlamydial infection where immunological reactions seem to play a role. C. trachomatis infection may be acquired as an intrauterine infection, as well as during transit through the birth channel, and this may result in neonatal conjunctivitis and/or pneumonia. The role of chlamydial infection in the sudden death syndrome has also been considered, but evidence so far is minimal. Neonatal chlamydial infection may cause life-long sequelae, such as obstructive lung disease. Genital chlamydial infections have been associated with problems in insemination and attempts at in vitro fertilization. The chapter also deals with screening of pregnant women for C. trachomatis and the treatment of infected mothers and their offspring.

  15. Impact of mold infections in explanted lungs on outcomes of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vadnerkar, Aniket; Clancy, Cornelius J; Celik, Umit; Yousem, Samuel A; Mitsani, Dimitra; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Nguyen, Minh-Ly; Kwak, Eun J; Pilewski, Joseph; Silveira, Fernanda P; Crespo, Maria; Nguyen, M Hong

    2010-01-27

    Little is known about the incidence or significance of mold infections in the explanted lungs of lung transplant recipients. We reviewed the histopathology of the explanted lungs from 304 patients who underwent lung transplantation at our institution from 2005 to 2007 and received alemtuzumab induction therapy and posttransplant voriconazole prophylaxis. Invasive mold infections were present in the explanted lungs of 5% (14 of 304) of patients, including chronic necrotizing pneumonias (n=7), mycetomas (n=4), and invasive fungal pneumonias (n=3). Only 21% (3 of 14) received immunosuppressive therapy within 1 year before lung transplantation, suggesting that lung damage itself predisposed patients to mold infections. The risk of mold infection was higher in patients with cystic fibrosis (11%, 4 of 35) than other underlying lung diseases (4%, 10 of 269). Pulmonary mold infections were not diagnosed or suspected in 57% (8 of 14) of patients. Despite secondary voriconazole prophylaxis, fungal infections developed in 43% (6 of 14) of patients with mold infections of the explanted lungs compared with 14% (42 of 290) of patients without mold infections (P=0.01). Three patients developed invasive fungal infections while on voriconazole prophylaxis and three developed fungal infections more than 8 months after the discontinuation of voriconazole. The mortality attributable to invasive fungal infections among patients with mold infections of the explanted lungs was 29% (4 of 14). Invasive mold infections in the explanted lungs are often not recognized before lung transplantation and are associated with poor outcomes.

  16. Chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins: regulation, function and potential vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Stojanov, Milos; Greub, Gilbert; Baud, David

    2016-01-01

    Pmps (Polymorphic Membrane Proteins) are a group of membrane bound surface exposed chlamydial proteins that have been characterized as autotransporter adhesins and are important in the initial phase of chlamydial infection. These proteins all contain conserved GGA (I, L, V) and FxxN tetrapeptide motifs in the N-terminal portion of each protein. All chlamydial species express Pmps. Even in the chlamydia-related bacteria Waddlia chondrophila, a Pmp-like adhesin has been identified, demonstrating the importance of Pmps in Chlamydiales biology. Chlamydial species vary in the number of pmp genes and their differentially regulated expression during the infectious cycle or in response to stress. Studies have also demonstrated that Pmps are able to induce innate immune functional responses in infected cells, including production of IL-8, IL-6 and MCP-1, by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Human serum studies have indicated that although anti-Pmp specific antibodies are produced in response to a chlamydial infection, the response is variable depending on the Pmp protein. In C. trachomatis, PmpB, PmpC, PmpD and PmpI were the proteins eliciting the strongest immune response among adolescents with and without pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). In contrast, PmpA and PmpE elicited the weakest antibody response. Interestingly, there seems to be a gender bias for Pmp recognition with a stronger anti-Pmp reactivity in male patients. Furthermore, anti-PmpA antibodies might contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes, at least among women with PID. In vitro studies indicated that dendritic cells infected with C. muridarum were able to present PmpG and PmpF on their MHC class II receptors and T cells were able to recognize the MHC class-II bound peptides. In addition, vaccination with PmpEFGH and Major Outer Membrane Protein (MOMP) significantly protected mice against a genital tract C. muridarum infection, suggesting that Pmps may be an important component of a multi

  17. Fungal infections of the lung in children.

    PubMed

    Toma, Paolo; Bertaina, Alice; Castagnola, Elio; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; D'Andrea, Maria Luisa; Finocchi, Andrea; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Granata, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Fungal infections of the lungs are relatively common and potentially life-threatening conditions in immunocompromised children. The role of imaging in children with lung mycosis is to delineate the extension of pulmonary involvement, to assess response to therapy, and to monitor for adverse sequelae such as bronchiectasis and cavitation. The aim of this paper is to show imaging findings in a series of patients with fungal pneumonia from two tertiary children's hospitals, to discuss differential diagnoses and to show how imaging findings can vary depending on the host immune response.

  18. NK cells modulate the lung dendritic cell-mediated Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Joyee, Antony G; Wang, Shuhe; Bai, Hong; Zhao, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yang, Xi

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the interaction between NK cells and lung dendritic cells (LDCs) on the outcome of respiratory infections is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of NK cells on the function of LDCs during intracellular bacterial lung infection of Chlamydia muridarum in mice. We found that the naive mice receiving LDCs from C. muridarum-infected NK-cell-depleted mice (NK-LDCs) showed more serious body weight loss, bacterial burden, and pathology upon chlamydial challenge when compared with the recipients of LDCs from infected sham-treated mice (NK+LDCs). Cytokine analysis of the local tissues of the former compared with the latter exhibited lower levels of Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17), but higher levels of Th2 (IL-4), cytokines. Consistently, NK-LDCs were less efficient in directing C. muridarum-specific Th1 and Th17 responses than NK+LDCs when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells. In NK cell/LDC coculture experiments, the blockade of NKG2D receptor reduced the production of IL-12p70, IL-6, and IL-23 by LDCs. The neutralization of IFN-γ in the culture decreased the production of IL-12p70 by LDCs, whereas the blockade of TNF-α resulted in diminished IL-6 production. Our findings demonstrate that NK cells modulate LDC function to elicit Th1/Th17 immunity during intracellular bacterial infection.

  19. Human cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L; Schmidt, L; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Jawetz, E

    1979-02-01

    A reproducible method was developed to determine the ability of chlamydial antigens to stimulate lymphocytes from volunteers. In tests repeated 4 to 14 times, the cells from a given volunteer gave a relatively narrow range of responses, but there were great differences in the mean response of different volunteers. In the entire group of 52 volunteers, lymphocyte stimulation was significantly associated with the presence of antibody, but in a given individual results of one test did not aid in predicting the results of the other. A majority of persons with either antichlamydial antibody or elevated lymphocyte stimulation, or both, did not have a history of signs or symptoms within a spectrum of chlamydial diseases. This may reflect the great frequency of asymptomatic infection with these organisms. The lymphocytes of some individuals were stimulated to a significantly greater degree by antigens of one chlamydial species (Chlamydia trachomatis or C. psittaci) than by the other. These and other cell-mediated reactions in human chlamydial infections, and their possible medical significance, are under continued study.

  20. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Lebrón, J; Guerrero-León, M; Del Arco, A; Colmenero, J; Márquez, M; Santos, J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012) were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%), and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2), with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9) years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7%) patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5%) had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232), the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397), and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0%) and 23 (38.3%) cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3%) cases with advanced stages (III and IV) at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%), chemotherapy 14 (24.1%), surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%), radiotherapy 7 (12.1%), surgery 4 (6.9%), and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%). Forty-six (76.7%) patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma

  1. Ultrastructural analysis of chlamydial antigen-containing vesicles everting from the Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion.

    PubMed

    Giles, David K; Whittimore, Judy D; LaRue, Richard W; Raulston, Jane E; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2006-05-01

    Several chlamydial antigens have been detected in the infected epithelial cell cytosol and on the host cell surface prior to their presumed natural release at the end of the 72-96 h developmental cycle. These extra-inclusion antigens are proposed to influence vital host cell functions, antigen trafficking and presentation and, ultimately, contribute to a prolonged inflammatory response. To begin to dissect the mechanisms for escape of these antigens from the chlamydial inclusion, which are enhanced on exposure to antibiotics, polarized endometrial epithelial cells (HEC-1B) were infected with Chlamydia trachomatis serovar E for 36 h or 48 h. Infected cells were then exposed to chemotactic human polymorphonuclear neutrophils not loaded or pre-loaded in vitro with the antibiotic azithromycin. Viewed by electron microscopy, the azithromycin-mediated killing of chlamydiae involved an increase in chlamydial outer membrane blebbing followed by the appearance of the blebs in larger vesicles (i) everting from but still associated with the inclusion as well as (ii) external to the inclusion. Evidence that the vesicles originated from the chlamydial inclusion membrane was shown by immuno-localization of inclusion membrane proteins A, F, and G on the vesicular membranes. Chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (chsp60) copies 2 and 3, but not copy 1, were released from RB and incorporated into the everted inclusion membrane vesicles and delivered to the infected cell surface. These data represent direct evidence for one mechanism of early antigen delivery, albeit membrane-bound, beyond the confines of the chlamydial inclusion.

  2. Lung Infections in Systemic Rheumatic Disease: Focus on Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Di Franco, Manuela; Lucchino, Bruno; Spaziante, Martina; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Valesini, Guido; Iaiani, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    Systemic rheumatic diseases have significant morbidity and mortality, due in large part to concurrent infections. The lung has been reported among the most frequent sites of infection in patients with rheumatic disease, who are susceptible to developing pneumonia sustained both by common pathogens and by opportunistic microorganisms. Patients with rheumatic disease show a peculiar vulnerability to infectious complications. This is due in part to intrinsic disease-related immune dysregulation and in part to the immunosuppressive treatments. Several therapeutic agents have been associated to a wide spectrum of infections, complicating the management of rheumatic diseases. This review discusses the most frequent pulmonary infections encountered in rheumatic diseases, focusing on opportunistic agents, consequent diagnostic challenges and appropriate therapeutic strategies. PMID:28146077

  3. Incidence and reinfection rates of genital chlamydial infection among women aged 16–24 years attending general practice, family planning and genitourinary medicine clinics in England: a prospective cohort study by the Chlamydia Recall Study Advisory Group

    PubMed Central

    LaMontagne, D Scott; Baster, Kathleen; Emmett, Lynsey; Nichols, Tom; Randall, Sarah; McLean, Louise; Meredith, Paula; Harindra, Veerakathy; Tobin, Jean M; Underhill, Gillian S; Hewitt, W Graham; Hopwood, Jennifer; Gleave, Toni; Ghosh, Ajit K; Mallinson, Harry; Davies, Alisha R; Hughes, Gwenda; Fenton, Kevin A

    2007-01-01

    Background In England, screening for genital chlamydial infection has begun; however, screening frequency for women is not yet determined. Aim To measure chlamydia incidence and reinfection rates among young women to suggest screening intervals. Methods An 18‐month prospective cohort study of women aged 16–24 years recruited from general practices, family planning clinics and genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics: baseline‐negative women followed for incidence and baseline‐positive women for reinfection; urine tested every 6 months via nucleic acid amplification; and behavioural data collected. Extra test and questionnaire completed 3 months after initial positive test. Factors associated with infection and reinfection investigated using Cox regression stratified by healthcare setting of recruitment. Results Chlamydia incidence was mean (95% CI) 4.9 (2.7 to 8.8) per 100 person‐years (py) among women recruited from general practices, 6.4 (4.2 to 9.8) from family planning clinics and 10.6 (7.4 to 15.2) from GUM clinics. Incidence was associated with young age, history of chlamydial infection and acquisition of new sexual partners. If recently acquiring new partners, condom use at last sexual intercourse was independently associated with lower incidence. Chlamydia reinfection was mean (95% CI) 29.9 (19.7 to 45.4) per 100/person‐year from general practices, 22.3 (15.6 to 31.8) from family planning clinics and 21.1 (14.3 to 30.9) from GUM clinics. Factors independently associated with higher reinfection rates were acquisition of new partners and failure to treat all partners. Conclusions Sexual behaviours determined incidence and reinfection, regardless of healthcare setting. Our results suggest annual screening of women aged 16–24 years who are chlamydia negative, or sooner if partner change occurs. Rescreening chlamydia‐positive women within 6 months of baseline infection may be sensible, especially if partner change occurs or all partners are

  4. Chlamydial Antibiotic Resistance and Treatment Failure in Veterinary and Human Medicine.

    PubMed

    Borel, Nicole; Leonard, Cory; Slade, Jessica; Schoborg, Robert V

    The Chlamydiaceae are widespread pathogens of both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis infection causes blinding trachoma and reproductive complications in humans. Chlamydia pneumoniae causes human respiratory tract infections and atypical pneumonia. Chlamydia suis infection is associated with conjunctivitis, diarrhea, and failure to gain weight in domestic swine. Chlamydial infections in humans and domesticated animals are generally controlled by antibiotic treatment-particularly macrolides (usually azithromycin) and tetracyclines (tetracycline and doxycycline). Tetracycline-containing feed has also been used to limit infections and promote growth in livestock populations, although its use has decreased because of growing concerns about antimicrobial resistance development. Because Sandoz and Rockey published an elegant review of chlamydial anti-microbial resistance in 2010, we will review the following: (i) antibiotic resistance in C. suis, (ii) recent evidence for acquired resistance in human chlamydial infections, and (iii) recent non-genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance that may contribute to treatment failure.

  5. A lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Collie, David; Govan, John; Wright, Steven; Thornton, Elisabeth; Tennant, Peter; Smith, Sionagh; Doherty, Catherine; McLachlan, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. A new paradigm for managing such infections is needed, as are relevant and translatable animal models to identify and test concepts. We sought to improve on limitations associated with existing models of infection in small animals through developing a lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep. Using local lung instillation of P. aeruginosa suspended in agar beads we were able to demonstrate that such infection led to the development of a suppurative, necrotising and pyogranulomatous pneumonia centred on the instilled beads. No overt evidence of organ or systemic compromise was apparent in any animal during the course of infection. Infection persisted in the lungs of individual animals for as long as 66 days after initial instillation. Quantitative microbiology applied to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid derived from infected segments proved an insensitive index of the presence of significant infection in lung tissue (>10(4) cfu/g). The agar bead model of chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in sheep is a relevant platform to investigate both the pathobiology of such infections as well as novel approaches to their diagnosis and therapy. Particular ethical benefits relate to the model in terms of refining existing approaches by compromising a smaller proportion of the lung with infection and facilitating longitudinal assessment by bronchoscopy, and also potentially reducing animal numbers through facilitating within-animal comparisons of differential therapeutic approaches.

  6. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Rosario; Pascual, Javier; Cabrera, Eva; Lebrón, Jose M; Guerrero-León, Miguel A; del Arco, Alfonso; Colmenero, Juan D; Santos, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Our objective was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of lung cancer (LC) in HIV patients and compare them with LC patients from the general population. All HIV patients diagnosed at three hospitals in Malaga (southern Spain) who developed LC during January 1989-June 2012 were reviewed. They were compared with a sample of patients with LC taken from the Pneumology and Oncology Department of the Hospital Virgen de le Victoria (Malaga) during the same period. Of the 4721 HIV patients (83% men) followed-up during the study period, 61 (1.29%) developed LC: 82% were men, mean age 48 years, all except two were smokers, 47.5% had a prior lung infection, and the median CD4 count was 237 cells/mm(3). Forty (65.5%) patients were on antiretroviral therapy at LC diagnosis (70% had an undetectable viral load). The HIV-negative group was older at diagnosis, contained fewer active smokers, had a greater frequency of the squamous cell carcinoma histological subtype and fewer cases of adenocarcinoma. Presentation was advanced in both groups and the median survival of HIV patients was three months. LC is a common tumour in HIV patients. It affects men and women equally, with a history of smoking and often a prior opportunistic lung disease. Affected patients are often immunosuppressed and have had an AIDS-related diagnosis.

  7. IL-6 ameliorates acute lung injury in influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei-Lin; Wang, Chung-Teng; Yang, Shiu-Ju; Leu, Chia-Hsing; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses to defend against pathogens. It also participates in the process of influenza infection by affecting viral clearance and immune cell responses. However, whether IL-6 impacts lung repair in influenza pathogenesis remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of IL-6 in acute influenza infection in mice. IL-6-deficient mice infected with influenza virus exhibited higher lethality, lost more body weight and had higher fibroblast accumulation and lower extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover in the lung than their wild-type counterparts. Deficiency in IL-6 enhanced proliferation, migration and survival of lung fibroblasts, as well as increased virus-induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. IL-6-deficient lung fibroblasts produced elevated levels of TGF-β, which may contribute to their survival. Furthermore, macrophage recruitment to the lung and phagocytic activities of macrophages during influenza infection were reduced in IL-6-deficient mice. Collectively, our results indicate that IL-6 is crucial for lung repair after influenza-induced lung injury through reducing fibroblast accumulation, promoting epithelial cell survival, increasing macrophage recruitment to the lung and enhancing phagocytosis of viruses by macrophages. This study suggests that IL-6 may be exploited for lung repair during influenza infection. PMID:28262742

  8. An indirect microimmunofluorescence test for detection of chlamydial antibodies in ovine fetal fluids.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, T P; Andersen, A A; Miller, L D; Andrews, J J; Janke, B H; Larson, D L; Schwartz, K J

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an indirect microimmunofluorescence test (IMIF) for detection of chlamydial antibodies in serum and/or thoracic fluids of aborted ovine fetuses. One hundred eighty-two ovine fetuses, including 64 fetuses from 40 ewes that were experimentally infected with an ovine abortion strain of Chlamydia psittaci at gestation days 90-100, 10 fetuses from 6 normal ewes, and 108 fetuses selected from those received at the Iowa Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, were evaluated in this study. Fetuses from experimentally infected ewes were examined 4-60 days after inoculation. The IMIF findings were compared with the results of complement fixation serology for chlamydiae and concentrations of immunoglobulin (IgG). Chlamydiae-specific antibodies were detected by IMIF in 28 of 38 fetuses infected with C. psittaci. Elevated levels of IgG and IMIF titers > or = 1:8 were consistent findings in ovine fetuses infected with chlamydiae for more than 24 days. IgG levels and titers of chlamydial antibodies increased with maturity of the fetus and duration of chlamydial infection. Chlamydial antibodies were not detected with the complement fixation test. Fluids from ovine fetuses aborted as a result of other causes also were examined, and IMIF results were negative. The results of this study indicate that the IMIF is a useful and relatively rapid test for identification of chlamydial antibodies in ovine fetuses.

  9. Experimental rabbit models of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, T. C.; Kuo, C.; Patton, D. L.; Grayston, J. T.; Campbell, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR), a common cause of acute respiratory disease in humans, has recently been associated with coronary and aortic atherosclerosis. In this study, we evaluated rabbit models of chlamydial infection to investigate the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae infection. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated intranasally and intratracheally with C. pneumoniae, strain AR-39, and primary and repeated infection were assessed. After a single inoculation, lung pathology was characterized by a moderate self-resolving interstitial pneumonia with bronchiolitis of 21 days in duration. Chlamydial DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) intermittently in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 21 postinoculation, spleen tissue at day 14, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells at days 3 and 21. After repeated inoculations, chlamydial DNA was detected by PCR in the upper respiratory tract and lung tissue through day 42. Lung lesions consisted of multifocal interstitial mononuclear cell aggregates that persisted up to day 42. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were less susceptible to C. pneumoniae infection. After multiple inoculations of Watanabe rabbits, C. pneumoniae was detected by PCR and/or immunocytochemistry until day 21. In conclusion, C. pneumoniae induced a moderate respiratory infection in these rabbit models. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8579129

  10. Bacterial activity in cystic fibrosis lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Carroll, Mary P; Serisier, David J; Hockey, Peter M; Kehagia, Valia; Jones, Graeme R; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic lung infections are the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. Recent molecular biological based studies have identified a surprisingly wide range of hitherto unreported bacterial species in the lungs of CF patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether the species present were active and, as such, worthy of further investigation as potential pathogens. Methods Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles were generated from PCR products amplified from 16S rDNA and Reverse Transcription Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RT-T-RFLP) profiles, a marker of metabolic activity, were generated from PCR products amplified from 16S rRNA, both extracted from the same CF sputum sample. To test the level of activity of these bacteria, T-RFLP profiles were compared to RT-T-RFLP profiles. Results Samples from 17 individuals were studied. Parallel analyses identified a total of 706 individual T-RF and RT-T-RF bands in this sample set. 323 bands were detected by T-RFLP and 383 bands were detected by RT-T-RFLP (statistically significant; P ≤ 0.001). For the group as a whole, 145 bands were detected in a T-RFLP profile alone, suggesting metabolically inactive bacteria. 205 bands were detected in an RT-T-RFLP profile alone and 178 bands were detected in both, suggesting a significant degree of metabolic activity. Although Pseudomonas aeruginosa was present and active in many patients, a low occurrence of other species traditionally considered to be key CF pathogens was detected. T-RFLP profiles obtained for induced sputum samples provided by healthy individuals without CF formed a separate cluster indicating a low level of similarity to those from CF patients. Conclusion These results indicate that a high proportion of the bacterial species detected in the sputum from all of the CF patients in the study are active. The widespread activity of bacterial species in these samples

  11. Crossing the border - Solute entry into the chlamydial inclusion.

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, Ilka

    2017-08-26

    Chlamydiales comprise important human and animal pathogens as well as endosymbionts of amoebae. Generally, these obligate intracellular living bacteria are characterized by a biphasic developmental cycle, a reduced genome and a restricted metabolic capacity. Because of their metabolic impairment, Chlamydiales essentially rely on the uptake of diverse metabolites from their hosts. Chlamydiales thrive in a special compartment, the inclusion, and hence are surrounded by an additional membrane. Solutes might enter the inclusion through pores and open channels or by redirection of host vesicles, which fuse with the inclusion membrane and release their internal cargo. Recent investigations shed new light on the chlamydia-host interaction and identified an additional way for nutrient uptake into the inclusion. Proteome studies and targeting analyses identified chlamydial and host solute carriers in inclusions of Chlamydia trachomatis infected cells. These transporters are involved in the provision of UDP-glucose and biotin, and probably deliver further metabolites to the inclusion. By the controlled recruitment of specific solute carriers to the inclusion, the chlamydial resident thus can actively manipulate the metabolite availability and composition in the inclusion. This review summarizes recent findings and new ideas on carrier mediated solute uptake into the chlamydial inclusion in the context of the bacterial and host metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperate phages enhance pathogen fitness in chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emily V; James, Chloe E; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Levesque, Roger C; Brockhurst, Michael A; Winstanley, Craig

    2016-10-01

    The Liverpool Epidemic Strain (LES) is a polylysogenic, transmissible strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, capable of superinfecting existing P. aeruginosa respiratory infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). The LES phages are highly active in the CF lung and may have a role in the competitiveness of the LES in vivo. In this study, we tested this by competing isogenic PAO1 strains that differed only by the presence or absence of LES prophages in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Lysogens invaded phage-susceptible populations, both in head-to-head competition and when invading from rare, in the spatially structured, heterogeneous lung environment. Appreciable densities of free phages in lung tissue confirmed active phage lysis in vivo. Moreover, we observed lysogenic conversion of the phage-susceptible competitor. These results suggest that temperate phages may have an important role in the competitiveness of the LES in chronic lung infection by acting as anti-competitor weapons.

  13. Toll-like receptor-2, but not Toll-like receptor-4, is essential for development of oviduct pathology in chlamydial genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Darville, Toni; O'Neill, Joshua M; Andrews, Charles W; Nagarajan, Uma M; Stahl, Lynn; Ojcius, David M

    2003-12-01

    The roles of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 in the host inflammatory response to infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis have not been elucidated. We examined production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in wild-type TLR2 knockout (KO), and TLR4 KO murine peritoneal macrophages infected with the mouse pneumonitis strain of C. trachomatis. Furthermore, we compared the outcomes of genital tract infection in control, TLR2 KO, and TLR4 KO mice. Macrophages lacking TLR2 produced significantly less TNF-alpha and IL6 in response to active infection. In contrast, macrophages from TLR4 KO mice consistently produced higher TNF-alpha and IL-6 responses than those from normal mice on in vitro infection. Infected TLR2-deficient fibroblasts had less mRNA for IL-1, IL-6, and macrophage-inflammatory protein-2, but TLR4-deficient cells had increased mRNA levels for these cytokines compared with controls, suggesting that ligation of TLR4 by whole chlamydiae may down-modulate signaling by other TLRs. In TLR2 KO mice, although the course of genital tract infection was not different from that of controls, significantly lower levels of TNF-alpha and macrophage-inflammatory protein-2 were detected in genital tract secretions during the first week of infection, and there was a significant reduction in oviduct and mesosalpinx pathology at late time points. TLR4 KO mice responded to in vivo infection similarly to wild-type controls and developed similar pathology. TLR2 is an important mediator in the innate immune response to C. trachomatis infection and appears to play a role in both early production of inflammatory mediators and development of chronic inflammatory pathology.

  14. Early airway infection, inflammation, and lung function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Carlin, J; Olinsky, A; Robertson, C; Grimwood, K

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the relation between lower airway infection and inflammation, respiratory symptoms, and lung function in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective study of children with CF aged younger than 3 years, diagnosed by a newborn screening programme. All were clinically stable and had testing as outpatients. Subjects underwent bronchial lavage (BL) and lung function testing by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique under general anaesthesia. BL fluid was cultured and analysed for neutrophil count, interleukin 8, and neutrophil elastase. Lung function was assessed by forced expiratory volume in 0.5, 0.75, and 1 second. Results: Thirty six children with CF were tested on 54 occasions. Lower airway infection shown by BL was associated with a 10% reduction in FEV0.5 compared with subjects without infection. No relation was identified between airway inflammation and lung function. Daily moist cough within the week before testing was reported on 20/54 occasions, but in only seven (35%) was infection detected. Independent of either infection status or airway inflammation, those with daily cough had lower lung function than those without respiratory symptoms at the time of BL (mean adjusted FEV0.5 195 ml and 236 ml respectively). Conclusions: In young children with CF, both respiratory symptoms and airway infection have independent, additive effects on lung function, unrelated to airway inflammation. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of airway obstruction in these young patients. PMID:12244003

  15. Use of a Guinea Pig-Specific Transcriptome Array for Evaluation of Protective Immunity against Genital Chlamydial Infection following Intranasal Vaccination in Guinea Pigs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-11

    trachomatis, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections globally, contributes significantly to increasing health-care costs [1, 2...Despite decades of epidemiological studies [3, 4, 5], sexual health programs [6], improved diagnosis [7, 8, 9] and antibiotic treatment regimens [10...genital infection with regard to pathogenesis, immunity, and the ability to be transmitted sexually [26, 32]. Also, C. caviae is a natural pathogen of the

  16. A Cross Sectional Analysis of Gonococcal and Chlamydial Infections among Men-Who-Have-Sex-with-Men in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kamkuemah, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Background Men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) are at high risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission. Asymptomatic STIs are common in MSM and remain undiagnosed and untreated where syndromic management is advocated. Untreated STIs could be contributing to high HIV rates. This study investigated symptomatic (SSTI) and asymptomatic STIs (ASTIs) in MSM in Cape Town. Methods MSM, 18 years and above, were enrolled into this study. Participants underwent clinical and microbiological screening for STIs. Urine, oro-pharyngeal and anal swab specimens were collected for STI analysis, and blood for HIV and syphilis screening. A psychosocial and sexual questionnaire was completed. STI specimens were analysed for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection. Results 200 MSM were recruited with a median age of 32 years (IQR 26–39.5). Their median number of sex partners within the last year was 5 (IQR 2–20). 155/200 (78%) reported only male sex partners while 45/200 (23%) reported sex with men and women. 77/200 (39%) reported transactional sex. At enrolment, 88/200 (44%) were HIV positive and 8/112 (7%) initially HIV-negative participants seroconverted during the study. Overall, 47/200 (24%) screened positive for either NG or CT. There were 32 MSM (16%) infected with NG and 7 (3.5%) of these men had NG infections at two anatomical sites (39 NG positive results in total). Likewise, there were 23 MSM (12%) infected with CT and all these men had infections at only one site. Eight of the 47 men (17%) were infected with both NG and CT. ASTI was more common than SSTI irrespective of anatomical site, 38 /200 (19%) versus 9/200 (5%) respectively (p<0.001). The anus was most commonly affected, followed by the oro-pharynx and then urethra. Asymptomatic infection was associated with transgender identity (OR 4.09 CI 1.60–5.62), ≥5 male sex partners in the last year (OR 2.50 CI 1.16–5.62) and transactional sex (OR 2.33 CI 1.13–4.79) but

  17. Sphingoid long chain bases prevent lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Pewzner-Jung, Yael; Tavakoli Tabazavareh, Shaghayegh; Grassmé, Heike; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Steinmann, Jörg; Joseph, Tammar; Lang, Stephan; Tuemmler, Burkhard; Schuchman, Edward H; Lentsch, Alex B; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Futerman, Anthony H; Gulbins, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, trauma, burn wound, or patients requiring ventilation are susceptible to severe pulmonary infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Physiological innate defense mechanisms against this pathogen, and their alterations in lung diseases, are for the most part unknown. We now demonstrate a role for the sphingoid long chain base, sphingosine, in determining susceptibility to lung infection by P. aeruginosa. Tracheal and bronchial sphingosine levels were significantly reduced in tissues from cystic fibrosis patients and from cystic fibrosis mouse models due to reduced activity of acid ceramidase, which generates sphingosine from ceramide. Inhalation of mice with sphingosine, with a sphingosine analog, FTY720, or with acid ceramidase rescued susceptible mice from infection. Our data suggest that luminal sphingosine in tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells prevents pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection in normal individuals, paving the way for novel therapeutic paradigms based on inhalation of acid ceramidase or of sphingoid long chain bases in lung infection. PMID:25085879

  18. Ex Vivo Perfusion Treatment of Infection in Human Donor Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, D; Cypel, M; Bonato, R; Machuca, T N; Iskender, I; Hashimoto, K; Linacre, V; Chen, M; Coutinho, R; Azad, S; Martinu, T; Waddell, T K; Hwang, D M; Husain, S; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2016-04-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a platform to treat infected donor lungs with antibiotic therapy before lung transplantation. Human donor lungs that were rejected for transplantation because of clinical concern regarding infection were randomly assigned to two groups. In the antibiotic group (n = 8), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h with high-dose antibiotics (ciprofloxacin 400 mg or azithromycin 500 mg, vancomycin 15 mg/kg, and meropenem 2 g). In the control group (n = 7), lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h without antibiotics. A quantitative decrease in bacterial counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was found in all antibiotic-treated cases but in only two control cases. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were significantly lower in the antibiotic group compared with the control group. EVLP with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy significantly improved pulmonary oxygenation and compliance and reduced pulmonary vascular resistance. Perfusate endotoxin levels at 12 h were strongly correlated with levels of perfusates tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β and macrophage inflammatory proteins 1α and 1β at 12 h. In conclusion, EVLP treatment of infected donor lungs with broad-spectrum antibiotics significantly reduced BAL bacterial counts and endotoxin levels and improved donor lung function. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Lung cancer in HIV infected patients: facts, questions and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cadranel, J; Garfield, D; Lavolé, A; Wislez, M; Milleron, B; Mayaud, C

    2006-11-01

    AIDS related mortality has fallen sharply in industrialised countries since 1996 following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. This has been accompanied by an increase in the proportion of deaths attributable to non-AIDS defining solid tumours, especially lung cancer. The risk of developing lung cancer seems to be higher in HIV infected subjects than in the general population of the same age, partly because the former tend more frequently to be smokers and, especially, intravenous drug users. The carcinogenic role of the antiretroviral nucleoside drugs and their interaction with smoking needs to be examined. Interestingly, there is no clear relationship between the degree of immunosuppression and the risk of lung cancer, so the reason for the increased risk is unknown. The mean age of HIV infected patients at the time of lung cancer diagnosis is 45 years and most are symptomatic. Lung cancer is diagnosed when locally advanced or metastatic (stage III-IV) in 75-90% of cases, similar to patients with unknown HIV status. Adenocarcinoma is the most frequent histological type. The prognosis is worse in HIV infected patients than in the general lung cancer population. Efficacy and toxicity data for chemotherapy and radiation therapy are few and imprecise. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for localised disease in patients with adequate pulmonary function and general good health, regardless of immune status. Prospective clinical trials are needed to define the optimal detection and treatment strategies for lung cancer in HIV infected patients.

  20. Periodical antibiotic treatment for the control of gonococcal and chlamydial infections among sex workers in Benin and Ghana: a cluster-randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Annie-Claude; Pépin, Jacques; Khonde, Nzambi; Dzokoto, Agnes; Méda, Honoré; Asamoah-Adu, Comfort; Mayaud, Philippe; Mabey, David; Demers, Eric; Alary, Michel

    2012-04-01

    In resource-poor settings, control of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) among female sex workers (FSWs) is difficult. We sought to determine whether periodical antibiotic treatment (PAT) might be effective in controlling these infections among West African FSWs. Secondary objectives were to determine the impact of PAT on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence among FSWs and on NG/CT prevalence among their clients. Cluster-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among FSW communities in Benin and Ghana. Within each of 9 pairs of clusters of FSW communities, one was allocated to receive, during 9 months, a monthly antibiotic (alternatively ciprofloxacin or azithromycin, n = 296 FSWs) and the other a placebo (n = 340 FSWs). Prevalence of NG/CT infections was measured at 3-month intervals using the polymerase chain reaction. HIV status was determined at the beginning and at the end of the study. After adjusting for age, HIV status, duration of prostitution, price per intercourse and condom use, and accounting for prevalence at enrollment and cluster-pairing effect, prevalence ratios (intervention vs. placebo) of NG infection were 0.77 (P = NS), 1.07 (P = NS), and 0.49 (P = 0.05) at the first, second, and third follow-up visits, respectively. PAT neither reduced significantly CT prevalence or HIV incidence among FSWs nor NG/CT prevalence among their clients. The only beneficial impact of PAT was on the prevalence of gonococcal infections among FSWs 9 months after the beginning of the intervention. Although PAT could be more effective in other circumstances, for instance, in the early stages of a program for FSWs, it can not be recommended at present as a routine strategy to control cervical infections among FSWs.

  1. Evaluation of a modified sanitary napkin as a sample self-collection device for the detection of genital chlamydial infection in women.

    PubMed

    Alary, M; Poulin, C; Bouchard, C; Fortier, M; Murray, G; Gingras, S; Aubé, M; Morin, C

    2001-07-01

    A modified sanitary napkin was compared with endocervical swab and urine specimens for the detection of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Endocervical swabs and/or first-catch urine were collected from 510 women at medical or community settings in Quebec City. Participants were also asked to wear a modified sanitary napkin (Ezy-Detek) during 4 consecutive hours and to bring it back to the clinic or mail it to the laboratory. Endocervical and urine specimens were tested using the Cobas Amplicor CT/NG assay (Roche Diagnostic Systems) according to the manufacturer's instructions, as were specimens collected with the napkin after adequate preparation. If the PCR test result was positive on the endocervical sample or on any two samples, a woman was considered to be infected. PCR testing results on paired samples were identical for 493 (96.6%) of 510 women. According to the definition given above, 58 (11.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7 to 14.5%) women were infected with C. trachomatis. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR testing on modified sanitary napkin specimens were, respectively, 93.1% (54 of 58; 95% CI, 83.3 to 98.1%) and 98.9% (447 of 452; 95% CI, 97.4 to 99.6%) compared to 81.0% (47 of 58; 95% CI, 68.6 to 90.1%) and 100% (451 of 451; 95% CI, 99.2 to 100%) for urine specimens. The positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 91.5% (54 of 59) and 99.1% (447 of 451) for the sanitary napkin specimens compared to 100% (47 of 47) and 97.6% (451 of 462) for urine samples. These results suggest that a modified sanitary napkin represents an effective noninvasive device for self-collection of specimens to detect urogenital C. trachomatis infection.

  2. Evaluation of a Modified Sanitary Napkin as a Sample Self-Collection Device for the Detection of Genital Chlamydial Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Alary, Michel; Poulin, Céline; Bouchard, Céline; Fortier, Michel; Murray, Gilles; Gingras, Suzanne; Aubé, Michel; Morin, Carol

    2001-01-01

    A modified sanitary napkin was compared with endocervical swab and urine specimens for the detection of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection. Endocervical swabs and/or first-catch urine were collected from 510 women at medical or community settings in Quebec City. Participants were also asked to wear a modified sanitary napkin (Ezy-Detek) during 4 consecutive hours and to bring it back to the clinic or mail it to the laboratory. Endocervical and urine specimens were tested using the Cobas Amplicor CT/NG assay (Roche Diagnostic Systems) according to the manufacturer's instructions, as were specimens collected with the napkin after adequate preparation. If the PCR test result was positive on the endocervical sample or on any two samples, a woman was considered to be infected. PCR testing results on paired samples were identical for 493 (96.6%) of 510 women. According to the definition given above, 58 (11.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7 to 14.5%) women were infected with C. trachomatis. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR testing on modified sanitary napkin specimens were, respectively, 93.1% (54 of 58; 95% CI, 83.3 to 98.1%) and 98.9% (447 of 452; 95% CI, 97.4 to 99.6%) compared to 81.0% (47 of 58; 95% CI, 68.6 to 90.1%) and 100% (451 of 451; 95% CI, 99.2 to 100%) for urine specimens. The positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 91.5% (54 of 59) and 99.1% (447 of 451) for the sanitary napkin specimens compared to 100% (47 of 47) and 97.6% (451 of 462) for urine samples. These results suggest that a modified sanitary napkin represents an effective noninvasive device for self-collection of specimens to detect urogenital C. trachomatis infection. PMID:11427561

  3. Antiadhesive properties of glycoclusters against Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Boukerb, Amine M; Rousset, Audric; Galanos, Nicolas; Méar, Jean-Baptiste; Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Gillon, Emilie; Cecioni, Samy; Abderrahmen, Claire; Faure, Karine; Redelberger, David; Kipnis, Eric; Dessein, Rodrigue; Havet, Stéphane; Darblade, Benoit; Matthews, Susan E; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Guéry, Benoit; Cournoyer, Benoit; Imberty, Anne; Vidal, Sébastien

    2014-12-26

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections are a major cause of death in cystic fibrosis and hospitalized patients. Treating these infections is becoming difficult due to the emergence of conventional antimicrobial multiresistance. While monosaccharides have proved beneficial against such bacterial lung infection, the design of several multivalent glycosylated macromolecules has been shown to be also beneficial on biofilm dispersion. In this study, calix[4]arene-based glycoclusters functionalized with galactosides or fucosides have been synthesized. The characterization of their inhibitory properties on Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregation, biofilm formation, adhesion on epithelial cells, and destruction of alveolar tissues were performed. The antiadhesive properties of the designed glycoclusters were demonstrated through several in vitro bioassays. An in vivo mouse model of lung infection provided an almost complete protection against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the designed glycoclusters.

  4. [Scedosporium apiospermum disseminated infection in a single lung transplant recipient].

    PubMed

    Solé, Amparo

    2011-01-01

    Scedosporium spp. are filamentous fungi, and the 2 most important species are Scedosporium prolificans and Scedosporium apiospermum. S. apiospermum accounts for approximately 25% of non-Aspergillus filamentous fungi infections in organ transplant recipients. Scedosporium can colonize the sinuses and airways of lung recipients with underlying pulmonary diseases, such as bronchiectasis or cystic fibrosis before transplant, and develop invasive disease after lung transplantation. In fact, invasive diseases caused by S. apiospermum have been reported only rarely, in single lung transplant recipients and cystic fibrosis transplant patients. The treatment of scedosporiasis is complicated due to the difficulty in early diagnosis together with inherent resistance to amphotericin B. A case of disseminated S. apiospermum infection after single lung transplant in a patient with pulmonary fibrosis is reported. Leg mycetoma was the initial sign of this disseminated infection. In this case report, current treatment options are discussed, and a review of the literature of previously published cases of lung transplants is made. One conclusion based on this case is the risk of emergent molds related to antifungal prophylaxis. In addition, colonization by Scedosporium in transplant recipients should not be ignored, and target prophylaxis or suppressive therapy should be considered in all those cases with residual lesions in native lung or chronic rejection in transplanted lungs. Copyright © 2011 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeting Lung Cancer Using an Infectivity Enhanced CXCR4-CRAd

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zeng B.; Rivera, Angel A.; Makhija, Sharmila K.; Lu, Baogen; Wang, Minghui; Izumi, Miiru; Cerfolio, Robert; Stoff-Khalili, Mariam A.; Zhou, Fen; Takayama, Koichi; Siegal, Gene P.; Curiel., David T.

    2007-01-01

    Conventional treatments are not adequate for the majority of lung cancer patients. Conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a promising new modality for the treatment of neoplastic diseases, including non-small cell lung cancer. Specifically, following cellular infection, the virus replicates selectively in the infected tumor cells and kills the cells by cytolysis. Next, the progeny virions infect a new population of surrounding target cells, replicate again and eradicate the infected tumor cells while leaving normal cells unaffected. However, to date there have been two main limitations to successful clinical application of these CRAd agents; i.e. poor infectivity and poor tumor specificity. Here we report the construction of a CRAd agent, CRAd-CXCR4.RGD, in which the adenovirus E1 gene is driven by a tumor-specific CXCR4 promoter and the viral infectivity is enhanced by a capsid modification, RGD4C. This agent CRAd-CXCR4.RGD, as expected, improved both of the viral infectivity and tumor specificity as evaluated in an established lung tumor cell line and in primary tumor tissue from multiple patients. As an added benefit, the activity of the CXCR4 promoter was low in human liver as compared to three other promoters regularly used for targeting tumors. In addition, this agent has the potential of targeting multiple other tumor cell types. From theses data, the CRAd-CXCR4.RGD appears to be a promising novel CRAd agent for lung cancer targeting with low host toxicity. PMID:17113184

  6. Diagnosis and follow-up of genital chlamydial infection by direct methods and by detection of serum IgG, IgA and secretory IgA.

    PubMed

    Fresse, A S; Sueur, J M; Hamdad, F

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a high-risk population by direct and indirect methods and to evaluate the diagnosis of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Urethral or endocervical specimens from 78 patients (48 females and 30 males) were examined by cell culture, direct fluorescence assay, PCR Cobas Amplicor (Roche Molecular Diagnostics), and sIgA was detected by the recombinant lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-enzyme-linked immunoassay (rELISA). Serum from each patient was also obtained and analysed for the presence of IgG and IgA antibody by in-house microimmunofluorescence (MIF) and by the rELISA method (Medac, Hamburg, Germany). The overall C. trachomatis prevalence determined by direct methods was 28%. The detection of sIgA antibodies was significantly higher in the group of patients with a positive direct detection (50%) than in the group of negative direct detection (10.7%). The Chlamydia-specific IgA antibodies were detected by the rELISA in 40.9 and 53.6% of group I (positive direct detection) and group II patients (negative direct detection), respectively. The species-specific IgA antibodies were detected by the MIF method in 18.2 and 16.1% of group I and II patients, respectively. Chlamydia genus-specific IgG antibodies were detected by the rELISA in 86.4 and 83.9% of group I and group II patients and, C. trachomatis specific IgG were present in 81.8 and 73.2% of group I and group II patients, respectively, as assessed by the MIF test. Combining the positive direct methods and/or positive sIgA antibody results from cervical or urethral specimens had an indication of current C. trachomatis infection.

  7. Primary pulmonary botryomycosis: a bacterial lung infection mimicking lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Prota, M A; Pando-Sandoval, A; García-Clemente, M; Jiménez, H; Álvarez-Álvarez, C; Casan-Clara, P

    2013-07-01

    Primary pulmonary botryomycosis, or bacterial pseudomycosis, is an unusual bacterial infection characterised by the formation of eosinophilic granules that resemble those of Actinomyces species infection. The diagnosis of botryomycosis is based on culture of the granules revealing gram-positive cocci or gram-negative bacilli. The bacterial pathogen most frequently found is Staphylococcus aureus. The pathobiology remains unknown. Pulmonary botryomycosis can resemble actinomycosis, tuberculosis or invasive carcinoma. Definitive treatment requires a combination of both surgical debridement and long-term antimicrobial therapy. We present a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis in an immunocompetent patient.

  8. The Chlamydia-Secreted Protease CPAF Promotes Chlamydial Survival in the Mouse Lower Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhangsheng; Tang, Lingli; Shao, Lili; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Tianyuan; Schenken, Robert; Valdivia, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Despite the extensive in vitro characterization of CPAF (chlamydial protease/proteasome-like activity factor), its role in chlamydial infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. We now report that a Chlamydia trachomatis strain deficient in expression of CPAF (L2-17) is no longer able to establish a successful infection in the mouse lower genital tract following an intravaginal inoculation. The L2-17 organisms were cleared from the mouse lower genital tract within a few days, while a CPAF-sufficient C. trachomatis strain (L2-5) survived in the lower genital tract for more than 3 weeks. However, both the L2-17 and L2-5 organisms maintained robust infection courses that lasted up to 4 weeks when they were directly delivered into the mouse upper genital tract. The CPAF-dependent chlamydial survival in the lower genital tract was confirmed in multiple strains of mice. Thus, we have demonstrated a critical role of CPAF in promoting C. trachomatis survival in the mouse lower genital tracts. It will be interesting to further investigate the mechanisms of the CPAF-dependent chlamydial pathogenicity. PMID:27382018

  9. Paragonimus kellicotti: A Lung Infection in Our Own Backyard.

    PubMed

    Johannesen, Eric; Nguyen, Van

    2016-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is an infection caused by the lung fluke of the genus Paragonimus. Within the United States, paragonimiasis has been commonly diagnosed in Southeast Asian immigrants infected with the Asian lung fluke Paragonimus westermani. Infections from the North American lung fluke, Paragonimus kellicotti, have been rare, although more infections have been seen in people in the Midwestern United States. A 29-year-old male with a history of pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma presented with hemoptysis. A CT scan showed a mass in the left upper lung lobe. A biopsy showed eosinophils and parasite eggs, some with a recognizable operculum. Further investigation revealed that he takes canoe trips on rivers within Missouri and would eat crayfish caught from these rivers. A blood sample was confirmed positive for Paragonimiasis serologically at the Center for Disease Control. Paragonimus kellicotti is found in rivers within the Mississippi basin. Infection occurs by consuming uncooked or undercooked crawfish. Microscopic identification of parasite eggs has been the gold standard. Serologic tests have been developed to aid in the diagnosis. Patients typically present with fever and hemoptysis. Common CT findings include pleural effusion, a mass, and lymphadenopathy. Awareness of P. kellicotti is important to guide appropriate diagnostic testing and ensuring proper treatment.

  10. Epidemic of Lung Cancer in Patients With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Winstone, Tiffany A.; Man, S. F. Paul; Hull, Mark; Montaner, Julio S.

    2013-01-01

    The survival of patients with HIV infection has improved dramatically over the past 20 years, largely owing to a significant reduction in opportunistic infections and AIDs-defining malignancies, such as lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma. However, with improved survival, patients with HIV are experiencing morbidity and mortality from other (non-AIDs-defining) complications, such as solid organ malignancies. Of these, the leading cause of mortality in the HIV-infected population is lung cancer, accounting for nearly 30% of all cancer deaths and 10% of all non-HIV-related deaths. Importantly, the average age of onset of lung cancer in the HIV-infected population is 25 to 30 years earlier than that in the general population and at lower exposure to cigarette smoke. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology of lung cancer in the HIV-infected population and discusses some of the important risk factors and pathways that may enhance the risk of lung cancer in this population. PMID:23381313

  11. [Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant].

    PubMed

    Chacón, C F; Vicente, R; Ramos, F; Porta, J; Lopez Maldonado, A; Ansotegui, E

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have a higher risk of developing chronic respiratory infectious diseases. The Nocardia farcinica lung infection is rare in this group of patients, and there are limited publications about this topic. Its diagnosis is complex, due to the clinical and the radiology signs being non-specific. Identification of the agent responsible in the sputum culture is occasionally negative. It is a slow growing organism and for this reason treatment is delayed, which can lead to an increase in complications, hospitable stays, and mortality. A case is reported on a 26 year-old woman with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung colonization by Nocardia farcinica and Aspergillus fumigatus, on long-term treatment with ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and posaconazole, who was admitted to ICU after bilateral lung transplantation. The initial post-operative progress was satisfactory. After discharge, the patient showed a gradual respiratory insufficiency with new chest X-ray showing diffuse infiltrates. Initially, the agent was not seen in the sputum culture. Prompt and aggressive measures were taken, due to the high clinical suspicion of a Nocardia farcinica lung infection. Treatment with a combination of amikacin and meropenem, and later combined with linezolid, led to the disappearance of the lung infiltrates and a clinical improvement. In our case, we confirm the rapid introduction of Nocardia farcinica in the new lungs. The complex identification and the delay in treatment increased the morbimortality. There is a special need for its eradication in patients with lung transplant, due to the strong immunosuppressive treatment.

  12. Bacteriocin-mediated competition in cystic fibrosis lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Ghoul, Melanie; West, Stuart A.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Molin, Søren; Harrison, Odile B.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Jelsbak, Lars; Bruce, John B.; Griffin, Ashleigh S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriocins are toxins produced by bacteria to kill competitors of the same species. Theory and laboratory experiments suggest that bacteriocin production and immunity play a key role in the competitive dynamics of bacterial strains. The extent to which this is the case in natural populations, especially human pathogens, remains to be tested. We examined the role of bacteriocins in competition using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains infecting lungs of humans with cystic fibrosis (CF). We assessed the ability of different strains to kill each other using phenotypic assays, and sequenced their genomes to determine what bacteriocins (pyocins) they carry. We found that (i) isolates from later infection stages inhibited earlier infecting strains less, but were more inhibited by pyocins produced by earlier infecting strains and carried fewer pyocin types; (ii) this difference between early and late infections appears to be caused by a difference in pyocin diversity between competing genotypes and not by loss of pyocin genes within a lineage over time; (iii) pyocin inhibition does not explain why certain strains outcompete others within lung infections; (iv) strains frequently carry the pyocin-killing gene, but not the immunity gene, suggesting resistance occurs via other unknown mechanisms. Our results show that, in contrast to patterns observed in experimental studies, pyocin production does not appear to have a major influence on strain competition during CF lung infections. PMID:26311664

  13. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans infection mimicking lung cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Matzumura-Kuan, Melissa; Jennings, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary infections can mimic a pulmonary neoplasm. Multiple organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can present with similar clinical, radiographic, and surgical findings as neoplastic processes. Because treatment and the prognosis are completely different, an accurate diagnosis is crucial, and lung biopsy is usually required. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is part of the normal oral flora and is a rare cause of invasive infection due to hematogenous dissemination or aspiration, particularly infective endocarditis. We present a case of A. actinomycetemcomitans and Actinomyces co-infection that presented as a mediastinal mass, with surgical findings similar to lung malignancy but with biopsy and culture showing an infectious origin. After antibiotic treatment, follow-up images showed resolution of the mass.

  14. Inhaled Formulation Design for the Treatment of Lung Infections.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Yadav, Khushwant S

    2015-01-01

    Lung infections may be bacterial, viral or fungal and they are typically treated with oral or parenteral antibiotics. Inhaled dry powder formulations offer unique opportunities for treating lung infections with enhanced effectiveness and stability. Since drug delivery to the lungs requires chronic and repeated administration of larger amounts of therapeutics, dry powder formulations are attractive alternatives to deliver drugs directly to the lungs as they are not limited by solubility issues and they are regarded as being more stable than liquid dosage forms. This state-of-the-art review presents the use of inhaled formulations for tuberculosis as a main focus, but also for other diseases such as bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia and respiratory infections occurring as complications during lung transplants. Opportunities for the use of inhaled therapies and other respiratory diseases or as prevention or antidotes against warfare agents are offered. Typical and novel inhaled formulations that have been used as well as preclinical and clinical studies and evaluation of these inhaled therapies are discussed for each disease state. Lastly, the use of inhaled therapies as an alternative to end the emergence of drug resistant strains is discussed along with the risks of increasing these resistant strains if the inhaled therapy is not designed based on dosing regimens established by wellplanned pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies.

  15. [Study on the diagnostic value of lung biopsy in hematologic patients with lung infection].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-li; Zhu, Zun-min; Zhang, Yin; Lei, Peng-chong; Wang, Zhen; Guo, Jian-min; Yang, Jing; Zang, Yu-zhu; Liu, Zhong-wen; Wang, Tong-bao; Chen, Yu-qing; Ma, Bao-geng

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value and safety of percutaneous lung biopsy in hematologic patients with lung infection. 28 cases hematologic patients received CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy when they developed a fever associated with pulmonary nodules or lumps in CT scan whose clinical diagnosis were unclear during or after chemotherapy. Sample of each lesion were drawn twice. The lung tissue was re-scanned after lung biopsy to check up in order to discover bleeding and pneumothorax. Biopsy tissue was examined by bacteria culture, acid-fast staining and pathology. Pathological examination contained HE staining, acid-fast stain, PAS stain, TB-DNA, methenamine silver and others. 28 cases contain 24 males and 4 females. Median age was 40 15 - 77 years old. Blood tests were as follows: 3 cases with HGB > 110 g/L, 9 with HGB 90 - 110 g/L, 12 with HGB 60 - 89 g/L, 4 with HGB < 60 g/L. 8 with WBC > 10×10(9)/L, 6 with WBC (4 - 10)×10(9)/L, 13 with WBC < 4×10(9)/L, 1 with WBC < 2×10(9)/L; 14 with PLT > 100×10(9)/L, 5 with PLT (50 - 100)×10(9)/L, 5 with PLT < 50×10(9)/L, 4 with PLT < 30×10(9)/L. 4 cases had mild extended PT, 3 mild extended APTT, 3 FIB lower than normal. Lung CT scans were as follows: 4 cases with simply lesion in right lung, 4 with simply lesion in left lung, 20 with lesions in bilateral lung. 8 cases were diagnosed as fungal infection, 3 as tuberculosis infection, 1 as lung cancer, 1 as pulmonary infiltration of lymphoma, 1 as pulmonary infiltration of leukemia, and 14 as inflammatory changes with no specific diagnosis. 4 cases came with pneumothorax during lung biopsy, mild to moderate in 3 cases and severe in 1 case. Severe patient turned better after CT-guided suction. 3 cases with mild hemoptysis turned better after treatment. When hematopathy patients are with pulmonary nodules or lumps in CT scan whose clinical diagnosis is unclear, CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy is safe and conducive to early diagnosis and conducive to early

  16. Killing me softly: chlamydial use of proteolysis for evading host defenses.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guangming

    2009-10-01

    Chlamydial infections in humans cause severe health problems, including blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted diseases. Although the involved pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear, the ability to replicate and maintain long-term residence in the infected cells seems to significantly contribute to chlamydial pathogenicity. These obligate intracellular parasites maintain a delicate balance between exploiting and protecting their host: they occupy intracellular space and acquire nutrients from the infected cells, but at the same time they have to maintain the integrity of the host cells for the completion of their intracellular growth. For this purpose, chlamydiae hijack certain signaling pathways that prevent the host cells from undergoing apoptosis induced by intracellular stress and protect the infected cells from recognition and attack by host defenses. Interestingly, one of the strategies that chlamydiae use for these purposes is the induction of limited proteolysis of host proteins, which is the main focus of this article.

  17. Characterization of cytomegalovirus lung infection in non-HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Gualteros, Sonia M; Jaramillo-Barberi, Lina E; Gonzalez-Santos, Monica; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Perez, Geovanny F; Gutierrez, Maria J; Nino, Gustavo

    2014-05-07

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a prevalent pathogen in the immunocompromised host and invasive pneumonia is a feared complication of the virus in this population. In this pediatric case series we characterized CMV lung infection in 15 non-HIV infected children (median age 3 years; IQR 0.2-4.9 years), using current molecular and imaging diagnostic modalities, in combination with respiratory signs and symptoms. The most prominent clinical and laboratory findings included cough (100%), hypoxemia (100%), diffuse adventitious breath sounds (100%) and increased respiratory effort (93%). All patients had abnormal lung images characterized by ground glass opacity/consolidation in 80% of cases. CMV was detected in the lung either by CMV PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage (82% detection rate) or histology/immunohistochemistry in lung biopsy (100% detection rate). CMV caused respiratory failure in 47% of children infected and the overall mortality rate was 13.3%. CMV pneumonia is a potential lethal disease in non-HIV infected children that requires a high-index of suspicion. Common clinical and radiological patterns such as hypoxemia, diffuse adventitious lung sounds and ground-glass pulmonary opacities may allow early identification of CMV lung infection in the pediatric population, which may lead to prompt initiation of antiviral therapy and better clinical outcomes.

  18. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  19. Fluorescent labeling reliably identifies Chlamydia trachomatis in living human endometrial cells and rapidly and accurately quantifies chlamydial inclusion forming units

    PubMed Central

    Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D.; Henschel, Kevin J.; Dueñas Lopez, Fiorela C.; Quispe Calla, Nirk E.; Cherpes, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia replication requires host lipid acquisition, allowing flow cytometry to identify C. trachomatis-infected cells that accumulated fluorescent Golgi-specific lipid. Herein, we describe modifications to currently available methods that allow precise differentiation between uninfected and C. trachomatis-infected human endometrial cells and rapidly and accurately quantify chlamydial inclusion forming units. PMID:26453947

  20. Paragonimus westermani infection mimicking recurrent lung cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoya; Tsukahara, Mika; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Kurai, Hanako

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report a case of Paragonimus westermani infection, which required differentiation from recurrent lung cancer. A 66-year old Japanese man with a history of lung cancer who had undergone a lobectomy was referred to our clinic for treatment of cough, sputum, dyspnea, and a right pulmonary nodule. He had previously eaten seafood he visited China. P. westermani infection was confirmed by the presence of antibody against P. westermani antigen in the patient's serum and eggs in his sputum. Eventually, molecular identification by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing confirmed that the patient was infected with triploid forms of P. westermani. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioengineered lysozyme in combination therapies for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Karl E; Bement, Jenna L; Teneback, Charlotte C; Scanlon, Thomas C; Wargo, Matthew J; Leclair, Laurie W

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing urgency in the battle against drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, and this public health crisis has created a desperate need for novel antimicrobial agents. Recombinant human lysozyme represents one interesting candidate for treating pulmonary infections, but the wild type enzyme is subject to electrostatic mediated inhibition by anionic biopolymers that accumulate in the infected lung. We have redesigned lysozyme’s electrostatic potential field, creating a genetically engineered variant that is less susceptible to polyanion inhibition, yet retains potent bactericidal activity. A recent publication demonstrated that the engineered enzyme outperforms wild type lysozyme in a murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection. Here, we expand upon our initial studies and consider dual therapies that combine lysozymes with an antimicrobial peptide. Consistent with our earlier results, the charge modified lysozyme combination outperformed its wild type counterpart, yielding more than an order-of-magnitude reduction in bacterial burden following treatment with a single dose. PMID:24637705

  2. Interleukin 17A is an immune marker for chlamydial disease severity and pathogenesis in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Mathew, Marina; Waugh, Courtney; Beagley, Kenneth W; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an iconic Australian marsupial species that is facing many threats to its survival. Chlamydia pecorum infections are a significant contributor to this ongoing decline. A major limiting factor in our ability to manage and control chlamydial disease in koalas is a limited understanding of the koala's cell-mediated immune response to infections by this bacterial pathogen. To identify immunological markers associated with chlamydial infection and disease in koalas, we used koala-specific Quantitative Real Time PCR (qrtPCR) assays to profile the cytokine responses of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) collected from 41 koalas with different stages of chlamydial disease. Target cytokines included the principal Th1 (Interferon gamma; IFNγ), Th2 (Interleukin 10; IL10), and pro-inflammatory cytokines (Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha; TNFα). A novel koala-specific IL17A qrtPCR assay was also developed as part of this study to quantitate the gene expression of this Th17 cytokine in koalas. A statistically significant higher IL17A gene expression was observed in animals with current chlamydial disease compared to animals with asymptomatic chlamydial infection. A modest up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα and IFNγ, was also observed in these animals with signs of current chlamydial disease. IL10 gene expression was not evident in the majority of animals from both groups. Future longitudinal studies are now required to confirm the role played by cytokines in pathology and/or protection against C. pecorum infection in the koala.

  3. Chlorine gas exposure increases susceptibility to invasive lung fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Melissa A.; Doran, Stephen F.; Yu, Zhihong; Dunaway, Chad W.; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly irritating and reactive gas with potential occupational and environmental hazards. Acute exposure to Cl2 induces severe epithelial damage, airway hyperreactivity, impaired alveolar fluid clearance, and pulmonary edema in the presence of heightened inflammation and significant neutrophil accumulation in the lungs. Herein, we investigated whether Cl2 exposure affected the lung antimicrobial immune response leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Mice exposed to Cl2 and challenged intratracheally 24 h thereafter with the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus demonstrated an >500-fold increase in A. fumigatus lung burden 72 h postchallenge compared with A. fumigatus mice exposed to room air. Cl2-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice also demonstrated significantly higher lung resistance following methacholine challenge and increased levels of plasma proteins (albumin and IgG) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Despite enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs of Cl2-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice, these cells (>60% of which were neutrophils) demonstrated a profound impairment in generating superoxide. Significantly higher A. fumigatus burden in the lungs of Cl2 exposed mice correlated with enhanced production of IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL3. Surprisingly, however, Cl2-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice had a specific impairment in the production of IL-17A and IL-22 in the lungs compared with mice exposed to room air and challenged with A. fumigatus. In summary, our results indicate that Cl2 exposure markedly impairs the antimicrobial activity and inflammatory reactivity of myeloid cells in the lung leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. PMID:23564508

  4. HIV infection in the etiology of lung cancer: confounding, causality, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Gregory D; Merlo, Christian A

    2011-06-01

    Persons infected with HIV have an elevated risk of lung cancer, but whether the increase simply reflects a higher smoking prevalence continues to be debated. This review summarizes existing data on the association of HIV infection and lung cancer, with particular attention to study design and adjustment for cigarette smoking. Potential mechanisms by which HIV infection may lead to lung cancer are discussed. Finally, irrespective of causality and mechanisms, lung cancer represents an important and growing problem confronting HIV-infected patients and their providers. Substantial efforts are needed to promote smoking cessation and to control lung cancer among HIV-infected populations.

  5. [The lungs in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection].

    PubMed

    Barić, D; Vrkić, L

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a case of two patients who were admitted to the Zadar hospital and according to clinical symptoms directed to the Department of Lung Diseases. Both patients were temporarily employed abroad. It has been established that they were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). One of the patients has been moved to the Department of Infectious Diseases and later to Zagreb, while the other has returned abroad. On admission to the hospital of the Zadar Medical Center none of them answered the question about being engaged in risky behavior. In 1990 there were 699 registered patients hospitalized and 745 registered in the protocol of the Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Lung Diseases. 0.069% of patients were HIV-1-infected. In 1991, there were 520 hospitalized and 453 outpatients, whereas 0.102% were HIV-1-infected and registered subjects. It must be pointed out that these are only numbers of registration and not subjects, because there were patients who were examined or hospitalized twice or more times during the corresponding calendar year. The aim of this study was to point to a new differentially-diagnostic problem present especially at the Department of Lung Diseases after AIDS has become part of our reality. There still remains a problem in regard to detection of HIV-1 seropositivity in patients at departments with opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis.

  6. Autophagy enhances bacterial clearance during P. aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Shen, Ann; Rosen, Kirill; McCormick, Craig; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among cystic fibrosis patients. Although P. aeruginosa is primarily considered an extacellular pathogen, recent reports have demonstrated that throughout the course of infection the bacterium acquires the ability to enter and reside within host cells. Normally intracellular pathogens are cleared through a process called autophagy which sequesters and degrades portions of the cytosol, including invading bacteria. However the role of autophagy in host defense against P. aeruginosa in vivo remains unknown. Understanding the role of autophagy during P. aeruginosa infection is of particular importance as mutations leading to cystic fibrosis have recently been shown to cause a blockade in the autophagy pathway, which could increase susceptibility to infection. Here we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa induces autophagy in mast cells, which have been recognized as sentinels in the host defense against bacterial infection. We further demonstrate that inhibition of autophagy through pharmacological means or protein knockdown inhibits clearance of intracellular P. aeruginosa in vitro, while pharmacologic induction of autophagy significantly increased bacterial clearance. Finally we find that pharmacological manipulation of autophagy in vivo effectively regulates bacterial clearance of P. aeruginosa from the lung. Together our results demonstrate that autophagy is required for an effective immune response against P. aeruginosa infection in vivo, and suggest that pharmacological interventions targeting the autophagy pathway could have considerable therapeutic potential in the treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infection.

  7. Lung Microbiota Changes Associated with Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection and the Impact of Intravenous Colistimethate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Collie, David; Glendinning, Laura; Govan, John; Wright, Steven; Thornton, Elisabeth; Tennant, Peter; Doherty, Catherine; McLachlan, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations associated with chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are a major contributor to morbidity, mortality and premature death in cystic fibrosis. Such exacerbations are treated with antibiotics, which generally lead to an improvement in lung function and reduced sputum P. aeruginosa density. This potentially suggests a role for the latter in the pathogenesis of exacerbations. However, other data suggesting that changes in P. aeruginosa sputum culture status may not reliably predict an improvement in clinical status, and data indicating no significant changes in either total bacterial counts or in P. aeruginosa numbers in sputum samples collected prior to pulmonary exacerbation sheds doubt on this assumption. We used our recently developed lung segmental model of chronic Pseudomonas infection in sheep to investigate the lung microbiota changes associated with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection and the impact of systemic therapy with colistimethate sodium (CMS). Methodology/Principal Findings We collected protected specimen brush (PSB) samples from sheep (n = 8) both prior to and 14 days after establishment of chronic local lung infection with P aeruginosa. Samples were taken from both directly infected lung segments (direct) and segments spatially remote to such sites (remote). Four sheep were treated with daily intravenous injections of CMS between days 7 and 14, and four were treated with a placebo. Necropsy examination at d14 confirmed the presence of chronic local lung infection and lung pathology in every direct lung segment. The predominant orders in lung microbiota communities before infection were Bacillales, Actinomycetales and Clostridiales. While lung microbiota samples were more likely to share similarities with other samples derived from the same lung, considerable within- and between-animal heterogeneity could be appreciated. Pseudomonadales joined the aforementioned list of predominant orders in lung microbiota

  8. Ocular delayed hypersensitivity: a pathogenetic mechanism of chlamydial-conjunctivitis in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, N G; Hadlow, W J; Moos, A B; Caldwell, H D

    1986-01-01

    We used a naturally occurring, Chlamydia psittaci-caused eye disease in guinea pigs, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis, as an animal model to understand both the immune response and the pathogenesis of chlamydial eye infections. When instilled into the conjunctival sac of guinea pigs that had been previously infected and were immune, viable chlamydiae or a Triton X-100-soluble extract of them produced a short-lived (12-48 hr) eye disease indistinguishable clinically and histologically from that observed during primary chlamydial eye infection. The clinical and histologic findings were consistent with those of ocular delayed hypersensitivity. Ocular delayed hypersensitivity was induced by primary chlamydial infection at mucosal sites other than conjunctival, such as vaginal and intestinal. Preliminary characterization of the hypersensitivity allergen shows that it is heat sensitive and common to the genus Chlamydia. The allergen is apparently not surface-exposed on chlamydiae and requires viable but not replicating organisms for activity. Our observation should be useful in understanding pathogenetic mechanisms of Chlamydia trachomatis-caused infections in humans, in particular those that produce chronic inflammatory diseases, such as blinding trachoma and urogenital diseases. Images PMID:3463978

  9. Modifications of lung clearance mechanisms by acute influenza A infection

    SciTech Connect

    Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Garrard, C.S.

    1985-10-01

    Four volunteers with naturally acquired, culture-proved influenza A infection inhaled a radiolabeled aerosol to permit investigation of lung mucociliary clearance mechanisms during and after symptomatic illness. Mucus transport in the trachea was undetectable when monitored with an external multidetector probe within 48 hours of the onset of the illness, but was found at a normal velocity by 1 week in three of the four subjects. In two volunteers who coughed 23 to 48 times during the 4.5-hour observation period, whole lung clearance was as fast within the first 48 hours of illness as during health 3 months later in spite of the absence of measurable tracheal mucus transport. Conversely, in spite of the return 1 week later of mucus transport at velocities expected in the trachea, whole lung clearance for the 4.5-hour period was slowed in two volunteers who coughed less than once an hour. The data offer evidence that cough is important in maintaining lung clearance for at least several days after symptomatic influenza A infection when other mechanisms that depend on ciliary function are severely deficient.

  10. Preparation of Stable Sensitized Erythrocytes for Detection of Chlamydial Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Vester J.; Engelman, Helen M.; Thacker, W. Lanier

    1975-01-01

    Sheep erythrocytes were treated with glutaraldehyde before sensitization for the indirect hemagglutination test to assay chlamydial antibodies. This treatment markedly increased stability during storage. PMID:809464

  11. Chlamydia genomics: providing novel insights into chlamydial biology.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Nathan L; Polkinghorne, Adam; Timms, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular pathogens that have successfully evolved to colonize a diverse range of hosts. There are currently 11 described species of Chlamydia, most of which have a significant impact on the health of humans or animals. Expanding chlamydial genome sequence information has revolutionized our understanding of chlamydial biology, including aspects of their unique lifecycle, host-pathogen interactions, and genetic differences between Chlamydia strains associated with different host and tissue tropisms. This review summarizes the major highlights of chlamydial genomics and reflects on the considerable impact these have had on understanding the biology of chlamydial pathogens and the changing nature of genomics tools in the 'post-genomics' era.

  12. Clearance of chlamydial elementary bodies from the conjunctival sac

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.R.; Velez, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    The rate of disappearance of inactivated Chlamydia trachomatis elementary body (EB) preparations from the conjunctival sac was studied in monkeys. Direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) cytology showed that the majority of EB had been cleared from the eye within 24 hr of the inoculation of 1 X 10(6) inactivated EB, although small numbers of EB could be detected for up to 144 hr. The rate of clearance in normal and ocular immune animals did not differ, and formalin-killed and UV-inactivated EBs disappeared at a comparable rate. These studies suggest that chlamydial EB are cleared relatively quickly from the eye and support the notion that EBs detected by DFA cytology indicate the presence of current infection.

  13. Bacterial infection profiles in lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Pluquet, Emilie; Lescure, Francois Xavier; Bentayeb, Houcine; Lecuyer, Emmanuelle; Boutemy, Marie; Dumont, Patrick; Jounieaux, Vincent; Schmit, Jean Luc; Dayen, Charles; Douadi, Youcef

    2011-06-27

    The chemotherapy used to treat lung cancer causes febrile neutropenia in 10 to 40% of patients. Although most episodes are of undetermined origin, an infectious etiology can be suspected in 30% of cases. In view of the scarcity of data on lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia, we performed a retrospective study of the microbiological characteristics of cases recorded in three medical centers in the Picardy region of northern France. We analyzed the medical records of lung cancer patients with neutropenia (neutrophil count < 500/mm(3)) and fever (temperature > 38.3°C). The study included 87 lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia (mean age: 64.2). Two thirds of the patients had metastases and half had poor performance status. Thirty-three of the 87 cases were microbiologically documented. Gram-negative bacteria (mainly enterobacteriaceae from the urinary and digestive tracts) were identified in 59% of these cases. Staphylococcus species (mainly S. aureus) accounted for a high proportion of the identified Gram-positive bacteria. Bacteremia accounted for 60% of the microbiologically documented cases of fever. 23% of the blood cultures were positive. 14% of the infections were probably hospital-acquired and 14% were caused by multidrug-resistant strains. The overall mortality rate at day 30 was 33% and the infection-related mortality rate was 16.1%. Treatment with antibiotics was successful in 82.8% of cases. In a multivariate analysis, predictive factors for treatment failure were age >60 and thrombocytopenia < 20000/mm(3). Gram-negative species were the most frequently identified bacteria in lung cancer patients with febrile neutropenia. Despite the success of antibiotic treatment and a low-risk neutropenic patient group, mortality is high in this particular population.

  14. Noninvasive monitoring of infection and rejection after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Martin, Lance; Kertesz, Michael; Patel, Kapil; Kowarsky, Mark; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F.; Okamoto, Jennifer; Nicolls, Mark R.; Cornfield, David; Weill, David; Valantine, Hannah; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The survival rate following lung transplantation is among the lowest of all solid-organ transplants, and current diagnostic tests often fail to distinguish between infection and rejection, the two primary posttransplant clinical complications. We describe a diagnostic assay that simultaneously monitors for rejection and infection in lung transplant recipients by sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma. We determined that the levels of donor-derived cfDNA directly correlate with the results of invasive tests of rejection (area under the curve 0.9). We also analyzed the nonhuman cfDNA as a hypothesis-free approach to test for infections. Cytomegalovirus is most frequently assayed clinically, and the levels of CMV-derived sequences in cfDNA are consistent with clinical results. We furthermore show that hypothesis-free monitoring for pathogens using cfDNA reveals undiagnosed cases of infection, and that certain infectious pathogens such as human herpesvirus (HHV) 6, HHV-7, and adenovirus, which are not often tested clinically, occur with high frequency in this cohort. PMID:26460048

  15. Chlamydial genes shed light on the evolution of photoautotrophic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Burkhard; Hoef-Emden, Kerstin; Melkonian, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria of protists, invertebrates and vertebrates, but have not been found to date in photosynthetic eukaryotes (algae and embryophytes). Genes of putative chlamydial origin, however, are present in significant numbers in sequenced genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes. It has been suggested that such genes were acquired by an ancient horizontal gene transfer from Chlamydiae to the ancestor of photosynthetic eukaryotes. To further test this hypothesis, an extensive search for proteins of chlamydial origin was performed using several recently sequenced algal genomes and EST databases, and the proteins subjected to phylogenetic analyses. A total of 39 proteins of chlamydial origin were retrieved from the photosynthetic eukaryotes analyzed and their identity verified through phylogenetic analyses. The distribution of the chlamydial proteins among four groups of photosynthetic eukaryotes (Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae, Glaucoplantae, Bacillariophyta) was complex suggesting multiple acquisitions and losses. Evidence is presented that all except one of the chlamydial genes originated from an ancient endosymbiosis of a chlamydial bacterium into the ancestor of the Plantae before their divergence into Viridiplantae, Rhodoplantae and Glaucoplantae, i.e. more than 1.1 BYA. The chlamydial proteins subsequently spread through secondary plastid endosymbioses to other eukaryotes. Of 20 chlamydial proteins recovered from the genomes of two Bacillariophyta, 10 were of rhodoplant, and 10 of viridiplant origin suggesting that they were acquired by two different secondary endosymbioses. Phylogenetic analyses of concatenated sequences demonstrated that the viridiplant secondary endosymbiosis likely occurred before the divergence of Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. We identified 39 proteins of chlamydial origin in photosynthetic eukaryotes signaling an ancient invasion of the ancestor of the Plantae by a chlamydial bacterium accompanied by horizontal

  16. Stochastic Tracking of Infection in a CF Lung

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Sara; Mirtar, Ali; Rohwer, Forest; Salamon, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT) scan are the two ubiquitous imaging sources that physicians use to diagnose patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) or any other Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Unfortunately the cost constraints limit the frequent usage of these medical imaging procedures. In addition, even though both CT scan and MRI provide mesoscopic details of a lung, in order to obtain microscopic information a very high resolution is required. Neither MRI nor CT scans provide micro level information about the location of infection in a binary tree structure the binary tree structure of the human lung. In this paper we present an algorithm that enhances the current imaging results by providing estimated micro level information concerning the location of the infection. The estimate is based on a calculation of the distribution of possible mucus blockages consistent with available information using an offline Metropolis-Hastings algorithm in combination with a real-time interpolation scheme. When supplemented with growth rates for the pockets of mucus, the algorithm can also be used to estimate how lung functionality as manifested in spirometric tests will change in patients with CF or COPD. PMID:25360611

  17. Impact of HIV Infection on Medicare Beneficiaries with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Moore, Page C; Lensing, Shelly Y

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer among individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is elevated compared to that among the general population. This study examines the prevalence of HIV and its impact on outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries who are 65 years of age or older and were diagnosed with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between 1997 and 2008. Prevalence of HIV was estimated using the Poisson point estimate and its 95% confidence interval. Relative risks for potential risk factors were estimated using the log-binomial model. A total of 111,219 Medicare beneficiaries met the study criteria. The prevalence of HIV was 156.4 per 100,000 (95% CI: 140.8 to 173.8) and has increased with time. Stage at NSCLC diagnosis did not vary by HIV status. Mortality rates due to all causes were 44%, 76%, and 88% for patients with stage I/II, III, and IV NSCLC, respectively. Across stages of disease, there was no difference between those who were HIV-infected and those who were not with respect to overall mortality. HIV patients, however, were more likely to die of causes other than lung cancer than their immunocompetent counterparts.

  18. Structural characterization of muropeptides from Chlamydia trachomatis peptidoglycan by mass spectrometry resolves "chlamydial anomaly".

    PubMed

    Packiam, Mathanraj; Weinrick, Brian; Jacobs, William R; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2015-09-15

    The "chlamydial anomaly," first coined by James Moulder, describes the inability of researchers to detect or purify peptidoglycan (PG) from pathogenic Chlamydiae despite genetic and biochemical evidence and antibiotic susceptibility data that suggest its existence. We recently detected PG in Chlamydia trachomatis by a new metabolic cell wall labeling method, however efforts to purify PG from pathogenic Chlamydiae have remained unsuccessful. Pathogenic chlamydial species are known to activate nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) innate immune receptors by as yet uncharacterized ligands, which are presumed to be PG fragments (muramyl di- and tripeptides). We used the NOD2-dependent activation of NF-κB by C. trachomatis-infected cell lysates as a biomarker for the presence of PG fragments within specific lysate fractions. We designed a new method of muropeptide isolation consisting of a double filtration step coupled with reverse-phase HPLC fractionation of Chlamydia-infected HeLa cell lysates. Fractions that displayed NOD2 activity were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, confirming the presence of muramyl di- and tripeptides in Chlamydia-infected cell lysate fractions. Moreover, the mass spectrometry data of large muropeptide fragments provided evidence that transpeptidation and transglycosylation reactions occur in pathogenic Chlamydiae. These results reveal the composition of chlamydial PG and disprove the "glycanless peptidoglycan" hypothesis.

  19. Clostridium difficile infection increases mortality risk in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janet T; Kelly, Rosemary F; Hertz, Marshall I; Dunitz, Jordan M; Shumway, Sara J

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and associated mortality in solid organ transplant recipients is rising, but data are scarce in lung transplant recipients. We aimed to characterize CDI and its effect on mortality in a large cohort of lung transplant recipients. Lung transplant recipients were identified from our transplant database from 2000 to 2011. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios for CDI and death after adjusting for potential confounders identified from bivariate analysis. We identified 388 patients (196 female, 192 male), with a median age of 56 years (range, 8-75 years), during the study period. CDI developed after transplant in 89 (22.9%), with 27 (7.0%) developing CDI during the initial hospitalization at a mean diagnosis of 12.7 ± 11.4 days. Incidence varied widely each year (median, 24%; range, 5%-32%), with the highest rates in 2007 to 2008. Post-operative length of stay was identified as a significant predictor of CDI (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.03). Early CDI was an independent significant predictor of death (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.14-3.36) as well as CDI anytime after transplant (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.02-2.52). CDI rates varied widely from 2000 through 2011, with the highest rates in 2007 to 2008. Lung transplant recipients who developed CDI had a higher risk of death, especially when CDI occurred in the first 6 months after transplant. © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  20. Interleukin-22 reduces lung inflammation during influenza A virus infection and protects against secondary bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Stoyan; Renneson, Joelle; Fontaine, Josette; Barthelemy, Adeline; Paget, Christophe; Fernandez, Elodie Macho; Blanc, Fany; De Trez, Carl; Van Maele, Laurye; Dumoutier, Laure; Huerre, Michel-René; Eberl, Gérard; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Gosset, Pierre; Renauld, Jean Christophe; Sirard, Jean Claude; Faveeuw, Christelle; Trottein, François

    2013-06-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) has redundant, protective, or pathogenic functions during autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Here, we addressed the potential role of IL-22 in host defense and pathogenesis during lethal and sublethal respiratory H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) infection. We show that IL-22, as well as factors associated with its production, are expressed in the lung tissue during the early phases of IAV infection. Our data indicate that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt)-positive αβ and γδ T cells, as well as innate lymphoid cells, expressed enhanced Il22 transcripts as early as 2 days postinfection. During lethal or sublethal IAV infections, endogenous IL-22 played no role in the control of IAV replication and in the development of the IAV-specific CD8(+) T cell response. During lethal infection, where wild-type (WT) mice succumbed to severe pneumonia, the lack of IL-22 did not accelerate or delay IAV-associated pathogenesis and animal death. In stark contrast, during sublethal IAV infection, IL-22-deficient animals had enhanced lung injuries and showed a lower airway epithelial integrity relative to WT littermates. Of importance, the protective effect of endogenous IL-22 in pulmonary damages was associated with a more controlled secondary bacterial infection. Indeed, after challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae, IAV-experienced Il22(-/-) animals were more susceptible than WT controls in terms of survival rate and bacterial burden in the lungs. Together, IL-22 plays no major role during lethal influenza but is beneficial during sublethal H3N2 IAV infection, where it limits lung inflammation and subsequent bacterial superinfections.

  1. Alveolar Macrophages Are a Prominent but Nonessential Target for Murine Cytomegalovirus Infecting the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Oliveira, Martha T.; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) infect the lungs and cause pathological damage there in immunocompromised hosts. How lung infection starts is unknown. Inhaled murine CMV (MCMV) directly infected alveolar macrophages (AMs) and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) but not type 1 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC1s). In contrast, herpes simplex virus 1 infected AEC1s and murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) infected AEC1s via AMs. MCMV-infected AMs prominently expressed viral reporter genes from a human CMV IE1 promoter; but most IE1-positive cells were AEC2s, and CD11c-cre mice, which express cre in AMs, switched the fluorochrome expression of <5% of floxed MCMV in the lungs. In contrast, CD11C-cre mice exhibited fluorochrome switching in >90% of floxed MuHV-4 in the lungs and 50% of floxed MCMV in the blood. AM depletion increased MCMV titers in the lung during the acute phase of infection. Thus, the influence of AMs was more restrictive than permissive. Circulating monocytes entered infected lungs in large numbers and became infected, but not directly; infection occurred mainly via AEC2s. Mice infected with an MCMV mutant lacking its m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which promotes macrophage infection, showed levels of lung infection equivalent to those of wild-type MCMV-infected mice. The level of lung infiltration by Gr-1-positive cells infected with the MCMV m131/m129-null mutant was modestly different from that for wild-type MCMV-infected lungs. These results are consistent with myeloid cells mainly disseminating MCMV from the lungs, whereas AEC2s provide local amplification. IMPORTANCE Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) chronically and systemically infect most mammals. Human CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but causes lung disease in people with poor immune function. As human infection is hard to analyze, studies with related animal viruses provide important insights. We show that murine CMV has two targets in the lungs: macrophages and surfactant-secreting epithelial cells

  2. Alveolar Macrophages Are a Prominent but Nonessential Target for Murine Cytomegalovirus Infecting the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Helen E; Lawler, Clara; Oliveira, Martha T; Davis-Poynter, Nick; Stevenson, Philip G

    2015-12-30

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) infect the lungs and cause pathological damage there in immunocompromised hosts. How lung infection starts is unknown. Inhaled murine CMV (MCMV) directly infected alveolar macrophages (AMs) and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2s) but not type 1 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC1s). In contrast, herpes simplex virus 1 infected AEC1s and murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) infected AEC1s via AMs. MCMV-infected AMs prominently expressed viral reporter genes from a human CMV IE1 promoter; but most IE1-positive cells were AEC2s, and CD11c-cre mice, which express cre in AMs, switched the fluorochrome expression of <5% of floxed MCMV in the lungs. In contrast, CD11C-cre mice exhibited fluorochrome switching in >90% of floxed MuHV-4 in the lungs and 50% of floxed MCMV in the blood. AM depletion increased MCMV titers in the lung during the acute phase of infection. Thus, the influence of AMs was more restrictive than permissive. Circulating monocytes entered infected lungs in large numbers and became infected, but not directly; infection occurred mainly via AEC2s. Mice infected with an MCMV mutant lacking its m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which promotes macrophage infection, showed levels of lung infection equivalent to those of wild-type MCMV-infected mice. The level of lung infiltration by Gr-1-positive cells infected with the MCMV m131/m129-null mutant was modestly different from that for wild-type MCMV-infected lungs. These results are consistent with myeloid cells mainly disseminating MCMV from the lungs, whereas AEC2s provide local amplification. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) chronically and systemically infect most mammals. Human CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but causes lung disease in people with poor immune function. As human infection is hard to analyze, studies with related animal viruses provide important insights. We show that murine CMV has two targets in the lungs: macrophages and surfactant-secreting epithelial cells. Acute virus

  3. Respirable bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Lynch, Karlene H; Matinkhoo, Sadaf; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J; Vehring, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    This review article discusses the development of respiratory therapeutics containing bacteriophages indicated for lung infections, specifically those that have become increasingly difficult to treat because of antibiotic resistance. Recent achievements and remaining problems are presented for each step necessary to develop a bacteriophage-containing dosage form for respiratory drug delivery, including selection of appropriate bacteriophages for therapy, processing and purification of phage preparations, formulation into a stable, solid dosage form, and delivery device selection. Safety and efficacy studies in animals and human subjects are also reviewed.

  4. Postnatal Infections and Immunology Affecting Chronic Lung Disease of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Pryhuber, Gloria S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Premature infants suffer significant respiratory morbidity during infancy with long-term negative consequences on health, quality of life, and health care costs. Enhanced susceptibility to a variety of infections and inflammation play a large role in early and prolonged lung disease following premature birth, though the mechanisms of susceptibility and immune dysregulation are active areas of research. This chapter will review aspects of host-pathogen interactions and immune responses that are altered by preterm birth and that impact chronic respiratory morbidity in these children. PMID:26593074

  5. Discovery of chlamydial peptidoglycan reveals bacteria with murein sacculi but without FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    Biboy, Jacob; Gray, Joe; Kuru, Erkin; Hall, Edward; Brun, Yves V.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Horn, Matthias; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydiae are important pathogens and symbionts, with unique cell biology features. They lack the cell-division protein FtsZ, which functions in maintaining cell shape and orchestrating cell division in almost all other bacteria. In addition, the existence of peptidoglycan (PG) in chlamydial cell envelopes has been highly controversial. Using electron cryotomography, mass spectrometry and fluorescent labeling dyes, here we show that some environmental chlamydiae have cell-wall sacculi consisting of an unusual PG type. Treatment with fosfomycin (a PG synthesis inhibitor) leads to lower infection rates and aberrant cell shapes, suggesting that PG synthesis is crucial for the chlamydial life cycle. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of PG in a member of the Chlamydiae. They also present a unique example of a bacterium with a PG sacculus but without FtsZ, challenging the current hypothesis that it is the absence of a cell wall that renders FtsZ non-essential. PMID:24292151

  6. Benzylidene Acylhydrazides Inhibit Chlamydial Growth in a Type III Secretion- and Iron Chelation-Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Gylfe, Åsa; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Gong, Zheng; Xu, Shuang; Caldwell, Harlan D.; Elofsson, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae are widespread Gram-negative pathogens of humans and animals. Salicylidene acylhydrazides, developed as inhibitors of type III secretion system (T3SS) in Yersinia spp., have an inhibitory effect on chlamydial infection. However, these inhibitors also have the capacity to chelate iron, and it is possible that their antichlamydial effects are caused by iron starvation. Therefore, we have explored the modification of salicylidene acylhydrazides with the goal to uncouple the antichlamydial effect from iron starvation. We discovered that benzylidene acylhydrazides, which cannot chelate iron, inhibit chlamydial growth. Biochemical and genetic analyses suggest that the derivative compounds inhibit chlamydiae through a T3SS-independent mechanism. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in a Chlamydia muridarum variant resistant to benzylidene acylhydrazides, but it may be necessary to segregate the mutations to differentiate their roles in the resistance phenotype. Benzylidene acylhydrazides are well tolerated by host cells and probiotic vaginal Lactobacillus species and are therefore of potential therapeutic value. PMID:24914180

  7. Intestinal lesions caused by two swine chlamydial isolates in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D G; Andersen, A A

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether 2 distinct chlamydial isolates recovered from the intestines and feces of diarrheic nursery pigs could cause intestinal lesions in gnotobiotic pigs. Both isolates share biological characteristics with Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydial isolates R27 and R19 were propagated in Vero cells or embryonated eggs, respectively, and suspended in sucrose-phosphate-glutamine buffer with 10% fetal bovine serum for inoculation. Sham inocula were prepared from uninfected cell culture lysates and from uninfected eggs. Each piglet was fed 1 ml of inoculum or sham inoculum at 3-4 days of age. Ten piglets were each fed 10(9) inclusion-forming-units (IFU) and 14 piglets were each fed 10(6) IFU of isolate R27; 5 control piglets were fed sham inoculum. Twenty piglets were each fed 10(5) IFU R19; 5 control piglets were fed sham inoculum. All infected piglets developed diarrhea 4-5 days postinfection (DPI). Most piglets fed 10(9) IFU R27 became anorexic, dehydrated, and weak and were necropsied 4-7 DPI. Piglets fed 10(6) IFU R27 or 10(5) IFU R19 were necropsied 4, 7, 10, 14, and 18 DPI. Diarrhea, although never profuse, persisted in the piglets fed 10(6) IFU R27 or 10(5) IFU R19 through 12 DPI. At necropsy, all diarrheic piglets had watery colonic contents with flecks of undigested curd. In small intestine, histologic lesions were seen most consistently in distal jejunum and ileum. Distal jejunum and ileum from piglets fed 10(9) IFU R27 and necropsied 4-5 DPI were characterized by villus atrophy and multifocal necrosis of villi; necrosis was limited to the tips or apical one half of villi. Mild to severe villus atrophy, lymphangitis, and perilymphangitis were seen in the distal jejunum and ileum from all infected piglets 7 and 10 DPI. Colon from 1 infected piglet necropsied 10 DPI had mild focal serositis; significant colonic lesions were not seen in the other infected piglets. Immunostaining done on sections of distal jejunum and ileum

  8. Influence of the Chlamydia pneumoniae AR39 bacteriophage ϕCPAR39 on chlamydial inclusion morphology.

    PubMed

    Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Christiansen, Gunna; Honoré, Bent; Birkelund, Svend

    2011-07-01

    The human respiratory tract pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae AR39 is naturally infected by the bacteriophage ϕCPAR39. The phage genome encodes six ORFs, [ORF8, ORF4, ORF5, and viral protein (VP) 1, VP2 and VP3]. To study the growth of the phage, antibodies were generated to VP1 and used to investigate the ϕCPAR39 infection. Using immunofluorescence laser confocal microscopy and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we investigated the ϕCPAR39 infection of C. pneumoniae AR39. It was observed that ϕCPAR39 infection differentially suppressed the C. pneumoniae protein synthesis as the polymorphic membrane protein 10 and the secreted chlamydial protein Cpn0796 was hardly expressed while the secreted chlamydial protein Cpaf was expressed, but not secreted. The inclusion membrane protein, IncA, was demonstrated to surround the phage-infected abnormal reticulate bodies (RB) as well as being located in the inclusion membrane. As IncA is secreted by the type 3 secretion (T3S) system, it is likely that the T3S is disrupted in the phage-infected chlamydiae such that it accumulates around the infected RB.

  9. IL-22 is essential for lung epithelial repair following influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Derek A; Scheller, Erich V; Mandalapu, Sivanarayana; McHugh, Kevin J; Enelow, Richard I; Fattman, Cheryl L; Kolls, Jay K; Alcorn, John F

    2013-04-01

    Influenza infection is widespread in the United States and the world. Despite low mortality rates due to infection, morbidity is common and little is known about the molecular events involved in recovery. Influenza infection results in persistent distal lung remodeling, and the mechanism(s) involved are poorly understood. Recently IL-22 has been found to mediate epithelial repair. We propose that IL-22 is critical for recovery of normal lung function and architecture after influenza infection. Wild-type and IL-22(-/-) mice were infected with influenza A PR8/34 H1N1 and were followed up for up to 21 days post infection. IL-22 receptor was localized to the airway epithelium in naive mice but was expressed at the sites of parenchymal lung remodeling induced by influenza infection. IL-22(-/-) mice displayed exacerbated lung injury compared with wild-type mice, which correlated with decreased lung function 21 days post infection. Epithelial metaplasia was observed in wild-type mice but was not evident in IL-22(-/-) animals that were characterized with an increased fibrotic phenotype. Gene expression analysis revealed aberrant expression of epithelial genes involved in repair processes, among changes in several other biological processes. These data indicate that IL-22 is required for normal lung repair after influenza infection. IL-22 represents a novel pathway involved in interstitial lung disease.

  10. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Mice Induces Chronic Lung Inflammation, iBALT Formation, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jupelli, Madhulika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chiba, Norika; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Jones, Heather D.; Peterson, Ellena; Chen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5×105 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs). Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis. PMID:24204830

  11. Symptomatic Respiratory Virus Infection and Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Cynthia E.; Preiksaitis, Carl M.; Lease, Erika D.; Edelman, Jeffrey; Kirby, Katharine A.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Raghu, Ganesh; Boeckh, Michael; Limaye, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is a major cause of allograft loss post-lung transplantation. Prior studies have examined the association between respiratory virus infection (RVI) and CLAD were limited by older diagnostic techniques, study design, and case numbers. We examined the association between symptomatic RVI and CLAD using modern diagnostic techniques in a large contemporary cohort of lung transplant recipients (LTRs). Methods. We retrospectively assessed clinical variables including acute rejection, cytomegalovirus pneumonia, upper and lower RVI, and the primary endpoint of CLAD (determined by 2 independent reviewers) in 250 LTRs in a single university transplantation program. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze the relationship between RVI and CLAD in a time-dependent manner, incorporating different periods of risk following RVI diagnosis. Results. Fifty patients (20%) were diagnosed with CLAD at a median of 95 weeks post-transplantation, and 79 (32%) had 114 episodes of RVI. In multivariate analysis, rejection and RVI were independently associated with CLAD (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) 2.2 (1.2–3.9), P = .01 and 1.9 (1.1–3.5), P = .03, respectively. The association of RVI with CLAD was stronger the more proximate the RVI episode: 4.8 (1.9–11.6), P < .01; 3.4 (1.5–7.5), P < .01; and 2.4 (1.2–5.0), P = .02 in multivariate analysis for 3, 6, and 12 months following RVI, respectively. Conclusions. Symptomatic RVI is independently associated with development of CLAD, with increased risk at shorter time periods following RVI. Prospective studies to characterize the virologic determinants of CLAD and define the underlying mechanisms are warranted. PMID:26565010

  12. Cytology as a guide to the presence of chlamydial inclusions in Giemsa-stained conjunctival smears in severe endemic trachoma.

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, C.; Dawson, C. R.; Daghfous, T.; Hoshiwara, I.; Jones, P.; Messadi, M.; Schachter, J.

    1975-01-01

    Microscopical examination of 927 Giemsa-stained conjunctival smears from children with chronic trachoma in southern Tunisia showed 93 (10 per cent.) with typical trachoma (chlamydial) inclusions in epithelial cells. The accompanying cytological features were a useful indicator for inclusions. Inclusions were found only in slides with numerous polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and separation of the epithelial cells. When these two features alone were present, 3 per cent. of the smears were inclusion-positive; when many lymphocytes were present also, 25 per cent. were inclusion positive; when other cytological features (plasma cells, macrophages, blastoid, and stem cells) were present as well, 70 per cent. of the smears were inclusion-positive. The occurrence of these sets of cytological features can be a useful guide for selecting smears for intensive examination for chlamydial inclusions. Immunofluorescent (FA) staining and Giemsa staining of 527 pairs of matched smears detected trachoma agent in 67 (13 per cent.); in thirty by both methods, in thirteen by Giemsa staining alone, and in 24 by FA alone. The examination of Giemsa-stained smears for chlamydial inclusions is a useful technique for the diagnosis of trachoma or inclusion conjunctivitis by laboratories that do not have the specialized facilities for the identification of these chlamydial infections by the technically more complex procedures of immunofluorescent staining or isolation in embryonated eggs or tissue cultures. Images PMID:48384

  13. Cough physiology in elderly women with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiu-Wen; Fennelly, Kevin; Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Adams, Sherry; Condrey, Jillian; Hosford, Jennifer L; Davenport, Paul W

    2017-05-01

    Elderly white, thin, nonsmoking women appear to be more susceptible to lung infections with Mycobacterium avium complex and other nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It has been postulated that such disease in women is related to suppression of their cough. We hypothesized that patients with pulmonary NTM (pNTM) infections may have altered cough physiology compared with unaffected control subjects. We used capsaicin-induced cough to assess the cough reflex in pNTM subjects. Eight elderly white women with stable chronic pNTM infections and six unaffected age-matched control subjects were recruited. There was no significant difference between groups in capsaicin-elicited cough motor response, airflow pattern, or cough frequency. The urge-to-cough (UTC) score at the lowest capsaicin concentration was significantly lower in pNTM than control subjects (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the UTC score between pNTM and control subjects at >50 μM capsaicin. These results suggest lower UTC sensitivity to the lowest concentration of capsaicin in pNTM than control subjects. In other words, the pNTM subjects do not sense a UTC when the stimulus is relatively small.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study investigates the cough motor response and cough sensitivity in patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. In elderly white female pulmonary NTM subjects, we demonstrated a capacity to produce coughs similar to that of age-matched control subjects but decreased cough sensitivity in response to a low dose of capsaicin compared with control subjects. These findings are important to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms resulting in NTM disease in elderly white women and/or the syndrome developing in elderly white female NTM patients. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. ICAM-1-dependent and ICAM-1-independent neutrophil lung infiltration by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Hou, Make; Yan, Meiping; Lü, Xinhui; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Songlin; Gao, Jianfeng; Liu, Bang; Wu, Xiaoxiong; Liu, Guoquan

    2015-08-01

    Neutrophils are innate immune cells that play a crucial role in the first line of host defense. It is also known that neutrophil lung recruitment and infiltration may cause lung injury. The roles of neutrophils in virus infection-induced lung injury are not clear. We explore the mechanisms of neutrophil lung infiltration and the potential biomarkers for lung injury in a swine model of lung injury caused by natural or experimental porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Neutrophil lung infiltration was determined by measurement of myeloperoxidase expression and enzyme activity of lung tissues. Myeloperoxidase expression and enzyme activity were dramatically increased in the naturally and experimentally infected lung tissues. Chemokine analysis by quantitative PCR and ELISA showed that IL-8 expression was increased in both infections, while monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression was increased only in experimentally infected lung tissues. Expression of the cell adhesion molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 was measured by quantitative PCR and Western blotting. VCAM-1 expression was increased in experimentally and naturally infected lungs, whereas ICAM-1 expression was increased only in the naturally infected lung samples. Our results suggest that neutrophil lung infiltrations in the infected animals are both ICAM-1- and -independent and that combined expression of VCAM-1 and IL-8 may serve as the biomarker for lung injury induced by virus infection. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Longitudinal analysis of the lung microbiota of cynomolgous macaques during long-term SHIV infection.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alison; Paulson, Joseph N; Talukder, Hisham; Tipton, Laura; Kling, Heather; Cui, Lijia; Fitch, Adam; Pop, Mihai; Norris, Karen A; Ghedin, Elodie

    2016-07-08

    Longitudinal studies of the lung microbiome are challenging due to the invasive nature of sample collection. In addition, studies of the lung microbiome in human disease are usually performed after disease onset, limiting the ability to determine early events in the lung. We used a non-human primate model to assess lung microbiome alterations over time in response to an HIV-like immunosuppression and determined impact of the lung microbiome on development of obstructive lung disease. Cynomolgous macaques were infected with the SIV-HIV chimeric virus SHIV89.6P. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected pre-infection and every 4 weeks for 53 weeks post-infection. The microbiota was characterized at each time point by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequencing. We observed individual variation in the composition of the lung microbiota with a proportion of the macaques having Tropheryma whipplei as the dominant organism in their lungs. Bacterial communities varied over time both within and between animals, but there did not appear to be a systematic alteration due to SHIV infection. Development of obstructive lung disease in the SHIV-infected animals was characterized by a relative increase in abundance of oral anaerobes. Network analysis further identified a difference in community composition that accompanied the development of obstructive disease with negative correlations between members of the obstructed and non-obstructed groups. This emphasizes how species shifts can impact multiple other species, potentially resulting in disease. This study is the first to investigate the dynamics of the lung microbiota over time and in response to immunosuppression in a non-human primate model. The persistence of oral bacteria in the lung and their association with obstruction suggest a potential role in pathogenesis. The lung microbiome in the non-human primate is a valuable tool for examining the impact of the lung microbiome in human health and disease.

  16. Penicillin G-Induced Chlamydial Stress Response in a Porcine Strain of Chlamydia pecorum

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Cory Ann; Dewez, Frederic; Borel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pecorum causes asymptomatic infection and pathology in ruminants, pigs, and koalas. We characterized the antichlamydial effect of the beta lactam penicillin G on Chlamydia pecorum strain 1710S (porcine abortion isolate). Penicillin-exposed and mock-exposed infected host cells showed equivalent inclusions numbers. Penicillin-exposed inclusions contained aberrant bacterial forms and exhibited reduced infectivity, while mock-exposed inclusions contained normal bacterial forms and exhibited robust infectivity. Infectious bacteria production increased upon discontinuation of penicillin exposure, compared to continued exposure. Chlamydia-induced cell death occurred in mock-exposed controls; cell survival was improved in penicillin-exposed infected groups. Similar results were obtained both in the presence and in the absence of the eukaryotic protein translation inhibitor cycloheximide and at different times of initiation of penicillin exposure. These data demonstrate that penicillin G induces the chlamydial stress response (persistence) and is not bactericidal, for this chlamydial species/strain in vitro, regardless of host cell de novo protein synthesis. PMID:26997956

  17. Invasive mold infections in lung and heart-lung transplant recipients: Stanford University experience.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, R; Vazquez-Guillamet, M C; Suarez, J; Mooney, J; Montoya, J G; Dhillon, G S

    2015-04-01

    Recipients of lung transplantation (LT) and heart-lung transplantation (HLT) are at increased risk of infection, including invasive mold infections (IMIs). The clinical presentation, radiographic correlates, and outcomes of Aspergillus and non-AspergillusIMIs in this population have not been well documented. LT and HLT recipients diagnosed with IMIs between 1990 and 2012 were identified using the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment and Stanford LT and HLT clinical database. Recipient clinical and radiographic characteristics were obtained via retrospective review of medical records and compared between Aspergillus and non-Aspergillus mold recipients. Risk factors for mortality were identified using multivariate logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 87 (14%) transplant recipients were diagnosed with IMIs. Aspergillus species were isolated in 63 (72%) and non-Aspergillus molds in 24 (28%) recipients. No significant difference was seen in presenting symptoms or radiographic findings between Aspergillus and non-Aspergillus mold recipients. Median time to diagnosis was 363 days in the Aspergillus group and 419 days in the non-Aspergillus group, with dissemination occurring only within the non-Aspergillus group (12.5%). Overall 90-day and 1-year mortality following IMI was 24% and 44%. One-year mortality was increased in the non-Aspergillus group (39.5% vs. 60.5%, P = 0.03). There is significant overlap in risk factors, presentation, and radiographic patterns in IMI in LT or HLT recipients. Non-Aspergillus molds were more likely to present late, with disseminated disease, and portend increased 1-year mortality. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mechanical ventilation and lung infection in the genesis of air-space enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Alfonso; Lu, Qin; Vieira, Silvia; Tonnellier, Marc; Lenaour, Gilles; Goldstein, Ivan; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Air-space enlargement may result from mechanical ventilation and/or lung infection. The aim of this study was to assess how mechanical ventilation and lung infection influence the genesis of bronchiolar and alveolar distention. Methods Four groups of piglets were studied: non-ventilated-non-inoculated (controls, n = 5), non-ventilated-inoculated (n = 6), ventilated-non-inoculated (n = 6), and ventilated-inoculated (n = 8) piglets. The respiratory tract of intubated piglets was inoculated with a highly concentrated solution of Escherichia coli. Mechanical ventilation was maintained during 60 hours with a tidal volume of 15 ml/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure. After sacrifice by exsanguination, lungs were fixed for histological and lung morphometry analyses. Results Lung infection was present in all inoculated piglets and in five of the six ventilated-non-inoculated piglets. Mean alveolar and mean bronchiolar areas, measured using an analyzer computer system connected through a high-resolution color camera to an optical microscope, were significantly increased in non-ventilated-inoculated animals (+16% and +11%, respectively, compared to controls), in ventilated-non-inoculated animals (+49% and +49%, respectively, compared to controls), and in ventilated-inoculated animals (+95% and +118%, respectively, compared to controls). Mean alveolar and mean bronchiolar areas significantly correlated with the extension of lung infection (R = 0.50, p < 0.01 and R = 0.67, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Lung infection induces bronchiolar and alveolar distention. Mechanical ventilation induces secondary lung infection and is associated with further air-space enlargement. The combination of primary lung infection and mechanical ventilation markedly increases air-space enlargement, the degree of which depends on the severity and extension of lung infection. PMID:17274806

  19. Caveolin-2 associates with intracellular chlamydial inclusions independently of caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Webley, Wilmore C; Norkin, Leonard C; Stuart, Elizabeth S

    2004-07-22

    Lipid raft domains form in plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells by the tight packing of glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Caveolae are invaginated structures that form in lipid raft domains when the protein caveolin-1 is expressed. The Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that replicate entirely within inclusions that develop from the phagocytic vacuoles in which they enter. We recently found that host cell caveolin-1 is associated with the intracellular vacuoles and inclusions of some chlamydial strains and species, and that entry of those strains depends on intact lipid raft domains. Caveolin-2 is another member of the caveolin family of proteins that is present in caveolae, but of unknown function. We utilized a caveolin-1 negative/caveolin-2 positive FRT cell line and laser confocal immunofluorescence techniques to visualize the colocalization of caveolin-2 with the chlamydial inclusions. We show here that in infected HeLa cells, caveolin-2, as well as caveolin-1, colocalizes with inclusions of C. pneumoniae (Cp), C. caviae (GPIC), and C. trachomatis serovars E, F and K. In addition, caveolin-2 also associates with C. trachomatis serovars A, B and C, although caveolin-1 did not colocalize with these organisms. Moreover, caveolin-2 appears to be specifically, or indirectly, associated with the pathogens at the inclusion membranes. Using caveolin-1 deficient FRT cells, we show that although caveolin-2 normally is not transported out of the Golgi in the absence of caveolin-1, it nevertheless colocalizes with chlamydial inclusions in these cells. However, our results also show that caveolin-2 did not colocalize with UV-irradiated Chlamydia in FRT cells, suggesting that in these caveolin-1 negative cells, pathogen viability and very likely pathogen gene expression are necessary for the acquisition of caveolin-2 from the Golgi. Caveolin-2 associates with the chlamydial inclusion independently of caveolin-1. The function of caveolin-2, either

  20. Caveolin-2 associates with intracellular chlamydial inclusions independently of caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Webley, Wilmore C; Norkin, Leonard C; Stuart, Elizabeth S

    2004-01-01

    Background Lipid raft domains form in plasma membranes of eukaryotic cells by the tight packing of glycosphingolipids and cholesterol. Caveolae are invaginated structures that form in lipid raft domains when the protein caveolin-1 is expressed. The Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that replicate entirely within inclusions that develop from the phagocytic vacuoles in which they enter. We recently found that host cell caveolin-1 is associated with the intracellular vacuoles and inclusions of some chlamydial strains and species, and that entry of those strains depends on intact lipid raft domains. Caveolin-2 is another member of the caveolin family of proteins that is present in caveolae, but of unknown function. Methods We utilized a caveolin-1 negative/caveolin-2 positive FRT cell line and laser confocal immunofluorescence techniques to visualize the colocalization of caveolin-2 with the chlamydial inclusions. Results We show here that in infected HeLa cells, caveolin-2, as well as caveolin-1, colocalizes with inclusions of C. pneumoniae (Cp), C. caviae (GPIC), and C. trachomatis serovars E, F and K. In addition, caveolin-2 also associates with C. trachomatis serovars A, B and C, although caveolin-1 did not colocalize with these organisms. Moreover, caveolin-2 appears to be specifically, or indirectly, associated with the pathogens at the inclusion membranes. Using caveolin-1 deficient FRT cells, we show that although caveolin-2 normally is not transported out of the Golgi in the absence of caveolin-1, it nevertheless colocalizes with chlamydial inclusions in these cells. However, our results also show that caveolin-2 did not colocalize with UV-irradiated Chlamydia in FRT cells, suggesting that in these caveolin-1 negative cells, pathogen viability and very likely pathogen gene expression are necessary for the acquisition of caveolin-2 from the Golgi. Conclusion Caveolin-2 associates with the chlamydial inclusion independently of caveolin

  1. Outcome of influenza infection managed with oseltamivir in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ison, Michael G; Sharma, Amita; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Wain, John C; Ginns, Leo C

    2008-03-01

    Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality in lung transplant recipients and likely predisposes to obliterative bronchiolitis. Neuraminidase inhibitors shorten the duration of symptoms and virus shedding and the number of antibiotic-requiring complications in ambulatory immunocompetent patients, although the efficacy of these agents in lung transplant recipients has not been assessed previously. In this study, 9 lung transplant patients who were treated with oseltamivir for influenza infections were identified and analyzed retrospectively. Oseltamivir was well tolerated. Infection resolved in all patients and there were no deaths. Two patients developed pneumonia shortly after their influenza infection and both responded to antibiotic therapy. None of the patients had persistent abnormalities noted on chest imaging and most did not show significant changes on pulmonary function testing. Two patients with the lowest pulmonary function test (PFT) values pre-infection had persistent defects after infection. Oseltamivir is well tolerated in lung transplant recipients and may reduce the risk of complications, although further studies are warranted.

  2. Stimulator of IFN gene is critical for induction of IFN-beta during Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    PubMed

    Prantner, Daniel; Darville, Toni; Nagarajan, Uma M

    2010-03-01

    Type I IFN signaling has recently been shown to be detrimental to the host during infection with Chlamydia muridarum in both mouse lung and female genital tract. However, the pattern recognition receptor and the signaling pathways involved in chlamydial-induced IFN-beta are unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated no role for TLR4 and a partial role for MyD88 in chlamydial-induced IFN-beta. In this study, we demonstrate that mouse macrophages lacking TLR3, TRIF, TLR7, or TLR9 individually or both TLR4 and MyD88, still induce IFN-beta equivalent to wild type controls, leading to the hypothesis that TLR-independent cytosolic pathogen receptor pathways are crucial for this response. Silencing nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 in HeLa cells partially decreased chlamydial-induced IFN-beta. Independently, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of the stimulator of IFN gene (STING) protein in HeLa cells and mouse oviduct epithelial cells significantly decreased IFN-beta mRNA expression, suggesting a critical role for STING in chlamydial-induced IFN-beta induction. Conversely, silencing of mitochondria-associated antiviral signaling proteins and the Rig-I-like receptors, RIG-I, and melanoma differentiation associated protein 5, had no effect. In addition, induction of IFN-beta depended on the downstream transcription IFN regulatory factor 3, and on activation of NF-kappaB and MAPK p38. Finally, STING, an endoplasmic reticulum-resident protein, was found to localize in close proximity to the chlamydial inclusion membrane during infection. These results indicate that C. muridarum induces IFN-beta via stimulation of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 pathway, and TLR- and Rig-I-like receptor-independent pathways that require STING, culminating in activation of IFN regulatory factor 3, NF-kappaB, and p38 MAPK.

  3. Chlamydia gallinacea, not C. psittaci, is the endemic chlamydial species in chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Guo, Weina; Li, Jing; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Gong, Jiansen; Fan, Weixing; Wang, Chengming

    2016-01-18

    To investigate the prevalence and diversity of Chlamydia spp. in domestic birds in China, oral and cloacal swabs of healthy chickens, ducks, geese and pigeons were collected nationwide from live-animal markets and examined by Chlamydia spp. 23 S rRNA gene FRET-PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis and confirmatory sequencing. Overall, 26.2% of the birds (602/2,300) were positive for Chlamydia spp. and five Chlamydia spp. were identified. While occasional detection of C. suis and C. muridarum in poultry is reported here for the first time, the predominant chlamydial agent was C. gallinacea representing 63.8% of all positives (384/602) and 81.2% of positive chickens (359/442). Analysis of the C. gallinacea ompA phylogeny revealed at least 13 well segregated variants (serovars). Seven-month monitoring of C. gallinacea-infected chickens indicated that the infection was persistent. C. gallinacea-infected chickens remained without overt clinical disease, but showed body weight gains significantly reduced by 6.5-11.4% beginning in week 3 post-infection. This study indicates that C. gallinacea is the endemic chlamydial species in chickens, whereas C. psittaci dominates only in pigeons. Further studies are required to address the specific conditions under which C. gallinacea could act as an avian pathogen and possibly also a zoonotic agent.

  4. Chlamydia gallinacea, not C. psittaci, is the endemic chlamydial species in chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weina; Li, Jing; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard; Gong, Jiansen; Fan, Weixing; Wang, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and diversity of Chlamydia spp. in domestic birds in China, oral and cloacal swabs of healthy chickens, ducks, geese and pigeons were collected nationwide from live-animal markets and examined by Chlamydia spp. 23 S rRNA gene FRET-PCR followed by high-resolution melting curve analysis and confirmatory sequencing. Overall, 26.2% of the birds (602/2,300) were positive for Chlamydia spp. and five Chlamydia spp. were identified. While occasional detection of C. suis and C. muridarum in poultry is reported here for the first time, the predominant chlamydial agent was C. gallinacea representing 63.8% of all positives (384/602) and 81.2% of positive chickens (359/442). Analysis of the C. gallinacea ompA phylogeny revealed at least 13 well segregated variants (serovars). Seven-month monitoring of C. gallinacea-infected chickens indicated that the infection was persistent. C. gallinacea-infected chickens remained without overt clinical disease, but showed body weight gains significantly reduced by 6.5–11.4% beginning in week 3 post-infection. This study indicates that C. gallinacea is the endemic chlamydial species in chickens, whereas C. psittaci dominates only in pigeons. Further studies are required to address the specific conditions under which C. gallinacea could act as an avian pathogen and possibly also a zoonotic agent. PMID:26778053

  5. Epigenetic and Transcriptomic Regulation of Lung Repair during Recovery from Influenza Infection.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Derek A; Robinson, Keven M; Chen, Kong; McHugh, Kevin J; Clay, Michelle E; Huang, Grace T; Benos, Panayiotis V; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W; Kolls, Jay K; Anathy, Vikas; Alcorn, John F

    2017-02-09

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza is a cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Most people infected with influenza virus display mild-to-moderate disease phenotypes and recover within a few weeks. Influenza is known to cause persistent alveolitis in animal models; however, little is known about the molecular pathways involved in this phenotype. We challenged C57BL/6 mice with influenza A/PR/8/34 and examined lung pathologic processes and inflammation, as well as transcriptomic and epigenetic changes at 21 to 60 days after infection. Influenza induced persistent parenchymal lung inflammation, alveolar epithelial metaplasia, and epithelial endoplasmic reticulum stress that were evident after the clearance of virus and resolution of morbidity. Influenza infection induced robust changes in the lung transcriptome, including a significant impact on inflammatory and extracellular matrix protein expression. Despite the robust changes in lung gene expression, preceding influenza (21 days) did not exacerbate secondary Staphylococcus aureus infection. Finally, we examined the impact of influenza on miRNA expression in the lung and found an increase in miR-155. miR-155 knockout mice recovered from influenza infection faster than controls and had decreased lung inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These data illuminate the dynamic molecular changes in the lung in the weeks after influenza infection and characterize the repair process, identifying a novel role for miR-155.

  6. Inhibition of chlamydial infectious activity due to P2X7R-dependent phospholipase D activation.

    PubMed

    Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Stahl, Lynn; Raymond, Marie-Noëlle; Jungas, Thomas; Verbeke, Philippe; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Darville, Toni; Ojcius, David M

    2003-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis survives within host cells by inhibiting fusion between Chlamydia vacuoles and lysosomes. We show here that treatment of infected macrophages with ATP leads to killing of chlamydiae through ligation of the purinergic receptor, P2X(7)R. Chlamydial killing required phospholipase D (PLD) activation, as PLD inhibition led to rescue of chlamydiae in ATP-treated macrophages. However, there was no PLD activation nor chlamydial killing in ATP-treated P2X(7)R-deficient macrophages. P2X(7)R ligation exerts its effects by promoting fusion between Chlamydia vacuoles and lysosomes. P2X(7)R stimulation also resulted in macrophage death, but fusion with lysosomes preceded macrophage death and PLD inhibition did not prevent macrophage death. These results suggest that P2X(7)R ligation leads to PLD activation, which is directly responsible for inhibition of infection.

  7. The eukaryotic signal sequence, YGRL, targets the chlamydial inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabeiseman, Emily J.; Cichos, Kyle H.; Moore, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how host proteins are targeted to pathogen-specified organelles, like the chlamydial inclusion, is fundamentally important to understanding the biogenesis of these unique subcellular compartments and how they maintain autonomy within the cell. Syntaxin 6, which localizes to the chlamydial inclusion, contains an YGRL signal sequence. The YGRL functions to return syntaxin 6 to the trans-Golgi from the plasma membrane, and deletion of the YGRL signal sequence from syntaxin 6 also prevents the protein from localizing to the chlamydial inclusion. YGRL is one of three YXXL (YGRL, YQRL, and YKGL) signal sequences which target proteins to the trans-Golgi. We designed various constructs of eukaryotic proteins to test the specificity and propensity of YXXL sequences to target the inclusion. The YGRL signal sequence redirects proteins (e.g., Tgn38, furin, syntaxin 4) that normally do not localize to the chlamydial inclusion. Further, the requirement of the YGRL signal sequence for syntaxin 6 localization to inclusions formed by different species of Chlamydia is conserved. These data indicate that there is an inherent property of the chlamydial inclusion, which allows it to recognize the YGRL signal sequence. To examine whether this “inherent property” was protein or lipid in nature, we asked if deletion of the YGRL signal sequence from syntaxin 6 altered the ability of the protein to interact with proteins or lipids. Deletion or alteration of the YGRL from syntaxin 6 does not appreciably impact syntaxin 6-protein interactions, but does decrease syntaxin 6-lipid interactions. Intriguingly, data also demonstrate that YKGL or YQRL can successfully substitute for YGRL in localization of syntaxin 6 to the chlamydial inclusion. Importantly and for the first time, we are establishing that a eukaryotic signal sequence targets the chlamydial inclusion. PMID:25309881

  8. High extracellular levels of cefpirome in unaffected and infected lung tissue of patients.

    PubMed

    Lindenmann, Jörg; Kugler, Sylvia A; Matzi, Veronika; Porubsky, Christian; Maier, Alfred; Dittrich, Peter; Graninger, Wolfgang; Smolle-Jüttner, Freyja M; Joukhadar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    the objective of the present investigation was to measure the extracellular concentrations of cefpirome in unaffected and infected lung tissue of septic patients. a single intravenous dose of 30 mg/kg total body weight of cefpirome was administered to eight patients every 12 h prior to insertion of microdialysis probes into lung tissue. the median (minimum, maximum) peak concentration (C(max)), time to C(max) (T(max)), area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 4 h (AUC(0-4)) and AUC(0-∞) of unbound cefpirome for unaffected lung were 48 (32, 107) mg/L, 0.83 (0.17, 3.17) h, 117 (60, 177) mg · h/L and 182 (80, 382) mg · h/L, respectively. The corresponding values for infected lung tissue were 45 (6, 122) mg/L, 1.17 (0.83, 2.83) h, 92 (17, 253) mg · h/L and 206 (49, 379) mg · h/L, respectively. The median apparent terminal elimination half-lives (t(½z)) of cefpirome were 2.61, 3.05 and 3.39 h for plasma, unaffected lung and infected lung, respectively. The median ratios of the AUC(0)(-∞) for lung to the AUC(0)(-∞) for plasma were 0.63 (0.19, 1.55) and 0.46 (0.32, 0.98) for unaffected and infected lung, respectively. we provide strong evidence that cefpirome penetrates effectively into the extracellular space fluid of lung tissue. Under steady-state conditions, the median concentrations of cefpirome in plasma, unaffected lung and infected lung exceeded the MICs of the majority of relevant bacteria over the entire dosing interval of up to 12 h after intravenous administration of a dose of 30 mg/kg total body weight.

  9. Following the Footsteps of Chlamydial Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Domman, D.; Horn, M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression ensures an organism responds to stimuli and undergoes proper development. Although the regulatory networks in bacteria have been investigated in model microorganisms, nearly nothing is known about the evolution and plasticity of these networks in obligate, intracellular bacteria. The phylum Chlamydiae contains a vast array of host-associated microbes, including several human pathogens. The Chlamydiae are unique among obligate, intracellular bacteria as they undergo a complex biphasic developmental cycle in which large swaths of genes are temporally regulated. Coupled with the low number of transcription factors, these organisms offer a model to study the evolution of regulatory networks in intracellular organisms. We provide the first comprehensive analysis exploring the diversity and evolution of regulatory networks across the phylum. We utilized a comparative genomics approach to construct predicted coregulatory networks, which unveiled genus- and family-specific regulatory motifs and architectures, most notably those of virulence-associated genes. Surprisingly, our analysis suggests that few regulatory components are conserved across the phylum, and those that are conserved are involved in the exploitation of the intracellular niche. Our study thus lends insight into a component of chlamydial evolution that has otherwise remained largely unexplored. PMID:26424812

  10. Effect of FHIT loss and p53 mutation on HPV-infected lung carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Liu, Xiaofei; Yang, Yuxuan; Zhao, Xiaodan; Xue, Jianjun; Zhang, Weixiao; Yang, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)16/18 infection in the development of lung cancer has previously been identified, and fragile histidine triad (FHIT) loss and p53 mutation are frequently observed in the disease. However, the association between these factors has not been well studied. The present study aimed to further investigate the significance of HPV infection, FHIT loss and p53 mutations in the development of lung cancer and their possible associations. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded specimens from 88 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 56 of adenocarcinoma (AC), 36 of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and 110 non-cancer control cases of lung neoplasms. The prevalence of HPV infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and FHIT loss and p53 mutations were detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ(2), Fisher's exact and Pearson correlation tests were applied for statistical analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that HPVL1 (the major capsid protein of HPV), HPV16 and HPV18 infection were more prevalent in the lung cancer samples compared with the non-cancer controls (all P<0.001). FHIT loss occurred more frequently in the lung cancer samples (44.44%) compared with the non-cancer controls (7.25%) (P<0.001). FHIT loss in the HPVL1-positive group was significantly increased compared with the HPVL1-negative group in the lung cancer cases and the non-cancer controls (P<0.05). In the lung cancer cases, the p53 mutation rates in the HPVL1- and HPV16/18-positive groups were significantly increased compared with the HPVL1- and HPV16/18-negative groups (P<0.05). In the 180 lung cancer cases, the coexistence rate of FHIT loss and a history of smoking was 38.33% (69/180; Pearson contingency coefficient of r=0.318; P<0.001). FHIT loss and p53 mutation exhibited a synergistic effect on HPV-associated lung cancer (Pearson contingency coefficient r=0.357, P<0.001). The present study demonstrated that FHIT loss may be important

  11. Natural Products for the Treatment of Chlamydiaceae Infections

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mika A.; Potroz, Michael G.; Teh, Seoh-Wei; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Due to the global prevalence of Chlamydiae, exploring studies of diverse antichlamydial compounds is important in the development of effective treatment strategies and global infectious disease management. Chlamydiaceae is the most widely known bacterial family of the Chlamydiae order. Among the species in the family Chlamydiaceae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae cause common human diseases, while Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia suis represent zoonotic threats or are endemic in human food sources. Although chlamydial infections are currently manageable in human populations, chlamydial infections in livestock are endemic and there is significant difficulty achieving effective treatment. To combat the spread of Chlamydiaceae in humans and other hosts, improved methods for treatment and prevention of infection are needed. There exist various studies exploring the potential of natural products for developing new antichlamydial treatment modalities. Polyphenolic compounds can inhibit chlamydial growth by membrane disruption, reestablishment of host cell apoptosis, or improving host immune system detection. Fatty acids, monoglycerides, and lipids can disrupt the cell membranes of infective chlamydial elementary bodies (EBs). Peptides can disrupt the cell membranes of chlamydial EBs, and transferrins can inhibit chlamydial EBs from attachment to and permeation through the membranes of host cells. Cellular metabolites and probiotic bacteria can inhibit chlamydial infection by modulating host immune responses and directly inhibiting chlamydial growth. Finally, early stage clinical trials indicate that polyherbal formulations can be effective in treating chlamydial infections. Herein, we review an important body of literature in the field of antichlamydial research. PMID:27754466

  12. Infection, inflammation, and lung function decline in infants with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Naveen; Williamson, Elizabeth; Linnane, Barry; Skoric, Billy; Robertson, Colin F; Robinson, Phil; Massie, John; Hall, Graham L; Sly, Peter; Stick, Stephen; Ranganathan, Sarath

    2011-07-01

    Better understanding of evolution of lung function in infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) and its association with pulmonary inflammation and infection is crucial in informing both early intervention studies aimed at limiting lung damage and the role of lung function as outcomes in such studies. To describe longitudinal change in lung function in infants with CF and its association with pulmonary infection and inflammation. Infants diagnosed after newborn screening or clinical presentation were recruited prospectively. FVC, forced expiratory volume in 0.5 seconds (FEV(0.5)), and forced expiratory flows at 75% of exhaled vital capacity (FEF(75)) were measured using the raised-volume technique, and z-scores were calculated from published reference equations. Pulmonary infection and inflammation were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage within 48 hours of lung function testing. Thirty-seven infants had at least two successful repeat lung function measurements. Mean (SD) z-scores for FVC were -0.8 (1.0), -0.9 (1.1), and -1.7 (1.2) when measured at the first visit, 1-year visit, or 2-year visit, respectively. Mean (SD) z-scores for FEV(0.5) were -1.4 (1.2), -2.4 (1.1), and -4.3 (1.6), respectively. In those infants in whom free neutrophil elastase was detected, FVC z-scores were 0.81 lower (P=0.003), and FEV(0.5) z-scores 0.96 lower (P=0.001), respectively. Significantly greater decline in FEV(0.5) z-scores occurred in those infected with Staphylococcus aureus (P=0.018) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P=0.021). In infants with CF, pulmonary inflammation is associated with lower lung function, whereas pulmonary infection is associated with a greater rate of decline in lung function. Strategies targeting pulmonary inflammation and infection are required to prevent early decline in lung function in infants with CF.

  13. Lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis patients with difficult to treat lung infections.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Lieven

    2017-11-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with end-stage pulmonary disease, lung transplantation (LTx) remains a life-extending therapy with good outcome in most patients. Despite early concern about chronic pretransplantation infections in the context of posttransplantation immunosuppression, typical CF-associated organisms such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa turned out to be quite well manageable and associated with favorable outcomes in transplanted CF patients, even in patients with highly resistant strains. However, the situation is less evident with other pathogens. Burkholderia cenocepacia is associated with reduced survival and regarded as a contraindication for LTx in most centers, other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Other resistant Gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in CF patients are not regarded as a contraindication. Nontuberculous mycobacteria disease in CF patients does not preclude successful recovery after LTx, although postoperative complications can be expected in patients with Mycobacterium abscessus and specific management is indicated. Fungal species should be treated aggressively to limit morbidity after transplantation. Despite its complexity, LTx is safe in most CF patients, with good outcomes if the pathogens that are present are identified and adequately treated.

  14. Immunodeficiency, AIDS-related pneumonia, and risk of lung cancer among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Julia L; Leyden, Wendy A; Chao, Chun R; Horberg, Michael A; Klein, Daniel B; Quesenberry, Charles P; Towner, William J; Silverberg, Michael J

    2017-04-24

    The objective is to clarify the role of immunodeficiency and pneumonia in elevated lung cancer risk among HIV-infected individuals. Cohort study of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults in a large integrated healthcare system in California during 1996-2011. We used Poisson models to obtain rate ratios for lung cancer associated with HIV infection, overall and stratified by recent CD4 cells/μl (HIV-uninfected as reference group), with χ tests for trends across CD4 strata. Fully adjusted models included demographics, cancer risk factors (smoking, drug/alcohol abuse, overweight/obesity), and prior pneumonia. Among 24 768 HIV-infected and 257 600 HIV-uninfected individuals, the lung cancer rate per 100 000 person-years was 66 (n = 80 events) for HIV-infected and 33 (n = 506 events) for HIV-uninfected individuals [rate ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7-2.2]. Overall, HIV-infected individuals were at increased risk of lung cancer after adjustment for demographics and cancer risk factors (rate ratio 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.7), but not after additional adjustment for pneumonia (rate ratio 1.2, 95% CI: 0.9-1.6). Lower CD4 cell counts were associated with higher risk of lung cancer in unadjusted and demographics-adjusted models (P < 0.001 for all), but this trend did not remain after adjustment for cancer risk factors and pneumonia. Compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, HIV-infected individuals with CD4 less than 200 cells/μl were not at increased risk of lung cancer in fully adjusted models. The increased lung cancer risk among HIV patients is attributable to differences in demographics, risk factors such as smoking, and history of pneumonia. Immunodeficiency does not appear to have an independent effect on lung cancer risk.

  15. Infections with Avian Pathogenic and Fecal Escherichia coli Strains Display Similar Lung Histopathology and Macrophage Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Fabiana; Corrêa, André Mendes Ribeiro; Barbieri, Nicolle Lima; Glodde, Susanne; Weyrauch, Karl Dietrich; Kaspers, Bernd; Driemeier, David; Ewers, Christa; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare histopathological changes in the lungs of chickens infected with avian pathogenic (APEC) and avian fecal (Afecal) Escherichia coli strains, and to analyze how the interaction of the bacteria with avian macrophages relates to the outcome of the infection. Chickens were infected intratracheally with three APEC strains, MT78, IMT5155, and UEL17, and one non-pathogenic Afecal strain, IMT5104. The pathogenicity of the strains was assessed by isolating bacteria from lungs, kidneys, and spleens at 24 h post-infection (p.i.). Lungs were examined for histopathological changes at 12, 18, and 24 h p.i. Serial lung sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE), terminal deoxynucleotidyl dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) for detection of apoptotic cells, and an anti-O2 antibody for detection of MT78 and IMT5155. UEL17 and IMT5104 did not cause systemic infections and the extents of lung colonization were two orders of magnitude lower than for the septicemic strains MT78 and IMT5155, yet all four strains caused the same extent of inflammation in the lungs. The inflammation was localized; there were some congested areas next to unaffected areas. Only the inflamed regions became labeled with anti-O2 antibody. TUNEL labeling revealed the presence of apoptotic cells at 12 h p.i in the inflamed regions only, and before any necrotic foci could be seen. The TUNEL-positive cells were very likely dying heterophils, as evidenced by the purulent inflammation. Some of the dying cells observed in avian lungs in situ may also be macrophages, since all four avian E. coli induced caspase 3/7 activation in monolayers of HD11 avian macrophages. In summary, both pathogenic and non-pathogenic fecal strains of avian E. coli produce focal infections in the avian lung, and these are accompanied by inflammation and cell death in the infected areas. PMID:22848424

  16. Lung cancer incidence and mortality among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the impact of HIV on lung cancer incidence and survival. Design Prospective study of 2,495 HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected injection drug users in Baltimore, MD. Methods Cancer data were obtained from the Maryland Cancer Registry. We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for lung cancer in two strata of packs smoked per day by HIV serostatus, and for mortality by HIV serostatus. Results HIV-infected participants had twice the risk (HR=2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-5.1) of lung cancer. There was no evidence of an interaction between HIV and packs of cigarettes smoked per day (p-interaction=0.18). Compared to participants who smoked <1.43 packs per day, among HIV-uninfected individuals lung cancer risk was six times greater (HR=5.9; 95% CI 2.1-17) and among HIV-infected individuals lung cancer risk was doubled (HR=2.1; 95% CI 0.63-6.8) in persons who smoked ≥1.43 per day. Additionally, HIV was associated with four times the risk of death (HR=3.8; 95% CI 0.92-15) in lung cancer cases. Conclusions HIV was associated with increased risk of lung cancer, after adjusting for smoking. However, no evidence was observed for synergistic effects of HIV and smoking. Further, HIV was associated with poorer lung cancer survival, after accounting for cancer stage. PMID:20838223

  17. Innate lymphoid cells promote lung tissue homeostasis following acute influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Monticelli, Laurel A.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Abt, Michael C.; Alenghat, Theresa; Ziegler, Carly G.K.; Doering, Travis A.; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Laidlaw, Brian J.; Yang, Cliff Y.; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Turner, Damian; Diamond, Joshua M.; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Farber, Donna L.; Collman, Ronald G.; Wherry, E. John; Artis, David

    2012-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), a recently identified heterogeneous cell population, are critical in orchestrating immunity and inflammation in the intestine but whether ILCs can influence immune responses or tissue homeostasis at other mucosal sites remains poorly characterized. Here we identify a population of lung-resident ILCs in mice and humans that expressed CD90, CD25, CD127 and T1-ST2. Strikingly, mouse ILCs accumulated in the lung following influenza virus infection and depletion of ILCs resulted in loss of airway epithelial integrity, decreased lung function and impaired airway remodeling. These defects could be restored by administration of the lung ILC product amphiregulin. Collectively, these results demonstrate a critical role for lung ILCs in restoring airway epithelial integrity and tissue homeostasis following influenza virus infection. PMID:21946417

  18. Multiplicity of Mathematical Modeling Strategies to Search for Molecular and Cellular Insights into Bacteria Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Cantone, Martina; Santos, Guido; Wentker, Pia; Lai, Xin; Vera, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Even today two bacterial lung infections, namely pneumonia and tuberculosis, are among the 10 most frequent causes of death worldwide. These infections still lack effective treatments in many developing countries and in immunocompromised populations like infants, elderly people and transplanted patients. The interaction between bacteria and the host is a complex system of interlinked intercellular and the intracellular processes, enriched in regulatory structures like positive and negative feedback loops. Severe pathological condition can emerge when the immune system of the host fails to neutralize the infection. This failure can result in systemic spreading of pathogens or overwhelming immune response followed by a systemic inflammatory response. Mathematical modeling is a promising tool to dissect the complexity underlying pathogenesis of bacterial lung infection at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels, and also at the interfaces among levels. In this article, we introduce mathematical and computational modeling frameworks that can be used for investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying bacterial lung infection. Then, we compile and discuss published results on the modeling of regulatory pathways and cell populations relevant for lung infection and inflammation. Finally, we discuss how to make use of this multiplicity of modeling approaches to open new avenues in the search of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection in the lung.

  19. Role of small colony variants in persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis lungs

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that predominates during the later stages of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung infections. Over many years of chronic lung colonization, P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive adaptation to the lung environment, evolving both toward a persistent, low virulence state and simultaneously diversifying to produce a number of phenotypically distinct morphs. These lung-adapted P. aeruginosa strains include the small colony variants (SCVs), small, autoaggregative isolates that show enhanced biofilm formation, strong attachment to surfaces, and increased production of exopolysaccharides. Their appearance in the sputum of CF patients correlates with increased resistance to antibiotics, poor lung function, and prolonged persistence of infection, increasing their relevance as a subject for clinical investigation. The evolution of SCVs in the CF lung is associated with overproduction of the ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP, with increased cyclic-di-GMP levels shown to be responsible for the SCV phenotype in a number of different CF lung isolates. Here, we review the current state of research in clinical P. aeruginosa SCVs. We will discuss the phenotypic characteristics underpinning the SCV morphotype, the clinical implications of lung colonization with SCVs, and the molecular basis and clinical evolution of the SCV phenotype in the CF lung environment. PMID:26251621

  20. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Staples, Karl J; Nicholas, Ben; McKendry, Richard T; Spalluto, C Mirella; Wallington, Joshua C; Bragg, Craig W; Robinson, Emily C; Martin, Kirstin; Djukanović, Ratko; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2015-01-01

    Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  1. Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, Sungho; Shi, Hyejin; Park, Sungrock; Lee, Sangki; Park, Kyoung Taek

    2017-01-01

    A mixed infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus (Mab) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the lung is an unusual clinical manifestation and has not yet been reported. A 61-year-old woman had been treated for Mab lung disease and concomitant pneumonia, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Despite both anti-PTB and anti-Mab therapy, her entire left lung was destroyed and collapsed. She underwent left pneumonectomy and received medical therapy. We were able to successfully treat her mixed infection by pneumonectomy followed by inhaled amikacin therapy. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, this is the first description of a mixed Mab and MTB lung infection. PMID:28180105

  2. Antecedent Nippostrongylus infection alters the lung immune response to Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Craig, J M; Scott, A L

    2017-08-01

    In endemic regions, it is not uncommon for patients to be co-infected with soil-transmitted helminths and malaria. Although both malaria and many helminth species use the lungs as a site of development, little attention has been paid to the impact that pulmonary immunity induced by one parasite has on the lung response to the other. To model the consequences of a prior hookworm exposure on the development of immunity to malaria in the lungs, mice were infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and 2 weeks later challenged with Plasmodium berghei. We found that a pre-existing hookworm-induced type 2 immune environment had a measurable but modest impact on the nature of the malaria-driven type 1 cytokine response in the lungs that was associated with a transient effect on parasite development and no significant changes in morbidity and mortality after malaria infection. However, prior hookworm infection did have a lasting effect on lung macrophages, where the malaria-induced M1-like response was blunted by previous M2 polarization. These results demonstrate that, although helminth parasites confer robust changes to the immunological status of the pulmonary microenvironment, lung immunity is plastic and capable of rapidly adapting to consecutive heterologous infections. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. ImmunoPET/MR imaging allows specific detection of Aspergillus fumigatus lung infection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rolle, Anna-Maria; Hasenberg, Mike; Thornton, Christopher R.; Solouk-Saran, Djamschid; Männ, Linda; Weski, Juliane; Maurer, Andreas; Fischer, Eliane; Spycher, Philipp R.; Schibli, Roger; Boschetti, Frederic; Stegemann-Koniszewski, Sabine; Bruder, Dunja; Severin, Gregory W.; Autenrieth, Stella E.; Krappmann, Sven; Davies, Genna; Pichler, Bernd J.; Gunzer, Matthias; Wiehr, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a life-threatening lung disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, and is a leading cause of invasive fungal infection-related mortality and morbidity in patients with hematological malignancies and bone marrow transplants. We developed and tested a novel probe for noninvasive detection of A. fumigatus lung infection based on antibody-guided positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (immunoPET/MR) imaging. Administration of a [64Cu]DOTA-labeled A. fumigatus-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), JF5, to neutrophil-depleted A. fumigatus-infected mice allowed specific localization of lung infection when combined with PET. Optical imaging with a fluorochrome-labeled version of the mAb showed colocalization with invasive hyphae. The mAb-based newly developed PET tracer [64Cu]DOTA-JF5 distinguished IPA from bacterial lung infections and, in contrast to [18F]FDG-PET, discriminated IPA from a general increase in metabolic activity associated with lung inflammation. To our knowledge, this is the first time that antibody-guided in vivo imaging has been used for noninvasive diagnosis of a fungal lung disease (IPA) of humans, an approach with enormous potential for diagnosis of infectious diseases and with potential for clinical translation. PMID:26787852

  4. Dipeptidyl peptidase I controls survival from Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection by processing surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Rachel E; Barry, Sophia S; Olsen, Joanna S; Salantes, D Brenda; Caughey, George H; Wolters, Paul J

    2014-07-18

    Prior work established that a deficiency in the cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) improves survival following polymicrobial septic peritonitis. To test whether DPPI regulates survival from severe lung infections, DPPI(-/-) mice were studied in a Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection model, finding that survival in DPPI(-/-) mice is significantly better than in DPPI(+/+) mice 8d after infection. DPPI(-/-) mice have significantly fewer bacteria in the lung than infected DPPI(+/+) mice, but no difference in lung histopathology, lung injury, or cytokine levels. To explore mechanisms of enhanced bacterial clearance in DPPI(-/-) mice, we examined the status of pulmonary collectins, finding that levels of surfactant protein D, but not of surfactant protein A, are higher in DPPI(-/-) than in DPPI(+/+) BAL fluid, and that DPPI(-/-) BAL fluid aggregate bacteria more effectively than control BAL fluid. Sequencing of the amino terminus of surfactant protein D revealed two or eight additional amino acids in surfactant protein D isolated from DPPI(-/-) mice, suggesting processing by DPPI. These results establish that DPPI is a major determinant of survival following Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection and suggest that the survival disadvantage in DPPI(+/+) mice is in part due to processing of surfactant protein D by DPPI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dipeptidyl Peptidase I Controls Survival from Klebsiella pneumoniae Lung Infection by Processing Surfactant Protein D 1

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Joanna S.; Salantes, D. Brenda; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior work established that a deficiency in the cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) improves survival following polymicrobial septic peritonitis. To test whether DPPI regulates survival from severe lung infections, DPPI −/− mice were studied in a Klebsiella pneumonia lung infection model, finding that survival in DPPI −/− mice is significantly better than in DPPI +/+ mice 8 d after infection. DPPI −/− mice have significantly fewer bacteria in the lung than infected DPPI +/+ mice, but no difference in lung histopathology, lung injury, or cytokine levels. To explore mechanisms of enhanced bacterial clearance in DPPI −/− mice, we examined the status of pulmonary collectins, finding that levels of surfactant protein D, but not of surfactant protein A, are higher in DPPI −/− than in DPPI +/+ BAL fluid, and that DPPI −/− BAL fluid aggregate bacteria more effectively than control BAL fluid. Sequencing of the amino terminus of surfactant protein D revealed two or eight additional amino acids in surfactant protein D isolated from DPPI −/− mice, suggesting processing by DPPI. These results establish that DPPI is a major determinant of survival following Klebsiella pneumoniae lung infection and suggest that the survival disadvantage in DPPI +/+ mice is in part due to processing of surfactant protein D by DPPI. PMID:24955853

  6. The caspase inhibitor zVAD increases lung inflammation in pneumovirus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Elske; Bal, Suzanne M; Kuipers, Maria T; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Lutter, René; Bos, Albert P; van Woensel, Job B M; Bem, Reinout A

    2015-03-01

    Severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease is a frequent cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in young children, and is associated with marked lung epithelial injury and neutrophilic inflammation. Experimental studies on ARDS have shown that inhibition of apoptosis in the lungs reduces lung epithelial injury. However, the blockade of apoptosis in the lungs may also have deleterious effects by hampering viral clearance, and importantly, by enhancing or prolonging local proinflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the broad caspase inhibitor Z-VAD(OMe)-FMK (zVAD) on inflammation and lung injury in a mouse pneumovirus model for severe RSV disease. Eight- to 11-week-old female C57BL/6OlaHsd mice were inoculated with the rodent-specific pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) strain J3666 and received multiple injections of zVAD or vehicle (control) during the course of disease, after which they were studied for markers of apoptosis, inflammation, and lung injury on day 7 after infection. PVM-infected mice that received zVAD had a strong increase in neutrophil numbers in the lungs, which was associated with decreased neutrophil apoptosis. Furthermore, zVAD treatment led to higher concentrations of several proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs and more weight loss in PVM-infected mice. In contrast, zVAD did not reduce apoptosis of lung epithelial cells and did not affect the degree of lung injury, permeability, and viral titers in PVM disease. We conclude that zVAD has an adverse effect in severe pneumovirus disease in mice by enhancing the lung proinflammatory response. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  7. The caspase inhibitor zVAD increases lung inflammation in pneumovirus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Elske; Bal, Suzanne M; Kuipers, Maria T; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Lutter, René; Bos, Albert P; van Woensel, Job B M; Bem, Reinout A

    2015-01-01

    Severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease is a frequent cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in young children, and is associated with marked lung epithelial injury and neutrophilic inflammation. Experimental studies on ARDS have shown that inhibition of apoptosis in the lungs reduces lung epithelial injury. However, the blockade of apoptosis in the lungs may also have deleterious effects by hampering viral clearance, and importantly, by enhancing or prolonging local proinflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the broad caspase inhibitor Z-VAD(OMe)-FMK (zVAD) on inflammation and lung injury in a mouse pneumovirus model for severe RSV disease. Eight- to 11-week-old female C57BL/6OlaHsd mice were inoculated with the rodent-specific pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) strain J3666 and received multiple injections of zVAD or vehicle (control) during the course of disease, after which they were studied for markers of apoptosis, inflammation, and lung injury on day 7 after infection. PVM-infected mice that received zVAD had a strong increase in neutrophil numbers in the lungs, which was associated with decreased neutrophil apoptosis. Furthermore, zVAD treatment led to higher concentrations of several proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs and more weight loss in PVM-infected mice. In contrast, zVAD did not reduce apoptosis of lung epithelial cells and did not affect the degree of lung injury, permeability, and viral titers in PVM disease. We conclude that zVAD has an adverse effect in severe pneumovirus disease in mice by enhancing the lung proinflammatory response. PMID:25780096

  8. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging of Bacteriogenic Cyanide in the Lungs of Live Mice Infected with Cystic Fibrosis Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seong-Won; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Lim, Jeesun; Kim, So Hyun; Kim, Sang-Tae; Cho, You-Hee; Yoon, Juyoung; Park, Sungsu

    2011-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc), commonly found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, often produce cyanide (CN), which inhibits cellular respiration. CN in sputa is a potential biomarker for lung infection by CF pathogens. However, its actual concentration in the infected lungs is unknown. Methods and Findings This work reports observation of CN in the lungs of mice infected with cyanogenic PA or Bcc strains using a CN fluorescent chemosensor (4′,5′-fluorescein dicarboxaldehyde) with a whole animal imaging system. When the CN chemosensor was injected into the lungs of mice intratracheally infected with either PA or B. cepacia strains embedded in agar beads, CN was detected in the millimolar range (1.8 to 4 mM) in the infected lungs. CN concentration in PA-infected lungs rapidly increased within 24 hours but gradually decreased over the following days, while CN concentration in B. cepacia-infected lungs slowly increased, reaching a maximum at 5 days. CN concentrations correlated with the bacterial loads in the lungs. In vivo efficacy of antimicrobial treatments was tested in live mice by monitoring bacteriogenic CN in the lungs. Conclusions The in vivo imaging method was also found suitable for minimally invasive testing the efficacy of antibiotic compounds as well as for aiding the understanding of bacterial cyanogenesis in CF lungs. PMID:21750709

  9. No causal association identified for human papillomavirus infections in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Devasena; Gheit, Tarik; Waterboer, Tim; Halec, Gordana; Carreira, Christine; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Zaridze, David; Mukeria, Anush; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mates, Dana; Janout, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Bencko, Vladimir; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Boeing, Heiner; Quirós, J Ramón; Johansson, Mikael; Krogh, Vittorio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Pawlita, Michael; Scelo, Ghislaine; Tommasino, Massimo; Brennan, Paul

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections have been implicated in lung carcinogenesis, but causal associations remain uncertain. We evaluated a potential causal role for HPV infections in lung cancer through an analysis involving serology, tumor DNA, RNA, and p16 protein expression. Association between type-specific HPV antibodies and risk of lung cancer was examined among 3,083 cases and 4,328 controls in two case-control studies (retrospective) and one nested case-control study (prospective design). Three hundred and thirty-four available tumors were subjected to pathologic evaluation and subsequent HPV genotyping following stringent conditions to detect all high-risk and two low-risk HPV types. All HPV DNA-positive tumors were further tested for the expression of p16 protein and type-specific HPV mRNA. On the basis of the consistency of the results, although HPV11 and HPV31 E6 antibodies were associated with lung cancer risk in the retrospective study, no association was observed in the prospective design. Presence of type-specific antibodies correlated poorly with the presence of the corresponding HPV DNA in the tumor. Although nearly 10% of the lung tumors were positive for any HPV DNA (7% for HPV16 DNA), none expressed the viral oncogenes. No association was observed between HPV antibodies or DNA and lung cancer survival. In conclusion, we found no supportive evidence for the hypothesized causal association between HPV infections and lung cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  11. Granzyme A- and B-cluster deficiency delays acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B M; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F; Bos, Albert P

    2010-01-15

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating proapoptotic caspase activity and proinflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A- and B-cluster single- and double-knockout mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3, and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A- and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury.

  12. Divergent functions of Toll-like receptors during bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L; Downey, Gregory P; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4(+) T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs.

  13. Divergent Functions of Toll-like Receptors during Bacterial Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Pankaj; Batra, Sanjay; Zemans, Rachel L.; Downey, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections caused by bacteria are a major cause of death in humans irrespective of sex, race, or geography. Indeed, accumulated data indicate greater mortality and morbidity due to these infections than cancer, malaria, or HIV infection. Successful recognition of, followed by an appropriate response to, bacterial pathogens in the lungs is crucial for effective pulmonary host defense. Although the early recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the lungs is key in the response against invading microbial pathogens, other sentinels, such as alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells, dendritic cells, and CD4+ T cells, also contribute to the elimination of the bacterial burden. Pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain–like receptors, are important for recognizing and responding to microbes during pulmonary infections. However, bacterial pathogens have acquired crafty evasive strategies to circumvent the pattern recognition receptor response and thus establish infection. Increased understanding of the function of TLRs and evasive mechanisms used by pathogens during pulmonary infection will deepen our knowledge of immunopathogenesis and is crucial for developing effective therapeutic and/or prophylactic measures. This review summarizes current knowledge of the multiple roles of TLRs in bacterial lung infections and highlights the mechanisms used by pathogens to modulate or interfere with TLR signaling in the lungs. PMID:25033332

  14. Loss of social behaviours in populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P; Scanlan, Pauline D; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A; Griffin, Ashleigh S

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections.

  15. Loss of Social Behaviours in Populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infecting Lungs of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiricny, Natalie; Molin, Søren; Foster, Kevin; Diggle, Stephen P.; Scanlan, Pauline D.; Ghoul, Melanie; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Santorelli, Lorenzo A.; Popat, Roman; West, Stuart A.; Griffin, Ashleigh S.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is an opportunistic, bacterial pathogen causing persistent and frequently fatal infections of the lung in patients with cystic fibrosis. Isolates from chronic infections differ from laboratory and environmental strains in a range of traits and this is widely interpreted as the result of adaptation to the lung environment. Typically, chronic strains carry mutations in global regulation factors that could effect reduced expression of social traits, raising the possibility that competitive dynamics between cooperative and selfish, cheating strains could also drive changes in P. aeruginosa infections. We compared the expression of cooperative traits - biofilm formation, secretion of exo-products and quorum sensing (QS) - in P. aeruginosa isolates that were estimated to have spent different lengths of time in the lung based on clinical information. All three exo-products involved in nutrient acquisition were produced in significantly smaller quantities with increased duration of infection, and patterns across four QS signal molecules were consistent with accumulation over time of mutations in lasR, which are known to disrupt the ability of cells to respond to QS signal. Pyocyanin production, and the proportion of cells in biofilm relative to motile, free-living cells in liquid culture, did not change. Overall, our results confirm that the loss of social behaviour is a consistent trend with time spent in the lung and suggest that social dynamics are potentially relevant to understanding the behaviour of P. aeruginosa in lung infections. PMID:24454693

  16. Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells are enriched in mouse lungs and liver.

    PubMed

    Unno, Akihiro; Kachi, Seira; Batanova, Tatiana A; Ohno, Tamio; Elhawary, Nagwa; Kitoh, Katsuya; Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is thought to disseminate throughout the host by circulation of tachyzoite-infected leukocytes in the blood, and adherence and migration of such leukocytes into solid tissues. However, it is unclear whether T. gondii-infected leukocytes can migrate to solid organs via the general circulation. In this study, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method to determine the rate of infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) flowing into and remaining within solid organs in mice. A transgenic T. gondii parasite line derived from the PLK strain that expresses DsRed Express, and transgenic green fluorescent protein-positive PBMCs, were used for these experiments. Tachyzoite-infected PBMCs were injected into mouse tail veins and qRT-PCR was used to measure the infection rates of the PBMCs remaining in the lungs, liver, spleen and brain. We found that the PBMCs in the lungs and liver had statistically higher infection rates than that of the original inoculum; this difference was statistically significant. However, the PBMC infection rate in the spleen showed no such enhancement. These results show that tachyzoite-infected PBMCs in the general circulation remain in the lungs and liver more effectively than non-infected PBMCs.

  17. Intramuscular Immunisation with Chlamydial Proteins Induces Chlamydia trachomatis Specific Ocular Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; McKay, Paul F.; Holland, Martin J.; Paes, Wayne; Brzozowski, Andrzej; Lacey, Charles; Follmann, Frank; Tregoning, John S.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis can cause trachoma, which is the leading cause of blindness due to infection worldwide. Despite the large-scale implementation of trachoma control programmes in the majority of countries where trachoma is endemic, there remains a need for a vaccine. Since C. trachomatis infects the conjunctival epithelium and stimulates an immune response in the associated lymphoid tissue, vaccine regimens that enhance local antibody responses could be advantageous. In experimental infections of non-human primates (NHPs), antibody specificity to C. trachomatis antigens was found to change over the course of ocular infection. The appearance of major outer membrane protein (MOMP) specific antibodies correlated with a reduction in ocular chlamydial burden, while subsequent generation of antibodies specific for PmpD and Pgp3 correlated with C. trachomatis eradication. Methods We used a range of heterologous prime-boost vaccinations with DNA, Adenovirus, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and protein vaccines based on the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) as an antigen, and investigated the effect of vaccine route, antigen and regimen on the induction of anti-chlamydial antibodies detectable in the ocular lavage fluid of mice. Results Three intramuscular vaccinations with recombinant protein adjuvanted with MF59 induced significantly greater levels of anti-MOMP ocular antibodies than the other regimens tested. Intranasal delivery of vaccines induced less IgG antibody in the eye than intramuscular delivery. The inclusion of the antigens PmpD and Pgp3, singly or in combination, induced ocular antigen-specific IgG antibodies, although the anti-PmpD antibody response was consistently lower and attenuated by combination with other antigens. Conclusions If translatable to NHPs and/or humans, this investigation of the murine C. trachomatis specific ocular antibody response following vaccination provides a potential mouse model for the rapid

  18. Widespread Colonization of the Lung by Tropheryma whipplei in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lozupone, Catherine; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Palmer, Brent E.; Linderman, Derek J.; Charlson, Emily S.; Sodergren, Erica; Mitreva, Makedonka; Abubucker, Sahar; Martin, John; Yao, Guohui; Campbell, Thomas B.; Flores, Sonia C.; Ackerman, Gail; Stombaugh, Jesse; Ursell, Luke; Beck, James M.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Young, Vincent B.; Lynch, Susan V.; Huang, Laurence; Weinstock, George M.; Knox, Kenneth S.; Twigg, Homer; Morris, Alison; Ghedin, Elodie; Bushman, Frederic D.; Collman, Ronald G.; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Lung infections caused by opportunistic or virulent pathogens are a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection. It is unknown whether HIV infection leads to changes in basal lung microflora, which may contribute to chronic pulmonary complications that increasingly are being recognized in individuals infected with HIV. Objectives: To determine whether the immunodeficiency associated with HIV infection resulted in alteration of the lung microbiota. Methods: We used 16S ribosomal RNA targeted pyrosequencing and shotgun metagenomic sequencing to analyze bacterial gene sequences in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and mouths of 82 HIV-positive and 77 HIV-negative subjects. Measurements and Main Results: Sequences representing Tropheryma whipplei, the etiologic agent of Whipple’s disease, were significantly more frequent in BAL of HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative individuals. T. whipplei dominated the community (>50% of sequence reads) in 11 HIV-positive subjects, but only 1 HIV-negative individual (13.4 versus 1.3%; P = 0.0018). In 30 HIV-positive individuals sampled longitudinally, antiretroviral therapy resulted in a significantly reduced relative abundance of T. whipplei in the lung. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing was performed on eight BAL samples dominated by T. whipplei 16S ribosomal RNA. Whole genome assembly of pooled reads showed that uncultured lung-derived T. whipplei had similar gene content to two isolates obtained from subjects with Whipple’s disease. Conclusions: Asymptomatic subjects with HIV infection have unexpected colonization of the lung by T. whipplei, which is reduced by effective antiretroviral therapy and merits further study for a potential pathogenic role in chronic pulmonary complications of HIV infection. PMID:23392441

  19. Benzylidene acylhydrazides inhibit chlamydial growth in a type III secretion- and iron chelation-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Gylfe, Asa; Sturdevant, Gail L; Gong, Zheng; Xu, Shuang; Caldwell, Harlan D; Elofsson, Mikael; Fan, Huizhou

    2014-08-15

    Chlamydiae are widespread Gram-negative pathogens of humans and animals. Salicylidene acylhydrazides, developed as inhibitors of type III secretion system (T3SS) in Yersinia spp., have an inhibitory effect on chlamydial infection. However, these inhibitors also have the capacity to chelate iron, and it is possible that their antichlamydial effects are caused by iron starvation. Therefore, we have explored the modification of salicylidene acylhydrazides with the goal to uncouple the antichlamydial effect from iron starvation. We discovered that benzylidene acylhydrazides, which cannot chelate iron, inhibit chlamydial growth. Biochemical and genetic analyses suggest that the derivative compounds inhibit chlamydiae through a T3SS-independent mechanism. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in a Chlamydia muridarum variant resistant to benzylidene acylhydrazides, but it may be necessary to segregate the mutations to differentiate their roles in the resistance phenotype. Benzylidene acylhydrazides are well tolerated by host cells and probiotic vaginal Lactobacillus species and are therefore of potential therapeutic value. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Delivery of a Chlamydial Adhesin N-PmpC Subunit Vaccine to the Ocular Mucosa Using Particulate Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Stojanovic, Marijana; Schlacher, Simone; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij-Rammerstorfer, Sandra; Marinkovic, Emilija; Lukic, Ivana; Montanaro, Jacqueline; Schuerer, Nadine; Bintner, Nora; Kovacevic-Jovanovic, Vesna; Krnjaja, Ognjen; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    Trachoma, caused by the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), remains the world’s leading preventable infectious cause of blindness. Recent attempts to develop effective vaccines rely on modified chlamydial antigen delivery platforms. As the mechanisms engaged in the pathology of the disease are not fully understood, designing a subunit vaccine specific to chlamydial antigens could improve safety for human use. We propose the delivery of chlamydia-specific antigens to the ocular mucosa using particulate carriers, bacterial ghosts (BGs). We therefore characterized humoral and cellular immune responses after conjunctival and subcutaneous immunization with a N-terminal portion (amino acid 1–893) of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane protein C (PmpC) of Ct serovar B, expressed in probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts (EcN BGs) in BALB/c mice. Three immunizations were performed at two-week intervals, and the immune responses were evaluated two weeks after the final immunization in mice. In a guinea pig model of ocular infection animals were immunized in the same manner as the mice, and protection against challenge was assessed two weeks after the last immunization. N-PmpC was successfully expressed within BGs and delivery to the ocular mucosa was well tolerated without signs of inflammation. N-PmpC-specific mucosal IgA levels in tears yielded significantly increased levels in the group immunized via the conjunctiva compared with the subcutaneously immunized mice. Immunization with N-PmpC EcN BGs via both immunization routes prompted the establishment of an N-PmpC-specific IFNγ immune response. Immunization via the conjunctiva resulted in a decrease in intensity of the transitional inflammatory reaction in conjunctiva of challenged guinea pigs compared with subcutaneously and non-immunized animals. The delivery of the chlamydial subunit vaccine to the ocular mucosa using a particulate carrier, such as BGs, induced both humoral and

  1. Immune mechanisms and the impact of the disrupted lung microbiome in chronic bacterial lung infection and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Reynolds, C J; Quigley, K J; Altmann, D M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies analysing immunogenetics and immune mechanisms controlling susceptibility to chronic bacterial infection in bronchiectasis implicate dysregulated immunity in conjunction with chronic bacterial infection. Bronchiectasis is a structural pathological end-point with many causes and disease associations. In about half of cases it is termed idiopathic, because it is of unknown aetiology. Bronchiectasis is proposed to result from a ‘vicious cycle’ of chronic bacterial infection and dysregulated inflammation. Paradoxically, both immune deficiency and excess immunity, either in the form of autoimmunity or excessive inflammatory activation, can predispose to disease. It appears to be a part of the spectrum of inflammatory, autoimmune and atopic conditions that have increased in prevalence through the 20th century, attributed variously to the hygiene hypothesis or the ‘missing microbiota’. Immunogenetic studies showing a strong association with human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Cw*03 and HLA-C group 1 homozygosity and combinational analysis of HLA-C and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) genes suggests a shift towards activation of natural killer (NK) cells leading to lung damage. The association with HLA-DR1, DQ5 implicates a role for CD4 T cells, possibly operating through influence on susceptibility to specific pathogens. We hypothesize that disruption of the lung microbial ecosystem, by infection, inflammation and/or antibiotic therapy, creates a disturbed, simplified, microbial community (‘disrupted microbiota’) with downstream consequences for immune function. These events, acting with excessive NK cell activation, create a highly inflammatory lung environment that, in turn, permits the further establishment and maintenance of chronic infection dominated by microbial pathogens. This review discusses the implication of these concepts for the development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:23286938

  2. Cytokine and Chemokine Responses of Lung Exposed to Surrogate Viral and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Teresa A; Trammell, Rita A; Randle, Michelle; Barrett, Sarah; Toth, Linda A

    2013-01-01

    The use of in vitro models of complex in vivo systems has yielded many insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie normal and pathologic physiology. However although the reduced complexity of these models is advantageous with regard to some research questions, the simplification may obscure or eliminate key influences that occur in vivo. We sought to examine this possibility with regard to the lung's response to infection, which may be inherent to resident lung cells or related to the systemic response to pulmonary infection. We used the inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and B6.129S2-IL6tm1Kopf, which differ in their response to inflammatory and infectious challenges, to assess in vivo responses of lung to surrogate viral and bacterial infection and compared these with responses of cultured lung slices and human A549 cells. Pulmonary cytokine concentrations were measured both after in vivo inoculation of mice and in vitro exposure of lung slices and A549 cells to surrogate viral and bacterial infections. The data indicate similarities and differences in early lung responses to in vivo compared with in vitro exposure to these inflammatory substances. Therefore, resident cells in the lung appear to respond to some challenges in a strain-independent manner, whereas some stimuli may elicit recruitment of peripheral inflammatory cells that generate the subsequent response in a genotype-related manner. These results add to the body of information pointing to host genotype as a crucial factor in mediating the severity of microbial infections and demonstrate that some of these effects may not be apparent in vitro. PMID:23582418

  3. Mechanical ventilation enhances lung inflammation and caspase activity in a model of mouse pneumovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B M; Bos, Albert P; Koski, Amy; Farnand, Alex W; Domachowske, Joseph B; Rosenberg, Helene F; Martin, Thomas R; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    Severe infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children can progress to respiratory distress and acute lung injury (ALI). Accumulating evidence suggests that mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important cofactor in the development of ALI by modulating the host immune responses to bacteria. This study investigates whether MV enhances the host response to pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a mouse pneumovirus that has been used as a model for RSV infection in humans. BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with diluted clarified lung homogenates from mice infected with PVM strain J3666 or uninfected controls. Four days after inoculation, the mice were subjected to 4 h of MV (tidal volume, 10 ml/kg) or allowed to breathe spontaneously. When compared with that of mice inoculated with PVM only, the administration of MV to PVM-infected mice resulted in increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of the cytokines macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, MIP-1alpha (CCL3), and IL-6; increased alveolar-capillary permeability to high molecular weight proteins; and increased caspase-3 activity in lung homogenates. We conclude that MV enhances the activation of inflammatory and caspase cell death pathways in response to pneumovirus infection. We speculate that MV potentially contributes to the development of lung injury in patients with RSV infection.

  4. Breathprints of model murine bacterial lung infections are linked with immune response.

    PubMed

    Bean, Heather D; Jiménez-Díaz, Jaime; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Hill, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In this model study, we explored the host's contribution of breath volatiles to diagnostic secondary electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) breathprints for acute bacterial lung infections, their correlation with the host's immune response, and their use in identifying the lung pathogen. Murine airways were exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cell lysates or to PBS (controls), and their breath and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected at six time points (from 6 to 120 h) after exposure. Five to six mice per treatment group and four to six mice per control group were sampled at each time. Breath volatiles were analysed using SESI-MS and the BALF total leukocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and cytokine concentrations were quantified. Lysate exposure breathprints contain host volatiles that persist for up to 120 h; are pathogen specific; are unique from breathprints of controls, active infections and cleared infections; and are correlated with the host's immune response. Bacterial lung infections induce changes to the host's breath volatiles that are selective and specific predictors of the source of infection. Harnessing the pathogen-specific volatiles in the host's breath may provide useful information for detecting latent bacterial lung infections and managing the spread of respiratory diseases. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  5. Breathprints of model murine bacterial lung infections are linked with immune response

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Heather D.; Jiménez-Díaz, Jaime; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Hill, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    In this model study, we explored the host’s contribution of breath volatiles to diagnostic secondary electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) breathprints for acute bacterial lung infections, their correlation with the host’s immune response, and their use in identifying the lung pathogen. Murine airways were exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cell lysates or to PBS (controls), and their breath and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected at six time points (from 6 to 120 h) after exposure. Five to six mice per treatment group and four to six mice per control group were sampled at each time. Breath volatiles were analysed using SESI-MS and the BALF total leukocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and cytokine concentrations were quantified. Lysate exposure breathprints contain host volatiles that persist for up to 120 h; are pathogen specific; are unique from breathprints of controls, active infections and cleared infections; and are correlated with the host’s immune response. Bacterial lung infections induce changes to the host’s breath volatiles that are selective and specific predictors of the source of infection. Harnessing the pathogen-specific volatiles in the host’s breath may provide useful information for detecting latent bacterial lung infections and managing the spread of respiratory diseases. PMID:25323243

  6. Laser-mediated rupture of chlamydial inclusions triggers pathogen egress and host cell necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Markus C.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Ferguson, Charles; Tanzer, Maria C.; Murphy, James M.; Yap, Alpha S.; Parton, Robert G.; Huston, Wilhelmina M.; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2017-01-01

    Remarkably little is known about how intracellular pathogens exit the host cell in order to infect new hosts. Pathogenic chlamydiae egress by first rupturing their replicative niche (the inclusion) before rapidly lysing the host cell. Here we apply a laser ablation strategy to specifically disrupt the chlamydial inclusion, thereby uncoupling inclusion rupture from the subsequent cell lysis and allowing us to dissect the molecular events involved in each step. Pharmacological inhibition of host cell calpains inhibits inclusion rupture, but not subsequent cell lysis. Further, we demonstrate that inclusion rupture triggers a rapid necrotic cell death pathway independent of BAK, BAX, RIP1 and caspases. Both processes work sequentially to efficiently liberate the pathogen from the host cytoplasm, promoting secondary infection. These results reconcile the pathogen's known capacity to promote host cell survival and induce cell death. PMID:28281536

  7. Statistical signal processing technique for identification of different infected sites of the diseased lungs.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ali

    2012-06-01

    Accurate Diagnosis of lung disease depends on understanding the sounds emanating from lung and its location. Lung sounds are of significance as they supply precise and important information on the health of the respiratory system. In addition, correct interpretation of breath sounds depends on a systematic approach to auscultation; it also requires the ability to describe the location of abnormal finding in relation to bony structures and anatomic landmark lines. Lungs consist of number of lobes; each lung lobe is further subdivided into smaller segments. These segments are attached to each other. Knowledge of the position of the lung segments is useful and important during the auscultation and diagnosis of the lung diseases. Usually the medical doctors give the location of the infection a segmental position reference. Breath sounds are auscultated over the anterior chest wall surface, the lateral chest wall surfaces, and posterior chest wall surface. Adventitious sounds from different location can be detected. It is common to seek confirmation of the sound detection and its location using invasive and potentially harmful imaging diagnosis techniques like x-rays. To overcome this limitation and for fast, reliable, accurate, and inexpensive diagnose a technique is developed in this research for identifying the location of infection through a computerized auscultation system.

  8. Human papillomavirus 16/18 infections in lung cancer patients in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Badillo-Almaraz, I; Zapata-Benavides, P; Saavedra-Alonso, S; Zamora-Avila, D; Reséndez-Pérez, D; Tamez-Guerra, R; Herrera-Esparza, R; Rodríguez-Padilla, C

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an epitheliotropic, double-stranded DNA virus, and its high-risk genotypes are associated with human cancer. HPV genome has been detected in lung carcinomas in certain places around the world, including Mexico; however, the prevalence of this is unclear. In this study, we examine the frequency of high-risk HPV 16/18 in lung cancer tissues from a Mexican population. 39 lung cancer specimens were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using HPV GP5+/GP6+ primers and then were genotyped using specific primers to HPV 16/18. Additionally, in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed using BIO-labeled oligonucleotide probes. Our results identified 15 positive cases (38.46%) for HPV 16 and 1 positive case (2.56%) for HPV 18 by PCR. ISH showed the presence of HPV DNA in 13 of 16 (81%) samples, in agreement with the PCR results. In this study, we detected HPV 16/18 gene sequences in lung cancer samples obtained from Mexican patients by PCR and ISH. We found the highest prevalence of HPV 16 infection in lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting that HPV infection may be associated with lung cancer. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the role of HPV in lung carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Role of Interleukin-17 in defense against pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in lungs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xilin; Shao, Bing; Wang, Ran; Zhou, Sijing; Tang, Zhongzhi; Lu, Weihua; Xiong, Shengdao

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause severe or even fatal infection in hosts with immunodeficiency. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a newly discovered pro-inflammatory cytokine, which promotes the recruitment and activation of neutrophils in the respiratory tract by inducing release of chemokine C-X-C. This study was conducted to explore the role of IL-17 in host defense against acute pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in lungs. The expression of IL-17 and its downstream effectors (IL-1β, MIP-2 and G-CSF) were detected in mouse lungs with acute pseudomonas aeruginosa infection; 48 h after intratracheal administration of justice plasmid, mice were infected with pseudomonas aeruginosa again, and the bacterial clearance rate and the expression of downstream effectors of IL-17, as well as the mice death rate, were determined 6 h later. The expression of IL-17 and its downstream effectors (IL-1β, MIP-2 and G-CSF) significantly increased in mouse lungs with acute pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. After intratracheal administration of justice plasmid expressing IL-17, the expression of IL-17 and its downstream effectors significantly increased, accompanied by increase in neutrophil count. The justice plasmid expressing IL-17 was intratracheally administered before acute pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, which significantly increased the expression of IL-17 and its downstream effectors (IL-1β, MIP-2 and G-CSF) in the respiratory tract, leading to increasing clearance rate of bacteria and survival rate. IL-17 may recruit neutrophil to the infected areas in the early phase of pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

  10. Genomic and functional analysis of the host response to acute simian varicella infection in the lung.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Nicole; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Rais, Maham; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-09-28

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Although it is well established that VZV is transmitted via the respiratory route, the host-pathogen interactions during acute VZV infection in the lungs remain poorly understood due to limited access to clinical samples. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we leveraged a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection where rhesus macaques are intrabronchially challenged with the closely related Simian Varicella Virus (SVV). Acute infection is characterized by immune infiltration of the lung airways, a significant up-regulation of genes involved in antiviral-immunity, and a down-regulation of genes involved in lung development. This is followed by a decrease in viral loads and increased expression of genes associated with cell cycle and tissue repair. These data provide the first characterization of the host response required to control varicella virus replication in the lung and provide insight into mechanisms by which VZV infection can cause lung injury in an immune competent host.

  11. Genomic and functional analysis of the host response to acute simian varicella infection in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nicole; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Rais, Maham; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) is the causative agent of varicella and herpes zoster. Although it is well established that VZV is transmitted via the respiratory route, the host-pathogen interactions during acute VZV infection in the lungs remain poorly understood due to limited access to clinical samples. To address these gaps in our knowledge, we leveraged a nonhuman primate model of VZV infection where rhesus macaques are intrabronchially challenged with the closely related Simian Varicella Virus (SVV). Acute infection is characterized by immune infiltration of the lung airways, a significant up-regulation of genes involved in antiviral-immunity, and a down-regulation of genes involved in lung development. This is followed by a decrease in viral loads and increased expression of genes associated with cell cycle and tissue repair. These data provide the first characterization of the host response required to control varicella virus replication in the lung and provide insight into mechanisms by which VZV infection can cause lung injury in an immune competent host. PMID:27677639

  12. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions.

  13. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  14. Sphingolipid trafficking and purification in Chlamydia trachomatis-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular human pathogen, which lacks a system that allows genetic manipulation. Therefore, chlamydial researchers must manipulate the host cell to better understand chlamydial biology. Host-derived lipid acquisition is critical for chlamydial survival within the host. Hence, the ability to track and purify sphingolipids in/from chlamydial infected cells has become an integral part of pivotal studies in chlamydial biology. This Unit outlines protocols that provide details about labeling eukaryotic cells with exogenous lipids to examine Golgi-derived lipid trafficking to the chlamydial inclusion and then performing imaging studies or lipid extractions for quantification. Details are provided to allow these protocols to be applied to subconfluent, polarized or siRNA knockdown cells. In addition, one will find important experimental design considerations and techniques. These methods are powerful tools to aid in the understanding of mechanisms which allow C. trachomatis to manipulate and usurp host cell trafficking pathways. PMID:23184593

  15. Toxocariasis and lung function: relevance of a neglected infection in an urban landscape.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael G; Haseeb, M A

    2014-03-01

    Toxocariasis has been highlighted as a potentially important neglected infection of poverty in developed countries that experience substantive health disparities such as the United States. An association between Toxocara infection and lung function, in concert with a relatively high prevalence of infection, may mark an important mechanism by which this infection could contribute significantly to the differential morbidity across different socioeconomic groups and landscapes. To assess the potential relevance of this infection in a dense urban environment, we measured the association between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁) and serology diagnosed Toxocara infection in a sample of US-born New York City residents. We identified a significant independent association between Toxocara infection and lung function, wherein those with previous Toxocara infection had a 236.9 mL reduced FEV₁ compared to those without Toxocara infection even after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, level of education, smoking status, body mass index, and pet ownership. These findings from New York City corroborate similar findings in a national sample and, while the cross-sectional data preclude a direct causal relationship, this study identifies a potentially important neglected infection in a dense urban landscape.

  16. Mouse lung infection model to assess Rhodococcus equi virulence and vaccine protection.

    PubMed

    González-Iglesias, Patricia; Scortti, Mariela; MacArthur, Iain; Hapeshi, Alexia; Rodriguez, Héctor; Prescott, John F; Vazquez-Boland, José A

    2014-08-06

    The pathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus equi causes severe purulent lung infections in foals and immunocompromised people. Although relatively unsusceptible to R. equi, mice are widely used for in vivo studies with this pathogen. The most commonly employed mouse model is based on systemic (intravenous) infection and determination of R. equi burdens in spleen and liver. Here, we investigated the murine lung for experimental infection studies with R. equi. Using a 10(7)CFU intranasal challenge in BALB/c mice, virulent R. equi consistently survived in quantifiable numbers up to 10 days in the lungs whereas virulence-deficient R. equi bacteria were rapidly cleared. An internally controlled virulence assay was developed in which the test R. equi strains are co-inoculated and monitored in the same mouse. Isogenic R. equi bacteria lacking either the plasmid vapA gene or the entire virulence plasmid were compared using this competitive assay. Both strains showed no significant differences in in vivo fitness in the lung, indicating that the single loss of the virulence factor VapA was sufficient to account for the full attenuation seen in the absence of the virulence plasmid. To test the adequacy of the lung infection model for monitoring R. equi vaccine efficacy, BALB/c mice were immunized with live R. equi and challenged intranasally. Vaccination conferred protection against acute pulmonary challenge with virulent R. equi. Our data indicate that the murine lung infection model provides a useful tool for both R. equi virulence and vaccine studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lung Abscess in a Patient With VAP: A Rare Case of Lung Infection Complicated by Two Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mystakelli, Christina; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Aravosita, Paraskevi; Seretis, Charalampos; Kanna, Efthymia; Aloizos, Stavros

    2013-02-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is defined as pneumonia occurring in a patient after intubation with an endotracheal tube or tracheostomy tube lasting for 48 hours or more. We describe a case of 75-year-old male who initially presented with pneumonia of the right basis with accompanying plevritis. The patient was intubated and his condition was complicated with a VAP infection while he developed a lung abscess. The antibiotic therapy was based on susceptibility bronchial secretions isolated acinetobacter baumannii and klebsiella pneumoniae; these pathogens were also isolated from the drained abscess. The patient was discharged in good health. The interest of this case is recommended in the existence of two responsible pathogens, the paucity of the development of lung abscess in a patient with VAP, and the successful treatment of the patient with the combination of controlled drainage of the abscess and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  18. Deficiency of LIGHT signaling pathway exacerbates Chlamydia psittaci respiratory tract infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hengling; Chen, Shenghua; Xu, Sha; Sun, Yuanbin; Bai, Qinqin; Lu, Chunxue; Chen, Yuyu; Fu, Xizong; Xu, Guilian; Chen, Lili

    2016-11-01

    LIGHT, a costimulatory member of the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig SF), can greatly impact T cell activation. The role of the LIGHT signaling pathway in chlamydial infection was evaluated in mice following respiratory tract infection with Chlamydia psittaci. Compared with wild type (WT) mice, LIGHT knockout (KO) mice showed significant reduction of body weight, much lower survival rate, higher bacterial burden, prolonged infection time courses and more severe pathological changes in lung tissue. The mRNA levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17 and IL-12 in the lung tissue of LIGHT KO mice were significantly lower than those in WT mice. While there was no obvious difference in the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the spleens of the two groups of mice, there was a markedly elevated percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells in LIGHT KO mice. Together, these results demonstrate that the LIGHT signaling pathway is not only required for inflammatory cytokine production as part of the host response to chlamydial infection, but also influences the differentiation of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells, both of which may be essential for control of C. psittaci respiratory tract infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Performance and Cost-Effectiveness of Direct Fluorescent-Antibody, Ligase Chain Reaction, and PCR Assays for Verification of Chlamydial Enzyme Immunoassay Results for Populations with a Low to Moderate Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Deborah; Ferrero, Dennis; McCarthy, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Many laboratories use a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with verification testing to diagnose Chlamydia trachomatis infections in an effort to contain costs. This study was designed to compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA), commercial PCR, and ligase chain reaction (LCR) for the verification of EIA results. Cervical specimens were screened by EIA. DFA, PCR, and LCR were compared as verification tests for EIA-reactive specimens and negative greyzone (NGZ) specimens at 50% below the cutoff value. These samples were also tested by in-house PCR, which was used in the analysis of verification results. A total of 477 (7%) of 6,571 samples were reactive or within the NGZ. EIA results with verification by DFA testing (EIA/DFA results) agreed with 93% of the true results compared with 97% for EIA/PCR results for one set of 242 samples; there was 97% agreement with true results for EIA/DFA results versus 95% for EIA/LCR results for another set of 235 samples. Ten samples were false positive by LCR. Time and costs were equivalent for EIA with the DFA, PCR, or LCR as the verification test but were two- to threefold greater for PCR or LCR alone than for EIA with verification. Since it is important to balance cost containment with public health objectives, DFA, PCR, and LCR as EIA verification tests for cervical samples offer acceptable sensitivities and specificities at reasonable cost for low- to moderate-risk populations and therefore can be extended to a broader spectrum of at-risk populations. PMID:9431928

  20. Successful lung transplant in a child with cystic fibrosis and persistent Blastobotrys rhaffinosifermentans infection.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Y; Chambers, A L; Fuller, J; Lacson, A; Mullen, J; Lien, D; Humar, A

    2014-08-01

    Fungal respiratory infections in patients with CF are a significant concern both pre- and post-lung transplantation (LTx). Fungal infection is associated with increased mortality post-LTx, and in the past decade, the prevalence of fungal colonization in Canadian pediatric patients with CF has increased. The emergence of novel fungal pathogens is particularly challenging to the transplant community, as little is known regarding their virulence and optimal management. We present a case of a successful double-lung transplant in a pediatric patient with CF who was infected pretransplantation with a novel yeast, Blastobotrys rhaffinosifermentans. This patient was treated successfully with aggressive antifungal therapy post-transplantation, followed by extended fungal prophylaxis. The significance of fungal colonization and infection in children with CF pre- and post-LTx is reviewed.

  1. IL-17A attracts inflammatory cells in murine lung infection with P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wonnenberg, Bodo; Jungnickel, Christopher; Honecker, Anja; Wolf, Lisa; Voss, Meike; Bischoff, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas; Herr, Christian; Bals, Robert; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    IL-17A-dependent immunity is of importance in the protection against extracellular bacterial pathogens. However, IL-17A is also suggested to mediate the pathogenesis of lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we studied the role of IL-17A in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. IL-17A mediated the expression of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and the recruitment of inflammatory cells in mice infected with a sub-lethal dose of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-17A deficiency protected mice from lethal P. aeruginosa lung infection. A sub-lethal infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae resulted in increased bacterial burden associated with increased pulmonary inflammation. Thus, the type of infectious bacteria seemed to influence the way in which IL-17A functions during pulmonary infection. Reducing pulmonary inflammation by targeting IL-17A may be a therapeutic option in acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia.

  2. Novel Mouse Model of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection Mimicking Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Jensen, PeterØstrup; Stub, Charlotte; Hentzer, Morten; Molin, Søren; Ciofu, Oana; Givskov, Michael; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a chronic infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients by establishing an alginate-containing biofilm. The infection has been studied in several animal models; however, most of the models required artificial embedding of the bacteria. We present here a new pulmonary mouse model without artificial embedding. The model is based on a stable mucoid CF sputum isolate (NH57388A) with hyperproduction of alginate due to a deletion in mucA and functional N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum-sensing systems. Chronic lung infection could be established in both CF mice (CftrtmlUnc−/−) and BALB/c mice, as reflected by the detection of a high number of P. aeruginosa organisms in the lung homogenates at 7 days postinfection and alginate biofilms, surrounded by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the alveoli. In comparison, both an AHL-producing nonmucoid revertant (NH57388C) from the mucoid isolate (NH57388A) and a nonmucoid isolate (NH57388B) deficient in AHL were almost cleared from the lungs of the mice. This model, in which P. aeruginosa is protected against the defense system of the lung by alginate, is similar to the clinical situation. Therefore, the mouse model provides an improved method for evaluating the interaction between mucoid P. aeruginosa, the host, and antibacterial therapy. PMID:15784597

  3. Suppression in lung defense responses after bacterial infection in rats pretreated with different welding fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, James M. . E-mail: jga6@cdc.gov; Taylor, Michael D.; Millecchia, Lyndell; Bebout, Alicia R.; Roberts, Jenny R.

    2004-11-01

    Epidemiology suggests that inhalation of welding fumes increases the susceptibility to lung infection. The effects of chemically distinct welding fumes on lung defense responses after bacterial infection were compared. Fume was collected during gas metal arc (GMA) or flux-covered manual metal arc (MMA) welding using two consumable electrodes: stainless steel (SS) or mild steel (MS). The fumes were separated into water-soluble and -insoluble fractions. The GMA-SS and GMA-MS fumes were found to be relatively insoluble, whereas the MMA-SS was highly water soluble, with the soluble fraction comprised of 87% Cr and 11% Mn. On day 0, male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with saline (vehicle control) or the different welding fumes (0.1 or 2 mg/rat). At day 3, the rats were intratracheally inoculated with 5 x 10{sup 3} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, left lungs were removed, homogenized, cultured overnight, and colony-forming units were counted to assess pulmonary bacterial clearance. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on right lungs to recover phagocytes and BAL fluid to measure the production of nitric oxide (NO) and immunomodulatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, and IL-10. In contrast to the GMA-SS, GMA-MS, and saline groups, pretreatment with the highly water soluble MMA-SS fume caused significant body weight loss, extensive lung damage, and a dramatic reduction in pulmonary clearance of L. monocytogenes after infection. NO concentrations in BAL fluid and lung immunostaining of inducible NO synthase were dramatically increased in rats pretreated with MMA-SS before and after infection. MMA-SS treatment caused a significant decrease in IL-2 and significant increases in TNF-{alpha}, IL-6, and IL-10 after infection. In conclusion, pretreatment with MMA-SS increased production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) after infection, which are likely

  4. A patient with seminal vesiculitis prior to acute chlamydial epididymitis.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ryoji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiji; Takeyama, Koh; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2005-10-01

    This is the first report of a case of seminal vesiculitis prior to acute chlamydial epididymitis. At the first visit to the clinic, the patient wished to check whether he had Chlamydia trachomatis in his genital tract, because his wife had been diagnosed as having chlamydial cervicitis. He had no specific symptoms at that time; however, transrectal ultrasonograpy (TRUS) revealed swelling of seminal vesicles, which suggested the presence of seminal vesiculitis. Two days after the first visit, he had high-grade fever and was diagnosed as having acute epididymitis caused by C. trachomatis. We had previously reported that seminal vesiculitis was always complicated with acute epididymitis, so this case could provide important evidence that seminal vesiculitis might precede acute epididymitis. It suggested that acute epididymitis could be affected by seminal vesiculitis via the retrograde transmission route.

  5. Lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis: special focus to infection and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Daniel J; Hadjiliadis, Denis

    2014-06-01

    Despite advances in medical care, patients with cystic fibrosis still face limited life expectancy. The most common cause of death remains respiratory failure. End-stage cystic fibrosis can be treated with lung transplantation and is the third most common reason for which the procedure is performed. Outcomes for cystic fibrosis are better than most other lung diseases, but remain limited (5-year survival 60%). For patients with advanced disease lung transplantation appears to improve survival. Outcomes for patients with Burkholderia cepacia remain poor, although they are better for patients with certain genomovars. Controversy exists about Mycobacterium abscessus infection and appropriateness for transplant. More information is also becoming available for comorbidities, including diabetes and pulmonary hypertension among others. Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation is used more frequently for end-stage disease as a bridge to lung transplantation and will likely be used more in the future.

  6. Human lung hydrolases delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis-macrophage interactions and the capacity to control infection.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Sasindran, Smitha J; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60-80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proinflammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis-macrophage interactions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection).

  7. Fusarium infection in lung transplant patients: report of 6 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Herman A; Coleman, Jeffrey J; Restrepo, Alejandro; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium is a fungal pathogen of immunosuppressed lung transplant patients associated with a high mortality in those with severe and persistent neutropenia. The principle portal of entry for Fusarium species is the airways, and lung involvement almost always occurs among lung transplant patients with disseminated infection. In these patients, the immunoprotective mechanisms of the transplanted lungs are impaired, and they are, therefore, more vulnerable to Fusarium infection. As a result, fusariosis occurs in up to 32% of lung transplant patients. We studied fusariosis in 6 patients following lung transplantation who were treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during an 8-year period and reviewed 3 published cases in the literature. Cases were identified by the microbiology laboratory and through discharge summaries. Patients presented with dyspnea, fever, nonproductive cough, hemoptysis, and headache. Blood tests showed elevated white blood cell counts with granulocytosis and elevated inflammatory markers. Cultures of Fusarium were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage, blood, and sputum specimens.Treatments included amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin, voriconazole, and posaconazole, either alone or in combination. Lung involvement occurred in all patients with disseminated disease and it was associated with a poor outcome. The mortality rate in this group of patients was high (67%), and of those who survived, 1 patient was treated with a combination of amphotericin B and voriconazole, 1 patient with amphotericin B, and 1 patient with posaconazole. Recommended empirical treatment includes voriconazole, amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B first-line, and posaconazole for refractory disease. High-dose amphotericin B is recommended for treatment of most cases of fusariosis. The echinocandins (for example, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin) are generally avoided because Fusarium species have intrinsic resistance to them. Treatment

  8. Human Lung Tissue Explants Reveal Novel Interactions during Legionella pneumophila Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Jens; Marwitz, Sebastian; Tiefenau, Jana; Rasch, Janine; Shevchuk, Olga; Kugler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Histological and clinical investigations describe late stages of Legionnaires' disease but cannot characterize early events of human infection. Cellular or rodent infection models lack the complexity of tissue or have nonhuman backgrounds. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel model for Legionella pneumophila infection comprising living human lung tissue. We stimulated lung explants with L. pneumophila strains and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to analyze tissue damage, bacterial replication, and localization as well as the transcriptional response of infected tissue. Interestingly, we found that extracellular adhesion of L. pneumophila to the entire alveolar lining precedes bacterial invasion and replication in recruited macrophages. In contrast, OMVs predominantly bound to alveolar macrophages. Specific damage to septa and epithelia increased over 48 h and was stronger in wild-type-infected and OMV-treated samples than in samples infected with the replication-deficient, type IVB secretion-deficient DotA− strain. Transcriptome analysis of lung tissue explants revealed a differential regulation of 2,499 genes after infection. The transcriptional response included the upregulation of uteroglobin and the downregulation of the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). Immunohistochemistry confirmed the downregulation of MARCO at sites of pathogen-induced tissue destruction. Neither host factor has ever been described in the context of L. pneumophila infections. This work demonstrates that the tissue explant model reproduces realistic features of Legionnaires' disease and reveals new functions for bacterial OMVs during infection. Our model allows us to characterize early steps of human infection which otherwise are not feasible for investigations. PMID:24166955

  9. Interleukin-17 Is Required for Control of Chronic Lung Infection Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bayes, Hannah K.; Ritchie, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other chronic lung diseases. Cytokines of the interleukin-17 (IL-17) family have been proposed as important in the host response to P. aeruginosa infection through their role in augmenting antibacterial immune responses, although their proinflammatory effect may contribute to lung damage that occurs as a result of chronic infection. We set out to explore the role of IL-17 in the host response to chronic P. aeruginosa infection. We used a murine model of chronic pulmonary infection with CF-related strains of P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that IL-17 cytokine signaling is essential for mouse survival and prevention of chronic infection at 2 weeks postinoculation using two different P. aeruginosa strains. Following infection, there was a marked expansion of cells within mediastinal lymph nodes, comprised mainly of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs); ∼90% of IL-17-producing (IL-17+) cells had markers consistent with group 3 ILCs. A smaller percentage of IL-17+ cells had markers consistent with a B1 phenotype. In lung homogenates harvested 14 days following infection, there was a significant expansion of IL-17+ cells; about 50% of these were CD3+, split equally between CD4+ Th17 cells and γδ T cells, while the CD3− IL-17+ cells were almost exclusively group 3 ILCs. Further experiments with B cell-deficient mice showed that B cell production of IL-17 or natural antibodies did not provide any defense against chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Thus, IL-17 rather than antibody is a key element in host defense against chronic pulmonary infection with P. aeruginosa. PMID:27698020

  10. Cross Protective Mucosal Immunity Mediated by Memory Th17 Cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Yongli; Li, Wenchao; Tian, Ying; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Ni, Xin; Shen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong Th17 responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4+ T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by IL-17A blockade. Transfer of memory CD4+ T cells from IL-17A knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells played a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells. PMID:27118490

  11. Rapid Accumulation of Eosinophils in Lung Lesions in Guinea Pigs Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lasco, Todd M.; Turner, Oliver C.; Cassone, Lynne; Sugawara, Isamu; Yamada, Hiroyuki; McMurray, David N.; Orme, Ian M.

    2004-01-01

    Guinea pig eosinophils were positively identified in bronchoalveolar lavage populations and in the lung granulomas of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected guinea pigs. It is possible that the rapid influx of these cells, and their subsequent degranulation during acute pulmonary tuberculosis, may play a key role in the susceptibility of this animal model. PMID:14742563

  12. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in latently infected lungs by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eugenin, Eliseo; Kaplan, Gilla

    2014-01-01

    Detection of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge in the diagnosis of asymptomatic, subclinical tuberculosis. We report the development of an immunofluorescence technique to visualize and enumerate M. tuberculosis in latently infected rabbit lungs where no acid-fast–stained organisms were seen and no cultivable bacilli were obtained by the agar-plating method. PMID:25161200

  13. Effects of Marijuana on the Lung and Its Defenses against Infection and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashkin, Donald P.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the many effects of marijuana use on the lungs. States that patients with pre-existing immune deficits are particularly vulnerable to marijuana-related pulmonary infections. However, warns that habitual use of marijuana may lead to respiratory cancer must await epidemiological studies, which are now possible since 30 years have passed…

  14. Effects of Marijuana on the Lung and Its Defenses against Infection and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashkin, Donald P.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the many effects of marijuana use on the lungs. States that patients with pre-existing immune deficits are particularly vulnerable to marijuana-related pulmonary infections. However, warns that habitual use of marijuana may lead to respiratory cancer must await epidemiological studies, which are now possible since 30 years have passed…

  15. TREM-2 promotes macrophage survival and lung disease after respiratory viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kangyun; Byers, Derek E; Jin, Xiaohua; Agapov, Eugene; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Patel, Anand C; Cella, Marina; Gilfilan, Susan; Colonna, Marco; Kober, Daniel L; Brett, Tom J; Holtzman, Michael J

    2015-05-04

    Viral infections and type 2 immune responses are thought to be critical for the development of chronic respiratory disease, but the link between these events needs to be better defined. Here, we study a mouse model in which infection with a mouse parainfluenza virus known as Sendai virus (SeV) leads to long-term activation of innate immune cells that drive IL-13-dependent lung disease. We find that chronic postviral disease (signified by formation of excess airway mucus and accumulation of M2-differentiating lung macrophages) requires macrophage expression of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2). Analysis of mechanism shows that viral replication increases lung macrophage levels of intracellular and cell surface TREM-2, and this action prevents macrophage apoptosis that would otherwise occur during the acute illness (5-12 d after inoculation). However, the largest increases in TREM-2 levels are found as the soluble form (sTREM-2) long after clearance of infection (49 d after inoculation). At this time, IL-13 and the adapter protein DAP12 promote TREM-2 cleavage to sTREM-2 that is unexpectedly active in preventing macrophage apoptosis. The results thereby define an unprecedented mechanism for a feed-forward expansion of lung macrophages (with IL-13 production and consequent M2 differentiation) that further explains how acute infection leads to chronic inflammatory disease.

  16. Development of Liposomal Ciprofloxacin to Treat Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, David; Blanchard, Jim; Gonda, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Except for management of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) in cystic fibrosis, there are no approved inhaled antibiotic treatments for any other diseases or for infections from other pathogenic microorganisms such as tuberculosis, non-tuberculous mycobacteria, fungal infections or potential inhaled biowarfare agents including Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Coxiella burnetii (which cause pneumonic tularemia, plague and Q fever, respectively). Delivery of an antibiotic formulation via the inhalation route has the potential to provide high concentrations at the site of infection with reduced systemic exposure to limit side effects. A liposomal formulation may improve tolerability, increase compliance by reducing the dosing frequency, and enhance penetration of biofilms and treatment of intracellular infections. Two liposomal ciprofloxacin formulations (Lipoquin® and Pulmaquin®) that are in development by Aradigm Corporation are described here. PMID:26938551

  17. Ventilator-associated respiratory infection following lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jordi; Caralt, Berta; López, Iker; Augustin, Salvador; Roman, Antonio; Gavalda, Joan; Rello, Jordi

    2015-03-01

    The medical records of 170 adult patients who underwent lung transplantation between January 2010 and December 2012 were reviewed to assess the incidence, causative organisms, risk factors and outcomes of post-operative pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. 20 (12%) patients suffered 24 episodes of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The condition was associated with mean increases of 43 days in mechanical ventilation and of 35 days in hospital stay, and significantly higher hospital mortality (OR 9.0, 95% CI 3.2-25.1). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (eight out of 12 patients were multidrug-resistant) was the most common pathogen, followed by Enterobacteriaceae (one out of five patients produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases). Gastroparesis occurred in 55 (32%) patients and was significantly associated with pneumonia (OR 6.2, 95% CI 2.2-17.2). Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis was associated with a mean increase of 28 days in mechanical ventilation and 30.5 days in hospital stay, but was not associated with higher mortality (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.4-3.2). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (six out of 16 patients were multidrug resistant) was the most common pathogen, followed by Enterobacteriaceae (three out of 14 patients produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase). Patients with gastroparesis also had more episodes of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (40% versus 12%, p<0.001). In conclusion, ventilator-associated pneumonia following lung transplantation increased mortality. Preventing gastroparesis probably decreases the risk of pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. Multidrug-resistant bacteria frequently cause post-lung-transplantation pneumonia and tracheobronchitis. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  18. Quorum Sensing and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Lung Infection of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Phipps, Richard; Nielsen, Anne Kirstine; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant microorganism in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients. The chronic lung infection is preceded by intermittent colonization. When the chronic infection becomes established, it is well accepted that the isolated strains differ phenotypically from the intermittent strains. Dominating changes are the switch to mucoidity (alginate overproduction) and loss of epigenetic regulation of virulence such as the Quorum Sensing (QS). To elucidate the dynamics of P. aeruginosa QS systems during long term infection of the CF lung, we have investigated 238 isolates obtained from 152 CF patients at different stages of infection ranging from intermittent to late chronic. Isolates were characterized with regard to QS signal molecules, alginate, rhamnolipid and elastase production and mutant frequency. The genetic basis for change in QS regulation were investigated and identified by sequence analysis of lasR, rhlR, lasI and rhlI. The first QS system to be lost was the one encoded by las system 12 years (median value) after the onset of the lung infection with subsequent loss of the rhl encoded system after 17 years (median value) shown as deficiencies in production of the 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL QS signal molecules respectively. The concomitant development of QS malfunction significantly correlated with the reduced production of rhamnolipids and elastase and with the occurrence of mutations in the regulatory genes lasR and rhlR. Accumulation of mutations in both lasR and rhlR correlated with development of hypermutability. Interestingly, a higher number of mucoid isolates were found to produce C4-HSL signal molecules and rhamnolipids compared to the non-mucoid isolates. As seen from the present data, we can conclude that P. aeruginosa and particularly the mucoid strains do not lose the QS regulation or the ability to produce rhamnolipids until the late stage of the chronic infection. PMID:20404933

  19. Absence of chlamydial deoxyribonucleic acid from testicular and epididymal samples from men with obstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Sreebala; Amezaga, Maria Rosario; Hamilton, Mark; McKenzie, Hamish; Templeton, Allan; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2010-02-01

    To identify Chlamydia trachomatis DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the upper genital tract of men with obstructive azoospermia compared with men seeking vasectomy reversal. Case-control study. Tertiary referral center, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, United Kingdom. Cases were men with idiopathic obstructive azoospermia, and controls were men with azoospermia secondary to vasectomy. Chlamydia trachomatis-specific DNA test by polymerase chain reaction on testicular and epididymal biopsy samples, as well as epididymal aspirate. Presence of Chlamydia trachomatis DNA. We did not detect the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis-specific DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the epididymis or testis of 36 asymptomatic men with obstructive azoospermia (14 cases, 22 controls). Our hypothesis that unrecognized, asymptomatic chlamydial infection will lead to complete bilateral obstruction of the male genital tract remains unproven. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene expression profiling in Salmonella Choleraesuis-infected porcine lung using a long oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shu-Hong; Kuhar, Daniel; Lunney, Joan K; Dawson, Harry; Guidry, Catherine; Uthe, Jolita J; Bearson, Shawn M D; Recknor, Justin; Nettleton, Dan; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2006-07-01

    Understanding the transcriptional response to pathogenic bacterial infection within food animals is of fundamental and applied interest. To determine the transcriptional response to Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (SC) infection, a 13,297-oligonucleotide swine array was used to analyze RNA from control, 24-h postinoculation (hpi), and 48-hpi porcine lung tissue from pigs infected with SC. In total, 57 genes showed differential expression (p < 0.001; false discovery rate = 12%). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of 61 genes was used to confirm the microarray results and to identify pathways responding to infection. Of the 33 genes identified by microarray analysis as differentially expressed, 23 were confirmed by qRT-PCR results. A novel finding was that two transglutaminase family genes (TGM1 and TGM3) showed dramatic increases in expression postinoculation; combined with several other apoptotic genes, they indicated the induction of apoptotic pathways during SC infection. A predominant T helper 1-type immune response occurred during infection, with interferon gamma (IFNG) significantly increased at 48 hpi. Genes induced by IFNs (GBP1, GBP2, C1S, C1R, MHC2TA, PSMB8, TAP1, TAP2) showed increased expression during porcine lung infection. These data represent the first thorough investigation of gene regulation pathways that control an important porcine respiratory and foodborne bacterial infection.

  1. Detecting bacterial lung infections: In vivo evaluation of in vitro volatile fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangjiang; Bean, Heather D.; Wargo, Matthew J.; Leclair, Laurie W.; Hill, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of bacteria by their volatilomes is of interest to many scientists and clinicians as it holds the promise of diagnosing infections in situ, particularly lung infections via breath analysis. While there are many studies reporting various bacterial volatile biomarkers or fingerprints using in vitro experiments, it has proven difficult to translate these data to in vivo breath analyses. Therefore, we aimed to create secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) pathogen fingerprints directly from the breath of mice with lung infections. In this study we demonstrated that SESI-MS is capable of differentiating infected vs. uninfected mice, P. aeruginosa–infected vs. S. aureus–infected mice, as well as distinguish between infections caused by P. aeruginosa strains PAO1 vs. FRD1, with statistical significance (p < 0.05). In addition, we compared in vitro and in vivo volatiles and observed that only 25–34% of peaks are shared between the in vitro and in vivo SESI-MS fingerprints. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first breath volatiles measured for P. aeruginosa PAO1, FRD1, and S. aureus RN450, and the first comparison of in vivo and in vitro volatile profiles from the same strains using the murine infection model. PMID:23307645

  2. Comparison between concentrations of amphotericin B in infected lung lesion and in uninfected lung tissue in a patient treated with liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Matsumoto, Kana; Igari, Hidetoshi; Uesato, Masaya; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Yasutaka; Morita, Kunihiko; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Yoshino, Ichiro; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2010-09-01

    Generally, the primary lesion of a mold infection is in the airway, an extravascular site. Therefore, the antifungal drug concentration at the actual tissue lesion of a mold infection is as important as in the blood compartment. Although our antifungal armamentarium has expanded recently, polyenes are still often needed in clinical practice because of their potent fungicidal activity and the rarity of resistance. Nevertheless, the distribution of amphotericin B (AmB) in infected lung tissue has not yet been evaluated. Using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, we determined the concentrations of AmB in plasma and infected and uninfected tissues of resected lung simultaneously, in a patient with pulmonary aspergillosis treated with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB). The AmB concentration in the infected lesion of the lung was approximately 5.2 times higher than that in plasma and 3.7 times higher than in uninfected lung tissue. L-AmB accumulated in the infected lesion of the lung at a higher concentration. Although our data are from only one patient, they may be useful in helping to develop better strategies for the use of L-AmB against pulmonary fungal infections.

  3. Ovine chlamydial abortion: characterization of the inflammatory immune response in placental tissues.

    PubMed

    Buxton, D; Anderson, I E; Longbottom, D; Livingstone, M; Wattegedera, S; Entrican, G

    2002-01-01

    Ovine chlamydial abortion is a serious cause of fetal mortality in several sheep-rearing countries. The causal agent, Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci), does not generally induce clinical signs in the ewe other than abortion; this is associated with macroscopically visible damage in the placenta, which may be inflamed and thickened. To investigate the nature of the placental inflammation, seven pregnant sheep were inoculated subcutaneously at 70 days' gestation with C. abortus (strain S 26/3). A further five pregnant sheep received control inoculum by the same route at the same stage of pregnancy. Three of the infected ewes produced stillborn lambs and four produced live lambs. Lesions characteristic of chlamydial infection were present in all placentas except for two from one ewe that gave birth to twins. Histopathological examination of placental tissues from aborted fetuses showed a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with vasculitis and thrombosis in the mesenchyme of the intercotyledonary membranes. Cells expressing the macrophage-associated molecule CD 14 were found to be numerous, as were cells expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. Many cells expressing messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were demonstrated, but few cells expressing interferon gamma mRNA and none expressing interleukin-4 mRNA were detected. The fetal immune response included small numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells, gamma delta T cells and B cells. It is concluded that abortion is the result of several factors, including destruction of tissue by C. abortus, vascular thrombosis, and an inflammatory response by the fetus. Production of TNF-alpha by fetal macrophages expressing MHC II molecules may be of considerable significance in the pathogenesis of abortion.

  4. Interleukin-17 Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Intervention in Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Daniel; Taylor, Patricia; Fletcher, Dave; van Heeckeren, Rolf; Eastman, Jean; van Heeckeren, Anna; Davis, Pamela; Chmiel, James F.; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by an excessive neutrophilic inflammatory response within the airway as a result of defective cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR) expression and function. Interleukin-17A induces airway neutrophilia and mucin production associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, which is associated with the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis. The objectives of this study were to use the preclinical murine model of cystic fibrosis lung infection and inflammation to investigate the role of IL-17 in CF lung pathophysiology and explore therapeutic intervention with a focus on IL-17. Cftr-deficient mice (CF mice) and wild-type mice (WT mice) infected with P. aeruginosa had robust IL-17 production early in the infection associated with a persistent elevated inflammatory response. Intratracheal administration of IL-17 provoked a neutrophilic response in the airways of WT and CF animals which was similar to that observed with P. aeruginosa infection. The neutralization of IL-17 prior to infection significantly improved the outcomes in the CF mice, suggesting that IL-17 may be a therapeutic target. We demonstrate in this report that the pathophysiological contribution of IL-17 may be due to the induction of chemokines from the epithelium which is augmented by a deficiency of Cftr and ongoing inflammation. These studies demonstrate the in vivo contribution of IL-17 in cystic fibrosis lung disease and the therapeutic validity of attenuating IL-17 activity in cystic fibrosis. PMID:27271746

  5. Morphological and Cytochemical Characterization of Cells Infiltrating Mouse Lungs After Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wyde, Philip R.; Peavy, Duane L.; Cate, Thomas R.

    1978-01-01

    To initiate evaluation of the cell-mediated immunological response to influenza virus in a major site of disease, lung cells were obtained by transpleural lavage from lungs of uninfected mice and from those infected 3 or 6 days previously with 5 50% mouse infectious doses (MID50) of avirulent (P3) or virulent (P9) influenza A Hong Kong (H3N2) virus. The number of cells recovered by lavage was dependent on the dose, time after inoculation, and the type of virus used for inoculation. Although lavage pools were shown to contain peripheral blood leukocytes, this contamination was shown to be consistently less than 5% of the total leukocytes harvested. Among the ca. 0.75 × 106 lavage cells obtained from each uninfected mouse, about 90% were macrophages or lymphocytes in approximately equal proportion. T, B, and null (lyphocytes lacking theta or surface immunoglobulin markers) lymphocytes averaged 23, 9, and 7% of cells in these suspensions, respectively. After infection with either P3 or P9 virus, increased numbers of activated macrophages and lymphoblasts were observed. The major change during P3 infection was an increase in absolute numbers of null lymphocytes. In contrast, during P9 infection, T and B lymphocytes and macrophages progressively increased in absolute numbers while null cells decreased. These data suggest that cell-mediated immunological responses to influenza virus occur in the lung during infection, but that the responses to virulent and avirulent variants may differ both qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:711312

  6. Combined Legionella and Escherichia coli lung infection after a tsunami disaster.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Kei; Yamada, Norihiro; Okada, Shinji; Suzuki, Yasuko; Satoh, Asami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Morikawa, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary infection after a tsunami is often polymicrobial and tends to form chronic pyogenic lung disease, necrotizing pneumonia, and empyemas. We report a combined pulmonary infection of Legionella and multiple antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in a previously well 75-year-old woman following immersion in tsunami waters 1 km inland from the Pacific coastline following the Tohoku Region Pacific Coast Earthquake of 2011. She needed drainage several times and the long-term use of multiple antibiotics according to the type of bacteria found and antibiotic susceptibility. We should be mindful of infections caused by multiple pathogens in the environment in Japan as a consequence of a tsunami disaster.

  7. Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory tract infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Nocardia are rarely implicated in these infections and few reports of the involvement of this species are found in the literature. Case presentation We describe a case of lung infection followed by chronic colonization of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole resistant Nocardia farcinica in a patient with cystic fibrosis. The chronic colonization of this uncommon bacterium in patients with cystic fibrosis was proved using a newly developed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, which indicates that this bacterium, despite treatment, is difficult to eradicate. Conclusion Our case report confirms that this organism can be recovered in persons with cystic fibrosis. Its eradication is necessary especially if the patient is to undergo lung transplantation. PMID:20211000

  8. Spatiotemporal quantification of cell dynamics in the lung following influenza virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Lu; Xu, Shuoyu; Cheng, Jierong; Zheng, Dahai; Limmon, Gino V.; Leung, Nicola H. N.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu; Yu, Hanry

    2013-04-01

    Lung injury caused by influenza virus infection is widespread. Understanding lung damage and repair progression post infection requires quantitative spatiotemporal information on various cell types mapping into the tissue structure. Based on high content images acquired from an automatic slide scanner, we have developed algorithms to quantify cell infiltration in the lung, loss and recovery of Clara cells in the damaged bronchioles and alveolar type II cells (AT2s) in the damaged alveolar areas, and induction of pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SPC)-expressing bronchiolar epithelial cells (SBECs). These quantitative analyses reveal: prolonged immune cell infiltration into the lung that persisted long after the influenza virus was cleared and paralleled with Clara cell recovery; more rapid loss and recovery of Clara cells as compared to AT2s; and two stages of SBECs from Scgb1a1+ to Scgb1a1-. These results provide evidence supporting a new mechanism of alveolar repair where Clara cells give rise to AT2s through the SBEC intermediates and shed light on the understanding of the lung damage and repair process. The approach and algorithms in quantifying cell-level changes in the tissue context (cell-based tissue informatics) to gain mechanistic insights into the damage and repair process can be expanded and adapted in studying other disease models.

  9. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Ranaware, Pradip B; Mishra, Anamika; Vijayakumar, Periyasamy; Gandhale, Pradeep N; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D; Raut, Ashwin Ashok

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens.

  10. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gandhale, Pradeep N.; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens. PMID:27071061

  11. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary hypertension Complications of lung transplantation include rejection of the transplanted lung and infection. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  12. Environmental exposure and HPV infection may act synergistically to induce lung tumorigenesis in nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Wen; Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Chen, Chih-Yi; Hsu, Nan-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of lung tumorigenesis have focused on smokers rather than nonsmokers. In this study, we used human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative lung cancer cells to test the hypothesis that HPV infection synergistically increases DNA damage induced by exposure to the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and contributes to lung tumorigenesis in nonsmokers. DNA adduct levels induced by B[a]P in HPV-positive cells were significantly higher than in HPV-negative cells. The DNA adduct formation was dependent on HPV E6 oncoprotein expression. Gene and protein expression of two DNA repair genes, XRCC3 and XRCC5, were lower in B[a]P-treated E6-positive cells than in E6-negative lung cancer cells. The reduced expression was also detected immunohistochemically and was caused by increased promoter hypermethylation. Moreover, mutations of p53 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) genes in lung cancer patients were associated with XRCC5 inactivation. In sum, our study indicates that HPV E6-induced promoter hypermethylation of the XRCC3 and XRCC5 DNA repair genes and the resultant decrease in their expression increases B[a]P-induced DNA adducts and contributes to lung tumorigenesis in nonsmokers. PMID:26918347

  13. Role of Mutant CFTR in Hypersusceptibility of Cystic Fibrosis Patients to Lung Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Gerald B.; Grout, Martha; Zaidi, Tanweer S.; Olsen, John C.; Johnson, Larry G.; Yankaskas, James R.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    1996-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are hypersusceptible to chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections. Cultured human airway epithelial cells expressing the ΔF508 allele of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) were defective in uptake of P. aeruginosa compared with cells expressing the wild-type allele. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-core oligosaccharide was identified as the bacterial ligand for epithelial cell ingestion; exogenous oligosaccharide inhibited bacterial ingestion in a neonatal mouse model, resulting in increased amounts of bacteria in the lungs. CFTR may contribute to a host-defense mechanism that is important for clearance of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract.

  14. Chemokine receptor 2-mediated accumulation of fungicidal exudate macrophages in mice that clear cryptococcal lung infection.

    PubMed

    Osterholzer, John J; Chen, Gwo-Hsiao; Olszewski, Michal A; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Huffnagle, Gary B; Toews, Galen B

    2011-01-01

    Clearance of pulmonary infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is associated with the accumulation and activation of lung macrophages. However, the phenotype of these macrophages and the mechanisms contributing to their accumulation are not well-defined. In this study, we used an established murine model of cryptococcal lung infection and flow cytometric analysis to identify alveolar macrophages (AMs) and the recently described exudate macrophages (ExMs). Exudate macrophages are distinguished from AMs by their strong expression of CD11b and major histocompatibility complex class II and modest expression of costimulatory molecules. Exudate macrophages substantially outnumber AMs during the effector phase of the immune response; and accumulation of ExMs, but not AMs, was chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) dependent and attributable to the recruitment and subsequent differentiation of Ly-6C(high) monocytes originating from the bone marrow and possibly the spleen. Peak ExM accumulation in wild-type (CCR2(+/+)) mice coincided with maximal lung expression of mRNA for inducible nitric oxide synthase and correlated with the known onset of cryptococcal clearance in this strain of mice. Exudate macrophages purified from infected lungs displayed a classically activated effector phenotype characterized by cryptococcal-enhanced production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor α. Cryptococcal killing by bone marrow-derived ExMs was CCR2 independent and superior to that of AMs. We conclude that clearance of cryptococcal lung infection requires the CCR2-mediated massive accumulation of fungicidal ExMs derived from circulating Ly-6C(high) monocytes.

  15. Molybdate transporter ModABC is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic lung infection.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Simone; Jeukens, Julie; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Ouellet, Myriam M; Charette, Steve J; Levesque, Roger C

    2016-01-12

    Mechanisms underlying the success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are poorly defined. The modA gene was previously linked to in vivo competitiveness of P. aeruginosa by a genetic screening in the rat lung. This gene encodes a subunit of transporter ModABC, which is responsible for extracellular uptake of molybdate. This compound is essential for molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductases. Since anaerobic growth conditions are known to occur during CF chronic lung infection, inactivation of a molybdate transporter could inhibit proliferation through the inactivation of denitrification enzymes. Hence, we performed phenotypic characterization of a modA mutant strain obtained by signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM_modA) and assessed its virulence in vivo with two host models. The STM_modA mutant was in fact defective for anaerobic growth and unable to use nitrates in the growth medium for anaerobic respiration. Bacterial growth and nitrate usage were restored when the medium was supplemented with molybdate. Most significantly, the mutant strain showed reduced virulence compared to wild-type strain PAO1 according to a competitive index in the rat model of chronic lung infection and a predation assay with Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. As the latter took place in aerobic conditions, the in vivo impact of the mutation in modA appears to extend beyond its effect on anaerobic growth. These results support the modABC-encoded transporter as important for the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that enzymatic machinery implicated in anaerobic growth during chronic lung infection in CF merits further investigation as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  16. The role of leptin in the development of pulmonary neutrophilia in infection and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubags, Niki D.; Vernooy, Juanita H.; Burg, Elianne; Hayes, Catherine; Bement, Jenna; Dilli, Estee; Zabeau, Lennart; Abraham, Edward; Poch, Katie R.; Nick, Jerry A.; Dienz, Oliver; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Wargo, Matthew J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Tavernier, Jan; Rincón, Mercedes; Poynter, Matthew E.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Suratt, Benjamin T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective One of the hallmarks of severe pneumonia and associated Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is neutrophil recruitment to the lung. Leptin is thought to be up-regulated in the lung following injury and to exert diverse effects on leukocytes, influencing both chemotaxis and survival. We hypothesized that pulmonary leptin contributes directly to the development of pulmonary neutrophilia during pneumonia and ALI. Design Controlled human and murine in vivo and ex vivo experimental studies. Settings Research laboratory of a university hospital. Subjects Healthy human volunteers and subjects hospitalized with bacterial and H1N1 pneumonia. C57Bl/6 and db/db mice were also used. Interventions Lung samples from patients and mice with either bacterial or H1N1 pneumonia and associated ALI were immunostained for leptin. Human bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) samples obtained after lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury were assayed for leptin. C57Bl/6 mice were examined after oropharyngeal aspiration of recombinant leptin alone or in combination with E.coli- or K.pneumonia-induced pneumonia. Leptin-resistant (db/db) mice were also examined using the E.coli model. BAL neutrophilia and cytokine levels were measured. Leptin-induced chemotaxis was examined in human blood- and murine marrow-derived neutrophils in vitro. Measurements and Main Results Injured human and murine lung tissue showed leptin induction compared to normal lung, as did human BAL following LPS instillation. BAL neutrophilia in uninjured and infected mice was increased and lung bacterial-load decreased by airway leptin administration, whereas BAL neutrophilia in infected leptin-resistant mice was decreased. In sterile lung injury by LPS, leptin also appeared to decrease airspace neutrophil apoptosis. Both human and murine neutrophils migrated towards leptin in vitro, and this required intact signaling through the JAK2/PI3K pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that pulmonary leptin is induced in injured human and

  17. GENETIC BASIS OF MURINE ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL LUNG INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mice (A/J, DBA/2J, CAST/Ei, FVB/NJ, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, 129/SvImJ, and C3H/HeJ) and tlr2-deficient mice (C57BL/6

  18. GENETIC BASIS OF MURINE ANTIBACTERIAL DEFENSE TO STREPTOCOCCAL LUNG INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the effect of genetic background and toll-like receptor 2 on antibacterial defense to streptococcal infection, eight genetically diverse strains of mice (A/J, DBA/2J, CAST/Ei, FVB/NJ, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, 129/SvImJ, and C3H/HeJ) and tlr2-deficient mice (C57BL/6

  19. Crossing barriers: infections of the lung and the gut.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, P J

    2009-03-01

    Although known as respiratory pathogens, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and its sister coronaviruses frequently cause enteric symptoms. In addition, other classically non-enteric viruses (such as HIV and influenza) may also have enteric effects that are crucial in their pathogeneses. These effects can be due to direct infection of the gut mucosa, but can also be because of decreased antibacterial defenses, increased mucosal permeability, bacterial translocation, and systemic leak of endotoxin.

  20. [Opportunistic lung infections in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease; a side effect of inhalation corticosteroids?].

    PubMed

    Smeenk, F W; Klinkhamer, P J; Breed, W; Jansz, A R; Jansveld, C A

    1996-01-13

    In four patients, men of 64, 66 and 69 years old and a woman of 65 years, who suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and used inhalation corticosteroids in a relatively high dose (800-1600 micrograms of budesonide per day), a pulmonary infection was diagnosed caused by Mycobacterium malmoense (the first two patients) and Aspergillus (the other two) respectively. Inhalation corticosteroids are of great importance in the treatment of asthmatic patients. Their place in the treatment of patients with COPD is much less clear. The patients did not have an immunological deficiency or anatomical pulmonary or bronchial deformation which could have explained the occurrence of these infections. The high dosages of inhalation corticosteroids may have been involved in the cause of these infections by suppressing the T-cell response locally. In view of this, longterm inhalation corticosteroid treatment should be prescribed in COPD patients only if the efficacy of the medication has been proved in the individual patient involved.

  1. A multi-subunit chlamydial vaccine induces antibody and cell-mediated immunity in immunized koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus): comparison of three different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Carey, Alison J; Timms, Peter; Rawlinson, Galit; Brumm, Jacqui; Nilsson, Karen; Harris, Jonathon M; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2010-02-01

    Chlamydial infections represent a major threat to the survival of the koala. Infections caused by Chlamydia pecorum cause blindness, infertility, pneumonia and urinary tract infections and represent a threat to the survival of the species. Little is known about the immune response in koalas, or the safety of commonly used adjuvants for induction of protective systemic and mucosal immunity. of study In the present study, we immunized 18 healthy female koalas subcutaneously with a combination of three chlamydial antigens [major outer membrane protein (MOMP), NrdB and TC0512 (Omp85)] mixed with one of three different adjuvants [Alhydrogel, Immunostimulating Complex (ISC) and TiterMax Gold]. All adjuvants induced strong neutralizing IgG responses in plasma against the three antigens with prolonged responses lasting more than 270 days seen in Alhydrogel and ISC immunized animals. Cloacal IgG responses lasting >270 days were also induced in ISC-immunized animals. Chlamydia-specific peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferative responses were elicited by both Alhydrogel and ISC, and these lasted >270 days in the ISC group. The data show that a multi-subunit chlamydial vaccine, given subcutaneously, can elicit Chlamydia-specific cell-mediated and antibody responses in the koala demonstrating that the development of a protective vaccine is feasible.

  2. Respiratory Failure due to Possible Donor-Derived Sporothrix schenckii Infection in a Lung Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Nathan C.; Janssen, Katherine; Billings, Joanne; Loor, Gabriel; Green, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. De novo and donor-derived invasive fungal infections (IFIs) contribute to morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Reporting of donor-derived IFIs (DDIFIs) to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network has been mandated since 2005. Prior to that time no systematic monitoring of DDIFIs occurred in the United States. Case Presentation. We report a case of primary graft dysfunction in a 49-year-old male lung transplant recipient with diffuse patchy bilateral infiltrates likely related to pulmonary Sporothrix schenckii infection. The organism was isolated from a bronchoalveolar lavage on the second day after transplantation. Clinical and radiographic responses occurred after initiation of amphotericin B lipid formulation. Conclusion. We believe that this was likely a donor-derived infection given the early timing of the Sporothrix isolation after transplant in a bilateral single lung transplant recipient. This is the first case report of sporotrichosis in a lung transplant recipient. Our patient responded well to amphotericin induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy with itraconazole. The implications of donor-derived fungal infections and Sporothrix in transplant recipients are reviewed. Early recognition and management of these fungi are essential in improving outcomes. PMID:26697244

  3. Differential Roles of Lung Dendritic Cell Subsets Against Respiratory Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory viruses can induce acute respiratory disease. Clinical symptoms and manifestations are dependent on interactions between the virus and host immune system. Dendritic cells (DCs), along with alveolar macrophages, constitute the first line of sentinel cells in the innate immune response against respiratory viral infection. DCs play an essential role in regulating the immune response by bridging innate and adaptive immunity. In the steady state, lung DCs can be subdivided into CD103+ conventional DCs (cDCs), CD11b+ cDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). In the inflammatory state, like a respiratory viral infection, monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) are recruited to the lung. In inflammatory lung, discrimination between moDCs and CD11b+ DCs in the inflamed lung has been a critical challenge in understanding their role in the antiviral response. In particular, CD103+ cDCs migrate from the intraepithelial base to the draining mediastinal lymph nodes to primarily induce the CD8+ T cell response against the invading virus. Lymphoid CD8α+ cDCs, which have a developmental relationship with CD103+ cDCs, also play an important role in viral antigen presentation. Moreover, pDCs have been reported to promote an antiviral response by inducing type I interferon production rather than adaptive immunity. However, the role of these cells in respiratory infections remains unclear. These different DC subsets have functional specialization against respiratory viral infection. Under certain viral infection, contextually controlling the balance of these specialized DC subsets is important for an effective immune response and maintenance of homeostasis. PMID:24999309

  4. Simvastatin attenuates stroke-induced splenic atrophy and lung susceptibility to spontaneous bacterial infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Zhu, Xiaolei; Liu, Lin; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins are widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke, but their effects on stroke-induced immunodeppression and post-stroke infections are elusive. We investigated effects of simvastatin treatment on stroke-induced splenic atrophy and lung susceptibility to bacterial infection in acute experimental stroke in mice. Methods Ischemic stroke was induced by transient occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO) followed by reperfusion. In some experiments, splenectomies were performed 2 weeks prior to MCAO. Animals were randomly assigned to sham and MCAO groups treated subcutaneously with vehicle or simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day). Brain infarction, neurological function, brain interferon-γ expression, splenic atrophy and apoptosis, and lung infection were examined. Results Simvastatin reduced stroke-induced spleen atrophy and splenic apoptosis via increased mitochrondrial anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression and decreased pro-apoptotic Bax translocation from cytosol into mitochondria. Splenectomy reduced brain interferon-γ (3d) and infarct size (5d) after stroke and these effects were reversed by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. Simvastatin inhibited brain interferon-γ (3d) and reduced infarct volume and neurological deficits (5d) after stroke, and these protective effects were observed not only in naïve stroke mice but also in splenectomied stroke mice adoptively transferred with splenocytes. Simvastatin also decreased the stroke-associated lung susceptibility to spontaneous bacterial infection. Conclusions Results provide the first direct experimental evidence that simvastatin ameliorates stroke-induced peripheral immunodepression by attenuating spleen atrophy and lung bacterial infection. These findings contribute to a better understanding of beneficial effects of statins in the treatment of stroke. PMID:23391769

  5. Novel experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection model mimicking long-term host–pathogen interactions in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    MOSER, CLAUS; VAN GENNIP, MARIA; BJARNSHOLT, THOMAS; JENSEN, PETER ØSTRUP; LEE, BAOLERI; HOUGEN, HANS PETTER; CALUM, HENRIK; CIOFU, OANA; GIVSKOV, MICHAEL; MOLIN, SØREN; HØIBY, NIELS

    2009-01-01

    The dominant cause of premature death in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) is chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chronic lung infection often lasts for decades with just one clone. However, as a result of inflammation, antibiotic treatment and different niches in the lungs, the clone undergoes significant genetic changes, resulting in diversifying geno- and phenotypes. Such an adaptation may generate different host responses. To experimentally reflect the year-long chronic lung infection in CF, groups of BALB/c mice were infected with clonal isolates from different periods (1980, 1988, 1997, 1999 and 2003) of the chronic lung infection of one CF patient using the seaweed alginate embedment model. The results showed that the non-mucoid clones reduced their virulence over time, resulting in faster clearing of the bacteria from the lungs, improved pathology and reduced pulmonary production of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In contrast, the mucoid clones were more virulent and virulence increased with time, resulting in impaired pulmonary clearing of the latest clone, severe inflammation and increased pulmonary MIP-2 and G-CSF production. In conclusion, adaptation of P. aeruginosa in CF is reflected by changed ability to establish lung infection and results in distinct host responses to mucoid and non-mucoid phenotypes. PMID:19239431

  6. Paragonimus westermani infection in lung: A confounding diagnostic entity

    PubMed Central

    Kalhan, Shivani; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Sonia; Kakria, Neha; Dudani, Sharmila; Gupta, Anshu

    2015-01-01

    Paragonimiasis is a food-borne parasitic zoonosis caused by the genus Paragonimus. Fresh water snails, crabs, and crayfish are the first and second intermediate hosts, respectively. Humans acquire this infection by ingesting uncooked/undercooked crustaceans. Laboratory diagnosis of Paragonimiasis is done by demonstration of ova in the sputum/feces/pleural fluid or by serology. A case of pulmonary Paragonimiasis is presented herewith; the patient having been diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis earlier. The aim of this presentation is to highlight this entity so that it is considered in the differential diagnosis in a case of hemoptysis. PMID:25983414

  7. Lung Function in South African Adolescents Infected Perinatally with HIV and Treated Long-Term with Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Githinji, Leah Nyawira; Gray, Diane M; Hlengwa, Sipho; Myer, Landon; Zar, Heather J

    2017-05-01

    Lung disease is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in HIV-infected adolescents, but there is limited information on the spectrum of lung function impairment in adolescents on antiretroviral therapy. To investigate lung function in HIV-infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in the Cape Town Adolescent Antiretroviral Cohort (Cape Town, South Africa). A total of 515 South African adolescents, aged 9-14 years, stable on antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months, underwent baseline lung function testing. Measures included spirometry, nitrogen multiple-breath washout, forced oscillation technique, 6-minute walk test, single-breath carbon monoxide diffusion testing, and bronchodilator response testing. A comparator group of 110 age- and ethnicity-matched HIV-uninfected adolescents was also tested. For the HIV-infected adolescents (mean [SD] age 12 [1.6] years, 52% male), the median (interquartile range) duration of antiretroviral therapy was 7.6 (4.6-9.2) years. The median (interquartile range) nadir CD4 was 510.5 (274-903) cells/mm(3). HIV-infected adolescents had significantly lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide, respiratory system compliance, and functional residual capacity than HIV-uninfected adolescents (P < 0.05 for all associations). HIV-infected adolescents had higher airway resistance and lung clearance index than HIV-uninfected adolescents (P < 0.05 for all associations). Although generally small in magnitude, these differences remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, and height. In addition, age, sex, height, and history of past lower respiratory tract infection or pulmonary tuberculosis were associated with reduced lung function. Perinatally infected South African HIV-infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy have lower lung function than uninfected adolescents. Prior lower respiratory tract infection or pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with lower lung function.

  8. Treatment and prevention of cytomegalovirus infection in heart and lung transplantation: an update.

    PubMed

    Potena, Luciano; Solidoro, Paolo; Patrucco, Filippo; Borgese, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Heart and lung transplantation are standard therapeutic strategies to improve survival and quality of life in selected patients with end-stage heart or lung diseases. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one the most clinically relevant and frequent post-transplant infectious agents, which may cause direct acute syndromes, and chronic indirect graft-related injury. Despite effective antiviral drugs being available to prevent and treat CMV infection, due to the immunosuppression burden and the specific characteristics of thoracic grafts, CMV infection remains a major clinical problem in heart and lung transplant recipients. We performed an extensive literature search focused on studies specifically including heart or lung transplantation, when available, or kidney transplant recipients when data on thoracic transplants were not available. We discuss the pros and cons supporting the use of currently available drugs and strategies for CMV prevention and treatment, highlighting current unmet needs. While (Val)Ganciclovir remains the cornerstone of anti-CMV therapy, prolonged universal prophylaxis may expose a large number of patients to an excess of drug toxicity. Additional drugs with lower toxicity may be available in the context of anti-CMV prophylaxis, and effective CMV-risk stratification, by means of novel immune monitoring assays, which may help to customize the therapeutic approach.

  9. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed. PMID:24289102

  10. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  11. Sequence specific binding of chlamydial histone H1-like protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, R; Allen, M; Bradbury, E M; Wenman, W M

    1996-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the few prokaryotic organisms known to contain proteins that bear homology to eukaryotic histone H1. Changes in macromolecular conformation of DNA mediated by the histone H1-like protein (Hc1) appear to regulate stage specific differentiation. We have developed a cross-linking immunoprecipitation protocol to examine in vivo protein-DNA interaction by immune precipitating chlamydial Hc1 cross linked to DNA. Our results strongly support the presence of sequence specific binding sites on the chlamydial plasmid and hc1 gene upstream of its open reading frame. The preferential binding sites were mapped to 520 bp BamHI-XhoI and 547 bp BamHI-DraI DNA fragments on the plasmid and hc1 respectively. Comparison of these two DNA sequences using Bestfit program has identified a 24 bp region with >75% identity that is unique to the chlamydial genome. Double-stranded DNA prepared by annealing complementary oligonucleotides corresponding to the conserved 24 bp region bind Hc1, in contrast to control sequences with similar A+T ratios. Further, Hc1 binds to DNA in a strand specific fashion, with preferential binding for only one strand. The site specific affinity to plasmid DNA was also demonstrated by atomic force microscopy data images. Binding was always followed by coiling, shrinking and aggregation of the affected DNA. Very low protein-DNA ratio was required if incubations were carried out in solution. However, if DNA was partially immobilized on mica substrate individual strands with dark foci were still visible even after the addition of excess Hc1. PMID:8760883

  12. Effect of a plant polyphenol-rich extract on the lung protease activities of influenza-virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Serkedjieva, Julia; Toshkova, Reneta; Antonova-Nikolova, Stefka; Stefanova, Tsvetanka; Teodosieva, Ani; Ivanova, Iskra

    2007-01-01

    Influenza infection was induced in white mice by intranasal inoculation of the virus A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2). The lung protease and the protease-inhibitory activities were followed for 9 days after infection. The intranasal application of a polyphenol-rich extract (PC) isolated from Geranium sanguineum L. induced a continuous rise in the anti-protease activity but did not cause substantial changes in the lung protease activity of healthy mice. Influenza virus infection triggered a slight reduction in protease activity in the lungs at 5 and 48 h post infection (p.i.) and a marked increase at 24 h and 6 day p.i.. Protease inhibition in the lungs was reduced at 24 and 48 h p.i. and an increase was observed at 5 h and 6 and 9 days p.i.. PC treatment brought both activities to normal levels. The restoration of the examined parameters was consistent with a prolongation of mean survival time and reduction of mortality rate, infectious virus titre and lung consolidation. PC reinstated superoxide production by alveolar macrophages and increased their number in virus-infected mice. The favourable effect on the protease and the protease-inhibitory activities in the lungs of influenza-virus-infected mice apparently contributes to the overall protective effect of PC in the murine experimental influenza A/Aichi infection. The antiviral effect of the individual constituents was evaluated.

  13. High frequency of hypermutable Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis lung infection.

    PubMed

    Oliver, A; Cantón, R; Campo, P; Baquero, F; Blázquez, J

    2000-05-19

    The lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are chronically infected for years by one or a few lineages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These bacterial populations adapt to the highly compartmentalized and anatomically deteriorating lung environment of CF patients, as well as to the challenges of the immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. These selective conditions are precisely those that recent theoretical studies predict for the evolution of mechanisms that augment the rate of variation. Determination of spontaneous mutation rates in 128 P. aeruginosa isolates from 30 CF patients revealed that 36% of the patients were colonized by a hypermutable (mutator) strain that persisted for years in most patients. Mutator strains were not found in 75 non-CF patients acutely infected with P. aeruginosa. This investigation also reveals a link between high mutation rates in vivo and the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  14. The innate immune system of the perinatal lung and responses to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Derscheid, R J; Ackermann, M R

    2013-09-01

    The response of the preterm and newborn lung to airborne pathogens, particles, and other insults is initially dependent on innate immune responses since adaptive responses may not fully mature and require weeks for sufficient responses to antigenic stimuli. Foreign material and microbial agents trigger soluble, cell surface, and cytoplasmic receptors that activate signaling cascades that invoke release of surfactant proteins, defensins, interferons, lactoferrin, oxidative products, and other innate immune substances that have antimicrobial activity, which can also influence adaptive responses. For viral infections such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the pulmonary innate immune responses has an essential role in defense as there are no fully effective vaccines or therapies for RSV infections of humans and reinfections are common. Understanding the innate immune response by the preterm and newborn lung may lead to preventive strategies and more effective therapeutic regimens.

  15. Cystic fibrosis lung microbiome: opportunities to reconsider management of airway infection.

    PubMed

    Caverly, Lindsay J; Zhao, Jiangchao; LiPuma, John J

    2015-10-01

    The importance of infection in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has been long recognized, and the use of antibiotics targeting bacteria identified in cultures of respiratory specimens has played a critical role in improving outcomes for individuals with CF. Over the past ∼15 years, the use of culture-independent methods to assess airway microbiology in CF has revealed complex and dynamic CF airway bacterial communities. Recent areas of investigation of the CF lung microbiome have included exploring how bacterial community structures change over time, particularly with respect to disease progression or pulmonary exacerbation, and in response to antibiotic therapies. This review will discuss what has been learned from these studies as well as how these findings offer opportunities to further refine management of CF airway infection.

  16. Allergic Airway Inflammation Decreases Lung Bacterial Burden following Acute Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection in a Neutrophil- and CCL8-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Moore, Martin L.; Boyd, Kelli L.; Kolls, Jay K.

    2014-01-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity. PMID:24958709

  17. Allergic airway inflammation decreases lung bacterial burden following acute Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in a neutrophil- and CCL8-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Dulek, Daniel E; Newcomb, Dawn C; Goleniewska, Kasia; Cephus, Jaqueline; Zhou, Weisong; Reiss, Sara; Toki, Shinji; Ye, Fei; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Sherrill, Taylor P; Blackwell, Timothy S; Moore, Martin L; Boyd, Kelli L; Kolls, Jay K; Peebles, R Stokes

    2014-09-01

    The Th17 cytokines interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-17F, and IL-22 are critical for the lung immune response to a variety of bacterial pathogens, including Klebsiella pneumoniae. Th2 cytokine expression in the airways is a characteristic feature of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. The Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 diminish ex vivo and in vivo IL-17A protein expression by Th17 cells. To determine the effect of IL-4 and IL-13 on IL-17-dependent lung immune responses to acute bacterial infection, we developed a combined model in which allergic airway inflammation and lung IL-4 and IL-13 expression were induced by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge prior to acute lung infection with K. pneumoniae. We hypothesized that preexisting allergic airway inflammation decreases lung IL-17A expression and airway neutrophil recruitment in response to acute K. pneumoniae infection and thereby increases the lung K. pneumoniae burden. As hypothesized, we found that allergic airway inflammation decreased the number of K. pneumoniae-induced airway neutrophils and lung IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 expression. Despite the marked reduction in postinfection airway neutrophilia and lung expression of Th17 cytokines, allergic airway inflammation significantly decreased the lung K. pneumoniae burden and postinfection mortality. We showed that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden was independent of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17A and partially dependent on IL-13 and STAT6. Additionally, we demonstrated that the decreased lung K. pneumoniae burden associated with allergic airway inflammation was both neutrophil and CCL8 dependent. These findings suggest a novel role for CCL8 in lung antibacterial immunity against K. pneumoniae and suggest new mechanisms of orchestrating lung antibacterial immunity.

  18. In situ growth rates and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in chronic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Haagensen, Janus A J; Jelsbak, Lars; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Sternberg, Claus; Høiby, Niels; Molin, Søren

    2008-04-01

    The growth dynamics of bacterial pathogens within infected hosts are a fundamental but poorly understood feature of most infections. We have focused on the in situ distribution and growth characteristics of two prevailing and transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones that have caused chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients for more than 20 years. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) directly on sputum specimens to examine the spatial distribution of the infecting P. aeruginosa cells. Mucoid variants were present in sputum as cell clusters surrounded by an extracellular matrix, whereas nonmucoid variants were present mainly as dispersed cells. To obtain estimates of the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in CF lungs, we used quantitative FISH to indirectly measure growth rates of bacteria in sputum samples (reflecting the in vivo lung conditions). The concentration of rRNA in bacteria isolated from sputa was measured and correlated with the rRNA contents of the same bacteria growing in vitro at defined rates. The results showed that most cells were actively growing with doubling times of between 100 and 200 min, with some growing even faster. Only a small stationary-phase subpopulation seemed to be present in sputa. This was found for both mucoid and nonmucoid variants despite their different organizations in sputum. The results suggest that the bacterial population may be confronted with selection forces that favor optimized growth activities. This scenario constitutes a new perspective on the adaptation and evolution of P. aeruginosa during chronic infections in CF patients in particular and on long-term infections in general.

  19. Disseminated Burkholderia gladioli infection in a lung transplant recipient with underlying hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, G R; Wickes, B L; Herrera, M L; Haman, T C; Lewis, J S; Jorgensen, J H

    2011-12-01

    Burkholderia gladioli is difficult to definitively identify within the laboratory using phenotypic testing alone. We describe a case of recurrent B. gladioli infection in a lung transplant recipient with underlying hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome, discuss the difficulties encountered with laboratory identification, provide a review of the methodology required for definitive identification, and discuss potential pathophysiologic mechanisms in this patient responsible for the difficulty in treatment. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Early diagnosis of Ehrlichia ewingii infection in a lung transplant recipient by peripheral blood smear.

    PubMed

    Regunath, Hariharan; Rojas-Moreno, Christian; Olano, Juan P; Hammer, Richard D; Salzer, William

    2017-04-01

    Ehrlichiosis in lung transplant (LT) recipients is associated with severe outcomes. Ehrlichia ewingii is a less frequent cause of symptomatic ehrlichiosis, characterized by cytoplasmic inclusions (morulae) within circulating neutrophils. We report a case of E. ewingii infection in an LT recipient diagnosed promptly by blood smear exam and confirmed with molecular studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. DYNC2H1 mutation causes Jeune syndrome and recurrent lung infections associated with ciliopathy.

    PubMed

    Emiralioglu, Nagehan; Wallmeier, Julia; Olbrich, Heike; Omran, Heymut; Ozcelik, Ugur

    2017-03-03

    Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy, also known as Jeune syndrome, is included in a group of syndromic skeletal ciliopathies associated with mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in the formation or function of motile cilia. Herein, we report a 6-mo-old male admitted to hospital with recurrent lung infections, thoracic dystrophy, and respiratory distress that was diagnosed as Jeune syndrome; DYNC2H1 mutation was detected via genetic analysis and ciliary dysfunction was noted via high-speed video microscopy.

  2. Cutaneous infection with Alternaria triticina in a Bilateral lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    González-Vela, M C; Armesto, S; Unda-Villafuerte, F; Val-Bernal, J F

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old man who was receiving immunosuppressive therapy for a bilateral lung transplant and presented with a crusted, violaceous plaque on the left hand. Based on histopathology and microbiological culture the patient was diagnosed with infection by Alternaria species. Treatment with itraconazole led to complete resolution of the skin lesion. Forty months later he developed four reddish, nodular, skin lesions on the left leg. Analysis of a biopsy from one of these lesions using histopathologic and molecular techniques identified a mold that shared 98% homology with a strain of Alternaria triticina. Alternaria species belong to a group of dematiaceous fungi that cause opportunistic infections in humans. The incidence of these infections is increasing, mainly in transplant centers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a human infection caused by A. triticina. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Intrinsic and environmental mutagenesis drive diversification and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chronic lung infections.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Oliver, Antonio; Blázquez, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile opportunistic pathogen causing a wide variety of hospital-acquired acute infections in immunocompromised patients as well as chronic respiratory infections in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis or other chronic respiratory diseases. Several traits contribute to its ability to colonize and persist in the lungs of chronically infected patients, including development of high resistance to antimicrobials and hypermutability, biofilm growth, and alginate hyperproduction, or a customized pathogenicity, which may include the loss of classical virulence factors and metabolic changes. Here we argue that a combination of both intrinsic and environmental mutagenesis leads to a high number of mutant variants in the population. The conducive environment then triggers a positive feedback loop leading to adaptation and persistence of P. aeruginosa, rendering these chronic infections almost impossible to eradicate.

  4. IL-10 regulates viral lung immunopathology during acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Loebbermann, Jens; Schnoeller, Corinna; Thornton, Hannah; Durant, Lydia; Sweeney, Nathan P; Schuijs, Martijn; O'Garra, Anne; Johansson, Cecilia; Openshaw, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL-) 10 is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad immunosuppressive functions, particularly at mucosal sites such as the intestine and lung. Here we demonstrate that infection of BALB/c mice with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induced IL-10 production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the airways at later time points (e.g. day 8); a proportion of these cells also co-produced IFN-γ. Furthermore, RSV infection of IL-10(-/-) mice resulted in more severe disease with enhanced weight loss, delayed recovery and greater cell infiltration of the respiratory tract without affecting viral load. In addition, IL-10(-/-) mice had a pronounced airway neutrophilia and heightened levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Notably, the proportion of lung T cells producing IFN-γ was enhanced, suggesting that IL-10 may act in an autocrine manner to dampen effector T cell responses. Similar findings were made in mice treated with anti-IL-10R antibody and infected with RSV. Therefore, IL-10 inhibits disease and inflammation in mice infected with RSV, especially during recovery from infection.

  5. [Lung diseases among HIV infected patients admitted to the "Instituto Nacional del Torax" in Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Chernilo, Sara; Trujillo, Sergio; Kahn, Mariana; Paredes, Mónica; Echevarría, Ghislaine; Sepúlveda, Claudia

    2005-05-01

    Pulmonary diseases are common among HIV infected patients. The prevalence of the different diseases varies greatly. To identify the different pulmonary diseases that affect a Chilean population of HIV infected patients and to identify factors associated with in hospital mortality. Retrospective review of the clinical records of all HIV infected patients with lung diseases discharged from our institution during a period of 3.5 years. Collection of demographic and biomedical data. One hundred seventy one patients (aged 35.7 years, 86% men) had 236 episodes of lung diseases. Only 13.5% of the patients were receiving antiretroviral therapy and 18% were on pneumocystis prophylaxis. Infectious diseases accounted for 87% of the discharges, neoplasm for 5.1%. Pneumocystis jirovecii infection was responsible for 37.7% of the episodes, community acquired pneumonia was seen in 24.1% and mycobacterial diseases in 14.4%. Two or more conditions were present in 13.6%. Death during hospital stay occurred in 19.5%. Multivariate analysis identified pneumothorax as the only significant independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, while nosocomial pneumonia was the only predictor of death among patients with non-pneumocystis pulmonary diseases. Infectious diseases were the main cause of hospitalization among Chilean HIV infected patients. Mortality among these patients remains high. Appropriate antiretroviral therapy and prophylaxis may alter pulmonary disease prevalence in the future. Every effort should be made to avoid the development of pneumothorax and nosocomial pneumonia.

  6. Innate lymphoid cells: the role in respiratory infections and lung tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Głobińska, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2017-10-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) represent a diverse family of cells of the innate immune system, which play an important role in regulation of tissue homeostasis, immunity and inflammation. Emerging evidence has highlighted the importance of ILCs in both protective immunity to respiratory infections and their pathological roles in the lungs. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge, interpret and integrate it into broader perspective, enabling greater insight into the role of ILCs in respiratory diseases. Areas covered: In this review we highlighted the role of ILCs in the lungs, citing the most recent studies in this area. PubMed searches (2004- July 2017) were conducted using the term 'innate lymphoid cells respiratory viral infections' in combination with other relevant terms including various respiratory viruses. Expert commentary: Since studies of ILCs have opened new areas of investigation, understanding the role of ILCs in respiratory infections may help to clarify the mechanisms underlying viral-induced exacerbations of lung diseases, providing the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. Potential therapeutic targets have already been identified. So far, the most promising strategy is cytokine-targeting, although further clinical trials are needed to verify its effectiveness.

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulates Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication and Lung Pathogenesis during Infection.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Janyra A; León, Miguel A; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Canedo-Marroquín, Gisela; Riquelme, Sebastían A; Salazar-Echegarai, Francisco J; Blancou, Phillipe; Simon, Thomas; Anegon, Ignacio; Lay, Margarita K; González, Pablo A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2017-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children. The development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic antiviral drugs against hRSV is imperative to control the burden of disease in the susceptible population. In this study, we examined the effects of inducing the activity of the host enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on hRSV replication and pathogenesis on lung inflammation induced by this virus. Our results show that after hRSV infection, HO-1 induction with metalloporphyrin cobalt protoporphyrin IX significantly reduces the loss of body weight due to hRSV-induced disease. Further, HO-1 induction also decreased viral replication and lung inflammation, as evidenced by a reduced neutrophil infiltration into the airways, with diminished cytokine and chemokine production and reduced T cell function. Concomitantly, upon cobalt protoporphyrin IX treatment, there is a significant upregulation in the production of IFN-α/β mRNAs in the lungs. Furthermore, similar antiviral and protective effects occur by inducing the expression of human HO-1 in MHC class II(+) cells in transgenic mice. Finally, in vitro data suggest that HO-1 induction can modulate the susceptibility of cells, especially the airway epithelial cells, to hRSV infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Influenza Infection in Mice Induces Accumulation of Lung Mast Cells through the Recruitment and Maturation of Mast Cell Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarnegar, Behdad; Mendez-Enriquez, Erika; Westin, Annika; Söderberg, Cecilia; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Grönvik, Kjell-Olov; Hallgren, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are powerful immune cells that mature in the peripheral tissues from bone marrow (BM)-derived mast cell progenitors (MCp). Accumulation of MCs in lung compartments where they are normally absent is thought to enhance symptoms in asthma. The enrichment of lung MCs is also observed in mice subjected to models of allergic airway inflammation. However, whether other types of lung inflammation trigger increased number of MCp, which give rise to MCs, is unknown. Here, mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza A was used as a model of respiratory virus infection. Intranasal administration of the virus induced expression of VCAM-1 on the lung vascular endothelium and an extensive increase in integrin β7hi lung MCp. Experiments were performed to distinguish whether the influenza-induced increase in the number of lung MCp was triggered mainly by recruitment or in situ cell proliferation. A similar proportion of lung MCp from influenza-infected and PBS control mice were found to be in a proliferative state. Furthermore, BM chimeric mice were used in which the possibility of influenza-induced in situ cell proliferation of host MCp was prevented. Influenza infection in the chimeric mice induced a similar number of lung MCp as in normal mice. These experiments demonstrated that recruitment of MCp to the lung is the major mechanism behind the influenza-induced increase in lung MCp. Fifteen days post-infection, the influenza infection had elicited an immature MC population expressing intermediate levels of integrin β7, which was absent in controls. At the same time point, an increased number of toluidine blue+ MCs was detected in the upper central airways. When the inflammation was resolved, the MCs that accumulated in the lung upon influenza infection were gradually lost. In summary, our study reveals that influenza infection induces a transient accumulation of lung MCs through the recruitment and maturation of MCp. We speculate that temporary augmented numbers of lung MCs

  9. A murine model of early Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung disease with transition to chronic infection

    PubMed Central

    Bayes, H. K.; Ritchie, N.; Irvine, S.; Evans, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) remains an important pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease as well as non-CF bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive airways disease. Initial infections are cleared but chronic infection with mucoid strains ensues in the majority of CF patients and specific interventions to prevent this critical infection transition are lacking. The PA bead model has been widely used to study pulmonary P.aeruginosa infection but has limitations in animal husbandry and in accurately mimicking human disease. We have developed an adapted agar bead murine model using a clinical mucoid strain that demonstrates the key features of transition from transitory to chronic airways infection. Infected animals show very limited acute morbidity and mortality, but undergo infection-related weight loss and neutrophilic inflammation, development of anti-pseudomonal antibodies, variable bacterial clearance, endobronchial infection and microbial adaptation with PA small colony variants. We anticipate this model will allow research into the host and microbial factors governing this critical period in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary pathogenesis when transition to chronicity is occurring. PMID:27804985

  10. T-bet Regulates Immunity to Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Infection, Particularly in Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Amanda A.; Foreman, Oded; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of the transcription factor T-bet is correlated with the strength of protection against secondary challenge with the live vaccine strain (LVS) of Francisella tularensis. Thus, to determine if this mediator had direct consequences in immunity to LVS, we examined its role in infection. Despite substantial in vivo gamma interferon (IFN-γ) levels, T-bet-knockout (KO) mice infected intradermally (i.d.) or intranasally (i.n.) with LVS succumbed to infection with doses 2 log units less than those required for their wild-type (WT) counterparts, and exhibited significantly increased bacterial burdens in the lung and spleen. Lungs of LVS-infected T-bet-KO mice contained fewer lymphocytes and more neutrophils and interleukin-17 than WT mice. LVS-vaccinated T-bet-KO mice survived lethal LVS intraperitoneal secondary challenge but not high doses of LVS i.n. challenge, independently of the route of vaccination. Immune T lymphocytes from the spleens of i.d. LVS-vaccinated WT or KO mice controlled intracellular bacterial replication in an in vitro coculture system, but cultures with T-bet-KO splenocyte supernatants contained less IFN-γ and increased amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, immune T-bet-KO lung lymphocytes were greatly impaired in controlling intramacrophage growth of LVS; this functional defect is the likely mechanism underpinning the lack of respiratory protection. Taken together, T-bet is important in host resistance to primary LVS infection and i.n. secondary challenge. Thus, T-bet represents a true, useful correlate for immunity to LVS. PMID:24421047

  11. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Lane, B Josh; Mutchler, Charla; Al Khodor, Souhaila; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein). TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  12. A 3D Human Lung Tissue Model for Functional Studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Braian, Clara; Svensson, Mattias; Brighenti, Susanna; Lerm, Maria; Parasa, Venkata R.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still holds a major threat to the health of people worldwide, and there is a need for cost-efficient but reliable models to help us understand the disease mechanisms and advance the discoveries of new treatment options. In vitro cell cultures of monolayers or co-cultures lack the three-dimensional (3D) environment and tissue responses. Herein, we describe an innovative in vitro model of a human lung tissue, which holds promise to be an effective tool for studying the complex events that occur during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). The 3D tissue model consists of tissue-specific epithelial cells and fibroblasts, which are cultured in a matrix of collagen on top of a porous membrane. Upon air exposure, the epithelial cells stratify and secrete mucus at the apical side. By introducing human primary macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis to the tissue model, we have shown that immune cells migrate into the infected-tissue and form early stages of TB granuloma. These structures recapitulate the distinct feature of human TB, the granuloma, which is fundamentally different or not commonly observed in widely used experimental animal models. This organotypic culture method enables the 3D visualization and robust quantitative analysis that provides pivotal information on spatial and temporal features of host cell-pathogen interactions. Taken together, the lung tissue model provides a physiologically relevant tissue micro-environment for studies on TB. Thus, the lung tissue model has potential implications for both basic mechanistic and applied studies. Importantly, the model allows addition or manipulation of individual cell types, which thereby widens its use for modelling a variety of infectious diseases that affect the lungs. PMID:26485646

  13. Systemic Effector and Regulatory Immune Responses to Chlamydial Antigens in Trachomatous Trichiasis

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Alevtina; Horowitz, Amir; Joof, Hassan; Natividad, Angels; Tetteh, Kevin; Riley, Eleanor; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Holland, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Trachomatous trichiasis (TT) caused by repeated or chronic ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is the result of a pro-fibrotic ocular immune response. At the conjunctiva, the increased expression of both inflammatory (IL1B, TNF) and regulatory cytokines (IL10) have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We measured in vitro immune responses of peripheral blood to a number of chlamydial antigens. Peripheral blood effector cells (CD4, CD69, IFNγ, IL-10) and regulatory cells (CD4, CD25, FOXP3, CTLA4/GITR) were readily stimulated by C. trachomatis antigens but neither the magnitude (frequency or stimulation index) or the breadth and amount of cytokines produced in vitro [IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, IFNγ, and TNFα] were significantly different between TT cases and their non-diseased controls. Interestingly we observed that CD4+ T cells account for <50% of the IFNγ positive cells induced following stimulation. Further investigation in individuals selected from communities where exposure to ocular infection with C. trachomatis is endemic indicated that CD3−CD56+ (classical natural killer cells) were a major early source of IFNγ production in response to C. trachomatis elementary body stimulation and that the magnitude of this response increased with age. Future efforts to unravel the contribution of the adaptive immune response to conjunctival fibrosis should focus on the early events following infection and the interaction with innate immune mediated mechanisms of inflammation in the conjunctiva. PMID:21747780

  14. Systemic effector and regulatory immune responses to chlamydial antigens in trachomatous trichiasis.

    PubMed

    Gall, Alevtina; Horowitz, Amir; Joof, Hassan; Natividad, Angels; Tetteh, Kevin; Riley, Eleanor; Bailey, Robin L; Mabey, David C W; Holland, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    Trachomatous trichiasis (TT) caused by repeated or chronic ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis is the result of a pro-fibrotic ocular immune response. At the conjunctiva, the increased expression of both inflammatory (IL1B, TNF) and regulatory cytokines (IL10) have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We measured in vitro immune responses of peripheral blood to a number of chlamydial antigens. Peripheral blood effector cells (CD4, CD69, IFNγ, IL-10) and regulatory cells (CD4, CD25, FOXP3, CTLA4/GITR) were readily stimulated by C. trachomatis antigens but neither the magnitude (frequency or stimulation index) or the breadth and amount of cytokines produced in vitro [IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, IFNγ, and TNFα] were significantly different between TT cases and their non-diseased controls. Interestingly we observed that CD4+ T cells account for <50% of the IFNγ positive cells induced following stimulation. Further investigation in individuals selected from communities where exposure to ocular infection with C. trachomatis is endemic indicated that CD3-CD56+ (classical natural killer cells) were a major early source of IFNγ production in response to C. trachomatis elementary body stimulation and that the magnitude of this response increased with age. Future efforts to unravel the contribution of the adaptive immune response to conjunctival fibrosis should focus on the early events following infection and the interaction with innate immune mediated mechanisms of inflammation in the conjunctiva.

  15. Chlamydial conjunctivitis: prevalence and serovar distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis in adults.

    PubMed

    Petrovay, Fruzsina; Németh, István; Balázs, Andrea; Balla, Eszter

    2015-09-01

    The extragenital manifestation of Chlamydia trachomatis infection frequently results in non-specific conjunctivitis among sexually active adults. The aims of the present study were to determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis, to describe the distribution of serovars among patients with conjunctivitis and to characterize the relationship between the prevalence and patient demographics such as age and gender. A total of 245 conjunctival specimens were screened for C. trachomatis DNA targeting the plasmid gene. Serovar determination of the C. trachomatis-positive specimens was carried out by an omp1 PCR-based RFLP analysis method. Statistical analysis was done using a generalized linear model. C. trachomatis was detected in 53 cases (21.6 %) of adult conjunctivitis. Molecular genotyping differentiated seven distinct urogenital serovars, the most prevalent being serovar E (16/53), followed by F (15/53), D (6/53), K (6/53), G (4/53), H (4/53) and J (2/53). Statistical analysis showed higher C. trachomatis prevalence in the younger age groups, and this peaked at younger age in women than in men. The high prevalence of this pathogen found in ocular samples should alert ophthalmologists to focus on the role of C. trachomatis in adult conjunctivitis. The serovar distribution indicated that ocular chlamydial infections usually have a genital source. Nevertheless, conjunctivitis might be the only sign of this sexually transmitted infection. Further comparative genotyping of C. trachomatis in ocular and genital specimens might give more detailed epidemiological information about the aetiology of the disease.

  16. Mesenteric lymph duct drainage attenuates acute lung injury in rats with severe intraperitoneal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Shukun; Tsui, Naiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the hypothesis that the mesenteric lymphatic system plays an important role in acute lung injury in a rat model induced by severe intraperitoneal infection. Male Wistar rats weighing 250∼300 g were randomly divided into 3 groups and subjected to sham operation, intraperitoneal infection, or mesenteric lymphatic drainage. The activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by enzymatic assay. The endotoxin levels in plasma, lymph, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated using the limulus amoebocyte lysate reagent. The cytokines, adhesion factors, chemokines, and inflammatory factors were detected by ELISA. TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 were analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with sham-operated rats, rats with intraperitoneal infection had increased MPO and decreased DAO activity in intestinal tissues. Mesenteric lymph drainage reduced the alterations in MPO and DAO activity induced by intraperitoneal infection. The MPO activity in pulmonary tissue and the permeability of pulmonary blood vessels were also increased, which were partially reversed by mesenteric lymph drainage. The endotoxin levels in lymphatic fluid and alveolar perfusion fluid were elevated after intraperitoneal infection but decreased to control levels after lymph drainage. No alterations in the levels of plasma endotoxin were observed. The number of neutrophils was increased in BALF and lymph in the infected rats, and was also reduced after drainage. Lymph drainage also decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion factors in the plasma, lymph, and BALF, as well as the levels of TLR-4, NF-kB, and IRAK-4 in pulmonary and intestinal tissues. The mesenteric lymphatic system is the main pathway involved in early lung injury caused by severe intraperitoneal infection, in which activation of the TLR-4 signal pathway may play a role.

  17. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines in human lung epithelial cells during Rhodococcus equi infection.

    PubMed

    Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Pilares-Ortega, Lilian; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Lorena; Aranzamendi-Zaldunbide, Maitane; Padilla, Daniel; Icardo, Jose Manuel; Ramos-Vivas, Jose

    2013-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with immunosuppressed people. While the interaction of R. equi with macrophages has been comprehensively studied, little is known about its interactions with non-phagocytic cells. Here, we characterized the entry process of this bacterium into human lung epithelial cells. The invasion is inhibited by nocodazole and wortmannin, suggesting that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and microtubule cytoskeleton are important for invasion. Pre-incubation of R. equi with a rabbit anti-R. equi polyclonal antiserum resulted in a dramatic reduction in invasion. Also, the invasion process as studied by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy indicates that R. equi make initial contact with the microvilli of the A549 cells, and at the structural level, the entry process was observed to occur via a zipper-like mechanism. Infected lung epithelial cells upregulate the expression of cytokines IL-8 and IL-6 upon infection. The production of these pro-inflammatory cytokines was significantly enhanced in culture supernatants from cells infected with non-mucoid plasmid-less strains when compared with cells infected with mucoid strains. These results demonstrate that human airway epithelial cells produce pro-inflammatory mediators against R. equi isolates.

  18. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis uses Ail and YadA to circumvent neutrophils by directing Yop translocation during lung infection.

    PubMed

    Paczosa, Michelle K; Fisher, Michael L; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Mecsas, Joan

    2014-02-01

    A Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Yptb) murine model of lung infection was previously developed using the serotype III IP2666NdeI strain, which robustly colonized lungs but only sporadically disseminated to the spleen and liver. We demonstrate here that a serotype Ib Yptb strain, IP32953, colonizes the lungs at higher levels and disseminates more efficiently to the spleen and liver compared with IP2666NdeI . The role of adhesins was investigated during IP32953 lung infection by constructing isogenic Δail, Δinv, ΔpsaE and ΔyadA mutants. An IP32953ΔailΔyadA mutant initially colonized but failed to persist in the lungs and disseminate to the spleen and liver. Yptb expressing these adhesins selectively bound to and targeted neutrophils for translocation of Yops. This selective targeting was critical for virulence because persistence of the ΔailΔyadA mutant was restored following intranasal infection of neutropenic mice. Furthermore, Ail and YadA prevented killing by complement-mediated mechanisms during dissemination to and/or growth in the spleen and liver, but not in the lungs. Combined, these results demonstratethat Ail and YadA are critical, redundant virulence factors during lung infection, because they thwart neutrophils by directing Yop-translocation specifically into these cells. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Inhaled diesel engine emissions reduce bacterial clearance and exacerbate lung disease to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Harrod, Kevin S; Jaramillo, Richard J; Berger, Jennifer A; Gigliotti, Andrew P; Seilkop, Steven K; Reed, Matthew D

    2005-01-01

    Despite experimental evidence supporting an adverse role for air pollution in models of human disease, little has been done in the way of assessing the health effects of inhalation of whole mixtures from defined sources at exposure levels relevant to ambient environmental exposures. The current study assessed the impact of inhaled diesel engine emissions (DEE) in modulating clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) and the adverse effects of infection to the pulmonary epithelium. At DEE concentrations representing from high ambient to high occupational exposures, mice were exposed to DEE continuously for one week or six months (6 h/day), and subsequently infected with P.a. by intratracheal instillation. At 18 h following P.a. infection, prior exposure to DEE impaired bacterial clearance and exacerbated lung histopathology during infection. To assess the airway epithelial cell changes indicative of lung pathogenesis, markers of specific lung epithelial cell populations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both ciliated and non-ciliated airway epithelial cell numbers were decreased during P.a. infection by DEE exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the lung transcription regulator, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), was also decreased during P.a. infection by prior exposure to DEE concordant with changes in airway populations. These findings are consistent with the notion that environmental levels of DEE can decrease the clearance of P.a. and increase lung pathogenesis during pulmonary bacterial infection.

  20. SIMIAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN THE BRAIN AND LUNG LEADS TO DIFFERENTIAL TYPE I INTERFERON SIGNALING DURING ACUTE INFECTION*

    PubMed Central

    Alammar, Luna; Gama, Lucio; Clements, Janice E.

    2011-01-01

    Using an accelerated and consistent simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) pigtailed macaque model of HIV associated neurological disorders, we have demonstrated that virus enters the brain during acute infection. However, neurological symptoms do not manifest until late stages of infection, suggesting that immunological mechanisms exist within the central nervous system (CNS) that control viral replication and associated inflammation. We have shown that interferon beta, a type I interferon central to viral innate immunity, is a major cytokine present in the brain during acute infection and is responsible for limiting virus infection and inflammatory cytokine expression. However, the induction and role of interferon alpha in the CNS during acute SIV infection has never been examined in this model. In the classical model of interferon signaling, interferon beta signals through the interferon α/β receptor, leading to expression of interferon alpha. Surprisingly, although interferon beta is up regulated during acute SIV infection, we found that interferon alpha is down regulated. We demonstrate that this down regulation is coupled with a suppression of signaling molecules downstream of the interferon receptor, namely tyk2, STAT1 and IRF7, as indicated by either lack of protein phosphorylation, lack of nuclear accumulation, or transcriptional and/or translational repression. In contrast to brain, interferon alpha is up regulated in lung and accompanied by activation of tyk2 and STAT1. These data provide a novel observation that during acute SIV infection in the brain there is differential signaling through the interferon α/β receptor that fails to activate expression of interferon alpha in the brain. PMID:21368232

  1. Clinically significant mutations in HIV-infected patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Jonathan; Sigel, Carlie; Beasley, Mary Beth; Wisnivesky, Juan; Crothers, Kristina; Bauml, Joshua; Hysell, Kristen; Emu, Brinda; Borsu, Laetitia; Sigel, Keith

    2017-09-21

    Lung cancer is a major cause of death in HIV-infected (HIV+) persons. In this study, we compared the prevalence of tumour EGFR and KRAS mutations in a cohort of lung adenocarcinoma patients by HIV status. We collected data from 55 HIV+ patients with lung adenocarcinoma matched to 136 uninfected comparators. We compared the prevalence of EGFR and KRAS mutations by HIV status. We then compared survival by HIV status and by cancer mutation status among HIV+ subjects. Presence of KRAS and EGFR genetic alterations did not vary by HIV status (all P>0.1). There was no difference in overall survival by HIV status or by mutation status among HIV+ subjects. We found no major differences in the prevalence of EGFR or KRAS lung adenocarcinoma mutations by HIV status, suggesting that mutational testing should be conducted similarly regardless of the HIV status.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication 21 September 2017; doi:10.1038/bjc.2017.333 www.bjcancer.com.

  2. Human Lung Hydrolases Delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–Macrophage Interactions and the Capacity To Control Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesus; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60–80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proin-flammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis–macrophage inter-actions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection). PMID:21602490

  3. Impaired immune responses in the lungs of aged mice following influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Each year, influenza virus infection causes severe morbidity and mortality, particularly in the most susceptible groups including children, the elderly (>65 years-old) and people with chronic respiratory diseases. Among the several factors that contribute to the increased susceptibility in elderly populations are the higher prevalence of chronic diseases (e.g. diabetes) and the senescence of the immune system. Methods In this study, aged and adult mice were infected with sublethal doses of influenza virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934). Differences in weight loss, morbidity, virus titer and the kinetics of lung infiltration with cells of the innate and adaptive immune responses were analyzed. Additionally, the main cytokines and chemokines produced by these cells were also assayed. Results Compared to adult mice, aged mice had higher morbidity, lost weight more rapidly, and recovered more slowly from infection. There was a delay in the accumulation of granulocytic cells and conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), but not macrophages in the lungs of aged mice compared to adult animals. The delayed infiltration kinetics of APCs in aged animals correlated with alteration in their activation (CD40 expression), which also correlated with a delayed detection of cytokines and chemokines in lung homogenates. This was associated with retarded lung infiltration by natural killer (NK), CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, the percentage of activated (CD69+) influenza-specific and IL-2 producer CD8+ T-cells was higher in adult mice compared to aged ones. Additionally, activation (CD69+) of adult B-cells was earlier and correlated with a quicker development of neutralizing antibodies in adult animals. Conclusion Overall, alterations in APC priming and activation lead to delayed production of cytokines and chemokines in the lungs that ultimately affected the infiltration of immune cells following influenza infection. This resulted in delayed activation of the adaptive immune

  4. Aerosol treatment with MNEI suppresses bacterial proliferation in a model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection.

    PubMed

    Woods, Donald E; Cantin, André; Cooley, Jessica; Kenney, Dianne M; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2005-02-01

    Neutrophil elastase is present at high levels in airway fluid of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and is responsible for considerable inflammatory damage. Human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor (MNEI), a 42-kDa serpin protein, is an effective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3, related proteases released from inflammatory neutrophils. We hypothesized that recombinant MNEI would reduce inflammatory damage and enhance bacterial clearance from the lung in an animal model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. In vitro studies showed that MNEI causes dose-dependent inhibition of the activity of rat neutrophil elastase. Recombinant MNEI was administered daily by aerosolization to rats previously inoculated with agar beads containing P. aeruginosa to initiate chronic infection. Administered MNEI was partially recovered in lavage fluid of treated rats as a 66-kDa complex with protease indicative of in vivo inhibition of elastase or a related protease. Aerosol treatment with MNEI significantly decreased the extent of inflammatory injury, quantified as the histopathology score. MNEI, which had no bactericidal effect on P. aeruginosa in vitro, significantly enhanced clearance of bacteria from infected rat lungs. The reduction of histopathology scores and enhancement of bacterial killing were evident 6 hr after a single aerosol treatment with MNEI. These findings indicate an important function of MNEI in protecting innate antimicrobial defense. Similar results were previously obtained for aerosolized prolastin (alpha1-antitrypsin), indicating that enhanced bacterial clearance by MNEI is due to inhibition of neutrophil protease. These findings demonstrate the value of this nonantibiotic protease inhibitor as an adjunct for the treatment and prevention of the infection component of CF lung disease.

  5. Nanodiscs as a therapeutic delivery agent: inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection in the lung.

    PubMed

    Numata, Mari; Grinkova, Yelena V; Mitchell, James R; Chu, Hong Wei; Sligar, Stephen G; Voelker, Dennis R

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the application of nanotechnology to solve the difficult problem of therapeutic administration of pharmaceuticals. Nanodiscs, composed of a stable discoidal lipid bilayer encircled by an amphipathic membrane scaffold protein that is an engineered variant of the human Apo A-I constituent of high-density lipoproteins, have been a successful platform for providing a controlled lipid composition in particles that are especially useful for investigating membrane protein structure and function. In this communication, we demonstrate that nanodiscs are effective in suppressing respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infection both in vitro and in vivo when self-assembled with the minor pulmonary surfactant phospholipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG). Preparations of nanodiscs containing POPG (nPOPG) antagonized interleukin-8 production from Beas2B epithelial cells challenged by RSV infection, with an IC50 of 19.3 μg/mL. In quantitative in vitro plaque assays, nPOPG reduced RSV infection by 93%. In vivo, nPOPG suppressed inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung, as well as IFN-γ production in response to RSV challenge. nPOPG also completely suppressed the histopathological changes in lung tissue elicited by RSV and reduced the amount of virus recovered from lung tissue by 96%. The turnover rate of nPOPG was estimated to have a halftime of 60-120 minutes (m), based upon quantification of the recovery of the human Apo A-I constituent. From these data, we conclude that nPOPG is a potent antagonist of RSV infection and its inflammatory sequelae both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. An ex vivo lung model to study bronchioles infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Freya; Diggle, Stephen P

    2016-10-01

    A key aim in microbiology is to determine the genetic and phenotypic bases of bacterial virulence, persistence and antimicrobial resistance in chronic biofilm infections. This requires tractable, high-throughput models that reflect the physical and chemical environment encountered in specific infection contexts. Such models will increase the predictive power of microbiological experiments and provide platforms for enhanced testing of novel antibacterial or antivirulence therapies. We present an optimized ex vivo model of cystic fibrosis lung infection: ex vivo culture of pig bronchiolar tissue in artificial cystic fibrosis mucus. We focus on the formation of biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show highly repeatable and specific formation of biofilms that resemble clinical biofilms by a commonly studied laboratory strain and ten cystic fibrosis isolates of this key opportunistic pathogen.

  7. Dendritic cell function and pathogen-specific T cell immunity are inhibited in mice administered levonorgestrel prior to intranasal Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, Nirk E; Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D; Mei, Ao; Fan, Shumin; Gilmore, Jocelyn R; Cherpes, Thomas L

    2016-11-28

    The growing popularity of levonorgestrel (LNG)-releasing intra-uterine systems for long-acting reversible contraception provides strong impetus to define immunomodulatory properties of this exogenous progestin. In initial in vitro studies herein, we found LNG significantly impaired activation of human dendritic cell (DCs) and their capacity to promote allogeneic T cell proliferation. In follow-up studies in a murine model of intranasal Chlamydia trachomatis infection, we analogously found that LNG treatment prior to infection dramatically reduced CD40 expression in DCs isolated from draining lymph nodes at 2 days post infection (dpi). At 12 dpi, we also detected significantly fewer CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the lungs of LNG-treated mice. This inhibition of DC activation and T cell expansion in LNG-treated mice also delayed chlamydial clearance and the resolution of pulmonary inflammation. Conversely, administering agonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody to LNG-treated mice at 1 dpi restored lung T cell numbers and chlamydial burden at 12 dpi to levels seen in infected controls. Together, these studies reveal that LNG suppresses DC activation and function, and inhibits formation of pathogen-specific T cell immunity. They also highlight the need for studies that define in vivo effects of LNG use on human host response to microbial pathogens.

  8. Dendritic cell function and pathogen-specific T cell immunity are inhibited in mice administered levonorgestrel prior to intranasal Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Quispe Calla, Nirk E.; Vicetti Miguel, Rodolfo D.; Mei, Ao; Fan, Shumin; Gilmore, Jocelyn R.; Cherpes, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The growing popularity of levonorgestrel (LNG)-releasing intra-uterine systems for long-acting reversible contraception provides strong impetus to define immunomodulatory properties of this exogenous progestin. In initial in vitro studies herein, we found LNG significantly impaired activation of human dendritic cell (DCs) and their capacity to promote allogeneic T cell proliferation. In follow-up studies in a murine model of intranasal Chlamydia trachomatis infection, we analogously found that LNG treatment prior to infection dramatically reduced CD40 expression in DCs isolated from draining lymph nodes at 2 days post infection (dpi). At 12 dpi, we also detected significantly fewer CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lungs of LNG-treated mice. This inhibition of DC activation and T cell expansion in LNG-treated mice also delayed chlamydial clearance and the resolution of pulmonary inflammation. Conversely, administering agonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody to LNG-treated mice at 1 dpi restored lung T cell numbers and chlamydial burden at 12 dpi to levels seen in infected controls. Together, these studies reveal that LNG suppresses DC activation and function, and inhibits formation of pathogen-specific T cell immunity. They also highlight the need for studies that define in vivo effects of LNG use on human host response to microbial pathogens. PMID:27892938

  9. Influenza and dengue virus co-infection impairs monocyte recruitment to the lung, increases dengue virus titers, and exacerbates pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael A; González, Karla N; Shah, Sanjana; Peña, José; Mack, Matthias; Talarico, Laura B; Polack, Fernando P; Harris, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Co-infections of influenza virus and bacteria are known to cause severe disease, but little information exists on co-infections with other acute viruses. Seasonal influenza and dengue viruses (DENV) regularly co-circulate in tropical regions. The pandemic spread of influenza virus H1N1 (hereafter H1N1) in 2009 led to additional severe disease cases that were co-infected with DENV. Here, we investigated the impact of co-infection on immune responses and pathogenesis in a new mouse model. Co-infection of otherwise sublethal doses of a Nicaraguan clinical H1N1 isolate and two days later with a virulent DENV2 strain increased systemic DENV titers and caused 90% lethality. Lungs of co-infected mice carried both viruses, developed severe pneumonia, and expressed a unique pattern of host mRNAs, resembling only partial responses against infection with either virus alone. A large number of monocytes were recruited to DENV-infected but not to co-infected lungs, and depletion and adoptive transfer experiments revealed a beneficial role of monocytes. Our study shows that co-infection with influenza and DENV impairs host responses, which fail to control DENV titers and instead, induce severe lung damage. Further, our findings identify key inflammatory pathways and monocyte function as targets for future therapies that may limit immunopathology in co-infected patients.

  10. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  11. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  12. A20 Deficiency in Lung Epithelial Cells Protects against Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vereecke, Lars; Mc Guire, Conor; Sze, Mozes; Schuijs, Martijn J.; Willart, Monique; Itati Ibañez, Lorena; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beyaert, Rudi; Saelens, Xavier; van Loo, Geert

    2016-01-01

    A20 negatively regulates multiple inflammatory signalling pathways. We here addressed the role of A20 in club cells (also known as Clara cells) of the bronchial epithelium in their response to influenza A virus infection. Club cells provide a niche for influenza virus replication, but little is known about the functions of these cells in antiviral immunity. Using airway epithelial cell-specific A20 knockout (A20AEC-KO) mice, we show that A20 in club cells critically controls innate immune responses upon TNF or double stranded RNA stimulation. Surprisingly, A20AEC-KO mice are better protected against influenza A virus challenge than their wild type littermates. This phenotype is not due to decreased viral replication. Instead host innate and adaptive immune responses and lung damage are reduced in A20AEC-KO mice. These attenuated responses correlate with a dampened cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response at later stages during infection, indicating that A20AEC-KO mice are better equipped to tolerate Influenza A virus infection. Expression of the chemokine CCL2 (also named MCP-1) is particularly suppressed in the lungs of A20AEC-KO mice during later stages of infection. When A20AEC-KO mice were treated with recombinant CCL2 the protective effect was abrogated demonstrating the crucial contribution of this chemokine to the protection of A20AEC-KO mice to Influenza A virus infection. Taken together, we propose a mechanism of action by which A20 expression in club cells controls inflammation and antiviral CTL responses in response to influenza virus infection. PMID:26815999

  13. Comparison of four lung scoring systems for the assessment of the pathological outcomes derived from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae experimental infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, four lung lesion scoring methods (Slaughterhouse Pleurisy Evaluation System [SPES], Consolidation Lung Lesion Score [LLS], Image analyses [IA] and Ratio of lung weight/body weight [LW/BW]) were compared for the assessment of the different pathological outcomes derived from an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) experimental infection model. Moreover, pathological data was coupled with clinical (fever, inappetence and clinical score), production (average daily weigh gain [ADWG]) and diagnostic (PCR, ELISA and bacterial isolation) parameters within the four infection outcomes (peracute, acute, subclinically infected and non-infected). Results From the 61 inoculated animals, 9 were classified as peracute (presence of severe App-like clinical signs and lesions and sudden death or euthanasia shortly after inoculation), 31 as acutely affected (presence of App-like clinical signs and lesions and survival until the end of the experiment), 12 as subclinically infected (very mild or no clinical signs but App infection confirmed) and 9 as non-infected animals (lack of App-like clinical signs and lack of evidence of App infection). A significant correlation between all lung lesion scoring systems was found with the exception of SPES score versus LW/BW. SPES showed a statistically significant association with all clinical, production and diagnostic (with the exception of PCR detection of App in the tonsil) variables assessed. LLS and IA showed similar statistically significant associations as SPES, with the exception of seroconversion against App at necropsy. In contrast, LW/BW was statistically associated only with App isolation in lungs, presence of App-like lesions and ELISA OD values at necropsy. Conclusions In conclusion, SPES, LLS and IA are economic, fast and easy-to-perform lung scoring methods that, in combination with different clinical and diagnostic parameters, allow the characterization of different outcomes after App infection. PMID

  14. In vivo ultrastructural analysis of the intimate relationship between polymorphonuclear leukocytes and the chlamydial developmental cycle.

    PubMed

    Rank, Roger G; Whittimore, Judy; Bowlin, Anne K; Wyrick, Priscilla B

    2011-08-01

    We utilized a recently developed model of intracervical infection with Chlamydia muridarum in the mouse to elicit a relatively synchronous infection during the initial developmental cycle in order to examine at the ultrastructural level the development of both the chlamydial inclusion and the onset of the inflammatory response. At 18 h after infection, only a few elementary bodies attached to cells were visible, as were an occasional intracellular intermediate body and reticulate body. By 24 h, inclusions had 2 to 5 reticulate bodies and were beginning to fuse. A few polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were already present in the epithelium in the vicinity of and directly adjacent to infected cells. By 30 h, the inclusions were larger and consisted solely of reticulate bodies, but by 36 to 42 h, they contained intermediate bodies and elementary bodies as well. Many PMNs were adjacent to or actually inside infected cells. Chlamydiae appeared to exit the cell either (i) through disintegration of the inclusion membrane and rupture of the cell, (ii) by dislodgement of the cell from the epithelium by PMNs, or (iii) by direct invasion of the infected cell by the PMNs. When PMNs were depleted, the number of released elementary bodies was significantly greater as determined both visually and by culture. Interestingly, depletion of PMNs revealed the presence of inclusions containing aberrant reticulate bodies, reminiscent of effects seen in vitro when chlamydiae are incubated with gamma interferon. In vivo evidence for the contact-dependent development hypothesis, a potential mechanism for triggering the conversion of reticulate bodies to elementary bodies, and for translocation of lipid droplets into the inclusion is also presented.

  15. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PrrF Small RNAs Regulate Iron Homeostasis during Acute Murine Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Alexandria A; Nguyen, Angela T; Brewer, Luke K; Bevere, Justin; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen A; Damron, F Heath; Barbier, Mariette; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2017-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen that requires iron for virulence. Iron homeostasis is maintained in part by the PrrF1 and PrrF2 small RNAs (sRNAs), which block the expression of iron-containing proteins under iron-depleted conditions. The PrrF sRNAs also promote the production of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum sensing molecule that activates the expression of several virulence genes. The tandem arrangement of the prrF genes allows for expression of a third sRNA, PrrH, which is predicted to regulate gene expression through its unique sequence derived from the prrF1-prrF2 intergenic (IG) sequence (the PrrHIG sequence). Previous studies showed that the prrF locus is required for acute lung infection. However, the individual functions of the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs were not determined. Here, we describe a system for differentiating PrrF and PrrH functions by deleting the PrrHIG sequence [prrF(ΔHIG)]. Our analyses of this construct indicate that the PrrF sRNAs, but not PrrH, are required for acute lung infection by P. aeruginosa Moreover, we show that the virulence defect of the ΔprrF1-prrF2 mutant is due to decreased bacterial burden during acute lung infection. In vivo analysis of gene expression in lung homogenates shows that PrrF-mediated regulation of genes for iron-containing proteins is disrupted in the ΔprrF1-prrF2 mutant during infection, while the expression of genes that mediate PrrF-regulated PQS production are not affected by prrF deletion in vivo Combined, these studies demonstrate that regulation of iron utilization plays a critical role in P. aeruginosa's ability to survive during infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Potential mechanisms underlying the acute lung dysfunction and bacterial extrapulmonary dissemination during Burkholderia cenocepacia respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic pathogen that causes lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, is associated with rapid and usually fatal lung deterioration due to necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis, a condition known as cepacia syndrome. The key bacterial determinants associated with this poor clinical outcome in CF patients are not clear. In this study, the cytotoxicity and procoagulant activity of B. cenocepacia from the ET-12 lineage, that has been linked to the cepacia syndrome, and four clinical isolates recovered from CF patients with mild clinical courses were analysed in both in vitro and in vivo assays. Methods B. cenocepacia-infected BEAS-2B epithelial respiratory cells were used to investigate the bacterial cytotoxicity assessed by the flow cytometric detection of cell staining with propidium iodide. Bacteria-induced procoagulant activity in cell cultures was assessed by a colorimetric assay and by the flow cytometric detection of tissue factor (TF)-bearing microparticles in cell culture supernatants. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) from intratracheally infected mice were assessed for bacterial proinflammatory and procoagulant activities as well as for bacterial cytotoxicity, by the detection of released lactate dehydrogenase. Results ET-12 was significantly more cytotoxic to cell cultures but clinical isolates Cl-2, Cl-3 and Cl-4 exhibited also a cytotoxic profile. ET-12 and CI-2 were similarly able to generate a TF-dependent procoagulant environment in cell culture supernatant and to enhance the release of TF-bearing microparticles from infected cells. In the in vivo assay, all bacterial isolates disseminated from the mice lungs, but Cl-2 and Cl-4 exhibited the highest rates of recovery from mice livers. Interestingly, Cl-2 and Cl-4, together with ET-12, exhibited the highest cytotoxicity. All bacteria were similarly capable of generating a procoagulant and inflammatory environment in animal lungs. Conclusion B

  17. Potential mechanisms underlying the acute lung dysfunction and bacterial extrapulmonary dissemination during Burkholderia cenocepacia respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luiz G; Assis, Maria-Cristina; Machado, Gloria-Beatriz; Assef, Ana P; Marques, Elizabeth A; Leão, Robson S; Saliba, Alessandra M; Plotkowski, Maria-Cristina

    2010-01-18

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic pathogen that causes lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, is associated with rapid and usually fatal lung deterioration due to necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis, a condition known as cepacia syndrome. The key bacterial determinants associated with this poor clinical outcome in CF patients are not clear. In this study, the cytotoxicity and procoagulant activity of B. cenocepacia from the ET-12 lineage, that has been linked to the cepacia syndrome, and four clinical isolates recovered from CF patients with mild clinical courses were analysed in both in vitro and in vivo assays. B. cenocepacia-infected BEAS-2B epithelial respiratory cells were used to investigate the bacterial cytotoxicity assessed by the flow cytometric detection of cell staining with propidium iodide. Bacteria-induced procoagulant activity in cell cultures was assessed by a colorimetric assay and by the flow cytometric detection of tissue factor (TF)-bearing microparticles in cell culture supernatants. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) from intratracheally infected mice were assessed for bacterial proinflammatory and procoagulant activities as well as for bacterial cytotoxicity, by the detection of released lactate dehydrogenase. ET-12 was significantly more cytotoxic to cell cultures but clinical isolates Cl-2, Cl-3 and Cl-4 exhibited also a cytotoxic profile. ET-12 and CI-2 were similarly able to generate a TF-dependent procoagulant environment in cell culture supernatant and to enhance the release of TF-bearing microparticles from infected cells. In the in vivo assay, all bacterial isolates disseminated from the mice lungs, but Cl-2 and Cl-4 exhibited the highest rates of recovery from mice livers. Interestingly, Cl-2 and Cl-4, together with ET-12, exhibited the highest cytotoxicity. All bacteria were similarly capable of generating a procoagulant and inflammatory environment in animal lungs. B. cenocepacia were shown to exhibit cytotoxic

  18. Unorthodox long-term aerosolized ampicillin use for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient.

    PubMed

    Máiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; Suárez, Lucrecia; Cantón, Rafael

    2009-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant cause of pulmonary colonization in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The optimal strategy of therapy in chronically infected patients with this pathogen is not yet established. We report a successful long-term aerosolized ampicillin treatment of a 14-year-old girl with chronic symptomatic S. aureus lung infection.

  19. Nodular inflammatory foci are sites of T cell priming and control of murine cytomegalovirus infection in the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Felix R; Heller, Katrin; Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten A; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Wagner, Karen; Boelter, Jasmin; Bischoff, Yvonne; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Arens, Ramon; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8(+) T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming "nodular inflammatory foci" (NIF) in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC) interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control.

  20. Nodular Inflammatory Foci Are Sites of T Cell Priming and Control of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection in the Neonatal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Felix R.; Heller, Katrin; Halle, Stephan; Keyser, Kirsten A.; Busche, Andreas; Marquardt, Anja; Wagner, Karen; Boelter, Jasmin; Bischoff, Yvonne; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Arens, Ramon; Messerle, Martin; Förster, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Neonates, including mice and humans, are highly susceptible to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. However, many aspects of neonatal CMV infections such as viral cell tropism, spatio-temporal distribution of the pathogen as well as genesis of antiviral immunity are unknown. With the use of reporter mutants of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) we identified the lung as a primary target of mucosal infection in neonatal mice. Comparative analysis of neonatal and adult mice revealed a delayed control of virus replication in the neonatal lung mucosa explaining the pronounced systemic infection and disease in neonates. This phenomenon was supplemented by a delayed expansion of CD8+ T cell clones recognizing the viral protein M45 in neonates. We detected viral infection at the single-cell level and observed myeloid cells forming “nodular inflammatory foci” (NIF) in the neonatal lung. Co-localization of infected cells within NIFs was associated with their disruption and clearance of the infection. By 2-photon microscopy, we characterized how neonatal antigen-presenting cells (APC) interacted with T cells and induced mature adaptive immune responses within such NIFs. We thus define NIFs of the neonatal lung as niches for prolonged MCMV replication and T cell priming but also as sites of infection control. PMID:24348257

  1. Chemokine Production and Leukocyte Recruitment to the Lungs of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis-Infected Mice Is Modulated by Interferon-γ

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Janeusa T.; Aliberti, Júlio C.; Campanelli, Ana P.; Livonesi, Márcia C.; Maffei, Cláudia M.L.; Ferreira, Beatriz R.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Martinez, Roberto; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2003-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a role in cell recruitment during granulomatous inflammatory reactions. Here, we evaluated the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors and their regulation by IFN-γ in the course of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb) infection in mice. We found an association between KC and MIP-1α (CCL3) production and neutrophil infiltration in the lungs of Pb-infected mice during the early acute phase of infection. High levels of RANTES/CCL5, MCP-1/CCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, and Mig/CXCL9 simultaneously with mononuclear cell infiltration in the lungs was found. In the absence of IFN-γ (GKO mice) we observed increased production of KC and MIP-1α and chronic neutrophilia. Moreover, we found a change in the chemokine receptor profiles expressed by wild-type (WT) versus GKO animals. Increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5, and low levels of CCR3 and CCR4 were observed in the lungs of Pb-infected WT mice, whereas the opposite effect was observed in the lungs of GKO mice. Consistent with these results, infected cells from WT mice preferentially migrated in response to IP-10 (CXCR3 ligand), while those from GKO mice migrated in response to eotaxin/CCL11 (CCR3 ligand). These results suggest that IFN-γ modulates the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors as well as the kind of cells that infiltrate the lungs of Pb-infected mice. PMID:12875978

  2. Understanding persistent bacterial lung infections: clinical implications informed by the biology of the microbiota and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Pragman, Alexa A.; Berger, John P.; Williams, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The infections found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis share a number of clinical similarities, the most striking of which is bacterial persistence despite the use of antibiotics. These infections have been clinically described using culture-based methods usually performed on sputum samples, and treatment has been directed towards the bacteria found in this manner. Unfortunately the clinical response to antibiotics is frequently not predictable based on these cultures, and the role of these cultured organisms in disease progression has been debated. The past 20 years have seen a revolution in the techniques used to describe bacterial populations and their growth patterns. These techniques have revealed these persistent lung infections are vastly more complicated than described by traditional, and still widely relied upon, sputum cultures. A better understanding of the initiation and evolution of these infections, and better clinical tools to describe them, will dramatically alter the way patients are cared for. While clinical tests to more accurately describe these infections are not yet available, the better appreciation of these infections afforded by current science should enlighten practitioners as to the care of their patients with these diseases. PMID:27004018

  3. The NOD/RIP2 pathway is essential for host defenses against Chlamydophila pneumoniae lung infection.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Dempsey, Paul W; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Alsabeh, Randa; Slepenkin, Anatoly V; Peterson, Ellena; Doherty, Terence M; Underhill, David; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-04-01

    Here we investigated the role of the Nod/Rip2 pathway in host responses to Chlamydophila pneumoniae-induced pneumonia in mice. Rip2(-/-) mice infected with C. pneumoniae exhibited impaired iNOS expression and NO production, and delayed neutrophil recruitment to the lungs. Levels of IL-6 and IFN-gamma levels as well as KC and MIP-2 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were significantly decreased in Rip2(-/-) mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice at day 3. Rip2(-/-) mice showed significant delay in bacterial clearance from the lungs and developed more severe and chronic lung inflammation that continued even on day 35 and led to increased mortality, whereas WT mice cleared the bacterial load, recovered from acute pneumonia, and survived. Both Nod1(-/-) and Nod2(-/-) mice also showed delayed bacterial clearance, suggesting that C. pneumoniae is recognized by both of these intracellular receptors. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that Rip2 in BM-derived cells rather than non-hematopoietic stromal cells played a key role in host responses in the lungs and clearance of C. pneumoniae. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of WT macrophages intratracheally was able to rescue the bacterial clearance defect in Rip2(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that in addition to the TLR/MyD88 pathway, the Nod/Rip2 signaling pathway also plays a significant role in intracellular recognition, innate immune host responses, and ultimately has a decisive impact on clearance of C. pneumoniae from the lungs and survival of the infectious challenge.

  4. Some characteristics of a secreted chlamydial antigen recognized by IgG from C. trachomatis patient sera.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, E S; Macdonald, A B

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis serovars release a glycolipid antigen (GLXA) into the culture supernatant during the infective cycle. This antigen is recognized by IgG isolated from humans with a natural chlamydial infection; GLXA may be a major antigenic determinant of chlamydia. It can be immunopurified by molecular shift or affinity chromatography. Silver staining of SDS-PAGE gels demonstrates a pattern of bands that is essentially the same for preparations isolated by either method. GLXA can also be extracted from mature elementary bodies (EB). These preparations show the same pattern of silver staining bands, and the major bands are immunoreactive as shown by Western blot analysis. Isoelectric focusing studies demonstrate that purified GLXA has an acidic pI. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2606506

  5. Epidemiology of invasive fungal infections in lung transplant recipients on long-term azole antifungal prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Pearlie P; Kennedy, Cassie C; Hathcock, Matthew A; Kremers, Walter K; Razonable, Raymund R

    2015-04-01

    Lung transplant recipients (LTR) at our institution receive prolonged and mostly lifelong azole antifungal (AF) prophylaxis. The impact of this prophylactic strategy on the epidemiology and outcome of invasive fungal infections (IFI) is unknown. This was a single-center, retrospective cohort study. We reviewed the medical records of all adult LTR from January 2002 to December 2011. Overall, 16.5% (15 of 91) of patients who underwent lung transplantation during this time period developed IFI. Nineteen IFI episodes were identified (eight proven, 11 probable), 89% (17 of 19) of which developed during AF prophylaxis. LTR with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were more likely to develop IFI (HR: 4.29; 95% CI: 1.15-15.91; p = 0.03). A higher hazard of mortality was observed among those who developed IFI, although this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.58-4.05]; p = 0.27). Aspergillus fumigatus was the most common cause of IFI (45%), with pulmonary parenchyma being the most common site of infection. None of our patients developed disseminated invasive aspergillosis, cryptococcal or endemic fungal infections. IFI continue to occur in LTR, and the eradication of IFI appears to be challenging even with prolonged prophylaxis. Azole resistance is uncommon despite prolonged AF exposure.

  6. Isolation and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from H37Rv infected guinea pig lungs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Libin; Ryan, Gavin J; Bhamidi, Suresh; Troudt, JoLynn; Amin, Anita; Izzo, Angelo; Lenaerts, Anne J; McNeil, Michael R; Belisle, John T; Crick, Dean C; Chatterjee, Delphi

    2014-09-01

    Evidence suggests that Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown in vivo may have a different phenotypic structure from its in vitro counterpart. In order to study the differences between in vivo and in vitro grown bacilli, it is important to establish a reliable method for isolating and purifying M. tuberculosis from infected tissue. In this study, we developed an optimal method to isolate bacilli from the lungs of infected guinea pigs, which was also shown to be applicable to the interferon-γ gene knockout mouse model. Briefly, 1) the infected lungs were thoroughly homogenized; 2) a four step enzymatic digestion was utilized to reduce the bulk of the host tissue using collagenase, DNase I and pronase E; 3) residual contamination by the host tissue debris was successfully reduced using percoll density gradient centrifugation. These steps resulted in a protocol such that relatively clean, viable bacilli can be isolated from the digested host tissue homogenate in about 50% yield. These bacilli can further be used for analytical studies of the more stable cellular components such as lipid, peptidoglycan and mycolic acid.

  7. Treatment of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Cidofovir and CMV Immune Globulin in a Lung Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Heinrike; Sester, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection after lung transplantation is associated with increased risk for pneumonitis and bronchiolitis obliterans as well as allograft rejection and opportunistic infections. Ganciclovir is the mainstay of prophylaxis and treatment but CMV infections can be unresponsive. Apart from direct antiviral drugs, CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) preparations may be considered but are only licensed for prophylaxis. A CMV-seronegative 42-year-old man with cystic fibrosis received a lung from a CMV-seropositive donor. Intravenous ganciclovir prophylaxis was delayed until day 12 due to acute postoperative renal failure and was accompanied by five doses of CMVIG (10 g). By day 16, CMV-DNA was detectable and rising; CMV-specific T-cells were undetectable. Switch from ganciclovir to foscarnet prompted a transient decrease in CMV viral load, but after increasing again to reach 3600 copies/mL foscarnet was changed to intravenous cidofovir and CMVIG was restarted. CMV load continued to fluctuate and declined slowly, whereas CMV-specific T-cells were detected five months later and increased thereafter. At last follow-up, the patient was in very good clinical condition with no evidence of bronchiolitis obliterans. No side effects of this treatment were observed. In this hard-to-treat case, the combination of cidofovir with off-label use of CMVIG contributed to a successful outcome.

  8. Pharmacodynamics of Ceftazidime and Avibactam in Neutropenic Mice with Thigh or Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Maria J.; van Mil, Anita C.; Lagarde, Claudia M.; Schuck, Virna J.; Nichols, Wright W.

    2015-01-01

    Avibactam is a new non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that shows promising restoration of ceftazidime activity against microorganisms producing Ambler class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases such as KPCs, class C β-lactamases (AmpC), and some class D enzymes. To determine optimal dosing combinations of ceftazidime-avibactam for treating infections with ceftazidime-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pharmacodynamic responses were explored in murine neutropenic thigh and lung infection models. Exposure-response relationships for ceftazidime monotherapy were determined first. Subsequently, the efficacy of adding avibactam every 2 h (q2h) or q8h to a fixed q2h dose of ceftazidime was determined in lung infection for two strains. Dosing avibactam q2h was significantly more efficacious, reducing the avibactam daily dose for static effect by factors of 2.7 and 10.1, whereas the mean percentage of the dosing interval that free drug concentrations remain above the threshold concentration of 1 mg/liter (%fT>CT 1 mg/liter) yielding bacteriostasis was similar for both regimens, with mean values of 21.6 (q2h) and 18.5 (q8h). Dose fractionation studies of avibactam in both the thigh and lung models indicated that the effect of avibactam correlated well with %fT>CT 1 mg/liter. This parameter of avibactam was further explored for four P. aeruginosa strains in the lung model and six in the thigh model. Parameter estimates of %fT>CT 1 mg/liter for avibactam ranged from 0 to 21.4% in the lung model and from 14.1 to 62.5% in the thigh model to achieve stasis. In conclusion, addition of avibactam enhanced the effect of ceftazidime, which was more pronounced at frequent dosing and well related with %fT>CT 1 mg/liter. The thigh model appeared more stringent, with higher values, ranging up to 62.5% fT>CT 1 mg/liter, required for a static effect. PMID:26525790

  9. Pharmacodynamics of Ceftazidime and Avibactam in Neutropenic Mice with Thigh or Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Berkhout, Johanna; Melchers, Maria J; van Mil, Anita C; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Lagarde, Claudia M; Schuck, Virna J; Nichols, Wright W; Mouton, Johan W

    2015-11-02

    Avibactam is a new non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that shows promising restoration of ceftazidime activity against microorganisms producing Ambler class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases such as KPCs, class C β-lactamases (AmpC), and some class D enzymes. To determine optimal dosing combinations of ceftazidime-avibactam for treating infections with ceftazidime-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, pharmacodynamic responses were explored in murine neutropenic thigh and lung infection models. Exposure-response relationships for ceftazidime monotherapy were determined first. Subsequently, the efficacy of adding avibactam every 2 h (q2h) or q8h to a fixed q2h dose of ceftazidime was determined in lung infection for two strains. Dosing avibactam q2h was significantly more efficacious, reducing the avibactam daily dose for static effect by factors of 2.7 and 10.1, whereas the mean percentage of the dosing interval that free drug concentrations remain above the threshold concentration of 1 mg/liter (%fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter) yielding bacteriostasis was similar for both regimens, with mean values of 21.6 (q2h) and 18.5 (q8h). Dose fractionation studies of avibactam in both the thigh and lung models indicated that the effect of avibactam correlated well with %fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter. This parameter of avibactam was further explored for four P. aeruginosa strains in the lung model and six in the thigh model. Parameter estimates of %fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter for avibactam ranged from 0 to 21.4% in the lung model and from 14.1 to 62.5% in the thigh model to achieve stasis. In conclusion, addition of avibactam enhanced the effect of ceftazidime, which was more pronounced at frequent dosing and well related with %fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter. The thigh model appeared more stringent, with higher values, ranging up to 62.5% fT>C(T) 1 mg/liter, required for a static effect. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. In vivo regulation of replicative Legionella pneumophila lung infection by endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Brieland, J K; Remick, D G; Freeman, P T; Hurley, M C; Fantone, J C; Engleberg, N C

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo role of endogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) in modulation of growth of Legionella pneumophila in the lung was assessed using a murine model of replicative L. pneumophila lung infection. Intratracheal inoculation of mice with L. pneumophila resulted in induction of endogenous TNF-alpha, which preceded clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Inhibition of endogenous TNF-alpha activity, via in vivo administration of TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody, or inhibition of endogenous RNIs, via administration of the nitric oxide (NO) synthetase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA), resulted in enhanced growth of L. pneumophila in the lung at > or = 3 days postinfection (when compared with untreated L. pneumophila-infected mice). Because of the similar kinetics of enhanced pulmonary growth of L. pneumophila in mice treated in vivo with either anti-TNF-alpha antibody or NMMA, the immunomodulatory effect of NO on endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung was assessed. Administration of NMMA to L. pneumophila-infected mice resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous TNF-alpha activity in the lung during replicative L. pneumophila infections in vivo. However, administration of exogenous TNF-alpha to NMMA-treated mice failed to significantly enhance clearance of L. pneumophila from the lung. Results of these studies indicate that both endogenous NO and TNF-alpha facilitate resolution of replicative L. pneumophila lung infections and that regulation of L. pneumophila replication by TNF-alpha is mediated, at least in part, by NO. PMID:7642253

  11. Immune Response in Male Guinea Pigs Infected with the Guinea Pig Inclusion Conjunctivitis Agent of Chlamydia Psittaci

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    occasionally epididymitis . About 20% of men infected with gonorrhea will have a concomitant chlamydial infection (15). Curiously, men show a lower infection...al. (18) examined the course of chlamydial induced epididymitis . When C. trachomatis, biovar MoPn, was injected into the vas deferens, the organism... epididymitis due to Chlamydia trachomatis in rats. Infect. Immun. 60:2324-2328. 19. Johnson, A. P., M. J. Hare, G. D. Wilbanks, P. Cooper, C. M. Heatherington

  12. A Biomathematical Model of Pneumococcal Lung Infection and Antibiotic Treatment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Schirm, Sibylle; Ahnert, Peter; Wienhold, Sandra; Mueller-Redetzky, Holger; Nouailles-Kursar, Geraldine; Loeffler, Markus; Witzenrath, Martin; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The outcome depends on both, proper antibiotic treatment and the effectivity of the immune response of the host. However, due to the complexity of the immunologic cascade initiated during infection, the latter cannot be predicted easily. We construct a biomathematical model of the murine immune response during infection with pneumococcus aiming at predicting the outcome of antibiotic treatment. The model consists of a number of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing dynamics of pneumococcal population, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, neutrophils and macrophages fighting the infection and destruction of alveolar tissue due to pneumococcus. Equations were derived by translating known biological mechanisms and assuming certain response kinetics. Antibiotic therapy is modelled by a transient depletion of bacteria. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to data sets derived from mice experiments of pneumococcal lung infection with and without antibiotic treatment. Time series of pneumococcal population, debris, neutrophils, activated epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes and IL-6 serum concentrations were available for this purpose. The antibiotics Ampicillin and Moxifloxacin were considered. Parameter fittings resulted in a good agreement of model and data for all experimental scenarios. Identifiability of parameters is also estimated. The model can be used to predict the performance of alternative schedules of antibiotic treatment. We conclude that we established a biomathematical model of pneumococcal lung infection in mice allowing predictions regarding the outcome of different schedules of antibiotic treatment. We aim at translating the model to the human situation in the near future.

  13. A Biomathematical Model of Pneumococcal Lung Infection and Antibiotic Treatment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schirm, Sibylle; Ahnert, Peter; Wienhold, Sandra; Mueller-Redetzky, Holger; Nouailles-Kursar, Geraldine; Loeffler, Markus; Witzenrath, Martin; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The outcome depends on both, proper antibiotic treatment and the effectivity of the immune response of the host. However, due to the complexity of the immunologic cascade initiated during infection, the latter cannot be predicted easily. We construct a biomathematical model of the murine immune response during infection with pneumococcus aiming at predicting the outcome of antibiotic treatment. The model consists of a number of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing dynamics of pneumococcal population, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, neutrophils and macrophages fighting the infection and destruction of alveolar tissue due to pneumococcus. Equations were derived by translating known biological mechanisms and assuming certain response kinetics. Antibiotic therapy is modelled by a transient depletion of bacteria. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to data sets derived from mice experiments of pneumococcal lung infection with and without antibiotic treatment. Time series of pneumococcal population, debris, neutrophils, activated epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes and IL-6 serum concentrations were available for this purpose. The antibiotics Ampicillin and Moxifloxacin were considered. Parameter fittings resulted in a good agreement of model and data for all experimental scenarios. Identifiability of parameters is also estimated. The model can be used to predict the performance of alternative schedules of antibiotic treatment. We conclude that we established a biomathematical model of pneumococcal lung infection in mice allowing predictions regarding the outcome of different schedules of antibiotic treatment. We aim at translating the model to the human situation in the near future. PMID:27196107

  14. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; He, Zhengxiang; Qin, Li; Li, Qinyan; Shi, Xibao; Zhao, Siting; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL) staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+) T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria parasite may provide a novel strategy or therapeutic vaccine vector for anti-lung cancer

  15. Antitumor Effect of Malaria Parasite Infection in a Murine Lewis Lung Cancer Model through Induction of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lili; He, Zhengxiang; Qin, Li; Li, Qinyan; Shi, Xibao; Zhao, Siting; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL) staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. Conclusions/Significance Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria parasite may provide a

  16. Genome-Wide Identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae Fitness Genes during Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Paul; Deornellas, Valerie; Mu, Qiao; Zhao, Lili; Wu, Weisheng; Cavalcoli, James D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is an urgent public health threat because of resistance to carbapenems, antibiotics of last resort against Gram-negative bacterial infections. Despite the fact that K. pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia in hospitalized patients, the bacterial factors required to cause disease are poorly understood. Insertion site sequencing combines transposon mutagenesis with high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously screen thousands of insertion mutants for fitness defects during infection. Using the recently sequenced K. pneumoniae strain KPPR1 in a well-established mouse model of pneumonia, insertion site sequencing was performed on a pool of >25,000 transposon mutants. The relative fitness requirement of each gene was ranked based on the ratio of lung to inoculum read counts and concordance between insertions in the same gene. This analysis revealed over 300 mutants with at least a 2-fold fitness defect and 69 with defects ranging from 10- to >2,000-fold. Construction of 6 isogenic mutants for use in competitive infections with the wild type confirmed their requirement for lung fitness. Critical fitness genes included those for the synthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids that are essential in mice and humans, the transcriptional elongation factor RfaH, and the copper efflux pump CopA. The majority of fitness genes were conserved among reference strains representative of diverse pathotypes. These results indicate that regulation of outer membrane components and synthesis of amino acids that are essential to its host are critical for K. pneumoniae fitness in the lung. PMID:26060277

  17. Genome-Wide Identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae Fitness Genes during Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Michael A; Breen, Paul; Deornellas, Valerie; Mu, Qiao; Zhao, Lili; Wu, Weisheng; Cavalcoli, James D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2015-06-09

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an urgent public health threat because of resistance to carbapenems, antibiotics of last resort against Gram-negative bacterial infections. Despite the fact that K. pneumoniae is a leading cause of pneumonia in hospitalized patients, the bacterial factors required to cause disease are poorly understood. Insertion site sequencing combines transposon mutagenesis with high-throughput sequencing to simultaneously screen thousands of insertion mutants for fitness defects during infection. Using the recently sequenced K. pneumoniae strain KPPR1 in a well-established mouse model of pneumonia, insertion site sequencing was performed on a pool of >25,000 transposon mutants. The relative fitness requirement of each gene was ranked based on the ratio of lung to inoculum read counts and concordance between insertions in the same gene. This analysis revealed over 300 mutants with at least a 2-fold fitness defect and 69 with defects ranging from 10- to >2,000-fold. Construction of 6 isogenic mutants for use in competitive infections with the wild type confirmed their requirement for lung fitness. Critical fitness genes included those for the synthesis of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids that are essential in mice and humans, the transcriptional elongation factor RfaH, and the copper efflux pump CopA. The majority of fitness genes were conserved among reference strains representative of diverse pathotypes. These results indicate that regulation of outer membrane components and synthesis of amino acids that are essential to its host are critical for K. pneumoniae fitness in the lung. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterium that commonly causes pneumonia in patients after they are admitted to the hospital. K. pneumoniae is becoming resistant to all available antibiotics, and when these infections spread to the bloodstream, over half of patients die. Since currently available antibiotics are failing, we must discover new ways to treat these infections

  18. Lack of Long-Lasting Hydrosalpinx in A/J Mice Correlates with Rapid but Transient Chlamydial Ascension and Neutrophil Recruitment in the Oviduct following Intravaginal Inoculation with Chlamydia muridarum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Jianlin; Wu, Ganqiu; Yang, Zhangsheng; Zhou, Zhiguang; Baseman, Joel; Zhang, Jin; Reddick, Robert Lee

    2014-01-01

    Lower genital tract infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and C. muridarum can induce long-lasting hydrosalpinx in the upper genital tract of women and female mice, respectively. However, A/J mice were highly resistant to induction of long-lasting hydrosalpinx by C. muridarum. We further compared host inflammatory responses and chlamydial infection courses between the hydrosalpinx-resistant A/J mice and CBA/J mice known to be susceptible to hydrosalpinx induction. Both mouse strains developed robust pyosalpinx during the acute phase followed by hydrosalpinx during the chronic phase. However, the hydrosalpinges disappeared in A/J mice by day 60 after infection, suggesting that some early hydrosalpinges are reversible. Although the overall inflammatory responses were indistinguishable between CBA/J and A/J mice, we found significantly more neutrophils in oviduct lumen of A/J mice on days 7 and 10, which correlated with a rapid but transient oviduct invasion by C. muridarum with a peak infection on day 7. In contrast, CBA/J mice developed a delayed and extensive oviduct infection. These comparisons have revealed an important role of the interactions of oviduct infection with inflammatory responses in chlamydial induction of long-lasting hydrosalpinx, suggesting that a rapid but transient invasion of oviduct by chlamydial organisms can prevent the development of the long-lasting hydrosalpinges. PMID:24711570

  19. Parainfluenza virus infection in adult lung transplant recipients: an emergent clinical syndrome with implications on allograft function.

    PubMed

    Vilchez, Regis A; Dauber, James; McCurry, Kenneth; Iacono, Aldo; Kusne, Shimon

    2003-02-01

    Parainfluenza virus is a common cause of seasonal upper respiratory tract infections in children and adults. Studies indicate that parainfluenza virus may play an important role in the etiology of respiratory tract infections in lung transplant recipients with an estimated incidence of 5.3 per 100 patients. Parainfluenza virus type 3 is the most frequent serotype in lung transplant patients. The rate of lower respiratory tract infections with parainfluenza virus among lung transplant recipients is between 10 and 66% of cases. In addition, trans-bronchial biopsy at the time of parainfluenza infection shows signs of acute allograft rejection. Subsequently, 32% of patients have been found to have active bronchiolitis obliterans at a median time of 6 months (range 1-14) postviral infection. These findings indicate that parainfluenza virus infections may have long-term implications for lung transplant recipients. Further studies are required to identify the mechanisms of immunomodulation of parainfluenza virus among these patients. In addition, controlled studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of aerosolized ribavarin in the treatment of parainfluenza virus infection and to determine whether vaccines may be effective in these high-risk patients.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand translates neonatal respiratory infection into chronic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Starkey, M R; Nguyen, D H; Essilfie, A T; Kim, R Y; Hatchwell, L M; Collison, A M; Yagita, H; Foster, P S; Horvat, J C; Mattes, J; Hansbro, P M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory infections in early life can lead to chronic respiratory disease. Chlamydia infections are common causes of respiratory disease, particularly pneumonia in neonates, and are linked to permanent reductions in pulmonary function and the induction of asthma. However, the immune responses that protect against early-life infection and the mechanisms that lead to chronic lung disease are incompletely understood. Here we identify novel roles for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in promoting Chlamydia respiratory infection-induced pathology in early life, and subsequent chronic lung disease. By infecting TRAIL-deficient neonatal mice and using neutralizing antibodies against this factor and its receptors in wild-type mice, we demonstrate that TRAIL is critical in promoting infection-induced histopathology, inflammation, and mucus hypersecretion, as well as subsequent alveolar enlargement and impaired lung function. This suggests that therapeutic agents that target TRAIL or its receptors may be effective treatments for early-life respiratory infections and associated chronic lung disease.

  1. The Impact of Protein Phosphorylation on Chlamydial Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Claywell, Ja E.; Matschke, Lea M.; Fisher, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram negative bacterial pathogens responsible for disease in humans and economically important domesticated animals. As obligate intracellular bacteria, they must gain entry into a host cell where they propagate within a parasitophorous organelle that serves as an interactive interface between the bacterium and the host. Nutrient acquisition, growth, and evasion of host defense mechanisms occur from this location. In addition to these cellular and bacterial dynamics, Chlamydia differentiate between two morphologically distinct forms, the elementary body and reticulate body, that are optimized for either extracellular or intracellular survival, respectively. The mechanisms regulating and mediating these diverse physiological events remain largely unknown. Reversible phosphorylation, including classical two-component signaling systems, partner switching mechanisms, and the more recently appreciated bacterial Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases and phosphatases, has gained increasing attention for its role in regulating important physiological processes in bacteria including metabolism, development, and virulence. Phosphorylation modulates these events via rapid and reversible modification of protein substrates leading to changes in enzyme activity, protein oligomerization, cell signaling, and protein localization. The characterization of several conserved chlamydial protein kinases and phosphatases along with phosphoproteome analysis suggest that Chlamydia are capable of global and growth stage-specific protein phosphorylation. This mini review will highlight the current knowledge of protein phosphorylation in Chlamydia and its potential role in chlamydial physiology and, consequently, virulence. Comparisons with other minimal genome intracellular bacterial pathogens also will be addressed with the aim of illustrating the importance of this understudied regulatory mechanism on pathogenesis and the principle questions that remain unanswered. PMID:28066729

  2. Morphology and Morphometry of the Lung in Corn Snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) Infected with Three Different Strains of Ferlavirus.

    PubMed

    Starck, J M; Neul, A; Schmidt, V; Kolb, T; Franz-Guess, S; Balcecean, D; Pees, M

    2017-03-08

    Ophidian paramyxovirus (ferlavirus) is a global threat to reptilian sauropsids in herpetological collections, with occasional but fatal effects. This study characterizes the effects of three different genetic strains of ferlavirus on the dynamic changes of histology and morphometry of the lung of corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus). Lungs from 42 corn snakes were either sham-infected or infected experimentally under standardized conditions. From 4 to 49 days after intratracheal inoculation, the lungs were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Progressive microscopical changes were seen in the lung. Initially, increased numbers of heterophils were observed in the interstitium followed by proliferation and vacuolation of epithelial cells lining faveoli. Electron microscopy revealed loss of type-I pneumocytes, hyperplasia of type-II pneumocytes, and interstitial infiltrates of heterophils and mononuclear cells. With progression of disease the respiratory epithelium was initially overgrown by transformed type-II pneumocytes and later became multilayered. The results of the study suggest that the respiratory capacity of the lungs declines with disease development. The dynamics of disease development and histopathology differed in snakes infected with different ferlavirus genogroups. Animals infected with virus genogroup B developed histopathological changes and morphometric changes more rapidly and of greater intensity than snakes infected with viruses from genogroups A or C.

  3. Aerosolized bovine lactoferrin reduces neutrophils and pro-inflammatory cytokines in mouse models of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Piera; Frioni, Alessandra; Rossi, Alice; Ranucci, Serena; De Fino, Ida; Cutone, Antimo; Rosa, Luigi; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Berlutti, Francesca

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-chelating glycoprotein of innate immunity, produced by exocrine glands and neutrophils in infection/inflammation sites, is one of the most abundant defence molecules in airway secretions. Lf, a pleiotropic molecule, exhibits antibacterial and anti-inflammatory functions. These properties may play a relevant role in airway infections characterized by exaggerated inflammatory response, as in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. To verify the Lf role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, we evaluated the efficacy of aerosolized bovine Lf (bLf) in mouse models of P. aeruginosa acute and chronic lung infections. C57BL/6NCrl mice were challenged with 10(6) CFUs of P. aeruginosa PAO1 (acute infection) or MDR-RP73 strain (chronic infection) by intra-tracheal administration. In both acute and chronic infections, aerosolized bLf resulted in nonsignificant reduction of bacterial load but significant decrease of the neutrophil recruitment and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Moreover, in chronic infection the bLf-treated mice recovered body weight faster and to a higher extent than the control mice. These findings add new insights into the benefits of bLf as a mediator of general health and its potential therapeutic applications.

  4. Lung Adenocarcinoma Originates from Retrovirus Infection of Proliferating Type 2 Pneumocytes during Pulmonary Post-Natal Development or Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Claudio; Caporale, Marco; Ceesay, Ousman; Di Francesco, Gabriella; Ferri, Nicola; Varasano, Vincenzo; de las Heras, Marcelo; Palmarini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is a unique oncogenic virus with distinctive biological properties. JSRV is the only virus causing a naturally occurring lung cancer (ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma, OPA) and possessing a major structural protein that functions as a dominant oncoprotein. Lung cancer is the major cause of death among cancer patients. OPA can be an extremely useful animal model in order to identify the cells originating lung adenocarcinoma and to study the early events of pulmonary carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that lung adenocarcinoma in sheep originates from infection and transformation of proliferating type 2 pneumocytes (termed here lung alveolar proliferating cells, LAPCs). We excluded that OPA originates from a bronchioalveolar stem cell, or from mature post-mitotic type 2 pneumocytes or from either proliferating or non-proliferating Clara cells. We show that young animals possess abundant LAPCs and are highly susceptible to JSRV infection and transformation. On the contrary, healthy adult sheep, which are normally resistant to experimental OPA induction, exhibit a relatively low number of LAPCs and are resistant to JSRV infection of the respiratory epithelium. Importantly, induction of lung injury increased dramatically the number of LAPCs in adult sheep and rendered these animals fully susceptible to JSRV infection and transformation. Furthermore, we show that JSRV preferentially infects actively dividing cell in vitro. Overall, our study provides unique insights into pulmonary biology and carcinogenesis and suggests that JSRV and its host have reached an evolutionary equilibrium in which productive infection (and transformation) can occur only in cells that are scarce for most of the lifespan of the sheep. Our data also indicate that, at least in this model, inflammation can predispose to retroviral infection and cancer. PMID:21483485

  5. Robust detection of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus acute lung infections by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) breathprinting: From initial infection to clearance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangjiang; Jiménez-Díaz, Jaime; Bean, Heather D.; Dapthary, Nirav A.; Aliyeva, Minara I.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Hill, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Before breath-based diagnostics for lung infections can be implemented in the clinic, it is necessary to understand how the breath volatiles change during the course of infection, and, ideally, to identify a core set of breath markers that can be used to identify the pathogen at any point during the infection. In the study presented here, we use secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) to characterize the breathprint of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus lung infections in a murine model over a period of 120 h, with a total of 86 mice in the study. Using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to evaluate the time-course data, we were able to show that SESI-MS breathprinting can be used to robustly classify acute P. aeruginosa and S. aureus mouse lung infections at any time during the 120 h infection/clearance process. The variable importance plot from PLS indicates that multiple peaks from the SESI-MS breathprints are required for discriminating the bacterial infections. Therefore, by utilizing the entire breathprint rather than single biomarkers, infectious agents can be diagnosed by SESI-MS independent of when during the infection breath is tested. PMID:23867706

  6. Late-onset chest wall abscess due to a biodegradable rib pin infection after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goda, Yasufumi; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Kusunose, Masaaki; Hamaji, Masatsugu; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-17

    A 55-year-old man with end-stage emphysema underwent a right single-lung transplantation through a posterolateral thoracotomy. The fifth rib was divided and fused back using a biodegradable pin made of polylactide acid and hydroxyapatite. Two weeks postoperatively, he suffered from central vein catheter-related sepsis due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. After being successfully treated for sepsis, he was discharged. However, 3 months later, computed tomography revealed multiple loculated abscesses in the chest wall and the right pleural space. Reoperative thoracotomy revealed abscesses mainly located around the fifth rib, where the pin was inserted. Both cultures of the abscess and the fifth rib were positive for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, which suggested that the rib pin was the cause of the secondary infection. This case suggests the rib pins, even if they are biodegradable, could have a risk of infections side effect especially for the immunosuppressed patients.

  7. Antiviral immune responses and lung inflammation after respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J M

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the commonest and most troublesome viruses of infancy. It causes most cases of bronchiolitis, which is associated with wheezing in later childhood. In primary infection, the peak of disease coincides not with the peak of viral replication but with the development of specific T and B cell responses. This immune response is apparently responsible for much of the disease. Animal models clearly show that a range of immune responses can enhance disease severity, particularly after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV. Prior immune sensitization leads to exuberant chemokine production, an excessive cellular influx, and an overabundance of cytokines during RSV challenge. The inflammatory host response to viral infection may be relevant not only to childhood bronchiolitis, but also to obstructive lung diseases in adults.

  8. SARS-CoV-Encoded Small RNAs Contribute to Infection-Associated Lung Pathology.

    PubMed

    Morales, Lucía; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Fernandez-Delgado, Raúl; tenOever, Benjamin Robert; Enjuanes, Luis; Sola, Isabel

    2017-03-08

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes lethal disease in humans, which is characterized by exacerbated inflammatory response and extensive lung pathology. To address the relevance of small non-coding RNAs in SARS-CoV pathology, we deep sequenced RNAs from the lungs of infected mice and discovered three 18-22 nt small viral RNAs (svRNAs). The three svRNAs were derived from the nsp3 (svRNA-nsp3.1 and -nsp3.2) and N (svRNA-N) genomic regions of SARS-CoV. Biogenesis of CoV svRNAs was RNase III, cell type, and host species independent, but it was dependent on the extent of viral replication. Antagomir-mediated inhibition of svRNA-N significantly reduced in vivo lung pathology and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Taken together, these data indicate that svRNAs contribute to SARS-CoV pathogenesis and highlight the potential of svRNA-N antagomirs as antivirals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnosis and prevalence of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma in lung tissues of naturally infected farm sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Ganesh G.; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) in sheep flocks affected with pulmonary disorders at organized farm. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 sheep died naturally were thoroughly examined for the lesions of OPA during necropsy. Tissue sections from affected portion of the lungs from each animal were collected aseptically and divided into two parts; one each for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and another for histopathology. Results: On PCR examination of lung tissues, six sheep (8%) were found to be positive for JSRV. Two of them were 3-6 months of age and did not show clinical signs/gross lesions of OPA. Four adult sheep positive on PCR revealed characteristic lesions of OPA on gross and histopathological examination. Conclusion: In the absence of known specific antibody response to the infection with JSRV, there is no diagnostic serological test available. The PCR assay employed in this study on lung tissues, using primers based on the U3 region of the viral long terminal repeat for JSRV would be helpful in the screening of preclinical and clinical cases of OPA in sheep. PMID:27182131

  10. Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB): isoniazid-resistant TB transmitted from a lung transplant donor with inadequately treated latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T O; Darley, D R; Goeman, E E; Shaw, K; Marriott, D J; Glanville, A R

    2016-10-01

    Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB) is an increasingly recognized complication of solid organ transplantation. We report a case of isoniazid-resistant pulmonary TB in a lung transplant recipient. The patient acquired the infection from the lung donor who was previously empirically treated with isoniazid for latent TB. The case highlights the caveat that, while adequate treatment of latent TB with isoniazid is presumed, meticulous screening of donors is required.

  11. FtsZ-independent septal recruitment and function of cell wall remodelling enzymes in chlamydial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Frandi, Antonio; Jacquier, Nicolas; Théraulaz, Laurence; Greub, Gilbert; Viollier, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    The nature and assembly of the chlamydial division septum is poorly defined due to the paucity of a detectable peptidoglycan (PG)-based cell wall, the inhibition of constriction by penicillin and the presence of coding sequences for cell wall precursor and remodelling enzymes in the reduced chlamydial (pan-)genome. Here we show that the chlamydial amidase (AmiA) is active and remodels PG in Escherichia coli. Moreover, forward genetics using an E. coli amidase mutant as entry point reveals that the chlamydial LysM-domain protein NlpD is active in an E. coli reporter strain for PG endopeptidase activity (ΔnlpI). Immunolocalization unveils NlpD as the first septal (cell-wall-binding) protein in Chlamydiae and we show that its septal sequestration depends on prior cell wall synthesis. Since AmiA assembles into peripheral clusters, trimming of a PG-like polymer or precursors occurs throughout the chlamydial envelope, while NlpD targets PG-like peptide crosslinks at the chlamydial septum during constriction. PMID:24953095

  12. The conserved Tarp actin binding domain is important for chlamydial invasion.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Travis J; Miller, Natalie J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-07-15

    The translocated actin recruiting phosphoprotein (Tarp) is conserved among all pathogenic chlamydial species. Previous reports identified single C. trachomatis Tarp actin binding and proline rich domains required for Tarp mediated actin nucleation. A peptide antiserum specific for the Tarp actin binding domain was generated and inhibited actin polymerization in vitro and C. trachomatis entry in vivo, indicating an essential role for Tarp in chlamydial pathogenesis. Sequence analysis of Tarp orthologs from additional chlamydial species and C. trachomatis serovars indicated multiple putative actin binding sites. In order to determine whether the identified actin binding domains are functionally conserved, GST-Tarp fusions from multiple chlamydial species were examined for their ability to bind and nucleate actin. Chlamydial Tarps harbored variable numbers of actin binding sites and promoted actin nucleation as determined by in vitro polymerization assays. Our findings indicate that Tarp mediated actin binding and nucleation is a conserved feature among diverse chlamydial species and this function plays a critical role in bacterial invasion of host cells.

  13. Use of an artificial neural network to predict risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Pan, Qin-Shi; Hong, Wan-Dong; Pan, Jingye; Zhang, Wen-Hui; Xu, Gang; Wang, Yu-Min

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods to analyze and predict the related risk factors of nosocomial infection in lung cancer patients are various, but the results are inconsistent. A total of 609 patients with lung cancer were enrolled to allow factor comparison using Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney test or the Chi-square test. Variables that were significantly related to the presence of nosocomial infection were selected as candidates for input into the final ANN model. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of the artificial neural network (ANN) model and logistic regression (LR) model. The prevalence of nosocomial infection from lung cancer in this entire study population was 20.1% (165/609), nosocomial infections occurring in sputum specimens (85.5%), followed by blood (6.73%), urine (6.0%) and pleural effusions (1.82%). It was shown that long term hospitalization (≥ 22 days, P= 0.000), poor clinical stage (IIIb and IV stage, P=0.002), older age (≥ 61 year old, P=0.023), and use the hormones were linked to nosocomial infection and the ANN model consisted of these four factors .The artificial neural network model with variables consisting of age, clinical stage, time of hospitalization, and use of hormones should be useful for predicting nosocomial infection in lung cancer cases.

  14. Evaluation of counterimmunoelectrophoresis for serotyping Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates and detection of type-specific antigens in lungs of infected pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, K R; Bourdon, S; Berrouard, M

    1993-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and accurate counterimmunoelectrophoresis technique was developed for serotyping cultures of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae as well as for detection of their type-specific antigens in the lung tissues of infected pigs. The counterimmunoelectrophoresis test correctly identified all of the reference antigens and more than 99% of 1,200 field isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae representing the 12 established serotypes within 1 h. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis and coagglutination tests did not differ broadly in sensitivity from each other. Both procedures were more rapid and more sensitive than immunodiffusion and indirect hemagglutination tests. A total of 355 lung tissue samples (130 lungs of pigs that died because of acute respiratory problems, 125 lungs of pigs from herds with chronically infected pleuropneumonia, and 100 lungs from apparently healthy pigs at the slaughterhouse) were examined for the presence of A. pleuropneumoniae type-specific antigens by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, and immunodiffusion tests. A. pleuropneumoniae type-specific antigen was found in all 55 samples from which the bacteria had earlier been isolated and in 27 specimens in which they had not been found. Detection of antigen in the lung tissues by coagglutination and counterimmunoelectrophoresis tests was found to be much simpler and much more rapid than conventional culture isolation. Both counterimmunoelectrophoresis and coagglutination tests were found extremely useful in the diagnosis of acute cases of porcine pleuropneumonia. However, these techniques were able to detect only some of the chronically infected carrier pigs. PMID:8408552

  15. Expression, Processing, and Localization of PmpD of Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar L2 during the Chlamydial Developmental Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kiselev, Andrey O.; Stamm, Walter E.; Yates, John R.; Lampe, Mary F.

    2007-01-01

    Background While families of polymorphic membrane protein (pmp) genes have been identified in several Chlamydia species, their function remains mostly unknown. These proteins are of great interest, however, because of their location in the outer membrane and possible role in chlamydial virulence. Methodology/Principal Finding We analyzed the relative transcription of the pmpD gene, a member of the pmp gene family in C. trachomatis serovar L2, and its protein product translation and processing during the chlamydial developmental cycle. By real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, the pmpD gene was found to be upregulated at 16 to 24 four hours after infection. Using polyclonal antibodies generated against the predicted passenger domain of PmpD, we demonstrated that it is initially localized on the surface of reticulate bodies, followed by its secretion outside Chlamydia starting at 24 hours after infection. In elementary bodies, we found a ≈157 kDa PmpD only inside the cell. Both events, the upregulation of pmpD gene transcription and PmpD protein processing and secretion, are coincidental with the period of replication and differentiation of RBs into EBs. We also demonstrated that, in the presence of penicillin, the cleavage and secretion of the putative passenger domain was suppressed. Conclusion/Significance Our results are in agreement with the general concept that PmpD is an autotransporter protein which is post-translationally processed and secreted in the form of the putative passenger domain outside Chlamydia at mid- to- late point after infection, coinciding with the development of RBs into EBs. PMID:17593967

  16. The neutrophil serine protease inhibitor serpinb1 preserves lung defense functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed

    Benarafa, Charaf; Priebe, Gregory P; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2007-08-06

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs; elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3) directly kill invading microbes. However, excess NSPs in the lungs play a central role in the pathology of inflammatory pulmonary disease. We show that serpinb1, an efficient inhibitor of the three NSPs, preserves cell and molecular components responsible for host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On infection, wild-type (WT) and serpinb1-deficient mice mount similar early responses, including robust production of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of neutrophils, and initial containment of bacteria. However, serpinb1(-/-) mice have considerably increased mortality relative to WT mice in association with late-onset failed bacterial clearance. We found that serpinb1-deficient neutrophils recruited to the lungs have an intrinsic defect in survival accompanied by release of neutrophil protease activity, sustained inflammatory cytokine production, and proteolysis of the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D). Coadministration of recombinant SERPINB1 with the P. aeruginosa inoculum normalized bacterial clearance in serpinb1(-/-) mice. Thus, regulation of pulmonary innate immunity by serpinb1 is nonredundant and is required to protect two key components, the neutrophil and SP-D, from NSP damage during the host response to infection.

  17. The neutrophil serine protease inhibitor serpinb1 preserves lung defense functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Benarafa, Charaf; Priebe, Gregory P.; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs; elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3) directly kill invading microbes. However, excess NSPs in the lungs play a central role in the pathology of inflammatory pulmonary disease. We show that serpinb1, an efficient inhibitor of the three NSPs, preserves cell and molecular components responsible for host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. On infection, wild-type (WT) and serpinb1-deficient mice mount similar early responses, including robust production of cytokines and chemokines, recruitment of neutrophils, and initial containment of bacteria. However, serpinb1−/− mice have considerably increased mortality relative to WT mice in association with late-onset failed bacterial clearance. We found that serpinb1-deficient neutrophils recruited to the lungs have an intrinsic defect in survival accompanied by release of neutrophil protease activity, sustained inflammatory cytokine production, and proteolysis of the collectin surfactant protein–D (SP-D). Coadministration of recombinant SERPINB1 with the P. aeruginosa inoculum normalized bacterial clearance in serpinb1−/− mice. Thus, regulation of pulmonary innate immunity by serpinb1 is nonredundant and is required to protect two key components, the neutrophil and SP-D, from NSP damage during the host response to infection. PMID:17664292

  18. Degradable polyphosphoester-based silver-loaded nanoparticles as therapeutics for bacterial lung infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuwu; Smolen, Justin A.; Zhang, Shiyi; Li, Richen; Shah, Parth N.; Cho, Sangho; Wang, Hai; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Cannon, Carolyn L.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new type of degradable polyphosphoester-based polymeric nanoparticle, capable of carrying silver cations via interactions with alkyne groups, has been developed as a potentially effective and safe treatment for lung infections. It was found that up to 15% (w/w) silver loading into the nanoparticles could be achieved, consuming most of the pendant alkyne groups along the backbone, as revealed by Raman spectroscopy. The well-defined Ag-loaded nanoparticles released silver in a controlled and sustained manner over 5 days, and displayed enhanced in vitro antibacterial activities against cystic fibrosis-associated pathogens and decreased cytotoxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells, in comparison to silver acetate.In this study, a new type of degradable polyphosphoester-based polymeric nanoparticle, capable of carrying silver cations via interactions with alkyne groups, has been developed as a potentially effective and safe treatment for lung infections. It was found that up to 15% (w/w) silver loading into the nanoparticles could be achieved, consuming most of the pendant alkyne groups along the backbone, as revealed by Raman spectroscopy. The well-defined Ag-loaded nanoparticles released silver in a controlled and sustained manner over 5 days, and displayed enhanced in vitro antibacterial activities against cystic fibrosis-associated pathogens and decreased cytotoxicity to human bronchial epithelial cells, in comparison to silver acetate. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, experimental details, and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07103d

  19. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T.; Segel, Nicholas H.; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs. PMID:26543803

  20. Lung fluke (Paragonimus africanus) infects Nigerian red-capped mangabeys and causes respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Friant, Sagan; Brown, Kelsey; Saari, Mason T; Segel, Nicholas H; Slezak, Julia; Goldberg, Tony L

    2015-12-01

    Eggs of the lung fluke genus Paragonimus were detected in red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus) in Nigeria. We assess the role of these primates as potential sylvatic hosts and the clinical effects of the parasite on monkeys. DNA sequenced from eggs in feces were 100% identical in the ITS2 region to Paragonimus africanus sequences from humans in Cameroon. Paragonimus-positive monkeys coughed more than uninfected monkeys. Experimental de-worming led to reduction in parasite intensity and a corresponding reduction of coughing to baseline levels in infected monkeys. This report provides the first evidence of Paragonimus sp. in C. torquatus, of P. africanus in Nigerian wildlife, and the first molecular evidence of the parasite in African wildlife. Coughing, sometimes interpreted as a communication behavior in primates, can actually indicate infection with lung parasites. Observations of coughing in primates may, in turn, provide a useful mechanism for surveillance of Paragonimus spp, which are re-emerging human pathogens, in wildlife reservoirs.

  1. Birth weight, childhood lower respiratory tract infection, and adult lung function

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, S; Sterne, J; Tucker, J; Florey, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Historical cohort studies in England have found that impaired fetal growth and lower respiratory tract infections in early childhood are associated with lower levels of lung function in late adult life. These relations are investigated in a similar study in Scotland.
METHODS—In 1985-86 a follow up study was carried out of 1070 children who had been born in St Andrew's from 1921 to 1935 and followed from birth to 14 years of age by the Mackenzie Institute for Medical Research. Recorded information included birth weight and respiratory illnesses. The lung function of 239 of these individuals was measured.
RESULTS—There was no association between birth weight and lung function. Pneumonia before two years of age was associated with a difference in mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of −0.39 litres (95% confidence interval (CI) −0.67, −0.11; p = 0.007) and in mean forced vital capacity (FVC) of −0.60 litres (95% CI −0.92, −0.28; p<0.001), after controlling for age, sex, height, smoking, type of spirometer, and other illnesses before two years. Similar reductions were seen in men and women. Bronchitis before two years was associated with smaller deficits in FEV1 and FVC. Asthma or wheeze at two years and older and cough after five years were also associated with a reduction in FEV1.
CONCLUSIONS—The relation between impaired fetal growth and lower lung function in late adult life seen in previous studies was not confirmed in this cohort. The deficits in FEV1 and FVC associated with pneumonia and bronchitis in the first two years of life are consistent with a causal relation.

 PMID:9797752

  2. Guillain-Barré Syndrome in a Boy With Lung Fluke Infection: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui-Wei; Gao, Feng; Xia, Zhe-Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome is the most common acute peripheral neuropathy in children in most countries. The cause and pathogenesis of the disease have yet to be clarified. There have been only a few reports of Guillain-Barré syndrome resulting from parasite infections worldwide, no cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome after lung fluke infection have been reported. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome after lung fluke infection. The child had a history of consumption of undercooked crabs. He was diagnosed with paragonimiasis. The patient experienced paralysis of and pain in the lower limbs about 3 weeks after symptom onset. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examination findings supported the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Parasitic infections should also be considered when determining which antecedent infection is associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  3. Leukotriene B4 induces release of antimicrobial peptides in lungs of virally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Gosselin, Jean

    2008-05-01

    Leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) is a lipid mediator of inflammation that was recently shown to exert antiviral activities. In this study, we demonstrate that the release of antimicrobial proteins by neutrophils contribute to an early host defense against influenza virus infection in vitro as well as in vivo. Daily i.v. treatments with LTB(4) lead to a significant decrease in lung viral loads at day 5 postinfection in mice infected with influenza A virus compared with the placebo-treated group. This reduction in viral load was not present in mice deficient in the high-affinity LTB(4) receptor. Viral clearance in lungs was associated with up-regulated presence of antimicrobial peptides such as beta-defensin-3, members of the mouse eosinophil-related RNase family, and the mouse cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide. Our results also indicate that neutrophils are important in the antiviral effect of LTB(4). Viral loads in neutrophil-depleted mice were not diminished by LTB(4) administration, and a substantial reduction in the presence of murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide and the murine eosinophil-related RNase family in lung tissue was observed. Moreover, in vitro treatment of human neutrophil cultures with LTB(4) led rapidly to the secretion of the human cathelicidin LL-37 and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, known as antiviral peptides. Pretreatment of cell cultures with specific LTB(4) receptor antagonists clearly demonstrate the implication of the high-affinity LTB(4) receptor in the LTB(4)-mediated activity. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of neutrophils and the secretion of antimicrobial peptides during the early immune response mediated by LTB(4) against a viral pathogen.

  4. Permissiveness of bovine epithelial cells from lung, intestine, placenta and udder for infection with Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, Katharina; Bonkowski, Katharina; Liebler-Tenorio, Elisabeth; Germon, Pierre; Rainard, Pascal; Hambruch, Nina; Pfarrer, Christiane; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Menge, Christian

    2017-04-12

    Ruminants are the main source of human infections with the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella (C.) burnetii. Infected animals shed high numbers of C. burnetii by milk, feces, and birth products. In goats, shedding by the latter route coincides with C. burnetii replication in epithelial (trophoblast) cells of the placenta, which led us to hypothesize that epithelial cells are generally implicated in replication and shedding of C. burnetii. We therefore aimed at analyzing the interactions of C. burnetii with epithelial cells of the bovine host (1) at the entry site (lung epithelium) which govern host immune responses and (2) in epithelial cells of gut, udder and placenta decisive for the quantity of pathogen excretion. Epithelial cell lines [PS (udder), FKD-R 971 (small intestine), BCEC (maternal placenta), F3 (fetal placenta), BEL-26 (lung)] were inoculated with C. burnetii strains Nine Mile I (NMI) and NMII at different cultivation conditions. The cell lines exhibited different permissiveness for C. burnetii. While maintaining cell viability, udder cells allowed the highest replication rates with formation of large cell-filling Coxiella containing vacuoles. Intestinal cells showed an enhanced susceptibility to invasion but supported C. burnetii replication only at intermediate levels. Lung and placental cells also internalized the bacteria but in strikingly smaller numbers. In any of the epithelial cells, both Coxiella strains failed to trigger a substantial IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α response. Epithelial cells, with mammary epithelial cells in particular, may therefore serve as a niche for C. burnetii replication in vivo without alerting the host's immune response.

  5. Collectin-mediated antiviral host defense of the lung: evidence from influenza virus infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Reading, P C; Morey, L S; Crouch, E C; Anders, E M

    1997-11-01

    Collagenous lectins (collectins) present in mammalian serum and pulmonary fluids bind to influenza virus and display antiviral activity in vitro, but their role in vivo has yet to be determined. We have used early and late isolates of H3N2 subtype influenza viruses that differ in their degree of glycosylation to examine the relationship between sensitivity to murine serum and pulmonary lectins in vitro and the ability of a virus to replicate in the respiratory tract of mice. A marked inverse correlation was found between these two parameters. Early H3 isolates (1968 to 1972) bear 7 potential glycosylation sites on hemagglutinin (HA), whereas later strains carry 9 or 10. Late isolates were shown to be much more sensitive than early strains to neutralization by the mouse serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and rat lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and bound greater levels of these lectins in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and Western blot analyses. They also replicated very poorly in mouse lungs compared to the earlier strains. Growth in the lungs was greatly enhanced, however, if saccharide inhibitors of the collectins were included in the virus inoculum. The level of SP-D in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids increased on influenza virus infection. MBL was absent from lavage fluids of normal mice but could be detected in fluids from mice 3 days after infection with the virulent strain A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). The results implicate SP-D and possibly MBL as important components of the innate defense of the respiratory tract against influenza virus and indicate that the degree or pattern of glycosylation of a virus can be an important factor in its virulence.

  6. Contribution of the Purinergic Receptor P2X7 to Development of Lung Immunopathology during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ermler, Megan E.; Schotsaert, Michael; Gonzalez, Ma G.; Gillespie, Virginia; Lim, Jean K.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An exacerbated immune response is one of the main causes of influenza-induced lung damage during infection. The molecular mechanisms regulating the fate of the initial immune response to infection, either as a protective response or as detrimental immunopathology, are not well understood. The purinergic receptor P2X7 is an ionotropic nucleotide-gated ion channel receptor expressed on immune cells that has been implicated in induction and maintenance of excessive inflammation. Here, we analyze the role of this receptor in a mouse model of influenza virus infection using a receptor knockout (KO) mouse strain. Our results demonstrate that the absence of the P2X7 receptor results in a better outcome to influenza virus infection characterized by reduced weight loss and increased survival upon experimental influenza challenge compared to wild-type mice. This effect was not virus strain specific. Overall lung pathology and apoptosis were reduced in virus-infected KO mice. Production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) was also reduced in the lungs of the infected KO mice. Infiltration of neutrophils and d