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Sample records for chlamydomonas sp ice-l

  1. Survival and proliferation characteristics of the microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L after hypergravitational stress pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhengquan; Li, Demao; Meng, Chunxiao; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao

    2013-09-01

    Seeking extraterrestrial life, transferring between planets, even migrating to other planets attracts more and more attention of public and scientists. However, to make it clear for the ability to survive the forces studies is prerequisite to enable the speculations by natural means. Gravity is a critical force involved in all the life on Earth and, possibly, others planets. Organisms have been grown in microgravity habitats and in centrifuges to characterize the biological response to a range of gravitational forces and radiation levels in space and on Earth. However, little is known about the profiles of eukaryotic life under conditions of hyperacceleration attributable to extreme gravities. In this study, a eukaryotic extremophile, the Antarctic green microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L, showed amazing proliferation capacity during and after hypergravitational stress for 30 min to 48 h at 110,200, 423,400, and 670,800g. These extreme gravities also had profound effects on viability, reproduction rate, photosynthesis efficiency, and gene transcriptional expression of this microalga. Most notably, all three supergravities efficiently stimulated algal cell division, but the greater the centrifugal force and the longer the duration of treatment, the lower the viable rate and breeding potential of samples in the following incubation. These results illustrated Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is a useful eukaryotic model system candidate for space research. Further studies could provide new insight into the physical limits of life and its evolution and enhance the possibility for interstellar space travel and the quest for extraterrestrial life according to panspermia theory. Also, it indicated that life come from the outer space is not always prokaryotes but may be eukaryotes.

  2. Transcriptome-wide analysis of DEAD-box RNA helicase gene family in an Antarctic psychrophilic alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohang

    2015-09-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase family proteins have been identified in almost all living organisms. Some of them play a crucial role in adaptation to environmental changes and stress response, especially in the low-temperature acclimation in different kinds of organisms. Compared with the full swing study in plants and bacteria, the characters and functions of DEAD-box family proteins had not been surveyed in algae. To identify genes critical for freezing acclimation in algae, we screened DEAD-box RNA helicase genes from the transcriptome sequences of a psychrophilic microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which was isolated from Antarctic sea ice. Totally 39 DEAD-box RNA helicase genes had been identified. Most of the DEAD-box RNA helicase have 1:1 homologous relationships in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L with several exceptions. The homologous proteins in ICE-L to the helicases critical for cold or freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana had been identified based on phylogenetic comparison studies. The response of these helicase genes is not always identical in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L and Arabidopsis under the same low-temperature treatment. The expression of several DEAD-box RNA helicase genes including CiRH5, CiRH25, CiRH28, and CiRH55 were significantly up-regulated under freezing treatment of ICE-L and their function in freezing acclimation of ICE-L deserved further investigation.

  3. Cloning and expression analysis of two different LhcSR genes involved in stress adaptation in an Antarctic microalga, Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Dong, Meitao; Liang, Chengwei; Liang, Qiang; Miao, Jinlai; Xu, Dong; Zheng, Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) play essential roles in light capture and photoprotection. Although the functional diversity of individual LHCs in many plants has been well described, knowledge regarding the extent of this family in the majority of green algal groups is still limited. In this study, two different LhcSR genes, LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 from Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L, were cloned from the total cDNA and characterized in response to high light (HL), low light (LL), UV-B radiation and high salinity. The lower F (v)/F (m) as well as the associated induction of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), observed under those conditions, indicated that Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was under stress. Under HL stress, the expression of LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 increased rapidly from 0.5 h HL and reached a maximum after 3 h. In LL, LhcSR2 expression was up-regulated during the first 0.5 h after which it decreased, while the expression of LhcSR1 decreased gradually from the beginning of the experiment. In addition, the transcript levels of LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 increased under UV-B radiation and high salinity. These results showed that both genes were inducible and up-regulated under stress conditions. A higher NPQ was accompanied by the up-regulated LhcSR genes, suggesting that LhcSR plays a role in thermal energy dissipation. Overall, the results presented here suggest that LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 play a primary role in photoprotection in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L under stress conditions and provide an important basis for investigation of the adaptation mechanism of LhcSR in Antarctic green algae.

  4. Long-term experiment on physiological responses to synergetic effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod in the Antarctic sea ice algae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Yitao; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Dongsheng; Ye, Naihao; Zhang, Xiaowen; Mou, Shanli; Guan, Zheng; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2014-07-15

    Studies on ocean acidification have mostly been based on short-term experiments of low latitude with few investigations of the long-term influence on sea ice communities. Here, the combined effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod on the physiological response of the Antarctic sea ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were examined. There was a general increase in growth, PSII photosynthetic parameters, and N and P uptake in continuous light, compared to those exposed to regular dark and light cycles. Elevated pCO2 showed no consistent effect on growth rate (p=0.8) and N uptake (p=0.38) during exponential phrase, depending on the photoperiod but had a positive effect on PSII photosynthetic capacity and P uptake. Continuous dark reduced growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake. Moreover, intracellular lipid, mainly in the form of PUFA, was consumed at 80% and 63% in low and high pCO2 in darkness. However, long-term culture under high pCO2 gave a more significant inhibition of growth and Fv/Fm to high light stress. In summary, ocean acidification may have significant effects on Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L survival in polar winter. The current study contributes to an understanding of how a sea ice algae-based community may respond to global climate change at high latitudes.

  5. Validation of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in an ice alga Chlamydomonas during freezing acclimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Wu, Guangting; Huang, Xiaohang; Liu, Shenghao; Cong, Bailin

    2012-05-01

    Antarctic ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L can endure extreme low temperature and high salinity stress under freezing conditions. To elucidate the molecular acclimation mechanisms using gene expression analysis, the expression stabilities of ten housekeeping genes of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L during freezing stress were analyzed. Some discrepancies were detected in the ranking of the candidate reference genes between geNorm and NormFinder programs, but there was substantial agreement between the groups of genes with the most and the least stable expression. RPL19 was ranked as the best candidate reference genes. Pairwise variation (V) analysis indicated the combination of two reference genes was sufficient for qRT-PCR data normalization under the experimental conditions. Considering the co-regulation between RPL19 and RPL32 (the most stable gene pairs given by geNorm program), we propose that the mean data rendered by RPL19 and GAPDH (the most stable gene pairs given by NormFinder program) be used to normalize gene expression values in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L more accurately. The example of FAD3 gene expression calculation demonstrated the importance of selecting an appropriate category and number of reference genes to achieve an accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression during freeze acclimation in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

  6. Acclimation of Antarctic Chlamydomonas to the sea-ice environment: a transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Wang, Xiuliang; Wang, Xingna; Sun, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    The Antarctic green alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was isolated from sea ice. As a psychrophilic microalga, it can tolerate the environmental stress in the sea-ice brine, such as freezing temperature and high salinity. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify freezing stress responding genes and explore the extreme environmental acclimation-related strategies. Here, we show that many genes in ICE-L transcriptome that encoding PUFA synthesis enzymes, molecular chaperon proteins, and cell membrane transport proteins have high similarity to the gens from Antarctic bacteria. These ICE-L genes are supposed to be acquired through horizontal gene transfer from its symbiotic microbes in the sea-ice brine. The presence of these genes in both sea-ice microalgae and bacteria indicated the biological processes they involved in are possibly contributing to ICE-L success in sea ice. In addition, the biological pathways were compared between ICE-L and its closely related sister species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. In ICE-L transcripome, many sequences homologous to the plant or bacteria proteins in the post-transcriptional, post-translational modification, and signal-transduction KEGG pathways, are absent in the nonpsychrophilic green algae. These complex structural components might imply enhanced stress adaptation capacity. At last, differential gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level of ICE-L indicated that genes that associated with post-translational modification, lipid metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism are responding to the freezing treatment. In conclusion, the transcriptome of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is very useful for exploring the mutualistic interaction between microalgae and bacteria in sea ice; and discovering the specific genes and metabolism pathways responding to the freezing acclimation in psychrophilic microalgae.

  7. Resolving the phylogenetic relationship between Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 and Chlamydomonas raudensis sag 49.72 (Chlorophyceae) with nuclear and plastid DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Possmayer, Marc; Gupta, Rajesh K; Szyszka-Mroz, Beth; Maxwell, Denis P; Lachance, Marc-André; Hüner, Norman P A; Smith, David Roy

    2016-04-01

    The Antarctic psychrophilic green alga Chlamy-domonas sp. UWO 241 is an emerging model for studying microbial adaptation to polar environments. However, little is known about its evolutionary history and its phylogenetic relationship with other chlamydomonadalean algae is equivocal. Here, we attempt to clarify the phylogenetic position of UWO 241, specifically with respect to Chlamydomonas rau-densis SAG 49.72. Contrary to a previous report, we show that UWO 241 is a distinct species from SAG 49.72. Our phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and plastid DNA sequences reveal that UWO 241 represents a unique lineage within the Moewusinia clade (sensu Nakada) of the Chlamydomonadales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta), closely affiliated to the marine species Chlamydomonas parkeae SAG 24.89.

  8. Growth and lipid content at low temperature of Arctic alga Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jae; Jung, Woongsic; Lim, Suyoun; Kim, Sanghee; Han, Se Jong; Choi, Han-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel produced from microalgae is a promising source of alternative energy. In winter, however, outdoor mass cultivation for biodiesel production is hampered by poor growth. Here, we report that Arctic Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C exhibits optimal growth at 4 °C and reaches densities up to 1.4 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Lipid body formation in the alga was visualized through BODIPY 505/515 staining and fluorescence microscopy. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production level of KNM0029C was 178.6 mg L(-1) culture and 2.3-fold higher than that of C. reinhardtii CC-125 at 4 °C. Analysis of the FAME content showed a predominance of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as C16:3, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:2. C18:3 fatty acids comprised the largest fraction (20.7%), and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (39.6%) was higher than that of saturated fatty acids (6.8%) at 4 °C. These results indicate that Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C, as a psychrophilic microalga, might represent a favorable source for biodiesel production in cold environments.

  9. Enzymatic modification by point mutation and functional analysis of an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase from Arctic Chlamydomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woongsic; Kim, Eun Jae; Han, Se Jong; Kang, Sung-Ho; Choi, Han-Gu; Kim, Sanghee

    2017-02-07

    Arctic Chlamydomonas sp. is a dominant microalgal strain in cold or frozen freshwater in the Arctic region. The full-length open reading frame of the omega-6 fatty acid desaturase gene (AChFAD6) was obtained from the transcriptomic database of Arctic Chlamydomonas sp. from the KOPRI culture collection of polar micro-organisms. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated the presence of three conserved histidine-rich segments as unique characteristics of omega-6 fatty acid desaturases, and three transmembrane regions transported to plastidic membranes by chloroplast transit peptides in the N-terminal region. The AChFAD6 desaturase activity was examined by expressing wild-type and V254A mutant (Mut-AChFAD6) heterologous recombinant proteins. Quantitative gas chromatography indicated that the concentration of linoleic acids in AChFAD6-transformed cells increased more than 3-fold [6.73 ± 0.13 mg g(-1) dry cell weight (DCW)] compared with cells transformed with vector alone. In contrast, transformation with Mut-AChFAD6 increased the concentration of oleic acid to 9.23 ± 0.18 mg g(-1) DCW, indicating a change in enzymatic activity to mimic that of stearoyl-CoA desaturase. These results demonstrate that AChFAD6 of Arctic Chlamydomonas sp. increases membrane fluidity by enhancing denaturation of C18 fatty acids and facilitates production of large quantities of linoleic fatty acids in prokaryotic expression systems.

  10. Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Endo, Kaichiro; Kobayashi, Koichi; Nakamura, Yuki; Wada, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol (PG) is an indispensable phospholipid class with photosynthetic function in plants and cyanobacteria. However, its biosynthesis in eukaryotic green microalgae is poorly studied. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two homologs (CrPGP1 and CrPGP2) of phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase (PGPS), the rate-limiting enzyme in PG biosynthesis, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Heterologous complementation of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 pgsA mutant by CrPGP1 and CrPGP2 rescued the PG-dependent growth phenotype, but the PG level and its fatty acid composition were not fully rescued in the complemented strains. As well, oxygen evolution activity was not fully recovered, although electron transport activity of photosystem II was restored to the wild-type level. Gene expression study of CrPGP1 and CrPGP2 in nutrient-starved C. reinhardtii showed differential response to phosphorus and nitrogen deficiency. Taken together, these results highlight the distinct and overlapping function of PGPS in cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. PMID:26379630

  11. Ecophysiology, secondary pigments and ultrastructure of Chlainomonas sp. (Chlorophyta) from the European Alps compared with Chlamydomonas nivalis forming red snow

    PubMed Central

    Remias, Daniel; Pichrtová, Martina; Pangratz, Marion; Lütz, Cornelius; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Red snow is a well-known phenomenon caused by microalgae thriving in alpine and polar regions during the melting season. The ecology and biodiversity of these organisms, which are adapted to low temperatures, high irradiance and freeze–thaw events, are still poorly understood. We compared two different snow habitats containing two different green algal genera in the European Alps, namely algae blooming in seasonal rock-based snowfields (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and algae dominating waterlogged snow bedded over ice (Chlainomonas sp.). Despite the morphological similarity of the red spores found at the snow surface, we found differences in intracellular organization investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy and in secondary pigments investigated by chromatographic analysis in combination with mass spectrometry. Spores of Chlainomonas sp. show clear differences from Chlamydomonas nivalis in cell wall arrangement and plastid organization. Active photosynthesis at ambient temperatures indicates a high physiological activity, despite no cell division being present. Lipid bodies containing the carotenoid astaxanthin, which produces the red color, dominate cells of both species, but are modified differently. While in Chlainomonas sp. astaxanthin is mainly esterified with two fatty acids and is more apolar, in Chamydomonas nivalis, in contrast, less apolar monoesters prevail. PMID:26884467

  12. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    DOE PAGES

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; ...

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  13. The Antarctic Psychrophile Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 Preferentially Phosphorylates a Photosystem I-Cytochrome b6/f Supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Szyszka-Mroz, Beth; Pittock, Paula; Ivanov, Alexander G; Lajoie, Gilles; Hüner, Norman P A

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 (UWO 241) is a psychrophilic green alga isolated from Antarctica. A unique characteristic of this algal strain is its inability to undergo state transitions coupled with the absence of photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting complex protein phosphorylation. We show that UWO 241 preferentially phosphorylates specific polypeptides associated with an approximately 1,000-kD pigment-protein supercomplex that contains components of both photosystem I (PSI) and the cytochrome b₆/f (Cyt b₆/f) complex. Liquid chromatography nano-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify three major phosphorylated proteins associated with this PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex, two 17-kD PSII subunit P-like proteins and a 70-kD ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease, FtsH. The PSII subunit P-like protein sequence exhibited 70.6% similarity to the authentic PSII subunit P protein associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Tyrosine-146 was identified as a unique phosphorylation site on the UWO 241 PSII subunit P-like polypeptide. Assessment of PSI cyclic electron transport by in vivo P700 photooxidation and the dark relaxation kinetics of P700(+) indicated that UWO 241 exhibited PSI cyclic electron transport rates that were 3 times faster and more sensitive to antimycin A than the mesophile control, Chlamydomonas raudensis SAG 49.72. The stability of the PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex was dependent upon the phosphorylation status of the PsbP-like protein and the zinc metalloprotease FtsH as well as the presence of high salt. We suggest that adaptation of UWO 241 to its unique low-temperature and high-salt environment favors the phosphorylation of a PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex to regulate PSI cyclic electron transport rather than the regulation of state transitions through the phosphorylation of PSII light-harvesting complex proteins.

  14. Optimizing biodiesel production in marine Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 through metabolic profiling and an innovative salinity-gradient strategy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production from marine microalgae has received much attention as microalgae can be cultivated on non-arable land without the use of potable water, and with the additional benefits of mitigating CO2 emissions and yielding biomass. However, there is still a lack of effective operational strategies to promote lipid accumulation in marine microalgae, which are suitable for making biodiesel since they are mainly composed of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms involved in lipid biosynthesis in microalgae under environmental stress are not well understood. Results In this work, the combined effects of salinity and nitrogen depletion stresses on lipid accumulation of a newly isolated marine microalga, Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4, were explored. Metabolic intermediates were profiled over time to observe transient changes during the lipid accumulation triggered by the combination of the two stresses. An innovative cultivation strategy (denoted salinity-gradient operation) was also employed to markedly improve the lipid accumulation and lipid quality of the microalga, which attained an optimal lipid productivity of 223.2 mg L-1 d-1 and a lipid content of 59.4% per dry cell weight. This performance is significantly higher than reported in most related studies. Conclusions This work demonstrated the synergistic integration of biological and engineering technologies to develop a simple and effective strategy for the enhancement of oil production in marine microalgae. PMID:25002905

  15. Biosorption of copper and zinc by immobilised and free algal biomass, and the effects of metal biosorption on the growth and cellular structure of Chlorella sp. and Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from rivers in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maznah, W O Wan; Al-Fawwaz, A T; Surif, Misni

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the biosorption of copper and zinc ions by Chlorella sp. and Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from local environments in Malaysia was investigated in a batch system and by microscopic analyses. Under optimal biosorption conditions, the biosorption capacity of Chlorella sp. for copper and zinc ions was 33.4 and 28.5 mg/g, respectively, after 6 hr of biosorption in an immobilised system. Batch experiments showed that the biosorption capacity of algal biomass immobilised in the form of sodium alginate beads was higher than that of the free biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses revealed that copper and zinc were mainly sorbed at the cell surface during biosorption. Exposure to 5 mg/L of copper and zinc affected both the chlorophyll content and cell count of the algal cells after the first 12 hr of contact time.

  16. Ecophysiology, secondary pigments and ultrastructure of Chlainomonas sp. (Chlorophyta) from the European Alps compared with Chlamydomonas nivalis forming red snow.

    PubMed

    Remias, Daniel; Pichrtová, Martina; Pangratz, Marion; Lütz, Cornelius; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Red snow is a well-known phenomenon caused by microalgae thriving in alpine and polar regions during the melting season. The ecology and biodiversity of these organisms, which are adapted to low temperatures, high irradiance and freeze-thaw events, are still poorly understood. We compared two different snow habitats containing two different green algal genera in the European Alps, namely algae blooming in seasonal rock-based snowfields (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and algae dominating waterlogged snow bedded over ice (Chlainomonassp.). Despite the morphological similarity of the red spores found at the snow surface, we found differences in intracellular organization investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy and in secondary pigments investigated by chromatographic analysis in combination with mass spectrometry. Spores ofChlainomonassp. show clear differences fromChlamydomonas nivalisin cell wall arrangement and plastid organization. Active photosynthesis at ambient temperatures indicates a high physiological activity, despite no cell division being present. Lipid bodies containing the carotenoid astaxanthin, which produces the red color, dominate cells of both species, but are modified differently. While inChlainomonassp. astaxanthin is mainly esterified with two fatty acids and is more apolar, inChamydomonas nivalis, in contrast, less apolar monoesters prevail.

  17. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    SciTech Connect

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  18. Dynamic metabolic profiling together with transcription analysis reveals salinity-induced starch-to-lipid biosynthesis in alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Nakanishi, Akihito; Kato, Yuichi; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Chang, Jo-Shu; Misawa, Naomi; Hirose, Yuu; Minagawa, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-04-04

    Biodiesel production using microalgae would play a pivotal role in satisfying future global energy demands. Understanding of lipid metabolism in microalgae is important to isolate oleaginous strain capable of overproducing lipids. It has been reported that reducing starch biosynthesis can enhance lipid accumulation. However, the metabolic mechanism controlling carbon partitioning from starch to lipids in microalgae remains unclear, thus complicating the genetic engineering of algal strains. We here used "dynamic" metabolic profiling and essential transcription analysis of the oleaginous green alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 for the first time to demonstrate the switching mechanisms from starch to lipid synthesis using salinity as a regulator, and identified the metabolic rate-limiting step for enhancing lipid accumulation (e.g., pyruvate-to-acetyl-CoA). These results, showing salinity-induced starch-to-lipid biosynthesis, will help increase our understanding of dynamic carbon partitioning in oleaginous microalgae. Moreover, we successfully determined the changes of several key lipid-synthesis-related genes (e.g., acetyl-CoA carboxylase, pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, acetyl-CoA synthetase and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase) and starch-degradation related genes (e.g., starch phosphorylases), which could provide a breakthrough in the marine microalgal production of biodiesel.

  19. Molecular mechanisms of the resistance to hydrogen peroxide of enzymes involved in the calvin cycle from halotolerant Chlamydomonas sp. W80.

    PubMed

    Tamoi, M; Kanaboshi, H; Miyasaka, H; Shigeoka, S

    2001-06-15

    cDNA clones encoding NADP(+)-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-GAPDH) and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) were isolated and characterized from halotolerant Chlamydomonas sp. W80 (C. W80) cells. The cDNA clone for NADP(+)-GAPDH encoded 369 amino acid residues, preceded by the chloroplast transit peptide (37 amino acid residues). The cDNA clone for SBPase encoded 351 amino acids with the chloroplast transit peptide. The activities of NADP(+)-GAPDH and SBPase from C. W80 cells were resistant to H(2)O(2) up to 1 mM, as distinct from spinach chloroplastic thiol-modulated enzymes. The illumination to the dark-adapted cells and dithiothreitol treatment to the crude homogenate had little effect on the activities of NADP(+)-GAPDH and SBPase in C. W80. Modeling of the tertiary structures of NADP(+)-GAPDH and SBPase suggests that resistance of the enzymes to H(2)O(2) in C. W80 is due to the different conformational structures in the vicinity of the Cys residues of the chloroplastic enzymes between higher plant and C. W80 cells.

  20. Dynamic metabolic profiling together with transcription analysis reveals salinity-induced starch-to-lipid biosynthesis in alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Nakanishi, Akihito; Kato, Yuichi; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Chang, Jo-Shu; Misawa, Naomi; Hirose, Yuu; Minagawa, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel production using microalgae would play a pivotal role in satisfying future global energy demands. Understanding of lipid metabolism in microalgae is important to isolate oleaginous strain capable of overproducing lipids. It has been reported that reducing starch biosynthesis can enhance lipid accumulation. However, the metabolic mechanism controlling carbon partitioning from starch to lipids in microalgae remains unclear, thus complicating the genetic engineering of algal strains. We here used “dynamic” metabolic profiling and essential transcription analysis of the oleaginous green alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 for the first time to demonstrate the switching mechanisms from starch to lipid synthesis using salinity as a regulator, and identified the metabolic rate-limiting step for enhancing lipid accumulation (e.g., pyruvate-to-acetyl-CoA). These results, showing salinity-induced starch-to-lipid biosynthesis, will help increase our understanding of dynamic carbon partitioning in oleaginous microalgae. Moreover, we successfully determined the changes of several key lipid-synthesis-related genes (e.g., acetyl-CoA carboxylase, pyruvate decarboxylase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, acetyl-CoA synthetase and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase) and starch-degradation related genes (e.g., starch phosphorylases), which could provide a breakthrough in the marine microalgal production of biodiesel. PMID:28374798

  1. CHLAMYDOMONAS FLAGELLA

    PubMed Central

    Witman, G. B.; Carlson, K.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative ultrastructural analysis and quantitative gel electrophoresis of preparations of selectively solubilized Chlamydomonas outer doublets indicated that tubulins 1 and 2 were present in both the A tubule and the B tubule, and that only tubulin 1 was present in the three protofilaments which form the wall ("partition") between the lumens of the A and B tubules. The data suggested that the remaining protofilaments of the outer doublet were grouped together in pairs containing the same type of tubulin, pairs containing tubulin 1 alternating with pairs containing tubulin 2. These findings were used to construct models for the arrangement of the two tubulins in the outer doublet. Further analysis by isoelectric focusing resolved tubulins 1 and 2 into at least five bands. PMID:5044758

  2. Metabolic and gene expression changes triggered by nitrogen deprivation in the photoautotrophically grown microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Coccomyxa sp. C-169.

    PubMed

    Msanne, Joseph; Xu, Di; Konda, Anji Reddy; Casas-Mollano, J Armando; Awada, Tala; Cahoon, Edgar B; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2012-03-01

    Microalgae are emerging as suitable feedstocks for renewable biofuel production. Characterizing the metabolic pathways involved in the biosynthesis of energy-rich compounds, such as lipids and carbohydrates, and the environmental factors influencing their accumulation is necessary to realize the full potential of these organisms as energy resources. The model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates significant amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) under nitrogen starvation or salt stress in medium containing acetate. However, since cultivation of microalgae for biofuel production may need to rely on sunlight as the main source of energy for biomass synthesis, metabolic and gene expression changes occurring in Chlamydomonas and Coccomyxa subjected to nitrogen deprivation were examined under strictly photoautotrophic conditions. Interestingly, nutrient depletion triggered a similar pattern of early synthesis of starch followed by substantial TAG accumulation in both of these fairly divergent green microalgae. A marked decrease in chlorophyll and protein contents was also observed, including reduction in ribosomal polypeptides and some key enzymes for CO₂ assimilation like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. These results suggest that turnover of nitrogen-rich compounds such as proteins may provide carbon/energy for TAG biosynthesis in the nutrient deprived cells. In Chlamydomonas, several genes coding for diacylglycerol:acyl-CoA acyltransferases, catalyzing the acylation of diacylglycerol to TAG, displayed increased transcript abundance under nitrogen depletion but, counterintuitively, genes encoding enzymes for de novo fatty acid synthesis, such as 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase I, were down-regulated. Understanding the interdependence of these anabolic and catabolic processes and their regulation may allow the engineering of algal strains with improved capacity to convert their biomass into useful biofuel precursors.

  3. Isolation of Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Craige, Branch; Brown, Jason M.; Witman, George B.

    2014-01-01

    A simple, scalable, and fast procedure for the isolation of Chlamydomonas flagella is described. Chlamydomonas can be synchronously deflagellated by treatment with chemicals, pH shock, or mechanical shear. The Basic Protocol describes the procedure for flagellar isolation using dibucaine to induce flagellar abscission; we also describe the pH shock method as an Alternate Protocol when flagellar regeneration is desirable. Sub-fractionation of the isolated flagella into axonemes and the membrane + matrix fraction is described in a Support Protocol. PMID:23728744

  4. Sex determination in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Ursula; Lin, Huawen; Lee, Jae-Hyeok

    2007-06-01

    The sex-determination system of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is governed by genes in the mating-type (MT) locus and entails additional genes located in autosomes. Gene expression is initiated by nitrogen starvation, and cells differentiate into plus or minus gametes within 6h. Reviewed is our current understanding of gametic differentiation and fertilization, initiation of zygote development, and the uniparental inheritance of organelle genomes.

  5. Cytoduction in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, R F; Remacle, C; Dinant, M

    1991-01-01

    After conjugation between Chlamydomonas gametes of opposite mating type, a transient dikaryon is formed. The two nuclei fuse within 4-6 hr after mating. The young diploid zygote differentiates into dormant zygospore competent to complete meiosis, or more rarely (2-10% of cases) it undergoes mitosis to produce a stable diploid progeny. We here bring genetical, biochemical, and cytological evidence that among the mitotic zygotes, a large proportion of them undergo cytokinesis without fusion of the nuclei-a process that has been termed "cytoduction." By using appropriate genetic markers, haploid cytoductants that possess the nuclear genotype of one parent and the chloroplast marker of the other parent can easily be isolated. Genetical analysis and hybridization experiments moreover show that many haploid cytoductants transmit the chloroplast DNA molecules of both parents and that, as in diploids, these DNA copies occasionally recombine. This process of cytoduction extends the life cycle of Chlamydomonas and provides new tools for its genetic analysis. Images PMID:1871143

  6. Diversity in photosynthetic electron transport under [CO2]-limitation: the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii drive an O2-dependent alternative electron flow and non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence during CO2-limited photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Akimoto, Seiji; Ueno, Yoshifumi; Wada, Ayumi; Shaku, Keiichiro; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-12-01

    Some cyanobacteria, but not all, experience an induction of alternative electron flow (AEF) during CO2-limited photosynthesis. For example, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) exhibits AEF, but Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942 does not. This difference is due to the presence of flavodiiron 2 and 4 proteins (FLV2/4) in S. 6803, which catalyze electron donation to O2. In this study, we observed a low-[CO2] induced AEF in the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 that lacks FLV2/4. The AEF shows high affinity for O2, compared with AEF mediated by FLV2/4 in S. 6803, and can proceed under extreme low [O2] (about a few µM O2). Further, the transition from CO2-saturated to CO2-limited photosynthesis leads a preferential excitation of PSI to PSII and increased non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. We found that the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also has an O2-dependent AEF showing the same affinity for O2 as that in S. 7002. These data represent the diverse molecular mechanisms to drive AEF in cyanobacteria and green algae. In this paper, we further discuss the diversity, the evolution, and the physiological function of strategy to CO2-limitation in cyanobacterial and green algal photosynthesis.

  7. Chlamydomonas: A Model Green Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the instructional potential of Chlamydomonas in providing a basis for a range of experimental investigations to illustrate basic biological phenomena. Describes the use of this algae genus in studies of population growth, photosynthesis, and mating behavior. Procedures for laboratory exercises are included. (ML)

  8. 13th International Conference on Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Silflow, Carolyn D.

    2014-03-11

    The 13th International Conference on Chlamydomonas (EMBO Workshop on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas) was held May 27 to June 1, 2008 in Hyeres, France. The conference was the biennial meeting for all researchers studying the green algal systems Chlamydomonas and Volvox. The conference brought together approximately 200 investigators from around the world (North America, Asia, Europe and Australia) representing different fields and disciplines (cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, plant physiology, genomics). It provided an opportunity for investigators from different countries to share methodologies and to discuss recent results with a focus on the Chlamydomonas experimental system.

  9. Isodityrosine cross-linking mediates insolubilization of cell walls in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Waffenschmidt, S; Woessner, J P; Beer, K; Goodenough, U W

    1993-07-01

    Enzymatic removal of the cell wall induces vegetative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to transcribe wall genes and synthesize new hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) related to the extensins found in higher plant cell walls. A cDNA expression library made from such induced cells was screened with antibodies to an oligopeptide containing the (SP)x repetitive domains found in Chlamydomonas wall proteins. One of the selected cDNAs encodes an (SP)x-rich polypeptide that also displays a repeated YGG motif. Ascorbate, a peroxidase inhibitor, and tyrosine derivatives were shown to inhibit insolubilization of both the vegetative and zygotic cell walls of Chlamydomonas, suggesting that oxidative cross-linking of tyrosines is occurring. Moreover, insolubilization of both walls was concomitant with a burst in H2O2 production and in extracellular peroxidase activity. Finally, both isodityrosine and dityrosine were found in hydrolysates of the insolubilized vegetative wall layer. We propose that the formation of tyrosine cross-links is essential to Chlamydomonas HRGP insolubilization.

  10. Isodityrosine cross-linking mediates insolubilization of cell walls in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Waffenschmidt, S; Woessner, J P; Beer, K; Goodenough, U W

    1993-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of the cell wall induces vegetative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to transcribe wall genes and synthesize new hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) related to the extensins found in higher plant cell walls. A cDNA expression library made from such induced cells was screened with antibodies to an oligopeptide containing the (SP)x repetitive domains found in Chlamydomonas wall proteins. One of the selected cDNAs encodes an (SP)x-rich polypeptide that also displays a repeated YGG motif. Ascorbate, a peroxidase inhibitor, and tyrosine derivatives were shown to inhibit insolubilization of both the vegetative and zygotic cell walls of Chlamydomonas, suggesting that oxidative cross-linking of tyrosines is occurring. Moreover, insolubilization of both walls was concomitant with a burst in H2O2 production and in extracellular peroxidase activity. Finally, both isodityrosine and dityrosine were found in hydrolysates of the insolubilized vegetative wall layer. We propose that the formation of tyrosine cross-links is essential to Chlamydomonas HRGP insolubilization. PMID:7689882

  11. Cell and molecular biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document contains only the abstracts of 92 presentations on the biology of Chlamydomonas. Topics include gene transformations, gene regulation, biosynthetic pathways, cell surfaces, circadian clocks, and the development and structure of the flagellar apparatus. (TEM)

  12. Select Acetophenones Modulate Flagellar Motility in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Shakila K.; Pearce, Austin A.; Ibezim, Prudence K.; Primm, Todd P.; Gaillard, Anne R.

    2009-01-01

    Acetophenones were screened for activity against positive phototaxis of Chlamydomonas cells, a process that requires coordinated flagellar motility. The structure-activity relationships of a series of acetophenones are reported, including acetophenones that affect flagellar motility and cell viability. Notably, 4-methoxyacetophenone, 3,4-dimethoxyacetophenone, and 4-hydroxyacetophenone induced negative phototaxis in Chlamydomonas, suggesting interference with activity of flagellar proteins and control of flagellar dominance. PMID:20659114

  13. Temperature-sensitive rubisco mutant of Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Spreitzer, R.J.; Chastain, C.J.

    1987-04-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant 68-4PP is a temperature-sensitive mutant that lacks photosynthetic ability at 35/sup 0/C, but is able to grow photosynthetically at 25/sup 0/C. Genetic analysis indicated that 68-4PP is a chloroplast mutant that is allelic with known Rubisco large-subunit structural-gene mutants, implying that 68-4PP also resulted from a mutation in the large-subunit gene. The 68-4PP mutant has about 35% of the wild-type level of Rubisco holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 25/sup 0/C, but it has less than 10% of normal holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 35/sup 0/C. However, (/sup 35/S)-sulfate pulse labeling showed that Rubisco subunits were synthesized at normal rates at both temperatures. More significantly, the ratio of carboxylase activity in the absence and presence of oxygen at a limiting CO/sub 2/ concentration (6.6 ..mu..M) was about 2.2 for the mutant enzyme, as compared to about 3.0 for the wild-type enzyme. The decreased ratio of the mutant enzyme is maternally inherited, indicating that this reduced oxygen sensitivity results from a mutation in chloroplast DNA. The authors have recently cloned the 68-4PP Rubisco large-subunit gene, and DNA sequencing is in progress.

  14. Photomixing of chlamydomonas rheinhardtii suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Capellazzi Resta, Marina; Abou, Bérengère; Brunet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas rheinhardtii is a fast swimming unicellular alga able to bias its swimming direction in gradients of light intensity, an ability know as phototaxis. We have investigated experimentally both the swimming behavior of individual cells and the macroscopic response of shallow suspensions of these micro-organisms in response to a localized light source. At low light intensity, algae exhibit positive phototaxis and accumulate beneath the excitation light. In weakly concentrated thin layers, the balance between phototaxis and cell motility results in steady symmetrical patterns compatible with a purely diffusive model using effective diffusion coefficients extracted from the analysis of individual cell trajectories. However, at higher cell density and layer depth, collective effects induce convective flows around the light source. These flows disturb the cell concentration patterns which spread and may then becomes unstable. Using large passive tracer particles, we have characterized the velocity fields associated with this forced bioconvection and their dependence on the cell density and layer depth. By tuning the light distribution, this mechanism of photo-bioconvection allows a fine control over the local fluid flows, and thus the mixing efficiency, in algal suspensions.

  15. A steering mechanism for phototaxis in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas shows both positive and negative phototaxis. It has a single eyespot near its equator, and as the cell rotates during the forward motion, the light signal received by the eyespot varies. We use a simple mechanical model of Chlamydomonas that couples the flagellar beat pattern to the light intensity at the eyespot to demonstrate a mechanism for phototactic steering that is consistent with observations. The direction of phototaxis is controlled by a parameter in our model, and the steering mechanism is robust to noise. Our model shows switching between directed phototaxis when the light is on and run-and-tumble behaviour in the dark. PMID:25589576

  16. Light-Absorbing Carbon in Cloud Residual Nuclei During ICE-L: Combining the Single Particle Soot Photometer and the Counterflow Virtual Impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, R.; Kok, G. L.; Baumgardner, D.; Twohy, C.

    2008-12-01

    The single particle soot photometer (SP2) measures strongly-light absorbing (black) carbon (LAC) using laser incandescence. During the Ice in Clouds Experiment (ICE-L) conducted over Colorado and Wyoming in November/December 2007, the SP2 was operated downstream of a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) onboard the NCAR C-130 aircraft, when the plane passed through a cloud. The CVI collects cloud droplets and ice crystals larger than 8 μm and evaporates the water content, so that residual nuclei are sampled. The CVI also concentrates the incoming air-stream by as much as a factor of 30 or more. The combination enables measurements of LAC much lower than 1 ng/m3. Results indicate that compared to aerosol in the surrounding air mass, LAC concentrations (per unit volume air) were generally lower in cloud. On November 16, two wave clouds were sampled near Riverton and Wheatland, WY at altitudes between 6-8 km above sea level. LAC mass concentrations upwind of the clouds averaged 5.6 and 4 ng/m3, while in- cloud averages were 0.6 and 0.3 ng/m3 respectively. Average number scavenging ratios of LAC- containing particles measured by the SP2 were 17% and 14% for the two mixed liquid/ice cloud events. In- cloud LAC mass normalized to cloud water content (CWC) was 19 ng/g-CWC in the Riverton cloud, and lower over Wheaton. Multiple passes at different altitudes through the cloud nearer Wheaton did not show a dependence of LAC/CWC on altitude. In a wave cloud over the Wind River Range on November 29, ice-only portions showed LAC/CWC about a factor-of-4 lower than smaller mixed-phase regions of the cloud. Data on LAC measurements in upslope conditions will also be presented.

  17. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on

    PubMed Central

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F. Y.; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated, an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the “omics” era. Housed at Phytozome, the Joint Genome Institute’s (JGI) plant genomics portal, the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of RNA-Seq data. Here, we present the past, present and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  18. MEETING: Chlamydomonas Annotation Jamboree - October 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-04-13

    Shotgun sequencing of the nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas throughout) was performed at an approximate 10X coverage by JGI. Roughly half of the genome is now contained on 26 scaffolds, all of which are at least 1.6 Mb, and the coverage of the genome is ~95%. There are now over 200,000 cDNA sequence reads that we have generated as part of the Chlamydomonas genome project (Grossman, 2003; Shrager et al., 2003; Grossman et al. 2007; Merchant et al., 2007); other sequences have also been generated by the Kasuza sequence group (Asamizu et al., 1999; Asamizu et al., 2000) or individual laboratories that have focused on specific genes. Shrager et al. (2003) placed the reads into distinct contigs (an assemblage of reads with overlapping nucleotide sequences), and contigs that group together as part of the same genes have been designated ACEs (assembly of contigs generated from EST information). All of the reads have also been mapped to the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome and the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences have been reassembled, and the resulting assemblage is called an ACEG (an Assembly of contiguous EST sequences supported by genomic sequence) (Jain et al., 2007). Most of the unique genes or ACEGs are also represented by gene models that have been generated by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Walnut Creek, CA). These gene models have been placed onto the DNA scaffolds and are presented as a track on the Chlamydomonas genome browser associated with the genome portal (http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Chlre3/Chlre3.home.html). Ultimately, the meeting grant awarded by DOE has helped enormously in the development of an annotation pipeline (a set of guidelines used in the annotation of genes) and resulted in high quality annotation of over 4,000 genes; the annotators were from both Europe and the USA. Some of the people who led the annotation initiative were Arthur Grossman, Olivier Vallon, and Sabeeha Merchant (with many individual

  19. Efficient H2 production via Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Esquível, Maria G; Amaro, Helena M; Pinto, Teresa S; Fevereiro, Pedro S; Malcata, F Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) obtained from biological sources provides an alternative to bulk chemical processes that is moving towards large-scale, economical generation of clean fuel for automotive engines. This opinion article examines recent improvements in H(2) production by wild and mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - the green microalga currently considered the best eukaryotic H(2) producer. Here, we review various aspects of genetic and metabolic engineering of C. reinhardtii, as well as of process engineering. Additionally, we lay out possible scenarios that would lead to more efficient research approaches in the near future, as part of a consistent strategy for sustainable biohydrogen supply.

  20. [An experiment with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii on the Kosmos-2044 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Gavrilova, O V; Gabova, A V; Goriainova, L N; Filatova, E V

    1992-01-01

    Space experiment with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii demonstrated that the microgravity effects were noted in Chlamydomonas at both cellular and population levels: in space the cell size is increased, stage of active growth of the culture is extended, it contains the juvenile vegetative motile cells in greater quantities. Ultrastructural analysis indicated that in microgravity the changes in shape, structure and distribution of intracellular organelles and in volume ratio of organelles and cytoplasma are absent. Chlamydomonas data are in line with the results of the Infusoria and Chlorella experiments.

  1. Paternal inheritance of mitochondria in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Soichi

    2010-03-01

    To analyze mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)inheritance, differences in mtDNA between Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii, respiration deficiency and antibiotic resistance were used to distinguish mtDNA origins. The analyses indicated paternal inheritance. However, these experiments raised questions regarding whether paternal inheritance occurred normally.Mitochondrial nucleoids were observed in living zygotes from mating until 3 days after mating and then until progeny formation. However, selective disappearance of nucleoids was not observed. Subsequently, experimental serial backcrosses between the two strains demonstrated strict paternal inheritance. The fate of mt+ and mt- mtDNA was followed using the differences in mtDNA between the two strains. The slow elimination of mt+ mtDNA through zygote maturation in darkness was observed, and later the disappearance of mt+ mtDNA was observed at the beginning of meiosis. To explain the different fates of mtDNA, methylation status was investigated; however, no methylation was detected. Variously constructed diploid cells showed biparental inheritance. Thus, when the mating process occurs normally, paternal inheritance occurs. Mutations disrupting mtDNA inheritance have not yet been isolated. Mutations that disrupt maternal inheritance of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) do not disrupt inheritance of mtDNA. The genes responsible for mtDNA inheritance are different from those of chloroplasts.

  2. International Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Stephen Miller

    2010-06-10

    The 2010 Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas was held June 6-10 near Boston, MA, and attracted a record 273 participants, 146 from US labs, 10 from Canada, and the remainder from 18 other countries. The single-celled algal protist Chlamydomonas is a key research organism for many investigators, including those who study photosynthesis, cell motility, adaptation to environmental stresses, the evolution of multicellularity, and the production of biofuels. Chlamydomonas researchers gather every two years at a research conference to exchange methods, develop collaborative efforts, disseminate recent findings, and plan large-scale studies to improve the usefulness of this unique research organism. This conference provides the only opportunity for Chlamydomonas scientists who work on different research problems to meet face to face, and greatly speeds progress in their respective fields. An important function of these Chlamydomonas conferences is to promote and showcase the work of younger scientists, and to attract new investigators into the Chlamydomonas community. DOE award SC0004085 was used to offset the travel and registration costs for 18 young investigators, 9 of whom were women, including one African American. Most of these scientists would not have been able to attend the conference without DOE support. A total of 208 research presentations were made at the meeting, 80 talks (63 presented by students, postdocs, and pre-tenured faculty) and 128 posters. Cell motility and biofuels/metabolism were the best-represented research areas, with a total of 77 presentations. This fact underscores the growing importance of Chlamydomonas as a research and production tool in the rapidly expanding world of biofuels research. A total of 28 talks and posters were presented on the topics of photosynthesis and stress responses, which were among the next best-represented research areas. As at several recent Chlamydomonas meetings, important advances were

  3. Identification of an NADP/thioredoxin system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; Picaud, A.; Buchanan, B. B.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.

    1991-01-01

    The protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system, NADP-thioredoxin reductase (NTR) and thioredoxin h, have been purified and characterized from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analysis of this system confirms that photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas cells resemble leaves in having both an NADP- and ferrodoxin-linked thioredoxin redox system. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin h, which is smaller on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than thioredoxin m from the same source, cross-reacted with antisera to thioredoxin h from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and wheat germ (Triticum vulgaris L.) but not with antisera to m or f thioredoxins. In these properties, the thioredoxin h resembled a thioredoxin from Chlamydomonas, designated Ch1, whose sequence was reported recently (P. Decottignies et al., 1991, Eur. J. Biochem. 198, 505-512). The differential reactivity of thioredoxin h with antisera was used to demonstrate that thioredoxin h is enriched outside the chloroplast. The NTR was purified from Chlamydomonas using thioredoxin h from the same source. Similar to its counterpart from other organisms, Chlamydomonas NTR had a subunit size of approx. 36 kDa and was specific for NADPH. Chlamydomonas NTR effectively reduced thioredoxin h from the same source but showed little activity with the other thioredoxins tested, including spinach thioredoxin h and Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Comparison of the reduction of Chlamydomonas thioredoxins m and h by each of the endogenous thioredoxin reductases, NTR and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase, revealed a differential specificity of each enzyme for thioredoxin. Thus, NTR showed increased activity with thioredoxin h and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase with thioredoxins m and f.

  4. A brief introduction to the model microswimmer Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanneret, Raphaël; Contino, Matteo; Polin, Marco

    2016-11-01

    The unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been an important model system in biology for decades, and in recent years it has started to attract growing attention also within the biophysics community. Here we provide a concise review of some of the aspects of Chlamydomonas biology and biophysics most immediately relevant to physicists that might be interested in starting to work with this versatile microorganism.

  5. Structure of GUN4 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Tarahi Tabrizi, Shabnam; Langley, David B; Harrop, Stephen J; Duff, Anthony P; Willows, Robert D

    2015-08-01

    The genomes uncoupled 4 (GUN4) protein stimulates chlorophyll biosynthesis by increasing the activity of Mg-chelatase, the enzyme that inserts magnesium into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. One of the roles of GUN4 is in binding PPIX and Mg-PPIX. In eukaryotes, GUN4 also participates in plastid-to-nucleus signalling, although the mechanism for this is unclear. Here, the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic GUN4, from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is presented. The structure is in broad agreement with those of previously solved cyanobacterial structures. Most interestingly, conformational divergence is restricted to several loops which cover the porphyrin-binding cleft. The conformational dynamics suggested by this ensemble of structures lend support to the understanding of how GUN4 binds PPIX or Mg-PPIX.

  6. Photoperiodic control of germination in the unicell Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Lena; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2002-03-01

    Photoperiodic time measurement is a well-documented adaptation of multicellular plants and animals to seasonal changes in the environment, but it is unclear whether unicellular organisms can exhibit bona fide photoperiodic responses. We demonstrate that the occurrence of zygospore germination of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas is a genuine photoperiodic response. Germination efficiency is enhanced in long days as compared with short days. While the total amount of light exposure influences the efficiency of germination, the photoperiod is a significant cue for germination. The developmental stage that senses the photoperiod is just prior to mating and during the first days of zygospore development, so there may be a critical window of zygospore maturation that is regulated by photoperiod. Because zygospores are resistant to freezing injury, whereas vegetative cells are not, it is likely that the suppression of germination by short days is an adaptive response for overwintering of Chlamydomonas. Therefore, Chlamydomonas is a single-celled organism that is capable of photoperiodic responses.

  7. Patching Holes in the Chlamydomonas Genome

    PubMed Central

    Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas genome has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated to produce a rich resource for genetics and molecular biology in this well-studied model organism. However, the current reference genome contains ∼1000 blocks of unknown sequence (‘N-islands’), which are frequently placed in introns of annotated gene models. We developed a strategy to search for previously unknown exons hidden within such blocks, and determine the sequence, and exon/intron boundaries, of such exons. These methods are based on assembly and alignment of short cDNA and genomic DNA reads, completely independent of prior reference assembly or annotation. Our evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of the annotated intronic N-islands contain hidden exons. For most of these, our algorithm recovers full exonic sequence with associated splice junctions and exon-adjacent intronic sequence. These new exons represent de novo sequence generally present nowhere in the assembled genome, and the added sequence improves evolutionary conservation of the predicted encoded peptides. PMID:27175017

  8. Analysis of flagellar phosphoproteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Boesger, Jens; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are cell organelles that are highly conserved throughout evolution. For many years, the green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model for examination of the structure and function of its flagella, which are similar to certain mammalian cilia. Proteome analysis revealed the presence of several kinases and protein phosphatases in these organelles. Reversible protein phosphorylation can control ciliary beating, motility, signaling, length, and assembly. Despite the importance of this posttranslational modification, the identities of many ciliary phosphoproteins and knowledge about their in vivo phosphorylation sites are still missing. Here we used immobilized metal affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides from purified flagella and analyzed them by mass spectrometry. One hundred forty-one phosphorylated peptides were identified, belonging to 32 flagellar proteins. Thereby, 126 in vivo phosphorylation sites were determined. The flagellar phosphoproteome includes different structural and motor proteins, kinases, proteins with protein interaction domains, and many proteins whose functions are still unknown. In several cases, a dynamic phosphorylation pattern and clustering of phosphorylation sites were found, indicating a complex physiological status and specific control by reversible protein phosphorylation in the flagellum.

  9. Recording and analyzing IFT in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William; Vanderwaal, Kristyn; Porter, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    The transport of materials to and from the cell body and tips of eukaryotic flagella and cilia is carried out by a process called intraflagellar transport, or IFT. This process is essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella: in the absence of IFT, cilia cannot assemble and, if IFT is arrested in ciliated cells, the cilia disassemble. The major IFT complex proteins and the major motor proteins, kinesin-2 and osm-3 (which transport particles from the cell body to ciliary tips) and cytoplasmic dynein 1b (which transports particles from ciliary tips to the cell body) have been identified. However, we have little understanding of the structure of the IFT particles, the cargo that these particles carry, how cargo is loaded and unloaded from the particles, or how the motor proteins are regulated. The focus of this chapter is to provide methods to observe and quantify the movements of IFT particles in Chlamydomonas flagella. IFT movements can be visualized in paralyzed or partially arrested flagella using either differential interference contrast (IFT) microscopy or, in cells with fluorescently tagged IFT components, with fluorescence microscopy. Methods for recording IFT movements and analyzing movements using kymograms are described.

  10. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  11. Drosophila roadblock and Chlamydomonas Lc7

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Aaron B.; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Benashski, Sharon E.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Goldstein, Lawrence S.B.; King, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms utilize microtubule-dependent motors of the kinesin and dynein superfamilies to generate intracellular movement. To identify new genes involved in the regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila melanogaster, we undertook a screen based upon the sluggish larval phenotype of known motor mutants. One of the mutants identified in this screen, roadblock (robl), exhibits diverse defects in intracellular transport including axonal transport and mitosis. These defects include intra-axonal accumulations of cargoes, severe axonal degeneration, and aberrant chromosome segregation. The gene identified by robl encodes a 97–amino acid polypeptide that is 57% identical (70% similar) to the 105–amino acid Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein–associated protein LC7, also reported here. Both robl and LC7 have homology to several other genes from fruit fly, nematode, and mammals, but not Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we demonstrate that members of this family of proteins are associated with both flagellar outer arm dynein and Drosophila and rat brain cytoplasmic dynein. We propose that roadblock/LC7 family members may modulate specific dynein functions. PMID:10402468

  12. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  13. Genetic tools and techniques for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mussgnug, Jan H

    2015-07-01

    The development of tools has always been a major driving force for the advancement of science. Optical microscopes were the first instruments that allowed discovery and descriptive studies of the subcellular features of microorganisms. Although optical and electron microscopes remained at the forefront of microbiological research tools since their inventions, the advent of molecular genetics brought about questions which had to be addressed with new "genetic tools". The unicellular green microalgal genus Chlamydomonas, especially the most prominent species C. reinhardtii, has become a frequently used model organism for many diverse fields of research and molecular genetic analyses of C. reinhardtii, as well as the available genetic tools and techniques, have become increasingly sophisticated throughout the last decades. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the molecular key features of C. reinhardtii and summarize the progress related to the development of tools and techniques for genetic engineering of this organism, from pioneering DNA transformation experiments to state-of-the-art techniques for targeted nuclear genome editing and high-throughput screening approaches.

  14. High yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martinez, E M; Fimognari, L; Sakuragi, Y

    2017-02-16

    Microalga-based biomanufacturing of recombinant proteins is attracting growing attention due to its advantages in safety, metabolic diversity, scalability, and sustainability. Secretion of recombinant proteins can accelerate the use of microalgal platforms by allowing post-translational modifications and easy recovery of products from the culture media. However, currently, the yields of secreted recombinant proteins are low, which hampers the commercial application of this strategy. This study aimed at expanding the genetic tools for enhancing secretion of recombinant proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a widely used green microalga as a model organism and a potential industrial biotechnology platform. We demonstrated that the putative signal sequence from C. reinhardtii gametolysin can assist the secretion of the yellow fluorescent protein Venus into the culture media. In order to increase the secretion yields, Venus was C-terminally fused with synthetic glycomodules comprised of tandem serine (Ser) and proline (Pro) repeats of 10 and 20 units [hereafter (SP)n, wherein n=10 or 20]. The yields of the (SP)n-fused Venus were higher than Venus without the glycomodule by up to 12 folds, with the maximum yield of 15 mg L(-1) . Moreover, the presence of the glycomodules confererred an enhanced proteolytic protein stability. The Venus-(SP)n proteins were shown to be glycosylated, and a treatment of the cells with Brefeldin A led to a suggestion that glycosylation of the (SP)n glycomodules starts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Taken together, the results demonstrate the utility of the gametolysin signal sequence and (SP)n glycomodule to promote a more efficient biomanufacturing of microalgae-based recombinant proteins. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Separate origins of ice-binding proteins in antarctic chlamydomonas species.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas raudensis is an important primary producer in a number of ice-covered lakes and ponds in Antarctica. A C. raudensis isolate (UWO241) from Lake Bonney in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, like many other Antarctic algae, was found to secrete ice-binding proteins (IBPs), which appear to be essential for survival in icy environments. The IBPs of several Antarctic algae (diatoms, a prymesiophyte, and a prasinophyte) are similar to each other (here designated as type I IBPs) and have been proposed to have bacterial origins. Other IBPs (type II IBPs) that bear no resemblance to type I IBPs, have been found in the Antarctic Chlamydomonas sp. CCMP681, a putative snow alga, raising the possibility that chlamydomonad IBPs developed separately from the IBPs of other algae. To test this idea, we obtained the IBP sequences of C. raudensis UWO241 by sequencing the transcriptome. A large number of transcripts revealed no sequences resembling type II IBPs. Instead, many isoforms resembling type I IBPs were found, and these most closely matched a hypothetical protein from the bacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca. The sequences were confirmed to encode IBPs by the activity of a recombinant protein and by the matching of predicted and observed isoelectric points and molecular weights. Furthermore, a mesophilic sister species, C. raudensis SAG49.72, showed no ice-binding activity or PCR products from UWO241 IBP primers. These results confirm that algal IBPs are required for survival in icy habitats and demonstrate that they have diverse origins that are unrelated to the taxonomic positions of the algae. Last, we show that the C. raudensis UWO241 IBPs can change the structure of ice in a way that could increase the survivability of cells trapped in the ice.

  16. Developing molecular tools for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh

    Microalgae have garnered increasing interest over the years for their ability to produce compounds ranging from biofuels to neutraceuticals. A main focus of researchers has been to use microalgae as a natural bioreactor for the production of valuable and complex compounds. Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. To take full advantage of these organisms' natural abilities, sophisticated molecular tools are needed to be able to introduce and functionally express multiple gene biosynthetic pathways in its genome. To achieve the above objective, we have sought to establish a method to construct, integrate and express multigene operons in the chloroplast and nuclear genome of the model microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast, or by random integration in the nuclear genome of C. reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii and up to three reporter proteins (Ble, AphVIII, and GFP) in its nuclear genome. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated-region selection when constructing a target pathway. In addition, this work focuses on expressing the cofactor regeneration enzyme phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH) in the chloroplast and nuclear genomes of C. reinhardtii. The PTDH enzyme converts phosphite into phosphate and NAD(P)+ into NAD(P)H. The reduced

  17. Strategies to facilitate transgene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Eichler-Stahlberg, Alke; Weisheit, Wolfram; Ruecker, Ovidiu; Heitzer, Markus

    2009-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been identified as a promising organism for the production of recombinant proteins. While during the last years important improvements have been developed for the production of proteins within the chloroplast, the expression levels of transgenes from the nuclear genome were too low to be of biotechnological importance. In this study, we integrated endogenous intronic sequences into the expression cassette to enhance the expression of transgenes in the nucleus. The insertion of one or more copies of intron sequences from the Chlamydomonas RBCS2 gene resulted in increased expression levels of a Renilla-luciferase gene used as a reporter. Although any of the three RBCS2 introns alone had a positive effect on expression, their integration in their physiological number and order created an over-proportional stimulating effect observed in all transformants. The secretion of the luciferase protein into the medium was achieved by using the export sequence of the Chlamydomonas ARS2 gene in a cell wall deficient strain and Renilla-luciferase could be successfully concentrated with the help of attached C-terminal protein tags. Similarly, a codon adapted gene variant for human erythropoietin (crEpo) was expressed as a protein of commercial relevance. Extracellular erythropoietin produced in Chlamydomonas showed a molecular mass of 33 kDa probably resulting from post-translational modifications. Both, the increased expression levels of transgenes by integration of introns and the isolation of recombinant proteins from the culture medium are important steps towards an extended biotechnological use of this alga.

  18. Homogentisate phytyltransferase from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Cardeñosa, Rosa; Pineda, Manuel; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Homogentisate phytyltransferase (HPT) (EC 2.5.1.-) catalyzes the first committed step of tocopherol biosynthesis in all photosynthetic organisms. This paper presents the molecular characterization and expression analysis of HPT1 gene, and a study on the accumulation of tocopherols under different environmental conditions in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas HPT1 protein conserves all the prenylphosphate- and divalent cation-binding sites that are found in polyprenyltransferases and all the amino acids that are essential for its catalytic activity. Its hydrophobicity profile confirms that HPT is a membrane-bound protein. Chlamydomonas genomic DNA analysis suggests that HPT is encoded by a single gene, HPT1, whose promoter region contains multiple motifs related to regulation by jasmonate, abscisic acid, low temperature and light, and an ATCTA motif presents in genes involved in tocopherol biosynthesis and some photosynthesis-related genes. Expression analysis revealed that HPT1 is strongly regulated by dark and low-temperature. Under the same treatments, α-tocopherol increased in cultures exposed to darkness or heat, whereas γ-tocopherol did it in low temperature. The regulatory expression pattern of HPT1 and the changes of tocopherol abundance support the idea that different tocopherols play specific functions, and suggest a role for γ-tocopherol in the adaptation to growth under low-temperature.

  19. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C; Sale, Winfield S; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-09-08

    Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Because actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor, suggesting that actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length.

  20. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis.

  1. Regulation of cellular manganese and manganese transport rates in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular accumulation and uptake kinetics of manganese by Chlamydomonas sp. were studied in model chelate buffer systems. Cellular manganese concentrations and uptake rates were related to the computed free manganese ion concentration and were independent of the total or chelated manganese concentration. Cellular manganese was constant at about 1 mmol liter/sup -1/ of cellular volume at free manganese ion concentrations of 10/sup -7/ /sup 6/-10/sup -6/ /sup 3/ mol liter/sup -1/ and decreased below this range. Manganese uptake rates followed saturation kinetics and V/sub max/, but not K/sub s/, varied with the free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium. V/sub max/ appeared to be under negative feedback control and increased with decreasing manganese ion concentration. Variations of up to 30-fold in this parameter seemed to be instrumental in limiting the variation in cellular manganese to a sixfold range despite a 1000-fold variation in free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium.

  2. Cross-reconstitution of the extrinsic proteins and photosystem II complexes from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Spinacia oleracea.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Ohta, H; Enami, I

    2005-06-01

    Cross-reconstitution of the extrinsic proteins and Photosystem II (PS II) from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and a higher plant,Spinacia oleracea, was performed to clarify the differences of binding properties of the extrinsic proteins between these two species of organisms. (1) Chlamydomonas PsbP and PsbQ directly bound to Chlamydomonas PS II independent of the other extrinsic proteins but not to spinach PS II. (2) Chlamydomonas PsbP and PsbQ directly bound to the functional sites of Chlamydomonas PS II independent of the origins of PsbO, while spinach PsbP and PsbQ only bound to non-functional sites on Chlamydomonas PS II. (3) Both Chlamydomonas PsbP and spinach PsbP functionally bound to spinach PS II in the presence of spinach PsbO. (4) While Chlamydomonas PsbP functionally bound to spinach PS II in the presence of Chlamydomonas PsbO, spinach PsbP bound loosely to spinach PS II in the presence of Chlamydomonas PsbO with no concomitant restoration of oxygen evolution. (5) Chlamydomonas PsbQ bound to spinach PS II in the presence of Chlamydomonas PsbP and PsbO or spinach PsbO but not to spinach PS II in the presence of spinach PsbP and Chlamydomonas PsbO or spinach PsbO. (6) Spinach PsbQ did not bind to spinach PS II in the presence of Chlamydomonas PsbO and PsbP. On the basis of these results, we showed a simplified scheme for binding patterns of the green algal and higher plant extrinsic proteins with respective PS II.

  3. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii.

  4. Effective viscosity of non-gravitactic Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Active microswimmers are known to affect the macroscopic viscosity of suspensions in a more complex manner than passive particles. For puller-like microswimmers an increase in the viscosity has been observed. It has been suggested that the persistence of the orientation of the microswimmers hinders the rotation that is normally caused by the vorticity. It was previously shown that some sorts of algae are bottom-heavy swimmers, i.e., their centre of mass is not located in the centre of the body. In this way, the algae affect the vorticity of the flow when they are perpendicularly oriented to the axis of gravity. This orientation of gravity to vorticity is given in a rheometer that is equipped with a cone-plate geometry. Here we present measurements of the viscosity both in a cone-plate and a Taylor-Couette cell. The two set-ups yielded the same increase in viscosity although the axis of gravitation in the Taylor-Couette cell is parallel to the direction of vorticity. In a complementary experiment we tested the orientation of the direction of swimming through microscopic observation of single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and could not identify a preferred orientation, i.e., our specific strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not bottom-heavy swimmers. We thus conclude that bottom heaviness is not a prerequisite for the increase of viscosity and that the effect of gravity on the rheology of our strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is negligible. This finding reopens the question of whether the origin of persistence in the orientation of cells is actually responsible for the increased viscosity of the suspension.

  5. [Development of the Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture after microwave irradiation].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, O O; Berezovskaia, M A; Datsenko, A I

    2012-01-01

    Effect of the microwave irradiation on the subsequent development of the Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture is studied. The number of cells in the suspension was controlled and photoluminescence measurements were performed for 25 days to estimate the functional state of the cells. The exposure at a dose of 80 J/g is shown to negligibly affect the green alga, whereas the 122 J/g dose led to deterioration of the functional state and, thereafter, to the death of most cells. However, the survivors intensively developed, the culture restored the normal state for 20 days, reached and later even left behind the control sample in development.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a Chlamydomonas L-asparaginase.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, J H

    1982-01-01

    An L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) specific for L-asparagine has been purified from a marine Chlamydomonas species, the first such enzyme to be purified from a microalga. The purified enzyme (mol.wt. 275 000) possessed a Km for asparagine of 1.34 x 10(-4) M and showed limited antitumour activity in an antilymphoma assay in vivo. Properties of the enzyme are contrasted with those of asparaginases from prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6896642

  7. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  8. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals.

  9. Propulsive Forces on the Flagellum during Locomotion of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Bayly, P.V.; Lewis, B.L.; Ranz, E.C.; Okamoto, R.J.; Pless, R.B.; Dutcher, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    The distributed propulsive forces exerted on the flagellum of the swimming alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by surrounding fluid were estimated from experimental image data. Images of uniflagellate mutant Chlamydomonas cells were obtained at 350 frames/s with 125-nm spatial resolution, and the motion of the cell body and the flagellum were analyzed in the context of low-Reynolds-number fluid mechanics. Wild-type uniflagellate cells, as well as uniflagellate cells lacking inner dynein arms (ida3) or outer dynein arms (oda2) were studied. Ida3 cells exhibit stunted flagellar waveforms, whereas oda2 cells beat with lower frequency. Image registration and sorting algorithms provided high-resolution estimates of the motion of the cell body, as well as detailed kinematics of the flagellum. The swimming cell was modeled as an ellipsoid in Stokes flow, propelled by viscous forces on the flagellum. The normal and tangential components of force on the flagellum (fN and fT) were related by resistive coefficients (CN and CT) to the corresponding components of velocity (VN and VT).The values of these coefficients were estimated by satisfying equilibrium requirements for force and torque on the cell. The estimated values of the resistive coefficients are consistent among all three genotypes and similar to theoretical predictions. PMID:21641317

  10. Linkage Group Xix of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Has a Linear Map

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, J. A.; Johnson, D. E.; Dutcher, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Linkage group XIX (or the UNI linkage group) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been reported to show a circular meiotic recombination map. A circular map predicts the existence of strong chiasma and chromatid interference, which would lead to an excess number of two-strand double crossovers during meiosis. We have tested this prediction in multipoint crosses. Our results are consistent with a linear linkage group that shows positive chiasma interference and no chromatid interference. Chiasma interference occurs both within arms and across the centromere. Of the original loci that contributed to the circular map, we find that two map to other linkage groups and a third cannot be retested because the mutant strain that defined it has been lost. A second reported unusual property for linkage group XIX was the increase in meiotic recombination with increases in temperature during a period that precedes the onset of meiosis. Although we observed changes in recombination frequencies in some intervals on linkage group XIX in crosses to CC-1952, and in strains heterozygous for the mutation ger1 at 16°, we also show that our strains do not exhibit the previously observed patterns of temperature-sensitive recombination for two different pairs of loci on linkage group XIX. We conclude that linkage group XIX has a linear genetic map that is not significantly different from other Chlamydomonas linkage groups. PMID:8462847

  11. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted.

  12. Identification of Global Ferredoxin Interaction Networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Peden, Erin A.; Boehm, Marko; Mulder, David W.; Davis, ReAnna; Old, William M.; King, Paul W.; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Dubini, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDXs) can distribute electrons originating from photosynthetic water oxidation, fermentation, and other reductant-generating pathways to specific redox enzymes in different organisms. The six FDXs identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not fully characterized in terms of their biological function. In this report, we present data from the following: (a) yeast two-hybrid screens, identifying interaction partners for each Chlamydomonas FDX; (b) pairwise yeast two-hybrid assays measuring FDX interactions with proteins from selected biochemical pathways; (c) affinity pulldown assays that, in some cases, confirm and even expand the interaction network for FDX1 and FDX2; and (d) in vitro NADP+ reduction and H2 photo-production assays mediated by each FDX that verify their role in these two pathways. Our results demonstrate new potential roles for FDX1 in redox metabolism and carbohydrate and fatty acid biosynthesis, for FDX2 in anaerobic metabolism, and possibly in state transition. Our data also suggest that FDX3 is involved in nitrogen assimilation, FDX4 in glycolysis and response to reactive oxygen species, and FDX5 in hydrogenase maturation. Finally, we provide experimental evidence that FDX1 serves as the primary electron donor to two important biological pathways, NADPH and H2 photo-production, whereas FDX2 is capable of driving these reactions at less than half the rate observed for FDX1. PMID:24100040

  13. Rapid triacylglycerol turnover in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires a lipase with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Benning, Christoph; Kuo, Min-Hao

    2012-12-01

    When deprived of nitrogen (N), the photosynthetic microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates large quantities of triacylglycerols (TAGs), making it a promising source of biofuel. Prominent transcriptional changes associated with the conditions leading to TAG accumulation have been found, suggesting that the key enzymes for TAG metabolism might be among those that fluctuate in their expression during TAG synthesis and breakdown. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae lipase null mutant strain for functional complementation, we identified the CrLIP1 gene from Chlamydomonas based on its ability to suppress the lipase deficiency-related phenotypes of the yeast mutant. In Chlamydomonas, an inverse correlation was found between the CrLIP1 transcript level and TAG abundance when Chlamydomonas cultures were reversibly deprived of N. The CrLIP1 protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli exhibited lipolytic activity against diacylglycerol (DAG) and polar lipids. The lipase domain of CrLIP1 is most similar to two human DAG lipases, DAGLα and DAGLβ. The involvement of CrLIP1 in Chlamydomonas TAG hydrolysis was corroborated by reducing the abundance of the CrLIP1 transcript with an artificial micro-RNA, which resulted in an apparent delay in TAG lipolysis when N was resupplied. Together, these data suggest that CrLIP1 facilitates TAG turnover in Chlamydomonas primarily by degrading the DAG presumably generated from TAG hydrolysis.

  14. Function and regulation of the glutathione peroxidase homologous gene GPXH/GPX5 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Dayer, Régine; Schwarzenbach, Yvonne; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Behra, Renata; Liedtke, Anja; Eggen, Rik I L

    2009-12-01

    When exposed to strong sunlight, photosynthetic organisms encounter photooxidative stress by the increased production of reactive oxygen species causing harmful damages to proteins and membranes. Consequently, a fast and specific induction of defense mechanisms is required to protect the organism from cell death. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the glutathione peroxidase homologous gene GPXH/GPX5 was shown to be specifically upregulated by singlet oxygen formed during high light conditions presumably to prevent the accumulation of lipid hydroperoxides and membrane damage. We now showed that the GPXH protein is a thioredoxin-dependent peroxidase catalyzing the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides.Furthermore, the GPXH gene seems to encode a dual-targeted protein, predicted to be localized both in the chloroplast and the cytoplasm, which is active with either plastidic TRXy or cytosolic TRXh1. Putative dual-targeting is achieved by alternative transcription and translation start sites expressed independently from either a TATA-box or an Initiator core promoter. Expression of both transcripts was upregulated by photooxidative stress even though with different strengths. The induction required the presence of the core promoter sequences and multiple upstream regulatory elements including a Sp1-like element and an earlier identified CRE/AP-1 homologous sequence. This element was further characterized by mutation analysis but could not be confirmed to be a consensus CRE or AP1 element. Instead, it rather seems to be another member of the large group of TGAC-transcription factor binding sites found to be involved in the response of different genes to oxidative stress.

  15. Ammonium removal from anaerobically treated effluent by Chlamydomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Ania; Blanco, Fernando; Lacalle, Arrate; Pinto, Miriam

    2014-02-01

    Several batch culture studies were carried out to evaluate an anaerobically treated effluent as a low-cost growth medium for the microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila and to study the effectiveness of the microalga in removing NH4-N from the effluent. An initial decrease in the effluent pH to 3 was required for adequate growth of C. acidophila and removal of NH4-N. Growth of the microalgae was inhibited at high light intensity (224μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1) at the surface of the vessels). However, the growth was not greatly affected by the high solid content and turbidity of the effluent. The microalga was able to grow in media containing NH4-N at concentrations of up to 1000mgL(-1) (50% of effluent) and to remove 88mg of NH4-NL(-1) in 10days. C. acidophila therefore appears a promising agent for the removal of NH4-N from anaerobically treated effluents.

  16. New thioredoxin targets in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Guillon, Blanche; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Keryer, Eliane; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Decottignies, Paulette

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics were used to identify the proteins from the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that can be reduced by thioredoxin. These proteins were retained specifically on a thioredoxin affinity column made of a monocysteinic thioredoxin mutant able to form mixed disulfides with its targets. Of a total of 55 identified targets, 29 had been found previously in higher plants or Synechocystis, but 26 were new targets. Biochemical tests were performed on three of them, showing a thioredoxin-dependent activation of isocitrate lyase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase and a thioredoxin-dependent deactivation of catalase that is redox insensitive in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identified a Ran protein, a previously uncharacterized nuclear target in a photosynthetic organism. The metabolic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:15123830

  17. Enzymatic pretreatment of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Phill; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Sim, Sang Jun

    2010-07-01

    The production of ethanol from feedstock other than agriculture materials has been promoted in recent years. Some microalgae can accumulate a high starch content (about 44% of dry base) via photosynthesis. Algal biomass, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii UTEX 90, was converted into a suitable fermentable feedstock by two commercial hydrolytic enzymes. The results showed that almost all starch was released and converted into glucose without steps for the cell wall disruption. Various conditions in the liquefaction and saccharification processes, such as enzyme concentration, pH, temperature, and residence time, have been investigated to obtain an optimum combination using the orthogonal analysis. As a result, approximately 235 mg of ethanol was produced from 1.0 g of algal biomass by a separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) method. The main advantages of this process include the low cost of chemicals, short residence time, and simple equipment system, all of which promote its large-scale application.

  18. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gille, Andrea; Trautmann, Andreas; Posten, Clemens; Briviba, Karlis

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae can contribute to a balanced diet because of their composition. Beside numerous essential nutrients, carotenoids are in the focus for food applications. The bioavailability of carotenoids from photoautotrophic-cultivated Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was compared. An in vitro digestion model was used to investigate carotenoid bioaccessibility. Furthermore, the effect of sonication on bioaccessibility was assessed. Lutein was the main carotenoid in both species. C. reinhardtii showed higher amounts of lutein and β-carotene than C. vulgaris. In contrast to C. reinhardtii, no β-carotene and only 7% of lutein were bioaccessible in nonsonicated C. vulgaris. Sonication increased the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from C. vulgaris to a level comparable with C. reinhardtii (β-carotene: ≥ 10%; lutein: ≥ 15%). Thus, C. reinhardtii represents a good carotenoid source for potential use in foods without processing, while the application of processing methods, like sonication, is necessary for C. vulgaris.

  19. Antiphase synchronization in a flagellar-dominance mutant of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Leptos, Kyriacos C; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-10-11

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  20. Regulation of Photosynthetic Capacity in Chlamydomonas mundana 1

    PubMed Central

    Russell, George K.; Gibbs, Martin

    1966-01-01

    A regulatory system has been described in the obligately phototrophic green alga Chlamydomonas mundana. Cells grown in acetate media are unable to fix carbon dioxide in the light but carry out a photoassimilation of acetate to carbohydrate: cells cultured with carbon dioxide as the sole source of cellular carbon carry out typical green plant photosynthesis. The control appears to take place at the level of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle. The presence of sodium acetate in the medium strongly inhibits formation of ribulose-1.5-diphosphate carboxylase, ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, and one of the 2 fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase activities of the cell. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase is present in higher activity in autotrophic cells. Changes in the levels of triose phosphate dehydrogenase were also noted. The total pigment content of the cell and the photosynthetic electron transport reactions are not altered under different conditions of growth. PMID:16656335

  1. New thioredoxin targets in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Stéphane D; Guillon, Blanche; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Keryer, Eliane; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Decottignies, Paulette

    2004-05-11

    Proteomics were used to identify the proteins from the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that can be reduced by thioredoxin. These proteins were retained specifically on a thioredoxin affinity column made of a monocysteinic thioredoxin mutant able to form mixed disulfides with its targets. Of a total of 55 identified targets, 29 had been found previously in higher plants or Synechocystis, but 26 were new targets. Biochemical tests were performed on three of them, showing a thioredoxin-dependent activation of isocitrate lyase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase and a thioredoxin-dependent deactivation of catalase that is redox insensitive in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identified a Ran protein, a previously uncharacterized nuclear target in a photosynthetic organism. The metabolic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Mark A; Nguyen, Ginnie TDT; Rico, Juan; Lambert, Devinn; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach. Significance Statement Chlamydomonas reinhardtii offers potential as a host for the production of high value compounds for industrial biotechnology. Synthetic biology provides a mechanism to generate generic, well characterised tools for application in the rational genetic manipulation of organisms: if synthetic biology principles were adopted for manipulation of C. reinhardtii, development of this microalga as an industrial biotechnology platform would be expedited. PMID:25641561

  3. Cytochrome f from the Antarctic psychrophile, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241: structure, sequence, and complementation in the mesophile, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Gretes, Michael; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Savitch, Leonid V; Simmonds, John; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Hüner, Norman P A

    2006-04-01

    Although cytochrome f from the Antarctic psychrophile, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241, exhibits a lower apparent molecular mass (34 kD) than that of the mesophile C. reinhardtii (41 kD) based on SDS-PAGE, both proteins are comparable in calculated molecular mass and show 79% identity in amino acid sequence. The difference in apparent molecular mass was maintained after expression of petA from both Chlamydomonas species in either E. coli or a C. reinhardtii DeltapetA mutant and after substitution of a unique third cysteine-292 to phenylalanine in the psychrophilic cytochrome f. Moreover, the heme of the psychrophilic form of cytochrome f was less stable upon heating than that of the mesophile. In contrast to C. raudensis, a C. reinhardtii DeltapetA mutant transformed with petA from C. raudensis exhibited the ability to undergo state transitions and a capacity for intersystem electron transport comparable to that of C. reinhardtii wild type. However, the C. reinhardtii petA transformants accumulated lower levels of cytochrome b ( 6 ) /f complexes and exhibited lower light saturated rates of O(2) evolution than C. reinhardtii wild type. We show that the presence of an altered form of cytochrome f in C. raudensis does not account for its inability to undergo state transitions or its impaired capacity for intersystem electron transport as previously suggested. A combined survey of the apparent molecular mass, thermal stability and amino acid sequences of cytochrome f from a broad range of mesophilic species shows unequivocally that the observed differences in cytochrome f structure are not related to psychrophilly. Thus, caution must be exercised in relating differences in amino acid sequence and thermal stability to adaptation to cold environments.

  4. Metabolism of D-lactate and structurally related organic acids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Husic, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    During the initial minutes of anaerobiosis, /sup 14/C-labeled D-lactate, derived from the photosynthetic sugar phosphate pool, accumulated in the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The production of the D-isomer of lactate by algae is in contrast to plant and mammalian cells in which L-lactate is formed. After initial lactate formation, Chlamydomonas exhibits a mixed-acid type fermentation, thereby avoiding lactate accumulation and enabling the cells to tolerate extended periods of anaerobiosis. A pyruvate reductase which catalyzes the formation of D-lactate in Chlamydomonas was partially purified and characterized. Lactate produced anaerobically was metabolized only when Chlamydomonas cells were returned to aerobic conditions, and reoxidation of the D-lactate was apparently catalyzed by a mitochondrial membrane-bound dehydrogenase, rather than by the soluble pyruvate reductase. Mutants of Chlamydomonas, deficient in mitochondrial respiration, were used to demonstrate that lactate metabolism was linked to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. In addition, the oxidation of glycolate, a structural analog of lactate, was also linked to mitochondrial electron transport in vivo.

  5. Activation of a chloroplast type of fructose bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by light-mediated agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1989-01-01

    A chloroplast type of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, a central regulatory enzyme of photosynthetic carbon metabolism, has been partially purified from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike its counterpart from spinach chloroplasts, the algal FBPase showed a strict requirement for a dithiol reductant irrespective of Mg2+ concentration. The enzymes from the two sources resembled each other immunologically, in subunit molecular mass and response to pH. In the presence of dithiothreitol, the pH optimum for both the algal and spinach enzymes shifted from 8.5 to a more physiologic value of 8.0 as the Mg2+ concentration was increased from 1 to 16 mM. At 1 mM Mg2+, a concentration estimated to be close to physiological, the Chlamydomonas FBPase was active only in the presence of reduced thioredoxin and was most active with Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f. Under these conditions, the enzyme showed a pH optimum of 8.0. The data suggest that the Chlamydomonas enzyme resembles its spinach counterpart in most respects, but it has a stricter requirement for reduction and less strict reductant specificity. A comparison of the properties of the FBPases from Chlamydomonas and spinach will be helpful for elucidating the mechanism of the reductive activation of this enzyme.

  6. Phylogenomic analysis of the Chlamydomonas genome unmasks proteins potentially involved in photosynthetic function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Karpowicz, Steven J.; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Hamel, Blaise; Dent, Rachel; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean; Wollman, Francis-André; Li, Huiying; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, has been exploited as a reference organism for identifying proteins and activities associated with the photosynthetic apparatus and the functioning of chloroplasts. Recently, the full genome sequence of Chlamydomonas was generated and a set of gene models, representing all genes on the genome, was developed. Using these gene models, and gene models developed for the genomes of other organisms, a phylogenomic, comparative analysis was performed to identify proteins encoded on the Chlamydomonas genome which were likely involved in chloroplast functions (or specifically associated with the green algal lineage); this set of proteins has been designated the GreenCut. Further analyses of those GreenCut proteins with uncharacterized functions and the generation of mutant strains aberrant for these proteins are beginning to unmask new layers of functionality/regulation that are integrated into the workings of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:20490922

  7. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  8. Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark A; Nguyen, Ginnie T D T; Rico, Juan; Lambert, Devinn; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach.

  9. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M.; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C.; Martin, Shelley S.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Lagarias, J. Clark

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period. PMID:23345435

  10. Modes of flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Johanna L; Lacomble, Sylvain; O’Toole, Eileen T; Hoenger, Andreas; McIntosh, J Richard; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Defects in flagella growth are related to a number of human diseases. Central to flagellar growth is the organization of microtubules that polymerize from basal bodies to form the axoneme, which consists of hundreds of proteins. Flagella exist in all eukaryotic phyla, but neither the mechanism by which flagella grow nor the conservation of this process in evolution are known. Here, we study how protein complexes assemble onto the growing axoneme tip using (cryo) electron tomography. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microtubules and associated proteins are added simultaneously. However, in Trypanosoma brucei, disorganized arrays of microtubules are arranged into the axoneme structure by the later addition of preformed protein complexes. Post assembly, the T. brucei transition zone alters structure and its association with the central pair loosens. We conclude that there are multiple ways to form a flagellum and that species-specific structural knowledge is critical before evaluating flagellar defects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01479.001 PMID:24448408

  11. Characterizing the Anaerobic Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([13C6]arginine/[12C6]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  12. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Different Growth Irradiances*

    PubMed Central

    Bonente, Giulia; Pippa, Sara; Castellano, Stefania; Bassi, Roberto; Ballottari, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    We report on the changes the photosynthetic apparatus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii undergoes upon acclimation to different light intensity. When grown in high light, cells had a faster growth rate and higher biomass production compared with low and control light conditions. However, cells acclimated to low light intensity are indeed able to produce more biomass per photon available as compared with high light-acclimated cells, which dissipate as heat a large part of light absorbed, thus reducing their photosynthetic efficiency. This dissipative state is strictly dependent on the accumulation of LhcSR3, a protein related to light-harvesting complexes, responsible for nonphotochemical quenching in microalgae. Other changes induced in the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus upon high light acclimation consist of an increase of carotenoid content on a chlorophyll basis, particularly zeaxanthin, and a major down-regulation of light absorption capacity by decreasing the chlorophyll content per cell. Surprisingly, the antenna size of both photosystem I and II is not modulated by acclimation; rather, the regulation affects the PSI/PSII ratio. Major effects of the acclimation to low light consist of increased activity of state 1 and 2 transitions and increased contributions of cyclic electron flow. PMID:22205699

  13. Lipidomic Analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under Nitrogen and Sulfur Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dawei; Song, Donghui; Kind, Tobias; Ma, Yan; Hoefkens, Jens; Fiehn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates lipids under complete nutrient starvation conditions while overall growth in biomass stops. In order to better understand biochemical changes under nutrient deprivation that maintain production of algal biomass, we used a lipidomic assay for analyzing the temporal regulation of the composition of complex lipids in C. reinhardtii in response to nitrogen and sulfur deprivation. Using a chip-based nanoelectrospray direct infusion into an ion trap mass spectrometer, we measured a diversity of lipid species reported for C. reinhardtii, including PG phosphatidylglycerols, PI Phosphatidylinositols, MGDG monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, DGDG digalactosyldiacylglycerols, SQDG sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols, DGTS homoserine ether lipids and TAG triacylglycerols. Individual lipid species were annotated by matching mass precursors and MS/MS fragmentations to the in-house LipidBlast mass spectral database and MS2Analyzer. Multivariate statistics showed a clear impact on overall lipidomic phenotypes on both the temporal and the nutrition stress level. Homoserine-lipids were found up-regulated at late growth time points and higher cell density, while triacyclglycerols showed opposite regulation of unsaturated and saturated fatty acyl chains under nutritional deprivation. PMID:26375463

  14. In vivo imaging of IFT in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2013-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a specialized intracellular transport which is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and eukaryotic flagella. IFT protein particles move bidirectionally along the flagella in the space between the flagellar membrane and the axonemal doublets. The particles consist of more than 20 different polypeptides and are transported by kinesin-2 from the cell body to the flagellar tip and by cytoplasmic dynein back to the cell body. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is unique in that IFT can be visualized by two distinct microscopic approaches: differential interference contrast (DIC) and tracking of fluorescently tagged IFT proteins. In vivo imaging of IFT is critical to determine, for example, the role of individual proteins in the IFT pathway and how flagellar proteins are transported by IFT. Here, the microscopic requirements and the procedures for the imaging of IFT by DIC and by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy will be described. Kymograms, graphical representations of spatial position over time, provide a convenient way to analyze in vivo recordings of IFT. In the future, multicolor in vivo imaging of IFT and its cargoes will be used to understand how flagella are assembled, maintained, and repaired.

  15. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) during assembly and disassembly of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William

    2005-08-15

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of particles along flagellar microtubules is required for the assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. In Chlamydomonas, anterograde and retrograde particles viewed by light microscopy average 0.12-microm and 0.06-microm diameter, respectively. Examination of IFT particle structure in growing flagella by electron microscopy revealed similar size aggregates composed of small particles linked to each other and to the membrane and microtubules. To determine the relationship between the number of particles and flagellar length, the rate and frequency of IFT particle movement was measured in nongrowing, growing, and shortening flagella. In all flagella, anterograde and retrograde IFT averaged 1.9 microm/s and 2.7 microm/s, respectively, but retrograde IFT was significantly slower in flagella shorter than 4 mum. The number of flagellar IFT particles was not fixed, but depended on flagellar length. Pauses in IFT particle entry into flagella suggest the presence of a periodic "gate" that permits up to 4 particles/s to enter a flagellum.

  16. Insecticides induced biochemical changes in freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Muthukannan Satheesh; Kabra, Akhil N; Min, Booki; El-Dalatony, Marwa M; Xiong, Jiuqiang; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of insecticides (acephate and imidacloprid) on a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana was investigated with respect to photosynthetic pigments, carbohydrate and protein contents, fatty acids composition and induction of stress indicators including proline, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). C. mexicana was cultivated with 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg L(-1) of acephate and imidacloprid. The microalga growth increased with increasing concentrations of both insecticides up to 15 mg L(-1), beyond which the growth declined compared to control condition (without insecticides). C. mexicana cultivated with 15 mg L(-1) of both insecticides for 12 days was used for further analysis. The accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids), carbohydrates and protein was decreased in the presence of both insecticides. Acephate and imidacloprid induced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and increased the concentration of proline in the microalga, which play a defensive role against various environmental stresses. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the fraction of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased on exposure to both insecticides. C. mexicana also promoted 25 and 21% removal of acephate and imidacloprid, respectively. The biochemical changes in C. mexicana on exposure to acephate and imidacloprid indicate that the microalga undergoes an adaptive change in response to the insecticide-induced oxidative stress.

  17. Analysis of Flagellar Phosphoproteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Boesger, Jens; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are cell organelles that are highly conserved throughout evolution. For many years, the green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as a model for examination of the structure and function of its flagella, which are similar to certain mammalian cilia. Proteome analysis revealed the presence of several kinases and protein phosphatases in these organelles. Reversible protein phosphorylation can control ciliary beating, motility, signaling, length, and assembly. Despite the importance of this posttranslational modification, the identities of many ciliary phosphoproteins and knowledge about their in vivo phosphorylation sites are still missing. Here we used immobilized metal affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides from purified flagella and analyzed them by mass spectrometry. One hundred forty-one phosphorylated peptides were identified, belonging to 32 flagellar proteins. Thereby, 126 in vivo phosphorylation sites were determined. The flagellar phosphoproteome includes different structural and motor proteins, kinases, proteins with protein interaction domains, and many proteins whose functions are still unknown. In several cases, a dynamic phosphorylation pattern and clustering of phosphorylation sites were found, indicating a complex physiological status and specific control by reversible protein phosphorylation in the flagellum. PMID:19429781

  18. Regulation of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle by light and dark

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    By growing cells in alternating periods of light and darkness, we have found that the synchronization of phototrophically grown Chlamydomonas populations is regulated at two specific points in the cell cycle: the primary arrest (A) point, located in early G1, and the transition (T) point, located in mid-G1. At the A point, cell cycle progression becomes light dependent. At the T point, completion of the cycle becomes independent of light. Cells transferred from light to dark at cell cycle position between the two regulatory points enter a reversible resting state in which they remain viable and metabolically active, but do not progress through their cycles. The photosystem II inhibitor dichlorophenyldimethylurea (DCMU) mimics the A point block induced by darkness. This finding indicates that the A point block is mediated by a signal that operates through photosynthetic electron transport. Cells short of the T point will arrest in darkness although they contain considerable carbohydrate reserves. After the T point, a sharp increase occurs in starch degradation and in the endogenous respiration rate, indicating that some internal block to the availability of stored energy reserves has now been released, permitting cell cycle progression. PMID:6767730

  19. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Grossman, Arthur R; Lagarias, J Clark

    2013-02-26

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period.

  20. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  1. Nitric oxide controls nitrate and ammonium assimilation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Llamas, Angel; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Nitrate and ammonium are major inorganic nitrogen sources for plants and algae. These compounds are assimilated by means of finely regulated processes at transcriptional and post-translational levels. In Chlamydomonas, the expression of several genes involved in high-affinity ammonium (AMT1.1, AMT1.2) and nitrate transport (NRT2.1) as well as nitrate reduction (NIA1) are downregulated by ammonium through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. At the post-translational level, nitrate/nitrite uptake and nitrate reductase (NR) are also inhibited by ammonium, but the mechanisms implicated in this regulation are scarcely known. In this work, the effect of NO on nitrate assimilation and the high-affinity ammonium uptake was addressed. NO inhibited the high-affinity uptake of ammonium and nitrate/nitrite, as well as the NR activity, in a reversible form. In contrast, nitrite reductase and glutamine synthetase activities were not affected. The in vivo and in vitro studies suggested that NR enzyme is inhibited by NO in a mediated process that requires the cell integrity. These data highlight a role of NO in inorganic nitrogen assimilation and suggest that this signalling molecule is an important regulator for the first steps of the pathway.

  2. Singlet oxygen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Ferretti, Ursula; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, singlet oxygen formation by lipid peroxidation induced by heat stress (40 °C) was studied in vivo in unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Primary and secondary oxidation products of lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde, were generated under heat stress as detected using swallow-tailed perylene derivative fluorescence monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by enzymatic reaction as inhibition of lipoxygenase by catechol and caffeic acid prevented hydroperoxide formation. Ultra-weak photon emission showed formation of electronically excited species such as triplet excited carbonyl, which, upon transfer of excitation energy, leads to the formation of either singlet excited chlorophyll or singlet oxygen. Alternatively, singlet oxygen is formed by direct decomposition of hydroperoxide via Russell mechanisms. Formation of singlet oxygen was evidenced by the nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and the imaging of green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Suppression of singlet oxygen formation by lipoxygenase inhibitors indicates that singlet oxygen may be formed via enzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase. PMID:26831215

  3. Gene Expression Profiling of Flagellar Disassembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Kara L.; Miller, Steven H.; Keller, Laura R.

    2008-01-01

    Flagella are sensory organelles that interact with the environment through signal transduction and gene expression networks. We used microarray profiling to examine gene regulation associated with flagellar length change in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Microarrays were probed with fluorescently labeled cDNAs synthesized from RNA extracted from cells before and during flagellar assembly or disassembly. Evaluation of the gene expression profiles identified >100 clones showing at least a twofold change in expression during flagellar length changes. Products of these genes are associated not only with flagellar structure and motility but also with other cellular responses, including signal transduction and metabolism. Expression of specific genes from each category was further characterized at higher resolution by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT–PCR). Analysis and comparison of the gene expression profiles coupled to flagellar assembly and disassembly revealed that each process involves a new and uncharacterized whole-cell response to flagellar length changes. This analysis lays the groundwork for a more comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular networks regulating flagellar length changes. PMID:18493036

  4. Stimulation of growth and photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with triacontanol

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard cells (-, strain N. 90), cultured at 5% CO/sub 2/, with 1 to 1000 ..mu..g/L triacontanol (TRIA) resulted in a 21% to 35% increase in cell density, 7% to 31% increase in total chlorophyll, and 20% to 100% increase in photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation. Chlamydomonas cells responded to a broad range of TRIA concentrations that were at least 10-fold above the optimum concentration for higher plants. Octacosanol inhibited the effect of TRIA on photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation. TRIA did not alter glycolate excretion, the CO/sub 2/ compensation point or sensitivity of photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation to O/sub 2/ in Chlamydomonas. Kinetic analysis of TRIA-treated cells showed that the increase in photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation was a result of an increase in the whole-cell apparent Vmax. The activity of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase was significantly higher in cell lysates from TRIA-treated cells than those from control cells. However, quantification of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase levels by /sup 14/CABP binding did not show increased enzyme levels in TRIA-treated cells. Therefore, there was an increase in the specific activity of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase extracted from Chlamydomonas cells treated with TRIA. TRIA alone had no effect in vitro on the activity of RuBPcarboxylase/oxygenase purified from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves or from cell lysates of Chlamydomonas. RuBP levels were significantly higher in TRIA-treated cells at high and low CO/sub 2/. Increased RuBP levels in TRIA-treated Chlamydomonas cells were also observed in the absence of CO/sub 2/ with atmospheres of N/sub 2/ and 21% O/sub 2/.

  5. Analysis of cargo transport by IFT and GFP imaging of IFT in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Diener, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the organism in which intraflagellar transport (IFT) was first visualized and in which the composition of IFT particles was originally elucidated. As the universality of IFT among ciliated/flagellated cells was uncovered, the diversity of organisms used to study IFT has grown. Still, because of the ease of isolation of flagella from Chlamydomonas and the battery of temperature-sensitive mutants affecting IFT proteins and motors, this unicellular alga remains the principal model for biochemical studies of IFT motors and cargo; furthermore, the long, exposed flagella of this cell are ideally suited for observing IFT in real time with GFP-tagged components of IFT.

  6. Functional and Spectroscopic Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Truncated Hemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Droghetti, Enrica; Tundo, Grazia R.; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Polticelli, Fabio; Visca, Paolo; Smulevich, Giulietta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii harbors twelve truncated hemoglobins (Cr-TrHbs). Cr-TrHb1-1 and Cr-TrHb1-8 have been postulated to be parts of the nitrogen assimilation pathway, and of a NO-dependent signaling pathway, respectively. Here, spectroscopic and reactivity properties of Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4, all belonging to clsss 1 (previously known as group N or group I), are reported. The ferric form of Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 displays a stable 6cLS heme-Fe atom, whereas the hexa-coordination of the ferrous derivative appears less strongly stabilized. Accordingly, kinetics of azide binding to ferric Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are independent of the ligand concentration. Conversely, kinetics of CO or NO2− binding to ferrous Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are ligand-dependent at low CO or NO2− concentrations, tending to level off at high ligand concentrations, suggesting the presence of a rate-limiting step. In agreement with the different heme-Fe environments, the pH-dependent kinetics for CO and NO2−binding to ferrous Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are characterized by different ligand-linked protonation events. This raises the question of whether the simultaneous presence in C. reinhardtii of multiple TrHb1s may be related to different regulatory roles. PMID:25993270

  7. Remodeling of membrane lipids in iron-starved Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Urzica, Eugen I; Vieler, Astrid; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Page, M Dudley; Casero, David; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Pellegrini, Matteo; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2013-10-18

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells exposed to abiotic stresses (e.g. nitrogen, zinc, or phosphorus deficiency) accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG), which are stored in lipid droplets. Here, we report that iron starvation leads to formation of lipid droplets and accumulation of TAGs. This occurs between 12 and 24 h after the switch to iron-starvation medium. C. reinhardtii cells deprived of iron have more saturated fatty acid (FA), possibly due to the loss of function of FA desaturases, which are iron-requiring enzymes with diiron centers. The abundance of a plastid acyl-ACP desaturase (FAB2) is decreased to the same degree as ferredoxin. Ferredoxin is a substrate of the desaturases and has been previously shown to be a major target of the iron deficiency response. The increase in saturated FA (C16:0 and C18:0) is concomitant with the decrease in unsaturated FA (C16:4, C18:3, or C18:4). This change was gradual for diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), whereas the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) FA profile remained stable during the first 12 h, whereas MGDG levels were decreasing over the same period of time. These changes were detectable after only 2 h of iron starvation. On the other hand, DGTS and DGDG contents gradually decreased until a minimum was reached after 24-48 h. RNA-Seq analysis of iron-starved C. reinhardtii cells revealed notable changes in many transcripts coding for enzymes involved in FA metabolism. The mRNA abundances of genes coding for components involved in TAG accumulation (diacylglycerol acyltransferases or major lipid droplet protein) were increased. A more dramatic increase at the transcript level has been observed for many lipases, suggesting that major remodeling of lipid membranes occurs during iron starvation in C. reinhardtii.

  8. Remodeling of Membrane Lipids in Iron-starved Chlamydomonas*

    PubMed Central

    Urzica, Eugen I.; Vieler, Astrid; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Page, M. Dudley; Casero, David; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Pellegrini, Matteo; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells exposed to abiotic stresses (e.g. nitrogen, zinc, or phosphorus deficiency) accumulate triacylglycerols (TAG), which are stored in lipid droplets. Here, we report that iron starvation leads to formation of lipid droplets and accumulation of TAGs. This occurs between 12 and 24 h after the switch to iron-starvation medium. C. reinhardtii cells deprived of iron have more saturated fatty acid (FA), possibly due to the loss of function of FA desaturases, which are iron-requiring enzymes with diiron centers. The abundance of a plastid acyl-ACP desaturase (FAB2) is decreased to the same degree as ferredoxin. Ferredoxin is a substrate of the desaturases and has been previously shown to be a major target of the iron deficiency response. The increase in saturated FA (C16:0 and C18:0) is concomitant with the decrease in unsaturated FA (C16:4, C18:3, or C18:4). This change was gradual for diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), whereas the monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) FA profile remained stable during the first 12 h, whereas MGDG levels were decreasing over the same period of time. These changes were detectable after only 2 h of iron starvation. On the other hand, DGTS and DGDG contents gradually decreased until a minimum was reached after 24–48 h. RNA-Seq analysis of iron-starved C. reinhardtii cells revealed notable changes in many transcripts coding for enzymes involved in FA metabolism. The mRNA abundances of genes coding for components involved in TAG accumulation (diacylglycerol acyltransferases or major lipid droplet protein) were increased. A more dramatic increase at the transcript level has been observed for many lipases, suggesting that major remodeling of lipid membranes occurs during iron starvation in C. reinhardtii. PMID:23983122

  9. Amino acid utilization by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: specific study of histidine.

    PubMed

    Hellio, Claire; Veron, Benoit; Le Gal, Yves

    2004-03-01

    Phytoplankton live in fluctuating environments where many factors such as grazing pressure, sinking, light availability, nutrient uptake and turnover influence the distribution of phytoplankton in time and space. The purpose of this study was to investigate if under conditions of depletion of inorganic nitrogen, as recorded in summer in naturals waters, phytoplanktonic species have the capability of using organic nitrogen sources, including free or combined amino acids, in addition to inorganic nitrogen. The study has focussed on histidine, the degradation of which yielding potentially three nitrogen atoms for each molecule of histidine. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CCAP 11/32A) was cultivated axenically with two different sources of nitrogen (histidine and/or ammonium). In the presence of histidine as sole source of nitrogen, cell growth was comparable to that observed with the same concentration of nitrogen in ammonium form. In the presence of both histidine and ammonium, histidine degradation was observed only when the concentration of ammonium was depleted. Under these conditions, the first two enzymes of histidine degradation pathway, histidase (EC 4.3.1.3) and urocanase (EC 4.2.1.49) were produced and were co-ordinately regulated. Histidase activity was also controlled by succinate and glutamate as carbon sources. Histidase was purified 1018-fold and partially characterized. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to 152.4 kDa corresponding to four subunits of 38.1 kDa. The enzyme did not exhibit classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics but showed a relationship between the rate of catalysis (V) and the concentration of substrate (S), characteristic of negative allosteric behavior. A Hill coefficient of 4 was measured for histidine concentrations higher than 20.5 mM.

  10. How the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii keeps time.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Thomas; Prager, Katja; Dathe, Hannes; Kelm, Juliane; Kiessling, Peter; Mittag, Maria

    2010-08-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two flagella and a primitive visual system, the eyespot apparatus, which allows the cell to phototax. About 40 years ago, it was shown that the circadian clock controls its phototactic movement. Since then, several circadian rhythms such as chemotaxis, cell division, UV sensitivity, adherence to glass, or starch metabolism have been characterized. The availability of its entire genome sequence along with homology studies and the analysis of several sub-proteomes render C. reinhardtii as an excellent eukaryotic model organism to study its circadian clock at different levels of organization. Previous studies point to several potential photoreceptors that may be involved in forwarding light information to entrain its clock. However, experimental data are still missing toward this end. In the past years, several components have been functionally characterized that are likely to be part of the oscillatory machinery of C. reinhardtii since alterations in their expression levels or insertional mutagenesis of the genes resulted in defects in phase, period, or amplitude of at least two independent measured rhythms. These include several RHYTHM OF CHLOROPLAST (ROC) proteins, a CONSTANS protein (CrCO) that is involved in parallel in photoperiodic control, as well as the two subunits of the circadian RNA-binding protein CHLAMY1. The latter is also tightly connected to circadian output processes. Several candidates including a significant number of ROCs, CrCO, and CASEIN KINASE1 whose alterations of expression affect the circadian clock have in parallel severe effects on the release of daughter cells, flagellar formation, and/or movement, indicating that these processes are interconnected in C. reinhardtii. The challenging task for the future will be to get insights into the clock network and to find out how the clock-related factors are functionally connected. In this respect, system biology approaches will certainly

  11. Nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunahay, T.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Efficient nuclear transformation of cell wall-deficient strains of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be accomplished by vortexing the cells in the presence of glass beads and polyethylene glycol (Kindle 1990 PNAS 87:1228). Intact (walled) cells can also be transformed using this protocol, but at very low efficiencies. Two recent reports have described the use of silicon carbide fibers to mediate DNA entry into plant suspension cells (Kaeppler et al. 1990 Plant Cell Rep. 9:414; Asano et al. 1991 Plant Sci. 79:247). The author has found that nuclear transformation efficiencies of walled cells of C. reinhardtii can be increased 3 to 10 fold by vortexing the cells in the presence of silicon carbide fibers and PEG. Using a modification of the glass bead transformation procedure, the wild-type nitrate reductase structural gene was used to complement a NR-deficient mutant of C. reinhardtii, nit-1-305. The transformation efficiency increased with longer vortexing times, although the absolute number of transformants varied between experiments, ranging from 10 to 40 transformants per 10[sup 7] cells. In contrast to vortexing with glass beads, cell viability was very high, with greater than 80% cell survival even after vortexing for 10 minutes. Neither cell death nor transformation efficiency increased when cell wall-deficient mutants (cw15 nit-1-305) were used as compared to intact cells. Experiments are in progress to test the applicability of silicon carbide-mediated transformation to other algal strains for which cell wall mutants or protoplasting procedures are unavailabile.

  12. Flagellar tip activation stimulated by membrane adhesions in Chlamydomonas gametes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Membrane adhesions between the flagella of mating-type "plus" and "minus" gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardi are shown to stimulate a rapid change in the ultrastructure of the flagellar tips, designated as flagellar tip activation (FTA). A dense substance, termed fibrous tip material (FTM), accumulates between the flagellar membrane and the nine single A microtubules of the tip. The A microtubules then elongate, growing into the distal region of the tip, increasing tip length by 30%. This study describes FTA kinetics during normal and mutant matings, presents experiments designed to probe its role in the mating reaction, and offers the following conclusions: (a) FTA is elicited by agents that cross-link flagellar membrane components (including natural sexual agglutinins, antiflagellar antisera, and concanavalin A) but not by flagellar adherence to polylysine-coated films. (b) FTA is reversed by flagellar disadhesion. (c) Gametes can undergo repeated cycles of FTA during successive rounds of adhesion/disadhesion. (d) FTA, flagellar tipping, and sexual signaling are simultaneously blocked by colchicine and by vinblastine, suggesting that tubulinlike molecules, perhaps exposed at the membrane surface, are involved in all three responses. (e) FTA is not blocked by short exposure to chymotrypsin, by cytochalasins B and D, nor by concanavalin A, even though all block cell fusion; the response is therefore autonomous and experimentally dissociable from later stages in the mating reaction. (f) Under no experimental conditions is mating-structure activation observed to occur unless FTA also occurs. This study concludes that FTA is a necessary event in the sexual signaling sequence, and presents a testable working model for its mechanism. PMID:7358792

  13. Adaptation prevents the extinction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under toxic beryllium

    PubMed Central

    Baselga-Cervera, Beatriz; Costas, Eduardo; Bustillo-Avendaño, Estéfano

    2016-01-01

    The current biodiversity crisis represents a historic challenge for natural communities: the environmental rate of change exceeds the population’s adaptation capability. Integrating both ecological and evolutionary responses is necessary to make reliable predictions regarding the loss of biodiversity. The race against extinction from an eco-evolutionary perspective is gaining importance in ecological risk assessment. Here, we performed a classical study of population dynamics—a fluctuation analysis—and evaluated the results from an adaption perspective. Fluctuation analysis, widely used with microorganisms, is an effective empirical procedure to study adaptation under strong selective pressure because it incorporates the factors that influence demographic, genetic and environmental changes. The adaptation of phytoplankton to beryllium (Be) is of interest because human activities are increasing the concentration of Be in freshwater reserves; therefore, predicting the effects of human-induced pollutants is necessary for proper risk assessment. The fluctuation analysis was performed with phytoplankton, specifically, the freshwater microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, under acute Be exposure. High doses of Be led to massive microalgae death; however, by conducting a fluctuation analysis experiment, we found that C. reinhardtii was able to adapt to 33 mg/l of Be due to pre-existing genetic variability. The rescuing adapting genotype presented a mutation rate of 9.61 × 10−6 and a frequency of 10.42 resistant cells per million wild-type cells. The genetic adaptation pathway that was experimentally obtained agreed with the theoretical models of evolutionary rescue (ER). Furthermore, the rescuing genotype presented phenotypic and physiologic differences from the wild-type genotype, was 25% smaller than the Be-resistant genotype and presented a lower fitness and quantum yield performance. The abrupt distinctions between the wild-type and the Be-resistant genotype

  14. Photosynthetic H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular green algae).

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2007-10-01

    Unicellular green algae have the ability to operate in two distinctly different environments (aerobic and anaerobic), and to photosynthetically generate molecular hydrogen (H2). A recently developed metabolic protocol in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii permitted separation of photosynthetic O2-evolution and carbon accumulation from anaerobic consumption of cellular metabolites and concomitant photosynthetic H2-evolution. The H2 evolution process was induced upon sulfate nutrient deprivation of the cells, which reversibly inhibits photosystem-II and O2-evolution in their chloroplast. In the absence of O2, and in order to generate ATP, green algae resorted to anaerobic photosynthetic metabolism, evolved H2 in the light and consumed endogenous substrate. This study summarizes recent advances on green algal hydrogen metabolism and discusses avenues of research for the further development of this method. Included is the mechanism of a substantial tenfold starch accumulation in the cells, observed promptly upon S-deprivation, and the regulated starch and protein catabolism during the subsequent H2-evolution. Also discussed is the function of a chloroplast envelope-localized sulfate permease, and the photosynthesis-respiration relationship in green algae as potential tools by which to stabilize and enhance H2 metabolism. In addition to potential practical applications of H2, approaches discussed in this work are beginning to address the biochemistry of anaerobic H2 photoproduction, its genes, proteins, regulation, and communication with other metabolic pathways in microalgae. Photosynthetic H2 production by green algae may hold the promise of generating a renewable fuel from nature's most plentiful resources, sunlight and water. The process potentially concerns global warming and the question of energy supply and demand.

  15. Flagellar coordination in Chlamydomonas cells held on micropipettes.

    PubMed

    Rüffer, U; Nultsch, W

    1998-01-01

    The two flagella of Chlamydomonas are known to beat synchronously: During breaststroke beating they are generally coordinated in a bilateral way while in shock responses during undulatory beating coordination is mostly parallel [Rüffer and Nultsch, 1995: Botanica Acta 108:169-276]. Analysis of a great number of shock responses revealed that in undulatory beats also periods of bilateral coordination are found and that the coordination type may change several times during a shock response, without concomitant changes of the beat envelope and the beat period. In normal wt cells no coordination changes are found during breaststroke beating, but only short temporary asynchronies: During 2 or 3 normal beats of the cis flagellum, the trans flagellum performs 3 or 4 flat beats with a reduced beat envelope and a smaller beat period, resulting in one additional trans beat. Long periods with flat beats of the same shape and beat period are found in both flagella of the non-phototactic mutant ptx1 and in defective wt 622E cells. During these periods, the coordination is parallel, the two flagella beat alternately. A correlation between normal asynchronous trans beats and the parallel-coordinated beats in the presumably cis defective cells and also the undulatory beats is discussed. In the cis defective cells, a perpetual spontaneous change between parallel beats with small beat periods (higher beat frequency) and bilateral beats with greater beat periods (lower beat frequency) are observed and render questionable the existence of two different intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella cis and trans. Asynchronies occur spontaneously but may also be induced by light changes, either step-up or step-down, but not by both stimuli in turn as breaststroke flagellar photoresponses (BFPRs). Asynchronies are not involved in phototaxis. They are independent of the BFPRs, which are supposed to be the basis of phototaxis. Both types of coordination must be assumed to be regulated

  16. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, G.; Togasaki, R.K. ); Marcus, Y. ); Moroney, J.V. )

    1989-04-01

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases {sup 14}CO{sub 3} which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 {plus minus} 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 {plus minus} 1.9 and 2.8 {plus minus} 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 {plus minus} 14.7 and 2.8 {plus minus} 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity.

  17. Compartmentalisation of [FeFe]-hydrogenase maturation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Anne; Bai, Yu; Lu, Yinghua; Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2017-03-13

    Molecular hydrogen (H2 ) can be produced in green microalgae by [FeFe]-hydrogenases as a direct product of photosynthesis. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogenase HYDA1 contains a catalytic site comprising a classic [4Fe4S] cluster linked to a unique 2Fe sub-cluster. From in vitro studies it appears that the [4Fe4S] cluster is incorporated first by the housekeeping FeS cluster assembly machinery, followed by the 2Fe sub-cluster, whose biosynthesis requires the specific maturases HYDEF and HYDG. To investigate the maturation process in vivo, we expressed HYDA1 from the C. reinhardtii chloroplast and nuclear genomes (with and without a chloroplast transit peptide) in a hydrogenase-deficient mutant strain, and examined the cellular enzymatic hydrogenase activity, as well as in vivo H2 production. The transformants expressing HYDA1 from the chloroplast genome displayed H2 production levels comparable to the wild type, as did the transformants expressing full-length HYDA1 from the nuclear genome. In contrast, cells equipped with cytoplasm-targeted HYDA1 produced inactive enzyme, which could only be activated in vitro after reconstitution of the [4Fe4S] cluster. This indicates that the HYDA1 FeS cluster can only be built by the chloroplastic FeS cluster assembly machinery. Further, the expression of a bacterial hydrogenase gene, CPI, from the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome resulted in H2 -producing strains, demonstrating that a hydrogenase with a very different structure can fulfil the role of HYDA1 in vivo and that overexpression of foreign hydrogenases in C. reinhardtii is possible. All chloroplast transformants were stable and no toxic effects were seen from HYDA1 or CPI expression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. New insights into the roles of molecular chaperones in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

    PubMed

    Nordhues, André; Miller, Stephen M; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used as a model organism for many decades, mainly to study photosynthesis and flagella/cilia. Only recently, Chlamydomonas has received much attention because of its ability to produce hydrogen and nonpolar lipids that have promise as biofuels. The best-studied multicellular cousin of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is Volvox carteri, whose life cycle comprises events that have clear parallels in higher plants and/or animals, making it an excellent system in which to study fundamental developmental processes. Molecular chaperones are proteins that guide other cellular proteins through their life cycle. They assist in de novo folding of nascent chains, mediate assembly and disassembly of protein complexes, facilitate protein transport across membranes, disassemble protein aggregates, fold denatured proteins back to the native state, and transfer unfoldable proteins to proteolytic degradation. Hence, molecular chaperones regulate protein function under all growth conditions and play important roles in many basic cellular and developmental processes. The aim of this chapter is to describe recent advances toward understanding molecular chaperone biology in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

  19. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-01-01

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  20. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-12-31

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  1. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  2. Historical perspective on Chlamydomonas as a model for basic research: 1950-1970.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Ursula

    2015-05-01

    During the period 1950-1970, groundbreaking research on the genetic mapping of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the use of mutant strains to analyze photosynthesis was conducted in the laboratory of R. Paul Levine at Harvard University. An account of this era, based in part on interviews with Levine, is presented.

  3. Rapid induction of lipid droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris by Brefeldin A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Kim, Hanul; Ko, Donghwi; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Otsuru, Masumi; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Oh, Hee-Mock; Nishida, Ikuo; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Lee, Youngsook

    2013-01-01

    Algal lipids are the focus of intensive research because they are potential sources of biodiesel. However, most algae produce neutral lipids only under stress conditions. Here, we report that treatment with Brefeldin A (BFA), a chemical inducer of ER stress, rapidly triggers lipid droplet (LD) formation in two different microalgal species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris. LD staining using Nile red revealed that BFA-treated algal cells exhibited many more fluorescent bodies than control cells. Lipid analyses based on thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography revealed that the additional lipids formed upon BFA treatment were mainly triacylglycerols (TAGs). The increase in TAG accumulation was accompanied by a decrease in the betaine lipid diacylglyceryl N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS), a major component of the extraplastidic membrane lipids in Chlamydomonas, suggesting that at least some of the TAGs were assembled from the degradation products of membrane lipids. Interestingly, BFA induced TAG accumulation in the Chlamydomonas cells regardless of the presence or absence of an acetate or nitrogen source in the medium. This effect of BFA in Chlamydomonas cells seems to be due to BFA-induced ER stress, as supported by the induction of three homologs of ER stress marker genes by the drug. Together, these results suggest that ER stress rapidly triggers TAG accumulation in two green microalgae, C. reinhardtii and C. vulgaris. A further investigation of the link between ER stress and TAG synthesis may yield an efficient means of producing biofuel from algae.

  4. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  5. Respiratory-deficient mutants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas: a review.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Thalia; Larosa, Véronique; Cardol, Pierre; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Remacle, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Genetic manipulation of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is straightforward. Nuclear genes can be interrupted by insertional mutagenesis or targeted by RNA interference whereas random or site-directed mutagenesis allows the introduction of mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This, combined with a screen that easily allows discriminating respiratory-deficient mutants, makes Chlamydomonas a model system of choice to study mitochondria biology in photosynthetic organisms. Since the first description of Chlamydomonas respiratory-deficient mutants in 1977 by random mutagenesis, many other mutants affected in mitochondrial components have been characterized. These respiratory-deficient mutants increased our knowledge on function and assembly of the respiratory enzyme complexes. More recently some of these mutants allowed the study of mitochondrial gene expression processes poorly understood in Chlamydomonas. In this review, we update the data concerning the respiratory components with a special focus on the assembly factors identified on other organisms. In addition, we make an inventory of different mitochondrial respiratory mutants that are inactivated either on mitochondrial or nuclear genes.

  6. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  7. 5' sequences are important positive and negative determinants of the longevity of Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, M L; Klein, U; Bogorad, L

    1993-01-01

    We have found that sequences in the 5' leader of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast rbcL gene, when fused 5' to foreign genes, destabilize transcripts of these chimeric genes in the chloroplast of transgenic Chlamydomonas but that 5' sequences of the rbcL structural gene prevent this destabilization. Transcripts of the chloroplast rbcL gene are about equally abundant at all times in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growing on an alternating 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. However, Chlamydomonas chloroplast transformants, harboring chimeric genes containing the same rbcL promoter with 63 or 92 bp of the rbcL 5' leader sequence fused upstream of the Escherichia coli uidA (beta-glucuronidase, GUS) gene, accumulated GUS transcripts only in the dark. Transcripts disappeared rapidly upon illumination of the cells. The same phenomenon was exhibited by transcripts of chimeric genes in which the GUS gene coding sequence was replaced by other unrelated genes. The precipitous light-induced drop in GUS transcript abundance was found to be due to an approximately 16-fold increase in the rate of degradation of GUS transcripts in light rather than to a decrease in the rate of transcription of the GUS gene. Transcripts of a chimeric rbcL-GUS construct in which the leader sequence of the rbcL gene was replaced by 103 bp of the leader sequence of the atpB gene were stable in illuminated cells. The destabilizing effect of the rbcL 5' leader sequence was reversed by adding 257 bp of the 5' coding region of the rbcL gene. The results show that chloroplast transcript levels in illuminated Chlamydomonas cells--and perhaps in other cases--can be determined, at least to some extent, by sequences and interactions of sequences transcribed from the 5' ends of genes. Images PMID:8434017

  8. Hydrogen evolution as a consumption mode of reducing equivalents in green algal fermentation. [Chlamydomonas reinhardii; Chlorella pyrenoidosa; Chlorococcum minutum

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, S.; Miyamoto, K.; Miura, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Dark anaerobic fermentation in the green algae Chlamydomonas MGA 161, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Chlorococcum minutum was studied. Their isolate, Chlamydomonas MGA 161, was unusual in having high H/sub 2/ but almost no formate. The fermentation pattern in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 was altered by changes in the NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl concentration. Glycerol formation increased at low (0.1%) and high (7%) NaCl concentrations starch degradation, and formation of ethanol, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ increased with the addition of NH/sub 4/Cl to above 5 millimolar in N-deficient cells. C. reinhardtii and C.pyrenoidosa exhibited a very similar anaerobic metabolism, forming formate, acetate and ethanol in a ratio of about 2:2:1. C. minimum was also unusual in forming acetate, glycerol, and CO/sub 2/ as its main products, with H/sub 2/, formate, and ethanol being formed in negligible amounts. In the presence of CO, ethanol formation increased twofold in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii, but the fermentation pattern in C. minimum did not change. An experiment with hypophosphite addition showed that dark H/sub 2/ evolution of the Escherichia coli type could be ruled out in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii. Among the green algae investigated, three fermentation types were identified by the distribution pattern of the end products, which reflected the consumption model of reducing equivalents in the cells.

  9. BiP links TOR signaling to ER stress in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L

    2012-02-01

    The highly conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) Ser/Thr kinase promotes protein synthesis under favorable growth conditions in all eukaryotes. Downregulation of TOR signaling in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has recently revealed a link between control of protein synthesis, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and the reversible modification of the BiP chaperone by phosphorylation. Inhibition of protein synthesis by rapamycin or cycloheximide resulted in the phosphorylation of BiP on threonine residues while ER stress induced by tunicamycin or heat shock caused the fast dephosphorylation of the protein. Regulation of BiP function by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events was proposed in early studies in mammalian cells although no connection to TOR signaling has been established so far. Here I will discuss about the coordinated regulation of BiP modification by TOR and ER stress signals in Chlamydomonas.

  10. Rescue of a paralyzed-flagella mutant of Chlamydomonas by transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, D.R.; Curry, A.M.; Johnson, K.A.; Williams, B.D.; Rosenbaum, J.L. ); Lefebvre, P.A. ); Kindle, K.L. )

    1990-08-01

    The biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas has been used extensively in the genetic and biochemical analysis of flagellar assembly and motility. The authors have restored motility to a paralyzed-flagella mutant of Chlamydomonas by transforming with the corresponding wild-type gene. A nitrate reductase-deficient paralyzed-flagella strain, nit1-305 pf-14, carrying mutations in the genes for nitrate reductase and radial spoke protein 3, was transformed with wild-type copies of both genes. Two-thirds of the cells that survived nitrate selection also regained motility, indicating that they had been transformed with both the nitrate reductase and radial spoke protein 3 genes. Transformants typically contained multiple copies of both genes, genetically linked to each other, but not linked to the original mutant loci. Complementation of paralyzed-flagella mutants by transformation is a powerful tool for investigating flagellar assembly and function.

  11. Development of a forward genetic screen to isolate oil mutants in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oils produced by microalgae are precursors to biodiesel. To achieve a profitable production of biodiesel from microalgae, identification of factors governing oil synthesis and turnover is desirable. The green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is amenable to genetic analyses and has recently emerged as a model to study oil metabolism. However, a detailed method to isolate various types of oil mutants that is adapted to Chlamydomonas has not been reported. Results We describe here a forward genetic approach to isolate mutants altered in oil synthesis and turnover from C. reinhardtii. It consists of a three-step screening procedure: a primary screen by flow cytometry of Nile red stained transformants grown in 96-deep-well plates under three sequential conditions (presence of nitrogen, then absence of nitrogen, followed by oil remobilization); a confirmation step using Nile red stained biological triplicates; and a validation step consisting of the quantification by thin layer chromatography of oil content of selected strains. Thirty-one mutants were isolated by screening 1,800 transformants generated by random insertional mutagenesis (1.7%). Five showed increased oil accumulation under the nitrogen-replete condition and 13 had altered oil content under nitrogen-depletion. All mutants were affected in oil remobilization. Conclusion This study demonstrates that various types of oil mutants can be isolated in Chlamydomonas based on the method set-up here, including mutants accumulating oil under optimal biomass growth. The strategy conceived and the protocol set-up should be applicable to other microalgal species such as Nannochloropsis and Chlorella, thus serving as a useful tool in Chlamydomonas oil research and algal biotechnology. PMID:24295516

  12. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures.

  13. Inorganic carbon limitation and mixotrophic growth in Chlamydomonas from an acidic mining lake.

    PubMed

    Tittel, Jörg; Bissinger, Vera; Gaedke, Ursula; Kamjunke, Norbert

    2005-06-01

    Plankton communities in acidic mining lakes (pH 2.5-3.3) are species-poor because they face extreme environmental conditions, e.g. 150mg l(-1) Fe2+ +Fe3+. We investigated the growth characteristics of the dominant pigmented species, the flagellate Chlamydomonas acidophila, in semi-continuous culture experiments under in situ conditions. The following hypotheses were tested: (1) Low inorganic carbon (IC) concentrations in the epilimnion (e.g. 0.3 mg l(-1)) arising from the low pH limit phototrophic growth (H-1); (2) the additional use of dissolved organic carbon (mixotrophy) leads to higher growth rates under IC-limitation (H-2), and (3) phagotrophy is not relevant (H-3). H-1 was supported as the culture experiments, in situ PAR and IC concentrations indicated that IC potentially limited phototrophic growth in the mixed surface layers. H-2 was also supported: mixotrophic growth always exceeded pure phototrophic growth even when photosynthesis was saturated. Dark growth in filtered lake water illuminated prior to inoculation provided evidence that Chlamydomonas was able to use the natural DOC. The alga did not grow on bacteria, thus confirming H-3. Chlamydomonas exhibited a remarkable resistance to starvation in the dark. The compensation light intensity (ca. 20 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and the maximum phototrophic growth (1.50 d(-1)) fell within the range of algae from non-acidic waters. Overall, Chlamydomonas, a typical r-strategist in circum-neutral systems, showed characteristics of a K-strategist in the stable, acidic lake environment in achieving moderate growth rates and minimizing metabolic losses.

  14. Predicting the Physiological Role of Circadian Metabolic Regulation in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Voytsekh, Olga; Mittag, Maria; Schuster, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Although the number of reconstructed metabolic networks is steadily growing, experimental data integration into these networks is still challenging. Based on elementary flux mode analysis, we combine sequence information with metabolic pathway analysis and include, as a novel aspect, circadian regulation. While minimizing the need of assumptions, we are able to predict changes in the metabolic state and can hypothesise on the physiological role of circadian control in nitrogen metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. PMID:21887226

  15. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Irina; Greiner, Andre; Awasthi, Mayanka; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a versatile model for fundamental and biotechnological research. A wide range of tools for genetic manipulation have been developed for this alga, but specific modification of nuclear genes is still not routinely possible. Here, we present a nuclear gene targeting strategy for Chlamydomonas that is based on the application of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Our approach includes (i) design of gene-specific ZFNs using available online tools, (ii) evaluation of the designed ZFNs in a Chlamydomonas in situ model system, (iii) optimization of ZFN activity by modification of the nuclease domain, and (iv) application of the most suitable enzymes for mutagenesis of an endogenous gene. Initially, we designed a set of ZFNs to target the COP3 gene that encodes the light-activated ion channel channelrhodopsin-1. To evaluate the designed ZFNs, we constructed a model strain by inserting a non-functional aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII) selection marker interspaced with a short COP3 target sequence into the nuclear genome. Upon co-transformation of this recipient strain with the engineered ZFNs and an aphVIII DNA template, we were able to restore marker activity and select paromomycin-resistant (Pm-R) clones with expressing nucleases. Of these Pm-R clones, 1% also contained a modified COP3 locus. In cases where cells were co-transformed with a modified COP3 template, the COP3 locus was specifically modified by homologous recombination between COP3 and the supplied template DNA. We anticipate that this ZFN technology will be useful for studying the functions of individual genes in Chlamydomonas.

  16. Cloning of Flagellar Genes in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii by DNA Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, L. W.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chlamydomonas is a popular genetic model system for studying many cellular processes. In this report, we describe a new approach to isolate Chlamydomonas genes using the cloned nitrate reductase gene (NIT1) as an insertional mutagen. A linearized plasmid containing the NIT1 gene was introduced into nit1 mutant cells by glass-bead transformation. Of 3000 Nit(+) transformants examined, 74 showed motility defects of a wide range of phenotypes, suggesting that DNA transformation is an effective method for mutagenizing cells. For 13 of 15 such motility mutants backcrossed to nit(-) mutant strains, the motility phenotype cosegregated with the Nit(+) phenotype, indicating that the motility defects of these 13 mutants may be caused by integration of the plasmid. Further genetic analysis indicated that three of these mutants contained alleles of previously identified loci: mbo2 (move backward only), pf13 (paralyzed flagella) and vfl1 (variable flagellar number). Three other abnormal-flagellar-number mutants did not map to any previously described loci at which mutations produce similar phenotypes. Genomic sequences flanking the integrated plasmid in the mbo2 and vfl1 mutants were isolated and used as probes to obtain wild-type genomic clones, which complemented the motility defects upon transformation into cells. Our results demonstrate the potential of this new approach for cloning genes identified by mutation in Chlamydomonas. PMID:8244002

  17. Reduction of PII signaling protein enhances lipid body production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Kharatyan, Nina; Forchhammer, Karl; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-11-01

    In all examined organisms that have the PII signal transduction machinery, PII coordinates the central C/N anabolic metabolism. In green algae and land plants, PII is localized in the chloroplast and controls the L-arginine biosynthetic pathway pathway. To elucidate additional functions of PII in the model photosynthetic organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrPII), we generated and analyzed four strains, in which PII was strongly under-expressed by artificial microRNA (GLB1-amiRNA strains). In response to nitrogen deficiency, Chlamydomonas produces triacylglycerols (TAGs) that are accumulated in lipid bodies (LB). Quantification of LBs by confocal microscopy in four GLB1-amiRNA strains showed that reduced PII levels resulted in over-accumulation of LBs compared to their parental strains. Moreover, knock-down of PII caused also an increase in the total TAG level. We propose that the larger yields of TAG-filled LBs in N-starved GLB1-amiRNA cells can be attributed to the strain's depleted PII level and their inability to properly control acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity (ACCase). Together, our results imply that PII in Chlamydomonas negatively controls TAG accumulation in LBs during acclimation to nitrogen starvation of the alga.

  18. Robust Transgene Expression from Bicistronic mRNA in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Pringle, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism that provides an opportunity to understand the evolution and functional biology of the lineage that includes the land plants, as well as aspects of the fundamental core biology conserved throughout the eukaryotic phylogeny. Although many tools are available to facilitate genetic, molecular biological, biochemical, and cell biological studies in Chlamydomonas, expression of unselected transgenes of interest (GOIs) has been challenging. In most methods used previously, the GOI and a selectable marker are expressed from two separate mRNAs, so that their concomitant expression is not guaranteed. In this study, we developed constructs that allow expression of an upstream GOI and downstream selectable marker from a single bicistronic mRNA. Although this approach in other systems has typically required a translation-enhancing element such as an internal ribosome entry site for the downstream marker, we found that a short stretch of unstructured junction sequence was sufficient to obtain adequate expression of the downstream gene, presumably through post-termination reinitiation. With this system, we obtained robust expression of both endogenous and heterologous GOIs, including fluorescent proteins and tagged fusion proteins, in the vast majority of transformants, thus eliminating the need for tedious secondary screening for GOI-expressing transformants. This improved efficiency should greatly facilitate a variety of genetic and cell-biological studies in Chlamydomonas and also enable new applications such as expression-based screens and large-scale production of foreign proteins. PMID:27770025

  19. Mutants of Chlamydomonas: tools to study thylakoid membrane structure, function and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    de Vitry, C; Vallon, O

    1999-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for the study of photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis. C. reinhardtii has a photosynthesis apparatus similar to that of higher plants and it grows at rapid rate (generation time about 8 h). It is a facultative phototroph, which allows the isolation of mutants unable to perform photosynthesis and its sexual cycle allows a variety of genetic studies. Transformation of the nucleus and chloroplast genomes is easily performed. Gene transformation occurs mainly by homologous recombination in the chloroplast and heterologous recombination in the nucleus. Mutants are precious tools for studies of thylakoid membrane structure, photosynthetic function and assembly. Photosynthesis mutants affected in the biogenesis of a subunit of a protein complex usually lack the entire complex; this pleiotropic effect has been used in the identification of the other subunits, in the attribution of spectroscopic signals and also as a 'genetic cleaning' process which facilitates both protein complex purification, absorption spectroscopy studies or freeze-fracture analysis. The cytochrome b6f complex is not required for the growth of C. reinhardtii, unlike the case of photosynthetic prokaryotes in which the cytochrome complex is also part of the respiratory chain, and can be uniquely studied in Chlamydomonas by genetic approaches. We describe in greater detail the use of Chlamydomonas mutants in the study of this complex.

  20. Rapid construction and screening of artificial microRNA systems in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinlu; Deng, Xuan; Shao, Ning; Wang, Gaohong; Huang, Kaiyao

    2014-09-01

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a classic model for the study of flagella/cilia and photosynthesis, and it has recently been exploited for producing biopharmaceuticals and biofuel. Due to the low frequency of homologous recombination, reverse genetic manipulation in Chlamydomonas relies mainly on miRNA- and siRNA-based knockdown methods. However, the difficulty in constructing artificial miRNA vectors, laborious screening of knockdown transformants, and undesired epigenetic silencing of exogenous miRNA constructs limit their application. We have established a one-step procedure to construct an artificial miRNA precursor by annealing eight oligonucleotides of approximately 40 nucleotides. In the final construct, the Gaussia princeps luciferase gene (G-Luc) is positioned between the promoter and the artificial miRNA precursor so that knockdown strains may quickly be screened by visualizing luciferase luminescence using a photon-counting camera. Furthermore, the luciferase activity of transformants correlates with the knockdown level of two test target proteins: the chloroplast protein VIPP1 (vesicle inducing protein in plastids 1) and the flagellar protein CDPK3 (calcium-dependent protein kinase 3). Adding an intron from RBCS2 (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit 2) to the miRNA construct enhanced both the luciferase activity and the miRNA knockdown efficiency. A second miRNA vector incorporated the promoter of the nitrate reductase gene to allow inducible expression of the artificial miRNA. These vectors will facilitate application of the artificial miRNA and provide tools for studying the mechanism of epigenetics in Chlamydomonas, and may also be adapted for use in other model organisms.

  1. [Effect of microwaves on Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture in the stationary phase of growth].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, O O; Berezovskaia, M A; Datsenko, A I

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the microwave radiation on the culture of Chlamydomonas actinochloris green flagellar alga in the stationary phase of growth are studied. After exposure to radiation at the maximum dose of 125 J/g, the cell functional state worsened but all the studied parameters were restored in 20 days and in the long run found to be even better than the control indices. The data are compared with the similar ones obtained earlier for the lag phase culture. The studied sample is found to be more resistant to the irradiation than the previous one.

  2. Comparison of the Microtubule Proteins of Neuroblastoma Cells, Brain, and Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, J. B.; Witman, G. B.; Carlson, K.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    1971-01-01

    Intact A microtubules isolated from outer doublet microtubules of Chlamydomonas flagella contain two separable proteins (tubulins) that differ in molecular weight and in amino-acid composition. The microtubule protein isolated from brain or neuroblastoma cells also has two electrophoretically distinct tubulins. Although the two tubulins of brain and neuroblastoma cells are electrophoretically similar to each other, only one of these tubulins migrates with the flagellar tubulins. This is the first evidence that (a) isolated, morphologically intact, single microtubules from flagella contain at least two different tubulins, and (b) at least one of these tubulins differs from tubulins that are isolated from other sources. Images PMID:5289385

  3. Ciliary kinematics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in Complex Fluids: Role of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Qin, Boyang; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. Guided by our experiments on the swimming gait of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in viscoelastic fluids, we focus on ciliary waveforms in Newtonian fluids and systematically study the effect of increasing viscosity. We find that the beat frequency as well as the wave speed are both strongly influenced by fluid viscosity. Interestingly, ciliary waveforms at low viscosity show a larger influence of the cell body than waveforms at higher viscosity. We use slender body theory and principal component analysis to elucidate the role of fluid viscosity in regulating the kinematics of the swimming process.

  4. Estimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass concentration from chord length distribution data.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Exposito, Patricio; Suarez, Angeles Blanco; Negro, Carlos

    A novel method to estimate the concentration of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass was developed. The method employs the chord length distribution information gathered by means of a focused beam reflectance probe immersed in the culture sample and processes the data through a feedforward multilayer perceptron. The multilayer perceptron architecture was systematically optimised through the application of a simulated annealing algorithm. The method developed can predict the concentration of microalgae with acceptable accuracy and, with further development, it could be implemented online to monitor the aggregation status and biomass concentration of microalgal cultures.

  5. Low oxygen levels contribute to improve photohydrogen production in mixotrophic non-stressed Chlamydomonas cultures

    DOE PAGES

    Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Dubini, Alexandra; Galvan, Aurora; ...

    2015-09-17

    Currently, hydrogen fuel is derived mainly from fossil fuels, but there is an increasing interest in clean and sustainable technologies for hydrogen production. In this context, the ability of some photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly cyanobacteria and microalgae, to produce hydrogen is a promising alternative for renewable, clean-energy production. Among a diverse array of photosynthetic microorganisms able to produce hydrogen, the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the model organism widely used to study hydrogen production. Furthermore, the well-known fact that acetate-containing medium enhances hydrogen production in this algae, little is known about the precise role of acetate during this process.

  6. Low oxygen levels contribute to improve photohydrogen production in mixotrophic non-stressed Chlamydomonas cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Dubini, Alexandra; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Gonzalez-Ballester, David

    2015-09-17

    Currently, hydrogen fuel is derived mainly from fossil fuels, but there is an increasing interest in clean and sustainable technologies for hydrogen production. In this context, the ability of some photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly cyanobacteria and microalgae, to produce hydrogen is a promising alternative for renewable, clean-energy production. Among a diverse array of photosynthetic microorganisms able to produce hydrogen, the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the model organism widely used to study hydrogen production. Furthermore, the well-known fact that acetate-containing medium enhances hydrogen production in this algae, little is known about the precise role of acetate during this process.

  7. Extremely low polymerizability of a highly-divergent Chlamydomonas actin (NAP).

    PubMed

    Kato-Minoura, Takako

    2011-09-09

    Novel actin-like protein (NAP) is a highly divergent actin expressed in Chlamydomonas. With its low sequence similarity, it is uncertain whether NAP can polymerize into filaments. Here I assessed it by ectopically expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged NAP (EGFP-NAP) in cultured cells. EGFP-NAP was excluded from stress fibres but partially co-localized with endogenous actin in the cell periphery. In fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiment, turnover rate of EGFP-NAP was similar to the estimated diffusion rate of monomeric actin. Therefore, EGFP-NAP likely accumulates by diffusion. These findings suggest that NAP has extremely poor ability to polymerize.

  8. Phosphatase of Chlamydomonas reinhardi: biochemical and cytochemical approach with specific mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Matagne, R F; Loppes, R; Deltour, R

    1976-01-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardi produces two constitutive acid phosphatases and three depressible phosphatases (a neutral and two alkaline ones) that can utilize napthyl phosphate as a substrate. Specific mutants depressible phosphatase were used to investigate biochemical properties and the cytochemical localization of these enzymes. The two constitutive phosphatases show similar pH optima (about 5.0) and Km values (2 x 10(-3) to 3.3 x 10(-3) M) but differ in their heat sensitivity and affinity for glycerophosphate. Images PMID:4437

  9. Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2013-04-01

    Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. Our study suggests that nonlinear mechanics could be a significant contributing factor to how the trajectories of the microorganism are selected.

  10. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the model of choice to study mitochondria from unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Funes, Soledad; Franzén, Lars-Gunnar; González-Halphen, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism to study photosynthesis, cellular division, flagellar biogenesis, and, more recently, mitochondrial function. It has distinct advantages in comparison to higher plants because it is unicellular, haploid, and amenable to tetrad analysis, and its three genomes are subject to specific transformation. It also has the possibility to grow either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on acetate, making the assembly of the photosynthetic machinery not essential for cell viability. Methods developed allow the isolation of C. reinhardtii mitochondria free of thylakoid contaminants. We review the general procedures used for the biochemical characterization of mitochondria from this green alga.

  11. A phenotypic screening platform to identify small molecule modulators of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii growth, motility and photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chemical biology, the interfacial discipline of using small molecules as probes to investigate biology, is a powerful approach of developing specific, rapidly acting tools that can be applied across organisms. The single-celled alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an excellent model system because of its photosynthetic ability, cilia-related motility and simple genetics. We report the results of an automated fitness screen of 5,445 small molecules and subsequent assays on motility/phototaxis and photosynthesis. Cheminformatic analysis revealed active core structures and was used to construct a naïve Bayes model that successfully predicts algal bioactive compounds. PMID:23158586

  12. Actinobacteria Associated with the Marine Sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and Their Culturability

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp. PMID:22214828

  13. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-12-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho-Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry-mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis.

  14. Altered fermentative metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants lacking pyruvate formate lyase and both pyruvate formate lyase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H(2) production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H(2) production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  15. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  16. Overexpression of Ferredoxin, PETF, Enhances Tolerance to Heat Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  17. Overexpression of ferredoxin, PETF, enhances tolerance to heat stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-10-17

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress.

  18. Photoinduced electric currents in carotenoid-deficient Chlamydomonas mutants reconstituted with retinal and its analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Sineshchekov, O A; Govorunova, E G; Dér, A; Keszthelyi, L; Nultsch, W

    1994-01-01

    Reconstitution of the photoelectric responses involved in photosensory transduction in "blind" cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii carotenoid-deficient mutants was studied by means of a recently developed population method. Both the photoreceptor current and the regenerative response can be restored by addition of all-trans-retinal, 9-demethyl-retinal, or dimethyl-octatrienal, while the retinal analogs prevented from 13-cis/trans isomerization, 13-demethyl-retinal and citral, are not effective. Fluence dependence, spectral sensitivity, and effect of hydroxylamine treatment on retinal-induced photoelectric responses are similar to those found earlier in green strains of Chlamydomonas, although an alternative mechanism of antenna directivity in white cells of reconstituted "blind" mutants (likely based on the focusing effect of the transparent cell bodies) leads to the reversed sign of phototaxis in mutant cells under the same conditions. The results obtained indicate that both photoreceptor current and regenerative response are initiated by the same or similar rhodopsins with arhaebacterial-like chromophore(s) and prove directly the earlier suggested identity of the photoreceptor pigment(s) involved in photomotile and photoelectric responses in flagellated algae. PMID:8075341

  19. System response of metabolic networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to total available ammonium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Yup; Park, Jeong-Jin; Barupal, Dinesh K; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-10-01

    Drastic alterations in macronutrients are known to cause large changes in biochemistry and gene expression in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, metabolomic and proteomic responses to subtle reductions in macronutrients have not yet been studied. When ammonium levels were reduced by 25-100% compared with control cultures, ammonium uptake and growth rates were not affected at 25% or 50% nitrogen-reduction for 28 h. However, primary metabolism and enzyme expression showed remarkable changes at acute conditions (4 h and 10 h after ammonium reduction) compared with chronic conditions (18 h and 28 h time points). Responses of 145 identified metabolites were quantified using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry; 495 proteins (including 187 enzymes) were monitored using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry with label-free spectral counting. Stress response and carbon assimilation processes (Calvin cycle, acetate uptake and chlorophyll biosynthesis) were altered first, in addition to increase in enzyme contents for lipid biosynthesis and accumulation of short chain free fatty acids. Nitrogen/carbon balance metabolism was found changed only under chronic conditions, for example in the citric acid cycle and amino acid metabolism. Metabolism in Chlamydomonas readily responds to total available media nitrogen with temporal increases in short-chain free fatty acids and turnover of internal proteins, long before nitrogen resources are depleted.

  20. Characterization of DNA repair deficient strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii generated by insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Plecenikova, Andrea; Slaninova, Miroslava; Riha, Karel

    2014-01-01

    While the mechanisms governing DNA damage response and repair are fundamentally conserved, cross-kingdom comparisons indicate that they differ in many aspects due to differences in life-styles and developmental strategies. In photosynthetic organisms these differences have not been fully explored because gene-discovery approaches are mainly based on homology searches with known DDR/DNA repair proteins. Here we performed a forward genetic screen in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to identify genes deficient in DDR/DNA repair. We isolated five insertional mutants that were sensitive to various genotoxic insults and two of them exhibited altered efficiency of transgene integration. To identify genomic regions disrupted in these mutants, we established a novel adaptor-ligation strategy for the efficient recovery of the insertion flanking sites. Four mutants harbored deletions that involved known DNA repair factors, DNA Pol zeta, DNA Pol theta, SAE2/COM1, and two neighbouring genes encoding ERCC1 and RAD17. Deletion in the last mutant spanned two Chlamydomonas-specific genes with unknown function, demonstrating the utility of this approach for discovering novel factors involved in genome maintenance.

  1. Experimental Genome-Wide Determination of RNA Polyadenylation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen A.; Shen, Chi; Brown, Alishea; Hunt, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    The polyadenylation of RNA is a near-universal feature of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. This process has been studied in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-throughput (gene-by-gene) and high-throughput (transcriptome sequencing) approaches that recovered poly(A)-containing sequence tags which revealed interesting features of this critical process in Chlamydomonas. In this study, RNA polyadenylation has been studied using the so-called Poly(A) Tag Sequencing (PAT-Seq) approach. Specifically, PAT-Seq was used to study poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in four different media types—Tris-Phosphate (TP), Tris-Phosphate-Acetate (TAP), High-Salt (HS), and High-Salt-Acetate (HAS). The results indicate that: 1. As reported before, the motif UGUAA is the primary, and perhaps sole, cis-element that guides mRNA polyadenylation in the nucleus; 2. The scope of alternative polyadenylation events with the potential to change the coding sequences of mRNAs is limited; 3. Changes in poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in the different media types are very few in number and do not affect protein-coding potential; 4. Organellar polyadenylation is considerable and affects primarily ribosomal RNAs in the chloroplast and mitochondria; and 5. Organellar RNA polyadenylation is a dynamic process that is affected by the different media types used for cell growth. PMID:26730730

  2. First crystal structure of Rubisco from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T C; Backlund, A; Bjorhall, K; Spreitzer, R J; Andersson, I

    2001-12-21

    The crystal structure of Rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been determined to 1.4 A resolution. Overall, the structure shows high similarity to the previously determined structures of L8S8 Rubisco enzymes. The largest difference is found in the loop between beta strands A and B of the small subunit (betaA-betaB loop), which is longer by six amino acid residues than the corresponding region in Rubisco from Spinacia. Mutations of residues in the betaA-betaB loop have been shown to affect holoenzyme stability and catalytic properties. The information contained in the Chlamydomonas structure enables a more reliable analysis of the effect of these mutations. No electron density was observed for the last 13 residues of the small subunit, which are assumed to be disordered in the crystal. Because of the high resolution of the data, some posttranslational modifications are unambiguously apparent in the structure. These include cysteine and N-terminal methylations and proline 4-hydroxylations.

  3. A galactoglycerolipid lipase is required for triacylglycerol accumulation and survival following nitrogen deprivation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Moellering, Eric R; Liu, Bensheng; Johnny, Cassandra; Fedewa, Marie; Sears, Barbara B; Kuo, Min-Hao; Benning, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Following N deprivation, microalgae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs). To gain mechanistic insights into this phenomenon, we identified mutants with reduced TAG content following N deprivation in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In one of the mutants, the disruption of a galactoglycerolipid lipase-encoding gene, designated PLASTID GALACTOGLYCEROLIPID DEGRADATION1 (PGD1), was responsible for the primary phenotype: reduced TAG content, altered TAG composition, and reduced galactoglycerolipid turnover. The recombinant PGD1 protein, which was purified from Escherichia coli extracts, hydrolyzed monogalactosyldiacylglycerol into its lyso-lipid derivative. In vivo pulse-chase labeling identified galactoglycerolipid pools as a major source of fatty acids esterified in TAGs following N deprivation. Moreover, the fatty acid flux from plastid lipids to TAG was decreased in the pgd1 mutant. Apparently, de novo-synthesized fatty acids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are, at least partially, first incorporated into plastid lipids before they enter TAG synthesis. As a secondary effect, the pgd1 mutant exhibited a loss of viability following N deprivation, which could be avoided by blocking photosynthetic electron transport. Thus, the pgd1 mutant provides evidence for an important biological function of TAG synthesis following N deprivation, namely, relieving a detrimental overreduction of the photosynthetic electron transport chain.

  4. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-10-03

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process.

  5. Generation of the heterodimeric precursor GP3 of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Kiess, Michael; Getzlaff, Rita; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Frank, Ronald

    2010-09-01

    The cell wall of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exclusively consists of hydroxyproline-containing glycoproteins. Protein chemical analysis of its polypeptide constituents was hindered by their cross-linking via peroxidase-catalysed intermolecular isodityrosine formation and transaminase-dependent processes. To overcome this problem, we have identified putative soluble precursors using polyclonal antibodies raised against deglycosylation products of the highly purified insoluble wall fraction and analysed their amino acid sequence. The occurrence of the corresponding polypeptide in the insoluble glycoprotein framework was finally probed by epitope mapping of the polyclonal antibodies using overlapping scan peptides which, together, cover the whole amino acid sequence of the putative precursor. As a control, peptide fragments released from the insoluble wall fraction by trypsin treatment were analysed by mass spectroscopy. By this approach, the heterodimeric, chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP3 proved to be a constituent of the insoluble extracellular matrix of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Furthermore, we have shown that the polypeptide backbones of both GP3 subunits are encoded by the same gene and differ by a C-terminal truncation in the case of GP3A.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool

    2016-06-13

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including "safe harboring" techniques shown in other organisms.

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including “safe harboring” techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  8. Spontaneous Dominant Mutations in Chlamydomonas Highlight Ongoing Evolution by Gene Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Alix; Drapier, Dominique; Razafimanantsoa, Hélène; Wostrikoff, Katia; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Pascal, Kevin; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Vallon, Olivier; Wollman, Francis-André; Choquet, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We characterized two spontaneous and dominant nuclear mutations in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ncc1 and ncc2 (for nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression), which affect two octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins encoded in a cluster of paralogous genes on chromosome 15. Both mutations cause a single amino acid substitution in one OPR repeat. As a result, the mutated NCC1 and NCC2 proteins now recognize new targets that we identified in the coding sequences of the chloroplast atpA and petA genes, respectively. Interaction of the mutated proteins with these targets leads to transcript degradation; however, in contrast to the ncc1 mutation, the ncc2 mutation requires on-going translation to promote the decay of the petA mRNA. Thus, these mutants reveal a mechanism by which nuclear factors act on chloroplast mRNAs in Chlamydomonas. They illustrate how diversifying selection can allow cells to adapt the nuclear control of organelle gene expression to environmental changes. We discuss these data in the wider context of the evolution of regulation by helical repeat proteins. PMID:25804537

  9. Transformation of Chloroplast Ribosomal RNA Genes in Chlamydomonas: Molecular and Genetic Characterization of Integration Events

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S. M.; Boynton, J. E.; Gillham, N. W.; Randolph-Anderson, B. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Harris, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of chloroplast ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in Chlamydomonas has been achieved by the biolistic process using cloned chloroplast DNA fragments carrying mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. The sites of exchange employed during the integration of the donor DNA into the recipient genome have been localized using a combination of antibiotic resistance mutations in the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms that flank these genes. Complete or nearly complete replacement of a region of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cell by the corresponding sequence from the donor plasmid was the most common integration event. Exchange events between the homologous donor and recipient sequences occurred preferentially near the vector:insert junctions. Insertion of the donor rRNA genes and flanking sequences into one inverted repeat of the recipient genome was followed by intramolecular copy correction so that both copies of the inverted repeat acquired identical sequences. Increased frequencies of rRNA gene transformants were achieved by reducing the copy number of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cells and by decreasing the heterology between donor and recipient DNA sequences flanking the selectable markers. In addition to producing bona fide chloroplast rRNA transformants, the biolistic process induced mutants resistant to low levels of streptomycin, typical of nuclear mutations in Chlamydomonas. PMID:1981764

  10. The small molecule fenpropimorph rapidly converts chloroplast membrane lipids to triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanul; Jang, Sunghoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Hong, Daewoong; Song, Won-Yong; Nishida, Ikuo; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Lee, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Concern about global warming has prompted an intense interest in developing economical methods of producing biofuels. Microalgae provide a promising platform for biofuel production, because they accumulate high levels of lipids, and do not compete with food or feed sources. However, current methods of producing algal oil involve subjecting the microalgae to stress conditions, such as nitrogen deprivation, and are prohibitively expensive. Here, we report that the fungicide fenpropimorph rapidly causes high levels of neutral lipids to accumulate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. When treated with fenpropimorph (10 μg mL-1) for 1 h, Chlamydomonas cells accumulated at least fourfold the amount of triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in the untreated control cells. Furthermore, the quantity of TAGs present after 1 h of fenpropimorph treatment was over twofold higher than that formed after 9 days of nitrogen starvation in medium with no acetate supplement. Biochemical analysis of lipids revealed that the accumulated TAGs were derived mainly from chloroplast polar membrane lipids. Such a conversion of chloroplast polar lipids to TAGs is desirable for biodiesel production, because polar lipids are usually removed during the biodiesel production process. Thus, our data exemplified that a cost and time effective method of producing TAGs is possible using fenpropimorph or similar drugs. PMID:25759683

  11. A Photoperiod-Regulating Gene CONSTANS Is Correlated to Lipid Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaodong; Fan, Xinzhao; Li, Ping; Fei, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background. The regulation of lipid biosynthesis is essential in photosynthetic eukaryotic cells. Thus far, no regulatory genes have been reported in the lipid metabolism pathway. Plant CONSTANS (CO) gene regulates blooming by participating in photoperiod and biological clock. Apart from regulating photoperiod, the Chlamydomonas CO gene also regulates starch content. Results. In this study, the results showed that, under HSM-S condition, cells accumulated more lipids at short-day conditions than at long-day conditions. The silencing of the CrCO gene via RNA interference resulted in an increase in lipid content and an increase in triacylglyceride (TAG) level by 24.5%. CrCO RNAi strains accumulated more lipids at short-day conditions than at long-day conditions. The decrease in CrCO expression resulted in the increased expression of TAG biosynthesis-related genes, such as DGAT2, PAP2, and PDAT3, whereas CIS and FBP1 genes showed a decrease in their mRNA when the CrCO expression was suppressed. On the other hand, the overexpression of CrCO resulted in the decrease in lipid content and TAG level. Conclusions. The results of this study revealed a relationship between CrCO gene and lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas, suggesting that increasing oil by suppressing CrCO expression in microalgae is feasible. PMID:25654119

  12. The Contractile Vacuole as a Key Regulator of Cellular Water Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Wöstehoff, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Most freshwater flagellates use contractile vacuoles (CVs) to expel excess water. We have used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a green model system to investigate CV function during adaptation to osmotic changes in culture medium. We show that the contractile vacuole in Chlamydomonas is regulated in two different ways. The size of the contractile vacuoles increases during cell growth, with the contraction interval strongly depending on the osmotic strength of the medium. In contrast, there are only small fluctuations in cytosolic osmolarity and plasma membrane permeability. Modeling of the CV membrane permeability indicates that only a small osmotic gradient is necessary for water flux into the CV, which most likely is facilitated by the aquaporin major intrinsic protein 1 (MIP1). We show that MIP1 is localized to the contractile vacuole, and that the expression rate and protein level of MIP1 exhibit only minor fluctuations under different osmotic conditions. In contrast, SEC6, a protein of the exocyst complex that is required for the water expulsion step, and a dynamin-like protein are upregulated under strong hypotonic conditions. The overexpression of a CreMIP1-GFP construct did not change the physiology of the CV. The functional implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25217463

  13. Atomic resolution modeling of the ferredoxin:[FeFe] hydrogenase complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-11-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H(2) from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20 kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H(2) evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2.

  14. Rubisco small subunits from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas complement Rubisco-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky; Leitão, Nuno; Orr, Douglas J; Meyer, Moritz T; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-04-01

    Introducing components of algal carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into higher plant chloroplasts could increase photosynthetic productivity. A key component is the Rubisco-containing pyrenoid that is needed to minimise CO2 retro-diffusion for CCM operating efficiency. Rubisco in Arabidopsis was re-engineered to incorporate sequence elements that are thought to be essential for recruitment of Rubisco to the pyrenoid, namely the algal Rubisco small subunit (SSU, encoded by rbcS) or only the surface-exposed algal SSU α-helices. Leaves of Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing 'pyrenoid-competent' chimeric Arabidopsis SSUs containing the SSU α-helices from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can form hybrid Rubisco complexes with catalytic properties similar to those of native Rubisco, suggesting that the α-helices are catalytically neutral. The growth and photosynthetic performance of complemented Arabidopsis rbcs mutants producing near wild-type levels of the hybrid Rubisco were similar to those of wild-type controls. Arabidopsis rbcs mutants expressing a Chlamydomonas SSU differed from wild-type plants with respect to Rubisco catalysis, photosynthesis and growth. This confirms a role for the SSU in influencing Rubisco catalytic properties.

  15. High-Throughput Robotically Assisted Isolation of Temperature-sensitive Lethal Mutants in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Breker, Michal; Lieberman, Kristi; Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    Systematic identification and characterization of genetic perturbations have proven useful to decipher gene function and cellular pathways. However, the conventional approaches of permanent gene deletion cannot be applied to essential genes. We have pioneered a unique collection of ~70 temperature-sensitive (ts) lethal mutants for studying cell cycle regulation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1. These mutations identify essential genes, and the ts alleles can be conditionally inactivated by temperature shift, providing valuable tools to identify and analyze essential functions. Mutant collections are much more valuable if they are close to comprehensive, since scattershot collections can miss important components. However, this requires the efficient collection of a large number of mutants, especially in a wide-target screen. Here, we describe a robotics-based pipeline for generating ts lethal mutants and analyzing their phenotype in Chlamydomonas. This technique can be applied to any microorganism that grows on agar. We have collected over 3000 ts mutants, probably including mutations in most or all cell-essential pathways, including about 200 new candidate cell cycle mutations. Subsequent molecular and cellular characterization of these mutants should provide new insights in plant cell biology; a comprehensive mutant collection is an essential prerequisite to ensure coverage of a broad range of biological pathways. These methods are integrated with downstream genetics and bioinformatics procedures for efficient mapping and identification of the causative mutations that are beyond the scope of this manuscript. PMID:28060315

  16. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process. PMID:27694882

  17. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  18. A chloroplast pathway for the de novo biosynthesis of triacylglycerol in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.; Andre, C.

    2011-06-23

    Neutral lipid metabolism has been extensively studied in yeast, plants and mammals. In contrast, little information is available regarding the biochemical pathway, enzymes and regulatory factors involved in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in microalgae. In the conventional TAG biosynthetic pathway widely accepted for yeast, plants and mammals, TAG is assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from its immediate precursor diacylglycerol (DAG) made by ER-specific acyltransferases, and is deposited exclusively in lipid droplets in the cytosol. Here, we demonstrated that the unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii employs a distinct pathway that uses DAG derived almost exclusively from the chloroplast to produce TAG. This unique TAG biosynthesis pathway is largely dependent on de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the TAG formed in this pathway is stored in lipid droplets in both the chloroplast and the cytosol. These findings have wide implications for understanding TAG biosynthesis and storage and other areas of lipid metabolism in microalgae and other organisms.

  19. Membrane-associated polypeptides induced in Chlamydomonas by limiting CO sub 2 concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, M.H.; Jeffrey, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other unicellular green algae have a high apparent affinity for CO{sub 2}, little O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, and reduced photorespiration. These characteristics result from operation of a CO{sub 2}-concentrating system. The CO{sub 2}-concentrating system involves active inorganic carbon transport and is under environmental control. Cells grown at limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations have inorganic carbon transport activity, but cells grown at 5% CO{sub 2} do not. Four membrane-associated polypeptides (M{sub r}, 19, 21, 35, and 36 kilodaltons) have been identified which either appear or increase in abundance during adaptation to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The appearance of two of the polypeptides occurs over roughly the same time course as the appearance of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system activity in response to CO{sub 2} limitation.

  20. Lack of mutagenic activity of crude and refined oils in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermeulen, J.H.; Lee, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of studies have presented evidence for the mutagenicity and/or carcinogenic potential of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons. These most usually were obtained with individual hydrocarbons, and using either specialized bacterial strains (e.g. Ames' strains) or mammalian tissue preparations. While providing important insights into mutagenic mechanisms involving xenobiotic compounds, the relevance of these studies to the natural aquatic environment is not always evident. This applies especially to the mutagenic potential of water-soluble fractions of hydrocarbon mixtures, as in whole oils or in complex distillate fractions, and involving typical marine biota. Accordingly, the authors have examined the mutagenic potential of the water-soluble fractions of four oils (two crude oils and two refined oils) using the unicellular haploid alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  1. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-11

    Cilia and flagella are model systems for studying how mechanical forces control morphology. The periodic bending motion of cilia and flagella is thought to arise from mechanical feedback: dynein motors generate sliding forces that bend the flagellum, and bending leads to deformations and stresses, which feed back and regulate the motors. Three alternative feedback mechanisms have been proposed: regulation by the sliding forces, regulation by the curvature of the flagellum, and regulation by the normal forces that deform the cross-section of the flagellum. In this work, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to show that the curvature control mechanism is the one that accords best with the bending waveforms of Chlamydomonas flagella. We make the surprising prediction that the motors respond to the time derivative of curvature, rather than curvature itself, hinting at an adaptation mechanism controlling the flagellar beat.

  2. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are model systems for studying how mechanical forces control morphology. The periodic bending motion of cilia and flagella is thought to arise from mechanical feedback: dynein motors generate sliding forces that bend the flagellum, and bending leads to deformations and stresses, which feed back and regulate the motors. Three alternative feedback mechanisms have been proposed: regulation by the sliding forces, regulation by the curvature of the flagellum, and regulation by the normal forces that deform the cross-section of the flagellum. In this work, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to show that the curvature control mechanism is the one that accords best with the bending waveforms of Chlamydomonas flagella. We make the surprising prediction that the motors respond to the time derivative of curvature, rather than curvature itself, hinting at an adaptation mechanism controlling the flagellar beat. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13258.001 PMID:27166516

  3. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Kage, Azusa; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume. PMID:26787679

  4. Lipid droplet synthesis is limited by acetate availability in starchless mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ramanan, Rishiram; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Ko, So-Ra; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2013-02-14

    Phenotypic and genotypic changes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii BafJ5, a starchless mutant, with respect to lipid metabolism was studied in different trophic states under nitrogen (N) sufficient and limited conditions. Interestingly, cellular lipid content increased linearly with input acetate concentration with highest lipid content (∼42%) under nitrogen limitation and mixotrophic state. RT-qPCR studies indicate that key fatty acid biosynthesis genes are down-regulated under N limitation but not under mixotrophic state, whereas, ACS2, encoding Acetyl-CoA synthetase, and DGTT4, encoding Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase, are up-regulated under all conditions. These results collectively indicate that acetate is the limiting factor and central molecule in lipid droplet synthesis. The study also provides further evidence of the presence of a chloroplast pathway for triacylglycerol synthesis in microalgae.

  5. The Effect of Gametogenesis Regimes on the Chloroplast Genetic System of CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Barbara B.; Boynton, John E.; Gillham, Nicholas W.

    1980-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, gamete differentiation is induced by nitrogen deprivation. While cellular nitrogen content and amount of chloroplast DNA in cells of both mating types are reduced during gametogenesis, the spontaneous transmission of paternal (mt-) chloroplast alleles in crosses is specifically affected by the stringency of the nitrogen starvation regime used for pregrowth and gametogenesis of the mt- parent. In all cases, reciprocal crosses yielded biparental zygospores whose clones contain predominantly cells expressing only the chloroplast alleles from the maternal (mt+) parent. No differences attributable to strain divergence were seen in chloroplast gene inheritance pattern, DNA content, or the relative frequency of transmission of paternal chloroplast alleles to progeny of biparental zygospores. PMID:17249065

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of full-length Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Elisa; del Valle Sosa, Liliana; Sanoguet, Zuleika; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin is a member of the EF-hand calcium-binding superfamily. It is found in the basal body complex and is important for flagellar motility. Like other members of the EF-hand family, centrin interacts with and modulates the function of other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner. To understand how C. reinhardtii centrin interacts with its protein targets, it has been crystallized in the presence of the model peptide melittin and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. The crystals are orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.1, b = 114.4, c = 34.8 Å, and are likely to belong to space group P21212. PMID:18453711

  7. IFT proteins accumulate during cell division and localize to the cleavage furrow in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christopher R; Wang, Zhaohui; Diener, Dennis; Zones, James Matt; Rosenbaum, Joel; Umen, James G

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins are well established as conserved mediators of flagellum/cilium assembly and disassembly. However, data has begun to accumulate in support of IFT protein involvement in other processes elsewhere in the cell. Here, we used synchronous cultures of Chlamydomonas to investigate the temporal patterns of accumulation and localization of IFT proteins during the cell cycle. Their mRNAs showed periodic expression that peaked during S and M phase (S/M). Unlike most proteins that are synthesized continuously during G1 phase, IFT27 and IFT46 levels were found to increase only during S/M phase. During cell division, IFT27, IFT46, IFT72, and IFT139 re-localized from the flagella and basal bodies to the cleavage furrow. IFT27 was further shown to be associated with membrane vesicles in this region. This localization pattern suggests a role for IFT in cell division.

  8. Recombinant Reconstitution and Purification of the IFT-B Core Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are assembled and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional transport of proteins between the ciliary base and tip. IFT is mediated by the multi-subunit IFT complex, which simultaneously binds cargo proteins and the ciliary motors. So far 22 subunits of the IFT complex have been identified, but insights into the biochemical architecture and especially the three-dimensional structure of this machinery are only starting to emerge because of difficulties in obtaining homogeneous material suitable for structural analysis. Here, we describe a protocol for the purification and reconstitution of a complex containing nine Chlamydomonas reinhardtii IFT proteins, commonly known as the IFT-B core complex. In our hands, this protocol routinely yields several milligrams of pure complex suitable for structural analysis by X-ray crystallography and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy.

  9. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells adjust the metabolism to maintain viability in response to atrazine stress.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Seoane, Marta; Rioboo, Carmen; Herrero, Concepción; Cid, Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were exposed to a sublethal concentration of the widespread herbicide atrazine for 3 and 24h. Physiological parameters related to cellular energy status, such as cellular activity and mitochondrial and cytoplasmic membrane potentials, monitored by flow cytometry, were altered in microalgal cells exposed to 0.25μM of atrazine. Transcriptomic analyses, carried out by RNA-Seq technique, displayed 12 differentially expressed genes between control cultures and atrazine-exposed cultures at both tested times. Many cellular processes were affected, but the most significant changes were observed in genes implicated in amino acid catabolism and respiratory cellular process. Obtained results suggest that photosynthesis inhibition by atrazine leads cells to get energy through a heterotrophic metabolism to maintain their viability.

  10. Cellulose degradation and assimilation by the unicellular phototrophic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Klassen, Viktor; Doebbe, Anja; Kersting, Klaudia; Grimm, Philipp; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Plants convert sunlight to biomass, which is primarily composed of lignocellulose, the most abundant natural biopolymer and a potential feedstock for fuel and chemical production. Cellulose assimilation has so far only been described for heterotrophic organisms that rely on photosynthetically active primary producers of organic compounds. Among phototrophs, the unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is widely known as one of the best established model organisms. It occupies many habitats, including aquatic and soil ecosystems. This ubiquity underscores the versatile metabolic properties of this microorganism. Here we present yet another paradigm of adaptation for C. reinhardtii, highlighting its photoheterotrophic ability to utilize cellulose for growth in the absence of other carbon sources. When grown under CO(2)-limiting conditions in the light, secretion of endo-β-1,4-glucanases by the cell causes digestion of exogenous cellulose, followed by cellobiose uptake and assimilation. Phototrophic microbes like C. reinhardtii may thus serve as biocatalysts for cellulosic biofuel production.

  11. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Nar1 Gene Encodes a Chloroplast Membrane Protein Involved in Nitrite Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rexach, Jesus; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2000-01-01

    A key step for nitrate assimilation in photosynthetic eukaryotes occurs within chloroplasts, where nitrite is reduced to ammonium, which is incorporated into carbon skeletons. The Nar1 gene from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is clustered with five other genes for nitrate assimilation, all of them regulated by nitrate. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA and cDNA of Nar1 and comparative studies of strains having or lacking Nar1 have been performed. The deduced amino acid sequence indicates that Nar1 encodes a chloroplast membrane protein with substantial identity to putative formate and nitrite transporters in bacteria. Use of antibodies against NAR1 has corroborated its location in the plastidic membrane. Characterization of strains having or lacking this gene suggests that NAR1 is involved in nitrite transport in plastids, which is critical for cell survival under limiting nitrate conditions, and controls the amount of nitrate incorporated by the cells under limiting CO2 conditions. PMID:10948261

  12. Ethanol stimulates phospholipid turnover and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production in Chlamydomonas eugametos gametes.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, A; Kuin, H; Jongen, M; de Wildt, P; Schuring, F; Klerk, H; van den Ende, H

    1992-02-01

    Alcohols induce mating-structure activation in Chlamydomonas eugametos gametes. From the effect of ethanol on the (32)P-labelling of polyphosphoinositides, we conclude that the synthesis of these lipids is stimulated. Biologically inactive concentrations of ethanol (<6%) had no effect on synthesis, but 6-8% ethanol stimulated synthesis for upto 60 min. The (32)P incorporated into polyphosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid during ethanol treatment was readily chased out when 1 mM unlabelled Na3PO4 was added. Using a binding assay for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, we show that the production of this phospholipid constituent is dramatically increased after ethanol treatment. This effect, coupled to a rise in intracellular calcium concentration, could explain gamete activation. The significance of these results in explaining other ethanol-induced phenomena in algae is discussed.

  13. Efficient phototrophic production of a high-value sesquiterpenoid from the eukaryotic microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lauersen, Kyle J; Baier, Thomas; Wichmann, Julian; Wördenweber, Robin; Mussgnug, Jan H; Hübner, Wolfgang; Huser, Thomas; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-11-01

    The heterologous expression of terpene synthases in microbial hosts has opened numerous possibilities for bioproduction of desirable metabolites. Photosynthetic microbial hosts present a sustainable alternative to traditional fermentative systems, using freely available (sun)light and carbon dioxide as inputs for bio-production. Here, we report the expression of a patchoulol synthase from Pogostemon cablin Benth in the model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The sesquiterpenoid patchoulol was produced from the alga and was used as a marker of sesquiterpenoid production capacity. A novel strategy for gene loading was employed and patchoulol was produced up to 922±242µgg(-1) CDW in six days. We additionally investigated the effect of carbon source on sesquiterpenoid productivity from C. reinhardtii in scale-up batch cultivations. It was determined that up to 1.03mgL(-1) sesquiterpenoid products could be produced in completely photoautotrophic conditions and that the alga exhibited altered sesquiterpenoid production metabolism related to carbon source.

  14. [LIGHT-DEPENDENT SYNTHESIS OF CELL MEMBRANES IN THE Brc-1 MUTANT OF CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII].

    PubMed

    Semenova, G A; Chekunova, E M; Ladygin, V G

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of cells of the Brc-1 mutant of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in the light and in the dark has been studied. The Brc-1 mutant contains the brc-1 mutation in the nucleus gene LTS3. In the light, all membrane structures in mutant cells form normally and are well developed. In the dark under heterotrophic conditions, the mutant cells grew and divided well, however, all its cell membranes: plasmalemma, tonoplast, mitochondrial membranes, membranes of the nucleus shell and chloroplast, thylakoids, and the membranes of dictiosomes of the Golgi apparatus were not detected. In the dark under heterotrophic conditions, mutant cells well grow and divide. It were shown that a short-term (1-10 min) exposure of Brc-1 mutant cells to light leads to the restoration of all above-mentioned membrane structures. Possible reasons for the alterations of membrane structures are discussed.

  15. Epigenetic silencing of a foreign gene in nuclear transformants of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, H; Johnson, A M; Gillham, N W; Boynton, J E

    1997-01-01

    The unstable expression of introduced genes poses a serious problem for the application of transgenic technology in plants. In transformants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, expression of a eubacterial aadA gene, conferring spectinomycin resistance, is transcriptionally suppressed by a reversible epigenetic mechanism(s). Variations in the size and frequency of colonies surviving on different concentrations of spectinomycin as well as the levels of transcriptional activity of the introduced transgene(s) suggest the existence of intermediate expression states in genetically identical cells. Gene silencing does not correlate with methylation of the integrated DNA and does not involve large alterations in its chromatin structure, as revealed by digestion with restriction endonucleases and DNase I. Transgene repression is enhanced by lower temperatures, similar to position effect variegation in Drosophila. By analogy to epigenetic phenomena in several eukaryotes, our results suggest a possible role for (hetero)chromatic chromosomal domains in transcriptional inactivation. PMID:9212467

  16. Molecular characterization of a zygote wall protein: an extensin-like molecule in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Woessner, J P; Goodenough, U W

    1989-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii elaborates two biochemically and morphologically distinct cell walls during its life cycle: one surrounds the vegetative and gametic cell and the other encompasses the zygote. Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) constitute a major component of both walls. We describe the isolation and characterization of a zygote-specific gene encoding a wall HRGP. The derived amino acid sequence of this algal HRGP is similar to those of higher plant extensins, rich in proline and serine residues and possessing repeating amino acid motifs, notably X(Pro)3 and (Ser-Pro)n. Antiserum against this zygote wall protein detected common epitopes in several other zygote polypeptides, at least one of which is also encoded by a zygote-specific gene. We conclude that there is one set of HRGP wall genes expressed only in zygotes and another set that is specific to vegetative and gametic cells. PMID:2535530

  17. [Effect of Methylmercury on the Light Dependence Fluorescence Parameters in a Green Alga Chlamydomonas moewusii].

    PubMed

    Protopopov, F F; Matorin, D N; Seifullina, N H; Bratkovskaya, L B; Zayadan, B K

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a dangerous toxic substance, methylmercury, on light dependence curves of chlorophyll fluorescence in Chlamydomonas moewusii was studied. We found low concentration of methylmercury (10(-7) M) to cause a decrease in the relative rate of the non-cyclic electron transport activity of PS 2, a decline in the maximum utilization of light energy (α), and a decline in the saturation light intensity (E(s)). Non-photochemical fluorescence quenching increased after short-term exposure and decreased in the course of prolonged incubation. These parameters were more sensitive to the action of the toxic substance than the widely used parameter F(V)/F(M), which reflects the maximum quantum yield of PS 2. We propose the use of the method of fast measurement of light dependence curves of fluorescence to detect the changes in algal cells at the early stages of exposure to mercury salts.

  18. Chlamydomonas swims with two "gears" in a eukaryotic version of run-and-tumble locomotion.

    PubMed

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Gollub, J P; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-07-24

    The coordination of eukaryotic flagella is essential for many of the most basic processes of life (motility, sensing, and development), yet its emergence and regulation and its connection to locomotion are poorly understood. Previous studies show that the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas, widely regarded as an ideal system in which to study flagellar biology, swims forward by the synchronous action of its two flagella. Using high-speed imaging over long intervals, we found a richer behavior: A cell swimming in the dark stochastically switches between synchronous and asynchronous flagellar beating. Three-dimensional tracking shows that these regimes lead, respectively, to nearly straight swimming and to abrupt large reorientations, which yield a eukaryotic version of the "run-and-tumble" motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  19. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; ...

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient tomore » confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.« less

  20. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity. PMID:27466170

  1. Evidence for thylakoid membrane fusion during zygote formation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    To understand whether fusions of thylakoid membranes from the parental chloroplasts occurred during zygote formation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we performed an ultrastructural analysis of the zygotes produced by crossing mutants lacking photosystem I or II protein complexes, in the absence of de novo chloroplast protein synthesis. Thylakoid membranes from each parent could be distinguished on thin sections due to their organization in "supergrana" in mutants lacking photosystem I centers, by freeze-fracturing due to the absence of most of the exoplasmic-face (EF) particles in mutants lacking photosystem II centers, by immunocytochemistry using antibodies directed against photosystem II subunits. We demonstrate that a fusion of the thylakoid membranes occurred during zygote formation approximately 15 h after mating. These fusions allowed a lateral redistribution of the thylakoid membrane proteins. These observations provide the structural basis for the restoration of photosynthetic electron flow in the mature zygote that we observed in fluorescence induction experiments. PMID:1874788

  2. Evidence from Chlamydomonas on the photoactivation of rhodopsins without isomerization of their chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kenneth W.; Saranak, Jureepan; Krane, Sonja; Johnson, Randy L.; Nakanishi, Koji

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Attachment of retinal to opsin forms the chromophore N-retinylidene which isomerizes during photoactivation of rhodopsins. To test whether isomerization is crucial, custom-tailored chromophores lacking the β-ionone ring and any isomerizable bonds were incorporated in vivo into the opsin of a blind mutant of the eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analogues restored phototaxis with the anticipated action spectra, ruling out the need for isomerization in photoactivation. To further elucidate photoactivation, responses to chromophores formed from naphthalene aldehydes were studied. The resulting action spectral shifts suggest that charge separation within the excited chromophore leads to electric field induced polarization of nearby amino-acid residues and altered hydrogen bonding. This redistribution of charge faciliates the reported multiple bond rotations and protein rearrangements of rhodopsin activation. These results provide new insight into the activation of rhodopsins and related GPCRs. PMID:21700209

  3. Zinc Deficiency Impacts CO2 Assimilation and Disrupts Copper Homeostasis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Malasarn, Davin; Kropat, Janette; Hsieh, Scott I.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Casero, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wollman, Francis-André; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because of its role in catalysis and in protein stabilization, but excess zinc is deleterious. We distinguished four nutritional zinc states in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: toxic, replete, deficient, and limited. Growth is inhibited in zinc-limited and zinc-toxic cells relative to zinc-replete cells, whereas zinc deficiency is visually asymptomatic but distinguished by the accumulation of transcripts encoding ZIP family transporters. To identify targets of zinc deficiency and mechanisms of zinc acclimation, we used RNA-seq to probe zinc nutrition-responsive changes in gene expression. We identified genes encoding zinc-handling components, including ZIP family transporters and candidate chaperones. Additionally, we noted an impact on two other regulatory pathways, the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and the nutritional copper regulon. Targets of transcription factor Ccm1 and various CAH genes are up-regulated in zinc deficiency, probably due to reduced carbonic anhydrase activity, validated by quantitative proteomics and immunoblot analysis of Cah1, Cah3, and Cah4. Chlamydomonas is therefore not able to grow photoautotrophically in zinc-limiting conditions, but supplementation with 1% CO2 restores growth to wild-type rates, suggesting that the inability to maintain CCM is a major consequence of zinc limitation. The Crr1 regulon responds to copper limitation and is turned on in zinc deficiency, and Crr1 is required for growth in zinc-limiting conditions. Zinc-deficient cells are functionally copper-deficient, although they hyperaccumulate copper up to 50-fold over normal levels. We suggest that zinc-deficient cells sequester copper in a biounavailable form, perhaps to prevent mismetallation of critical zinc sites. PMID:23439652

  4. Increased photosystem II stability promotes H2 production in sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Volgusheva, Alena; Styring, Stenbjörn; Mamedov, Fikret

    2013-01-01

    Photobiological H2 production is an attractive option for renewable solar fuels. Sulfur-deprived cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been shown to produce hydrogen with the highest efficiency among photobiological systems. We have investigated the photosynthetic reactions during sulfur deprivation and H2 production in the wild-type and state transition mutant 6 (Stm6) mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The incubation period (130 h) was dissected into different phases, and changes in the amount and functional status of photosystem II (PSII) were investigated in vivo by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and variable fluorescence measurements. In the wild type it was found that the amount of PSII is decreased to 25% of the original level; the electron transport from PSII was completely blocked during the anaerobic phase preceding H2 formation. This block was released during the H2 production phase, indicating that the hydrogenase withdraws electrons from the plastoquinone pool. This partly removes the block in PSII electron transport, thereby permitting electron flow from water oxidation to hydrogenase. In the Stm6 mutant, which has higher respiration and H2 evolution than the wild type, PSII was analogously but much less affected. The addition of the PSII inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea revealed that ∼80% of the H2 production was inhibited in both strains. We conclude that (i) at least in the earlier stages, most of the electrons delivered to the hydrogenase originate from water oxidation by PSII, (ii) a faster onset of anaerobiosis preserves PSII from irreversible photoinhibition, and (iii) mutants with enhanced respiratory activity should be considered for better photobiological H2 production. PMID:23589846

  5. A revised mineral nutrient supplement increases biomass and growth rate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kropat, Janette; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Casero, David; Ent, Petr; Castruita, Madeli; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Malasarn, Davin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Interest in exploiting algae as a biofuel source and the role of inorganic nutrient deficiency in inducing triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation in cells necessitates a strategy to efficiently formulate species-specific culture media that can easily be manipulated. Using the reference organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we tested the hypothesis that modeling trace element supplements after the cellular ionome would result in optimized cell growth. We determined the trace metal content of several commonly used Chlamydomonas strains in various culture conditions and developed a revised trace element solution to parallel these measurements. Comparison of cells growing in the revised supplement versus a traditional trace element solution revealed faster growth rates and higher maximum cell densities with the revised recipe. RNA-seq analysis of cultures growing in the traditional versus revised medium suggest that the variation in transcriptomes was smaller than that found between different wild-type strains grown in traditional Hutner’s supplement. Visual observation did not reveal defects in cell motility or mating efficiency in the new supplement. Ni2+-inducible expression from the CYC6 promoter remained a useful tool, albeit with an increased requirement for Ni2+ because of the introduction of an EDTA buffer system in the revised medium. Other advantages include more facile preparation of trace element stock solutions, a reduction in total chemical use, a more consistent batch-to-batch formulation, and long-term stability (tested up to 5 years). Under the new growth regime, we analyzed cells growing under different macro- and micronutrient-deficiencies. TAG accumulation in N deficiency is comparable in the new medium. Fe and Zn deficiency also induced TAG accumulation, as suggested by Nile Red staining. This approach can be used to efficiently optimize culture conditions for other algal species to improve growth and to assay cell physiology. PMID:21309872

  6. Biochemical and morphological characterization of sulfur-deprived and H2-producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green alga).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liping; Happe, Thomas; Melis, Anastasios

    2002-02-01

    Sulfur deprivation in green algae causes reversible inhibition of photosynthetic activity. In the absence of S, rates of photosynthetic O2 evolution drop below those of O2 consumption by respiration. As a consequence, sealed cultures of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii become anaerobic in the light, induce the "Fe-hydrogenase" pathway of electron transport and photosynthetically produce H2 gas. In the course of such H2-gas production cells consume substantial amounts of internal starch and protein. Such catabolic reactions may sustain, directly or in directly, the H2-production process. Profile analysis of selected photosynthetic proteins showed a precipitous decline in the amount of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) as a function of time in S deprivation, a more gradual decline in the level of photosystem (PS) II and PSI proteins, and a change in the composition of the PSII light-harvesting complex (LHC-II). An increase in the level of the enzyme Fe-hydrogenase was noted during the initial stages of S deprivation (0-72 h) followed by a decline in the level of this enzyme during longer (t >72 h) S-deprivation times. Microscopic observations showed distinct morphological changes in C. reinhardtii during S deprivation and H2 production. Ellipsoid-shaped cells (normal photosynthesis) gave way to larger and spherical cell shapes in the initial stages of S deprivation and H2 production, followed by cell mass reductions after longer S-deprivation and H2-production times. It is suggested that, under S-deprivation conditions, electrons derived from a residual PSII H2O-oxidation activity feed into the hydrogenase pathway, thereby contributing to the H2-production process in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Interplay between oxygenic photosynthesis, mitochondrial respiration, catabolism of endogenous substrate, and electron transport via the hydrogenase pathway is essential for this light-mediated H2-production process.

  7. How Chlamydomonas keeps track of the light once it has reached the right phototactic orientation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, K; David, R; Uhl, R

    1997-01-01

    By using a real-time assay that allows measurement of the phototactic orientation of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas with millisecond time resolution, it can be shown that single photons not only induce transient direction changes but that fluence rates as low as 1 photon cell(-1) s(-1) can already lead to a persistent orientation. Orientation is a binary variable, i.e., in a partially oriented population some organisms are fully oriented while the rest are still at random. Action spectra reveal that the response to a pulsed stimulus follows the Dartnall-nomogram for a rhodopsin while the response to a persistent stimulus falls off more rapidly toward the red end of the spectrum. Thus light of 540 nm, for which chlamy-rhodopsin is equally sensitive as for 440-nm light, induces no measurable persistent orientation while 440-nm light does. A model is presented which explains not only this behavior, but also how Chlamydomonas can track the light direction and switches between a positive and negative phototaxis. According to the model the ability to detect the direction of light, to make the right turn and to stay oriented, is a direct consequence of the helical path of the organism, the orientation of its eyespot relative to the helix-axis, and the special shielding properties of eyespot and cell body. The model places particular emphasis on the fact that prolonged swimming into the correct direction not only requires making a correct turn initially, but also avoiding further turns once the right direction has been reached. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9284323

  8. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions.

  9. A comparison of hydrogen photoproduction by sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Patrusheva, Elena; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael; Tsygankov, Anatoly

    2007-03-10

    Continuous photoproduction of H(2) by the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is observed after incubating the cultures for about a day in the absence of sulfate and in the presence of acetate. Sulfur deprivation causes the partial and reversible inactivation of photosynthetic O(2) evolution in algae, resulting in the light-induced establishment of anaerobic conditions in sealed photobioreactors, expression of two [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the cells, and H(2) photoproduction for several days. We have previously demonstrated that sulfur-deprived algal cultures can produce H(2) gas in the absence of acetate, when appropriate experimental protocols were used (Tsygankov, A.A., Kosourov, S.N., Tolstygina, I.V., Ghirardi, M.L., Seibert, M., 2006. Hydrogen production by sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under photoautotrophic conditions. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 31, 1574-1584). We now report the use of an automated photobioreactor system to compare the effects of photoautotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photomixotrophic growth conditions on the kinetic parameters associated with the adaptation of the algal cells to sulfur deprivation and H(2) photoproduction. This was done under the experimental conditions outlined in the above reference, including controlled pH. From this comparison we show that both acetate and CO(2) are required for the most rapid inactivation of photosystem II and the highest yield of H(2) gas production. Although, the presence of acetate in the system is not critical for the process, H(2) photoproduction under photoautotrophic conditions can be increased by optimizing the conditions for high starch accumulation. These results suggest ways of engineering algae to improve H(2) production, which in turn may have a positive impact on the economics of applied systems for H(2) production.

  10. Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov., Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sneath, P H; Stevens, M

    1990-04-01

    Evidence from numerical taxonomic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization supports the proposal of new species in the genera Actinobacillus and Pasteurella. The following new species are proposed: Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., from the vaginas of postparturient sows; Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., associated with epididymitis of sheep; Pasteurella bettii sp. nov., associated with human Bartholin gland abscess and finger infections; Pasteurella lymphangitidis sp. nov. (the BLG group), which causes bovine lymphangitis; Pasteurella mairi sp. nov., which causes abortion in sows; and Pasteurella trehalosi sp. nov., formerly biovar T of Pasteurella haemolytica, which causes septicemia in older lambs.

  11. Stable isotope fractionation in photosynthesis: Analysis of autotrophic competence following transformation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.E.; Gillham, N.W.; Osmond, C.B.

    1991-06-15

    Isotopic techniques needed to assess the interactions between photosynthesis and respiration in Chlamydomonas have been devised for {sup 13}C, using plate and liquid cultures. The effectiveness of various transformation strategies for the chloroplast psbA gene has been evaluated with respect to their utility in constructing and characterizing strains homoplasmic for site-directed mutations in an otherwise isogenic background. Our analysis of the first site-directed change in the D-1 protein of Chlamydomonas indicates that a second site mutation (arg{sub 238} > lys) in the loop between transmembrane helices IV -- V can partially compensate for the reduced photosynthetic performance that accompanies the atrazine resistant mutation (ser{sub 264} > ala/gly) in this alga and in higher plants grown under high light intensities. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Defects in the ratio of the dynein isoform, DHC11 in the long-flagella mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Marilyn P; Sinha, Sapna; Motiwalla, Mustafa J; Rao, Venkatramanan G; D'Souza, Jacinta S

    2017-01-22

    The long-flagella mutants (lf1, lf2, lf3 and lf4) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are defective in proteins that are required for the assembly of normal flagella, their phenotype being long flagella. In a previous study, we biophysically characterized these mutants for their waveform patterns, swimming speeds, beat frequencies and correlated these parameters with their flagellar lengths. We found an anomaly in this correlation and set out to explore the underlying molecular significance, if any. The diverse inner dynein isoforms are the flagellar motors that convert the chemical energy of ATP into the mechanical energy of motility; we probed the presence of one of these isoforms (DHC11, which might help in bend initiation) in the lf mutants and compared it with the wild-type. Our studies show that the ratio of DHC11 is defective in the long-flagella mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  13. Annotation of genes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: discovery of the betaine lipid synthase BTA1Cr.

    PubMed

    Riekhof, Wayne R; Sears, Barbara B; Benning, Christoph

    2005-02-01

    Lipid metabolism in flowering plants has been intensely studied, and knowledge regarding the identities of genes encoding components of the major fatty acid and membrane lipid biosynthetic pathways is very extensive. We now present an in silico analysis of fatty acid and glycerolipid metabolism in an algal model, enabled by the recent availability of expressed sequence tag and genomic sequences of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Genes encoding proteins involved in membrane biogenesis were predicted on the basis of similarity to proteins with confirmed functions and were organized so as to reconstruct the major pathways of glycerolipid synthesis in Chlamydomonas. This analysis accounts for the majority of genes predicted to encode enzymes involved in anabolic reactions of membrane lipid biosynthesis and compares and contrasts these pathways in Chlamydomonas and flowering plants. As an important result of the bioinformatics analysis, we identified and isolated the C. reinhardtii BTA1 (BTA1Cr) gene and analyzed the bifunctional protein that it encodes; we predicted this protein to be sufficient for the synthesis of the betaine lipid diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS), a major membrane component in Chlamydomonas. Heterologous expression of BTA1Cr led to DGTS accumulation in Escherichia coli, which normally lacks this lipid, and allowed in vitro analysis of the enzymatic properties of BTA1Cr. In contrast, in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, two separate proteins, BtaARs and BtaBRs, are required for the biosynthesis of DGTS. Site-directed mutagenesis of the active sites of the two domains of BTA1Cr allowed us to study their activities separately, demonstrating directly their functional homology to the bacterial orthologs BtaARs and BtaBRs.

  14. Evidence that an internal carbonic anhydrase is present in 5% CO/sub 2/-grown and air-grown Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Moroney, J.V.; Togasaki, R.K.; Husic, H.D.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1987-07-01

    Inorganic carbon (C/sub i/) uptake was measured in wild-type cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in cia-3, a mutant strain of C. reinhardtii that cannot grow with air levels of CO/sub 2/. Both air-grown cells, that have a CO/sub 2/ concentrating system, and 5% CO/sub 2/-grown cells that do not have this system, were used. When the external pH was 5.1 or 7.3, air-grown, wild-type cells accumulated inorganic carbon (C/sub i/) and this accumulation was enhanced when the permeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, was added. When the external pH was 5.1, 5% CO/sub 2/-grown cells also accumulated some C/sub i/, although not as much as air-grown cells and this accumulation was stimulated by the addition of ethoxyzolamide. At the same time, ethoxyzolamide inhibited CO/sub 2/ fixation by high CO/sub 2/-grown, wild-type cells at both pH 5.1 and 7.3. These observations imply that 5% CO/sub 2/-grown, wild-type cells, have a physiologically important internal carbonic anhydrase, although the major carbonic anhydrase located in the periplasmic space is only present in air-grown cells. Inorganic carbon uptake by cia-3 cells supported this conclusion. This mutant strain, which is thought to lack an internal carbonic anhydrase, was unaffected by ethoxyzolamide at pH 5.1. Other physiological characteristics of cia-3 resemble those of wild-type cells that have been treated with ethoxyzolamide. It is concluded that an internal carbonic anhydrase is under different regulatory control than the periplasmic carbonic anhydrase.

  15. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  16. Whole-Genome Resequencing Reveals Extensive Natural Variation in the Model Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hazzouri, Khaled M.; Rosas, Ulises; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Nelson, David R.; Abdrabu, Rasha; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We performed whole-genome resequencing of 12 field isolates and eight commonly studied laboratory strains of the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to characterize genomic diversity and provide a resource for studies of natural variation. Our data support previous observations that Chlamydomonas is among the most diverse eukaryotic species. Nucleotide diversity is ∼3% and is geographically structured in North America with some evidence of admixture among sampling locales. Examination of predicted loss-of-function mutations in field isolates indicates conservation of genes associated with core cellular functions, while genes in large gene families and poorly characterized genes show a greater incidence of major effect mutations. De novo assembly of unmapped reads recovered genes in the field isolates that are absent from the CC-503 assembly. The laboratory reference strains show a genomic pattern of polymorphism consistent with their origin as the recombinant progeny of a diploid zygospore. Large duplications or amplifications are a prominent feature of laboratory strains and appear to have originated under laboratory culture. Extensive natural variation offers a new source of genetic diversity for studies of Chlamydomonas, including naturally occurring alleles that may prove useful in studies of gene function and the dissection of quantitative genetic traits. PMID:26392080

  17. Diversification of the Core RNA Interference Machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the Role of DCL1 in Transposon Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Mollano, J. Armando; Rohr, Jennifer; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Balassa, Eniko; van Dijk, Karin; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2008-01-01

    Small RNA-guided gene silencing is an evolutionarily conserved process that operates by a variety of molecular mechanisms. In multicellular eukaryotes, the core components of RNA-mediated silencing have significantly expanded and diversified, resulting in partly distinct pathways for the epigenetic control of gene expression and genomic parasites. In contrast, many unicellular organisms with small nuclear genomes seem to have lost entirely the RNA-silencing machinery or have retained only a basic set of components. We report here that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular eukaryote with a relatively large nuclear genome, has undergone extensive duplication of Dicer and Argonaute polypeptides after the divergence of the green algae and land plant lineages. Chlamydomonas encodes three Dicers and three Argonautes with DICER-LIKE1 (DCL1) and ARGONAUTE1 being more divergent than the other paralogs. Interestingly, DCL1 is uniquely involved in the post-transcriptional silencing of retrotransposons such as TOC1. Moreover, on the basis of the subcellular distribution of TOC1 small RNAs and target transcripts, this pathway most likely operates in the nucleus. However, Chlamydomonas also relies on a DCL1-independent, transcriptional silencing mechanism(s) for the maintenance of transposon repression. Our results suggest that multiple, partly redundant epigenetic processes are involved in preventing transposon mobilization in this green alga. PMID:18493041

  18. Characterization of a Mutant Deficient for Ammonium and Nitric Oxide Signalling in the Model System Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio; de Montaigu, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous signalling molecule Nitric Oxide (NO) is characterized not only by the variety of organisms in which it has been described, but also by the wealth of biological processes that it regulates. In contrast to the expanding repertoire of functions assigned to NO, however, the mechanisms of NO action usually remain unresolved, and genes that work within NO signalling cascades are seldom identified. A recent addition to the list of known NO functions is the regulation of the nitrogen assimilation pathway in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a well-established model organism for genetic and molecular studies that offers new possibilities in the search for mediators of NO signalling. By further exploiting a collection of Chlamydomonas insertional mutant strains originally isolated for their insensitivity to the ammonium (NH4+) nitrogen source, we found a mutant which, in addition to its ammonium insensitive (AI) phenotype, was not capable of correctly sensing the NO signal. Similarly to what had previously been described in the AI strain cyg56, the expression of nitrogen assimilation genes in the mutant did not properly respond to treatments with various NO donors. Complementation experiments showed that NON1 (NO Nitrate 1), a gene that encodes a protein containing no known functional domain, was the gene underlying the mutant phenotype. Beyond the identification of NON1, our findings broadly demonstrate the potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be used as a model system in the search for novel components of gene networks that mediate physiological responses to NO. PMID:27149516

  19. An improved ARS2-derived nuclear reporter enhances the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Hoang, Kevin T D; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to pioneer genetic engineering techniques for high-value protein and biofuel production from algae. To date, most studies of transgenic Chlamydomonas have utilized the chloroplast genome due to its ease of engineering, with a sizeable suite of reporters and well-characterized expression constructs. The advanced manipulation of algal nuclear genomes has been hampered by limited strong expression cassettes, and a lack of high-throughput reporters. We have improved upon an endogenous reporter gene - the ARS2 gene encoding an arylsulfatase enzyme - that was first cloned and characterized decades ago but has not been used extensively. The new construct, derived from ARS2 cDNA, expresses significantly higher levels of reporter protein and transforms more efficiently, allowing qualitative and quantitative screening using a rapid, inexpensive 96-well assay. The improved arylsulfatase expression cassette was used to screen a new transgene promoter from the ARG7 gene, and found that the ARG7 promoter can express the ARS2 reporter as strongly as the HSP70-RBCS2 chimeric promoter that currently ranks as the best available promoter, thus adding to the list of useful nuclear promoters. This enhanced arylsulfatase reporter construct improves the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering within the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, with potential application to other algal strains.

  20. 3'end maturation of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast atpB mRNA is a two-step process.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Kindle, K L

    1993-01-01

    Inverted repeat (IR) sequences are found at the 3' ends of most chloroplast protein coding regions, and we have previously shown that the 3'IR is important for accumulation of atpB mRNA in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (D. B. Stern, E.R. Radwanski, and K. L. Kindle, Plant Cell 3:285-297, 1991). In vitro studies indicate that 3' IRs are inefficient transcription termination signals in higher plants and have furthermore defined processing activities that act on the 3' ends of chloroplast transcripts, suggesting that most chloroplast mRNAs are processed at their 3' ends in vivo. To investigate the mechanism of 3' end processing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts, the maturation of atpB mRNA was examined in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, a synthetic atpB mRNA precursor is rapidly cleaved at a position 10 nucleotides downstream from the mature 3' terminus. This cleavage is followed by exonucleolytic processing to generate the mature 3' end. In vivo run-on transcription experiments indicate that a maximum of 50% of atpB transcripts are transcriptionally terminated at or near the IR, while the remainder are subject to 3' end processing. Analysis of transcripts derived from chimeric atpB genes introduced into Chlamydomonas chloroplasts by biolistic transformation suggests that in vivo processing and in vitro processing occur by similar or identical mechanisms. Images PMID:8455609

  1. Retinal Chromophore Structure and Schiff Base Interactions in Red-Shifted Channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs), which form a distinct branch of the microbial rhodopsin family, control phototaxis in green algae. Because ChRs can be expressed and function in neuronal membranes as light-gated cation channels, they have rapidly become an important optogenetic tool in neurobiology. While channelrhodopsin-2 from the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2) is the most commonly used and extensively studied optogenetic ChR, little is known about the properties of the diverse group of other ChRs. In this study, near-infrared confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy along with hydrogen–deuterium exchange and site-directed mutagenesis were used to study the structure of red-shifted ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1). These measurements reveal that (i) CaChR1 has an all-trans-retinal structure similar to those of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and sensory rhodopsin II but different from that of the mixed retinal composition of CrChR2, (ii) lowering the pH from 7 to 2 or substituting neutral residues for Glu169 or Asp299 does not significantly shift the ethylenic stretch frequency more than 1–2 cm–1 in contrast to BR in which a downshift of 7–9 cm–1 occurs reflecting neutralization of the Asp85 counterion, and (iii) the CaChR1 protonated Schiff base (SB) has stronger hydrogen bonding than BR. A model is proposed to explain these results whereby at pH 7 the predominant counterion to the SB is Asp299 (the homologue to Asp212 in BR) while Glu169 (the homologue to Asp85 in BR) exists in a neutral state. We observe an unusual constancy of the resonance Raman spectra over the broad range from pH 9 to 2 and discuss its implications. These results are in accord with recent visible absorption and current measurements of CaChR1 [Sineshchekov, O. A., et al. (2013) Intramolecular proton transfer in channelrhodopsins. Biophys. J. 104, 807–817; Li, H., et al. (2014) Role of a helix B lysine residue in the photoactive site in

  2. Partial purification of the chloroplast ATP synthase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the gamma subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The chloroplast ATP synthase was partially purified from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by extracting membranes with deoxycholate and KCl, followed by centrifugation and ammonium sulfate fractionation of the supernatant. The enzyme assay involved the reconstitution of such fractions with bacteriorhodopsin and soybean phospholipids to form vesicles capable of light-dependent ({sup 32}P)-phosphate esterification. A cDNA for the gamma subunit from Chlamydomonas was isolated, expressed in vitro and sequenced. It contains the entire coding region for the gamma subunit precursor. A 35 amino acid long transit peptide resides at the NH{sub 2}-terminus of a 323 amino acid long mature peptide that is 77% similar to the spinach gamma subunit. Six cysteines were found; three were conserved in Chlamydomonas and spinach.

  3. Independent Control of the Static and Dynamic Components of the Chlamydomonas Flagellar Beat.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Veikko F; Sartori, Pablo; Friedrich, Benjamin M; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-04-25

    When the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii swims, it uses the breaststroke beat of its two flagella to pull itself forward [1]. The flagellar waveform can be decomposed into a static component, corresponding to an asymmetric time-averaged shape, and a dynamic component, corresponding to the time-varying wave [2]. Extreme lightening conditions photoshock the cell, converting the breaststroke beat into a symmetric sperm-like beat, which causes a reversal of the direction of swimming [3]. Waveform conversion is achieved by a reduction in magnitude of the static component, whereas the dynamic component remains unchanged [2]. The coupling between static and dynamic components, however, is poorly understood, and it is not known whether the static component requires the dynamic component or whether it can exist independently. We used isolated and reactivated axonemes [4] to investigate the relation between the two beat components. We discovered that, when reactivated in the presence of low ATP concentrations, axonemes displayed the static beat component in absence of the dynamic component. Furthermore, we found that the amplitudes of the two components depend on ATP in qualitatively different ways. These results show that the decomposition into static and dynamic components is not just a mathematical concept but that the two components can independently control different aspects of cell motility: the static component controls swimming direction, whereas the dynamic component provides propulsion.

  4. Dynamic Changes in the Transcriptome and Methylome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii throughout Its Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Lopez, David; Hamaji, Takashi; Kropat, Janette; De Hoff, Peter; Morselli, Marco; Rubbi, Liudmilla; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel; Gallaher, Sean D; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Umen, James; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii undergoes gametogenesis and mating upon nitrogen starvation. While the steps involved in its sexual reproductive cycle have been extensively characterized, the genome-wide transcriptional and epigenetic changes underlying different life cycle stages have yet to be fully described. Here, we performed transcriptome and methylome sequencing to quantify expression and DNA methylation from vegetative and gametic cells of each mating type and from zygotes. We identified 361 gametic genes with mating type-specific expression patterns and 627 genes that are specifically induced in zygotes; furthermore, these sex-related gene sets were enriched for secretory pathway and alga-specific genes. We also examined the C. reinhardtii nuclear methylation map with base-level resolution at different life cycle stages. Despite having low global levels of nuclear methylation, we detected 23 hypermethylated loci in gene-poor, repeat-rich regions. We observed mating type-specific differences in chloroplast DNA methylation levels in plus versus minus mating type gametes followed by chloroplast DNA hypermethylation in zygotes. Lastly, we examined the expression of candidate DNA methyltransferases and found three, DMT1a, DMT1b, and DMT4, that are differentially expressed during the life cycle and are candidate DNA methylases. The expression and methylation data we present provide insight into cell type-specific transcriptional and epigenetic programs during key stages of the C. reinhardtii life cycle.

  5. An organelle K+ channel is required for osmoregulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Wu, Xiaoan; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hucheng; Pan, Junmin

    2016-08-01

    Fresh water protozoa and algae face hypotonic challenges in their living environment. Many of them employ a contractile vacuole system to uptake excessive water from the cytoplasm and expel it to the environment to achieve cellular homeostasis. K(+), a major osmolyte in contractile vacuole, is predicted to create higher osmolarity for water influx. Molecular mechanisms for K(+) permeation through the plasma membrane have been well studied. However, how K(+) permeates organelles such as the contractile vacuole is not clear. Here, we show that the six-transmembrane K(+) channel KCN11 in Chlamydomonas is exclusively localized to contractile vacuole. Ectopic expression of KCN11 in HEK293T cells results in voltage-gated K(+) channel activity. Disruption of the gene or mutation of key residues for K(+) permeability of the channel leads to dysfunction of cell osmoregulation in very hypotonic conditions. The contractile cycle is inhibited in the mutant cells with a slower rate of contractile vacuole swelling, leading to cell death. These data demonstrate a new role for six-transmembrane K(+) channels in contractile vacuole functioning and provide further insights into osmoregulation mediated by the contractile vacuole.

  6. UV-B photoreceptor-mediated protection of the photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Allorent, Guillaume; Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Chappuis, Richard; Kuntz, Marcel; Truong, Thuy B; Niyogi, Krishna K; Ulm, Roman; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2016-12-20

    Life on earth is dependent on the photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical energy. However, absorption of excess sunlight can damage the photosynthetic machinery and limit photosynthetic activity, thereby affecting growth and productivity. Photosynthetic light harvesting can be down-regulated by nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). A major component of NPQ is qE (energy-dependent nonphotochemical quenching), which allows dissipation of light energy as heat. Photodamage peaks in the UV-B part of the spectrum, but whether and how UV-B induces qE are unknown. Plants are responsive to UV-B via the UVR8 photoreceptor. Here, we report in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that UVR8 induces accumulation of specific members of the light-harvesting complex (LHC) superfamily that contribute to qE, in particular LHC Stress-Related 1 (LHCSR1) and Photosystem II Subunit S (PSBS). The capacity for qE is strongly induced by UV-B, although the patterns of qE-related proteins accumulating in response to UV-B or to high light are clearly different. The competence for qE induced by acclimation to UV-B markedly contributes to photoprotection upon subsequent exposure to high light. Our study reveals an anterograde link between photoreceptor-mediated signaling in the nucleocytosolic compartment and the photoprotective regulation of photosynthetic activity in the chloroplast.

  7. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane.

  8. UV-B photoreceptor-mediated protection of the photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Allorent, Guillaume; Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Chappuis, Richard; Kuntz, Marcel; Truong, Thuy B.; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Life on earth is dependent on the photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical energy. However, absorption of excess sunlight can damage the photosynthetic machinery and limit photosynthetic activity, thereby affecting growth and productivity. Photosynthetic light harvesting can be down-regulated by nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). A major component of NPQ is qE (energy-dependent nonphotochemical quenching), which allows dissipation of light energy as heat. Photodamage peaks in the UV-B part of the spectrum, but whether and how UV-B induces qE are unknown. Plants are responsive to UV-B via the UVR8 photoreceptor. Here, we report in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that UVR8 induces accumulation of specific members of the light-harvesting complex (LHC) superfamily that contribute to qE, in particular LHC Stress-Related 1 (LHCSR1) and Photosystem II Subunit S (PSBS). The capacity for qE is strongly induced by UV-B, although the patterns of qE-related proteins accumulating in response to UV-B or to high light are clearly different. The competence for qE induced by acclimation to UV-B markedly contributes to photoprotection upon subsequent exposure to high light. Our study reveals an anterograde link between photoreceptor-mediated signaling in the nucleocytosolic compartment and the photoprotective regulation of photosynthetic activity in the chloroplast. PMID:27930292

  9. A Dual Strategy to Cope with High Light in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W

    PubMed Central

    Allorent, Guillaume; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Roach, Thomas; Peers, Graham; Cardol, Pierre; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Kuntz, Marcel; Breyton, Cécile; Franck, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-André; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Minagawa, Jun; Finazzi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Absorption of light in excess of the capacity for photosynthetic electron transport is damaging to photosynthetic organisms. Several mechanisms exist to avoid photodamage, which are collectively referred to as nonphotochemical quenching. This term comprises at least two major processes. State transitions (qT) represent changes in the relative antenna sizes of photosystems II and I. High energy quenching (qE) is the increased thermal dissipation of light energy triggered by lumen acidification. To investigate the respective roles of qE and qT in photoprotection, a mutant (npq4 stt7-9) was generated in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by crossing the state transition–deficient mutant (stt7-9) with a strain having a largely reduced qE capacity (npq4). The comparative phenotypic analysis of the wild type, single mutants, and double mutants reveals that both state transitions and qE are induced by high light. Moreover, the double mutant exhibits an increased photosensitivity with respect to the single mutants and the wild type. Therefore, we suggest that besides qE, state transitions also play a photoprotective role during high light acclimation of the cells, most likely by decreasing hydrogen peroxide production. These results are discussed in terms of the relative photoprotective benefit related to thermal dissipation of excess light and/or to the physical displacement of antennas from photosystem II. PMID:23424243

  10. Carbon Supply and Photoacclimation Cross Talk in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Dinc, Emine

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are exposed to drastic changes in light conditions, which can affect their photosynthetic efficiency and induce photodamage. To face these changes, they have developed a series of acclimation mechanisms. In this work, we have studied the acclimation strategies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a model green alga that can grow using various carbon sources and is thus an excellent system in which to study photosynthesis. Like other photosynthetic algae, it has evolved inducible mechanisms to adapt to conditions where carbon supply is limiting. We have analyzed how the carbon availability influences the composition and organization of the photosynthetic apparatus and the capacity of the cells to acclimate to different light conditions. Using electron microscopy, biochemical, and fluorescence measurements, we show that differences in CO2 availability not only have a strong effect on the induction of the carbon-concentrating mechanisms but also change the acclimation strategy of the cells to light. For example, while cells in limiting CO2 maintain a large antenna even in high light and switch on energy-dissipative mechanisms, cells in high CO2 reduce the amount of pigments per cell and the antenna size. Our results show the high plasticity of the photosynthetic apparatus of C. reinhardtii. This alga is able to use various photoacclimation strategies, and the choice of which to activate strongly depends on the carbon availability. PMID:27637747

  11. Advances in the biotechnology of hydrogen production with the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Torzillo, Giuseppe; Scoma, Alberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Giannelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is being evaluated for use as a fuel, since it is a promising substitute for carbonaceous fuels owing to its high conversion efficiency and high specific energy content. The basic advantages of biological hydrogen production over other "green" energy sources are that it does not compete for agricultural land use, and it does not pollute, as water is the only by-product of the combustion. These characteristics make hydrogen a suitable fuel for the future. Among several biotechnological approaches, photobiological hydrogen production carried out by green microalgae has been intensively investigated in recent years. A select group of photosynthetic organisms has evolved the ability to harness light energy to drive hydrogen gas production from water. Of these, the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is considered one of the most promising eukaryotic H2 producers. In this model microorganism, light energy, H2O and H2 are linked by two excellent catalysts, the photosystem 2 (PSII) and the [FeFe]-hydrogenase, in a pathway usually referred to as direct biophotolysis. This review summarizes the main advances made over the past decade as an outcome of the discovery of the sulfur-deprivation process. Both the scientific and technical barriers that need to be overcome before H2 photoproduction can be scaled up to an industrial level are examined. Actual and theoretical limits of the efficiency of the process are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on algal biohydrogen production outdoors, and guidelines for an optimal photobioreactor design are suggested.

  12. Temperature-Sensitive, Photosynthesis-Deficient Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Spreitzer, Robert J.; Al-Abed, Souhail R.; Huether, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants of the unicellular, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were recovered by screening for the absence of photoautotrophic growth at 35°C. Whereas nonconditional mutants required acetate for growth at both 25 and 35°C, the conditional mutants have normal photoautotrophic growth at 25°C. The conditional mutants consisted of two classes: (a) Temperature-sensitive mutants died under all growth conditions at 35°C, but (b) temperature-sensitive, acetate-requiring mutants were capable of heterotrophic growth at 35°C when supplied with acetate in the dark. The majority of mutants within the latter of these two classes had defects in photosynthetic functions. These defects included altered pigmentation, reduced whole-chain electron-transport activity, reduced ribulosebis-phosphate carboxylase activity, or pleiotropic alterations in a number of these photosynthetic components. Both nuclear and chloroplast mutants were identified, and a correlation between light-sensitive and photosynthesis-deficient phenotypes was observed. PMID:16665986

  13. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  14. A small multifunctional pentatricopeptide repeat protein in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Abdullah; Schwarz, Christian; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Vallon, Olivier; Nickelsen, Jörg; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola

    2015-03-01

    Organellar biogenesis is mainly regulated by nucleus-encoded factors, which act on various steps of gene expression including RNA editing, processing, splicing, stabilization, and translation initiation. Among these regulatory factors, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form the largest family of RNA binding proteins, with hundreds of members in flowering plants. In striking contrast, the genome of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes only 14 such proteins. In this study, we analyzed PPR7, the smallest and most highly expressed PPR protein in C. reinhardtii. Green fluorescent protein-based localization and gel-filtration analysis revealed that PPR7 forms a part of a high-molecular-weight ribonucleoprotein complex in the chloroplast stroma. RIP-chip analysis of PPR7-bound RNAs demonstrated that the protein associates with a diverse set of chloroplast transcripts in vivo, i.e. rrnS, psbH, rpoC2, rbcL, atpA, cemA-atpH, tscA, and atpI-psaJ. Furthermore, the investigation of PPR7 RNAi strains revealed that depletion of PPR7 results in a light-sensitive phenotype, accompanied by altered levels of its target RNAs that are compatible with the defects in their maturation or stabilization. PPR7 is thus an unusual type of small multifunctional PPR protein, which interacts, probably in conjunction with other RNA binding proteins, with numerous target RNAs to promote a variety of post-transcriptional events.

  15. Methanol-Promoted Lipid Remodelling during Cooling Sustains Cryopreservation Survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Duanpeng; Li, Weiqi

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments and cryoprotective agents (CPAs) determine the survival rate of organisms that undergo cryopreservation, but their mechanisms of operation have not yet been characterised adequately. In particular, the way in which membrane lipids respond to cryogenic treatments and CPAs is unknown. We developed comparative profiles of the changes in membrane lipids among cryogenic treatments and between the CPAs dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH) for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We found that freezing in liquid nitrogen led to a dramatic degradation of lipids, and that thawing at warm temperature (35°C) induced lipid remodelling. DMSO did not protect membranes, but MeOH significantly attenuated lipid degradation. The presence of MeOH during cooling (from 25°C to −55°C at a rate of 1°C/min) sustained the lipid composition to the extent that membrane integrity was maintained; this phenomenon accounts for successful cryopreservation. An increase in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and a decrease in diacylglycerol were the major changes in lipid composition associated with survival rate, but there was no transformation between these lipid classes. Phospholipase D-mediated phosphatidic acid was not involved in freezing-induced lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii. Lipid unsaturation changed, and the patterns of change depended on the cryogenic treatment. Our results provide new insights into the cryopreservation of, and the lipid metabolism in, algae. PMID:26731741

  16. Copper response regulator1-dependent and -independent responses of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii transcriptome to dark anoxia.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Casero, David; Liu, Bensheng; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Happe, Thomas; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobiosis is a stress condition for aerobic organisms and requires extensive acclimation responses. We used RNA-Seq for a whole-genome view of the acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to anoxic conditions imposed simultaneously with transfer to the dark. Nearly 1.4 × 10(3) genes were affected by hypoxia. Comparing transcript profiles from early (hypoxic) with those from late (anoxic) time points indicated that cells activate oxidative energy generation pathways before employing fermentation. Probable substrates include amino acids and fatty acids (FAs). Lipid profiling of the C. reinhardtii cells revealed that they degraded FAs but also accumulated triacylglycerols (TAGs). In contrast with N-deprived cells, the TAGs in hypoxic cells were enriched in desaturated FAs, suggesting a distinct pathway for TAG accumulation. To distinguish transcriptional responses dependent on copper response regulator1 (CRR1), which is also involved in hypoxic gene regulation, we compared the transcriptomes of crr1 mutants and complemented strains. In crr1 mutants, ~40 genes were aberrantly regulated, reaffirming the importance of CRR1 for the hypoxic response, but indicating also the contribution of additional signaling strategies to account for the remaining differentially regulated transcripts. Based on transcript patterns and previous results, we conclude that nitric oxide-dependent signaling cascades operate in anoxic C. reinhardtii cells.

  17. Nitrogen-Sparing Mechanisms in Chlamydomonas Affect the Transcriptome, the Proteome, and Photosynthetic Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Schmollinger, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Boyle, Nanette R.; Blaby, Ian K.; Casero, David; Mettler, Tabea; Moseley, Jeffrey L.; Kropat, Janette; Sommer, Frederik; Strenkert, Daniela; Hemme, Dorothea; Pellegrini, Matteo; Grossman, Arthur R.; Stitt, Mark; Schroda, Michael; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that limits global primary productivity; hence, N-use efficiency is of compelling interest in agriculture and aquaculture. We used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a reference organism for a multicomponent analysis of the N starvation response. In the presence of acetate, respiratory metabolism is prioritized over photosynthesis; consequently, the N-sparing response targets proteins, pigments, and RNAs involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast function over those involved in respiration. Transcripts and proteins of the Calvin-Benson cycle are reduced in N-deficient cells, resulting in the accumulation of cycle metabolic intermediates. Both cytosolic and chloroplast ribosomes are reduced, but via different mechanisms, reflected by rapid changes in abundance of RNAs encoding chloroplast ribosomal proteins but not cytosolic ones. RNAs encoding transporters and enzymes for metabolizing alternative N sources increase in abundance, as is appropriate for the soil environmental niche of C. reinhardtii. Comparison of the N-replete versus N-deplete proteome indicated that abundant proteins with a high N content are reduced in N-starved cells, while the proteins that are increased have lower than average N contents. This sparing mechanism contributes to a lower cellular N/C ratio and suggests an approach for engineering increased N-use efficiency. PMID:24748044

  18. Phosphoprotein SAK1 is a regulator of acclimation to singlet oxygen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Wakao, Setsuko; Chin, Brian L; Ledford, Heidi K; Dent, Rachel M; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a highly toxic and inevitable byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of acclimating specifically to singlet oxygen stress, but the retrograde signaling pathway from the chloroplast to the nucleus mediating this response is unknown. Here we describe a mutant, singlet oxygen acclimation knocked-out 1 (sak1), that lacks the acclimation response to singlet oxygen. Analysis of genome-wide changes in RNA abundance during acclimation to singlet oxygen revealed that SAK1 is a key regulator of the gene expression response during acclimation. The SAK1 gene encodes an uncharacterized protein with a domain conserved among chlorophytes and present in some bZIP transcription factors. The SAK1 protein is located in the cytosol, and it is induced and phosphorylated upon exposure to singlet oxygen, suggesting that it is a critical intermediate component of the retrograde signal transduction pathway leading to singlet oxygen acclimation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02286.001 PMID:24859755

  19. The Proteome of Copper, Iron, Zinc, and Manganese Micronutrient Deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott I.; Castruita, Madeli; Malasarn, Davin; Urzica, Eugen; Erde, Jonathan; Page, M. Dudley; Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Trace metals such as copper, iron, zinc, and manganese play important roles in several biochemical processes, including respiration and photosynthesis. Using a label-free, quantitative proteomics strategy (MSE), we examined the effect of deficiencies in these micronutrients on the soluble proteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We quantified >103 proteins with abundances within a dynamic range of 3 to 4 orders of magnitude and demonstrated statistically significant changes in ∼200 proteins in each metal-deficient growth condition relative to nutrient-replete media. Through analysis of Pearson's coefficient, we also examined the correlation between protein abundance and transcript abundance (as determined via RNA-Seq analysis) and found moderate correlations under all nutritional states. Interestingly, in a subset of transcripts known to significantly change in abundance in metal-replete and metal-deficient conditions, the correlation to protein abundance is much stronger. Examples of new discoveries highlighted in this work include the accumulation of O2 labile, anaerobiosis-related enzymes (Hyd1, Pfr1, and Hcp2) in copper-deficient cells; co-variation of Cgl78/Ycf54 and coprogen oxidase; the loss of various stromal and lumenal photosynthesis-related proteins, including plastocyanin, in iron-limited cells; a large accumulation (from undetectable amounts to over 1,000 zmol/cell) of two COG0523 domain-containing proteins in zinc-deficient cells; and the preservation of photosynthesis proteins in manganese-deficient cells despite known losses in photosynthetic function in this condition. PMID:23065468

  20. Nitrogen-Sparing Mechanisms in Chlamydomonas Affect the Transcriptome, the Proteome, and Photosynthetic Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schmollinger, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Boyle, Nanette R; Blaby, Ian K; Casero, David; Mettler, Tabea; Moseley, Jeffrey L; Kropat, Janette; Sommer, Frederik; Strenkert, Daniela; Hemme, Dorothea; Pellegrini, Matteo; Grossman, Arthur R; Stitt, Mark; Schroda, Michael; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that limits global primary productivity; hence, N-use efficiency is of compelling interest in agriculture and aquaculture. We used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a reference organism for a multicomponent analysis of the N starvation response. In the presence of acetate, respiratory metabolism is prioritized over photosynthesis; consequently, the N-sparing response targets proteins, pigments, and RNAs involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast function over those involved in respiration. Transcripts and proteins of the Calvin-Benson cycle are reduced in N-deficient cells, resulting in the accumulation of cycle metabolic intermediates. Both cytosolic and chloroplast ribosomes are reduced, but via different mechanisms, reflected by rapid changes in abundance of RNAs encoding chloroplast ribosomal proteins but not cytosolic ones. RNAs encoding transporters and enzymes for metabolizing alternative N sources increase in abundance, as is appropriate for the soil environmental niche of C. reinhardtii. Comparison of the N-replete versus N-deplete proteome indicated that abundant proteins with a high N content are reduced in N-starved cells, while the proteins that are increased have lower than average N contents. This sparing mechanism contributes to a lower cellular N/C ratio and suggests an approach for engineering increased N-use efficiency.

  1. Phosphoprotein SAK1 is a regulator of acclimation to singlet oxygen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wakao, Setsuko; Chin, Brian L; Ledford, Heidi K; Dent, Rachel M; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2014-05-23

    Singlet oxygen is a highly toxic and inevitable byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of acclimating specifically to singlet oxygen stress, but the retrograde signaling pathway from the chloroplast to the nucleus mediating this response is unknown. Here we describe a mutant, singlet oxygen acclimation knocked-out 1 (sak1), that lacks the acclimation response to singlet oxygen. Analysis of genome-wide changes in RNA abundance during acclimation to singlet oxygen revealed that SAK1 is a key regulator of the gene expression response during acclimation. The SAK1 gene encodes an uncharacterized protein with a domain conserved among chlorophytes and present in some bZIP transcription factors. The SAK1 protein is located in the cytosol, and it is induced and phosphorylated upon exposure to singlet oxygen, suggesting that it is a critical intermediate component of the retrograde signal transduction pathway leading to singlet oxygen acclimation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02286.001.

  2. Asymmetric properties of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cytoskeleton direct rhodopsin photoreceptor localization

    PubMed Central

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M.; Boyd, Joseph S.; Lamb, Mary Rose

    2011-01-01

    The eyespot of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoreceptive organelle required for phototaxis. Relative to the anterior flagella, the eyespot is asymmetrically positioned adjacent to the daughter four-membered rootlet (D4), a unique bundle of acetylated microtubules extending from the daughter basal body toward the posterior of the cell. Here, we detail the relationship between the rhodopsin eyespot photoreceptor Channelrhodopsin 1 (ChR1) and acetylated microtubules. In wild-type cells, ChR1 was observed in an equatorial patch adjacent to D4 near the end of the acetylated microtubules and along the D4 rootlet. In cells with cytoskeletal protein mutations, supernumerary ChR1 patches remained adjacent to acetylated microtubules. In mlt1 (multieyed) mutant cells, supernumerary photoreceptor patches were not restricted to the D4 rootlet, and more anterior eyespots correlated with shorter acetylated microtubule rootlets. The data suggest a model in which photoreceptor localization is dependent on microtubule-based trafficking selective for the D4 rootlet, which is perturbed in mlt1 mutant cells. PMID:21555459

  3. The Awesome Power of Dikaryons for Studying Flagella and Basal Bodies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Dutcher, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella and basal bodies/centrioles play key roles in human health and homeostasis. Among the organisms used to study these microtubule-based organelles, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has several advantages. One is the existence of a temporary phase of the life cycle, termed the dikaryon. These cells are formed during mating when the cells fuse and the behavior of flagella from two genetically distinguishable parents can be observed. During this stage, the cytoplasms mix allowing for a defect in the flagella of one parent to be rescued by proteins from the other parent. This offers the unique advantage of adding back wild-type gene product or labeled protein at endogenous levels that can used to monitor various flagellar and basal body phenotypes. Mutants that show rescue and ones that fail to show rescue are both informative about the nature of the flagella and basal body defects. When rescue occurs, it can be used to determine the mutant gene product and to follow the temporal and spatial patterns of flagellar assembly. This review describes many examples of insights into basal body and flagellar proteins’ function and assembly that have been discovered using dikaryons and discusses the potential for further analyses. PMID:24272949

  4. Dichromate effect on energy dissipation of photosystem II and photosystem I in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Perreault, François; Ait Ali, Nadia; Saison, Cyril; Popovic, Radovan; Juneau, Philippe

    2009-07-17

    In this study, we investigated the energy dissipation processes via photosystem II and photosystem I activity in green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to dichromate inhibitory effect. Quantum yield of photosystem II and also photosystem I were highly decreased by dichromate effect. Such inhibition by dichromate induced strong quenching effect on rapid OJIP fluorescence transients, indicating deterioration of photosystem II electron transport via plastoquinone pool toward photosystem I. The decrease of energy dissipation dependent on electron transport of photosystem II and photosystem I by dichromate effect was associated with strong increase of non-photochemical energy dissipation processes. By showing strong effect of dichromate on acceptor side of photosystem I, we indicated that dichromate inhibitory effect was not associated only with PSII electron transport. Here, we found that energy dissipation via photosystem I was limited by its electron acceptor side. By the analysis of P700 oxido-reduction state with methylviolagen as an exogenous PSI electron transport mediator, we showed that PSI electron transport discrepancy induced by dichromate effect was also caused by inhibitory effect located beyond photosystem I. Therefore, these results demonstrated that dichromate has different sites of inhibition which are associated with photosystem II, photosystem I and electron transport sink beyond photosystems.

  5. The Regulation of Photosynthetic Structure and Function during Nitrogen Deprivation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Matthew T.; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Lucker, Ben F.; Park, Jeong-Jin; Wang, Hongxia; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Holguin, F. Omar; Disbrow, Bradley; Schaub, Tanner; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Kramer, David M.; Gang, David R.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of carbon storage compounds by many unicellular algae after nutrient deprivation occurs despite declines in their photosynthetic apparatus. To understand the regulation and roles of photosynthesis during this potentially bioenergetically valuable process, we analyzed photosynthetic structure and function after nitrogen deprivation in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and lipid profiling and microscopic time course data were combined with multiple measures of photosynthetic function. Levels of transcripts and proteins of photosystems I and II and most antenna genes fell with differing trajectories; thylakoid membrane lipid levels decreased, while their proportions remained similar and thylakoid membrane organization appeared to be preserved. Cellular chlorophyll (Chl) content decreased more than 2-fold within 24 h, and we conclude from transcript protein and 13C labeling rates that Chl synthesis was down-regulated both pre- and posttranslationally and that Chl levels fell because of a rapid cessation in synthesis and dilution by cellular growth rather than because of degradation. Photosynthetically driven oxygen production and the efficiency of photosystem II as well as P700+ reduction and electrochromic shift kinetics all decreased over the time course, without evidence of substantial energy overflow. The results also indicate that linear electron flow fell approximately 15% more than cyclic flow over the first 24 h. Comparing Calvin-Benson cycle transcript and enzyme levels with changes in photosynthetic 13CO2 incorporation rates also pointed to a coordinated multilevel down-regulation of photosynthetic fluxes during starch synthesis before the induction of high triacylglycerol accumulation rates. PMID:25489023

  6. Method to assemble and integrate biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh; Pourmir, Azadeh; Johannes, Tyler W

    2012-11-01

    Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast genome of the microalgal species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated region selection when constructing a target pathway. This new method represents a useful genetic tool in the construction and integration of complex biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of microalgae and should aid current efforts to engineer algae for biofuels production and other desirable natural products.

  7. Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii high-CO sub 2 -requiring mutants to limiting CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics of four high-CO{sub 2}-requiring mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were compared to those of wild type before and after a 24-hour exposure to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The four mutants represent two loci involved in the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system of this unicellular alga. All mutants had a lower photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon than did the wild type when grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration, indicating that the genetic lesion in each is expressed even at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Wild type and all four mutants exhibited adaptive responses to limiting CO{sub 2} characteristic of the induction of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system, resulting in an increased affinity for inorganic carbon only in wild type. Although other components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system were induced in these mutants, the defective component in each was sufficient to prevent any increase in the affinity for inorganic carbon. It was concluded that the genes corresponding to the ca-1 and pmp-1 loci exhibit at least partially constitutive expression and that all components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system may be required to significantly affect the photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon.

  8. Controlling expression of genes in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a vitamin-repressible riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes of land plants and algae contain generally between 100 and 150 genes. These genes are involved in plastid gene expression and photosynthesis and in various other tasks. The function of some chloroplast genes is still unknown and some of them appear to be essential for growth and survival. Repressible and reversible expression systems are highly desirable for functional and biochemical characterization of these genes. We have developed a genetic tool that allows one to regulate the expression of any coding sequence in the chloroplast genome of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our system is based on vitamin-regulated expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast Nac2 protein, which is specifically required for the expression of any plastid gene fused to the psbD 5'UTR. With this approach, expression of the Nac2 gene in the nucleus and, in turn, that of the chosen chloroplast gene artificially driven by the psbD 5'UTR, is controlled by the MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch, which can be inactivated in a reversible way by supplying vitamin B12 and thiamine to the growth medium, respectively. This system opens interesting possibilities for studying the assembly and turnover of chloroplast multiprotein complexes such as the photosystems, the ribosome, and the RNA polymerase. It also provides a way to overcome the toxicity often associated with the expression of proteins of biotechnological interest in the chloroplast.

  9. Effects of Light Intensity and Oxidized Nitrogen Sources on Hydrogen Production by Chlamydomonas reinhardii1

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Pedro J.; Azuara, María P.; Ballesteros, Antonio; Fernández, Victor M.

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells, after a period of dark anaerobic adaptation, evolve H2 not only in the dark but also in the light. Our results show that high irradiances impair prolonged H2 evolution, while under low irradiances or darkness H2 evolution proceeds for more than 50 hours. NO3− and NO2− suppress H2 evolution both in the dark or under low irradiance. Apparently the cells prefer these oxidized nitrogen sources to protons as electron acceptors, since both NO3− and NO2− become reduced to NH4+, which is excreted to the culture medium in high amounts. H2 evolution started once these oxidized anions were largely depleted from the medium. Moreover, H2 evolution was consistently associated with NH4+ excretion even if NH4+ was already present in high amounts in the medium. This observation indicates that the cells utilize not only their carbohydrate but also their protein reserves as sources of reducing power for H2 evolution. This conclusion was supported by the observation that when nitrogen-starved cells were made anaerobic in a nitrogen-free medium, they not only evolved H2 at very high rates but excreted concomitantly NH4+ up to concentrations in the millimolar range. PMID:16664329

  10. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    DOE PAGES

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; ...

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labelingmore » demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.« less

  11. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Chang, Christopher J.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.

  12. Light Intensity is Important for Hydrogen Production in NaHSO3-Treated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lanzhen; Yi, Jing; Wang, Lianjun; Huang, Tingting; Gao, Fudan; Wang, Quanxi; Ma, Weimin

    2017-01-07

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga that can use light energy to produce H2 from H2O in the background of NaHSO3 treatment. However, the role of light intensity in such H2 production remains elusive. Here, light intensity significantly affected the yield of H2 production in NaHSO3-treated C. reinhardtii, which was consistent with its effects on the content of O2 and the expression and activity of hydrogenase. Further, NaHSO3 was found to be able to remove O2 via a reaction of bisulfite with superoxide anion produced at the acceptor side of PSI, and light intensity affected the reaction rate significantly. Accordingly, high light and strong light but not low light can create an anaerobic environment, which is important to activate hydrogenase and produce H2 Based on the above results, we conclude that light intensity plays an important role in removing O2 and consequently activating hydrogenase and producing H2 in NaHSO3-treated C. reinhardtii.

  13. Effect of aluminum on cellular division and photosynthetic electron transport in Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Perreault, François; Dewez, David; Fortin, Claude; Juneau, Philippe; Diallo, Amirou; Popovic, Radovan

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated aluminum's effect on cellular division and the photosynthetic processes in Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas acidophila at pH 3.0, at which Al is present mostly as Al(3+), AlSO(4) (+), and Al(SO(4))(2) (-). These algal species were exposed to 100, 188, and 740 microM Al, and after 24 h cell-bound Al was significantly different from control only for the highest concentration tested. However, very different effects of Al on algal cellular division, biomass per cell, and photosynthetic activity were found. Aluminum stimulated cell division but decreased at some level biomass per cell in C. acidophila. Primary photochemistry of photosynthesis, as Photosystem II quantum yield, and energy dissipation via nonphotochemical activity were slightly affected. However, for E. gracilis, under the same conditions, Al did not show a stimulating effect on cellular division or photosynthetic activity. Primary photochemical activity was diminished, and energy dissipation via nonphotochemical pathways was strongly increased. Therefore, when Al is highly available in aquatic ecosystems, these effects may indicate very different response mechanisms that are dependent on algal species.

  14. The Antarctic Chlamydomonas raudensis: an emerging model for cold adaptation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Maxwell, Denis P; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2013-09-01

    Permanently cold habitats dominate our planet and psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in cold environments. Environmental adaptations unique to psychrophilic microorganisms have been thoroughly described; however, the vast majority of studies to date have focused on cold-adapted bacteria. The combination of low temperatures in the presence of light is one of the most damaging environmental stresses for a photosynthetic organism: in order to survive, photopsychrophiles (i.e. photosynthetic organisms adapted to low temperatures) balance temperature-independent reactions of light energy capture/transduction with downstream temperature-dependent metabolic processes such as carbon fixation. Here, we review research on photopsychrophiles with a focus on an emerging model organism, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241 (UWO241). UWO241 is a psychrophilic green algal species and is a member of the photosynthetic microbial eukaryote community that provides the majority of fixed carbon for ice-covered lake ecosystems located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The water column exerts a range of environmental stressors on the phytoplankton community that inhabits this aquatic ecosystem, including low temperatures, extreme shade of an unusual spectral range (blue-green), high salinity, nutrient deprivation and extremes in seasonal photoperiod. More than two decades of work on UWO241 have produced one of our most comprehensive views of environmental adaptation in a cold-adapted, photosynthetic microbial eukaryote.

  15. Evidence for phenotypic plasticity in the Antarctic extremophile Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl. UWO 241.

    PubMed

    Pocock, Tessa; Vetterli, Adrien; Falk, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Life in extreme environments poses unique challenges to photosynthetic organisms. The ability for an extremophilic green alga and its genetic and mesophilic equivalent to acclimate to changes in their environment was examined to determine the extent of their phenotypic plasticities. The Antarctic extremophile Chlamydomonas raudensis Ettl. UWO 241 (UWO) was isolated from an ice-covered lake in Antarctica, whereas its mesophilic counterpart C. raudensis Ettl. SAG 49.72 (SAG) was isolated from a meadow pool in the Czech Republic. The effects of changes in temperature and salinity on growth, morphology, and photochemistry were examined in the two strains. Differential acclimative responses were observed in UWO which include a wider salinity range for growth, and broader temperature- and salt-induced fluctuations in F(v)/F(m), relative to SAG. Furthermore, the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, measured as 1-q(P), was modulated in the extremophile whereas this was not observed in the mesophile. Interestingly, it is shown for the first time that SAG is similar to UWO in that it is unable to undergo state transitions. The different natural histories of these two strains exert different evolutionary pressures and, consequently, different abilities for acclimation, an important component of phenotypic plasticity. In contrast to SAG, UWO relied on a redox sensing and signalling system under the growth conditions used in this study. It is proposed that growth and adaptation of UWO under a stressful and extreme environment poises this extremophile for better success under changing environmental conditions.

  16. Kinetic Characterization of Nitrite Uptake and Reduction by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Francisco; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1986-01-01

    Kinetics of nitrite uptake and reduction by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells growing phototrophically has been studied by means of progress curves and the Michaelis-Menten integrated equation. Both uptake and reduction processes exhibited hyperbolic saturation kinetics, the nitrite uptake system lacking a diffusion component. Nitrite uptake and reduction showed significant differences in Ks for nitrite at pH 7.5 (1.6 versus 20 micromolar, respectively), optimal pH, activation energy values, and sensitivity toward reagents of sulfhydryl groups. Ks values for nitrite uptake were halved in cells subjected to darkness or to nitrogen-starvation. Nitrate inhibited nitrite uptake by a partially competitive mechanism. The same inhibition pattern was found for nitrite uptake by C. reinhardtii mutant 305 cells incapable of nitrate assimilation. The results demonstrate that C. reinhardtii cells take up nitrite via a highly specific carrier, probably energy-dependent, kinetically responsive to environmental changes, distinguishable from the enzymic nitrite reduction and endowed with an active site for nitrite not usable for nitrate transport. PMID:16665164

  17. Application of Phosphoproteomics to Find Targets of Casein Kinase 1 in the Flagellum of Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Boesger, Jens; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii serves as model for studying structural and functional features of flagella. The axoneme of C. reinhardtii anchors a network of kinases and phosphatases that control motility. One of them, Casein Kinase 1 (CK1), is known to phosphorylate the Inner Dynein Arm I1 Intermediate Chain 138 (IC138), thereby regulating motility. CK1 is also involved in regulating the circadian rhythm of phototaxis and is relevant for the formation of flagella. By a comparative phosphoproteome approach, we determined phosphoproteins in the flagellum that are targets of CK1. Thereby, we applied the specific CK1 inhibitor CKI-7 that causes significant changes in the flagellum phosphoproteome and reduces the swimming velocity of the cells. In the CKI-7-treated cells, 14 phosphoproteins were missing compared to the phosphoproteome of untreated cells, including IC138, and four additional phosphoproteins had a reduced number of phosphorylation sites. Notably, inhibition of CK1 causes also novel phosphorylation events, indicating that it is part of a kinase network. Among them, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 is of special interest, because it is involved in the phosphorylation of key clock components in flies and mammals and in parallel plays an important role in the regulation of assembly in the flagellum. PMID:23316220

  18. Application of phosphoproteomics to find targets of casein kinase 1 in the flagellum of chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Boesger, Jens; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Mittag, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The green biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii serves as model for studying structural and functional features of flagella. The axoneme of C. reinhardtii anchors a network of kinases and phosphatases that control motility. One of them, Casein Kinase 1 (CK1), is known to phosphorylate the Inner Dynein Arm I1 Intermediate Chain 138 (IC138), thereby regulating motility. CK1 is also involved in regulating the circadian rhythm of phototaxis and is relevant for the formation of flagella. By a comparative phosphoproteome approach, we determined phosphoproteins in the flagellum that are targets of CK1. Thereby, we applied the specific CK1 inhibitor CKI-7 that causes significant changes in the flagellum phosphoproteome and reduces the swimming velocity of the cells. In the CKI-7-treated cells, 14 phosphoproteins were missing compared to the phosphoproteome of untreated cells, including IC138, and four additional phosphoproteins had a reduced number of phosphorylation sites. Notably, inhibition of CK1 causes also novel phosphorylation events, indicating that it is part of a kinase network. Among them, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 is of special interest, because it is involved in the phosphorylation of key clock components in flies and mammals and in parallel plays an important role in the regulation of assembly in the flagellum.

  19. The selective breeding of the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for growth in salinity.

    PubMed

    Takouridis, Simon J; Tribe, David E; Gras, Sally L; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be utilized for biofuel production was strengthened by developing it for growth in elevated salinity via the selective breeding method of genome shuffling. A population was constructed via random mutagenesis and subjected to multiple rounds of sex and growth in increasing salinity. This sexual line was capable of growth in up to 700 mM NaCl, unlike its progenitor, which could only grow in 300 mM NaCl. An asexual control line was capable of growth in 500 mM NaCl. Palmelloid aggregations increased in size and the concentration of final biomass decreased as a function of NaCl concentration, which poses considerations for future strain development. The sexual line maintained sexual efficiencies of up to 50% over the course of selection. This investigation achieved significant strain improvement of C. reinhardtii and demonstrated the clear advantage of its ability to participate in laboratory controlled and reproducible high efficiency sex.

  20. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M; Gang, David R

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism.

  1. Integrated quantitative analysis of nitrogen stress response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using metabolite and protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Wase, Nishikant; Black, Paul N; Stanley, Bruce A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2014-03-07

    Nitrogen starvation induces a global stress response in microalgae that results in the accumulation of lipids as a potential source of biofuel. Using GC-MS-based metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling, we examined and correlated the metabolic and proteomic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under nitrogen stress. Key amino acids and metabolites involved in nitrogen sparing pathways, methyl group transfer reactions, and energy production were decreased in abundance, whereas certain fatty acids, citric acid, methionine, citramalic acid, triethanolamine, nicotianamine, trehalose, and sorbitol were increased in abundance. Proteins involved in nitrogen assimilation, amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, starch, and lipid metabolism were elevated compared with nonstressed cultures. In contrast, the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, one carbon metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway, the Calvin cycle, photosynthetic and light harvesting complex, and ribosomes were reduced. A noteworthy observation was that citrate accumulated during nitrogen stress coordinate with alterations in the enzymes that produce or utilize this metabolite, demonstrating the value of comparing protein and metabolite profiles to understand complex patterns of metabolic flow. Thus, the current study provides unique insight into the global metabolic adjustments leading to lipid storage during N starvation for application toward advanced biofuel production technologies.

  2. RNA interference silencing of a major lipid droplet protein affects lipid droplet size in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Moellering, Eric R; Benning, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells store oils in the chemical form of triacylglycerols in distinct organelles, often called lipid droplets. These dynamic storage compartments have been intensely studied in the context of human health and also in plants as a source of vegetable oils for human consumption and for chemical or biofuel feedstocks. Many microalgae accumulate oils, particularly under conditions limiting to growth, and thus have gained renewed attention as a potentially sustainable feedstock for biofuel production. However, little is currently known at the cellular or molecular levels with regard to oil accumulation in microalgae, and the structural proteins and enzymes involved in the biogenesis, maintenance, and degradation of algal oil storage compartments are not well studied. Focusing on the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the accumulation of triacylglycerols and the formation of lipid droplets during nitrogen deprivation were investigated. Mass spectrometry identified 259 proteins in a lipid droplet-enriched fraction, among them a major protein, tentatively designated major lipid droplet protein (MLDP). This protein is specific to the green algal lineage of photosynthetic organisms. Repression of MLDP gene expression using an RNA interference approach led to increased lipid droplet size, but no change in triacylglycerol content or metabolism was observed.

  3. High-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting for lipid hyperaccumulating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Stessman, Dan; Hart, Jason H; Dong, Haili; Wang, Yingjun; Wright, David A; Nikolau, Basil J; Spalding, Martin H; Halverson, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    The genetically tractable microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model for renewable bioproducts and/or biofuels production. However, one limitation of C. reinhardtii is its relatively low-lipid content compared with some other algal species. To overcome this limitation, we combined ethane methyl sulfonate mutagenesis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of cells stained with the lipophilic stain Nile Red to isolate lipid hyperaccumulating mutants of C. reinhardtii. By manipulating the FACS gates, we sorted mutagenized cells with extremely high Nile Red fluorescence signals that were rarely detected in nonmutagenized populations. This strategy successfully isolated several putative lipid hyperaccumulating mutants exhibiting 23% to 58% (dry weight basis) higher fatty acid contents than their progenitor strains. Significantly, for most mutants, nitrogen starvation was not required to attain high-lipid content nor was there a requirement for a deficiency in starch accumulation. Microscopy of Nile Red stained cells revealed that some mutants exhibit an increase in the number of lipid bodies, which correlated with TLC analysis of triacyglycerol content. Increased lipid content could also arise through increased biomass production. Collectively, our findings highlight the ability to enhance intracellular lipid accumulation in algae using random mutagenesis in conjunction with a robust FACS and lipid yield verification regime. Our lipid hyperaccumulating mutants could serve as a genetic resource for stacking additional desirable traits to further increase lipid production and for identifying genes contributing to lipid hyperaccumulation, without lengthy lipid-induction periods.

  4. Lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) share a common uptake transporter in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marín, Paula; Fortin, Claude; Campbell, Peter G C

    2014-02-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a very high rate of lead (Pb) internalization and is known to be highly sensitive to dissolved Pb. However, the transport pathway that this metal uses to cross cellular membranes in microalgae is still unknown. To identify the Pb(2+) transport pathway in C. reinhartdii, we performed several competition experiments with environmentally relevant concentrations of Pb(2+) (~10 nM) and a variety of divalent cations. Among the essential trace metals tested, cobalt, manganese, nickel and zinc had no effect on Pb internalization. A greater than tenfold increase in the concentrations of the major ions calcium and magnesium led to a slight decrease (~34 %) in short-term Pb internalization by the algae. Copper (Cu) was even more effective: at a Cu concentration 50 times higher than that of Pb, Pb internalization by the algae decreased by 87 %. Pre-exposure of the algae to Cu showed that the effect was not due to a physiological effect of Cu on the algae, but rather to competition for the same transporter. A reciprocal effect of Pb on Cu internalization was also observed. These results suggest that Cu and Pb share a common transport pathway in C. reinhardtii at environmentally relevant metal concentrations.

  5. Characterization of the Major Light-Harvesting Complexes (LHCBM) of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Natali, Alberto; Croce, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Nine genes (LHCBM1-9) encode the major light-harvesting system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses have shown that those genes are all expressed albeit in different amounts and some of them only in certain conditions. However, little is known about the properties and specific functions of the individual gene products because they have never been isolated. Here we have purified several complexes from native membranes and/or we have reconstituted them in vitro with pigments extracted from C. reinhardtii. It is shown that LHCBM1 and -M2/7 represent more than half of the LHCBM population in the membrane. LHCBM2/7 forms homotrimers while LHCBM1 seems to be present in heterotrimers. Trimers containing only type I LHCBM (M3/4/6/8/9) were also observed. Despite their different roles, all complexes have very similar properties in terms of pigment content, organization, stability, absorption, fluorescence and excited-state lifetimes. Thus the involvement of LHCBM1 in non-photochemical quenching is suggested to be due to specific interactions with other components of the membrane and not to the inherent quenching properties of the complex. Similarly, the overexpression of LHCBM9 during sulfur deprivation can be explained by its low sulfur content as compared with the other LHCBMs. Considering the highly conserved biochemical and spectroscopic properties, the major difference between the complexes may be in their capacity to interact with other components of the thylakoid membrane. PMID:25723534

  6. Eyespot-dependent determination of the phototactic sign in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Noriko; Ide, Takahiro; Mochiji, Shota; Kobayashi, Yuki; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Tanaka, Kan; Minagawa, Jun; Hisabori, Toru; Hirono, Masafumi; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    The biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits both positive and negative phototaxis to inhabit areas with proper light conditions. It has been shown that treatment of cells with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reagents biases the phototactic sign to positive, whereas that with ROS scavengers biases it to negative. Taking advantage of this property, we isolated a mutant, lts1-211, which displays a reduction-oxidation (redox) dependent phototactic sign opposite to that of the wild type. This mutant has a single amino acid substitution in phytoene synthase, an enzyme that functions in the carotenoid-biosynthesis pathway. The eyespot contains large amounts of carotenoids and is crucial for phototaxis. Most lts1-211 cells have no detectable eyespot and reduced carotenoid levels. Interestingly, the reversed phototactic-sign phenotype of lts1-211 is shared by other eyespot-less mutants. In addition, we directly showed that the cell body acts as a convex lens. The lens effect of the cell body condenses the light coming from the rear onto the photoreceptor in the absence of carotenoid layers, which can account for the reversed-phototactic-sign phenotype of the mutants. These results suggest that light-shielding property of the eyespot is essential for determination of phototactic sign. PMID:27122315

  7. Flow Cytometric Methods for Indirect Analysis and Quantification of Gametogenesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlorophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of sexual reproduction in the facultatively sexual Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is cued by depletion of nitrogen. We explore the capacity for indirect monitoring of population variation in the gametogenic process using flow cytometry. We describe a high-throughput method capable of identifying fluorescence, ploidy and scatter profiles that track vegetative cells entering and undergoing gametogenesis. We demonstrate for the first time, that very early and late growth phases reduce the capacity to distinguish putative gametes from vegetative cells based on scatter and fluorescence profiles, and that early/mid-logarithmic cultures show the optimal distinction between vegetative cells and gamete scatter profiles. We argue that early/mid logarithmic cultures are valuable in such high throughput comparative approaches when investigating optimisation or quantification of gametogenesis based on scatter and fluorescence profiles. This approach provides new insights into the impact of culture conditions on gametogenesis, while documenting novel scatter and fluorescence profile shifts which typify the process. This method has potential applications to; enabling quick high-throughput monitoring, uses in increasing efficiency in the quantification of gametogenesis, as a method of comparing the switch between vegetative and gametic states across treatments, and as criteria for enrichment of gametic phenotypes in cell sorting assays. PMID:27676075

  8. Phytotoxicity Evaluation of Type B Trichothecenes Using a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Model System

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tadahiro; Iwahashi, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    Type B trichothecenes, which consist of deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) as the major end products, are produced by phytotoxic fungi, such as the Fusarium species, and pollute arable fields across the world. The DON toxicity has been investigated using various types of cell systems or animal bioassays. The evaluation of NIV toxicity, however, has been relatively restricted because of its lower level compared with DON. In this study, the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii testing system, which has been reported to have adequate NIV sensitivity, was reinvestigated under different mycotoxin concentrations and light conditions. The best concentration of DON and NIV, and their derivatives, for test conditions was found to be 25 ppm (2.5 × 10−2 mg/mL). In all light test conditions, DON, NIV, and fusarenon-X (FusX) indicated significant growth inhibition regardless of whether a light source existed, or under differential wavelength conditions. FusX growth was also influenced by changes in photon flux density. These results suggest that C. reinhardtii is an appropriate evaluation system for type B trichothecenes. PMID:24476708

  9. Anomalies in the motion dynamics of long-flagella mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Khona, Dolly K; Rao, Venkatramanan G; Motiwalla, Mustafa J; Varma, P C Sreekrishna; Kashyap, Anisha R; Das, Koyel; Shirolikar, Seema M; Borde, Lalit; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K; Mukhopadhyay, Siuli; Mathur, Deepak; D'Souza, Jacinta S

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been used as a model organism in studies of cell motility and flagellar dynamics. The motility of the well-conserved '9+2' axoneme in its flagella remains a subject of immense curiosity. Using high-speed videography and morphological analyses, we have characterized long-flagella mutants (lf1, lf2-1, lf2-5, lf3-2, and lf4) of C. reinhardtii for biophysical parameters such as swimming velocities, waveforms, beat frequencies, and swimming trajectories. These mutants are aberrant in proteins involved in the regulation of flagellar length and bring about a phenotypic increase in this length. Our results reveal that the flagellar beat frequency and swimming velocity are negatively correlated with the length of the flagella. When compared to the wild-type, any increase in the flagellar length reduces both the swimming velocities (by 26-57%) and beat frequencies (by 8-16%). We demonstrate that with no apparent aberrations/ultrastructural deformities in the mutant axonemes, it is this increased length that has a critical role to play in the motion dynamics of C. reinhardtii cells, and, provided there are no significant changes in their flagellar proteome, any increase in this length compromises the swimming velocity either by reduction of the beat frequency or by an alteration in the waveform of the flagella.

  10. Genetic analysis of suppressors of the PF10 mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, S.K.; Gibbons, W.; Inwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    A mutation at the PF10 locus of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to abnormal cell motility. The asymmetric form of the ciliary beat stroke characteristic of wild-type flagella is modified by this mutation to a nearly symmetric beat. We report here that this abnormal motility is a conditional phenotype that depends on light intensity. In the absence of light or under low light intensities, the motility is more severely impaired than at higher light intensities. By UV mutagenesis we obtained 11 intragenic and 70 extragenic strains that show reversion of the pf10 motility phenotype observed in low light. The intragenic events reverted the motility phenotype of the pf10 mutation completely. The extragenic events define at least seven suppressor loci; these map to linkage groups IV, VII, IX, XI, XII and XVII. Suppressor mutations at two of the seven loci (LIS1 and LIS2) require light for their suppressor activity. Forty-eight of the 70 extragenic suppressors were examined in heterozygous diploid cells; 47 of these mutants were recessive to the wild-type allele and one mutant (bop5-1) was dominant to the wild-type allele. Complementation analysis of the 47 recessive mutants showed unusual patterns. Most mutants within a recombinationally defined group failed to complement one another, although there were pairs that showed intra-allelic complementation. Additionally, some of the mutants at each recombinationally defined locus failed to complement mutants at other loci. They define dominant enhancers of one another.

  11. The conserved ciliary protein Bug22 controls planar beating of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dan; Cao, Muqing; Oda, Toshiyuki; Pan, Junmin

    2014-01-15

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia can exhibit planar and non-planar beating, and the mechanism controlling these beating patterns is not well understood. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella beat in approximately the same plane with either an asymmetric ciliary-type or symmetric flagellar-type waveform. Each B-tubule of the number 1, 5 and 6 doublets of the flagellar axoneme possesses a beak-like structure. The number 5 and 6 beak structures are implicated in conversion of ciliary motion into flagellar motion. Here, we show that in a null mutant of Bug22, the asymmetric ciliary waveform is converted into a three-dimensional (non-planar) symmetric flagellar waveform. Bug22 is localized to approximately the proximal half to two-thirds of the flagellum, similar to localization of beak-like structures. However, as shown by immunogold labeling, Bug22 associates with axonemal microtubules without apparent preference for any particular doublets. Interestingly, bug22 mutants lack all beak-like structures. We propose that one function of Bug22 is to regulate the anchoring of the beak-like structures to the doublet microtubules and confine flagellar beating to a plane.

  12. The awesome power of dikaryons for studying flagella and basal bodies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Cilia/flagella and basal bodies/centrioles play key roles in human health and homeostasis. Among the organisms used to study these microtubule-based organelles, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has several advantages. One is the existence of a temporary phase of the life cycle, termed the dikaryon. These cells are formed during mating when the cells fuse and the behavior of flagella from two genetically distinguishable parents can be observed. During this stage, the cytoplasms mix allowing for a defect in the flagella of one parent to be rescued by proteins from the other parent. This offers the unique advantage of adding back wild-type gene product or labeled protein at endogenous levels that can used to monitor various flagellar and basal body phenotypes. Mutants that show rescue and ones that fail to show rescue are both informative about the nature of the flagella and basal body defects. When rescue occurs, it can be used to determine the mutant gene product and to follow the temporal and spatial patterns of flagellar assembly. This review describes many examples of insights into basal body and flagellar proteins' function and assembly that have been discovered using dikaryons and discusses the potential for further analyses.

  13. CDKL5 regulates flagellar length and localizes to the base of the flagella in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Tam, Lai-Wa; Ranum, Paul T; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    The length of Chlamydomonas flagella is tightly regulated. Mutations in four genes-LF1, LF2, LF3, and LF4-cause cells to assemble flagella up to three times wild-type length. LF2 and LF4 encode protein kinases. Here we describe a new gene, LF5, in which null mutations cause cells to assemble flagella of excess length. The LF5 gene encodes a protein kinase very similar in sequence to the protein kinase CDKL5. In humans, mutations in this kinase cause a severe form of juvenile epilepsy. The LF5 protein localizes to a unique location: the proximal 1 μm of the flagella. The proximal localization of the LF5 protein is lost when genes that make up the proteins in the cytoplasmic length regulatory complex (LRC)-LF1, LF2, and LF3-are mutated. In these mutants LF5p becomes localized either at the distal tip of the flagella or along the flagellar length, indicating that length regulation involves, at least in part, control of LF5p localization by the LRC.

  14. Phytohormone supplementation significantly increases growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultivated for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Kun; Yoo, Gursong; Moon, Myounghoon; Kim, Chul Woong; Choi, Yoon-E; Yang, Ji-Won

    2013-11-01

    Cultivation is the most expensive step in the production of biodiesel from microalgae, and substantial research has been devoted to developing more cost-effective cultivation methods. Plant hormones (phytohormones) are chemical messengers that regulate various aspects of growth and development and are typically active at very low concentrations. In this study, we investigated the effect of different phytohormones on microalgal growth and biodiesel production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and their potential to lower the overall cost of commercial biofuel production. The results indicated that all five of the tested phytohormones (indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellic acid, kinetin, 1-triacontanol, and abscisic acid) promoted microalgal growth. In particular, hormone treatment increased biomass production by 54 to 69 % relative to the control growth medium (Tris-acetate-phosphate, TAP). Phytohormone treatments also affected microalgal cell morphology but had no effect on the yields of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as a percent of biomass. We also tested the effect of these phytohormones on microalgal growth in nitrogen-limited media by supplementation in the early stationary phase. Maximum cell densities after addition of phytohormones were higher than in TAP medium, even when the nitrogen source was reduced to 40 % of that in TAP medium. Taken together, our results indicate that phytohormones significantly increased microalgal growth, particularly in nitrogen-limited media, and have potential for use in the development of efficient microalgal cultivation for biofuel production.

  15. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms.

  16. Influence of sulphate on the reduction of cadmium toxicity in the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium is considered as one of the most hazardous metals for living organism and ecosystems. Environmental factors play an important role since they alter the toxicity of metals by varying the bioavailability of these elements for the organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate, using the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii, the existence of an interaction between cadmium and sulphate as a factor that varied the toxicity of this metal. Different cell parameters such as cell growth, content of chlorophylls and biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were determined. A two-way ANOVA showed that the interaction had a significant effect size of 21% (p<0.001) for the growth of this microalga and around of a 6% on the content of chlorophylls/cell. The effect of this inhibition was that when the concentration of sulphate increased, a lower toxic effect of cadmium on the growth and on the content of chlorophylls was observed. In addition, the increase of sulphate concentration allowed the biosynthesis of a higher amount of PCs and/or PCs with higher chain length. This higher biosynthesis was responsible for the reduction of the toxic effect of cadmium and explained the interaction.

  17. Ciprofloxacin toxicity and its co-metabolic removal by a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiu-Qiang; Kurade, Mayur B; Kim, Jung Rae; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2017-02-05

    This study evaluated the toxicity and cellular stresses of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and its co-metabolic removal in a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana. The toxicological effects of CIP on C. mexicana were assessed by studying the growth and biochemical characteristics of the microalga including total chlorophyll, carotenoid content, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The calculated effective concentration (EC50) of CIP on C. mexicana was 65±4mgL(-1) at 96h. The growth of C. mexicana was significantly inhibited at increased concentrations of CIP, showing 36±1, 75±3. and 88±3% inhibition at 40, 60 and 100mgL(-1) CIP, respectively, compared to the control after 11days of cultivation. The total chlorophyll, carotenoid, MDA and SOD activity were significantly increased as a result of relatively high concentrations of CIP stress. C. mexicana showed 13±1% removal of CIP (2mgL(-1)) after 11days of cultivation; however, the addition of an electron donor (sodium acetate, 4gL(-1)) highly enhanced the removal of CIP (2mgL(-1)) by>3-fold after 11days. Kinetic studies showed that removal of CIP followed a first-order model (R(2) 0.94-0.97) with the apparent rate constants (k) ranging from 0.0121 to 0.079 d(-1).

  18. Toxicity of atrazine and its bioaccumulation and biodegradation in a green microalga, Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Akhil N; Ji, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Jung Rae; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity of herbicide atrazine, along with its bioaccumulation and biodegradation in the green microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana. At low concentration (10 μg L(-1)), atrazine had no profound effect on the microalga, while higher concentrations (25, 50, and 100 μg L(-1)) imposed toxicity, leading to inhibition of cell growth and chlorophyll a accumulation by 22 %, 33 %, and 36 %, and 13 %, 24 %, and 27 %, respectively. Atrazine 96-h EC50 for C. mexicana was estimated to be 33 μg L(-1). Microalga showed a capability to accumulate atrazine in the cell and to biodegrade the cell-accumulated atrazine resulting in 14-36 % atrazine degradation at 10-100 μg L(-1). Increasing atrazine concentration decreased the total fatty acids (from 102 to 75 mg g(-1)) and increased the unsaturated fatty acid content in the microalga. Carbohydrate content increased gradually with the increase in atrazine concentration up to 15 %. This study shows that C. mexicana has the capability to degrade atrazine and can be employed for the remediation of atrazine-contaminated streams.

  19. Acetic acid-induced programmed cell death and release of volatile organic compounds in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhaojiang; Zhu, Yerong; Bai, Yanling; Wang, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Acetic acid widely spreads in atmosphere, aquatic ecosystems containing residues and anoxic soil. It can inhibit aquatic plant germination and growth, and even cause programmed cell death (PCD) of yeast. In the present study, biochemical and physiological responses of the model unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were examined after acetic acid stress. H(2)O(2) burst was found in C. reinhardtii after acetic acid stress at pH 5.0 for 10 min. The photosynthetic pigments were degraded, gross photosynthesis and respiration were disappeared gradually, and DNA fragmentation was also detected. Those results indicated that C. reinhardtii cells underwent a PCD but not a necrotic, accidental cell death event. It was noticed that C. reinhardtii cells in PCD released abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) upon acetic acid stress. Therefore, we analyzed the VOCs and tested their effects on other normal cells. The treatment of C. reinhardtii cultures with VOCs reduced the cell density and increased antioxidant enzyme activity. Therefore, a function of VOCs as infochemicals involved in cell-to-cell communication at the conditions of applied stress is suggested.

  20. Spontaneous mutation accumulation in multiple strains of the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew D; Ness, Rob W; Keightley, Peter D; Colegrave, Nick

    2014-09-01

    Estimates of mutational parameters, such as the average fitness effect of a new mutation and the rate at which new genetic variation for fitness is created by mutation, are important for the understanding of many biological processes. However, the causes of interspecific variation in mutational parameters and the extent to which they vary within species remain largely unknown. We maintained multiple strains of the unicellular eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for approximately 1000 generations under relaxed selection by transferring a single cell every ~10 generations. Mean fitness of the lines tended to decline with generations of mutation accumulation whereas mutational variance increased. We did not find any evidence for differences among strains in any of the mutational parameters estimated. The overall change in mean fitness per cell division and rate of input of mutational variance per cell division were more similar to values observed in multicellular organisms than to those in other single-celled microbes. However, after taking into account differences in genome size among species, estimates from multicellular organisms and microbes, including our new estimates from C. reinhardtii, become substantially more similar. Thus, we suggest that variation in genome size is an important determinant of interspecific variation in mutational parameters.

  1. Two equilibration pools of chlorophylls in the Photosystem I core antenna of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Ramesh, V M; Lin, Su; Redding, Kevin; Woodbury, Neal W; Webber, Andrew N

    2007-04-01

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy was applied for a comparative study of excitation decay in several different Photosystem I (PSI) core preparations from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. For PSI cores with a fully interconnected network of chlorophylls, the excitation energy was equilibrated over a pool of chlorophylls absorbing at approximately 683 nm, independent of excitation wavelength [Gibasiewicz et al. J Phys Chem B 105:11498-11506, 2001; J Phys Chem B 106:6322-6330, 2002]. In preparations with impaired connectivity between chlorophylls, we have found that the spectrum of chlorophylls connected to the reaction center (i.e., with approximately 20 ps decay time) over which the excitation is equilibrated becomes excitation-wavelength-dependent. Excitation at 670 nm is finally equilibrated over chlorophylls absorbing at approximately 675 nm, whereas excitation at 695 nm or 700 nm is equilibrated over chlorophylls absorbing at approximately 683 nm. This indicates that in the vicinity of the reaction center there are two spectrally different and spatially separated pools of chlorophylls that are equally capable of effective excitation energy transfer to the reaction center. We propose that they are related to the two groups of central PSI core chlorophylls lying on the opposite sides of reaction center.

  2. The Involvement of hybrid cluster protein 4, HCP4, in Anaerobic Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Adam C.; Carter, Clay J.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been studied for its unique fermentation pathways and has been evaluated as a candidate organism for biofuel production. Fermentation in C. reinhardtii is facilitated by a network of three predominant pathways producing four major byproducts: formate, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen. Previous microarray studies identified many genes as being highly up-regulated during anaerobiosis. For example, hybrid cluster protein 4 (HCP4) was found to be one of the most highly up-regulated genes under anoxic conditions. Hybrid cluster proteins have long been studied for their unique spectroscopic properties, yet their biological functions remain largely unclear. To probe its role during anaerobiosis, HCP4 was silenced using artificial microRNAs (ami-hcp4) followed by extensive phenotypic analyses of cells grown under anoxic conditions. Both the expression of key fermentative enzymes and their respective metabolites were significantly altered in ami-hcp4, with nitrogen uptake from the media also being significantly different than wild-type cells. The results strongly suggest a role for HCP4 in regulating key fermentative and nitrogen utilization pathways. PMID:26930496

  3. Phytotoxicity of 15 common pharmaceuticals on the germination of Lactuca sativa and photosynthesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pino, Ma Rosa; Muñiz, Selene; Val, Jonatan; Navarro, Enrique

    2016-11-01

    Pharmaceuticals reach terrestrial environments through the application of treated wastewaters and biosolids to agricultural soils. We have investigated the toxicity of 15 common pharmaceuticals, classified as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), blood lipid-lowering agents, β-blockers and antibiotics, in two photosynthetic organisms. Twelve pharmaceuticals caused inhibitory effects on the radicle and hypocotyl elongation of Lactuca sativa seeds. The EC50 values obtained were in the range of 170-5656 mg L(-1) in the case of the radicle and 188-4558 mg L(-1) for the hypocotyl. Propranolol was the most toxic drug for both root and hypocotyl elongation, followed by the NSAIDs, then gemfibrozil and tetracycline. Other effects, such as root necrosis, inhibition of root growth and curly hairs, were detected. However, even at the highest concentrations tested (3000 mg L(-1)), seed germination was not affected. NSAIDs decreased the photosynthetic yield of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but only salicylic acid showed EC50 values below 1000 mg L(-1). The first effects detected at low concentrations, together with the concentrations found in environmental samples, indicate that the use of biosolids and wastewaters containing pharmaceuticals should be regulated and their compositions assessed in order to prevent medium- and long-term impacts on agricultural soils and crops.

  4. Cytoplasmic microtubules containing acetylated alpha-tubulin in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: spatial arrangement and properties

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 6-11B-1, specific for acetylated alpha-tubulin (Piperno, G., and M. T. Fuller, 1985, J. Cell Biol., 101:2085-2094) was used to study the distribution of this molecule in interphase cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Double-label immunofluorescence was performed using 6-11B-1, and 3A5, an antibody specific for all alpha- tubulin isoforms. It was found that acetylated alpha-tubulin is not restricted to the axonemes, but is also present in basal bodies and in a subset of cytoplasmic microtubules that radiate from the basal bodies just beneath the plasma membrane. Immunoblotting experiments of basal body polypeptide components using 6-11B-1 as a probe confirmed that basal bodies contain acetylated alpha-tubulin. In the cell body, 6-11B- 1 stained an average of 2.2 microtubules/cell, while 3A5 stained an average of 6.5 microtubules. Although exposure to 0 degrees C depolymerized both types of cytoplasmic microtubules, exposure to various concentrations of colchicine or nocodazole showed that the acetylated microtubules are much more resistant to drug-induced depolymerization than nonacetylated microtubules. Axonemes and basal bodies are already known to be colchicine-resistant. All acetylated microtubules appear, therefore, to be more drug-resistant than nonacetylated microtubules. The acetylation of alpha-tubulin may be part of a mechanism that stabilizes microtubules. PMID:3722261

  5. High light induced changes in organization, protein profile and function of photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Nama, Srilatha; Madireddi, Sai Kiran; Devadasu, Elsin Raju; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-11-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas (C.) reinhardtii is used as a model organism to understand the efficiency of photosynthesis along with the organization and protein profile of photosynthetic apparatus under various intensities of high light exposure for 1h. Chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence induction, OJIPSMT transient was decreased with increase in light intensity indicating the reduction in photochemical efficiency. Further, circular dichroism studies of isolated thylakoids from high light exposed cells showed considerable change in the pigment-pigment interactions and pigment-proteins interactions. Furthermore, the organization of supercomplexes from thylakoids is studied, in which, one of the hetero-trimer of light harvesting complex (LHC) II is affected significantly in comparison to other complexes of LHC's monomers. Also, other supercomplexes, photosystem (PS)II reaction center dimer and PSI complexes are reduced. Additionally, immunoblot analysis of thylakoid proteins revealed that PSII core proteins D1 and D2 were significantly decreased during high light treatment. Similarly, the PSI core proteins PsaC, PsaD and PsaG were drastically changed. Further, the LHC antenna proteins of PSI and PSII were differentially affected. From our results it is clear that LHCs are damaged significantly, consequently the excitation energy is not efficiently transferred to the reaction center. Thus, the photochemical energy transfer from PSII to PSI is reduced. The inference of the study deciphers the structural and functional changes driven by light may therefore provide plants/alga to regulate the light harvesting capacity in excess light conditions.

  6. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  7. Production of biodiesel from microalgae Chlamydomonas polypyrenoideum grown on dairy industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Prasad, Ravindra; Kumar, Virendra; Singh, D P

    2013-09-01

    This study involves a process of phyco-remediation of dairy industry wastewater by algal strain Chlamydomonas polypyrenoideum. The results of selected algal strain indicated that dairy industry wastewater was good nutrient supplement for algal growth in comparable with BG-11 growth medium. Alga grown on dairy industry wastewater reduced the pollution load of nitrate (90%), nitrite (74%), phosphate (70%), chloride (61%), fluoride (58%), and ammonia (90%) on 10th day of its growth as compared to that of uninoculated wastewater. The lipid content of algal biomass grown on dairy wastewater on 10th day (1.6g) and 15th day (1.2 g) of batch experiment was found to be higher than the lipid content of algal biomass grown in BG-11 growth medium on 10th day (1.27 g) and 15th day (1.0 g) of batch experiment. The results on FTIR analysis of the extracted bio-oil through transesterification reaction was comparable with bio-oil obtained from other sources.

  8. Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. IV. Purification and Properties of Plastocyanin.

    PubMed

    Gorman, D S; Levine, R P

    1966-12-01

    The copper protein plastocyanin has been found to be an essential component of the photosynthetic electron transport chain of Chlamydomonas reinhardi, and in this paper we describe a method for its isolation and purification from the wild-type strain. In addition, we describe some of its properties and compare them with those reported for spinach plastocyanin.The plastocyanin was extracted from acetone powders prepared from intact cells, and it was purified by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. The yield of the purified protein ranged from plastocyanin equivalent to 2.0 to 2.5 mug atoms copper per 1000 mumoles chlorophyll. In general the absorption spectrum of plastocyanin from C. reinhardi resembled that of the plastocyanin from spinach. Some spectral differences were found in the ultraviolet region where, in contrast to spinach plastocyanin, that of C. reinhardi had a greater absorbance (relative to peaks in the visible) and less evidence for phenylalanine fine structure. The normal oxidation-reduction potential of C. reinhardi plastocyanin was found to be + 0.37 volts, the same as reported for spinach plastocyanin. The molecular weight of C. reinhardi plastocyanin has been estimated to be 13,000 +/- 2000. In contrast, the value for spinach plastocyanin has been found to be 21,000.

  9. The microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a platform for the production of human protein therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rasala, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are a diverse group of eukaryotic photosynthetic microorganisms. While microalgae play a crucial role in global carbon fixation and oxygen evolution, these organisms have recently gained much attention for their potential role in biotechnological and industrial applications, such as the production of biofuels. We investigated the potential of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be a platform for the production of human therapeutic proteins. C. reinhardtii is a unicellular freshwater green alga that has served as a popular model alga for physiological, molecular, biochemical and genetic studies. As such, the molecular toolkit for this microorganism is highly developed, including well-established methods for genetic transformation and recombinant gene expression. We transformed the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii with seven unrelated genes encoding for current or potential human therapeutic proteins and found that four of these genes supported protein accumulation to levels that are sufficient for commercial production. Furthermore, the algal-produced proteins were bioactive. Thus, the microalga C. reinhardtii has the potential to be a robust platform for human therapeutic protein production. PMID:21636988

  10. A Simple and Non-Invasive Method for Nuclear Transformation of Intact-walled Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sora; Lee, Young-Chul; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Uk; Huh, Yun Suk; Kim, Geun-Joong; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Genetic engineering in microalgae is gaining attraction but nuclear transformation methods available so far are either inefficient or require special equipment. In this study, we employ positively charged nanoparticles, 3-aminopropyl-functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay, approximate unit cell composition of [H2N(CH2)3]8Si8Mg6O12(OH)4), for nuclear transformation into eukaryotic microalgae. TEM and EDX analysis of the process of transformation reveals that aminoclay coats negatively-charged DNA biomolecules and forms a self-assembled hybrid nanostructure. Subsequently, when this nanostructure is mixed with microalgal cells and plated onto selective agar plates with high friction force, cell wall is disrupted facilitating delivery of plasmid DNA into the cell and ultimately to the nucleus. This method is not only simple, inexpensive, and non-toxic to cells but also provides efficient transformation (5.03×102 transformants/µg DNA), second only to electroporation which needs advanced instrumentation. We present optimized parameters for efficient transformation including pre-treatment, friction force, concentration of foreign DNA/aminoclay, and plasticity of agar plates. It is also confirmed the successful integration and stable expression of foreign gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through molecular methods. PMID:24988123

  11. Light/electricity conversion by defined cocultures of Chlamydomonas and Geobacter.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-04-01

    Biological energy-conversion systems are attractive in terms of their self-organizing and self-sustaining properties and are expected to be applied towards environmentally friendly bioenergy processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustainable light/electricity-conversion systems, termed microbial solar cells (MSCs), can be constructed using naturally occurring microbial communities. To better understand the energy-conversion mechanisms in microbial communities, the present study attempted to construct model MSCs comprised of defined cocultures of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and an iron-reducing bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens, and examined their metabolism and interactions in MSCs. When MSC bioreactors were inoculated with these microbes and irradiated on a 12-h light/dark cycle, periodic current was generated in the dark with energy-conversion efficiencies of 0.1%. Metabolite analyses revealed that G. sulfurreducens generated current by oxidizing formate that was produced by C. reinhardtii in the dark. These results demonstrate that the light/electricity conversion occurs via syntrophic interactions between phototrophs and electricity-generating bacteria. Based on the results and data in literatures, it is estimated that the excretion of organics by the phototroph was the bottleneck step in the syntrophic light/electricity conversion. We also discuss differences between natural-community and defined-coculture MSCs.

  12. Transcriptome for Photobiological Hydrogen Production Induced by Sulfur Deprivation in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh Vu; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Malnoë, Alizée; Timmins, Matthew; Mussgnug, Jan H.; Rupprecht, Jens; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Schenk, Peer M.

    2008-01-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production using microalgae is being developed into a promising clean fuel stream for the future. In this study, microarray analyses were used to obtain global expression profiles of mRNA abundance in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different time points before the onset and during the course of sulfur-depleted hydrogen production. These studies were followed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and protein analyses. The present work provides new insights into photosynthesis, sulfur acquisition strategies, and carbon metabolism-related gene expression during sulfur-induced hydrogen production. A general trend toward repression of transcripts encoding photosynthetic genes was observed. In contrast to all other LHCBM genes, the abundance of the LHCBM9 transcript (encoding a major light-harvesting polypeptide) and its protein was strongly elevated throughout the experiment. This suggests a major remodeling of the photosystem II light-harvesting complex as well as an important function of LHCBM9 under sulfur starvation and photobiological hydrogen production. This paper presents the first global transcriptional analysis of C. reinhardtii before, during, and after photobiological hydrogen production under sulfur deprivation. PMID:18708561

  13. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  14. Integration of carbon assimilation modes with photosynthetic light capture in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hanna; Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2014-10-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of using organic and inorganic carbon sources simultaneously, which requires the adjustment of photosynthetic activity to the prevailing mode of carbon assimilation. We obtained novel insights into the regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) following altered carbon source availability. In C. reinhardtii, synthesis of PSII-associated light-harvesting proteins (LHCBMs) is controlled by the cytosolic RNA-binding protein NAB1, which represses translation of particular LHCBM isoform transcripts. This mechanism is fine-tuned via regulation of the nuclear NAB1 promoter, which is activated when linear photosynthetic electron flow is restricted by CO(2)-limitation in a photoheterotrophic context. In the wild-type, accumulation of NAB1 reduces the functional PSII antenna size, thus preventing a harmful overexcited state of PSII, as observed in a NAB1-less mutant. We further demonstrate that translation control as a newly identified long-term response to prolonged CO(2)-limitation replaces LHCII state transitions as a fast response to PSII over-excitation. Intriguingly, activation of the long-term response is perturbed in state transition mutant stt7, suggesting a regulatory link between the long- and short-term response. We depict a regulatory circuit operating on distinct timescales and in different cellular compartments to fine-tune light-harvesting in photoheterotrophic eukaryotes.

  15. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F. Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M.; Gang, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:26022256

  16. Genetic structure of the mating-type locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Patrick J; Armbrust, E Virginia; Goodenough, Ursula W

    2002-01-01

    Portions of the cloned mating-type (MT) loci (mt(+) and mt(-)) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, defined as the approximately 1-Mb domains of linkage group VI that are under recombinational suppression, were subjected to Northern analysis to elucidate their coding capacity. The four central rearranged segments of the loci were found to contain both housekeeping genes (expressed during several life-cycle stages) and mating-related genes, while the sequences unique to mt(+) or mt(-) carried genes expressed only in the gametic or zygotic phases of the life cycle. One of these genes, Mtd1, is a candidate participant in gametic cell fusion; two others, Mta1 and Ezy2, are candidate participants in the uniparental inheritance of chloroplast DNA. The identified housekeeping genes include Pdk, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and GdcH, encoding glycine decarboxylase complex subunit H. Unusual genetic configurations include three genes whose sequences overlap, one gene that has inserted into the coding region of another, several genes that have been inactivated by rearrangements in the region, and genes that have undergone tandem duplication. This report extends our original conclusion that the MT locus has incurred high levels of mutational change. PMID:11805055

  17. Phosphoregulation of an Inner Dynein Arm Complex in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Is Altered in Phototactic Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a further understanding of axonemal dynein regulation, mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had defects in both phototactic behavior and flagellar motility were identified and characterized. ptm1, ptm2, and ptm3 mutant strains exhibited motility phenotypes that resembled those of known inner dynein arm region mutant strains, but did not have biochemical or genetic phenotypes characteristic of other inner dynein arm mutations. Three other mutant strains had defects in the f class of inner dynein arms. Dynein extracts from the pf9-4 strain were missing the entire f complex. Strains with mutations in pf9/ida1, ida2, or ida3 failed to assemble the f dynein complex and did not exhibit phototactic behavior. Fractionated dynein from mia1-1 and mia2-1 axonemes exhibited a novel f class inner dynein arm biochemical phenotype; the 138-kD f intermediate chain was present in altered phosphorylation forms. In vitro axonemal dynein activity was reduced by the mia1-1 and mia2-1 mutations. The addition of kinase inhibitor restored axonemal dynein activity concomitant with the dephosphorylation of the 138-kD f intermediate chain. Dynein extracts from uni1-1 axonemes, which specifically assemble only one of the two flagella, contained relatively high levels of the altered phosphorylation forms of the 138-kD intermediate chain. We suggest that the f dynein complex may be phosphoregulated asymmetrically between the two flagella to achieve phototactic turning. PMID:9008712

  18. Chlamydomonas Outer Arm Dynein Alters Conformation in Response to Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Sakato, Miho; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that Ca2+ directly activates ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by a Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein subparticle containing the β and γ heavy chains (HCs). The γ HC–associated LC4 light chain is a member of the calmodulin family and binds 1-2 Ca2+ with KCa = 3 × 10−5 M in vitro, suggesting it may act as a Ca2+ sensor for outer arm dynein. Here we investigate interactions between the LC4 light chain and γ HC. Two IQ consensus motifs for binding calmodulin-like proteins are located within the stem domain of the γ heavy chain. In vitro experiments indicate that LC4 undergoes a Ca2+-dependent interaction with the IQ motif domain while remaining tethered to the HC. LC4 also moves into close proximity of the intermediate chain IC1 in the presence of Ca2+. The sedimentation profile of the γ HC subunit changed subtly upon Ca2+ addition, suggesting that the entire complex had become more compact, and electron microscopy of the isolated γ subunit revealed a distinct alteration in conformation of the N-terminal stem in response to Ca2+ addition. We propose that Ca2+-dependent conformational change of LC4 has a direct effect on the stem domain of the γ HC, which eventually leads to alterations in mechanochemical interactions between microtubules and the motor domain(s) of the outer dynein arm. PMID:17634291

  19. Dynamic Interplay between Nucleoid Segregation and Genome Integrity in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Odahara, Masaki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Nishimura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast (cp) genome is organized as nucleoids that are dispersed throughout the cp stroma. Previously, a cp homolog of bacterial recombinase RecA (cpRECA) was shown to be involved in the maintenance of cp genome integrity by repairing damaged chloroplast DNA and by suppressing aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here, overexpression and knockdown analysis of cpRECA in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed that cpRECA was involved in cp nucleoid dynamics as well as having a role in maintaining cp genome integrity. Overexpression of cpRECA tagged with yellow fluorescent protein or hemagglutinin resulted in the formation of giant filamentous structures that colocalized exclusively to chloroplast DNA and cpRECA localized to cp nucleoids in a heterogenous manner. Knockdown of cpRECA led to a significant reduction in cp nucleoid number that was accompanied by nucleoid enlargement. This phenotype resembled those of gyrase inhibitor-treated cells and monokaryotic chloroplast mutant cells and suggested that cpRECA was involved in organizing cp nucleoid dynamics. The cp genome also was destabilized by induced recombination between short dispersed repeats in cpRECA-knockdown cells and gyrase inhibitor-treated cells. Taken together, these results suggest that cpRECA and gyrase are both involved in nucleoid dynamics and the maintenance of genome integrity and that the mechanisms underlying these processes may be intimately related in C. reinhardtii cps. PMID:27756821

  20. Direct lipid extraction from wet Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass using osmotic shock.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gursong; Park, Won-Kun; Kim, Chul Woong; Choi, Yoon-E; Yang, Ji-Won

    2012-11-01

    High-cost downstream process is a major bottleneck for producing microalgal biodiesel at reasonable price. Conventional lipid extraction process necessitates biomass drying process, which requires substantial amount of energy. In this regard, lipid extraction from wet biomass must be an attractive solution. However, it is almost impossible to recover lipid directly from wet microalgae with current technology. In this study, we conceived osmotic shock treatment as a novel method to extract lipid efficiently. Osmotic shock treatment was applied directly to wet Chlamydomonas reinhardtii biomass with water content >99%, along with both polar and non-polar organic solvents. Our results demonstrated that osmotic shock could increase lipid recovery approximately 2 times. We also investigated whether the presence of cell wall or different cell stages could have any impact on lipid recovery. Cell wall-less mutant stains and senescent cell phase could display significantly increased lipid recovery. Taken together, our results suggested that osmotic shock is a promising technique for wet lipid extraction from microalgal biomass and successfully determined that specific manipulation of biomass in certain cell phase could enhance lipid recovery further.

  1. Characterization of the truncated hemoglobin THB1 from protein extracts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric A.; Lecomte, Juliette T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Truncated hemoglobins (TrHbs) belong to the hemoglobin superfamily, but unlike their distant vertebrate relatives, little is known about their principal physiologic functions.  Several TrHbs have been studied in vitro using engineered recombinant peptides.  These efforts have resulted in a wealth of knowledge about the chemical properties of TrHbs and have generated interesting functional leads. However, questions persist as to how closely these engineered proteins mimic their counterparts within the native cell. In this report, we examined THB1, one of several TrHbs from the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The recombinant THB1 (rTHB1) has favorable solubility and stability properties and is an excellent candidate for in vitro characterization. Linking rTHB1 to the in vivo protein is a critical step in understanding the physiologic function of this protein. Using a simplified three-step purification protocol, 3.5-L batches of algal culture were processed to isolate 50–60 μL fractions enriched in THB1. These fractions of C. reinhardtii proteins were then subjected to physical examination. Using gel mobility, optical absorbance and immunoreactivity, THB1 was identified in these enriched fractions and its presence correlated with that of a heme molecule. Mass spectrometry confirmed this cofactor to be a type b heme and revealed that the native protein contains a co-translational modification consistent with amino-terminal acetylation following initial methionine cleavage. PMID:25653846

  2. Chlamydomonas as a model for biofuels and bio-products production.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Melissa A; Ostrand, Joseph T; Fields, Francis J; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-05-01

    Developing renewable energy sources is critical to maintaining the economic growth of the planet while protecting the environment. First generation biofuels focused on food crops like corn and sugarcane for ethanol production, and soybean and palm for biodiesel production. Second generation biofuels based on cellulosic ethanol produced from terrestrial plants, has received extensive funding and recently pilot facilities have been commissioned, but to date output of fuels from these sources has fallen well short of what is needed. Recent research and pilot demonstrations have highlighted the potential of algae as one of the most promising sources of sustainable liquid transportation fuels. Algae have also been established as unique biofactories for industrial, therapeutic, and nutraceutical co-products. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii's long established role in the field of basic research in green algae has paved the way for understanding algal metabolism and developing genetic engineering protocols. These tools are now being utilized in C. reinhardtii and in other algal species for the development of strains to maximize biofuels and bio-products yields from the lab to the field.

  3. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ∼15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04889.001 PMID:25584625

  4. Improved automated monitoring and new analysis algorithm for circadian phototaxis rhythms in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Christa; Forbes-Stovall, Jennifer; Kessler, Bruce; Young, Mike; Rinehart, Claire A.; Jacobshagen, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    Automated monitoring of circadian rhythms is an efficient way of gaining insight into oscillation parameters like period and phase for the underlying pacemaker of the circadian clock. Measurement of the circadian rhythm of phototaxis (swimming towards light) exhibited by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been automated by directing a narrow and dim light beam through a culture at regular intervals and determining the decrease in light transmittance due to the accumulation of cells in the beam. In this study, the monitoring process was optimized by constructing a new computer-controlled measuring machine that limits the test beam to wavelengths reported to be specific for phototaxis and by choosing an algal strain, which does not need background illumination between test light cycles for proper expression of the rhythm. As a result, period and phase of the rhythm are now unaffected by the time a culture is placed into the machine. Analysis of the rhythm data was also optimized through a new algorithm, whose robustness was demonstrated using virtual rhythms with various noises. The algorithm differs in particular from other reported algorithms by maximizing the fit of the data to a sinusoidal curve that dampens exponentially. The algorithm was also used to confirm the reproducibility of rhythm monitoring by the machine. Machine and algorithm can now be used for a multitude of circadian clock studies that require unambiguous period and phase determinations such as light pulse experiments to identify the photoreceptor(s) that reset the circadian clock in C. reinhardtii. PMID:20116270

  5. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  6. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  7. Expression of bkt and bch genes from Haematococcus pluvialis in transgenic Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, KaiJing; Wang, ChaoGang; Xiao, Ming; Chen, Jun; Li, JianCheng; Hu, ZhangLi

    2014-10-01

    β-carotene ketolase and β-carotene hydroxylase encoded by bkt and bch, respectively, are key enzymes required for astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcu pluvialis 34-1n. Two expression vectors containing cDNA sequences of bkt and bch were constructed and co-transformed into cell-wall-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-849. Transgenic algae were screened on TAP agar plates containing 10 μg mL(-1) Zeomycin. PCR-Southern analysis showed that bkt and bch were integrated into the genomes of C. reinhardtii. Transcripts of bkt and bch were further confirmed by RT-PCR-Southern analysis. Compared with the wild type, transgenic algae produced 29.04% and 30.27% more carotenoids and xanthophylls, respectively. Moreover, the transgenic algae could accumulate 34% more astaxanthin than wild type. These results indicate that foreign bkt and bch genes were successfully translated into β-carotene ketolase and β-carotene hydroxylase, which were responsible for catalyzing the biosynthesis of astaxanthin in transgenic algae.

  8. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  9. Building Blocks of the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex in Chlamydomonas Flagella*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianfeng; Tritschler, Douglas; Song, Kangkang; Barber, Cynthia F.; Cobb, Jennifer S.; Porter, Mary E.; Nicastro, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    The directional flow generated by motile cilia and flagella is critical for many processes, including human development and organ function. Normal beating requires the control and coordination of thousands of dynein motors, and the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) has been identified as an important regulatory node for orchestrating dynein activity. The nexin link appears to be critical for the transformation of dynein-driven, linear microtubule sliding to flagellar bending, yet the molecular composition and mechanism of the N-DRC remain largely unknown. Here, we used proteomics with special attention to protein phosphorylation to analyze the composition of the N-DRC and to determine which subunits may be important for signal transduction. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of WT and mutant flagellar axonemes from Chlamydomonas identified 12 N-DRC-associated proteins, including all seven previously observed N-DRC components. Sequence and PCR analyses identified the mutation responsible for the phenotype of the sup-pf-4 strain, and biochemical comparison with a radial spoke mutant revealed two components that may link the N-DRC and the radial spokes. Phosphoproteomics revealed eight proteins with phosphorylated isoforms for which the isoform patterns changed with the genotype as well as two components that may play pivotal roles in N-DRC function through their phosphorylation status. These data were assembled into a model of the N-DRC that explains aspects of its regulatory function. PMID:21700706

  10. Comparative study of phototactic and photophobic receptor chromophore properties in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, D N; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Spudich, J L

    1993-01-01

    The motile, unicellular, eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits two distinct behavioral reactions to light stimuli, phototaxis and the photophobic response. Both are mediated by retinal-containing receptors. This paper focuses on a direct comparison of the two photoresponses and the chromophore requirements for their photoreceptor(s). Using computerized motion analysis assays for phototaxis and photophobic responses by the same populations of cells, we measured the ability of various isomers and analogues of retinal to reconstitute photobehavior in the pigment-deficient mutant FN68. The results indicate that photophobic and phototaxis responses each require chromophores with an all-trans polyene chain configuration, planar ionone ring/polyene chain conformation, and the ability to isomerize around the retinal C13-C14 double bond. One difference between the two behaviors is that the photophobic response becomes highly desensitized after light stimuli to which the phototaxis response does not become desensitized, indicating the existence of at least one distinct step in the photophobic response pathway. A second difference is that the retinal regeneration of the photophobic response but not of phototaxis is inhibited by a 5-membered ring 13-trans-locked analogue. While showing close similarity in the chromophore structural requirements of the two behaviors, the results indicate that differences exist between the two responses at the level of their photoreceptor proteins and/or in their transduction processes. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:8369455

  11. Sub-cellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-01-01

    We identified a Cu accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulated Cu, dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but was functionally Cu-deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. NanoSIMS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bio-available for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mis-metallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein (re)-metallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  12. Trophic transfer of gold nanoparticles from Euglena gracilis or Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Mi; Yoon, Sung-Ji; Shin, Yu-Jin; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the trophic transfer of nanoparticles (NPs) is important because NPs are small enough to easily penetrate into organisms. In this study, we evaluated the trophic transfer of gold NPs (AuNPs) within the aquatic food chain. We observed AuNPs transfer from 2 species of primary producers (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Euglena gracilis) to the primary consumer (Daphnia magna). Also, bioaccumulation of AuNPs in E. gracilis was higher than that in C. reinhardtii. The reasons for the difference in Au accumulation may be the physical structure of these organisms, and the surface area that is available for interaction with NPs. C. reinhardtii has a cell wall that may act as a barrier to the penetration of NPs. The size of E. gracilis is larger than that of C. reinhardtii. This study demonstrates the trophic transfer of AuNPs from a general producer to a consumer in an aquatic environment.

  13. Fitness effects of new mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii across two stress gradients.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, S A; Morgan, A D; Ness, R W; Keightley, P D; Colegrave, N

    2016-03-01

    Most spontaneous mutations affecting fitness are likely to be deleterious, but the strength of selection acting on them might be impacted by environmental stress. Such stress-dependent selection could expose hidden genetic variation, which in turn might increase the adaptive potential of stressed populations. On the other hand, this variation might represent a genetic load and thus lead to population extinction under stress. Previous studies to determine the link between stress and mutational effects on fitness, however, have produced inconsistent results. Here, we determined the net change in fitness in 29 genotypes of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that accumulated mutations in the near absence of selection for approximately 1000 generations across two stress gradients, increasing NaCl and decreasing phosphate. We found mutational effects to be magnified under extremely stressful conditions, but such effects were specific both to the type of stress and to the genetic background. The detection of stress-dependent fitness effects of mutations depended on accurately scaling relative fitness measures by generation times, thus offering an explanation for the inconsistencies among previous studies.

  14. Characterization of the EYE2 gene required for eyespot assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D G; Lamb, M R; Dieckmann, C L

    2001-01-01

    The unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can perceive light and respond by altering its swimming behavior. The eyespot is a specialized structure for sensing light, which is assembled de novo at every cell division from components located in two different cellular compartments. Photoreceptors and associated signal transduction components are localized in a discrete patch of the plasma membrane. This patch is tightly packed against an underlying sandwich of chloroplast membranes and carotenoid-filled lipid granules, which aids the cell in distinguishing light direction. In a prior screen for mutant strains with eyespot defects, the EYE2 locus was defined by the single eye2-1 allele. The mutant strain has no eyespot by light microscopy and has no organized carotenoid granule layers as judged by electron microscopy. Here we demonstrate that the eye2-1 mutant is capable of responding to light, although the strain is far less sensitive than wild type to low light intensities and orients imprecisely. Therefore, pigment granule layer assembly in the chloroplast is not required for photoreceptor localization in the plasma membrane. A plasmid-insertion mutagenesis screen yielded the eye2-2 allele, which allowed the isolation and characterization of the EYE2 gene. The EYE2 protein is a member of the thioredoxin superfamily. Site-directed mutagenesis of the active site cysteines demonstrated that EYE2 function in eyespot assembly is redox independent, similar to the auxiliary functions of other thioredoxin family members in protein folding and complex assembly. PMID:11454753

  15. Effects of chromium on photosynthetic and photoreceptive apparatus of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M Cecilia; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valter; Conforti, Visitacion; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Chromium is a highly toxic non-essential metal for microorganisms and plants. Due to its widespread industrial use, chromium (Cr) has become a serious pollutant in diverse environmental settings. The presence of Cr leads to the selection of algal populations able to tolerate high levels of Cr compounds. The diverse Cr-resistance mechanisms displayed by microorganisms include biosorption, diminished accumulation, precipitation, reduction of Cr(6+) to Cr(3+), and chromate efflux. In this paper we describe the effects of Cr(6+) (the more toxic species) on the photosynthetic and photoreceptive apparatus of the fresh water unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We measured the effect of the heavy metal by means of in vivo absorption microspectroscopy of both the thylakoid compartments and the eyespot. The decomposition of the overall absorption spectra in pigment constituents indicates that Cr(6+) induced a complete pheophinitization of the chrorophylls and a modification of the carotenoids present in the eyespot only when its concentration is equal or greater than 10 microM. Due to this low tolerance level, C. reinhardtii could be used as indicator of Cr pollution, but it is not feasible for bioremediation purposes.

  16. Hydrogen Production by a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Strain with Inducible Expression of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Batyrova, Khorcheska; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cy6Nac2.49 is a genetically modified algal strain that activates photosynthesis in a cyclical manner, so that photosynthesis is not active constitutively in the presence of oxygen, but is turned on only in response to a metabolic trigger (anaerobiosis). Here, we further investigated hydrogen production by this strain comparing it with the parental wild-type strain under photoheterotrophic conditions in regular tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) medium with a 10-h:14-h light/dark regime. Unlike the wild-type, whose level of H2 production remained low during illumination, H2 production in the mutant strain increased gradually with each subsequent light period, and by the final light period was significantly higher than the wild-type. The relatively low Photosystem II (PSII) activity of the mutant culture was shown by low fluorescence yield both in the dark (Fv/Fm) and in the light (δF/Fm’) periods. Measurement of oxygen evolution confirmed the low photosynthetic activity of the mutant cells, which gradually accumulated O2 to a lesser extent than the wild-type, thus allowing the mutant strain to maintain hydrogenase activity over a longer time period and to gradually accumulate H2 during periods of illumination. Therefore, controllable expression of PSII can be used to increase hydrogen production under nutrient replete conditions, thus avoiding many of the limitations associated with nutrient deprivation approaches sometimes used to promote hydrogen production. PMID:28300765

  17. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong -Jin; Holguin, F. Omar; Kim, Min -Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M.; Gang, David R.

    2015-05-28

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. In conclusion, evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism.

  18. Evolution of salt tolerance in a laboratory reared population of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Perrineau, Marie-Mathilde; Zelzion, Ehud; Gross, Jeferson; Price, Dana C; Boyd, Jeffrey; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the genetic underpinnings of adaptive traits in microalgae is important for the study of evolution and for applied uses. We used long-term selection under a regime of serial transfers with haploid populations of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii raised in liquid TAP medium containing 200 mM NaCl. After 1255 generations, evolved salt (ES) populations could grow as rapidly in high salt medium as progenitor cells (progenitor light [PL]). Transcriptome data were analysed to elucidate the basis of salt tolerance in ES cells when compared with PL cells and to cells incubated for 48 h in high salt medium (progenitor salt [PS], the short-term acclimation response). These data demonstrate that evolved and short-term acclimation responses to salt stress differ fundamentally from each other. Progenitor salt cells exhibit well-known responses to salt stress such as reduction in photosynthesis, upregulation of glycerophospholipid signaling, and upregulation of the transcription and translation machinery. In contrast, ES cells show downregulation of genes involved in the stress response and in transcription/translation. Our results suggest that gene-rich mixotrophic lineages such as C. reinhardtii may be able to adapt rapidly to abiotic stress engendered either by a rapidly changing climate or physical vicariance events that isolate populations in stressful environments.

  19. Towards elucidation of the toxic mechanism of copper on the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongguang; Zhu, Yanli; Hu, Zhangli; Lei, Anping; Wang, Jiangxin

    2016-09-01

    Toxic effects of copper on aquatic organisms in polluted water bodies have garnered particular attention in recent years. Microalgae play an important role in aquatic ecosystems, and they are sensitive to heavy metal pollution. Thus, it is important to clarify the mechanism of copper toxicity first for ecotoxicology studies. In this study, the physiological, biochemical and gene expression characteristics of a model green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with 0, 50, 150 and 250 μM copper treatments were investigated. The response of C. reinhardtii to copper stress was significantly shown at a dose dependent manner. Inhibition of cell growth and variation of total chlorophyll content were observed with copper treatments. The maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII, actual photochemical efficiency of PSII and photochemical quenching value decreased in the 250 μM copper treatment with minimum values equal to 28, 24 and 60 % of the control values respectively. The content of lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde with copper treatments increased with a maximum value sevenfold higher than the control value. Inhibition of cell growth and photosynthesis was ascribed to peroxidation of membrane lipids. The glutathione content and activities of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were induced by copper. Interestingly, the expression of antioxidant genes and the photosynthetic gene decreased in most copper treatments. In conclusion, oxidative stress caused by production of excess reactive oxidative species might be the major mechanism of copper toxicity on C. reinhardtii.

  20. Genome-wide characterization of genetic variation in the unicellular, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyosik; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for studying cilia, photosynthesis, and other core features of eukaryotes, and is also an emerging source of biofuels. Despite its importance to basic and applied biological research, the level and pattern of genetic variation in this haploid green alga has yet to be characterized on a genome-wide scale. To improve understanding of C. reinhardtii's genetic variability, we generated low coverage whole genome resequencing data for nearly all of the available isolates of this species, which were sampled from a number of sites in North America over the past ∼70 years. Based on the analysis of more than 62,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, we identified two groups of isolates that represent geographical subpopulations of the species. We also found that measurements of genetic diversity were highly variable throughout the genome, in part due to technical factors. We studied the level and pattern of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and observed one chromosome that exhibits elevated LD. Furthermore, we detected widespread evidence of recombination across the genome, which implies that outcrossing occurs in natural populations of this species. In summary, our study provides multiple insights into the sequence diversity of C. reinhardtii that will be useful to future studies of natural genetic variation in this organism.

  1. The circadian clock of the unicellular eukaryotic model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Maria; Wagner, Volker

    2003-05-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, also called 'green yeast', emerged in the past years as a model organism for specific scientific questions such as chloroplast biogenesis and function, the composition of the flagella including its basal apparatus, or the mechanism of the circadian clock. Sequencing of its chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes have already been completed and a first draft of its nuclear genome has also been released recently. In C. reinhardtii several circadian rhythms are physiologically well characterized, and one of them has even been shown to operate in outer space. Circadian expression patterns of nuclear and plastid genes have been studied. The mode of regulation of these genes occurs at the transcriptional level, although there is also evidence for posttranscriptional control. A clock-controlled, phylogenetically conserved RNA-binding protein was characterized in this alga, which interacts with several mRNAs that all contain a common cis-acting motif. Its function within the circadian system is currently under investigation. This review summarizes the current state of the knowledge about the circadian system in C. reinhardtii and points out its potential for future studies.

  2. Glutathionylation in the photosynthetic model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a proteomic survey.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Mirko; Bedhomme, Mariette; Groni, Hayam; Marchand, Christophe H; Puppo, Carine; Gontero, Brigitte; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Decottignies, Paulette; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2012-02-01

    Protein glutathionylation is a redox post-translational modification occurring under oxidative stress conditions and playing a major role in cell regulation and signaling. This modification has been mainly studied in nonphotosynthetic organisms, whereas much less is known in photosynthetic organisms despite their important exposure to oxidative stress caused by changes in environmental conditions. We report a large scale proteomic analysis using biotinylated glutathione and streptavidin affinity chromatography that allowed identification of 225 glutathionylated proteins in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Moreover, 56 sites of glutathionylation were also identified after peptide affinity purification and tandem mass spectrometry. The targets identified belong to a wide range of biological processes and pathways, among which the Calvin-Benson cycle appears to be a major target. The glutathionylation of four enzymes of this cycle, phosphoribulokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, and phosphoglycerate kinase was confirmed by Western blot and activity measurements. The results suggest that glutathionylation could constitute a major mechanism of regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle under oxidative stress conditions.

  3. The Involvement of hybrid cluster protein 4, HCP4, in Anaerobic Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Olson, Adam C; Carter, Clay J

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been studied for its unique fermentation pathways and has been evaluated as a candidate organism for biofuel production. Fermentation in C. reinhardtii is facilitated by a network of three predominant pathways producing four major byproducts: formate, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen. Previous microarray studies identified many genes as being highly up-regulated during anaerobiosis. For example, hybrid cluster protein 4 (HCP4) was found to be one of the most highly up-regulated genes under anoxic conditions. Hybrid cluster proteins have long been studied for their unique spectroscopic properties, yet their biological functions remain largely unclear. To probe its role during anaerobiosis, HCP4 was silenced using artificial microRNAs (ami-hcp4) followed by extensive phenotypic analyses of cells grown under anoxic conditions. Both the expression of key fermentative enzymes and their respective metabolites were significantly altered in ami-hcp4, with nitrogen uptake from the media also being significantly different than wild-type cells. The results strongly suggest a role for HCP4 in regulating key fermentative and nitrogen utilization pathways.

  4. Changes in transcript abundance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii following nitrogen deprivation predict diversion of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel; Wu, Guangxi; Deshpande, Rahul R; Vieler, Astrid; Gärtner, Katrin; Li, Xiaobo; Moellering, Eric R; Zäuner, Simone; Cornish, Adam J; Liu, Bensheng; Bullard, Blair; Sears, Barbara B; Kuo, Min-Hao; Hegg, Eric L; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Shiu, Shin-Han; Benning, Christoph

    2010-12-01

    Like many microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii forms lipid droplets rich in triacylglycerols when nutrient deprived. To begin studying the mechanisms underlying this process, nitrogen (N) deprivation was used to induce triacylglycerol accumulation and changes in developmental programs such as gametogenesis. Comparative global analysis of transcripts under induced and noninduced conditions was applied as a first approach to studying molecular changes that promote or accompany triacylglycerol accumulation in cells encountering a new nutrient environment. Towards this goal, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to generate large numbers of expressed sequence tags of eight biologically independent libraries, four for each condition, N replete and N deprived, allowing a statistically sound comparison of expression levels under the two tested conditions. As expected, N deprivation activated a subset of control genes involved in gametogenesis while down-regulating protein biosynthesis. Genes for components of photosynthesis were also down-regulated, with the exception of the PSBS gene. N deprivation led to a marked redirection of metabolism: the primary carbon source, acetate, was no longer converted to cell building blocks by the glyoxylate cycle and gluconeogenesis but funneled directly into fatty acid biosynthesis. Additional fatty acids may be produced by membrane remodeling, a process that is suggested by the changes observed in transcript abundance of putative lipase genes. Inferences on metabolism based on transcriptional analysis are indirect, but biochemical experiments supported some of these deductions. The data provided here represent a rich source for the exploration of the mechanism of oil accumulation in microalgae.

  5. Metabolic control of urea catabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardi and Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, R C; Williams, S K; Davidson, W R

    1975-01-01

    In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardi (strain y-1), synthesis of the enzymes required for urea hydrolysis is under substrate induction control by urea and under end product repression control by ammonia. Hydrolysis of urea if effected by the sequential action of the discrete enzymes urea carboxylase and allophanate lyase, collectively called urea amidolyase. The carboxylase converts urea to allophanate in a reaction requiring biotin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and Mg2+. The lyase hydrolzyes allophanate to ammonium ions and bicarbonate. Neither activity is present in more than trace amounts when cultures are grown with ammonia or urea plus ammonia, or when they are starved for nitrogen for 8 h. Urea in the absence of ammonia induces both activities 10 to 100 times the basal levels. Addition of ammonia to an induced culture causes complete cessation of carboxylase accumulation and an 80% depression of lyase accumulation. Ammonia does not reduce urea uptake by repressed cells, so it does not prevent induction by the mechanism of inducer exclusion. The unicellular green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (strain 3 Emerson) also has discrete carboxylase and lyase enzymes, but only the carboxylase exhibits metabolic control. PMID:1116994

  6. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism.

  7. Trophic status of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii influences the impact of iron deficiency on photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Aimee M.; Peers, Graham; Kobayashi, Marilyn C.; Niyogi, Krishna K.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the impact of iron deficiency on bioenergetic pathways in Chlamydomonas, we compared growth rates, iron content, and photosynthetic parameters systematically in acetate versus CO2-grown cells. Acetate-grown cells have, predictably (2-fold) greater abundance of respiration components but also, counter-intuitively, more chlorophyll on a per cell basis. We found that phototrophic cells are less impacted by iron deficiency and this correlates with their higher iron content on a per cell basis, suggesting a greater capacity/ability for iron assimilation in this metabolic state. Phototrophic cells maintain both photosynthetic and respiratory function and their associated Fe-containing proteins in conditions where heterotrophic cells lose photosynthetic capacity and have reduced oxygen evolution activity. Maintenance of NPQ capacity might contribute to protection of the photosynthetic apparatus in iron-limited phototrophic cells. Acetate-grown iron-limited cells maintain high growth rates by suppressing photosynthesis but increasing instead respiration. These cells are also able to maintain a reduced plastoquinone pool. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11120-010-9562-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20535560

  8. Transcriptome Analysis of Manganese-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Provides Insight on the Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, Ainsley; Zvenigorodsky, Natasha; Pedraza, Mary Ann; Lindquist, Erika

    2011-08-11

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other tetrapyrroles is a vital but poorly understood process. Recent genomic advances with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have created opportunity to more closely examine the mechanisms of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway via transcriptome analysis. Manganese is a nutrient of interest for complex reactions because of its multiple stable oxidation states and role in molecular oxygen coordination. C. reinhardtii was cultured in Manganese-deplete Tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) media for 24 hours and used to create cDNA libraries for sequencing using Illumina TruSeq technology. Transcriptome analysis provided intriguing insight on possible regulatory mechanisms in the pathway. Evidence supports similarities of GTR (Glutamyl-tRNA synthase) to its Chlorella vulgaris homolog in terms of Mn requirements. Data was also suggestive of Mn-related compensatory up-regulation for pathway proteins CHLH1 (Manganese Chelatase), GUN4 (Magnesium chelatase activating protein), and POR1 (Light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase). Intriguingly, data suggests possible reciprocal expression of oxygen dependent CPX1 (coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) and oxygen independent CPX2. Further analysis using RT-PCR could provide compelling evidence for several novel regulatory mechanisms in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway.

  9. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ODA3 Gene Encodes a Protein of the Outer Dynein Arm Docking Complex

    PubMed Central

    Koutoulis, Anthony; Pazour, Gregory J.; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Inaba, Kazuo; Sheng, Hong; Takada, Saeko; Witman, George B.

    1997-01-01

    We have used an insertional mutagenesis/ gene tagging technique to generate new Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants that are defective in assembly of the outer dynein arm. Among 39 insertional oda mutants characterized, two are alleles of the previously uncloned ODA3 gene, one is an allele of the uncloned ODA10 gene, and one represents a novel ODA gene (termed ODA12). ODA3 is of particular interest because it is essential for assembly of both the outer dynein arm and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC) onto flagellar doublet microtubules (Takada, S., and R. Kamiya. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:737– 745). Beginning with the inserted DNA as a tag, the ODA3 gene and a full-length cDNA were cloned. The cloned gene rescues the phenotype of oda3 mutants. The cDNA sequence predicts a novel 83.4-kD protein with extensive coiled-coil domains. The ODA-DC contains three polypeptides; direct amino acid sequencing indicates that the largest of these polypeptides corresponds to ODA3. This protein is likely to have an important role in the precise positioning of the outer dynein arms on the flagellar axoneme. PMID:9166407

  10. A flavin binding cryptochrome photoreceptor responds to both blue and red light in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Beel, Benedikt; Prager, Katja; Spexard, Meike; Sasso, Severin; Weiss, Daniel; Müller, Nico; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Ikoma, Danielle; Grossman, Arthur R; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria

    2012-07-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that act as sensory blue light receptors in insects, plants, fungi, and bacteria. We have investigated a cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with sequence homology to animal cryptochromes and (6-4) photolyases. In response to blue and red light exposure, this animal-like cryptochrome (aCRY) alters the light-dependent expression of various genes encoding proteins involved in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, light-harvesting complexes, nitrogen metabolism, cell cycle control, and the circadian clock. Additionally, exposure to yellow but not far-red light leads to comparable increases in the expression of specific genes; this expression is significantly reduced in an acry insertional mutant. These in vivo effects are congruent with in vitro data showing that blue, yellow, and red light, but not far-red light, are absorbed by the neutral radical state of flavin in aCRY. The aCRY neutral radical is formed following blue light absorption of the oxidized flavin. Red illumination leads to conversion to the fully reduced state. Our data suggest that aCRY is a functionally important blue and red light-activated flavoprotein. The broad spectral response implies that the neutral radical state functions as a dark form in aCRY and expands the paradigm of flavoproteins and cryptochromes as blue light sensors to include other light qualities.

  11. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  12. Measurement of ethanol formation in single living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, Kira L.; Quaroni, Luca; Pedersen, Tor; Wilson, Kenneth E.

    2010-02-03

    We demonstrate the capability of Fourier-Transform Infra-Red (FITR) spectroscopy to detect metabolite formation by the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in solution. We show that using a synchrotron source in the microscopy configuration provides a sufficient s/n ratio to detect small molecular species accumulating at a single cell, allowing an increased sensitivity relative to measurements of bulk cultures. The formation of small molecular species, including ethanol and at least one carbonyl containing compound, can be detected with a time resolution of the order of one minute.

  13. The chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP1 is a constituent of the insoluble glycoprotein framework of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Frank, Ronald; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells are surrounded by the insoluble cell wall component, a sac-like framework of cross-linked glycoproteins containing 22% hydroxyproline. The chaotrope-soluble cell wall glycoprotein GP1 is the only polypeptide with an even higher proportion of hydroxyproline (35%) occurring in vegetative C. reinhardtii cells. Mass spectrometric analyses of peptides released from the purified insoluble cell wall fraction by trypsin treatment and epitope analyses of polyclonal antibodies raised against different deglycosylation products of this particular wall fraction using 181 chemically synthesized GP1-derived pentadecapeptides revealed evidence that GP1 is indeed a constituent of the insoluble wall component.

  14. Filling Knowledge Gaps in Biological Networks: integrating global approaches to understand H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Posewitz, Matthew C

    2011-06-30

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas) has numerous genes encoding enzymes that function in fermentative pathways. Among these genes, are the [FeFe]-hydrogenases, pyruvate formate lyase, pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase. We have systematically undertaken a series of targeted mutagenesis approaches to disrupt each of these key genes and omics techniques to characterize alterations in metabolic flux. Funds from DE-FG02-07ER64423 were specifically leveraged to generate mutants with disruptions in the genes encoding the [FeFe]-hydrogenases HYDA1 and HYDA2, pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), and in bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1). Additionally funds were used to conduct global transcript profiling experiments of wildtype Chlamydomonas cells, as well as of the hydEF-1 mutant, which is unable to make H2 due to a lesion in the [FeFe]-hydrogenase biosynthetic pathway. In the wildtype cells, formate, acetate and ethanol are the dominant fermentation products with traces of CO2 and H2 also being produced. In the hydEF-1 mutant, succinate production is increased to offset the loss of protons as a terminal electron acceptor. In the pfl-1 mutant, lactate offsets the loss of formate production, and in the adh1-1 mutant glycerol is made instead of ethanol. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars, and a decline in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant performs a complete rerouting of the glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Lastly, transcriptome data have been analysed for both the wildtype and hydEF-1, that correlate with our

  15. The small domain of cytochrome f from the psychrophile Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241 modulates the apparent molecular mass and decreases the accumulation of cytochrome f in the mesophile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Loiselay, Christelle; Savitch, Leonid V; Simmonds, John; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Choquet, Yves; Hüner, Norman P A

    2007-10-01

    Cytochrome f from the psychrophile Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO 241 has a lower thermostability of its c-type heme and an apparent molecular mass that is 7 kDa lower than that of the model mesophilic green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We combined chloroplast transformation, site-directed mutagensis, and the creation of chimeric fusion constructs to assess the contribution of specific domains and (or) amino acids residues to the structure, stability, and accumulation of cytochrome f, as well as its function in photosynthetic intersystem electron transport. We demonstrate that differences in the amino acid sequence of the small domain and specific charged amino acids in the large domain of cytochrome f alter the physical properties of this protein but do not affect either the thermostability of the c-type heme, the apparent half-life of cytochrome f in the presence of the chloroplastic protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol, or the capacity for photosynthetic intersystem electron transport, measured as e-/P700. However, pulse-labeling with [14C]acetate, combined with immunoblotting, indicated that the negative autoregulation of cytochrome f accumulation observed in mesophilic C. reinhardtii transformed with chimeric constructs from the psychrophile was likely the result of the defective association of the chimeric forms of cytochrome f with the other subunits of the cytochrome b6/f complex native to the C. reinhardtii wild type. These results are discussed in terms of the unique fatty acid composition of the thylakoid membranes of C. raudensis UWO 241 adapted to cold environments.

  16. Chloroplast remodeling during state transitions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as revealed by noninvasive techniques in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gergely; Ünnep, Renáta; Zsiros, Ottó; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Takizawa, Kenji; Porcar, Lionel; Moyet, Lucas; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Garab, Győző; Finazzi, Giovanni; Minagawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to changes in light quality by regulating the absorption capacity of their photosystems. These short-term adaptations use redox-controlled, reversible phosphorylation of the light-harvesting complexes (LHCIIs) to regulate the relative absorption cross-section of the two photosystems (PSs), commonly referred to as state transitions. It is acknowledged that state transitions induce substantial reorganizations of the PSs. However, their consequences on the chloroplast structure are more controversial. Here, we investigate how state transitions affect the chloroplast structure and function using complementary approaches for the living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we found a strong periodicity of the thylakoids in state 1, with characteristic repeat distances of ∼200 Å, which was almost completely lost in state 2. As revealed by circular dichroism, changes in the thylakoid periodicity were paralleled by modifications in the long-range order arrangement of the photosynthetic complexes, which was reduced by ∼20% in state 2 compared with state 1, but was not abolished. Furthermore, absorption spectroscopy reveals that the enhancement of PSI antenna size during state 1 to state 2 transition (∼20%) is not commensurate to the decrease in PSII antenna size (∼70%), leading to the possibility that a large part of the phosphorylated LHCIIs do not bind to PSI, but instead form energetically quenched complexes, which were shown to be either associated with PSII supercomplexes or in a free form. Altogether these noninvasive in vivo approaches allow us to present a more likely scenario for state transitions that explains their molecular mechanism and physiological consequences. PMID:24639515

  17. Phosphorylation in isolated Chlamydomonas axonemes: a phosphoprotein may mediate the Ca2+-dependent photophobic response

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro system was devised for studying phosphorylation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii axonemal proteins. Many of the polypeptides phosphorylated in this system could be identified as previously described axonemal components that are phosphorylated in vivo. The in vitro system apparently preserved the activities of diverse axonemal kinases without greatly altering the substrate specificity of the enzymes. The in vitro system was used to study the effect of calcium concentration on axonemal protein phosphorylation. Calcium has previously been demonstrated to initiate the axonemal reversal reaction of the photophobic response; the in vitro system made it possible to investigate the possibility that this calcium effect is mediated by protein phosphorylation. Calcium specifically altered the phosphorylation of only two axonemal proteins; the phosphorylation of an otherwise unidentified 85,000 Mr protein was repressed by calcium concentrations greater than or equal to 10(-6) M, while the phosphorylation of the previously identified 95,000 Mr protein b4 was stimulated by calcium at concentrations greater than 10(-6) M. Protein b4 is one of six polypeptides that are deficient in the mbo mutants, strains that do not exhibit a photophobic reversal reaction. Therefore, this calcium-stimulated phosphorylation may be involved in initiating the photophobic response. Neither calmodulin nor the C-kinase could be implicated in b4 phosphorylation. The calcium-dependent activation of the b4 kinase was not affected by several drugs that bind to and inhibit calmodulin, or by the addition of exogenous calmodulin. Activators and inhibitors of the calcium-phospholipid-dependent C kinase also had no effect on b4 phosphorylation. PMID:4055893

  18. Antioxidant and HSP70B responses in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genotypes with different resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chankova, Stephka G; Dimova, Evgeniya G; Mitrovska, Zhana; Miteva, Daniela; Mokerova, Dariya V; Yonova, Petranka A; Yurina, Nadezhda P

    2014-03-01

    Today, the information from model species that differ in their resistance to oxidative stress and the determination of suitable plant markers for screening stress-resistant genotypes are essential for better understanding of plant stress responses and for selection. Here we aimed to assess the differences in antioxidant and HSP70B responses to paraquat treatment between genotypes susceptible and resistant to oxidative stress. Four genotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were chosen as a model of plant cells: two susceptible genotypes: wild type and paraquat-sensitive; and two paraquat-resistant genotypes: with high and moderate resistance. Varying responses to paraquat treatment were found depending on the genotype and paraquat concentrations. High paraquat concentrations (>50μM) were shown to be very stressful for all C. reinhardtii genotypes, leading to inhibition of enzyme activity. Only the paraquat-sensitive genotype responded to low-level paraquat treatment with a marked enhancement of SOD, CAT, GST activities. The lack of statistically significant response measured as SOD, CAT, GST activities in WT and resistant genotypes could be considered as an indication of absence of strong oxidative stress. This could relate to higher levels of endogenous SOD and CAT activities characteristic of moderately and highly paraquat-resistant genotypes. The response to lower paraquat concentrations evaluated as HSP70B accumulation was proportional to the level of genotype susceptibility to PQ. New evidence is provided that low-level oxidative stress impacts the antioxidant and HSP70B responses differently depending on the genotype resistance. In light of the still unresolved challenge for identification of reliable characters for screening of genotype resistance/susceptibility to oxidative stress, our study demonstrates that HSP70B accumulation could be used as an early marker for induced oxidative stress in the studied genotypes. The obtained results that the most pronounced

  19. Sensitivity evaluation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to uranium by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Herlory, Olivier; Bonzom, Jean-Marc; Gilbin, Rodolphe

    2013-09-15

    Although ecotoxicological studies tend to address the toxicity thresholds of uranium in freshwaters, there is a lack of information on the effects of the metal on physiological processes, particularly in aquatic plants. Knowing that uranium alters photosynthesis via impairment of the water photo-oxidation process, we determined whether pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry was a relevant tool for assessing the impact of uranium on the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated how and to what extent uranium hampered photosynthetic performance. Photosynthetic activity and quenching were assessed from fluorescence induction curves generated by PAM fluorometry, after 1 and 5h of uranium exposure in controlled conditions. The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII was identified as the primary action site of uranium, through alteration of the water photo-oxidation process as revealed by F0/Fv. Limiting re-oxidation of the plastoquinone pool, uranium impaired the electron flux between the photosystems until almost complete inhibition of the PSII quantum efficiency ( [Formula: see text] , EC50=303 ± 64 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure) was observed. Non-photochemical quenching (qN) was identified as the most sensitive fluorescence parameter (EC50=142 ± 98 μg UL(-1) after 5h of exposure), indicating that light energy not used in photochemistry was dissipated in non-radiative processes. It was shown that parameters which stemmed from fluorescence induction kinetics are valuable indicators for evaluating the impact of uranium on PSII in green algae. PAM fluorometry provided a rapid and reasonably sensitive method for assessing stress response to uranium in microalgae.

  20. Analysis of a family of ypt genes and their products from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dietmaier, W; Fabry, S; Huber, H; Schmitt, R

    1995-05-26

    Small G-proteins encoded by the ras-like ypt genes are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells. They have been shown to play an essential role in membrane vesicle transport. We have isolated four ypt genes, yptC1, yptC4, yptC5 and yptC6, from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) genomic and cDNA libraries. Three of them, yptC1, yptC4 and yptC5, are close homologues of ypt genes previously found in the multicellular alga Volvox carteri (Vc), the fourth, yptC6, is new. Each yptC gene is present as a single copy in the genome. Comparisons of genomic and cDNA sequences revealed that the coding regions are interrupted by five (yptC5), six (yptC6), seven (yptC4) and eight (yptC1) introns, respectively. Cr ypt genes and the closely related Vc ypt genes have identical exon-intron structures, but the corresponding intron sequences are completely different. Polyadenylation is signalled by UAUAA, UGUAG and UGUAA. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of YptC6 exhibited 79% identity with HRab2; YptC1, YptC4 and YptC5 exhibited over 90% identity with their Vc homologues. Primary structures of the 9-aa 'effector domain' and the contiguous 'helix3-loop7' motif (approx. 30 aa) are 'diagnostic' features for functional assignment. Recombinant YptC proteins, overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity, displayed strong and specific binding of GTP, but not of GMP or ATP. The four Cr Ypt proteins showed immunochemical cross reactions to their Vc counterparts. Moreover, Western blots demonstrated at least six types of Ypt in both Cr and Vc, suggesting that these Ypt are used for household functions responsible for vesicle transport rather than for cellular differentiation.

  1. Tying Down Loose Ends in the Chlamydomonas Genome: Functional Significance of Abundant Upstream Open Reading Frames

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas genome has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated to produce a rich resource for genetics and molecular biology in this well-studied model organism. The annotated genome is very rich in open reading frames upstream of the annotated coding sequence (‘uORFs’): almost three quarters of the assigned transcripts have at least one uORF, and frequently more than one. This is problematic with respect to the standard ‘scanning’ model for eukaryotic translation initiation. These uORFs can be grouped into three classes: class 1, initiating in-frame with the coding sequence (CDS) (thus providing a potential in-frame N-terminal extension); class 2, initiating in the 5′ untranslated sequences (5UT) and terminating out-of-frame in the CDS; and class 3, initiating and terminating within the 5UT. Multiple bioinformatics criteria (including analysis of Kozak consensus sequence agreement and BLASTP comparisons to the closely related Volvox genome, and statistical comparison to cds and to random sequence controls) indicate that of ∼4000 class 1 uORFs, approximately half are likely in vivo translation initiation sites. The proposed resulting N-terminal extensions in many cases will sharply alter the predicted biochemical properties of the encoded proteins. These results suggest significant modifications in ∼2000 of the ∼20,000 transcript models with respect to translation initiation and encoded peptides. In contrast, class 2 uORFs may be subject to purifying selection, and the existent ones (surviving selection) are likely inefficiently translated. Class 3 uORFs are found in more than half of transcripts, frequently multiple times per transcript; however, they are remarkably similar to random sequence expectations with respect to size, number, and composition, and therefore may in most cases be selectively neutral. PMID:26701783

  2. The Path to Triacylglyceride Obesity in the sta6 Strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Blaby, Ian; Casero, David; Gallaher, Sean D.; Goodson, Carrie; Johnson, Shannon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Roth, Robyn; Rusch, Jannette; Singh, Manmilan; Umen, James G.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Wulan, Tuya

    2014-01-01

    When the sta6 (starch-null) strain of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is nitrogen starved in acetate and then “boosted” after 2 days with additional acetate, the cells become “obese” after 8 days, with triacylglyceride (TAG)-filled lipid bodies filling their cytoplasm and chloroplasts. To assess the transcriptional correlates of this response, the sta6 strain and the starch-forming cw15 strain were subjected to RNA-Seq analysis during the 2 days prior and 2 days after the boost, and the data were compared with published reports using other strains and growth conditions. During the 2 h after the boost, ∼425 genes are upregulated ≥2-fold and ∼875 genes are downregulated ≥2-fold in each strain. Expression of a small subset of “sensitive” genes, encoding enzymes involved in the glyoxylate and Calvin-Benson cycles, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway, is responsive to culture conditions and genetic background as well as to boosting. Four genes—encoding a diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGTT2), a glycerol-3-P dehydrogenase (GPD3), and two candidate lipases (Cre03.g155250 and Cre17.g735600)—are selectively upregulated in the sta6 strain. Although the bulk rate of acetate depletion from the medium is not boost enhanced, three candidate acetate permease-encoding genes in the GPR1/FUN34/YaaH superfamily are boost upregulated, and 13 of the “sensitive” genes are strongly responsive to the cell's acetate status. A cohort of 64 autophagy-related genes is downregulated by the boost. Our results indicate that the boost serves both to avert an autophagy program and to prolong the operation of key pathways that shuttle carbon from acetate into storage lipid, the combined outcome being enhanced TAG accumulation, notably in the sta6 strain. PMID:24585881

  3. Structural Analysis of the Rubisco-Assembly Chaperone RbcX-II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cuimin; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2015-01-01

    The most prevalent form of the Rubisco enzyme is a complex of eight catalytic large subunits (RbcL) and eight regulatory small subunits (RbcS). Rubisco biogenesis depends on the assistance by specific molecular chaperones. The assembly chaperone RbcX stabilizes the RbcL subunits after folding by chaperonin and mediates their assembly to the RbcL8 core complex, from which RbcX is displaced by RbcS to form active holoenzyme. Two isoforms of RbcX are found in eukaryotes, RbcX-I, which is more closely related to cyanobacterial RbcX, and the more distant RbcX-II. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains only RbcX-II isoforms, CrRbcX-IIa and CrRbcX-IIb. Here we solved the crystal structure of CrRbcX-IIa and show that it forms an arc-shaped dimer with a central hydrophobic cleft for binding the C-terminal sequence of RbcL. Like other RbcX proteins, CrRbcX-IIa supports the assembly of cyanobacterial Rubisco in vitro, albeit with reduced activity relative to cyanobacterial RbcX-I. Structural analysis of a fusion protein of CrRbcX-IIa and the C-terminal peptide of RbcL suggests that the peptide binding mode of RbcX-II may differ from that of cyanobacterial RbcX. RbcX homologs appear to have adapted to their cognate Rubisco clients as a result of co-evolution. PMID:26305355

  4. L,L-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: A Target for Algaecide Development

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Girón, Irma; Hudson, André O.

    2011-01-01

    In some bacterial species and photosynthetic cohorts, including algae, the enzyme l,l-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) (E.C. 2.6.1.83) is involved in the anabolism of the essential amino acid L-lysine. DapL catalyzes the conversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate (THDPA) to l,l-diaminopimelate (l,l-DAP), in one step bypassing the DapD, DapC and DapE enzymatic reactions present in the acyl DAP pathways. Here we present an in vivo and in vitro characterization of the DapL ortholog from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-DapL). The in vivo analysis illustrated that the enzyme is able to functionally complement the E. coli dap auxotrophs and was essential for plant development in Arabidopsis. In vitro, the enzyme was able to inter-convert THDPA and l,l-DAP, showing strong substrate specificity. Cr-DapL was dimeric in both solution and when crystallized. The structure of Cr-DapL was solved in its apo form, showing an overall architecture of a α/β protein with each monomer in the dimer adopting a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent transferase-like fold in a V-shaped conformation. The active site comprises residues from both monomers in the dimer and shows some rearrangement when compared to the apo-DapL structure from Arabidopsis. Since animals do not possess the enzymatic machinery necessary for the de novo synthesis of the amino acid l-lysine, enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for the development of antibiotics, herbicides and algaecides. PMID:21633707

  5. L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a target for algaecide development.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Renwick C J; Girón, Irma; Hudson, André O

    2011-01-01

    In some bacterial species and photosynthetic cohorts, including algae, the enzyme L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) (E.C. 2.6.1.83) is involved in the anabolism of the essential amino acid L-lysine. DapL catalyzes the conversion of tetrahydrodipicolinate (THDPA) to L,L-diaminopimelate (L,L-DAP), in one step bypassing the DapD, DapC and DapE enzymatic reactions present in the acyl DAP pathways. Here we present an in vivo and in vitro characterization of the DapL ortholog from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-DapL). The in vivo analysis illustrated that the enzyme is able to functionally complement the E. coli dap auxotrophs and was essential for plant development in Arabidopsis. In vitro, the enzyme was able to inter-convert THDPA and L,L-DAP, showing strong substrate specificity. Cr-DapL was dimeric in both solution and when crystallized. The structure of Cr-DapL was solved in its apo form, showing an overall architecture of a α/β protein with each monomer in the dimer adopting a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent transferase-like fold in a V-shaped conformation. The active site comprises residues from both monomers in the dimer and shows some rearrangement when compared to the apo-DapL structure from Arabidopsis. Since animals do not possess the enzymatic machinery necessary for the de novo synthesis of the amino acid L-lysine, enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for the development of antibiotics, herbicides and algaecides.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the sexual binding site of Chlamydomonas eugametos gametes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against the mt- sexual agglutinin of Chlamydomonas eugametos gametes. Those that blocked the agglutination site were selected. They were divided into two classes dependent upon whether they gave a weak (class A) or clear positive (class B) reaction with mt- flagellar membranes in an ELISA and an indirect immunofluorescence test using glutaraldehyde-fixed mt- gametes. Class A antibodies were shown to be specific for the agglutinin in an extract of mt- gametes, based on results from immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, affinity chromatography, and the absence of a reaction with nonagglutinable cells. Surprisingly, class A mAbs also recognized two mt+ glycoproteins, one of which is the mt+ agglutinin. Class B antibodies were shown to bind to several glycoproteins in both mt- and mt+ gametes, including the mt- agglutinin. Fab fragments from class A mAbs blocked the sexual agglutination process, but those from class B did not, even though the parent antibody did. We conclude that the class A epitope lies in or close to the agglutination site of the mt- agglutinin, whereas the class B epitope lies elsewhere on the molecule. We also conclude that the mt- agglutinin is the only component on the mt- flagellar surface directly involved in agglutination. Class A mAbs were found to elicit several reactions displayed by the mt+ agglutinin. They bound to the mt- agglutinin on gamete flagella and induced most of the reactions typical of sexual agglutination, with the exception of flagellar tip activation. None of these reactions was induced by Fab fragments. High concentrations of class A mAbs completely repressed the sexual competence of live mt- gametes, but low concentrations stimulated cell fusion. PMID:3292540

  7. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii responding to high light: A role for 2-propenal (acrolein).

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Baur, Theresa; Stöggl, Wolfgang; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-03-21

    High light causes photosystem II to generate singlet oxygen ((1) O2 ), a reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can react with membrane lipids, releasing reactive electrophile species (RES), such as acrolein. To investigate how RES may contribute to light stress responses, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was high light-treated in photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions and also in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere to elevate ROS production. The responses were compared to exogenous acrolein. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was higher in photoautotrophic cells, as a consequence of a more de-epoxidized state of the xanthophyll cycle pool and more LHCSR3 protein, showing that photosynthesis was under more pressure than in mixotrophic cells. Photoautotrophic cells had lowered α-tocopherol and β-carotene contents and a higher level of protein carbonylation, indicators of elevated (1) O2 production. Levels of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPX5) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST1), important antioxidants against RES, were also increased in photoautotrophic cells. In parallel to wild-type, the LHCSR3-deficient npq4 mutant was high light-treated, which in photoautotrophic conditions exhibited particular sensitivity under elevated oxygen, the treatment that induced the highest RES levels, including acrolein. The npq4 mutant had more GPX5 and GST1 alongside higher levels of carbonylated protein and a more oxidized glutathione redox state. In wild-type cells glutathione contents doubled after 4 h treatment, either with high light under elevated oxygen or with a non-critical dose (600 ppm) of acrolein. Exogenous acrolein also increased GST1 levels, but not GPX5. Overall, RES-associated oxidative damage and glutathione metabolism are prominently associated with light stress and potentially in signaling responses of C. reinhardtii.

  8. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ultraviolet radiation and its impact on chemical toxicity.

    PubMed

    Korkaric, Muris; Xiao, Mao; Behra, Renata; Eggen, Rik I L

    2015-10-01

    The toxicity of chemical pollutants can be modulated under stressful environmental conditions, such as increased temperature, salinity or ultraviolet radiation (UVR), due to the interaction of effects during simultaneous stressor exposure. However, organisms may acclimate to such conditions by activation of physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms. In sequential exposures, organisms acclimated to environmental stressors may display an increased sensitivity or co-tolerance towards chemical pollutants. It has been suggested that co-tolerance might be expected for similarly acting stressors due to common defence mechanisms. To test this for combinations of UVR and chemical stressors, we first acclimatized the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to UVR and subsequently compared the sensitivity of UVR pre-exposed and control algae towards chemicals. Selected chemicals all act on photosynthesis and thus share a common physiological target, but display distinct toxicity mechanisms. Results showed that UVR pre-exposure for four days partially inhibited algal growth and photosynthesis, but also increased algal tolerance to higher UVR levels, confirming UVR acclimation. HPLC analysis of algal pigments indicated that UVR acclimation might in part be explained by the protective function of lutein while the contribution of UVR absorbing compounds was less clear. Challenge exposure to chemicals in the absence of UVR showed that acclimated algae were co-tolerant to the photosensitizer rose bengal, but not to the herbicides paraquat and diuron, suggesting that the fast physiological and biochemical defence mechanisms that conferred tolerance of algae towards higher UVR levels were related to singlet oxygen defence. The presented study suggests that knowledge of the molecular toxicity mechanisms of chemicals, rather than their general physiological target, is needed in order to predict co-tolerance between environmental and chemical stressors.

  9. Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Xenie

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear factor, Maturation/stability of RbcL (MRL1), regulates the accumulation of the chloroplast rbcL gene transcript in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by stabilising the mRNA via its 5' UTR. An absence of MRL1 in algal mrl1 mutants leads to a complete absence of RuBisCO large subunit protein and thus a lack of accumulation of the RuBisCO holoenzyme. By complementing mrl1 mutants by random transformation of the nuclear genome with the MRL1 cDNA, different levels of rbcL transcript accumulate. We also observe that RuBisCO Large Subunit accumulation is perturbed. Complemented strains accumulating as little as 15% RuBisCO protein can grow phototrophically while RuBisCO in this range is limiting for phototrophic growth. We also observe that photosynthetic activity, here measured by the quantum yield of PSII, appears to be a determinant for phototrophic growth. In some strains that accumulate less RuBisCO, a strong production of reactive oxygen species is detected. In the absence of RuBisCO, oxygen possibly acts as the PSI terminal electron acceptor. These results show that random transformation of MRL1 into mrl1 mutants can change RuBisCO accumulation allowing a range of phototrophic growth phenotypes. Furthermore, this technique allows for the isolation of strains with low RuBisCO, within the range of acceptable photosynthetic growth and reasonably low ROS production. MRL1 is thus a potential tool for applications to divert electrons away from photosynthetic carbon metabolism towards alternative pathways.

  10. Synthesis, transport, and utilization of specific flagellar proteins during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We labeled gametes of Chlamydomonas with 10-min pulses of 35SO4(-2) before and at various times after deflagellation, and isolated whole cells and flagella immediately after the pulse. The labeled proteins were separated by one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and the amount of isotope incorporated into specific proteins was determined. Individual proteins were identified with particular structures by correlating missing axonemal polypeptides with ultrastructural defects in paralyzed mutants, or by polypeptide analysis of flagellar fractions. Synthesis of most flagellar proteins appeared to be coordinately induced after flagellar amputation. The rate of synthesis for most quantified proteins increased at least 4- to 10-fold after deflagellation. The kinetics of synthesis of proteins contained together within a structure (e.g., the radial spoke proteins [RSP] ) were frequently similar; however, the kinetics of synthesis of proteins contained in different structures (e.g., RSP vs. alpha- and beta- tubulins) were different. Most newly synthesized flagellar proteins were rapidly transported into the flagellum with kinetics reflecting the rate of growth of the organelle; exceptions included a central tubule complex protein (CT1) and an actinlike component, both of which appeared to be supplied almost entirely from pre-existing, unlabeled pools. Isotope dilution experiments showed that, for most quantified axonemal proteins, a minimum of 35-40% of the polypeptide chains used in assembling a new axoneme was synthesized during regeneration; these proteins appeared to have predeflagellation pools of approximately the same size relative to their stoichiometries in the axoneme. In contrast, CT1 and the actinlike protein had comparatively large pools. PMID:7118994

  11. The path to triacylglyceride obesity in the sta6 strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Ursula; Blaby, Ian; Casero, David; Gallaher, Sean D; Goodson, Carrie; Johnson, Shannon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Roth, Robyn; Rusch, Jannette; Singh, Manmilan; Umen, James G; Weiss, Taylor L; Wulan, Tuya

    2014-05-01

    When the sta6 (starch-null) strain of the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is nitrogen starved in acetate and then "boosted" after 2 days with additional acetate, the cells become "obese" after 8 days, with triacylglyceride (TAG)-filled lipid bodies filling their cytoplasm and chloroplasts. To assess the transcriptional correlates of this response, the sta6 strain and the starch-forming cw15 strain were subjected to RNA-Seq analysis during the 2 days prior and 2 days after the boost, and the data were compared with published reports using other strains and growth conditions. During the 2 h after the boost, ∼425 genes are upregulated ≥2-fold and ∼875 genes are downregulated ≥2-fold in each strain. Expression of a small subset of "sensitive" genes, encoding enzymes involved in the glyoxylate and Calvin-Benson cycles, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway, is responsive to culture conditions and genetic background as well as to boosting. Four genes-encoding a diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGTT2), a glycerol-3-P dehydrogenase (GPD3), and two candidate lipases (Cre03.g155250 and Cre17.g735600)-are selectively upregulated in the sta6 strain. Although the bulk rate of acetate depletion from the medium is not boost enhanced, three candidate acetate permease-encoding genes in the GPR1/FUN34/YaaH superfamily are boost upregulated, and 13 of the "sensitive" genes are strongly responsive to the cell's acetate status. A cohort of 64 autophagy-related genes is downregulated by the boost. Our results indicate that the boost serves both to avert an autophagy program and to prolong the operation of key pathways that shuttle carbon from acetate into storage lipid, the combined outcome being enhanced TAG accumulation, notably in the sta6 strain.

  12. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; ...

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 minmore » that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid

  13. Hydrogen production by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: an elaborate interplay of electron sources and sinks.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Fouchard, Swanny; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles; Happe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses a [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 (EC 1.12.7.2), which is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Large amounts of H2 are produced in a light-dependent reaction for several days when C. reinhardtii cells are deprived of sulfur. Under these conditions, the cells drastically change their physiology from aerobic photosynthetic growth to an anaerobic resting state. The understanding of the underlying physiological processes is not only important for getting further insights into the adaptability of photosynthesis, but will help to optimize the biotechnological application of algae as H2 producers. Two of the still most disputed questions regarding H2 generation by C. reinhardtii concern the electron source for H2 evolution and the competition of the hydrogenase with alternative electron sinks. We analyzed the H2 metabolism of S-depleted C. reinhardtii cultures utilizing a special mass spectrometer setup and investigated the influence of photosystem II (PSII)- or ribulosebisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)-deficiency. We show that electrons for H2-production are provided both by PSII activity and by a non-photochemical plastoquinone reduction pathway, which is dependent on previous PSII activity. In a Rubisco-deficient strain, which produces H2 also in the presence of sulfur, H2 generation seems to be the only significant electron sink for PSII activity and rescues this strain at least partially from a light-sensitive phenotype. The latter indicates that the down-regulation of assimilatory pathways in S-deprived C. reinhardtii cells is one of the important prerequisites for a sustained H2 evolution.

  14. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the TLA1 gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Mautusi; Melis, Anastasios

    2010-02-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genomic DNA database contains a predicted open reading frame (ORF-P) without an apparent stop-codon and unknown coding sequence, located in close proximity and immediately upstream of the TLA1 gene (GenBank Accession No. AF534570). The latter was implicated in the regulation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis (Tetali et al. Planta 225:813-829, 2007). To provide currently lacking information on ORF-P and its potential participation in TLA1 gene expression, thus in the regulation of the chlorophyll antenna size, genetic and biochemical analyses were undertaken. The coding and UTR regions of the ORF-P were defined and delineated from those of the adjacent TLA1 gene. ORF-P is shown to encode a protein with a distinct RING-like zinc finger domain that is present in numerous eukaryotic proteins, believed to play a role in cellular ubiquitination, leading to regulation of cellular processes like signaling, growth, transcription, and DNA repair. It is further shown that the two genes share a 74-bp overlap between the 3' UTR region of ORF-P and the 5' UTR region of TLA1. However, they possess distinct start and stop codons and separate coding sequences, and transcribed as separate mRNAs without any trans-splicing between them. Complementation experiments showed that the TLA1 gene alone is sufficient to rescue the truncated chlorophyll antenna size phenotype of the tla1 mutant. Protein sequence alignments in C. reinhardtii and the colorless microalga Polytomella parva suggested that TLA1 defines the relationship between nucleus and organelle in microalgae, indirectly affecting the development of the chlorophyll antenna size.

  15. Heavy Metal-Activated Synthesis of Peptides in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Gregg; Merchant, Sabeeha

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have addressed the capacity of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce metal-binding peptides in response to stress induced by the heavy metals Cd2+, Hg2+, and Ag+. Cells cultured in the presence of sublethal concentrations of Cd2+ synthesized and accumulated oligopeptides consisting solely of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine in an average ratio of 3:3:1. Cadmium-induced peptides were isolated in their native form as higher molecular weight peptide-metal complexes with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 6.5 × 103. The isolated complex bound cadmium (as evidenced by absorption spectroscopy) and sequestered (with a stoichiometry of 0.7 moles of cadmium per mole of cysteine) up to 70% of the total cadmium found in extracts of cadmium-treated cells. In Hg2+-treated cells, the principal thiol-containing compound induced by Hg2+ ions was glutathione. It is possible that glutathione functions in plant cells (as it does in animal cells) to detoxify heavy metals. Cells treated with Ag+ ions also synthesized a sulfur-containing component with a charge to mass ratio similar to Cd2+-induced peptides. But, in contrast to the results obtained using Cd2+ as an inducer, these molecules did not accumulate to significant levels in Ag+-treated cells. The presence of physiological concentrations of Cu2+ in the growth medium blocked the synthesis of the Ag+-inducible component(s) and rendered cells resistant to the toxic effects of Ag+, suggesting competition between Cu2+ and Ag+ ions, possibly at the level of metal uptake. ImagesFigure 2Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 11 PMID:16668603

  16. Experimental Definition and Validation of Protein Coding Transcripts in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani; Jason A. Papin

    2012-01-13

    Algal fuel sources promise unsurpassed yields in a carbon neutral manner that minimizes resource competition between agriculture and fuel crops. Many challenges must be addressed before algal biofuels can be accepted as a component of the fossil fuel replacement strategy. One significant challenge is that the cost of algal fuel production must become competitive with existing fuel alternatives. Algal biofuel production presents the opportunity to fine-tune microbial metabolic machinery for an optimal blend of biomass constituents and desired fuel molecules. Genome-scale model-driven algal metabolic design promises to facilitate both goals by directing the utilization of metabolites in the complex, interconnected metabolic networks to optimize production of the compounds of interest. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model, we developed a systems-level methodology bridging metabolic network reconstruction with annotation and experimental verification of enzyme encoding open reading frames. We reconstructed a genome-scale metabolic network for this alga and devised a novel light-modeling approach that enables quantitative growth prediction for a given light source, resolving wavelength and photon flux. We experimentally verified transcripts accounted for in the network and physiologically validated model function through simulation and generation of new experimental growth data, providing high confidence in network contents and predictive applications. The network offers insight into algal metabolism and potential for genetic engineering and efficient light source design, a pioneering resource for studying light-driven metabolism and quantitative systems biology. Our approach to generate a predictive metabolic model integrated with cloned open reading frames, provides a cost-effective platform to generate metabolic engineering resources. While the generated resources are specific to algal systems, the approach that we have developed is not specific to algae and

  17. Preventive effect of the microalga Chlamydomonas debaryana on the acute phase of experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Avila-Román, Javier; Talero, Elena; Alcaide, Antonio; Reyes, Carolina de Los; Zubía, Eva; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Motilva, Virginia

    2014-10-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterised by chronic uncontrolled inflammation of intestinal mucosa. Diet and nutritional factors have emerged as possible interventions for IBD. Microalgae are rich sources of n-3 PUFA and derived oxylipins. Oxylipins are lipid mediators involved in the resolution of many inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the oxylipin-containing biomass of the microalga Chlamydomonas debaryana and its major oxylipin constituent, (9Z,11E,13S,15Z)-13-hydroxyoctadeca-9,11,15-trienoic acid ((13S)-HOTE), on acute 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Lyophilised microalgal biomass and (13S)-HOTE were administered by oral route 48, 24 and 1 h before the induction of colitis and 24 h later, and the rats were killed after 48 h. The treatment with the lyophilised microalga and (13S)-HOTE improved body-weight loss and colon shortening, as well as attenuated the extent of colonic damage and increased mucus production. Cellular neutrophil infiltration, with the subsequent increase in myeloperoxidase levels induced by TNBS, were also reduced after the administration of the lyophilised microalga or (13S)-HOTE. The anti-inflammatory effects of these treatments were confirmed by the inhibition of colonic TNF-α production. Moreover, lyophilised microalga or (13S)-HOTE down-regulated cyclo-oxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. The present study was the first to show the prophylactic effects of a lyophilised biomass sample of the microalga C. debaryana and the oxylipin (13S)-HOTE on TNBS-induced acute colitis in rats. Our findings suggest that the microalga C. debaryana or derived oxylipins could be used as nutraceuticals in the treatment of the active phase of IBD.

  18. Sulphate, more than a nutrient, protects the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii from cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2014-03-01

    Sulphur is an essential macroelement that plays important roles in living organisms. The thiol rich sulphur compounds, such as cysteine, γ-Glu-Cys, glutathione and phytochelatins participate in the tolerance mechanisms against cadmium toxicity. Plants, algae, yeasts and most prokaryotes cover their demand for reduced sulphur by reduction of inorganic sulphate. The aim of this study was to investigate, using a bifactorial experimental design, the effect of different sulphate concentrations in the nutrient solution on cadmium toxicity in the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii. Cell growth, kinetic parameters of sulphate utilization and intracellular concentrations of low-molecular mass thiol compounds were determined. A mathematical model to describe the growth of this microalga based on the effects of sulphate and cadmium was obtained. An ANOVA revealed an interaction between them, 16% of the effect sizes was explained by this interaction. A higher amount of sulphate in the culture medium allowed a higher cadmium tolerance due to an increase in the thiol compound biosynthesis. The amount of low-molecular mass thiol compounds, mainly phytochelatins, synthesized by this microalga was significantly dependent on the sulphate and cadmium concentrations; the higher phytochelatin content was obtained in cultures with 4 mg Cd/L and 1mM sulphate. The maximum EC50 value (based on nominal cadmium concentration) reached for this microalga was 4.46 ± 0.42 mg Cd/L when the sulphate concentration added to the culture medium was also 1mM. An increase in the sulphate concentration, in deficient environments, could alleviate the toxic effect of this metal; however, a relative excess is also negative. The results obtained showed a substrate inhibition for this nutrient. An uncompetitive model for sulphate was chosen to establish the mathematical model that links both factors.

  19. CrGNAT gene regulates excess copper accumulation and tolerance in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Cheng, Zhen Zhen; Chen, Xi; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Zhi Min

    2015-11-01

    Excess copper (Cu) in environment affects the growth and metabolism of plants and green algae. However, the molecular mechanism for regulating plant tolerance to excess Cu is not fully understood. Here, we report a gene CrGNAT enconding an acetyltransferase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and identified its role in regulating tolerance to Cu toxicity. Expression of CrGNAT was significantly induced by 75-400μM Cu. The top induction occurred at 100μM. Transgenic algae overexpressing CrGNAT (35S::CrGNAT) in C. reinhardtii showed high tolerance to excess Cu, with improved cell population, chlorophyll accumulation and photosynthesis efficiency, but with low degree of oxidation with regard to reduced hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxides and non-protein thiol compounds. In contrast, CrGNAT knock-down lines with antisense led to sensitivity to Cu stress. 35S::CrGNAT algae accumulated more Cu and other metals (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn and Mg) than wild-type, whereas the CrGNAT down-regulated algae (35S::AntiCrGNAT) had moderate levels of Cu and Mn, but no effects on Zn, Fe and Mg accumulation as compared to wild-type. The elevated metal absorption in CrGNAT overexpression algae implies that the metals can be removed from water media. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of two genes encoding N-lysine histone methyltransferases was repressed in 35S::CrGNAT algae, suggesting that CrGNAT-regulated algal tolerance to Cu toxicity is likely associated with histone methylation and chromatin remodeling. The present work provided an example a basis to develop techniques for environmental restoration of metal-contaminated aquatic ecosystems.

  20. HISN3 mediates adaptive response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to excess nickel.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Cheng, Zhen Zhen; Yang, Zhi Min

    2013-12-01

    Investigation of genes for heavy metal [e.g. nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn)] absorption and detoxification in green algae is of great importance because some of the metals have become one of the major contaminants in the aquatic ecosystem. In plants, overload of heavy metals modifies many aspects of biological processes. However, the mechanisms by which heavy metals exert detrimental effects are not fully understood. The present study identified a biological role for HISN3 (the gene coding for phosphoribosylformimino-5-aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide isomerase) in regulating the response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, to Ni toxicity. In higher plants, HISN3 encodes an enzyme catalyzing the fourth step in the histidine biosynthesis pathway, but its functional importance is yet to be identified. Transgenic algae overexpressing HISN3 in C. reinhardtii showed high tolerance to excess Ni, with a 48.3-57.4% increase in cell population and moderate histidine accumulation compared with the wild type. HISN3 overexpression improved accumulation of Chl and photosynthesis efficiency, but suppressed Ni-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides. Interestingly, more Ni and other metals [Zn, iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn) and magnesium (Mg)] were accumulated in HISN3-overexpressing cells than in the wild type. In contrast, RNA interference of HISN3 depressed Ni accumulation but caused cellular sensitivity to Ni. The elevated metal absorption in the HISN3-overexpressing algae implies that the metals can be removed from water media. Thus, our work presents an example for algae genetically designed to improve tolerance to metal toxicity and environmental restoration of metal-contaminated aquatic ecosystems.

  1. Sensitivity of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to gamma radiation: Photosynthetic performance and ROS formation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tânia; Xie, Li; Brede, Dag; Lind, Ole-Christian; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Salbu, Brit; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2017-02-01

    The aquatic environment is continuously exposed to ionizing radiation from both natural and anthropogenic sources, making the characterization of ecological and health risks associated with radiation of large importance. Microalgae represent the main source of biomass production in the aquatic ecosystem, thus becoming a highly relevant biological model to assess the impacts of gamma radiation. However, little information is available on the effects of gamma radiation on microalgal species, making environmental radioprotection of this group of species challenging. In this context, the present study aimed to improve the understanding of the effects and toxic mechanisms of gamma radiation in the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii focusing on the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus and ROS formation. Algal cells were exposed to gamma radiation (0.49-1677mGy/h) for 6h and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters obtained by PAM fluorometry, while two fluorescent probes carboxy-H2DFFDA and DHR 123 were used for the quantification of ROS. The alterations seen in functional parameters of C. reinhardtii PSII after 6h of exposure to gamma radiation showed modifications of PSII energy transfer associated with electron transport and energy dissipation pathways, especially at the higher dose rates used. Results also showed that gamma radiation induced ROS in a dose-dependent manner under both light and dark conditions. The observed decrease in photosynthetic efficiency seems to be connected to the formation of ROS and can potentially lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage in chloroplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report on changes in several chlorophyll fluorescence parameters associated with photosynthetic performance and ROS formation in microalgae after exposure to gamma radiation.

  2. Mastoparan-induced programmed cell death in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Yordanova, Zhenya P.; Woltering, Ernst J.; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M.; Iakimova, Elena T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Under stress-promoting conditions unicellular algae can undergo programmed cell death (PCD) but the mechanisms of algal cellular suicide are still poorly understood. In this work, the involvement of caspase-like proteases, DNA cleavage and the morphological occurrence of cell death in wasp venom mastoparan (MP)-treated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied. Methods Algal cells were exposed to MP and cell death was analysed over time. Specific caspase inhibitors were employed to elucidate the possible role of caspase-like proteases. YVADase activity (presumably a vacuolar processing enzyme) was assayed by using a fluorogenic caspase-1 substrate. DNA breakdown was evaluated by DNA laddering and Comet analysis. Cellular morphology was examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Key Results MP-treated C. reinhardtii cells expressed several features of necrosis (protoplast shrinkage) and vacuolar cell death (lytic vesicles, vacuolization, empty cell-walled corpse-containing remains of digested protoplast) sometimes within one single cell and in different individual cells. Nucleus compaction and DNA fragmentation were detected. YVADase activity was rapidly stimulated in response to MP but the early cell death was not inhibited by caspase inhibitors. At later time points, however, the caspase inhibitors were effective in cell-death suppression. Conditioned medium from MP-treated cells offered protection against MP-induced cell death. Conclusions In C. reinhardtii MP triggered PCD of atypical phenotype comprising features of vacuolar and necrotic cell deaths, reminiscent of the modality of hypersensitive response. It was assumed that depending on the physiological state and sensitivity of the cells to MP, the early cell-death phase might be not mediated by caspase-like enzymes, whereas later cell death may involve caspase-like-dependent proteolysis. The findings substantiate the hypothesis that, depending on the mode of induction and sensitivity of

  3. Over-expression of Dof-type transcription factor increases lipid production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Salazar, Alejandro; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Rocha-Uribe, Alejandro; Ramírez-Alonso, Jocelín Itzel; Lara-Hernández, Ignacio; Hernández-Torres, Araceli; Paz-Maldonado, Luz María Teresita; Silva-Ramírez, Ana Sonia; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo; Martínez-Salgado, José Luis; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena

    2014-08-20

    The high demand for less polluting, newer, and cheaper fuel resources has increased the search of the most innovative options for the production of the so-called biofuels. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photosynthetic unicellular algae with multiple biotechnological advantages such as easy handling in the laboratory, a simple scale-up to industrial levels, as well as a feasible genetic modification at nuclear and chloroplast levels. Besides, its fatty acids can be used to produce biofuels. Previous studies in plants have found that the over expression of DOF-type transcription factor genes increases the synthesis and the accumulation of total lipids in seeds. In this context, the over-expression of a DOF-type transcription factor in C. reinhardtii was applied as approach to increase the amount of lipids. The results indicate higher amounts (around 2-fold) of total lipids, which are mainly fatty acids, in the genetically C. reinhardtii modified strains when compared with the non-genetically modified strain. In order to elucidate the possible function of the introduced Dof-type transcription factor, we performed a transcription profile of 8 genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and 6 genes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis, by quantitative real time (qRT-PCR). Differential expression profile was observed, which can explain the increase in lipid accumulation. However, these strains did not show notable changes in the fatty acid profile. This work represents an early effort in generating a strategy to increase fatty acids production in C. reinhardtii and their use in biofuel synthesis.

  4. Genetic Interactions among Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Mutations That Confer Resistance to anti-Microtubule Herbicides

    PubMed Central

    James, S. W.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    We previously described two types of genetic interactions among recessive mutations in the APM1 and APM2 loci of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that may reflect a physical association of the gene products or their involvement in a common structure/process: (1) allele-specific synthetic lethality, and (2) unlinked noncomplementation, or dominant enhancement. To further investigate these interactions, we isolated revertants in which the heat sensitivity caused by the apm2-1 mutation is lost. The heat-insensitive revertants were either fully or partially suppressed for the drug-resistance caused by the apm2-1 allele. In recombination tests the revertants behaved as if the suppressing mutation mapped within the APM2 locus; the partial suppressors of apm2-1 herbicide resistance failed to complement apm2-1, leading to the conclusion that they were likely to be intragenic pseudorevertants. The apm2-1 partial suppressor mutations reversed apm1(-)apm2-1 synthetic lethality in an allele-specific manner with respect both to apm1(-) alleles and apm2-1 suppressor mutations. Those apm1(-) apm2-1(rev) strains that regained viability also regained heat sensitivity characteristic of the original apm2-1 mutation, even though the apm2-1 suppressor strains were fully heat-insensitive. The Hs(+) phenotypes of apm2-1 partial suppressors were also reversed by treatment with the microtubule-stabilizing agent deuterium oxide (D(2)O). In addition to the above interactions, we observed interallelic complementation and phenotypic enhancement of temperature conditionality among apm1(-) alleles. Evidence of a role for the products of the two genes in microtubule-based processes was obtained from studying flagellar assembly in apm1(-) and apm2(-) mutants. PMID:1311696

  5. Two Loci Control Phytoglycogen Production in the Monocellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Colleoni, Christophe; Mouille, Gregory; Buléon, Alain; Gallant, Daniel J.; Bouchet, Brigitte; Morell, Matthew K.; d'Hulst, Christophe; Myers, Alan M.; Ball, Steven G.

    2001-01-01

    The STA8 locus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was identified in a genetic screen as a factor that controls starch biosynthesis. Mutations of STA8 cause a significant reduction in the amount of granular starch produced during nutrient limitation and accumulate phytoglycogen. The granules remaining in sta8 mutants are misshapen, and the abundance of amylose and long chains in amylopectin is altered. Mutations of the STA7 locus, which completely lack isoamylase activity, also cause accumulation of phytoglycogen, although sta8 and sta7 mutants differ in that there is a complete loss of granular starch in the latter. This is the first instance in which mutations of two different genetic elements in one plant species have been shown to cause phytoglycogen accumulation. An analytical procedure that allows assay of isoamylase in total extracts was developed and used to show that sta8 mutations cause a 65% reduction in the level of this activity. All other enzymes known to be involved in starch biosynthesis were shown to be unaffected in sta8 mutants. The same amount of total isoamylase activity (approximately) as that present in sta8 mutants was observed in heterozygous triploids containing two sta7 mutant alleles and one wild-type allele. This strain, however, accumulates normal levels of starch granules and lacks phytoglycogen. The total level of isoamylase activity, therefore, is not the major determinant of whether granule production is reduced and phytoglycogen accumulates. Instead, a qualitative property of the isoamylase that is affected by the sta8 mutation is likely to be the critical factor in phytoglycogen production. PMID:11299352

  6. Transcriptional and cellular responses of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, David; Houde, Magali; Douville, Mélanie; De Silva, Amila O; Spencer, Christine; Verreault, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids (PFPAs), a new class of perfluoroalkyl substances used primarily in the industrial sector as surfactants, were recently detected in surface water and wastewater treatment plant effluents. Toxicological effects of PFPAs have as yet not been investigated in aquatic organisms. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of perfluorooctylphosphonic acid (C8-PFPA) and perfluorodecylphosphonic acid (C10-PFPA) exposure (31-250μg/L) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using genomic (qRT-PCR), biochemical (reactive oxygen species production (ROS) and lipid peroxidation), and physiological (cellular viability) indicators. After 72h of exposure, no differences were observed in cellular viability for any of the two perfluorochemicals. However, increase in ROS concentrations (36% and 25.6% at 125 and 250μg/L, respectively) and lipid peroxidation (35.5% and 35.7% at 125 and 250μg/L, respectively) was observed following exposure to C10-PFPA. C8-PFPA exposure did not impact ROS production and lipid peroxidation in algae. To get insights into the molecular response and modes of action of PFPA toxicity, qRT-PCR-based assays were performed to analyze the transcription of genes related to antioxidant responses including superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX I). Genomic analyses revealed that the transcription of CAT and APX I was up-regulated for all the C10-PFPA concentrations. In addition, PFPAs were quantified in St. Lawrence River surface water samples and detected at concentrations ranging from 250 to 850pg/L for C8-PFPA and 380 to 650pg/L for C10-PFPA. This study supports the prevalence of PFPAs in the aquatic environment and suggests potential impacts of PFPA exposure on the antioxidant defensive system in C. reinhardtii.

  7. Flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas: Studies of radial spoke-defective strains by dikaryon and revertant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luck, David; Piperno, Gianni; Ramanis, Zenta; Huang, B.

    1977-01-01

    The motility mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pf14 lacks radial spoke structures in its flagellar axonemes, and 12 proteins present in wild type are missing from a two-dimensional map (isoelectrofocusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis) of its 35S-labeled flagellar proteins. Six of these same proteins are missing in pf1, which lacks spoke-heads. To determine whether any of the missing proteins represent the mutant gene product two experimental approaches have been applied. The first makes use of the fact that gametes of either mutant strain when fused with wild-type gametes to form quadriflagellate dikaryons undergo recovery of flagellar function. Recovery at the molecular level was monitored by prelabeling the mutant proteins with 35S and allowing recovery to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. It is to be expected that the mutant gene product would not be restored as a radioactive protein and that recovery would depend on the assembly of the wild-type counterpart that is not labeled. The second technique makes use of revertants induced by UV irradiation. Dikaryon rescue in the case of pf14 leads to restoration of 11 radioactive components; only protein 3 fails to appear as a radioactive spot. For pf1 only two radioactive proteins are restored; proteins 4, 6, 9, and 10 were not radioactive. Analysis of revertants of pf1 gave evidence (altered map positions) that protein 4 is the mutant gene product. In the case of pf14, analysis of 22 revertants has not provided similar positive evidence that protein 3 is the gene product. Images PMID:269405

  8. Codon reassignment to facilitate genetic engineering and biocontainment in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Young, Rosanna E B; Purton, Saul

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of microalgae as low-cost hosts for the synthesis of recombinant products such as therapeutic proteins and bioactive metabolites. In particular, the chloroplast, with its small, genetically tractable genome (plastome) and elaborate metabolism, represents an attractive platform for genetic engineering. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of the 69 protein-coding genes in the plastome uses the stop codon UGA, therefore this spare codon can be exploited as a useful synthetic biology tool. Here, we report the assignment of the codon to one for tryptophan and show that this can be used as an effective strategy for addressing a key problem in chloroplast engineering: namely, the assembly of expression cassettes in Escherichia coli when the gene product is toxic to the bacterium. This problem arises because the prokaryotic nature of chloroplast promoters and ribosome-binding sites used in such cassettes often results in transgene expression in E. coli, and is a potential issue when cloning genes for metabolic enzymes, antibacterial proteins and integral membrane proteins. We show that replacement of tryptophan codons with the spare codon (UGG→UGA) within a transgene prevents functional expression in E. coli and in the chloroplast, and that co-introduction of a plastidial trnW gene carrying a modified anticodon restores function only in the latter by allowing UGA readthrough. We demonstrate the utility of this system by expressing two genes known to be highly toxic to E. coli and discuss its value in providing an enhanced level of biocontainment for transplastomic microalgae.

  9. Transcriptional program for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Lomana, Adrian Lopez; Schäuble, Sascha; Valenzuela, Jacob; Imam, Saheed; Carter, Warren; Bilgin, Damla D.; Yohn, Christopher B.; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J.; Orellana, Monica V.; Price, Nathan D.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2015-12-02

    Algae accumulate lipids to endure different kinds of environmental stresses including macronutrient starvation. Although this response has been extensively studied, an in depth understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) that controls the transition into lipid accumulation remains elusive. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to elucidate the transcriptional program that coordinates the nitrogen starvation-induced metabolic readjustments that drive lipid accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that nitrogen starvation triggered differential regulation of 2147 transcripts, which were co-regulated in 215 distinct modules and temporally ordered as 31 transcriptional waves. An early-stage response was triggered within 12 min that initiated growth arrest through activation of key signaling pathways, while simultaneously preparing the intracellular environment for later stages by modulating transport processes and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. Subsequently, central metabolism and carbon fixation were remodeled to trigger the accumulation of triacylglycerols. Further analysis revealed that these waves of genome-wide transcriptional events were coordinated by a regulatory program orchestrated by at least 17 transcriptional regulators, many of which had not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that the TRN coordinates transcriptional downregulation of 57 metabolic enzymes across a period of nearly 4 h to drive an increase in lipid content per unit biomass. Notably, this TRN appears to also drive lipid accumulation during sulfur starvation, while phosphorus starvation induces a different regulatory program. The TRN model described here is available as a community-wide web-resource at http://networks.systemsbiology.net/chlamy-portal. In conclusion, in this work, we have uncovered a comprehensive mechanistic model of the TRN controlling the transition from N starvation to lipid accumulation

  10. The Fox1 Ferroxidase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: A New Multicopper Oxidase Structural Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Terzulli, Alaina J.; Kosman, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCO) contain at least four copper atoms arrayed in three distinct ligand fields supported by two canonical structural features: 1) multiples of the cupredoxin fold; and 2) four unique sequence elements that include the 10 histidine and one cysteine ligands to the four copper atoms. Ferroxidases are a sub-family of MCO proteins that contain residues supporting a specific reactivity towards ferrous iron; these MCOs play a vital role in iron metabolism in bacteria, algae, fungi and mammals. In contrast to the fungal ferroxidases, e.g. Fet3p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mammalian ceruloplasmin (Cp) is twice as large (six versus three cupredoxin domains) and contains three type 1, or “blue” copper sites. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii expresses a putative ferroxidase, Fox1, which has sequence similarity to human Cp (hCp). Eschewing the standard sequence-based modeling paradigm, a function-based model of the Fox1 protein has been constructed which replicates hCp's six Cu-site ligand arrays with an overall root mean square deviation of 1.4 Å. Analysis of this model has led also to assignment of motifs in Fox1 that are unique to ferroxidases, the strongest evidence to date that the well-characterized fungal high-affinity iron uptake system is essential to iron homeostasis in green algae. The model of Fox1 also establishes a sub-family of MCO proteins with a non-canonical Cu-ligand organization. These diverse structures suggest alternate mechanisms for intramolecular electron transfer and require a new trajectory for the evolution of the MCO superfamily. PMID:19023602

  11. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong -Jin; Holguin, F. Omar; ...

    2015-05-28

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combinedmore » omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. In conclusion, evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism.« less

  12. Photosystem II stress tolerance in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii under space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertalan, Ivo; Esposito, Dania; Torzillo, Giuseppe; Faraloni, Cecilia; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2007-09-01

    Photosynthesis was established on the earth 3.5 billion years ago. Due to the absence of the ozone layer in the early atmosphere it was most likely adapted to the presence of ionizing radiation continuously emitted by solar and stellar flares. That complex radiation spectrum comprises protons, alpha particles, heavy charged particle-HZE, electrons, X-ray and neutrons. Such spectrum has a significant impact on biological systems which capture light energy for e.g. photosynthesis. Oxygenic photosynthesis of plants, algae and cyanobacteria initiates at the level of photosystem II (PSII), a multisubunit protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane inside chloroplasts. PSII uses sunlight to power the unique photo-induced oxidation of water to atmospheric oxygen which is indispensable for most life forms. It is an especially sensitive component if exposed to space radiation and thus an important target for research aimed at improving bioregenerative life-support systems. The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a long standing model organism for photosynthesis research. It was exposed to ionizing radiation in the ESA facility Biopan located in the Foton capsule brought to space by the Russian Soyuzfor 15 days. The algae were tested in space under shielded conditions in the past, but they were never exposed to direct ionizing radiation such as in Biopan. Conditions for survival were identified. It was observed that the effect of space stress on the survival of the algae varied depending on the light conditions to which they were exposed during the flight. In some cases the flight experience caused a stimulation of the photosystem II oxygen evolution of the cells.

  13. Acetate in mixotrophic growth medium affects photosystem II in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and protects against photoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Roach, Thomas; Sedoud, Arezki; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2013-10-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoautotrophic green alga, which can be grown mixotrophically in acetate-supplemented media (Tris-acetate-phosphate). We show that acetate has a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII). As a consequence, Tris-acetate-phosphate-grown mixotrophic C. reinhardtii cultures are less susceptible to photoinhibition than photoautotrophic cultures when subjected to high light. Spin-trapping electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that thylakoids from mixotrophic C. reinhardtii produced less (1)O2 than those from photoautotrophic cultures. The same was observed in vivo by measuring DanePy oxalate fluorescence quenching. Photoinhibition can be induced by the production of (1)O2 originating from charge recombination events in photosystem II, which are governed by the midpoint potentials (Em) of the quinone electron acceptors. Thermoluminescence indicated that the Em of the primary quinone acceptor (QA/QA(-)) of mixotrophic cells was stabilised while the Em of the secondary quinone acceptor (QB/QB(-)) was destabilised, therefore favouring direct non-radiative charge recombination events that do not lead to (1)O2 production. Acetate treatment of photosystem II-enriched membrane fragments from spinach led to the same thermoluminescence shifts as observed in C. reinhardtii, showing that acetate exhibits a direct effect on photosystem II independent from the metabolic state of a cell. A change in the environment of the non-heme iron of acetate-treated photosystem II particles was detected by low temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We hypothesise that acetate replaces the bicarbonate associated to the non-heme iron and changes the environment of QA and QB affecting photosystem II charge recombination events and photoinhibition.

  14. MicroRNAs modulate adaption to multiple abiotic stresses in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Fengge; Hu, Jinlu; Cai, Wenkai; Shan, Ge; Dai, Dongsheng; Huang, Kaiyao; Wang, Gaohong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play an important role in abiotic stress responses in higher plants and animals, but their role in stress adaptation in algae remains unknown. In this study, the expression of identified and putative miRNAs in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction; some of the miRNAs (Cre-miR906-3p) were up-regulated, whereas others (Cre-miR910) were down-regulated when the species was subjected to multiple abiotic stresses. With degradome sequencing data, we also identified ATP4 (the d-subunit of ATP synthase) and NCR2 (NADPH: cytochrome P450 reductase) as one of the several targets of Cre-miR906-3p and Cre-miR910, respectively. Q-PCR data indicated that ATP4, which was expressed inversely in relation to Cre-miR906-3p under stress conditions. Overexpressing of Cre-miR906-3p enhanced resistance to multiple stresses; conversely, overexpressing of ATP4 produced the opposite effect. These data of Q-PCR, degradome sequencing and adaptation of overexpressing lines indicated that Cre-miR906-3p and its target ATP4 were a part of the same pathway for stress adaptation. We found that Cre-miR910 and its target NCR2 were also a part of this pathway. Overexpressing of Cre-miR910 decreased, whereas that of NCR2 increased the adaption to multiple stresses. Our findings suggest that the two classes of miRNAs synergistically mediate stress adaptation in algae. PMID:27910907

  15. Cyclic AMP functions as a primary sexual signal in gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pasquale, S M; Goodenough, U W

    1987-11-01

    When Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gametes of opposite mating type are mixed together, they adhere by a flagella-mediated agglutination that triggers three rapid mating responses: flagellar tip activation, cell wall loss, and mating structure activation accompanied by actin polymerization. Here we show that a transient 10-fold elevation of intracellular cAMP levels is also triggered by sexual agglutination. We further show that gametes of a single mating type can be induced to undergo all three mating responses when presented with exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP). These events are also induced by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous cAMP levels and act synergistically with db-cAMP. Non-agglutinating mutants of opposite mating type will fuse efficiently in the presence of db-cAMP. No activation of mating events is induced by calcium plus ionophores, 8-bromo-cGMP, dibutyryl-cGMP, nigericin at alkaline pH, phorbol esters, or forskolin. H-8, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase, inhibits mating events in agglutinating cells and antagonizes the effects of cAMP on non-agglutinating cells. Adenylate cyclase activity was detected in both the gamete cell body and flagella, with the highest specific activity displayed in flagellar membrane fractions. The flagellar membrane adenylate cyclase is preferentially stimulated by Mn++, unresponsive to NaF, GTP, GTP gamma S, AlF4-, and forskolin, and is inhibited by trifluoperazine. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is also present in flagella. Our observations indicate that cAMP is a sufficient initial signal for all of the known mating reaction events in C. reinhardtii, and suggest that the flagellar cyclase and/or phosphodiesterase may be important loci of control for the agglutination-stimulated production of this signal.

  16. Culture of microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in wastewater for biomass feedstock production.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing-xue; Li, Ling; Martinez, Blanca; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop large-scale technologies to produce oil-rich algal biomass from wastewater. The experiments were conducted using Erlenmeyer flasks and biocoil photobioreactor. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was grown in artificial media and wastewaters taken from three different stages of the treatment process, namely, influent, effluent, and centrate. Each of wastewaters contained different levels of nutrients. The specific growth rate of C. reinhardtii in different cultures was monitored over a period of 10 days. The biomass yield of microalgae and associated nitrogen and phosphorous removal were evaluated. Effects of CO(2) and pH on the growth were also studied. The level of nutrients greatly influenced algae growth. High levels of nutrients seem to inhibit algae growth in the beginning, but provided sustained growth to a high degree. The studies have shown that the optimal pH for C. reinhardtii is in the range of 7.5. An injection of air and a moderate amount of CO(2) promoted algae growth. However, too much CO(2) inhibited algae growth due to a significant decrease in pH. The experimental results showed that algal dry biomass yield reached a maximum of 2.0 g L(-1) day(-1) in the biocoil. The oil content of microalgae of C. reinhardtii was 25.25% (w/w) in dry biomass weight. In the biocoil, 55.8 mg nitrogen and 17.4 mg phosphorus per liter per day were effectively removed from the centrate wastewater. Ferric chloride was found to be an effective flocculent that helps the algae settle for easy harvest and separation from the culture media.

  17. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-08-14

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC.

  18. Overexpressing Ferredoxins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Increase Starch and Oil Yields and Enhance Electric Power Production in a Photo Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Lin, Ji-Yu; Pan, Kui-You; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chu, Ying-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxins (FDX) are final electron carrier proteins in the plant photosynthetic pathway, and function as major electron donors in diverse redox-driven metabolic pathways. We previously showed that overexpression of a major constitutively expressed ferredoxin gene PETF in Chlamydomonas decreased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and enhanced tolerance to heat stress. In addition to PETF, an endogenous anaerobic induced FDX5 was overexpressed in transgenic Chlamydomonas lines here to address the possible functions of FDX5. All the independent FDX transgenic lines showed decreased cellular ROS levels and enhanced tolerance to heat and salt stresses. The transgenic Chlamydomonas lines accumulated more starch than the wild-type line and this effect increased almost three-fold in conditions of nitrogen depletion. Furthermore, the lipid content was higher in the transgenic lines than in the wild-type line, both with and without nitrogen depletion. Two FDX-overexpressing Chlamydomonas lines were assessed in a photo microbial fuel cell (PMFC); power density production by the transgenic lines was higher than that of the wild-type cells. These findings suggest that overexpression of either PETF or FDX5 can confer tolerance against heat and salt stresses, increase starch and oil production, and raise electric power density in a PMFC. PMID:26287179

  19. Taxonomic revision of Chlamydomonas subg. Amphichloris (Volvocales, Chlorophyceae), with resurrection of the genus Dangeardinia and descriptions of Ixipapillifera gen. nov. and Rhysamphichloris gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Takashi; Tomita, Masaru; Wu, Jiunn-Tzong; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2016-04-01

    Chlamydomonas (Cd.) is one of the largest but most polyphyletic genera of freshwater unicellular green algae. It consists of 400-600 morphological species and requires taxonomic revision. Toward reclassification, each morphologically defined classical subgenus (or subgroup) should be examined using culture strains. Chlamydomonas subg. Amphichloris is characterized by a central nucleus between two axial pyrenoids, however, the phylogenetic structure of this subgenus has yet to be examined using molecular data. Here, we examined 12 strains including six newly isolated strains, morphologically identified as Chlamydomonas subg. Amphichloris, using 18S rRNA gene phylogeny, light microscopy, and mitochondria fluorescent microscopy. Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed three independent lineages of the subgenus, separated from the type species of Chlamydomonas, Cd. reinhardtii. These three lineages were further distinguished from each other by light and fluorescent microscopy-in particular by the morphology of the papillae, chloroplast surface, stigmata, and mitochondria-and are here assigned to three genera: Dangeardinia emend., Ixipapillifera gen. nov., and Rhysamphichloris gen. nov. Based on the molecular and morphological data, two to three species were recognized in each genus, including one new species, I. pauromitos. In addition, Cd. deasonii, which was previously assigned to subgroup "Pleiochloris," was included in the genus Ixipapillifera as I. deasonii comb. nov.

  20. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase[W

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotti, Claudia; Dubini, Alexandra; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Yang, Wenqiang; Magneschi, Leonardo; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism. PMID:22353371

  1. Systems Biology Approach in Chlamydomonas Reveals Connections between Copper Nutrition and Multiple Metabolic Steps[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Castruita, Madeli; Casero, David; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Kropat, Janette; Vieler, Astrid; Hsieh, Scott I.; Yan, Weihong; Cokus, Shawn; Loo, Joseph A.; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we query the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii copper regulon at a whole-genome level. Our RNA-Seq data simulation and analysis pipeline validated a 2-fold cutoff and 10 RPKM (reads per kilobase of mappable length per million mapped reads) (~1 mRNA per cell) to reveal 63 CRR1 targets plus another 86 copper-responsive genes. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses captured 25% of the corresponding proteins, whose abundance was also dependent on copper nutrition, validating transcriptional regulation as a major control mechanism for copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. The impact of copper deficiency on the expression of several O2-dependent enzymes included steps in lipid modification pathways. Quantitative lipid profiles indicated increased polyunsaturation of fatty acids on thylakoid membrane digalactosyldiglycerides, indicating a global impact of copper deficiency on the photosynthetic apparatus. Discovery of a putative plastid copper chaperone and a membrane protease in the thylakoid suggest a mechanism for blocking copper utilization in the chloroplast. We also found an example of copper sparing in the N assimilation pathway: the replacement of copper amine oxidase by a flavin-dependent backup enzyme. Forty percent of the targets are previously uncharacterized proteins, indicating considerable potential for new discovery in the biology of copper. PMID:21498682

  2. Three Acyltransferases and Nitrogen-responsive Regulator Are Implicated in Nitrogen Starvation-induced Triacylglycerol Accumulation in Chlamydomonas*

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Nanette R.; Page, Mark Dudley; Liu, Bensheng; Blaby, Ian K.; Casero, David; Kropat, Janette; Cokus, Shawn J.; Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Shaw, Johnathan; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Gallaher, Sean D.; Johnson, Shannon; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Grossman, Arthur; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2012-01-01

    Algae have recently gained attention as a potential source for biodiesel; however, much is still unknown about the biological triggers that cause the production of triacylglycerols. We used RNA-Seq as a tool for discovering genes responsible for triacylglycerol (TAG) production in Chlamydomonas and for the regulatory components that activate the pathway. Three genes encoding acyltransferases, DGAT1, DGTT1, and PDAT1, are induced by nitrogen starvation and are likely to have a role in TAG accumulation based on their patterns of expression. DGAT1 and DGTT1 also show increased mRNA abundance in other TAG-accumulating conditions (minus sulfur, minus phosphorus, minus zinc, and minus iron). Insertional mutants, pdat1-1 and pdat1-2, accumulate 25% less TAG compared with the parent strain, CC-4425, which demonstrates the relevance of the trans-acylation pathway in Chlamydomonas. The biochemical functions of DGTT1 and PDAT1 were validated by rescue of oleic acid sensitivity and restoration of TAG accumulation in a yeast strain lacking all acyltransferase activity. Time course analyses suggest than a SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein domain transcription factor, whose mRNA increases precede that of lipid biosynthesis genes like DGAT1, is a candidate regulator of the nitrogen deficiency responses. An insertional mutant, nrr1-1, accumulates only 50% of the TAG compared with the parental strain in nitrogen-starvation conditions and is unaffected by other nutrient stresses, suggesting the specificity of this regulator for nitrogen-deprivation conditions. PMID:22403401

  3. Synergism between Inositol Polyphosphates and TOR Kinase Signaling in Nutrient Sensing, Growth Control, and Lipid Metabolism in Chlamydomonas[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bradley S.; Li, Jia; Liu, Yu; Diamond, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    The networks that govern carbon metabolism and control intracellular carbon partitioning in photosynthetic cells are poorly understood. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved growth regulator that integrates nutrient signals and modulates cell growth in eukaryotes, though the TOR signaling pathway in plants and algae has yet to be completely elucidated. We screened the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using insertional mutagenesis to find mutants that conferred hypersensitivity to the TOR inhibitor rapamycin. We characterized one mutant, vip1-1, that is predicted to encode a conserved inositol hexakisphosphate kinase from the VIP family that pyrophosphorylates phytic acid (InsP6) to produce the low abundance signaling molecules InsP7 and InsP8. Unexpectedly, the rapamycin hypersensitive growth arrest of vip1-1 cells was dependent on the presence of external acetate, which normally has a growth-stimulatory effect on Chlamydomonas. vip1-1 mutants also constitutively overaccumulated triacylglycerols (TAGs) in a manner that was synergistic with other TAG inducing stimuli such as starvation. vip1-1 cells had reduced InsP7 and InsP8, both of which are dynamically modulated in wild-type cells by TOR kinase activity and the presence of acetate. Our data uncover an interaction between the TOR kinase and inositol polyphosphate signaling systems that we propose governs carbon metabolism and intracellular pathways that lead to storage lipid accumulation. PMID:27600537

  4. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  5. Efficient Heterologous Transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii npq2 Mutant with the Zeaxanthin Epoxidase Gene Isolated and Characterized from Chlorella zofingiensis

    PubMed Central

    Couso, Inmaculada; Cordero, Baldo F.; Vargas, María Ángeles; Rodríguez, Herminia

    2012-01-01

    In the violaxanthin cycle, the violaxanthin de-epoxidase and zeaxanthin epoxidase catalyze the inter-conversion between violaxanthin and zeaxanthin in both plants and green algae. The zeaxanthin epoxidase gene from the green microalga Chlorella zofingiensis (Czzep) has been isolated. This gene encodes a polypeptide of 596 amino acids. A single copy of Czzep has been found in the C. zofingiensis genome by Southern blot analysis. qPCR analysis has shown that transcript levels of Czzep were increased after zeaxanthin formation under high light conditions. The functionality of Czzep gene by heterologous genetic complementation in the Chlamydomonas mutant npq2, which lacks zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) activity and accumulates zeaxanthin in all conditions, was analyzed. The Czzep gene was adequately inserted in the pSI105 vector and expressed in npq2. The positive transformants were able to efficiently convert zeaxanthin into violaxanthin, as well as to restore their maximum quantum efficiency of the PSII (Fv/Fm). These results show that Chlamydomonas can be an efficient tool for heterologous expression and metabolic engineering for biotechnological applications. PMID:23118714

  6. Synergism between inositol polyphosphates and TOR kinase signaling in nutrient sensing, growth control and lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Couso, Inmaculada; Evans, Bradley; Li, Jia; Liu, Yu; Ma, Fangfang; Diamond, Spencer; Allen, Doug K; Umen, James G

    2016-09-06

    The networks that govern carbon metabolism and control intracellular carbon partitioning in photosynthetic cells are poorly understood. Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved growth regulator that integrates nutrient signals and modulates cell growth in eukaryotes, though the TOR signaling pathway in plants and algae has yet to be completely elucidated. We screened the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas using insertional mutagenesis to find mutants that conferred hypersensitivity to the TOR inhibitor rapamycin. We characterized one mutant, vip1-1, that is predicted to encode a conserved inositol hexakisphosphate kinase from the VIP family that pyrophosphorylates phytic acid (InsP6) to produce the low abundance signaling molecules InsP7 and InsP8. Unexpectedly, the rapamycin hypersensitive growth arrest of vip1-1 cells was dependent on the presence of external acetate, which normally has a growth-stimulatory effect on Chlamydomonas. vip1-1 mutants also constitutively over-accumulated triacylglycerols (TAGs) in a manner that was synergistic with other TAG inducing stimuli such as starvation. vip1-1 cells had reduced InsP7 and InsP8, both of which are dynamically modulated in wild-type cells by TOR kinase activity and the presence of acetate. Our data uncover an interaction between the TOR kinase and inositol polyphosphate signaling systems that we propose governs carbon metabolism and intracellular pathways that lead to storage lipid accumulation.

  7. cAMP controls the balance of the propulsive forces generated by the two flagella of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Yu; Yoshimura, Kenjiro

    2015-08-01

    The motility of cilia and flagella of eukaryotic cells is controlled by second messengers such as Ca(2+), cAMP, and cGMP. In this study, the cAMP-dependent control of flagellar bending of Chlamydomonas is investigated by applying cAMP through photolysis of 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl adenosine 3',5'-cyclicmonophosphate (caged cAMP). When cAMP is applied to demembranated and reactivated cells, cells begin to swim with a larger helical path. This change is due to a larger turn about the axis normal to the anterior-posterior axis, indicating an increased imbalance in the propulsive forces generated by the cis-flagellum (flagellum nearer to the eyespot) and trans-flagellum (flagellum farther from the eyespot). Consistently, when cAMP is applied to isolated axonemes, some axonemes show attenuated motility whereas others do not. Axonemes from uni1 mutants, which have only trans-flagella, do not respond to cAMP. These observations indicate that cAMP controls the balance of the forces generated by cis- and trans-flagella in Chlamydomonas.

  8. Interaction of Herbicides and Quinone with the QB-Protein of the Diuron-Resistant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutant Dr2

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Philip; Steinback, Katherine E.

    1987-01-01

    We have used the diuron-resistant Dr2 mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is altered in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein at amino acid 219 (valine to isoleucine), to investigate the interactions of herbicides and plastoquinone with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein. The data contained in this report demonstrate that the effects of this mutation are different from those of the more completely characterized mutant which confers extreme resistance to triazines in higher plants. The mutation in C. reinhardtii Dr2 confers only slight resistance to a number of inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport. Extreme triazine resistance results from an increase in the binding constant of the herbicide with the 32 kilodalton QB-protein, in contrast the diuron binding constant for chloroplasts isolated from wild-type (sensitive) Chlamydomonas and the resistant Dr2 are indistinguishable. We conclude that the altered structure in the 32 kilodalton QB-protein of Dr2 does not directly affect the diuron binding site. This mutation appears to alter the steric properties of the binding protein in such a way that diuron and plastoquinone do not directly compete for binding. This steric perturbation confers mild resistance to other herbicidal inhibitors of photosynthesis and alters the kinetics of QA to QB electron transfer. PMID:16665318

  9. Dehydroascorbate: a possible surveillance molecule of oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Murik, Omer; Elboher, Ahinoam; Kaplan, Aaron

    2014-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii tolerates relatively high H2 O2 levels that induce an array of antioxidant activities. However, rather than rendering the cells more resistant to oxidative stress, the cells become far more sensitive to an additional H2 O2 dose. If H2 O2 is provided 1.5-9 h after an initial dose, it induces programmed cell death (PCD) in the wild-type, but not in the dum1 mutant impaired in the mitochondrial respiratory complex III. This mutant does not exhibit a secondary oxidative burst 4-5 h after the inducing H2 O2 , nor does it activate metacaspase-1 after the second H2 O2 treatment. The intracellular dehydroascorbate level, a product of ascorbate peroxidase, increases under conditions leading to PCD. The addition of dehydroascorbate induces PCD in the wild-type and dum1 cultures, but higher levels are required in dum1 cells, where it is metabolized faster. The application of dehydroascorbate induces the expression of metacaspase-2, which is much stronger than the expression of metacaspase-1. The presence or absence of oxidative stress, in addition to the rise in internal dehydroascorbate, may determine which metacaspase is activated during Chlamydomonas PCD. Cell death is strongly affected by the timing of H2 O2 or dehydroascorbate admission to synchronously grown cultures, suggesting that the cell cycle phase may distinguish cells that perish from those that do not.

  10. The flagellar motility of Chlamydomonas pf25 mutant lacking an AKAP-binding protein is overtly sensitive to medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen

    2006-01-01

    Radial spokes are a conserved axonemal structural complex postulated to regulate the motility of 9 + 2 cilia and flagella via a network of phosphoenzymes and regulatory proteins. Consistently, a Chlamydomonas radial spoke protein, RSP3, has been identified by RII overlays as an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that localizes the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) holoenzyme by binding to the RIIa domain of PKA RII subunit. However, the highly conserved docking domain of PKA is also found in the N termini of several AKAP-binding proteins unrelated to PKA as well as a 24-kDa novel spoke protein, RSP11. Here, we report that RSP11 binds to RSP3 directly in vitro and colocalizes with RSP3 toward the spoke base near outer doublets and dynein motors in axonemes. Importantly, RSP11 mutant pf25 displays a spectrum of motility, from paralysis with flaccid or twitching flagella as other spoke mutants to wildtype-like swimming. The wide range of motility changes reversibly depending on the condition of liquid media without replacing defective proteins. We postulate that radial spokes use the RIIa/AKAP module to regulate ciliary and flagellar beating; absence of the spoke RIIa protein exposes a medium-sensitive regulatory mechanism that is not obvious in wild-type Chlamydomonas.

  11. Evidence for chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase participating in the chloroplastic respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Gombos, Z.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-07-01

    A method for isolating intact chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 was developed from the Klein, Chen, Gibbs, Platt-Aloia procedure. Protoplasts, generated by treatment with autolysine, were lysed with a solution of digitonin and fractionated on Percoll step gradients. The chloroplasts were assessed to be 90% intact (ferricyanide assay) and free from cytoplasmic contamination (NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase activity) and to range from 2 to 5% in mitochondrial contamination (cytochrome c oxidase activity). About 25% of the cellular succinate dehydrogenase activity (21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, as determined enzymically) was placed within the chloroplast. Chloroplastic succinate dehydrogenase had a K{sub m} for succinate of 0.55 millimolar and was associated with the thylakoidal material derived from the intact chloroplasts. This same thylakoidal material, with an enzymic assay of 21.6 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour was able to initiate a light-dependent uptake of oxygen at a rate of 16.4 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour when supplied with succinate and methyl viologen. Malonate was an apparent competitive inhibitor of this reaction. The succinate dehydrogenase activity present in the chloroplast was sufficient to account for the photoanaerobic rate of acetate dissimilation in H{sub 2} adapted Chlamydomonas.

  12. The CO2 concentrating mechanism and photosynthetic carbon assimilation in limiting CO2 : how Chlamydomonas works against the gradient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Stessman, Dan J; Spalding, Martin H

    2015-05-01

    The CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) represents an effective strategy for carbon acquisition that enables microalgae to survive and proliferate when the CO2 concentration limits photosynthesis. The CCM improves photosynthetic performance by raising the CO2 concentration at the site of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), simultaneously enhancing carbon fixation and suppressing photorespiration. Active inorganic carbon (Ci) uptake, Rubisco sequestration and interconversion between different Ci species catalyzed by carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are key components in the CCM, and an array of molecular regulatory elements is present to facilitate the sensing of CO2 availability, to regulate the expression of the CCM and to coordinate interplay between photosynthetic carbon metabolism and other metabolic processes in response to limiting CO2 conditions. This review intends to integrate our current understanding of the eukaryotic algal CCM and its interaction with carbon assimilation, based largely on Chlamydomonas as a model, and to illustrate how Chlamydomonas acclimates to limiting CO2 conditions and how its CCM is regulated.

  13. Photoregulation of fructose and glucose respiration in the intact chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.K.; Changguo Chen; Gibbs, M. )

    1993-04-01

    The photoregulation of chloroplastic respiration was studied by monitoring in darkness and in light the release of [sup 14]CO[sub 2] from whole chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) supplied externally with [[sup 14]C]glucose and [[sup 14]C]fructose, respectively. CO[sub 2] release was inhibited more than 90% in both chloroplasts by a light intensity of 4 W m[sup [minus]2]. Oxidants, oxaloacetate in Chlamydomonas, nitrite in spinach, and phenazine methosulfate in both chloroplasts, reversed the inhibition. The onset of the photoinhibitory effect on CO[sub 2] release was relatively rapid compared to the restoration of CO[sub 2] release following illumination. In both darkened chloroplasts, dithiothreitol inhibited release. Of the four enzymes (fructokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, glucose-6-P dehydrogenase, and gluconate-6-P dehydrogenase) in the pathway catalyzing the release of CO[sub 2] from fructose, only glucose-6-P dehydrogenase was deactivated by light and by dithiothreitol. 33 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. The mTERF protein MOC1 terminates mitochondrial DNA transcription in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wobbe, Lutz; Nixon, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    The molecular function of mTERFs (mitochondrial transcription termination factors) has so far only been described for metazoan members of the protein family and in animals they control mitochondrial replication, transcription and translation. Cells of photosynthetic eukaryotes harbour chloroplasts and mitochondria, which are in an intense cross-talk that is vital for photosynthesis. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga widely used as a model organism for photosynthesis research and green biotechnology. Among the six nuclear C. reinhardtii mTERF genes is mTERF-like gene of Chlamydomonas (MOC1), whose inactivation alters mitorespiration and interestingly also light-acclimation processes in the chloroplast that favour the enhanced production of biohydrogen. We show here from in vitro studies that MOC1 binds specifically to a sequence within the mitochondrial rRNA-coding module S3, and that a knockout of MOC1 in the mutant stm6 increases read-through transcription at this site, indicating that MOC1 acts as a transcription terminator in vivo. Whereas the level of certain antisense RNA species is higher in stm6, the amount of unprocessed mitochondrial sense transcripts is strongly reduced, demonstrating that a loss of MOC1 causes perturbed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) expression. Overall, we provide evidence for the existence of mitochondrial antisense RNAs in C. reinhardtii and show that mTERF-mediated transcription termination is an evolutionary-conserved mechanism occurring in phototrophic protists and metazoans.

  15. The mTERF protein MOC1 terminates mitochondrial DNA transcription in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Wobbe, Lutz; Nixon, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular function of mTERFs (mitochondrial transcription termination factors) has so far only been described for metazoan members of the protein family and in animals they control mitochondrial replication, transcription and translation. Cells of photosynthetic eukaryotes harbour chloroplasts and mitochondria, which are in an intense cross-talk that is vital for photosynthesis. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga widely used as a model organism for photosynthesis research and green biotechnology. Among the six nuclear C. reinhardtii mTERF genes is mTERF-like gene of Chlamydomonas (MOC1), whose inactivation alters mitorespiration and interestingly also light-acclimation processes in the chloroplast that favour the enhanced production of biohydrogen. We show here from in vitro studies that MOC1 binds specifically to a sequence within the mitochondrial rRNA-coding module S3, and that a knockout of MOC1 in the mutant stm6 increases read-through transcription at this site, indicating that MOC1 acts as a transcription terminator in vivo. Whereas the level of certain antisense RNA species is higher in stm6, the amount of unprocessed mitochondrial sense transcripts is strongly reduced, demonstrating that a loss of MOC1 causes perturbed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) expression. Overall, we provide evidence for the existence of mitochondrial antisense RNAs in C. reinhardtii and show that mTERF-mediated transcription termination is an evolutionary-conserved mechanism occurring in phototrophic protists and metazoans. PMID:23649833

  16. An Indexed, Mapped Mutant Library Enables Reverse Genetics Studies of Biological Processes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gang, Spencer S.; Blum, Sean R.; Ivanova, Nina; Yue, Rebecca; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a leading unicellular model for dissecting biological processes in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, its usefulness has been limited by difficulties in obtaining mutants in specific genes of interest. To allow generation of large numbers of mapped mutants, we developed high-throughput methods that (1) enable easy maintenance of tens of thousands of Chlamydomonas strains by propagation on agar media and by cryogenic storage, (2) identify mutagenic insertion sites and physical coordinates in these collections, and (3) validate the insertion sites in pools of mutants by obtaining >500 bp of flanking genomic sequences. We used these approaches to construct a stably maintained library of 1935 mapped mutants, representing disruptions in 1562 genes. We further characterized randomly selected mutants and found that 33 out of 44 insertion sites (75%) could be confirmed by PCR, and 17 out of 23 mutants (74%) contained a single insertion. To demonstrate the power of this library for elucidating biological processes, we analyzed the lipid content of mutants disrupted in genes encoding proteins of the algal lipid droplet proteome. This study revealed a central role of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase LCS2 in the production of triacylglycerol from de novo-synthesized fatty acids. PMID:26764374

  17. Channelrhodopsin-1 Initiates Phototaxis and Photophobic Responses in Chlamydomonas by Immediate Light-Induced Depolarization[W

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, Peter; Tsunoda, Satoshi P.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Mages, Wolfgang; Gradmann, Dietrich; Hegemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins (CHR1 and CHR2) are light-gated ion channels acting as sensory photoreceptors in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In neuroscience, they are used to trigger action potentials by light in neuronal cells, tissues, or living animals. Here, we demonstrate that Chlamydomonas cells with low CHR2 content exhibit photophobic and phototactic responses that strictly depend on the availability of CHR1. Since CHR1 was described as a H+-channel, the ion specificity of CHR1 was reinvestigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our experiments show that, in addition to H+, CHR1 also conducts Na+, K+, and Ca2+. The kinetic selectivity analysis demonstrates that H+ selectivity is not due to specific translocation but due to selective ion binding. Purified recombinant CHR1 consists of two isoforms with different absorption maxima, CHR1505 and CHR1463, that are in pH-dependent equilibrium. Thus, CHR1 is a photochromic and protochromic sensory photoreceptor that functions as a light-activated cation channel mediating phototactic and photophobic responses via depolarizing currents in a wide range of ionic conditions. PMID:18552201

  18. SP-100 program developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnyer, A. D.; Sholtis, J. A., Jr.; Wahlquist, E. J.; Verga, R. L.; Wiley, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    An update is provided on the status of the Sp-100 Space Reactor Power Program. The historical background that led to the program is reviewed and the overall program objectives and development approach are discussed. The results of the mission studies identify applications for which space nuclear power is desirable and even essential. Results of a series of technology feasibility experiments are expected to significantly improve the earlier technology data base for engineering development. The conclusion is reached that a nuclear reactor space power system can be developed by the early 1990s to meet emerging mission performance requirements.

  19. Harvesting microalgae cultures with superabsorbent polymers: desulfurization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Martín del Campo, Julia S; Patiño, Rodrigo

    2013-12-01

    It is presented in this work a new methodology to harvest fresh water microalgae cultures by extracting the culture medium with superabsorbent polymers (SAPs). The microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown in the Sueoka culture medium, harvested with polyacrylic SAPs and re-suspended in the culture medium tris-acetate-potassium without sulfur (TAP-S) to generate hydrogen (H2 ) under anoxic conditions. The H2 production as an alternative fuel is relevant since this gas has high-energy recovery without involving carbon. Before microalgae harvesting, a number of range diameters (1-7 mm) for SAPs spherical particles were tested, and the initial rate (V0 ) and the maximal capacity (Qmax ) were determined for the Sueoka medium absorption. The SAP particles with the diameter range 2.0-2.5 mm performed the best and these were employed for the rest of the experiments. The Sueoka medium has a high salt content and the effect of the ionic strength was also studied for different medium concentrations (0-400%). The SAPs were reused in consecutive absorption/desorption cycles, maintaining their absorption capacity. Although the Sueoka medium reduces the SAPs absorption capacity to 40% compared with deionized water, the use of SAPs was very significant for the desulfurization process of C. reihardtii. The presence of C. reinhardtii at different concentrations does not affect the absorption capacity of the Sueoka culture medium by the SAPs. In order to reduce the time of the process, an increase of the SAPs concentration was tested, being 20 g of SAP per liter of medium, a condition to harvest the microalgae culture in 4 h. There were no evident cell ruptures during the harvesting process and the cells remained alive. Finally, the harvested biomass was re-suspended in TAP-S medium and kept under anaerobic conditions and illumination to produce H2 that was monitored by a PEM fuel cell. The use of SAPs for microalgae harvesting is a feasible non-invasive procedure to obtain

  20. X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Recordings from Oriented Demembranated Chlamydomonas Flagellar Axonemes

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Shiori; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Shinji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The high homology of its axonemal components with humans and a large repertoire of axonemal mutants make Chlamydomonas a useful model system for experiments on the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Using this organism, we explored the spatial arrangement of axonemal components under physiological conditions by small-angle x-ray fiber diffraction. Axonemes were oriented in physiological solution by continuous shear flow and exposed to intense and stable x rays generated in the synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8, BL45XU. We compared diffraction patterns from axonemes isolated from wild-type and mutant strains lacking the whole outer arm (oda1), radial spoke (pf14), central apparatus (pf18), or the α-chain of the outer arm dynein (oda11). Diffraction of the axonemes showed a series of well-defined meridional/layer-line and equatorial reflections. Diffraction patterns from mutant axonemes exhibited a systematic loss/attenuation of meridional/layer-line reflections, making it possible to determine the origin of various reflections. The 1/24 and 1/12 nm−1 meridional reflections of oda1 and oda11 were much weaker than those of the wild-type, suggesting that the outer dynein arms are the main contributor to these reflections. The weaker 1/32 and 1/13.7 nm−1 meridional reflections from pf14 compared with the wild-type suggest that these reflections come mainly from the radial spokes. The limited contribution of the central pair apparatus to the diffraction patterns was confirmed by the similarity between the patterns of the wild-type and pf18. The equatorial reflections were complex, but a comparison with electron micrograph-based models allowed the density of each axonemal component to be estimated. Addition of ATP to rigor-state axonemes also resulted in subtle changes in equatorial intensity profiles, which could report nucleotide-dependent structural changes of the dynein arms. The first detailed description of axonemal reflections

  1. Enhanced Ascorbate Regeneration Via Dehydroascorbate Reductase Confers Tolerance to Photo-Oxidative Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Tseng; Chiou, Chih-Wen; Chu, Yen-Lin; Hsiao, Yu; Tseng, Yu-Fei; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hsien-Jung; Chang, Hsin-Yang; Lee, Tse-Min

    2016-10-01

    The role of ascorbate (AsA) recycling via dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) in the tolerance of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to photo-oxidative stress was examined. The activity of DHAR and the abundance of the CrDHAR1 (Cre10.g456750) transcript increased after moderate light (ML; 750 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) or high light (HL; 1,800 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) illumination, accompanied by dehydroascorbate (DHA) accumulation, decreased AsA redox state, photo-inhibition, lipid peroxidation, H2O2 overaccumulation, growth inhibition and cell death. It suggests that DHAR and AsA recycling is limiting under high-intensity light stress. The CrDHAR1 gene was cloned and its recombinant CrDHAR1 protein was a monomer (25 kDa) detected by Western blot that exhibits an enzymatic activity of 965 µmol min(-1)( )mg(-1) protein. CrDHAR1 was overexpressed driven by a HSP70A:RBCS2 fusion promoter or down-regulated by artificial microRNA (amiRNA) to examine whether DHAR-mediated AsA recycling is critical for the tolerance of C. reinahartii cells to photo-oxidative stress. The overexpression of CrDHAR1 increased DHAR protein abundance and enzyme activity, AsA pool size, AsA:DHA ratio and the tolerance to ML-, HL-, methyl viologen- or H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The CrDHAR1-knockdown amiRNA lines that have lower DHAR expression and AsA recycling ability were sensitive to high-intensity illumination and oxidative stress. The glutathione pool size, glutathione:oxidized glutathione ratio and glutathione reductase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were increased in CrDHAR1-overexpressing cells and showed a further increase after high-intensity illumination but decreased in wild-type cells after light stress. The present results suggest that increasing AsA regeneration via enhanced DHAR activity modulates the ascorbate-glutathione cycle activity in C. reinhardtii against photo-oxidative stress.

  2. Real-time monitoring of genetically modified Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during the Foton M3 space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambreva, M.; Rea, G.; Antonacci, A.; Serafini, A.; Damasso, M.; Pastorelli, S.; Margonelli, A.; Johanningmeier, U.; Bertalan, I.; Pezzotti, G.; Giardi, M. T.

    2008-09-01

    Long-term space exploration, colonization or habitation requires biological life support systems capable to cope with the deleterious space environment. The use of oxygenic photosynthetic microrganisms is an intriguing possibility mainly for food, O2 and nutraceutical compounds production. The critical points of utilizing plants- or algae-based life support systems are the microgravity and the ionizing radiation, which can influence the performance of these organisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of space environment on the photosynthetic activity of various microrganisms and to select space stresstolerant strains. Photosystem II D1 protein sitedirected and random mutants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [1] were used as a model system to test and select the amino acid substitutions capable to account for space stress tolerance. We focussed our studies also on the accumulation of the Photosystem II photoprotective carotenoids (the xantophylls violaxanthin, anteraxanthin and zeaxanthin), powerful antioxidants that epidemiological studies demonstrated to be human vision protectors. For this purpose some mutants modified at the level of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of xanthophylls were included in the study [2]. To identify the consequences of the space environment on the photosynthetic apparatus the changes in the Photosystem II efficiency were monitored in real time during the ESA-Russian Foton- M3 mission in September 2007. For the space flight a high-tech, multicell fluorescence detector, Photo-II, was designed and built by the Centre for Advanced Research in Space Optics in collaboration with Kayser-Italy, Biosensor and DAS. Photo-II is an automatic device developed to measure the chlorophyll fluorescence and to provide a living conditions for several different algae strains (Fig.1). Twelve different C. reinhardti strains were analytically selected and two replications for each strain were brought to space

  3. X-Ray Fiber Diffraction Recordings from Oriented Demembranated Chlamydomonas Flagellar Axonemes.

    PubMed

    Toba, Shiori; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Shinji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-16

    The high homology of its axonemal components with humans and a large repertoire of axonemal mutants make Chlamydomonas a useful model system for experiments on the structure and function of eukaryotic cilia and flagella. Using this organism, we explored the spatial arrangement of axonemal components under physiological conditions by small-angle x-ray fiber diffraction. Axonemes were oriented in physiological solution by continuous shear flow and exposed to intense and stable x rays generated in the synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8, BL45XU. We compared diffraction patterns from axonemes isolated from wild-type and mutant strains lacking the whole outer arm (oda1), radial spoke (pf14), central apparatus (pf18), or the α-chain of the outer arm dynein (oda11). Diffraction of the axonemes showed a series of well-defined meridional/layer-line and equatorial reflections. Diffraction patterns from mutant axonemes exhibited a systematic loss/attenuation of meridional/layer-line reflections, making it possible to determine the origin of various reflections. The 1/24 and 1/12 nm(-1) meridional reflections of oda1 and oda11 were much weaker than those of the wild-type, suggesting that the outer dynein arms are the main contributor to these reflections. The weaker 1/32 and 1/13.7 nm(-1) meridional reflections from pf14 compared with the wild-type suggest that these reflections come mainly from the radial spokes. The limited contribution of the central pair apparatus to the diffraction patterns was confirmed by the similarity between the patterns of the wild-type and pf18. The equatorial reflections were complex, but a comparison with electron micrograph-based models allowed the density of each axonemal component to be estimated. Addition of ATP to rigor-state axonemes also resulted in subtle changes in equatorial intensity profiles, which could report nucleotide-dependent structural changes of the dynein arms. The first detailed description of axonemal reflections

  4. Dislocations in a vortex lattice and complexity of chlamydomonas ciliary beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amnuanpol, Sitichoke

    For the first topic the moving dislocations interrupt an orchestrating transport of vortices, leading to the different velocities of vortices at the different parts of a vortex lattice. Since the correlation of displacement grows algebraically in two dimensions rather than logarithmically in three dimensions, we emphasize the movement of edge dislocations on a single copper oxide plane. Effect of moving dislocations is particularly examined in connection to the velocity-force characteristics of vortices. Under the neutrality condition, the density of Burgers vectors of dislocations emerges in the equations of motion of vortices as a source term. Time evolution of the density of Burgers vectors is governed by a Fokker-Planck equation in which the drift and diffusion coefficients describe the interaction of dislocations and the thermal fluctuation, respectively. To find the Green's function of Fokker-Planck equation a perturbation series in the orders of drift coefficient which generally possesses the spatiotemporal dependence is constructed, analogous to the Born series of the time-dependent Schr¨odinger equation. In contrast, the drift coefficient shows up only with the even orders and the sign in a series alternates. Dislocations slow the velocity of vortices below their linear flux flow velocity, like the pinning. Free dislocations are more efficient to slow the velocity of vortices than interacting dislocations. For the second topic the adaptation of Chlamydomonas ciliary beating to light stimulation during its phototaxis is studied by adopting a notion of memory believed to account for the slower responses. The influence of the past ciliary beating on the present one is expressed in terms of memory time estimated by a saturating point of Lipschitz number. Mutant cells seem to possess a memory time longer than wild type cells. Under a dark environment the ciliary beating shows strong time variability suitable for a temporal self-similarity study. The scaling

  5. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  6. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus on arsenite accumulation, oxidation, and toxicity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning-Xin; Huang, Bin; Xu, Shen; Wei, Zhong-Bo; Miao, Ai-Jun; Ji, Rong; Yang, Liu-Yan

    2014-12-01

    We studied arsenite (iAs(III)) accumulation, oxidation, and toxicity in the freshwater green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under nutrient-enriched (+NP), phosphorus-limited (-P), and nitrogen-limited (-N) conditions. The -P alga (55.1 μM) had a Michaelis constant (Kd) for uptake approximately one tenth of the +NP (419 μM) and -N (501 μM) cells, indicating iAs(III) uptake inhibition by extracellular phosphate. This conclusion was supported by the hyperbolic reduction in iAs(III) uptake rate (V) from 9.2 to 0.8 μmol/g-dw/h when the extracellular phosphate concentration went up from 0 to 250 μM. The maximal iAs(III) uptake rate (Vmax) of the -N alga (24.3 μmol/g-dw/h) was twice as much as that of the +NP (12 μmol/g-dw/h) and -P (8.1 μmol/g-dw/h) cells. It implies that more arsenic transporters were synthesized under the -N condition. Once accumulated, iAs(III) was oxidized and a higher proportion of arsenate (iAs(V)) was observed at lower [As]dis or under nutrient-limited conditions. Nevertheless, iAs(III) oxidation mainly occurred outside the cells with the extent of oxidation reciprocal to [As]dis. Based on the logistic modeling of the concentration-response curves in the +NP, -P, and -N toxicity tests, iAs(III) had an [As]dis-based EC50 of 1763, 13.1, and 1208 μM and an intracellular arsenic concentration based EC50 of 35.6, 28.8, and 195 μmol/g-dw, respectively. Higher iAs(III) toxicity to the -P cells occured because of their increased iAs(III) accumulation, whereas the underlying mechanisms why the -N alga was more tolerant need to be further revealed. Overall, both N and P had remarkable effects on the behavior and effects of iAs(III), which cannot be disregarded in the biogeochemical cycling research of arsenic.

  7. New mutations in flagellar motors identified by whole genome sequencing in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The building of a cilium or flagellum requires molecular motors and associated proteins that allow the relocation of proteins from the cell body to the distal end and the return of proteins to the cell body in a process termed intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT trains are carried out by kinesin and back to the cell body by dynein. Methods We used whole genome sequencing to identify the causative mutations for two temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutants in Chlamydomonas and validated the changes using reversion analysis. We examined the effect of these mutations on the localization of IFT81, an IFT complex B protein, the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DHC1b), and the dynein light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Results The strains, fla18 and fla24, have mutations in kinesin-2 and cytoplasmic dynein, respectively. The fla18 mutation alters the same glutamic acid (E24G) mutated in the fla10-14 allele (E24K). The fla18 strain loses flagella at 32?C more rapidly than the E24K allele but less rapidly than the fla10-1 allele. The fla18 mutant loses its flagella by detachment rather than by shortening. The fla24 mutation falls in cytoplasmic dynein and changes a completely conserved amino acid (L3243P) in an alpha helix in the AAA5 domain. The fla24 mutant loses its flagella by shortening within 6 hours at 32?C. DHC1b protein is reduced by 18-fold and D1bLIC is reduced by 16-fold at 21?C compared to wild-type cells. We identified two pseudorevertants (L3243S and L3243R), which remain flagellated at 32?C. Although fla24 cells assemble full-length flagella at 21?C, IFT81 protein localization is dramatically altered. Instead of localizing at the basal body and along the flagella, IFT81 is concentrated at the proximal end of the flagella. The pseudorevertants show wild-type IFT81 localization at 21?C, but proximal end localization of IFT81 at 32?C. Conclusions The change in the AAA5 domain of the cytoplasmic dynein in fla24 may block the recycling of IFT

  8. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis

  9. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  10. Carbon dioxide fixation and photoevolution of hydrogen and oxygen in a mutant of Chlamydomonas lacking Photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-09-01

    Sustained photoassimilation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen has been observed in a Photosystem I deficient mutant B4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that contains only Photosystem II. The data indicate that Photosystem II alone is capable of spanning the potential difference between water oxidation/oxygen evolution and ferredoxin reduction. The rates of both CO{sub 2} fixation and hydrogen and oxygen evolution are similar in the mutant to that of the wild-type C. reinhardtii 137c containing both photosystems. The wild-type had stable photosynthetic activity, measured as CO{sub 2} fixation, under both air and anaerobic conditions, while the mutant was stable only under anaerobic conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the fundamental mechanisms and energetics of photosynthesis and possible implications for the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  11. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley Jsc; Umen, James G

    2016-03-25

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a 'counting' mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control.

  12. [Effect of dibromothymoquinone on chlorophyll a fluorescence in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells incubated in complete or sulfur-depleted medium].

    PubMed

    Volgusheva, A A; Kukarskikh, G P; Antal, T K; Lavrukhina, O G; Krendeleva, T E; Rubin, A B

    2008-01-01

    The influence of dibromothymoquinone on chlorophyll fluorescence was studied in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells using PAM and PEA fluorometers. The reagent affected differently control cells incubated in complete medium and S-starved cells. Thus, the fluorescence yield in the control essentially increased in the presence of dibromothymoquinone, which can be due to the inactivation of light-harvesting complex II protein kinase, followed by the suppression of membrane transition from high-fluorescence state 1 to low-fluorescence state 2. On the contrary, S-starved cells with membranes in state 2 showed a lower fluorescence yield in the presence of dibromothymoquinone than without it. The JIP test of OJIP fluorescence transients suggests that dibromothymoquinone inhibits both light-harvesting complex II kinase and photosynthetic electron transport when added to control, while in starved cells, it acts predominantly as an electron acceptor.

  13. Chlamydomonas shortens its flagella by activating axonemal disassembly, stimulating IFT particle trafficking, and blocking anterograde cargo loading.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junmin; Snell, William J

    2005-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic cells form cilia/flagella, maintain them at their genetically specified lengths, and shorten them. Here, we define the cellular mechanisms that bring about shortening of flagella prior to meiotic cell division and in response to environmental cues in the biflagellated green alga Chlamydomonas. We show that the flagellar shortening pathway is distinct from the one that enforces transient shortening essential for length control. During flagellar shortening, disassembly of the axoneme is stimulated over the basal rate, and the rate of entry into flagella of intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles is increased. Moreover, the particles entering the disassembling flagella lack cargo. Thus, flagellar shortening depends on the interplay between dynamic properties of the axoneme and the IFT machinery; a cell triggered to shorten its flagellum activates disassembly of the axoneme and stimulates entry into the flagellum of IFT particles possessing empty cargo binding sites available to retrieve the disassembled components.

  14. Early alterations on photosynthesis-related parameters in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells exposed to atrazine: A multiple approach study.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Seoane, Marta; Rioboo, Carmen; Herrero, Concepción; Cid, Ángeles

    2016-06-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were exposed to a sublethal concentration of the widespread herbicide atrazine for 3h. Physiological cellular parameters, such as chlorophyll a fluorescence and oxidative stress monitored by flow cytometry and pigments levels were altered in microalgal cells exposed to 0.25 μM of atrazine. Furthermore, the effects of this herbicide on C. reinhardtii were explored using "omics" techniques. Transcriptomic analyses, carried out by RNA-Seq technique, displayed 9 differentially expressed genes, related to photosynthesis, between control cultures and atrazine exposed cultures. Proteomic profiles were obtained using iTRAQ tags and MALDI-MS/MS analysis, identifying important changes in the proteome during atrazine stress; 5 proteins related to photosynthesis were downexpressed. The results of these experiments advance the understanding of photosynthetic adjustments that occur during an early herbicide exposure. Inhibition of photosynthesis induced by atrazine toxicity will affect the entire physiological and biochemical states of microalgal cells.

  15. Altered chlorplast ribosomal proteins associated with erythromycin-resistant mutants in two genetic systems of Chlamydomonas reinhardi.

    PubMed

    Mets, L; Bogorad, L

    1972-12-01

    The phenotype of several erythromycin-resistant mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardi was further characterized in terms of the electrophoretic properties of their chloroplast ribosomal proteins. In mutant ery-M2d a single protein of the large (52 S) subunit has altered properties, which probably result from a change in its primary sequence. This mutation is inherited in a Meudelian manner. In mutant ery-U1a, which is inherited in a uniparental manner, a different single protein of the 52 S subunit is altered. This change might result from a change in either the primary sequence of the protein or in some form of secondary modification. These results indicate that these two distinct genetic systems must cooperate in the production of chloroplast ribosomes.

  16. Transcriptomic and Physiological Responses of the Green Microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Short-Term Exposure to Subnanomolar Methylmercury Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Beauvais-Flück, Rebecca; Slaveykova, Vera I; Cosio, Claudia

    2016-07-05

    The effects of short-term exposure to subnanomolar methyl-mercury (MeHg) concentrations, representative of contaminated environments, on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed using both physiological end points and gene expression analysis. MeHg bioaccumulated and induced significant increase of the photosynthesis efficiency, while the algal growth, oxidative stress, and chlorophyll fluorescence were unaffected. At the molecular level, MeHg significantly dysregulated the expression of genes involved in motility, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, metal transport, and antioxidant enzymes. Data suggest that the cells were able to cope with subnanomolar MeHg exposure, but this tolerance resulted in a significant cost to the cell energy and reserve metabolism as well as ample changes in the nutrition and motility of C. reinhardtii. The present results allowed gaining new insights on the effects and uptake mechanisms of MeHg at subnanomolar concentrations in aquatic primary producers.

  17. Cooperative processing of primary miRNAs by DUS16 and DCL3 in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Heriberto

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously reported that the RNA-binding protein Dull slicer 16 (DUS16) plays a key role in the processing of primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the present report, we elaborate on the interaction of DUS16 with Dicer-like 3 (DCL3) during pri-miRNA processing. Comprehensive analyses of small RNA libraries derived from mutant and wild-type algal strains allowed the de novo prediction of 35 pri-miRNA genes, including 9 previously unknown ones. The pri-miRNAs dependent on DUS16 for processing largely overlapped with those dependent on DCL3. Our findings suggest that DUS16 and DCL3 work cooperatively, presumably as components of a microprocessor complex, in the processing of the majority of pri-miRNAs in C. reinhardtii. PMID:28289490

  18. Transcription of novel genes, including a gene linked to the mating-type locus, induced by Chlamydomonas fertilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, P J; Goodenough, U W

    1987-01-01

    Six cDNA clones have been identified that are complementary to transcripts present in young zygotes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii but absent from vegetative and gametic cells. Five early transcripts are synthesized within 5 to 10 min of fertilization; the sixth, late, transcript is not synthesized until 90 min following fertilization. Synthesis of both classes requires cell fusion between gametes. Cycloheximide fails to inhibit early mRNA synthesis, indicating that transcription factors must preexist in the gametes and be activated by cytoplasmic confluence. By contrast, cycloheximide blocks synthesis of the late transcript, suggesting that an early protein product(s) is required for expression of the late gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of inter- and intraspecific genetic crosses demonstrates that one of the early genes is very tightly linked to the mating-type locus. Images PMID:3614194

  19. A sex recognition glycoprotein is encoded by the plus mating-type gene fus1 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, P J; Woessner, J P; Goodenough, U W

    1996-01-01

    Sexual fusion between plus and minus gametes of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii entails adhesion between plus-specific and minus-specific "fringe" proteins displayed on the plasma membrane of gametic mating structures. We report the identification of the gene (fus1) encoding the plus fringe glycoprotein, which resides in a unique domain of the mating-type plus (mt+) locus, and which was identified by transposon insertions in three fusion-defective mutant strains. Transformation with fus1+ restores fringe and fusion competence to these mutants and to the pseudo-plus mutant imp11 mt-, defective in minus differentiation. The fus1 gene is remarkable in lacking the codon bias found in all other nuclear genes of C. reinhardtii. Images PMID:8856667

  20. Protein-Protein Interactions between Intermediate Chains and the Docking Complex of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Outer Arm Dynein

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Takahiro; Owa, Mikito; King, Stephen M.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) is bound to specific loci on outer-doublet-microtubules by interactions at two sites: via intermediate chain 1 (IC1) and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC). Studies using Chlamydomonas mutants have suggested that the individual sites have rather weak affinities for microtubules, and therefore strong OAD attachment to microtubules is achieved by their cooperation. To test this idea, we examined interactions between IC1, IC2 (another intermediate chain) and ODA-DC using recombinant proteins. Recombinant IC1 and IC2 were found to form a 1:1 complex, and this complex associated with ODA-DC in vitro. Binding of IC1 to mutant axonemes revealed that there are specific binding sites for IC1. From these data, we propose a novel model of OAD-outer doublet association. PMID:23747306

  1. Study of the effect of reducing conditions on the initial chlorophyll fluorescence rise in the green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Antal, T K; Kolacheva, A; Maslakov, A; Riznichenko, G Yu; Krendeleva, T E; Rubin, A B

    2013-03-01

    Incubation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells under nutrient deficiency results in the faster initial rise in the light-induced chlorophyll fluorescence kinetic curve. We showed that short-term anaerobic incubation of algal cells altered initial fluorescence in a way similar to nutrient starvation, suggesting an important role of the plastoquinones redox state in the observed effect. Bi-component analysis of highly resolved initial fluorescence rise kinetics in sulfur- or oxygen-depleted C. reinhardtii cells suggested that one of the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomenon involves primary closure (photochemical inactivation via Qa reduction) of β-type PSII as compared to α-PSII. Moreover, results of modeling of the fluorescence curve brought us to the conclusion that accumulation of closed centers in α-PSII supercomplexes may also cause a faster initial fluorescence rise. The observed correlations between nutrient supply rate and initial fluorescence rise pattern in green algae can serve to characterize culture nutritional status in vivo.

  2. Repression of Essential Chloroplast Genes Reveals New Signaling Pathways and Regulatory Feedback Loops in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rahire, Michèle; Schaad, Olivier; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2013-01-01

    Although reverse genetics has been used to elucidate the function of numerous chloroplast proteins, the characterization of essential plastid genes and their role in chloroplast biogenesis and cell survival has not yet been achieved. Therefore, we developed a robust repressible chloroplast gene expression system in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based mainly on a vitamin-repressible riboswitch, and we used this system to study the role of two essential chloroplast genes: ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), encoding a plastid ribosomal protein, and rpoA, encoding the α-subunit of chloroplast bacterial-like RNA polymerase. Repression of either of these two genes leads to the arrest of cell growth, and it induces a response that involves changes in expression of nuclear genes implicated in chloroplast biogenesis, protein turnover, and stress. This response also leads to the overaccumulation of several plastid transcripts and reveals the existence of multiple negative regulatory feedback loops in the chloroplast gene circuitry. PMID:23292734

  3. Two-dimensional analysis of flagellar proteins from wild-type and paralyzed mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Piperno, G; Huang, B; Luck, D J

    1977-01-01

    Flagellar polypeptides of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were analyzed in two-dimensions by isoelectric focusing and electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. In addition to flagellar tubulin, over 130 polypeptides were resolved and 100 of these were identified as axonemal components in wild-type organisms. Flagella of two nonconditional paralyzed mutants, pf 14 and pf 1, were also analyzed and, at the same time, electron microscopic studies were carried out. pf 14 flagella, which completely lack radial spokes and associated spokeheads, are missing 12 polypeptides. Six of these polypeptides are also missing from pf 1 flagella in which spokes are clearly present but spoke heads appear to be absent. Images PMID:266200

  4. Genome analysis and its significance in four unicellular algae, Cyanidioschyzon [corrected] merolae, Ostreococcus tauri, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Osami; Yoshida, Yamato; Nishida, Keiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Sakajiri, Takayuki; Hirooka, Syunsuke; Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Algae play a more important role than land plants in the maintenance of the global environment and productivity. Progress in genome analyses of these organisms means that we can now obtain information on algal genomes, global annotation and gene expression. The full genome information for several algae has already been analyzed. Whole genomes of the red alga Cyanidioschyzon [corrected] merolae, the green algae Ostreococcus tauri and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana have been sequenced. Genome composition and the features of cells among the four algae were compared. Each alga maintains basic genes as photosynthetic eukaryotes and possesses additional gene groups to represent their particular characteristics. This review discusses and introduces the latest research that makes the best use of the particular features of each organism and the significance of genome analysis to study biological phenomena. In particular, examples of post-genome studies of organelle multiplication in C. merolae based on analyzed genome information are presented.

  5. Localization of EB1, IFT polypeptides, and kinesin-2 in Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes via immunogold scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, Roger D; Howard, Louisa

    2007-06-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) refers to the bi-directional movement of particles and associated cargo along the axonemes of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. To provide a new perspective on the morphology of IFT particles, their association with the axoneme, and their composition, we have used immunogold localization coupled to detection via scanning electron microscopy. Here we co-localize in the Chlamydomonas flagellar axoneme polypeptides labeled with specific antibodies. Chlamydomonas EB1 localizes to the distal tip of the axoneme, as expected from previous immunofluorescent data (Pedersen et al. Curr Biol2003;13(22):1969-1974), thus demonstrating the utility of this approach. Using antibodies to IFT-related polypeptides, particles can be identified associated with the axoneme that fall into one of two classes: The first class is composed of IFT particles labeled with polyclonal antibodies to kinesin-2 and monoclonal antibodies to either IFT139 (an IFT complex A polypeptide) or IFT172 (a complex B polypeptide). The second class is comprised of particles that label with antibodies to IFT139 alone; thus, discrete particles are present associated with the axoneme that are composed only of complex A polypeptides. When IFT particles were purified by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, they appeared as more or less spherical aggregates of varying dimensions labeled with antibodies to IFT139 and to the motor protein kinesin-2. By contrast, isolated IFT particles that were labeled with IFT172 antibodies were not labeled with kinesin-2 antibodies. The data are discussed in terms of the total polypeptide composition of an IFT particle and the interaction of the particles with the motors that power IFT.

  6. Submicromolar levels of calcium control the balance of beating between the two flagella in demembranated models of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, R; Witman, G B

    1984-01-01

    When detergent-extracted, demembranated cell models of Chlamydomonas were resuspended in reactivation solutions containing less than 10(-8) M Ca++, many models initially swam in helical paths similar to those of intact cells; others swam in circles against the surface of the slide or coverslip. With increasing time after reactivation, fewer models swam in helices and more swam in circles. This transition from helical to circular swimming was the result of a progressive inactivation of one of the axonemes; in the extreme case, one axoneme was completely inactive whereas the other beat with a normal waveform. At these low Ca++ concentrations, the inactivated axoneme was the trans-axoneme (the one farthest from the eyespot) in 70-100% of the models. At 10(-7) or 10(-6) M Ca++, cell models also proceeded from helical to circular swimming as a result of inactivation of one of the axonemes; however, under these conditions the cis-axoneme was usually the one that was inactivated. At 10(-8) M Ca++, most cells continued helical swimming, indicating that both axonemes were remaining relatively active. The progressive, Ca++-dependent inactivation of the trans- or cis-axoneme was reversed by switching the cell models to higher or lower Ca++ concentrations, respectively. A similar reversible, selective inactivation of the trans-flagellum occurred in intact cells swimming in medium containing 0.5 mM EGTA and no added Ca++. The results show that there are functional differences between the two axonemes of Chlamydomonas. The differential responses of the axonemes to submicromolar concentrations of Ca++ may form the basis for phototactic turning.

  7. Hemin and Magnesium-Protoporphyrin IX Induce Global Changes in Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Voß, Björn; Meinecke, Linda; Kurz, Thorsten; Al-Babili, Salim; Beck, Christoph F.; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2011-01-01

    Retrograde signaling is a pathway of communication from mitochondria and plastids to the nucleus in the context of cell differentiation, development, and stress response. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the tetrapyrroles magnesium-protoporphyrin IX and heme are only synthesized within the chloroplast, and they have been implicated in the retrograde control of nuclear gene expression in this unicellular green alga. Feeding the two tetrapyrroles to Chlamydomonas cultures was previously shown to transiently induce five nuclear genes, three of which encode the heat shock proteins HSP70A, HSP70B, and HSP70E. In contrast, controversial results exist on the possible role of magnesium-protoporphyrin IX in the repression of genes for light-harvesting proteins in higher plants, raising the question of how important this mode of regulation is. Here, we used genome-wide transcriptional profiling to measure the global impact of these tetrapyrroles on gene regulation and the scope of the response. We identified almost 1,000 genes whose expression level changed transiently but significantly. Among them were only a few genes for photosynthetic proteins but several encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, heme-binding proteins, stress-response proteins, as well as proteins involved in protein folding and degradation. More than 50% of the latter class of genes was also regulated by heat shock. The observed drastic fold changes at the RNA level did not correlate with similar changes in protein concentrations under the tested experimental conditions. Phylogenetic profiling revealed that genes of putative endosymbiontic origin are not overrepresented among the responding genes. This and the transient nature of changes in gene expression suggest a signaling role of both tetrapyrroles as secondary messengers for adaptive responses affecting the entire cell and not only organellar proteins. PMID:21148414

  8. The LC7 Light Chains of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Dyneins Interact with Components Required for Both Motor Assembly and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    DiBella, Linda M.; Sakato, Miho; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; King, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the LC7/Roadblock family of light chains (LCs) have been found in both cytoplasmic and axonemal dyneins. LC7a was originally identified within Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein and associates with this motor's cargo-binding region. We describe here a novel member of this protein family, termed LC7b that is also present in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. Levels of LC7b are reduced ∼20% in axonemes isolated from strains lacking inner arm I1 and are ∼80% lower in the absence of the outer arms. When both dyneins are missing, LC7b levels are diminished to <10%. In oda9 axonemal extracts that completely lack outer arms, LC7b copurifies with inner arm I1, whereas in ida1 extracts that are devoid of I1 inner arms it associates with outer arm dynein. We also have observed that some LC7a is present in both isolated axonemes and purified 18S dynein from oda1, suggesting that it is also a component of both the outer arm and inner arm I1. Intriguingly, in axonemal extracts from the LC7a null mutant, oda15, which assembles ∼30% of its outer arms, LC7b fails to copurify with either dynein, suggesting that it interacts with LC7a. Furthermore, both the outer arm γ heavy chain and DC2 from the outer arm docking complex completely dissociate after salt extraction from oda15 axonemes. EDC cross-linking of purified dynein revealed that LC7b interacts with LC3, an outer dynein arm thioredoxin; DC2, an outer arm docking complex component; and also with the phosphoprotein IC138 from inner arm I1. These data suggest that LC7a stabilizes both the outer arms and inner arm I1 and that both LC7a and LC7b are involved in multiple intradynein interactions within both dyneins. PMID:15304520

  9. Differential Replication of Two Chloroplast Genome Forms in Heteroplasmic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Gametes Contributes to Alternative Inheritance Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Stern, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Two mechanisms for chloroplast DNA replication have been revealed through the study of an unusual heteroplasmic strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Heteroplasmy is a state in which more than one genome type occurs in a mitochondrion or chloroplast. The Chlamydomonas strain spa19 bears two distinct chloroplast genomes, termed PS+ and PS−. PS+ genomes predominate and are stably maintained in vegetative cells, despite their lack of known replication origins. In sexual crosses with spa19 as the mating type plus parent, however, PS+ genomes are transmitted in only ∼25% of tetrads, whereas the PS− genomes are faithfully inherited in all progeny. In this research, we have explored the mechanism underlying this biased uniparental inheritance. We show that the relative reduction and dilution of PS+ vs. PS− genomes takes place during gametogenesis. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation and PCR, was used to compare replication activities of PS+ and PS− genomes. We found that the replication of PS+ genomes is specifically suppressed during gametogenesis and germination of zygospores, a phenomenon that also was observed when spa19 cells were treated with rifampicin, an inhibitor of the chloroplast RNA polymerase. Furthermore, when bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was compared at 11 sites within the chloroplast genome between vegetative cells, gametes, and rifampicin-treated cells by quantitative PCR, we found that incorporation was often reduced at the same sites in gametes that were also sensitive to rifampicin treatment. We conclude that a transcription-mediated form of DNA replication priming, which may be downregulated during gametogenesis, is indispensable for robust maintenance of PS+ genomes. These results highlight the potential for chloroplast genome copy number regulation through alternative replication strategies. PMID:20519744

  10. Differential replication of two chloroplast genome forms in heteroplasmic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gametes contributes to alternative inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Stern, David B

    2010-08-01

    Two mechanisms for chloroplast DNA replication have been revealed through the study of an unusual heteroplasmic strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Heteroplasmy is a state in which more than one genome type occurs in a mitochondrion or chloroplast. The Chlamydomonas strain spa19 bears two distinct chloroplast genomes, termed PS+ and PS-. PS+ genomes predominate and are stably maintained in vegetative cells, despite their lack of known replication origins. In sexual crosses with spa19 as the mating type plus parent, however, PS+ genomes are transmitted in only approximately 25% of tetrads, whereas the PS- genomes are faithfully inherited in all progeny. In this research, we have explored the mechanism underlying this biased uniparental inheritance. We show that the relative reduction and dilution of PS+ vs. PS- genomes takes place during gametogenesis. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation and PCR, was used to compare replication activities of PS+ and PS- genomes. We found that the replication of PS+ genomes is specifically suppressed during gametogenesis and germination of zygospores, a phenomenon that also was observed when spa19 cells were treated with rifampicin, an inhibitor of the chloroplast RNA polymerase. Furthermore, when bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was compared at 11 sites within the chloroplast genome between vegetative cells, gametes, and rifampicin-treated cells by quantitative PCR, we found that incorporation was often reduced at the same sites in gametes that were also sensitive to rifampicin treatment. We conclude that a transcription-mediated form of DNA replication priming, which may be downregulated during gametogenesis, is indispensable for robust maintenance of PS+ genomes. These results highlight the potential for chloroplast genome copy number regulation through alternative replication strategies.

  11. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes.

  12. Acetobacter intermedius, sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Boesch, C; Trcek, J; Sievers, M; Teuber, M

    1998-03-01

    Strains of a new species in the genus Acetobacter, for which we propose the name A. intermedius sp. nov., were isolated and characterized in pure culture from different sources (Kombucha beverage, cider vinegar, spirit vinegar) and different countries (Switzerland, Slovenia). The isolated strains grow in media with 3% acetic acid and 3% ethanol as does A. europaeus, do, however, not require acetic acid for growth. These characteristics phenotypically position A. intermedius between A. europaeus and A. xylinus, DNA-DNA hybridizations of A. intermedius-DNA with DNA of the type strains of Acetobacter europaeus, A. xylinus, A. aceti, A. hansenii, A. liquefaciens, A. methanolicus, A. pasteurianus, A. diazotrophicus, Gluconobacter oxydans and Escherichia coli HB 101 indicated less than 60% DNA similarity. The important features of the new species are described. Acetobacter intermedius strain TF2 (DSM11804) isolated from the liquid phase of a tea fungus beverage (Kombucha) is the type strain.

  13. Functional determinants in transit sequences: import and partial maturation by vascular plant chloroplasts of the ribulose-1,5- bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit of Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The precursor of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit and other proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are efficiently transported into chloroplasts isolated from spinach and pea. Thus, similar determinants specify precursor-chloroplast interactions in the alga and vascular plants. Removal of all or part of its transit sequence was found to block import of the algal small subunit into isolated chloroplasts. Comparison of available sequences revealed a nine amino acid segment conserved in the transit sequences of all small subunit precursors. A protease in the vascular plant chloroplasts recognized this region in the Chlamydomonas precursor and produced an intermediate form of the small subunit. We propose that processing of the small subunit precursor involves at least two proteolytic events; only one of these has been evolutionarily conserved. PMID:3965471

  14. Functional hybrid rubisco enzymes with plant small subunits and algal large subunits: engineered rbcS cDNA for expression in chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Genkov, Todor; Meyer, Moritz; Griffiths, Howard; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2010-06-25

    There has been much interest in the chloroplast-encoded large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) as a target for engineering an increase in net CO(2) fixation in photosynthesis. Improvements in the enzyme would lead to an increase in the production of food, fiber, and renewable energy. Although the large subunit contains the active site, a family of rbcS nuclear genes encodes the Rubisco small subunits, which can also influence the carboxylation catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity of the enzyme. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, small subunits from spinach, Arabidopsis, and sunflower were assembled with algal large subunits by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the rbcS gene family. Foreign rbcS cDNAs were successfully expressed in Chlamydomonas by fusing them to a Chlamydomonas rbcS transit peptide sequence engineered to contain rbcS introns. Although plant Rubisco generally has greater CO(2)/O(2) specificity but a lower carboxylation V(max) than Chlamydomonas Rubisco, the hybrid enzymes have 3-11% increases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity and retain near normal V(max) values. Thus, small subunits may make a significant contribution to the overall catalytic performance of Rubisco. Despite having normal amounts of catalytically proficient Rubisco, the hybrid mutant strains display reduced levels of photosynthetic growth and lack chloroplast pyrenoids. It appears that small subunits contain the structural elements responsible for targeting Rubisco to the algal pyrenoid, which is the site where CO(2) is concentrated for optimal photosynthesis.

  15. Respiration of sugars in spinach (Spinacia oleraces), maize (Zea mays), and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 chloroplasts with emphasis on the hexose kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.K.; Chen, C.; Epstein, D.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1993-06-01

    The role of hexokinase in carbohydrate degradation in isolated, intact chloroplasts was evaluated. This was accomplished by monitoring the evolution of [sup 14]CO[sub 2] from darkened spinach (Spinacia oleracea), maize (Zea mays) mesophyll, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts externally supplied with [sup 14]C-labeled fructose, glucose, mannose, galactose, maltose, and ribose. Glucose and ribose were the preferred substrates with the Chlamydomonas and maize chloroplasts, respectively. The rate of CO[sub 2] release from fructose was about twice that from glucose in the spinach chloroplast. externally supplied ATP stimulated the rate of CO[sub 2] release. The pH optimum for CO[sub 2] release was 7.5 with ribose and fructose and 8.5 with glucose as substrates. Probing the outer membrane polypeptides of the intact spinach chloroplast with two proteases, trypsin and thermolysin, decreased [sup 14]CO[sub 2] release from glucose about 50% but had little effect when fructose was the substrate. Tryptic digestion decreased CO[sub 2] release from glucose in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast about 70%. [sup 14]CO[sub 2] evolution from [1-[sup 14]C]-glucose-6-phosphate in both chloroplasts was unaffected by treatment with trypsin. Enzymic analysis of the supernatant (stroma) of the lysed spinach chloroplast indicated a hexokinase active primarily with fructose but with some affinity for glucose. The pellet (membranal fraction) contained a hexokinase utilizing both glucose and fructose but with considerably less total activity than the stormal enzyme. Treatment with trypsin and thermolysin eliminated more than 50% of the glucokinase activity but had little effect on fructokinase activity in the spinach chloroplast. Tryptic digestion of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast resulted in a loss of about 90% of glucokinase activity. 34 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Structural and functional characterization of a transcription-enhancing sequence element in the rbcL gene of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Anthonisen, Inger Lill; Kasai, Seitaro; Kato, Ko; Salvador, Maria Luisa; Klein, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    The structure and function of a transcription-enhancing sequence element in the coding region of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii rbcL gene was analyzed in Chlamydomonas chloroplast transformants in vivo. The enhancer sequence is contained within a DNA segment extending from position +108 to position +143, relative to the start site of rbcL gene transcription. The sequence remains functional when inverted or when placed 34 bp closer to or 87 bp further downstream of the basic rbcL promoter. However, it does not function from a site about 250 bp downstream of its original location. Besides promoting transcription initiation from the rbcL promoter, the element is able to augment transcription from the promoter of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast atpB gene, but has an inhibitory effect on transcription from the promoter of the chloroplast ribosomal RNA genes. The results suggest that the enhancer-like sequence acts upon transcription initiation in a position-specific and promoter type-specific manner.

  17. CSL encodes a leucine-rich-repeat protein implicated in red/violet light signaling to the circadian clock in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Ayumi; Niwa, Yoshimi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Yamano, Takashi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Ishiura, Masahiro; Matsuo, Takuya

    2017-03-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii shows various light responses in behavior and physiology. One such photoresponse is the circadian clock, which can be reset by external light signals to entrain its oscillation to daily environmental cycles. In a previous report, we suggested that a light-induced degradation of the clock protein ROC15 is a trigger to reset the circadian clock in Chlamydomonas. However, light signaling pathways of this process remained unclear. Here, we screened for mutants that show abnormal ROC15 diurnal rhythms, including the light-induced protein degradation at dawn, using a luciferase fusion reporter. In one mutant, ROC15 degradation and phase resetting of the circadian clock by light were impaired. Interestingly, the impairments were observed in response to red and violet light, but not to blue light. We revealed that an uncharacterized gene encoding a protein similar to RAS-signaling-related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins is responsible for the mutant phenotypes. Our results indicate that a previously uncharacterized red/violet light signaling pathway is involved in the phase resetting of circadian clock in Chlamydomonas.

  18. Proteomic profiling of oil bodies isolated from the unicellular green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: with focus on proteins involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa M; Baudet, Mathieu; Cuiné, Stéphan; Adriano, Jean-Marc; Barthe, Damien; Billon, Emmanuelle; Bruley, Christophe; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Ferro, Myriam; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2011-11-01

    Oil bodies are sites of energy and carbon storage in many organisms including microalgae. As a step toward deciphering oil accumulation mechanisms in algae, we used proteomics to analyze purified oil bodies from the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown under nitrogen deprivation. Among the 248 proteins (≥ 2 peptides) identified by LC-MS/MS, 33 were putatively involved in the metabolism of lipids (mostly acyl-lipids and sterols). Compared with a recently reported Chlamydomonas oil body proteome, 19 new proteins of lipid metabolism were identified, spanning the key steps of the triacylglycerol synthesis pathway and including a glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), a lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) and a putative phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT). In addition, proteins putatively involved in deacylation/reacylation, sterol synthesis, lipid signaling and lipid trafficking were found to be associated with the oil body fraction. This data set thus provides evidence that Chlamydomonas oil bodies are not only storage compartments but also are dynamic structures likely to be involved in processes such as oil synthesis, degradation and lipid homeostasis. The proteins identified here should provide useful targets for genetic studies aiming at increasing our understanding of triacyglycerol synthesis and the role of oil bodies in microalgal cell functions.

  19. CSL encodes a leucine-rich-repeat protein implicated in red/violet light signaling to the circadian clock in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Ayumi; Niwa, Yoshimi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii shows various light responses in behavior and physiology. One such photoresponse is the circadian clock, which can be reset by external light signals to entrain its oscillation to daily environmental cycles. In a previous report, we suggested that a light-induced degradation of the clock protein ROC15 is a trigger to reset the circadian clock in Chlamydomonas. However, light signaling pathways of this process remained unclear. Here, we screened for mutants that show abnormal ROC15 diurnal rhythms, including the light-induced protein degradation at dawn, using a luciferase fusion reporter. In one mutant, ROC15 degradation and phase resetting of the circadian clock by light were impaired. Interestingly, the impairments were observed in response to red and violet light, but not to blue light. We revealed that an uncharacterized gene encoding a protein similar to RAS-signaling-related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins is responsible for the mutant phenotypes. Our results indicate that a previously uncharacterized red/violet light signaling pathway is involved in the phase resetting of circadian clock in Chlamydomonas. PMID:28333924

  20. Chlamydomonas Genome Resource for Laboratory Strains Reveals a Mosaic of Sequence Variation, Identifies True Strain Histories, and Enables Strain-Specific Studies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a widely used reference organism in studies of photosynthesis, cilia, and biofuels. Most research in this field uses a few dozen standard laboratory strains that are reported to share a common ancestry, but exhibit substantial phenotypic differences. In order to facilitate ongoing Chlamydomonas research and explain the phenotypic variation, we mapped the genetic diversity within these strains using whole-genome resequencing. We identified 524,640 single nucleotide variants and 4812 structural variants among 39 commonly used laboratory strains. Nearly all (98.2%) of the total observed genetic diversity was attributable to the presence of two, previously unrecognized, alternate haplotypes that are distributed in a mosaic pattern among the extant laboratory strains. We propose that these two haplotypes are the remnants of an ancestral cross between two strains with ∼2% relative divergence. These haplotype patterns create a fingerprint for each strain that facilitates the positive identification of that strain and reveals its relatedness to other strains. The presence of these alternate haplotype regions affects phenotype scoring and gene expression measurements. Here, we present a rich set of genetic differences as a community resource to allow researchers to more accurately conduct and interpret their experiments with Chlamydomonas. PMID:26307380

  1. Alternative Acetate Production Pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Dark Anoxia and the Dominant Role of Chloroplasts in Fermentative Acetate Production[W

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotti, Claudia; D’Adamo, Sarah; Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Ingram-Smith, Cheryl J.; Mackinder, Luke; Miller, Tarryn E.; Heuberger, Adam L.; Peers, Graham; Smith, Kerry S.; Jonikas, Martin C.; Grossman, Arthur R.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii insertion mutants disrupted for genes encoding acetate kinases (EC 2.7.2.1) (ACK1 and ACK2) and a phosphate acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.8) (PAT2, but not PAT1) were isolated to characterize fermentative acetate production. ACK1 and PAT2 were localized to chloroplasts, while ACK2 and PAT1 were shown to be in mitochondria. Characterization of the mutants showed that PAT2 and ACK1 activity in chloroplasts plays a dominant role (relative to ACK2 and PAT1 in mitochondria) in producing acetate under dark, anoxic conditions and, surprisingly, also suggested that Chlamydomonas has other pathways that generate acetate in the absence of ACK activity. We identified a number of proteins associated with alternative pathways for acetate production that are encoded on the Chlamydomonas genome. Furthermore, we observed that only modest alterations in the accumulation of fermentative products occurred in the ack1, ack2, and ack1 ack2 mutants, which contrasts with the substantial metabolite alterations described in strains devoid of other key fermentation enzymes. PMID:25381350

  2. SP-100 space reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The SP-100 space reactor power system is being developed to meet the large electrical power requirements of civilian and military missions planned for the 1990's and beyond. It will remove the restrictions on electrical power generation that have tended to limit missions and will enable the fuller exploration and utilization of space. This booklet describes the SP-100 space reactor power system and its development. Particular emphasis is given to safety. The design aand operational features as well as the design and safety review process that will assure that the SP-100 can be launched nd operated safely are described.

  3. Yersinia nurmii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Murros-Kontiainen, Anna; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Korkeala, Hannu; Johansson, Per; Rahkila, Riitta; Björkroth, Johanna

    2011-10-01

    This study was set up to identify three Gram-negative, rod-shaped strains originating from broiler meat packaged under a modified atmosphere. A polyphasic taxonomic approach, including multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of five genes (16S rRNA, glnA, gyrB, recA and HSP60), DNA-DNA reassociation between the closest phylogenetic neighbours and determination of relevant phenotypic properties, was applied. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences grouped these strains together and within the genus Yersinia. MLSA of the 16S rRNA gene and four housekeeping genes showed that the strains formed a monophyletic group separate from other Yersinia species in all phylogenetic trees constructed. The strains had a phenotypic profile different from those of other representatives of the genus Yersinia, but most similar to that of Yersinia ruckeri. Typical virulence markers for pathogenic Yersinia were not detected. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and DNA-DNA reassociation data, a novel species, Yersinia nurmii sp. nov., is proposed for the isolated strains. The type strain is APN3a-c(T) ( = DSM 22296(T)  = LMG 25213(T)).

  4. In Polytomella sp. mitochondria, biogenesis of the heterodimeric COX2 subunit of cytochrome c oxidase requires two different import pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Suárez, Alejandra; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rojas-Hernández, Andrés; Funes, Soledad; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-05-01

    In the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms, the mitochondrial cox2 gene encodes subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase (COX2). However, in some lineages including legumes and chlorophycean algae, the cox2 gene migrated to the nucleus. Furthermore, in chlorophycean algae, this gene was split in two different units. Thereby the COX2 subunit is encoded by two independent nuclear genes, cox2a and cox2b, and mitochondria have to import the cytosol-synthesized COX2A and COX2B subunits and assemble them into the cytochrome c oxidase complex. In the chlorophycean algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Polytomella sp., the COX2A precursor exhibits a long (130-140 residues), cleavable mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS). In contrast, COX2B lacks an MTS, suggesting that mitochondria use different mechanisms to import each subunit. Here, we explored the in vitro import processes of both, the Polytomella sp. COX2A precursor and the COX2B protein. We used isolated, import-competent mitochondria from this colorless alga. Our results suggest that COX2B is imported directly into the intermembrane space, while COX2A seems to follow an energy-dependent import pathway, through which it finally integrates into the inner mitochondrial membrane. In addition, the MTS of the COX2A precursor is eliminated. This is the first time that the in vitro import of split COX2 subunits into mitochondria has been achieved.

  5. Characterization of an Electron Transport Pathway Associated with Glucose and Fructose Respiration in the Intact Chloroplasts of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Spinach 1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kausal K.; Chen, Changguo; Gibbs, Martin

    1992-01-01

    The role of an electron transport pathway associated with aerobic carbohydrate degradation in isolated, intact chloroplasts was evaluated. This was accomplished by monitoring the evolution of 14CO2 from darkened spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts externally supplied with [14C]fructose and [14C]glucose, respectively, in the presence of nitrite, oxaloacetate, and conventional electron transport inhibitors. Addition of nitrite or oxaloacetate increased the release of 14CO2, but it was shown that O2 continued to function as a terminal electron acceptor. 14CO2 evolution was inhibited up to 30 and 15% in Chlamydomonas and spinach, respectively, by 50 μm rotenone and by amytal, but at 500- to 1000-fold higher concentrations, indicating the involvement of a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-plastoquinone oxidoreductase. 14CO2 release from the spinach chloroplast was inhibited 80% by 25 μm 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone. 14CO2 release was sensitive to propylgallate, exhibiting approximately 50% inhibition in Chlamydomonas and in spinach chloroplasts of 100 and 250 μm concentrations, respectively. These concentrations were 20- to 50-fold lower than the concentrations of salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) required to produce an equivalent sensitivity. Antimycin A (100 μm) inhibited approximately 80 to 90% of 14CO2 release from both types of chloroplast. At 75 μm, sodium azide inhibited 14CO2 evolution about 50% in Chlamydomonas and 30% in spinach. Sodium azide (100 mm) combined with antimycin A (100 μm) inhibited 14CO2 evolution more than 90%. 14CO2 release was unaffected by uncouplers. These results are interpreted as evidence for a respiratory electron transport pathway functioning in the darkened, isolated chloroplast. Chloroplast respiration defined as 14CO2 release from externally supplied [1-14C]glucose can account for at least 10% of the total respiratory capacity (endogenous release of CO2) of the

  6. Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Kämpfer, Peter; Huber, Birgit; Thummes, Kathrin; Grün-Wollny, Iris; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, strain GW8-1761(T), was isolated from soil close to the Marmore waterfalls, Terni, Italy. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain GW8-1761(T) belonged to the genus Actinoplanes, being most closely related to Actinoplanes italicus JCM 3165(T) (98.9 %), A. rectilineatus IFO 13941(T) (98.5 %), A. palleronii JCM 7626(T) (97.8 %), A. utahensis IFO 13244(T) (97.6 %) and A. cyaneus DSM 46137(T) (97.6 %). Strain GW8-1761(T) could be distinguished from any other Actinoplanes species with validly published names by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of less than 97.5 %. Chemotaxonomic data [major menaquinone MK-9(H(4)); major polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, with phosphatidylcholine and aminoglycolipids absent; major fatty acids C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 0) iso, C(17 : 1)omega8c and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH)] supported the affiliation of strain GW8-1761(T) to the genus Actinoplanes. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain GW8-1761(T) from the most closely related species. Strain GW8-1761(T) therefore merits species status, and we propose the name Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov., with the type strain GW8-1761(T) (=DSM 45050(T)=CIP 109316(T)).

  7. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L; Granas, David M; Dutcher, Susan K

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating.

  8. Comparison of the Structural Changes Occurring during the Primary Phototransition of Two Different Channelrhodopsins from Chlamydomonas Algae

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) from green flagellate algae function as light-gated ion channels when expressed heterologously in mammalian cells. Considerable interest has focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of ChRs to bioengineer their properties for specific optogenetic applications such as elucidating the function of specific neurons in brain circuits. While most studies have used channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2), in this work low-temperature Fourier transform infrared-difference spectroscopy is applied to study the conformational changes occurring during the primary phototransition of the red-shifted ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1). Substitution with isotope-labeled retinals or the retinal analogue A2, site-directed mutagenesis, hydrogen–deuterium exchange, and H218O exchange were used to assign bands to the retinal chromophore, protein, and internal water molecules. The primary phototransition of CaChR1 at 80 K involves, in contrast to that of CrChR2, almost exclusively an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization of the retinal chromophore, as in the primary phototransition of bacteriorhodopsin (BR). In addition, significant differences are found for structural changes of the protein and internal water(s) compared to those of CrChR2, including the response of several Asp/Glu residues to retinal isomerization. A negative amide II band is identified in the retinal ethylenic stretch region of CaChR1, which reflects along with amide I bands alterations in protein backbone structure early in the photocycle. A decrease in the hydrogen bond strength of a weakly hydrogen bonded internal water is detected in both CaChR1 and CrChR2, but the bands are much broader in CrChR2, indicating a more heterogeneous environment. Mutations involving residues Glu169 and Asp299 (homologues of the Asp85 and Asp212 Schiff base counterions, respectively, in BR) lead to the conclusion that Asp299 is protonated during P1 formation and suggest that

  9. Site energies of active and inactive pheophytins in the reaction center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Acharya, K; Neupane, B; Zazubovich, V; Sayre, R T; Picorel, R; Seibert, M; Jankowiak, R

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin a (Pheo a) within the D1 protein (Pheo(D1)), while Pheo(D2) (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q(y)-states of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986 - 998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364 - 12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo(D1) is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo(D2) (~677.5 nm) and Chl(D1) (~680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo(D2)-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q(y) absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472 - 11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664 - 1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) (including the corresponding Q(x) transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo(D1) is genetically replaced with chlorophyll a (Chl a). We show that the Q(x)-/Q(y)-region site energies of Pheo(D1) and Pheo(D2) are ~545/680 nm and ~541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment [Jankowiak et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2002, 106, 8803 - 8814]. The latter values should be used to model excitonic

  10. Site Energies of Active and Inactive Pheophytins in the Reaction Center of Photosystem II from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, K.; Neupane, B.; Zazubovich, V.; Sayre, R. T.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.

    2012-03-29

    It is widely accepted that the primary electron acceptor in various Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center (RC) preparations is pheophytin {alpha} (Pheo {alpha}) within the D1 protein (Pheo{sub D1}), while Pheo{sub D2} (within the D2 protein) is photochemically inactive. The Pheo site energies, however, have remained elusive, due to inherent spectral congestion. While most researchers over the past two decades placed the Q{sub y}-states of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} bands near 678-684 and 668-672 nm, respectively, recent modeling [Raszewski et al. Biophys. J. 2005, 88, 986-998; Cox et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 12364-12374] of the electronic structure of the PSII RC reversed the assignment of the active and inactive Pheos, suggesting that the mean site energy of Pheo{sub D1} is near 672 nm, whereas Pheo{sub D2} ({approx}677.5 nm) and Chl{sub D1} ({approx}680 nm) have the lowest energies (i.e., the Pheo{sub D2}-dominated exciton is the lowest excited state). In contrast, chemical pigment exchange experiments on isolated RCs suggested that both pheophytins have their Q{sub y} absorption maxima at 676-680 nm [Germano et al. Biochemistry 2001, 40, 11472-11482; Germano et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 86, 1664-1672]. To provide more insight into the site energies of both Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} (including the corresponding Q{sub x} transitions, which are often claimed to be degenerate at 543 nm) and to attest that the above two assignments are most likely incorrect, we studied a large number of isolated RC preparations from spinach and wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (at different levels of intactness) as well as the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant (D2-L209H), in which the active branch Pheo{sub D1} is genetically replaced with chlorophyll {alpha} (Chl {alpha}). We show that the Q{sub x}-/Q{sub y}-region site energies of Pheo{sub D1} and Pheo{sub D2} are {approx}545/680 nm and {approx}541.5/670 nm, respectively, in good agreement with our previous assignment

  11. The Role of Glycerol and Inorganic Ions in Osmoregulatory Responses of the Euryhaline Flagellate Chlamydomonas pulsatilla Wollenweber 1

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Hellebust, Johan A.

    1986-01-01

    The green euryhaline flagellate Chlamydomonas pulsatilla Wollenweber, isolated from a coastal marine environment, was grown exponentially over the salinity range of 10 to 200% artificial seawater (ASW). The cellular volume and aqueous space of the alga, measured by [14C] mannitol and 3H2O tracer analyses of centrifuged cell pellets, ranged between 2.3 and 3.1 picoliters and between 1.5 and 2.1 picoliters, respectively. The nonaqueous space determined in those analyses (28-35%) was consistent with the cell composition of the alga. The glycerol content of the alga increased almost linearly with increasing salinity; its contribution to intracellular osmolality at 200% ASW was about 57%. The contribution of amino acids and soluble carbohydrates to the cell osmotic balance was small. Intracellular ion concentrations determined by analyzing centrifuged cell pellets of known [14C]mannitol space by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and by neutron activation analyses of washed cells were similar. At 10% ASW, potassium and magnesium were the major cations, and chloride and phosphate were the major anions. The sodium and chloride content of the alga increased with increasing salinity; at 200% ASW the intracellular concentration of both sodium and chloride was about 400 millimolar. The intracellular osmolality (πint) matched closely the external osmolality (πext) over the entire salinity range except at 10% ASW where πint exceeded πext by 120 to 270 milliosmoles per kilogram H2O. PMID:16665042

  12. Flow rate and duty cycle effects in lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Grant; Bigelow, Timothy A; Stessman, Dan J; Spalding, Martin H; Yao, Linxing; Wang, Tong; Xu, Jin

    2014-06-01

    To consider microalgae lipid biofuel as a viable energy source, it is a necessity to maximize algal cell lysis, lipid harvest, and thus biofuel production versus the energy used to lyse the cells. Previous techniques have been to use energy consumptive ultrasound waves in the 10-40 kHz range in a stationary exposure environment. This study evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound pulses in a new flow through type chamber on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism for cell breakage. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at varied pulse repetition frequencies. First, variations in flow rate were examined at a constant duty cycle of 3.6%. After assessing flow rates, the duty cycle was varied to further explore the dependence on the tone burst parameters. Cell lysis was assessed by quantifying protein and chlorophyll release into the supernatant as well as by lipid extractability. Appropriate flow rates with higher duty cycles led to statistically significant increases in cell lysis relative to controls and other exposure conditions.

  13. The chloroplast atpA gene cluster in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Functional analysis of a polycistronic transcription unit.

    PubMed

    Drapier, D; Suzuki, H; Levy, H; Rimbault, B; Kindle, K L; Stern, D B; Wollman, F A

    1998-06-01

    Most chloroplast genes in vascular plants are organized into polycistronic transcription units, which generate a complex pattern of mono-, di-, and polycistronic transcripts. In contrast, most Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast transcripts characterized to date have been monocistronic. This paper describes the atpA gene cluster in the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome, which includes the atpA, psbI, cemA, and atpH genes, encoding the alpha-subunit of the coupling-factor-1 (CF1) ATP synthase, a small photosystem II polypeptide, a chloroplast envelope membrane protein, and subunit III of the CF0 ATP synthase, respectively. We show that promoters precede the atpA, psbI, and atpH genes, but not the cemA gene, and that cemA mRNA is present only as part of di-, tri-, or tetracistronic transcripts. Deletions introduced into the gene cluster reveal, first, that CF1-alpha can be translated from di- or polycistronic transcripts, and, second, that substantial reductions in mRNA quantity have minimal effects on protein synthesis rates. We suggest that posttranscriptional mRNA processing is common in C. reinhardtii chloroplasts, permitting the expression of multiple genes from a single promoter.

  14. Distinct roles of 1α and 1β heavy chains of the inner arm dynein I1 of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Shiori; Fox, Laura A.; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Porter, Mary E.; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Sale, Winfield S.

    2011-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas I1 dynein is a two-headed inner dynein arm important for the regulation of flagellar bending. Here we took advantage of mutant strains lacking either the 1α or 1β motor domain to distinguish the functional role of each motor domain. Single- particle electronic microscopic analysis confirmed that both the I1α and I1β complexes are single headed with similar ringlike, motor domain structures. Despite similarity in structure, however, the I1β complex has severalfold higher ATPase activity and microtubule gliding motility compared to the I1α complex. Moreover, in vivo measurement of microtubule sliding in axonemes revealed that the loss of the 1β motor results in a more severe impairment in motility and failure in regulation of microtubule sliding by the I1 dynein phosphoregulatory mechanism. The data indicate that each I1 motor domain is distinct in function: The I1β motor domain is an effective motor required for wild-type microtubule sliding, whereas the I1α motor domain may be responsible for local restraint of microtubule sliding. PMID:21148301

  15. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Stephen P; Paget, Caroline M; Johnson, Giles N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the down regulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF), but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential-impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of l,l-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, André O.; Girón, Irma; Dobson, Renwick C. J.

    2011-01-01

    In the anabolic synthesis of diaminopimelate and lysine in plants and in some bacteria, the enzyme l,l-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL; EC 2.6.1.83) catalyzes the conversion of tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (THDPA) to l,l-diaminopimelate, bypassing the DapD, DapC and DapE enzymatic steps in the bacterial acyl pathways. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DapL from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are presented. Protein crystals were grown in conditions containing 25%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 200 mM lithium sulfate and initially diffracted to ∼1.35 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 91.8, c = 162.9 Å. The data were processed to 1.55 Å resolution with an R merge of 0.081, an R p.i.m. of 0.044, an R r.i.m of 0.093 and a V M of 2.28 Å3 Da−1. PMID:21206046

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hudson, André O; Girón, Irma; Dobson, Renwick C J

    2011-01-01

    In the anabolic synthesis of diaminopimelate and lysine in plants and in some bacteria, the enzyme L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL; EC 2.6.1.83) catalyzes the conversion of tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (THDPA) to L,L-diaminopimelate, bypassing the DapD, DapC and DapE enzymatic steps in the bacterial acyl pathways. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of DapL from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are presented. Protein crystals were grown in conditions containing 25% (w/v) PEG 3350 and 200 mM lithium sulfate and initially diffracted to ∼1.35 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a=58.9, b=91.8, c=162.9 Å. The data were processed to 1.55 Å resolution with an Rmerge of 0.081, an Rp.i.m. of 0.044, an Rr.i.m of 0.093 and a VM of 2.28 Å3 Da(-1).

  18. Central Carbon Metabolism and Electron Transport in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Metabolic Constraints for Carbon Partitioning between Oil and Starch

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Xenie

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of microalgae is so flexible that it is not an easy task to give a comprehensive description of the interplay between the various metabolic pathways. There are, however, constraints that govern central carbon metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that are revealed by the compartmentalization and regulation of the pathways and their relation to key cellular processes such as cell motility, division, carbon uptake and partitioning, external and internal rhythms, and nutrient stress. Both photosynthetic and mitochondrial electron transfer provide energy for metabolic processes and how energy transfer impacts metabolism and vice versa is a means of exploring the regulation and function of these pathways. A key example is the specific chloroplast localization of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and how it impacts the redox poise and ATP budget of the plastid in the dark. To compare starch and lipids as carbon reserves, their value can be calculated in terms of NAD(P)H and ATP. As microalgae are now considered a potential renewable feedstock, we examine current work on the subject and also explore the possibility of rerouting metabolism toward lipid production. PMID:23543671

  19. Genome-wide long non-coding RNA screening, identification and characterization in a model microorganism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Yuting; Chen, Meirong; Xiao, Peng; Hu, Changxing; Zeng, Zhiyong; Wang, Chaogang; Wang, Jiangxin; Hu, Zhangli

    2016-09-23

    Microalgae are regarded as the most promising biofuel candidates and extensive metabolic engineering were conducted but very few improvements were achieved. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) investigation and manipulation may provide new insights for this issue. LncRNAs refer to transcripts that are longer than 200 nucleotides, do not encode proteins but play important roles in eukaryotic gene regulation. However, no information of potential lncRNAs has been reported in eukaryotic alga. Recently, we performed RNA sequencing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and obtained totally 3,574 putative lncRNAs. 1440 were considered as high-confidence lncRNAs, including 936 large intergenic, 310 intronic and 194 anti-sense lncRNAs. The average transcript length, ORF length and numbers of exons for lncRNAs are much less than for genes in this green alga. In contrast with human lncRNAs of which more than 98% are spliced, the percentage in C. reinhardtii is only 48.1%. In addition, we identified 367 lncRNAs responsive to sulfur deprivation, including 36 photosynthesis-related lncRNAs. This is the first time that lncRNAs were explored in the unicellular model organism C. reinhardtii. The lncRNA data could also provide new insights into C. reinhardtii hydrogen production under sulfur deprivation.

  20. Refactoring the Six-Gene Photosystem II Core in the Chloroplast of the Green Algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Scranton, Melissa A; Li, Daphne; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2016-07-15

    Oxygenic photosynthesis provides the energy to produce all food and most of the fuel on this planet. Photosystem II (PSII) is an essential and rate-limiting component of this process. Understanding and modifying PSII function could provide an opportunity for optimizing photosynthetic biomass production, particularly under specific environmental conditions. PSII is a complex multisubunit enzyme with strong interdependence among its components. In this work, we have deleted the six core genes of PSII in the eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and refactored them in a single DNA construct. Complementation of the knockout strain with the core PSII synthetic module from three different green algae resulted in reconstitution of photosynthetic activity to 85, 55, and 53% of that of the wild-type, demonstrating that the PSII core can be exchanged between algae species and retain function. The strains, synthetic cassettes, and refactoring strategy developed for this study demonstrate the potential of synthetic biology approaches for tailoring oxygenic photosynthesis and provide a powerful tool for unraveling PSII structure-function relationships.

  1. Multiple stressor effects of predation by rotifers and herbicide pollution on different Chlamydomonas strains and potential impacts on population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Roffler, Severin; Eggen, Rik I L

    2012-12-01

    Environmental factors can interact with the effects of chemical pollutants on natural systems by inducing multiple stressor effects in individual organisms as well as by altering selection pressure on tolerant strains in heterogeneous populations. Predation is a stressful environmental factor relevant for many species. Therefore, the impact of predation by the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus on tolerance of eight genetically different strains of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to simultaneous exposure to each of the three herbicides (diuron, paraquat, and S-metolachlor) was tested. Interactions of combined stressors were analyzed based on the independent action model; additive, synergistic, and antagonistic effects of the combined exposure could be detected depending on the herbicide and strain tested. If cultures were acclimated (pre-exposed) to one stressor, tolerance to the second stressor could be increased. This indicates that physiological changes can induce cotolerance of predation-exposed algae to herbicides and of herbicide-treated algae to predation depending on the combination of stressors. The strain-specific differences in multiple stressor effects also changed the correlation of strains' tolerances to individual stressors determined during combined and single-stressor exposure. Changes in cotolerance to stressors affect selection pressure and population dynamics during long-term exposure. This shows that predation stress can have adverse effects on the toxicity of chemical pollutants to microalgae on the organism and population levels.

  2. Down-regulation of catalase activity allows transient accumulation of a hydrogen peroxide signal in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Laure; Roach, Thomas; Fischer, Beat B; Bedhomme, Mariette; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2013-06-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, excess light is a stress that induces production of reactive oxygen species inside the chloroplasts. As a response, the capacity of antioxidative defence mechanisms increases. However, when cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were shifted from dark to high light, a reversible partial inactivation of catalase activity was observed, which correlated with a transient increase in the level of H2 O2 in the 10 μm range. This concentration range seems to be necessary to activate H2 O2 -dependent signalling pathways stimulating the expression of H2 O2 responsive genes, such as the heat shock protein HSP22C. Catalase knock-down mutants had lost the transient accumulation of H2 O2 , suggesting that a decrease in catalase activity was the key element for establishing a transient H2 O2 burst. Catalase was inactivated by a one-electron event consistent with the reduction of a single cysteine. We propose that under high light intensity, the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain is sensed and transmitted to the cytosol to regulate the catalase activity. This allows a transient accumulation of H2 O2 , inducing a signalling event that is transmitted to the nucleus to modulate the expression of chloroplast-directed protection enzymes.

  3. Comparison of tubular and panel type photobioreactors for biohydrogen production utilizing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii considering mixing time and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Oncel, S; Kose, A

    2014-01-01

    Two different photobioreactor designs; tubular and panel, were investigated for the biohydrogen production utilizing a green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain CC124 following the two stage protocol. Mixing time and light intensity of the systems were adjusted to compare the productivity of both aerobic culture phase and the following anaerobic biohydrogen production phase. The results showed there was an effect on both phases related with the design. During the aerobic phase bigger illumination area serving more energy, tubular photobioreactor reached higher biomass productivity of 31.8±2.1 mg L(-1) h(-1) which was about 11% higher than the panel photobioreactor. On the other hand biohydrogen productivity in the panel photobioreactor reached a value of 1.3±0.05 mL L(-1) h(-1) based on the efficient removal of biohydrogen gas. According to the results it would be a good approach to utilize tubular design for aerobic phase and panel for biohydrogen production phase.

  4. Application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells for the monitoring and direct usage of biohydrogen produced by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncel, S.; Vardar-Sukan, F.

    Photo-biologically produced hydrogen by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is integrated with a proton exchange (PEM) fuel cell for online electricity generation. To investigate the fuel cell efficiency, the effect of hydrogen production on the open circuit fuel cell voltage is monitored during 27 days of batch culture. Values of volumetric hydrogen production, monitored by the help of the calibrated water columns, are related with the open circuit voltage changes of the fuel cell. From the analysis of this relation a dead end configuration is selected to use the fuel cell in its best potential. After the open circuit experiments external loads are tested for their effects on the fuel cell voltage and current generation. According to the results two external loads are selected for the direct usage of the fuel cell incorporating with the photobioreactors (PBR). Experiments with the PEM fuel cell generate a current density of 1.81 mA cm -2 for about 50 h with 10 Ω load and 0.23 mA cm -2 for about 80 h with 100 Ω load.

  5. Herbicide mixtures at high doses slow the evolution of resistance in experimentally evolving populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lagator, Mato; Vogwill, Tom; Mead, Andrew; Colegrave, Nick; Neve, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The widespread evolution of resistance to herbicides is a pressing issue in global agriculture. Evolutionary principles and practices are key to the management of this threat to global food security. The application of mixtures of herbicides has been advocated as an anti-resistance strategy, without substantial empirical support for its validation. We evolved experimentally populations of the unicellular green chlorophyte, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of single-herbicide modes of action and to pair-wise and three-way mixtures between different herbicides at various total combined doses. Herbicide mixtures were most effective when each component was applied at or close to its MIC. When doses were high, increasing the number of mixture components was also effective in reducing the evolution of resistance. Employing mixtures at low combined doses did not retard resistance evolution, even accelerating the evolution of resistance to some components. At low doses, increasing the number of herbicides in the mixture tended to select for more generalist resistance (cross-resistance). Our results reinforce findings from the antibiotic resistance literature and confirm that herbicide mixtures can be very effective for resistance management, but that mixtures should only be employed where the economic and environmental context permits the applications of high combined doses.

  6. Multiple stressor effects in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii--toward understanding mechanisms of interaction between effects of ultraviolet radiation and chemical pollutants.

    PubMed

    Korkaric, Muris; Behra, Renata; Fischer, Beat B; Junghans, Marion; Eggen, Rik I L

    2015-05-01

    The effects of chemical pollutants and environmental stressors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR), can interact when organisms are simultaneously exposed, resulting in higher (synergistic) or lower (antagonistic) multiple stressor effects than expected based on the effects of single stressors. Current understanding of interactive effects is limited due to a lack of mechanism-based multiple stressor studies. It has been hypothesized that effect interactions may generally occur if chemical and non-chemical stressors cause similar physiological effects in the organism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to combinations of UVR and single chemicals displaying modes of action (MOA) similar or dissimilar to the impact of UVR on photosynthesis. Stressor interactions were analyzed based on the independent action model. Effect interactions were found to depend on the MOA of the chemicals, and also on their concentrations, the exposure time and the measured endpoint. Indeed, only chemicals assumed to cause effects on photosynthesis similar to UVR showed interactions with UVR on photosynthetic yield: synergistic in case of Cd(II) and paraquat and antagonistic in case of diuron. No interaction on photosynthesis was observed for S-metolachlor, which acts dissimilarly to UVR. However, combined effects of S-metolachlor and UVR on algal reproduction were synergistic, highlighting the importance of considering additional MOA of UVR. Possible mechanisms of stressor effect interactions are discussed.

  7. LHCSR1 induces a fast and reversible pH-dependent fluorescence quenching in LHCII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Emine; Tian, Lijin; Roy, Laura M.; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Croce, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    To avoid photodamage, photosynthetic organisms are able to thermally dissipate the energy absorbed in excess in a process known as nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Although NPQ has been studied extensively, the major players and the mechanism of quenching remain debated. This is a result of the difficulty in extracting molecular information from in vivo experiments and the absence of a validation system for in vitro experiments. Here, we have created a minimal cell of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that is able to undergo NPQ. We show that LHCII, the main light harvesting complex of algae, cannot switch to a quenched conformation in response to pH changes by itself. Instead, a small amount of the protein LHCSR1 (light-harvesting complex stress related 1) is able to induce a large, fast, and reversible pH-dependent quenching in an LHCII-containing membrane. These results strongly suggest that LHCSR1 acts as pH sensor and that it modulates the excited state lifetimes of a large array of LHCII, also explaining the NPQ observed in the LHCSR3-less mutant. The possible quenching mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27335457

  8. Gametogenesis in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii minus mating type is controlled by two genes, MID and MTD1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huawen; Goodenough, Ursula W

    2007-06-01

    In the unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the plus and minus mating types are controlled by a complex locus, MT, where the dominant MID gene in the MT(-) locus has been shown to be necessary for expression of minus-specific gamete-specific genes in response to nitrogen depletion. We report studies on MID expression patterns during gametogenesis and on a second gene unique to the MT(-) locus, MTD1. Vegetative cells express basal levels of MID. An early activation of MID transcription after nitrogen removal, and its sequence similarity to plant RWP-RK proteins involved in nitrogen-responsive processes, suggest that Mid conformation/activity may be nitrogen sensitive. A second stage of MID upregulation correlates with the acquisition of mating ability in minus gametes. Knockdown of MTD1 by RNAi in minus strains results in a failure to differentiate into gametes of either mating type after nitrogen deprivation. We propose that intermediate Mid levels are sufficient to activate MTD1 transcription and to repress plus gamete-specific genes and that MTD1 expression in turn allows the threshold-level MID expression needed to turn on minus gamete-specific genes. We further propose that an MTD1-equivalent system, utilizing at least one gene product encoded in the MT(+) locus, is operant during plus gametogenesis.

  9. Alteration of photochemistry and protein degradation of photosystem II from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under high salt grown cells.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Satyabala; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2013-07-05

    In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of NaCl on cell growth, photochemistry and protein profile of photosystem (PS) II in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To study the effect of NaCl on the photosynthetic apparatus, the C. reinhardtii cells were grown at different concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 mM). NaCl induced flagellar resorption due to which the cells lost their motility, formation of palmelloids, reduced cell size and slower cell division. Chlorophyll fluorescence transients at different NaCl concentrations had decreased intensities of all peaks (OJIP) indicating the apparent inactivation energies of both donor and acceptor side of PSII. Consequently, inhibition of electron transport occurred particularly at PSII. Further, low temperature emission spectra showed that the rate of damage to the PSII was more when compared to PSI. Also, we have carried out the visible circular dichroism spectra from thylakoids where the major peaks contributed to chlorophyll a and b are equally reduced in different salt grown cells, which may explain the changes at the level of inter pigment-pigment interactions. Furthermore protein profile analysis of PSII revealed that the major subunit of light harvesting complex (LHC)II is more prone to salt stress than core proteins of PSII indicating the light harvesting funnel from LHCII to PSII core is impaired.

  10. Improving recombinant protein production in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast using vivid Verde Fluorescent Protein as a reporter.

    PubMed

    Braun-Galleani, Stephanie; Baganz, Frank; Purton, Saul

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae have potential as platforms for the synthesis of high-value recombinant proteins due to their many beneficial attributes including ease of cultivation, lack of pathogenic agents, and low-cost downstream processing. However, current recombinant protein levels are low compared to other microbial platforms and stable insertion of transgenes is available in only a few microalgal species. We have explored different strategies aimed at increasing growth rate and recombinant protein production in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast. A novel fluorescent protein (vivid Verde Fluorescent Protein, VFP) was expressed under the control of the native atpA promoter/5'UTR element. VFP levels were detected by western blotting, with increased protein levels observed when co-expressed with a gene encoding the Escherichia coli Spy chaperone. We used these transformant lines to study the effect of temperature, light and media on recombinant protein production and cell growth. VFP levels and fluorescence, assessed by flow cytometry, allowed a determination of improved cultivation conditions as 30°C under mixotrophic mode. These conditions were tested for the accumulation of an antimicrobial endolysin (Cpl-1) of potential commercial interest, observing that the outcome obtained for VFP could not be easily replicated for Cpl-1. This study suggests that recombinant protein expression is product-specific and needs to be optimized individually.

  11. The phosphorylation state of an aurora-like kinase marks the length of growing flagella in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Luo, Minna; Cao, Muqing; Kan, Yinan; Li, Guihua; Snell, William; Pan, Junmin

    2011-04-12

    Flagella and cilia are structurally polarized organelles whose lengths are precisely defined, and alterations in length are related to several human disorders. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) and protein signaling molecules are implicated in specifying flagellar and ciliary length, but evidence has been lacking for a flagellum and cilium length sensor that could participate in active length control or establishment of structural polarity. Previously, we showed that the phosphorylation state of the aurora-like protein kinase CALK in Chlamydomonas is a marker of the absence of flagella. Here we show that CALK phosphorylation state is also a marker for flagellar length. CALK is phosphorylated in cells without flagella, and during flagellar assembly it becomes dephosphorylated. Dephosphorylation is not simply a consequence of initiation of flagellar assembly or of time after experimentally induced flagellar loss, but instead requires flagella to be assembled to a threshold length. Analysis of cells with flagella of varying lengths shows that the threshold length for CALK dephosphorylation is ~6 μm (half length). Studies with short and long flagellar mutants indicate that cells detect absolute rather than relative flagellar length. Our results demonstrate that cells possess a mechanism for translating flagellar length into a posttranslational modification of a known flagellar regulatory protein.

  12. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport-independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F

    2016-01-15

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein-tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia.

  13. Biogenesis and fate of the cell-cell adhesion molecule, agglutinin, during gametogenesis and fertilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Hunnicutt, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Fertilization in Chlamydomonas begins with the species-specific recognition and adhesion between gametes of opposite mating types via agglutinin molecules on the flagellar surface. This adhesion generates a cAMP-mediated sexual signal that initiates the subsequent events of call wall release, mating structure activation, and cell fusion. Although flagella of paired gametes remain attached to each other until the zygote forms, the process is dynamic. Engaged agglutinins rapidly become inactivated and turnover, requiring the constant supply of new agglutinins to replace the lost molecules. A population of cell body associated agglutinins has been postulated to the pool of agglutinins recruited during this turnover. Cell body agglutinins, therefore were identified, purified, localized within the cells and compared to flagellar agglutinins. The relationship between these two agglutinin populations was also examined. Cell body agglutinins were biochemically indistinguishable from the flagellar form with respect to their M{sub r}, sedimentation coefficient, and hydrophobicity elution properties. Functionally, however, these molecules were inactive in situ. The calculated surface density of agglutinins in the cell body and flagellar domains was similar and thus could not explain their functional difference, but two domains contiguous and yet distinctive suggested they may be separated by a functional barrier. To test this, a method was developed, using a monoclonal antibody and cycloheximide, that removed the flagellar agglutinins so movement between the domains could be monitored. Mobilization of agglutinins onto the flagella did not occur unless sexual signaling was induced with cAMP and papaverine.

  14. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii BBSome is an IFT cargo required for export of specific signaling proteins from flagella.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Johnson, Eric C; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Cochran, Deborah; Ballif, Bryan A; Rush, John; Pazour, Gregory J; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Witman, George B

    2009-12-28

    In humans, seven evolutionarily conserved genes that cause the cilia-related disorder Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) encode proteins that form a complex termed the BBSome. The function of the BBSome in the cilium is not well understood. We purified a BBSome-like complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella and found that it contains at least BBS1, -4, -5, -7, and -8 and undergoes intraflagellar transport (IFT) in association with a subset of IFT particles. C. reinhardtii insertional mutants defective in BBS1, -4, and -7 assemble motile, full-length flagella but lack the ability to phototax. In the bbs4 mutant, the assembly and transport of IFT particles are unaffected, but the flagella abnormally accumulate several signaling proteins that may disrupt phototaxis. We conclude that the BBSome is carried by IFT but is an adapter rather than an integral component of the IFT machinery. C. reinhardtii BBS4 may be required for the export of signaling proteins from the flagellum via IFT.

  15. Acclimation to salt modifies the activation of several osmotic stress-activated lipid signalling pathways in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; van Himbergen, John A J; Musgrave, Alan; Munnik, Teun

    2017-03-01

    Osmotic stress rapidly activates several phospholipid signalling pathways in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas. In this report, we have studied the effects of salt-acclimation on growth and phospholipid signalling. Growing cells on media containing 100 mM NaCl increased their salt-tolerance but did not affect the overall phospholipid content, except that levels of phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] were reduced by one-third. When these NaCl-acclimated cells were treated with increasing concentrations of salt, the same lipid signalling pathways as in non-acclimated cells were activated. This was witnessed as increases in phosphatidic acid (PA), lyso-phosphatidic acid (L-PA), diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DGPP), PI(4,5)P2 and its isomer PI(3,5)P2. However, all dose-dependent responses were shifted to higher osmotic-stress levels, and the responses were lower than in non-acclimated cells. When NaCl-acclimated cells were treated with other osmotica, such as KCl and sucrose, the same effects were found, illustrating that they were due to hyperosmotic rather than hyperionic acclimation. The results indicate that acclimation to moderate salt stress modifies stress perception and the activation of several downstream pathways.

  16. Effects of sodium sulfate on the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii: implications for the optimization of algal culture media.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-02-01

    The study of the microalgal growth kinetics is an indispensable tool in all fields of phycology. Knowing the optimal nutrient concentration is an important issue that will help to develop efficient growth systems for these microorganisms. Although nitrogen and phosphorus are well studied for this purpose, sulfur seems to be less investigated. Sulfate is a primary sulfur source used by microalgae; moreover, the concentration of this compound is increasing in freshwater systems due to pollution. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different sodium sulfate concentrations in the culture medium on growth and growth kinetics of the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii. Production of biomass, chl content, kinetic equations, and a mathematical model that describe the microalgal growth in relation with the concentration of sodium sulfate were obtained. The lowest concentration of sodium sulfate allowing optimal growth was 0.1 mM. Concentrations higher than 3 mM generated a toxic effect. This work demonstrates that this toxic effect was not directly due to the excess of sulfate ion but by the elevation of the ionic strength. An inhibition model was successfully used to simulate the relationship between specific growth rate and sodium sulfate in this microalga.

  17. Expression and function analysis of the metallothionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Han, SiHai; Hu, ZhangLi; Lei, AnPing

    2008-12-01

    The cDNA of the metallothionein-like (MT-like) gene from Festuca rubra cv. Merlin was optimized with bias codon of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast genome. The optimized MT-like gene was delivered into C. reinhardtii chloroplast and the transgenic strains expressing MT-like gene was obtained. PCR-Southern blot and RT-PCR-Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the MT-like gene was integrated into chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii and expressed at the transcriptional level. The cadmium binding capacity of the transgenic C. reinhardtii was determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) and the binding properties were analyzed. Results showed that the transgenic C. reinhardtii expressing the MT-like gene exhibited remarkably higher Cd(2+) binding capacity and grew to higher densities at toxic Cd(2+) concentrations (40-100 micromol/L) than the wild type strain, and that the IC(50) of Cd(2+) (3-d treating) to algal cell growth of transgenic strain was 55.43% higher than that of the wild type strain, indicating that the Cd(2+) binding capacity and Cd(2+) tolerance of C. reinhardtii was enhanced through the expression of the foreign MT-like gene in chloroplast.

  18. PSR1 Is a Global Transcriptional Regulator of Phosphorus Deficiency Responses and Carbon Storage Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bajhaiya, Amit K.; Dean, Andrew P.; Zeef, Leo A.H.; Webster, Rachel E.; Pittman, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic microalgae modify their metabolism in response to nutrient stresses such as phosphorus (P) starvation, which substantially induces storage metabolite biosynthesis, but the genetic mechanisms regulating this response are poorly understood. Here, we show that P starvation-induced lipid and starch accumulation is inhibited in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant lacking the transcription factor Pi Starvation Response1 (PSR1). Transcriptomic analysis identified specific metabolism transcripts that are induced by P starvation but misregulated in the psr1 mutant. These include transcripts for starch and triacylglycerol synthesis but also transcripts for photosynthesis-, redox-, and stress signaling-related proteins. To further examine the role of PSR1 in regulating lipid and starch metabolism, PSR1 complementation lines in the psr1 strain and PSR1 overexpression lines in a cell wall-deficient strain were generated. PSR1 expression in the psr1 lines was shown to be functional due to rescue of the psr1 phenotype. PSR1 overexpression lines exhibited increased starch content and number of starch granules per cell, which correlated with a higher expression of specific starch metabolism genes but reduced neutral lipid content. Furthermore, this phenotype was consistent in the presence and absence of acetate. Together, these results identify a key transcriptional regulator in global metabolism and demonstrate transcriptional engineering in microalgae to modulate starch biosynthesis. PMID:26704642

  19. Direct Estimate of the Spontaneous Mutation Rate Uncovers the Effects of Drift and Recombination in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Plastid Genome.

    PubMed

    Ness, Rob W; Kraemer, Susanne A; Colegrave, Nick; Keightley, Peter D

    2016-03-01

    Plastids perform crucial cellular functions, including photosynthesis, across a wide variety of eukaryotes. Since endosymbiosis, plastids have maintained independent genomes that now display a wide diversity of gene content, genome structure, gene regulation mechanisms, and transmission modes. The evolution of plastid genomes depends on an input of de novo mutation, but our knowledge of mutation in the plastid is limited to indirect inference from patterns of DNA divergence between species. Here, we use a mutation accumulation experiment, where selection acting on mutations is rendered ineffective, combined with whole-plastid genome sequencing to directly characterize de novo mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that the mutation rates of the plastid and nuclear genomes are similar, but that the base spectra of mutations differ significantly. We integrate our measure of the mutation rate with a population genomic data set of 20 individuals, and show that the plastid genome is subject to substantially stronger genetic drift than the nuclear genome. We also show that high levels of linkage disequilibrium in the plastid genome are not due to restricted recombination, but are instead a consequence of increased genetic drift. One likely explanation for increased drift in the plastid genome is that there are stronger effects of genetic hitchhiking. The presence of recombination in the plastid is consistent with laboratory studies in C. reinhardtii and demonstrates that although the plastid genome is thought to be uniparentally inherited, it recombines in nature at a rate similar to the nuclear genome.