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Sample records for chlamydomonas sp ice-l

  1. Survival and proliferation characteristics of the microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L after hypergravitational stress pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhengquan; Li, Demao; Meng, Chunxiao; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao

    2013-09-01

    Seeking extraterrestrial life, transferring between planets, even migrating to other planets attracts more and more attention of public and scientists. However, to make it clear for the ability to survive the forces studies is prerequisite to enable the speculations by natural means. Gravity is a critical force involved in all the life on Earth and, possibly, others planets. Organisms have been grown in microgravity habitats and in centrifuges to characterize the biological response to a range of gravitational forces and radiation levels in space and on Earth. However, little is known about the profiles of eukaryotic life under conditions of hyperacceleration attributable to extreme gravities. In this study, a eukaryotic extremophile, the Antarctic green microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L, showed amazing proliferation capacity during and after hypergravitational stress for 30 min to 48 h at 110,200, 423,400, and 670,800g. These extreme gravities also had profound effects on viability, reproduction rate, photosynthesis efficiency, and gene transcriptional expression of this microalga. Most notably, all three supergravities efficiently stimulated algal cell division, but the greater the centrifugal force and the longer the duration of treatment, the lower the viable rate and breeding potential of samples in the following incubation. These results illustrated Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is a useful eukaryotic model system candidate for space research. Further studies could provide new insight into the physical limits of life and its evolution and enhance the possibility for interstellar space travel and the quest for extraterrestrial life according to panspermia theory. Also, it indicated that life come from the outer space is not always prokaryotes but may be eukaryotes.

  2. Effect of Cd on GSH and GSH-related enzymes of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L existing in Antarctic ice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Miao, Jin-Lai; Li, Guang-You; Wang, Quan-Fu; Kan, Guang-Feng; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes play a great role in protecting organisms from oxidative damage. The GSH level and GSH-related enzymes activities were investigated as well as the growth yield and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) content in the Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L exposure to the different cadmium concentration in this paper. The results showed that the higher concentration Cd inhibited the growth of ICE-L significantly and Cd would induce formation of MDA. At the same time, it is clear that GSH level, glutathione peroxidases (GPx) activity and glutathione S-transferases (GST), activity were higher in ICE-L exposed to Cd than the control. But GR activity dropped notably when ICE-L were cultured in the medium containing Cd. Increase of GSH level, GPx and GST activities acclimate to oxidative stress induced by Cd and protect Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L from toxicity caused by Cd exposure. These parameters may be used to assess the biological impact of Cd in the Antarctic pole region environment.

  3. Expression of fatty acid desaturase genes and fatty acid accumulation in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L under salt stress.

    PubMed

    An, Meiling; Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zheng, Zhou; Ye, Naihao; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Wei; Miao, Jinlai

    2013-12-01

    The Antarctic ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which is highly resistant to salt stress holds promise in providing an alternative species for the production of microalgal oil. We studied the effects of the alga in confrontation with NaCl stress on the growth, oil yield and expression of fatty acid desaturase genes. The growth rate of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L decreased with the gradual increase in NaCl concentration. Interestingly, we found that the highest lipid content was achieved at 16‰ NaCl, reaching 23% (w/w). Meanwhile, the expression of Δ9ACPCiFAD increased rapidly while Δ12CiFAD, ω3CiFAD2 and Δ6CiFAD showed a delayed elevation in response to altered salt stress. C18:3 was the dominant PUFA, which account for about 75% TFA in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L. Under 96‰ and 128‰ NaCl stress, the content of C20:5 almost approached that of C18:3. In contrast, low salinity enhanced the dominance of C18:3 at the expense of C20:3 and C20:5.

  4. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of glutathione reductase gene in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Liu, Ying; Jian, Ji-Chang; Wu, Zao-He; Miao, Jin-Lai

    2012-03-01

    A cDNA (GenBank ID: GU395492) encoding cytosolic glutathione reductase (named ICE-LGR) in Antarctic microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was successfully cloned by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique (RACE). The expression patterns of ICE-LGR under different salinity stresses were determined by real-time PCR. ICE-LGR cDNA has 1913 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1458 bp, encoding 485 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 79% homology with glutathione reductase (GR) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Activity assessment and mRNA expression analysis results showed that activity and expression level of GR in ICE-L cells were up-regulated under either high or low salinity. Together, our results revealed that ICE-LGR might play an important role in Antarctic ice algae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L acclimatizing to polar high salinity environment as well as low salinity. These results provide us valuable information on further investigating the molecular mechanism of ICE-LGR.

  5. Transcriptome-wide analysis of DEAD-box RNA helicase gene family in an Antarctic psychrophilic alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Huang, Xiaohang

    2015-09-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase family proteins have been identified in almost all living organisms. Some of them play a crucial role in adaptation to environmental changes and stress response, especially in the low-temperature acclimation in different kinds of organisms. Compared with the full swing study in plants and bacteria, the characters and functions of DEAD-box family proteins had not been surveyed in algae. To identify genes critical for freezing acclimation in algae, we screened DEAD-box RNA helicase genes from the transcriptome sequences of a psychrophilic microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which was isolated from Antarctic sea ice. Totally 39 DEAD-box RNA helicase genes had been identified. Most of the DEAD-box RNA helicase have 1:1 homologous relationships in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L with several exceptions. The homologous proteins in ICE-L to the helicases critical for cold or freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana had been identified based on phylogenetic comparison studies. The response of these helicase genes is not always identical in the Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L and Arabidopsis under the same low-temperature treatment. The expression of several DEAD-box RNA helicase genes including CiRH5, CiRH25, CiRH28, and CiRH55 were significantly up-regulated under freezing treatment of ICE-L and their function in freezing acclimation of ICE-L deserved further investigation.

  6. Temperature regulates fatty acid desaturases at a transcriptional level and modulates the fatty acid profile in the Antarctic microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    An, Meiling; Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Zheng, Zhou; Cao, Shaona; Xu, Dong; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Yitao; Miao, Jinlai

    2013-04-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which can thrive in extreme environments of the Antarctic is a major biomass producer. The FAD genes in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were obtained and sequence alignment showed that these genes are homologous to known FADs with conserved histidine motifs. In this study, we analyzed the transcription of five FADs and FA compositions at different temperatures. The results showed that the expressions of Δ9CiFAD, ω3CiFAD1 and ω3CiFAD2 were apparently up-regulated at 0°C, however, the up-regulation of Δ6CiFAD intensified with rising temperature. Meanwhile, analysis of the FA compositions showed that PUFAs were dominant compositions, accounting for more than 75% TFA in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L. Furthermore, PUFAs were significantly increased at 0 and 5°C, which may be attributed to higher proportions of C18:3 and C20:3. Moreover, PUFAs were significantly decreased at 15°C whereas SFAs were significantly increased.

  7. Cloning and expression analysis of two different LhcSR genes involved in stress adaptation in an Antarctic microalga, Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Dong, Meitao; Liang, Chengwei; Liang, Qiang; Miao, Jinlai; Xu, Dong; Zheng, Zhou

    2012-03-01

    Light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) play essential roles in light capture and photoprotection. Although the functional diversity of individual LHCs in many plants has been well described, knowledge regarding the extent of this family in the majority of green algal groups is still limited. In this study, two different LhcSR genes, LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 from Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L, were cloned from the total cDNA and characterized in response to high light (HL), low light (LL), UV-B radiation and high salinity. The lower F (v)/F (m) as well as the associated induction of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), observed under those conditions, indicated that Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was under stress. Under HL stress, the expression of LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 increased rapidly from 0.5 h HL and reached a maximum after 3 h. In LL, LhcSR2 expression was up-regulated during the first 0.5 h after which it decreased, while the expression of LhcSR1 decreased gradually from the beginning of the experiment. In addition, the transcript levels of LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 increased under UV-B radiation and high salinity. These results showed that both genes were inducible and up-regulated under stress conditions. A higher NPQ was accompanied by the up-regulated LhcSR genes, suggesting that LhcSR plays a role in thermal energy dissipation. Overall, the results presented here suggest that LhcSR1 and LhcSR2 play a primary role in photoprotection in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L under stress conditions and provide an important basis for investigation of the adaptation mechanism of LhcSR in Antarctic green algae.

  8. Long-term experiment on physiological responses to synergetic effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod in the Antarctic sea ice algae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Yitao; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Dongsheng; Ye, Naihao; Zhang, Xiaowen; Mou, Shanli; Guan, Zheng; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2014-07-15

    Studies on ocean acidification have mostly been based on short-term experiments of low latitude with few investigations of the long-term influence on sea ice communities. Here, the combined effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod on the physiological response of the Antarctic sea ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were examined. There was a general increase in growth, PSII photosynthetic parameters, and N and P uptake in continuous light, compared to those exposed to regular dark and light cycles. Elevated pCO2 showed no consistent effect on growth rate (p=0.8) and N uptake (p=0.38) during exponential phrase, depending on the photoperiod but had a positive effect on PSII photosynthetic capacity and P uptake. Continuous dark reduced growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake. Moreover, intracellular lipid, mainly in the form of PUFA, was consumed at 80% and 63% in low and high pCO2 in darkness. However, long-term culture under high pCO2 gave a more significant inhibition of growth and Fv/Fm to high light stress. In summary, ocean acidification may have significant effects on Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L survival in polar winter. The current study contributes to an understanding of how a sea ice algae-based community may respond to global climate change at high latitudes. PMID:24922067

  9. Long-term experiment on physiological responses to synergetic effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod in the Antarctic sea ice algae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Yitao; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Dongsheng; Ye, Naihao; Zhang, Xiaowen; Mou, Shanli; Guan, Zheng; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2014-07-15

    Studies on ocean acidification have mostly been based on short-term experiments of low latitude with few investigations of the long-term influence on sea ice communities. Here, the combined effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod on the physiological response of the Antarctic sea ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were examined. There was a general increase in growth, PSII photosynthetic parameters, and N and P uptake in continuous light, compared to those exposed to regular dark and light cycles. Elevated pCO2 showed no consistent effect on growth rate (p=0.8) and N uptake (p=0.38) during exponential phrase, depending on the photoperiod but had a positive effect on PSII photosynthetic capacity and P uptake. Continuous dark reduced growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake. Moreover, intracellular lipid, mainly in the form of PUFA, was consumed at 80% and 63% in low and high pCO2 in darkness. However, long-term culture under high pCO2 gave a more significant inhibition of growth and Fv/Fm to high light stress. In summary, ocean acidification may have significant effects on Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L survival in polar winter. The current study contributes to an understanding of how a sea ice algae-based community may respond to global climate change at high latitudes.

  10. Analysis of ΔpH and the xanthophyll cycle in NPQ of the Antarctic sea ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Miao, Jinlai; Cao, Shaona; Xu, Dong; Fan, Xiao; An, Meiling

    2013-05-01

    Non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ) is mainly associated with the transthylakoid proton gradient (ΔpH) and xanthophyll cycle. However, the exact mechanism of NPQ is different in different oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. In this study, several inhibitors were used to study NPQ kinetics in the sea ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L and to determine the functions of ΔpH and the xanthophyll cycle in the NPQ process. NH4Cl and nigericin, uncouplers of ΔpH, inhibited NPQ completely and zeaxanthin (Z) was not detected in 1 mM NH4Cl-treated samples. Moreover, Z and NPQ were increased in the samples containing N,N'-dicyclohexyl-carbodiimide (DCCD) under low light conditions. We conclude that ΔpH plays a major role in NPQ, and activation of the xanthophyll cycle is related to ΔpH. In dithiothreitol (DTT)-treated samples, no Z was observed and NPQ decreased. NPQ was completely inhibited when NH4Cl was added suggesting that part of the NPQ process is related to the xanthophyll cycle and the remainder depends on ΔpH. Moreover, lutein and β-carotene were also essential for NPQ. These results indicate that NPQ in the sea ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is mainly dependent on ΔpH which affects the protonation of PSII proteins and de-epoxidation of the xanthophyll cycle, and the transthylakoid proton gradient alone can induce NPQ.

  11. Chlamydomonas sajao nov. sp. (Chlorophyta, Volvocales)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, Ralph A.

    1984-06-01

    A new species of Chlamydomonas, namely, C. sajao nov. sp. of the Volvocales, Chlorophyta was isolated from a duckweed growing near a ricefield in the vicinity of Guangzhou, China. This interesting unicellular green alga, similar to C. mexicana from Mexico, secretes quantities of extracellular mucilaginous polysaccharides, and may be employed in improving soil quality. The new species resembles C. waldenburgensis Moewus in most characteristics but differs in three important features.

  12. Azolla filiculoides Nitrogenase Activity Decrease Induced by Inoculation with Chlamydomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Habte, M

    1986-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of Chlamydomonas sp. on nitrogen fixation (C(2)H(2) --> C(2)H(4)) in Azolla filiculoides and on the nitrogen fixation and growth of free-living Anabaena azollae 2B organisms. Inoculation of azolla medium with Chlamydomonas sp. was associated with decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides and with increases in the density of a fungal population identified as Acremonium sp. Subsequent inoculation of azolla medium with this fungus was also accompanied by a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity of A. filiculoides. However, the extent of depression of nitrogenase activity was significantly higher when azolla medium was inoculated with Chlamydomonas sp. than when it was inoculated with Acremonium sp. Inoculation of nitrogen-free Stanier medium with either Acremonium sp. or Chlamydomonas sp. did not adversely affect the growth or nitrogenase activity of free-living A. azollae. Decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides is apparently related to the adverse influence of the green alga and the fungus on the macrosymbiont. The mechanisms that might be involved are discussed. PMID:16347211

  13. Azolla filiculoides Nitrogenase Activity Decrease Induced by Inoculation with Chlamydomonas sp. †

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Mitiku

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the influence of Chlamydomonas sp. on nitrogen fixation (C2H2 → C2H4) in Azolla filiculoides and on the nitrogen fixation and growth of free-living Anabaena azollae 2B organisms. Inoculation of azolla medium with Chlamydomonas sp. was associated with decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides and with increases in the density of a fungal population identified as Acremonium sp. Subsequent inoculation of azolla medium with this fungus was also accompanied by a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity of A. filiculoides. However, the extent of depression of nitrogenase activity was significantly higher when azolla medium was inoculated with Chlamydomonas sp. than when it was inoculated with Acremonium sp. Inoculation of nitrogen-free Stanier medium with either Acremonium sp. or Chlamydomonas sp. did not adversely affect the growth or nitrogenase activity of free-living A. azollae. Decreased nitrogenase activity in A. filiculoides is apparently related to the adverse influence of the green alga and the fungus on the macrosymbiont. The mechanisms that might be involved are discussed. PMID:16347211

  14. Validation of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in an ice alga Chlamydomonas during freezing acclimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Wu, Guangting; Huang, Xiaohang; Liu, Shenghao; Cong, Bailin

    2012-05-01

    Antarctic ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L can endure extreme low temperature and high salinity stress under freezing conditions. To elucidate the molecular acclimation mechanisms using gene expression analysis, the expression stabilities of ten housekeeping genes of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L during freezing stress were analyzed. Some discrepancies were detected in the ranking of the candidate reference genes between geNorm and NormFinder programs, but there was substantial agreement between the groups of genes with the most and the least stable expression. RPL19 was ranked as the best candidate reference genes. Pairwise variation (V) analysis indicated the combination of two reference genes was sufficient for qRT-PCR data normalization under the experimental conditions. Considering the co-regulation between RPL19 and RPL32 (the most stable gene pairs given by geNorm program), we propose that the mean data rendered by RPL19 and GAPDH (the most stable gene pairs given by NormFinder program) be used to normalize gene expression values in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L more accurately. The example of FAD3 gene expression calculation demonstrated the importance of selecting an appropriate category and number of reference genes to achieve an accurate and reliable normalization of gene expression during freeze acclimation in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

  15. Acclimation of Antarctic Chlamydomonas to the sea-ice environment: a transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Wang, Xiuliang; Wang, Xingna; Sun, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    The Antarctic green alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was isolated from sea ice. As a psychrophilic microalga, it can tolerate the environmental stress in the sea-ice brine, such as freezing temperature and high salinity. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify freezing stress responding genes and explore the extreme environmental acclimation-related strategies. Here, we show that many genes in ICE-L transcriptome that encoding PUFA synthesis enzymes, molecular chaperon proteins, and cell membrane transport proteins have high similarity to the gens from Antarctic bacteria. These ICE-L genes are supposed to be acquired through horizontal gene transfer from its symbiotic microbes in the sea-ice brine. The presence of these genes in both sea-ice microalgae and bacteria indicated the biological processes they involved in are possibly contributing to ICE-L success in sea ice. In addition, the biological pathways were compared between ICE-L and its closely related sister species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. In ICE-L transcripome, many sequences homologous to the plant or bacteria proteins in the post-transcriptional, post-translational modification, and signal-transduction KEGG pathways, are absent in the nonpsychrophilic green algae. These complex structural components might imply enhanced stress adaptation capacity. At last, differential gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level of ICE-L indicated that genes that associated with post-translational modification, lipid metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism are responding to the freezing treatment. In conclusion, the transcriptome of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is very useful for exploring the mutualistic interaction between microalgae and bacteria in sea ice; and discovering the specific genes and metabolism pathways responding to the freezing acclimation in psychrophilic microalgae. PMID:27161450

  16. Acclimation of Antarctic Chlamydomonas to the sea-ice environment: a transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenlin; Wang, Xiuliang; Wang, Xingna; Sun, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    The Antarctic green alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was isolated from sea ice. As a psychrophilic microalga, it can tolerate the environmental stress in the sea-ice brine, such as freezing temperature and high salinity. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify freezing stress responding genes and explore the extreme environmental acclimation-related strategies. Here, we show that many genes in ICE-L transcriptome that encoding PUFA synthesis enzymes, molecular chaperon proteins, and cell membrane transport proteins have high similarity to the gens from Antarctic bacteria. These ICE-L genes are supposed to be acquired through horizontal gene transfer from its symbiotic microbes in the sea-ice brine. The presence of these genes in both sea-ice microalgae and bacteria indicated the biological processes they involved in are possibly contributing to ICE-L success in sea ice. In addition, the biological pathways were compared between ICE-L and its closely related sister species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. In ICE-L transcripome, many sequences homologous to the plant or bacteria proteins in the post-transcriptional, post-translational modification, and signal-transduction KEGG pathways, are absent in the nonpsychrophilic green algae. These complex structural components might imply enhanced stress adaptation capacity. At last, differential gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level of ICE-L indicated that genes that associated with post-translational modification, lipid metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism are responding to the freezing treatment. In conclusion, the transcriptome of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is very useful for exploring the mutualistic interaction between microalgae and bacteria in sea ice; and discovering the specific genes and metabolism pathways responding to the freezing acclimation in psychrophilic microalgae.

  17. Development of lipid productivities under different CO2 conditions of marine microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Akihito; Aikawa, Shimpei; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel production from microalgae has become a popular research topic. In this study, Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 isolated from the southern coast of Taiwan was selected for a detailed study on cell growth and lipid accumulation under marine salinity (3.5% sea salt). Proper CO2 was supplied as the improvement of lipid productivity. Under the optimal condition, the highest lipid productivity was 169.1mg/L/d, which was significantly higher than those reported in current studies for marine green algae. To date, only very few studies have reported a marine algae strain with both high cell growth and lipid productivity. This study demonstrated that a newly isolated marine green alga Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 would be a feasible oil producer due to its high biomass production and lipid productivity under marine salinity.

  18. Photoevolution of hydrogen from Chlamydomonas sp. in the presence of CO/sub 2/. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlamydomonas moewusii

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, D.A.; Greenbaum, E.

    1987-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and C. moewusii are known to photoevolve O/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ at 22/sup 0/C under anaeroblosis and in the absence of CO/sub 2/. Under these conditions the ratio of H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ is very nearly 2, indicating that essentially all electrons generated by the photolysis of H/sub 2/O are expressed as H/sub 2/. In an atmosphere of 1% CO/sub 2/ in He, steady-state photoproduction of H/sub 2/ was completely inhibited at 22/sup 0/C, with the only detectable production of H/sub 2/ being a transient burst which accompanied the onset of irradiation. The maximum ratio of H/sub 2/ to O/sub 2/ during the burst was ca. 0.2. Carbon dioxide also caused a >10-fold increase in O/sub 2/ photoevolution. Chilling the cells to 0/sup 0/C in the presence of CO/sub 2/ reduced the rate of O/sub 2/ evolution to slightly less than that observed in the absence of CO/sub 2/; the maximum ratio of H/sub 2/ to O/sub 2/ approached 2; and sustained H/sub 2/ evolution occurred with an H/sub 2//O/sub 2/ ratio of approx. 1, indicating that as much as one-half of the electrons generated by the photolysis of H/sub 2/O were shunted to hydrogenase. The pathway for CO/sub 2/ reduction and the mechanism by which CO/sub 2/ regulates photosynthesis appear to be more sensitive to temperature than the pathway for H/sub 2/ evolution. This may be a reflection of the complexity of the relatively simple H/sub 2/ evolution pathway (ferredoxin ..-->.. hydrogenase) versus the more complex, multi-enzyme Calvin cycle.

  19. Growth and lipid content at low temperature of Arctic alga Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jae; Jung, Woongsic; Lim, Suyoun; Kim, Sanghee; Han, Se Jong; Choi, Han-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Biodiesel produced from microalgae is a promising source of alternative energy. In winter, however, outdoor mass cultivation for biodiesel production is hampered by poor growth. Here, we report that Arctic Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C exhibits optimal growth at 4 °C and reaches densities up to 1.4 × 10(7) cells mL(-1). Lipid body formation in the alga was visualized through BODIPY 505/515 staining and fluorescence microscopy. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production level of KNM0029C was 178.6 mg L(-1) culture and 2.3-fold higher than that of C. reinhardtii CC-125 at 4 °C. Analysis of the FAME content showed a predominance of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as C16:3, C18:2, C18:3, and C20:2. C18:3 fatty acids comprised the largest fraction (20.7%), and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (39.6%) was higher than that of saturated fatty acids (6.8%) at 4 °C. These results indicate that Chlamydomonas sp. KNM0029C, as a psychrophilic microalga, might represent a favorable source for biodiesel production in cold environments.

  20. Morphological, Molecular, and Biochemical Characterization of Monounsaturated Fatty Acids-Rich Chlamydomonas sp. KIOST-1 Isolated from Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seon-Mi; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Taeho; Park, Areumi; Ko, Ah-Ra; Ju, Se-Jong; Heo, Soo-Jin; Oh, Chulhong; Affan, Md Abu; Shim, Won-Bo; Kang, Do-Hyung

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae hold promise as producers of sustainable biomass for the production of biofuels and other biomaterials. However, the selection of strains with efficient and robust production of desirable resources remains challenging. In this study, we isolated a green microalga from Korea and analyzed its morphological, molecular, and biochemical characteristics. Microscopic and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that the isolate could be classified into the genus Chlamydomonas, and we designated the isolate Chlamydomonas s p. K IOST -1. Compositions of protein, lipid, and carbohydrate in the microalgal cells were estimated to be 58.8 ± 0.2%, 22.7 ± 1.2%, and 18.5 ± 1.0%, respectively. Similar to other microalgae belonging to Chlorophyceae, the dominant amino acid and monosaccharide in Chlamydomonas sp. KIOST-1 were glutamic acid and glucose. On the other hand, the proportions of saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids clearly differed from other species in the genus Chlamydomonas, and monounsaturated fatty acids accounted for a large portion (41.3%) of the total fatty acids in the isolate. Based on these results, Chlamydomonas sp. KIOST-1 has advantageous characteristics for biomass production.

  1. Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Endo, Kaichiro; Kobayashi, Koichi; Nakamura, Yuki; Wada, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol (PG) is an indispensable phospholipid class with photosynthetic function in plants and cyanobacteria. However, its biosynthesis in eukaryotic green microalgae is poorly studied. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of two homologs (CrPGP1 and CrPGP2) of phosphatidylglycerophosphate synthase (PGPS), the rate-limiting enzyme in PG biosynthesis, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Heterologous complementation of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 pgsA mutant by CrPGP1 and CrPGP2 rescued the PG-dependent growth phenotype, but the PG level and its fatty acid composition were not fully rescued in the complemented strains. As well, oxygen evolution activity was not fully recovered, although electron transport activity of photosystem II was restored to the wild-type level. Gene expression study of CrPGP1 and CrPGP2 in nutrient-starved C. reinhardtii showed differential response to phosphorus and nitrogen deficiency. Taken together, these results highlight the distinct and overlapping function of PGPS in cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae. PMID:26379630

  2. Ecophysiology, secondary pigments and ultrastructure of Chlainomonas sp. (Chlorophyta) from the European Alps compared with Chlamydomonas nivalis forming red snow

    PubMed Central

    Remias, Daniel; Pichrtová, Martina; Pangratz, Marion; Lütz, Cornelius; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Red snow is a well-known phenomenon caused by microalgae thriving in alpine and polar regions during the melting season. The ecology and biodiversity of these organisms, which are adapted to low temperatures, high irradiance and freeze–thaw events, are still poorly understood. We compared two different snow habitats containing two different green algal genera in the European Alps, namely algae blooming in seasonal rock-based snowfields (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and algae dominating waterlogged snow bedded over ice (Chlainomonas sp.). Despite the morphological similarity of the red spores found at the snow surface, we found differences in intracellular organization investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy and in secondary pigments investigated by chromatographic analysis in combination with mass spectrometry. Spores of Chlainomonas sp. show clear differences from Chlamydomonas nivalis in cell wall arrangement and plastid organization. Active photosynthesis at ambient temperatures indicates a high physiological activity, despite no cell division being present. Lipid bodies containing the carotenoid astaxanthin, which produces the red color, dominate cells of both species, but are modified differently. While in Chlainomonas sp. astaxanthin is mainly esterified with two fatty acids and is more apolar, in Chamydomonas nivalis, in contrast, less apolar monoesters prevail. PMID:26884467

  3. Interactions between marine facultative epiphyte Chlamydomonas sp. (Chlamydomonadales, Chlorophyta) and ceramiaceaen algae (Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Klochkova, Tatyana A; Cho, Ga Youn; Boo, Sung Min; Chung, Ki Wha; Kim, Song Ja; Kim, Gwang Hoon

    2008-07-01

    Previously unrecorded marine Chlamydomonas that grew epiphytic on ceramiaceaen algae was collected from the western coast of Korea and isolated into a unialgal culture. The isolate was subjected to 18S rDNA phylogenetic analysis as well as ultrastructure and life cycle studies. It had an affinity with the marine Chlamydomonas species and was less related to freshwater/terrestrial representatives of this genus. It had flagella shorter than the cell body two-layered cell wall with striated outer surface and abundant mucilaginous material beneath the innermost layer and no contractile vacuoles. This alga grew faster in mixed cultures with ceramiaceaen algae rather than in any tested unialgal culture condition; the cells looked healthier and zoosporangia and motile flagellated vegetative cells appeared more often. These results suggested that this Chlamydomonas might be a facultative epiphyte benefiting from its hosts. Several ceramiaceaen algae were tested as host plants. Meanwhile, cell deformation or collapse of the whole thallus was caused to Aglaothamnion byssoides, and preliminary study suggested that a substance released from Chlamydomonas caused the response. This is first report on harmful epiphytic interactions between Chlamydomonas species and red ceramiaceaen algae.

  4. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    DOE PAGES

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  5. The Antarctic Psychrophile Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 Preferentially Phosphorylates a Photosystem I-Cytochrome b6/f Supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Szyszka-Mroz, Beth; Pittock, Paula; Ivanov, Alexander G; Lajoie, Gilles; Hüner, Norman P A

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 (UWO 241) is a psychrophilic green alga isolated from Antarctica. A unique characteristic of this algal strain is its inability to undergo state transitions coupled with the absence of photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting complex protein phosphorylation. We show that UWO 241 preferentially phosphorylates specific polypeptides associated with an approximately 1,000-kD pigment-protein supercomplex that contains components of both photosystem I (PSI) and the cytochrome b₆/f (Cyt b₆/f) complex. Liquid chromatography nano-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify three major phosphorylated proteins associated with this PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex, two 17-kD PSII subunit P-like proteins and a 70-kD ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease, FtsH. The PSII subunit P-like protein sequence exhibited 70.6% similarity to the authentic PSII subunit P protein associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Tyrosine-146 was identified as a unique phosphorylation site on the UWO 241 PSII subunit P-like polypeptide. Assessment of PSI cyclic electron transport by in vivo P700 photooxidation and the dark relaxation kinetics of P700(+) indicated that UWO 241 exhibited PSI cyclic electron transport rates that were 3 times faster and more sensitive to antimycin A than the mesophile control, Chlamydomonas raudensis SAG 49.72. The stability of the PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex was dependent upon the phosphorylation status of the PsbP-like protein and the zinc metalloprotease FtsH as well as the presence of high salt. We suggest that adaptation of UWO 241 to its unique low-temperature and high-salt environment favors the phosphorylation of a PSI-Cyt b₆/f supercomplex to regulate PSI cyclic electron transport rather than the regulation of state transitions through the phosphorylation of PSII light-harvesting complex proteins.

  6. The Antarctic Psychrophile Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 Preferentially Phosphorylates a Photosystem I-Cytochrome b6/f Supercomplex1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Szyszka-Mroz, Beth; Pittock, Paula; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Lajoie, Gilles; Hüner, Norman P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. UWO 241 (UWO 241) is a psychrophilic green alga isolated from Antarctica. A unique characteristic of this algal strain is its inability to undergo state transitions coupled with the absence of photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting complex protein phosphorylation. We show that UWO 241 preferentially phosphorylates specific polypeptides associated with an approximately 1,000-kD pigment-protein supercomplex that contains components of both photosystem I (PSI) and the cytochrome b6/f (Cyt b6/f) complex. Liquid chromatography nano-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify three major phosphorylated proteins associated with this PSI-Cyt b6/f supercomplex, two 17-kD PSII subunit P-like proteins and a 70-kD ATP-dependent zinc metalloprotease, FtsH. The PSII subunit P-like protein sequence exhibited 70.6% similarity to the authentic PSII subunit P protein associated with the oxygen-evolving complex of PSII in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Tyrosine-146 was identified as a unique phosphorylation site on the UWO 241 PSII subunit P-like polypeptide. Assessment of PSI cyclic electron transport by in vivo P700 photooxidation and the dark relaxation kinetics of P700+ indicated that UWO 241 exhibited PSI cyclic electron transport rates that were 3 times faster and more sensitive to antimycin A than the mesophile control, Chlamydomonas raudensis SAG 49.72. The stability of the PSI-Cyt b6/f supercomplex was dependent upon the phosphorylation status of the PsbP-like protein and the zinc metalloprotease FtsH as well as the presence of high salt. We suggest that adaptation of UWO 241 to its unique low-temperature and high-salt environment favors the phosphorylation of a PSI-Cyt b6/f supercomplex to regulate PSI cyclic electron transport rather than the regulation of state transitions through the phosphorylation of PSII light-harvesting complex proteins. PMID:26169679

  7. Optimizing biodiesel production in marine Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 through metabolic profiling and an innovative salinity-gradient strategy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biodiesel production from marine microalgae has received much attention as microalgae can be cultivated on non-arable land without the use of potable water, and with the additional benefits of mitigating CO2 emissions and yielding biomass. However, there is still a lack of effective operational strategies to promote lipid accumulation in marine microalgae, which are suitable for making biodiesel since they are mainly composed of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms involved in lipid biosynthesis in microalgae under environmental stress are not well understood. Results In this work, the combined effects of salinity and nitrogen depletion stresses on lipid accumulation of a newly isolated marine microalga, Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4, were explored. Metabolic intermediates were profiled over time to observe transient changes during the lipid accumulation triggered by the combination of the two stresses. An innovative cultivation strategy (denoted salinity-gradient operation) was also employed to markedly improve the lipid accumulation and lipid quality of the microalga, which attained an optimal lipid productivity of 223.2 mg L-1 d-1 and a lipid content of 59.4% per dry cell weight. This performance is significantly higher than reported in most related studies. Conclusions This work demonstrated the synergistic integration of biological and engineering technologies to develop a simple and effective strategy for the enhancement of oil production in marine microalgae. PMID:25002905

  8. Biosorption of copper and zinc by immobilised and free algal biomass, and the effects of metal biosorption on the growth and cellular structure of Chlorella sp. and Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from rivers in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maznah, W O Wan; Al-Fawwaz, A T; Surif, Misni

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the biosorption of copper and zinc ions by Chlorella sp. and Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from local environments in Malaysia was investigated in a batch system and by microscopic analyses. Under optimal biosorption conditions, the biosorption capacity of Chlorella sp. for copper and zinc ions was 33.4 and 28.5 mg/g, respectively, after 6 hr of biosorption in an immobilised system. Batch experiments showed that the biosorption capacity of algal biomass immobilised in the form of sodium alginate beads was higher than that of the free biomass. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses revealed that copper and zinc were mainly sorbed at the cell surface during biosorption. Exposure to 5 mg/L of copper and zinc affected both the chlorophyll content and cell count of the algal cells after the first 12 hr of contact time.

  9. Chlamydomonas proteomics.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Norbert; Atteia, Ariane; Decottignies, Paulette; Garin, Jérôme; Hippler, Michael; Kreimer, Georg; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Mittag, Maria; Wagner, Volker

    2009-06-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a biflagellate and photosynthetic unicellular alga that has long fascinated scientists because it combines characteristics of both plants and animals. Chlamydomonas offers the simplicity of a unicellular organism that is amenable to genetic screening, molecular, and biochemical approaches, as well as to transformation of its nuclear, plastid, or mitochondrial genomes. Over the past decade, proteomics based studies of Chlamydomonas have provided major research contributions in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular biology, and evolution. This review refers to technical and biological aspects of proteomics studies that have been recently performed on the C. reinhardtii model organism.

  10. Ecophysiology, secondary pigments and ultrastructure of Chlainomonas sp. (Chlorophyta) from the European Alps compared with Chlamydomonas nivalis forming red snow.

    PubMed

    Remias, Daniel; Pichrtová, Martina; Pangratz, Marion; Lütz, Cornelius; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Red snow is a well-known phenomenon caused by microalgae thriving in alpine and polar regions during the melting season. The ecology and biodiversity of these organisms, which are adapted to low temperatures, high irradiance and freeze-thaw events, are still poorly understood. We compared two different snow habitats containing two different green algal genera in the European Alps, namely algae blooming in seasonal rock-based snowfields (Chlamydomonas nivalis) and algae dominating waterlogged snow bedded over ice (Chlainomonassp.). Despite the morphological similarity of the red spores found at the snow surface, we found differences in intracellular organization investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy and in secondary pigments investigated by chromatographic analysis in combination with mass spectrometry. Spores ofChlainomonassp. show clear differences fromChlamydomonas nivalisin cell wall arrangement and plastid organization. Active photosynthesis at ambient temperatures indicates a high physiological activity, despite no cell division being present. Lipid bodies containing the carotenoid astaxanthin, which produces the red color, dominate cells of both species, but are modified differently. While inChlainomonassp. astaxanthin is mainly esterified with two fatty acids and is more apolar, inChamydomonas nivalis, in contrast, less apolar monoesters prevail. PMID:26884467

  11. Growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in acetate-free medium when co-cultured with alginate-encapsulated, acetate-producing strains of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    SciTech Connect

    Therien, Jesse B.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Bryant, Donald A.; Peters, John W.

    2014-10-18

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires acetate as a co-substrate for optimal production of lipids, and the addition of acetate to culture media has practical and economic implications for algal biofuel production. We demonstrate the growth of C. reinhardtii on acetate provided by mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7002.

  12. New Insights into the Unique Structure of the F0F1-ATP Synthase from the Chlamydomonad Algae Polytomella sp. and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Groth, Georg; Atteia, Ariane

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase of the colorless alga Polytomella sp. with respect to the enzyme of its green close relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. It is demonstrated that several unique features of the ATP synthase in C. reinhardtii are also present in Polytomella sp. The α- and β-subunits of the ATP synthase from both algae are highly unusual in that they exhibit extensions at their N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. Several subunits of the Polytomella ATP synthase in the range of 9 to 66 kD have homologs in the green alga but do not have known equivalents as yet in mitochondrial ATP synthases of mammals, plants, or fungi. The largest of these so-called ASA (ATP Synthase-Associated) subunits, ASA1, is shown to be an extrinsic protein. Short heat treatment of isolated Polytomella mitochondria unexpectedly dissociated the otherwise highly stable ATP synthase dimer of 1,600 kD into subcomplexes of 800 and 400 kD, assigned as the ATP synthase monomer and F1-ATPase, respectively. Whereas no ASA subunits were found in the F1-ATPase, all but two were present in the monomer. ASA6 (12 kD) and ASA9 (9 kD), predicted to be membrane bound, were not detected in the monomer and are thus proposed to be involved in the formation or stabilization of the enzyme. A hypothetical configuration of the Chlamydomonad dimeric ATP synthase portraying its unique features is provided to spur further research on this topic. PMID:17468226

  13. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Cross, Frederick R; Umen, James G

    2015-05-01

    The position of Chlamydomonas within the eukaryotic phylogeny makes it a unique model in at least two important ways: as a representative of the critically important, early-diverging lineage leading to plants; and as a microbe retaining important features of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) that has been lost in the highly studied yeast lineages. Its cell biology has been studied for many decades and it has well-developed experimental genetic tools, both classical (Mendelian) and molecular. Unlike land plants, it is a haploid with very few gene duplicates, making it ideal for loss-of-function genetic studies. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle has a striking temporal and functional separation between cell growth and rapid cell division, probably connected to the interplay between diurnal cycles that drive photosynthetic cell growth and the cell division cycle; it also exhibits a highly choreographed interaction between the cell cycle and its centriole-basal body-flagellar cycle. Here, we review the current status of studies of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. We begin with an overview of cell-cycle control in the well-studied yeast and animal systems, which has yielded a canonical, well-supported model. We discuss briefly what is known about similarities and differences in plant cell-cycle control, compared with this model. We next review the cytology and cell biology of the multiple-fission cell cycle of Chlamydomonas. Lastly, we review recent genetic approaches and insights into Chlamydomonas cell-cycle regulation that have been enabled by a new generation of genomics-based tools.

  14. Axonemal motility in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Kamiya, Ritsu

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia and flagella rapidly propagate bending waves and produce water flow over the cell surface. Their function is important for the physiology and development of various organisms including humans. The movement is based on the sliding between outer doublet microtubules driven by axonemal dyneins, and is regulated by various axonemal components and environmental factors. For studies aiming to elucidate the mechanism of cilia/flagella movement and regulation, Chlamydomonas is an invaluable model organism that offers a variety of mutants. This chapter introduces standard methods for studying Chlamydomonas flagellar motility including analysis of swimming paths, measurements of swimming speed and beat frequency, motility reactivation in demembranated cells (cell models), and observation of microtubule sliding in disintegrating axonemes. Most methods may be easily applied to other organisms with slight modifications of the medium conditions.

  15. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  16. Diversity of Chlamydomonas channelrhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sing-Yi; Govorunova, Elena G; Ntefidou, Maria; Lane, C Elizabeth; Spudich, Elena N; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Spudich, John L

    2012-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins act as photoreceptors for control of motility behavior in flagellates and are widely used as genetically targeted tools to optically manipulate the membrane potential of specific cell populations ("optogenetics"). The first two channelrhodopsins were obtained from the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR1 and CrChR2). By homology cloning we identified three new channelrhodopsin sequences from the same genus, CaChR1, CyChR1 and CraChR2, from C. augustae, C. yellowstonensis and C. raudensis, respectively. CaChR1 and CyChR1 were functionally expressed in HEK293 cells, where they acted as light-gated ion channels similar to CrChR1. However, both, which are similar to each other, differed from CrChR1 in current kinetics, inactivation, light intensity dependence, spectral sensitivity and dependence on the external pH. These results show that extensive channelrhodopsin diversity exists even within the same genus, Chlamydomonas. The maximal spectral sensitivity of CaChR1 was at 520 nm at pH 7.4, about 40 nm redshifted as compared to that of CrChR1 under the same conditions. CaChR1 was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and exhibited an absorption spectrum identical to the action spectrum of CaChR1-generated photocurrents. The redshifted spectra and the lack of fast inactivation in CaChR1- and CyChR1-generated currents are features desirable for optogenetics applications.

  17. Gametogenesis in Chlamydomonas eugametos

    PubMed Central

    Lorch, Steven K.; Karlander, Edward P.

    1973-01-01

    Male and female mating types of Chlamydomonas eugametos Moewus show an absolute light requirement for gametogenesis. Increasing light intensity from 0.3 to 1.2 mw cm−2 during nitrogen starvation (a precondition for gametogenesis) caused an increase in gametogenesis throughout a 28-hour period. Gametogenesis was measured by determining the percentage of paired cells after a 1-hour mixing period. Light requirements for the male and female differed. There was a 9-hour lag period in gametogenesis in the male, but no lag in the female. Gametogenesis was reduced 50% in the female and 90% in the male when 6.0 μm 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethyl-urea was in the N-starvation medium. Sodium acetate, 1.8 mm, in the N-starvation medium increased gametogenesis in both mating types and eliminated the 9-hour lag in the male for cells irradiated for 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, or 23 hours during the last part of a 23-hour N-starvation period. Sodium acetate concentrations higher than 1.8 mm inhibited the mating process. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea inhibition of gametogenesis was decreased in the male but increased in the female, when sodium acetate was added to the N-starvation medium. These results indicate a nonphotosynthetic as well as a photosynthetic role for light in the gametogenesis of both mating types. Also, the male will not undergo gametogenesis unless a required amount of energy is provided either in the medium or through photosynthesis. PMID:16658462

  18. Chlamydomonas: A Model Green Plant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, E.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the instructional potential of Chlamydomonas in providing a basis for a range of experimental investigations to illustrate basic biological phenomena. Describes the use of this algae genus in studies of population growth, photosynthesis, and mating behavior. Procedures for laboratory exercises are included. (ML)

  19. FISH and immunofluorescence staining in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Uniacke, James; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Zerges, William

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe how to use fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence staining to determine the in situ distributions of specific mRNAs and proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This unicellular eukaryotic green alga is a major model organism in cell biological research. Chlamydomonas is well suited for these approaches because one can determine the cytological location of fluorescence signals within a characteristic cellular anatomy relative to prominent cytological markers. Moreover, FISH and IF staining offer practical alternatives to techniques involving fluorescent proteins, which are difficult to express and detect in Chlamydomonas. The main goal of this review is to describe these powerful tools and to facilitate their routine use in Chlamydomonas research.

  20. 13th International Conference on Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Silflow, Carolyn D.

    2014-03-11

    The 13th International Conference on Chlamydomonas (EMBO Workshop on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas) was held May 27 to June 1, 2008 in Hyeres, France. The conference was the biennial meeting for all researchers studying the green algal systems Chlamydomonas and Volvox. The conference brought together approximately 200 investigators from around the world (North America, Asia, Europe and Australia) representing different fields and disciplines (cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, plant physiology, genomics). It provided an opportunity for investigators from different countries to share methodologies and to discuss recent results with a focus on the Chlamydomonas experimental system.

  1. The Chlamydomonas heat stress response.

    PubMed

    Schroda, Michael; Hemme, Dorothea; Mühlhaus, Timo

    2015-05-01

    Heat waves occurring at increased frequency as a consequence of global warming jeopardize crop yield safety. One way to encounter this problem is to genetically engineer crop plants toward increased thermotolerance. To identify entry points for genetic engineering, a thorough understanding of how plant cells perceive heat stress and respond to it is required. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model system to study the fundamental mechanisms of the plant heat stress response has several advantages. Most prominent among them is the suitability of Chlamydomonas for studying stress responses system-wide and in a time-resolved manner under controlled conditions. Here we review current knowledge on how heat is sensed and signaled to trigger temporally and functionally grouped sub-responses termed response elements to prevent damage and to maintain cellular homeostasis in plant cells.

  2. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  3. Cell and molecular biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This document contains only the abstracts of 92 presentations on the biology of Chlamydomonas. Topics include gene transformations, gene regulation, biosynthetic pathways, cell surfaces, circadian clocks, and the development and structure of the flagellar apparatus. (TEM)

  4. Autophagy in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Crespo, José L

    2010-05-01

    Degradation and recycling of intracellular components via autophagy is conserved among eukaryotes. This catabolic process is mediated by autophagy-related (ATG) proteins, which have been identified in different systems including yeasts, mammals and plants. The genome of the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains homologues to yeast and plant ATG genes although autophagy has not been previously described in this organism. In our study, we report the molecular characterization of autophagy in Chlamydomonas. Using the ATG8 protein from Chlamydomonas as a molecular autophagy marker, we demonstrate that this degradative process is induced in stationary cells or under different stresses such as nutrient limitation, oxidative stress or the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results also indicate that TOR, a major regulator of autophagy, inhibits this process in Chlamydomonas.

  5. [Progress of chlamydomonas as a model organism].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuan-Xiao; Han, Wei; Yu, Zeng-Liang

    2003-05-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas offers a simple life cycle, easy culture and isolation of series of mutants, established the techniques and tool kit for molecular genetics and genetics analysis. It is now becoming the model organism for studies on photosynthesis in plant, flagellar assembly and function, cell cycle and circadian rhythms, signal transduction, light perception and cell recognition. It is summarized the progress of study on Chlamydomonas as a model organism in this paper.

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Species of Chlamydomonas Containing Phosphatidylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Hirashima, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the essential phospholipids for most eukaryotes. Although the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks PC, four species containing PC were found in the genus Chlamydomonas. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the four species of Chlamydomonas containing PC. PMID:27688324

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Species of Chlamydomonas Containing Phosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is one of the essential phospholipids for most eukaryotes. Although the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks PC, four species containing PC were found in the genus Chlamydomonas Here, we report the draft genome sequences of the four species of Chlamydomonas containing PC. PMID:27688324

  8. The basal bodies of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Dutcher, Susan K; O'Toole, Eileen T

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is a biflagellated cell that can swim or glide. C. reinhardtii cells are amenable to genetic, biochemical, proteomic, and microscopic analysis of its basal bodies. The basal bodies contain triplet microtubules and a well-ordered transition zone. Both the mother and daughter basal bodies assemble flagella. Many of the proteins found in other basal body-containing organisms are present in the Chlamydomonas genome, and mutants in these genes affect the assembly of basal bodies. Electron microscopic analysis shows that basal body duplication is site-specific and this may be important for the proper duplication and spatial organization of these organelles. Chlamydomonas is an excellent model for the study of basal bodies as well as the transition zone. PMID:27252853

  9. Photomixing of chlamydomonas rheinhardtii suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Capellazzi Resta, Marina; Abou, Bérengère; Brunet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas rheinhardtii is a fast swimming unicellular alga able to bias its swimming direction in gradients of light intensity, an ability know as phototaxis. We have investigated experimentally both the swimming behavior of individual cells and the macroscopic response of shallow suspensions of these micro-organisms in response to a localized light source. At low light intensity, algae exhibit positive phototaxis and accumulate beneath the excitation light. In weakly concentrated thin layers, the balance between phototaxis and cell motility results in steady symmetrical patterns compatible with a purely diffusive model using effective diffusion coefficients extracted from the analysis of individual cell trajectories. However, at higher cell density and layer depth, collective effects induce convective flows around the light source. These flows disturb the cell concentration patterns which spread and may then becomes unstable. Using large passive tracer particles, we have characterized the velocity fields associated with this forced bioconvection and their dependence on the cell density and layer depth. By tuning the light distribution, this mechanism of photo-bioconvection allows a fine control over the local fluid flows, and thus the mixing efficiency, in algal suspensions.

  10. A steering mechanism for phototaxis in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Rachel R; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-03-01

    Chlamydomonas shows both positive and negative phototaxis. It has a single eyespot near its equator, and as the cell rotates during the forward motion, the light signal received by the eyespot varies. We use a simple mechanical model of Chlamydomonas that couples the flagellar beat pattern to the light intensity at the eyespot to demonstrate a mechanism for phototactic steering that is consistent with observations. The direction of phototaxis is controlled by a parameter in our model, and the steering mechanism is robust to noise. Our model shows switching between directed phototaxis when the light is on and run-and-tumble behaviour in the dark.

  11. A steering mechanism for phototaxis in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas shows both positive and negative phototaxis. It has a single eyespot near its equator, and as the cell rotates during the forward motion, the light signal received by the eyespot varies. We use a simple mechanical model of Chlamydomonas that couples the flagellar beat pattern to the light intensity at the eyespot to demonstrate a mechanism for phototactic steering that is consistent with observations. The direction of phototaxis is controlled by a parameter in our model, and the steering mechanism is robust to noise. Our model shows switching between directed phototaxis when the light is on and run-and-tumble behaviour in the dark. PMID:25589576

  12. A steering mechanism for phototaxis in Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rachel; Golestanian, Ramin

    2015-03-01

    Chlamydomonas shows both positive and negative phototaxis. It has a single eyespot near its equator and as the cell rotates during forward motion the light signal received by the eyespot varies. We use a simple mechanical model of Chlamydomonas that couples the flagellar beat pattern to the light intensity at the eyespot to demonstrate a mechanism for phototactic steering that is consistent with observations. The direction of phototaxis is controlled by a parameter in our model and the steering mechanism is robust to noise. In the dark, our model shows emergent run-and-tumble behavior and we see switching between directed phototaxis and run-and-tumble when we switch the light on and off.

  13. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on.

    PubMed

    Blaby, Ian K; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F Y; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George B; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-10-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis, and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the omics era. Housed at Phytozome, the plant genomics portal of the Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. We present here the past, present, and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions, and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes.

  14. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on.

    PubMed

    Blaby, Ian K; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F Y; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George B; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-10-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis, and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the omics era. Housed at Phytozome, the plant genomics portal of the Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. We present here the past, present, and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions, and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  15. The Chlamydomonas genome project: a decade on

    PubMed Central

    Blaby, Ian K.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten; Tourasse, Nicolas; Hom, Erik F. Y.; Lopez, David; Aksoy, Munevver; Grossman, Arthur; Umen, James; Dutcher, Susan; Porter, Mary; King, Stephen; Witman, George; Stanke, Mario; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Goodstein, David; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Vallon, Olivier; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular unicellular organism for studying photosynthesis, cilia biogenesis and micronutrient homeostasis. Ten years since its genome project was initiated, an iterative process of improvements to the genome and gene predictions has propelled this organism to the forefront of the “omics” era. Housed at Phytozome, the Joint Genome Institute’s (JGI) plant genomics portal, the most up-to-date genomic data include a genome arranged on chromosomes and high-quality gene models with alternative splice forms supported by an abundance of RNA-Seq data. Here, we present the past, present and future of Chlamydomonas genomics. Specifically, we detail progress on genome assembly and gene model refinement, discuss resources for gene annotations, functional predictions and locus ID mapping between versions and, importantly, outline a standardized framework for naming genes. PMID:24950814

  16. Chlamydomonas Flavodiiron Proteins Facilitate Acclimation to Anoxia During Sulfur Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Jokel, Martina; Kosourov, Sergey; Battchikova, Natalia; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Aro, Eva Mari; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut

    2015-01-01

    The flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are involved in the detoxification of oxidative compounds, such as nitric oxide (NO) or O2 in Archaea and Bacteria. In cyanobacteria, the FDPs Flv1 and Flv3 are essential in the light-dependent reduction of O2 downstream of PSI. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that two genes (flvA and flvB) in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii show high homology to flv1 and flv3 genes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The physiological role of these FDPs in eukaryotic green algae is not known, but it is of a special interest since these phototrophic organisms perform oxygenic photosynthesis similar to higher plants, which do not possess FDP homologs. We have analyzed the levels of flvA and flvB transcripts in C. reinhardtii cells under various environmental conditions and showed that these genes are highly expressed under ambient CO2 levels and during the early phase of acclimation to sulfur deprivation, just before the onset of anaerobiosis and the induction of efficient H2 photoproduction. Importantly, the increase in transcript levels of the flvA and flvB genes was also corroborated by protein levels. These results strongly suggest the involvement of FLVA and FLVB proteins in alternative electron transport. PMID:26063391

  17. Chlamydomonas Flavodiiron Proteins Facilitate Acclimation to Anoxia During Sulfur Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Jokel, Martina; Kosourov, Sergey; Battchikova, Natalia; Tsygankov, Anatoly A; Aro, Eva Mari; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut

    2015-08-01

    The flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are involved in the detoxification of oxidative compounds, such as nitric oxide (NO) or O(2) in Archaea and Bacteria. In cyanobacteria, the FDPs Flv1 and Flv3 are essential in the light-dependent reduction of O(2) downstream of PSI. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that two genes (flvA and flvB) in the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii show high homology to flv1 and flv3 genes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The physiological role of these FDPs in eukaryotic green algae is not known, but it is of a special interest since these phototrophic organisms perform oxygenic photosynthesis similar to higher plants, which do not possess FDP homologs. We have analyzed the levels of flvA and flvB transcripts in C. reinhardtii cells under various environmental conditions and showed that these genes are highly expressed under ambient CO(2) levels and during the early phase of acclimation to sulfur deprivation, just before the onset of anaerobiosis and the induction of efficient H(2) photoproduction. Importantly, the increase in transcript levels of the flvA and flvB genes was also corroborated by protein levels. These results strongly suggest the involvement of FLVA and FLVB proteins in alternative electron transport. PMID:26063391

  18. MEETING: Chlamydomonas Annotation Jamboree - October 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-04-13

    Shotgun sequencing of the nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas throughout) was performed at an approximate 10X coverage by JGI. Roughly half of the genome is now contained on 26 scaffolds, all of which are at least 1.6 Mb, and the coverage of the genome is ~95%. There are now over 200,000 cDNA sequence reads that we have generated as part of the Chlamydomonas genome project (Grossman, 2003; Shrager et al., 2003; Grossman et al. 2007; Merchant et al., 2007); other sequences have also been generated by the Kasuza sequence group (Asamizu et al., 1999; Asamizu et al., 2000) or individual laboratories that have focused on specific genes. Shrager et al. (2003) placed the reads into distinct contigs (an assemblage of reads with overlapping nucleotide sequences), and contigs that group together as part of the same genes have been designated ACEs (assembly of contigs generated from EST information). All of the reads have also been mapped to the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome and the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences have been reassembled, and the resulting assemblage is called an ACEG (an Assembly of contiguous EST sequences supported by genomic sequence) (Jain et al., 2007). Most of the unique genes or ACEGs are also represented by gene models that have been generated by the Joint Genome Institute (JGI, Walnut Creek, CA). These gene models have been placed onto the DNA scaffolds and are presented as a track on the Chlamydomonas genome browser associated with the genome portal (http://genome.jgi-psf.org/Chlre3/Chlre3.home.html). Ultimately, the meeting grant awarded by DOE has helped enormously in the development of an annotation pipeline (a set of guidelines used in the annotation of genes) and resulted in high quality annotation of over 4,000 genes; the annotators were from both Europe and the USA. Some of the people who led the annotation initiative were Arthur Grossman, Olivier Vallon, and Sabeeha Merchant (with many individual

  19. Comparative analysis of cryopreservation methods in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Scarbrough, Chasity; Wirschell, Maureen

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydomonas is a model organism used for studies of many important biological processes. Traditionally, strains have been propagated on solid agar, which requires routine passaging for long-term maintenance. Cryopreservation of Chlamydomonas is possible, yet long-term viability is highly variable. Thus, improved cryopreservation methods for Chlamydomonas are an important requirement for sustained study of genetically defined strains. Here, we tested a commercial cryopreservation kit and directly compared it's effectiveness to a methanol-based method. We also tested thaw-back procedures comparing the growth of cells in liquid culture or on solid agar media. We demonstrated that methanol was the superior cryopreservation method for Chlamydomonas compared to the commercial kit and that post-thaw culture conditions dramatically affect viability. We also demonstrated that cryopreserved cells could be successfully thawed and plated directly onto solid agar plates. Our findings have important implications for the long-term storage of Chlamydomonas that can likely be extended to other algal species.

  20. Light stress and photoprotection in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Erika; Wakao, Setsuko; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2015-05-01

    Plants and algae require light for photosynthesis, but absorption of too much light can lead to photo-oxidative damage to the photosynthetic apparatus and sustained decreases in the efficiency and rate of photosynthesis (photoinhibition). Light stress can adversely affect growth and viability, necessitating that photosynthetic organisms acclimate to different environmental conditions in order to alleviate the detrimental effects of excess light. The model unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, employs diverse strategies of regulation and photoprotection to avoid, minimize, and repair photo-oxidative damage in stressful light conditions, allowing for acclimation to different and changing environments. PMID:25758978

  1. Genetic transformation of the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Juliane; Shao, Ning; Lu, Yinghong; Bock, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the single-celled green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has become an invaluable model organism in plant biology and an attractive production host in biotechnology. The genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas is relatively simple and efficient, but achieving high expression levels of foreign genes has remained challenging. Here, we provide working protocols for algal cultivation and transformation as well as for selection and analysis of transgenic algal clones. We focus on two commonly used transformation methods for Chlamydomonas: glass bead-assisted transformation and particle gun-mediated (biolistic) transformation. In addition, we describe available tools for promoting efficient transgene expression and highlight important considerations for designing transformation vectors.

  2. Nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Flavin, M

    1976-01-10

    Nucleotides have at least two functions in eukaryotic cilia and flagella. ATP, originating in the cells, is utilized for motility by energy-transducing protein(s) called dynein, and the binding of guanine nucleotides to tubulin, and probably certain transformations of the bound nucleotides, are prerequisites for the assembly of microtubules. Besides dynein, which can be solubulized from Chlamydomonas flagella as a heterogeneous, Mg2+ or Ca2+-activated ATPase, we have purified and characterized five other flagellar enzymes involved in nucleotide transformations. A homogeneous, low molecular weight, Ca2+-specific adenosine triphosphatase was isolated, which was inhibited by Mg2+ and was not specific for ATP. This enzyme was not formed by treating purified dynein with proteases. It was absent from extracts of Tetrahymena cilia. Its function might be an auxiliary energy transducer, or in steering or tactic responses. Two species of adenylate kinase were isolated, one of which was much elevated in regenerating flagella; the latter was also present in cell bodies. A large part of flagellar nucleoside diphosphokinase activity could not be solubilized. Two soluble enzyme species were identified, one of which was also present in cell bodies. Since these enzymes are of interest because they might function in microtubule assembly, we studied the extent to which brain nucleoside diphosphokinase co-polymerizes with tubulin purified by repeated cycles of polymerization. Arginine kinase was not detected in Chlamydomonas flagellar extracts. PMID:397

  3. Paternal inheritance of mitochondria in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Soichi

    2010-03-01

    To analyze mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)inheritance, differences in mtDNA between Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas smithii, respiration deficiency and antibiotic resistance were used to distinguish mtDNA origins. The analyses indicated paternal inheritance. However, these experiments raised questions regarding whether paternal inheritance occurred normally.Mitochondrial nucleoids were observed in living zygotes from mating until 3 days after mating and then until progeny formation. However, selective disappearance of nucleoids was not observed. Subsequently, experimental serial backcrosses between the two strains demonstrated strict paternal inheritance. The fate of mt+ and mt- mtDNA was followed using the differences in mtDNA between the two strains. The slow elimination of mt+ mtDNA through zygote maturation in darkness was observed, and later the disappearance of mt+ mtDNA was observed at the beginning of meiosis. To explain the different fates of mtDNA, methylation status was investigated; however, no methylation was detected. Variously constructed diploid cells showed biparental inheritance. Thus, when the mating process occurs normally, paternal inheritance occurs. Mutations disrupting mtDNA inheritance have not yet been isolated. Mutations that disrupt maternal inheritance of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) do not disrupt inheritance of mtDNA. The genes responsible for mtDNA inheritance are different from those of chloroplasts.

  4. International Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Stephen Miller

    2010-06-10

    The 2010 Conference on the Cell and Molecular Biology of Chlamydomonas was held June 6-10 near Boston, MA, and attracted a record 273 participants, 146 from US labs, 10 from Canada, and the remainder from 18 other countries. The single-celled algal protist Chlamydomonas is a key research organism for many investigators, including those who study photosynthesis, cell motility, adaptation to environmental stresses, the evolution of multicellularity, and the production of biofuels. Chlamydomonas researchers gather every two years at a research conference to exchange methods, develop collaborative efforts, disseminate recent findings, and plan large-scale studies to improve the usefulness of this unique research organism. This conference provides the only opportunity for Chlamydomonas scientists who work on different research problems to meet face to face, and greatly speeds progress in their respective fields. An important function of these Chlamydomonas conferences is to promote and showcase the work of younger scientists, and to attract new investigators into the Chlamydomonas community. DOE award SC0004085 was used to offset the travel and registration costs for 18 young investigators, 9 of whom were women, including one African American. Most of these scientists would not have been able to attend the conference without DOE support. A total of 208 research presentations were made at the meeting, 80 talks (63 presented by students, postdocs, and pre-tenured faculty) and 128 posters. Cell motility and biofuels/metabolism were the best-represented research areas, with a total of 77 presentations. This fact underscores the growing importance of Chlamydomonas as a research and production tool in the rapidly expanding world of biofuels research. A total of 28 talks and posters were presented on the topics of photosynthesis and stress responses, which were among the next best-represented research areas. As at several recent Chlamydomonas meetings, important advances were

  5. Identification of an NADP/thioredoxin system in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; Picaud, A.; Buchanan, B. B.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.

    1991-01-01

    The protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system, NADP-thioredoxin reductase (NTR) and thioredoxin h, have been purified and characterized from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The analysis of this system confirms that photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas cells resemble leaves in having both an NADP- and ferrodoxin-linked thioredoxin redox system. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin h, which is smaller on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis than thioredoxin m from the same source, cross-reacted with antisera to thioredoxin h from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and wheat germ (Triticum vulgaris L.) but not with antisera to m or f thioredoxins. In these properties, the thioredoxin h resembled a thioredoxin from Chlamydomonas, designated Ch1, whose sequence was reported recently (P. Decottignies et al., 1991, Eur. J. Biochem. 198, 505-512). The differential reactivity of thioredoxin h with antisera was used to demonstrate that thioredoxin h is enriched outside the chloroplast. The NTR was purified from Chlamydomonas using thioredoxin h from the same source. Similar to its counterpart from other organisms, Chlamydomonas NTR had a subunit size of approx. 36 kDa and was specific for NADPH. Chlamydomonas NTR effectively reduced thioredoxin h from the same source but showed little activity with the other thioredoxins tested, including spinach thioredoxin h and Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Comparison of the reduction of Chlamydomonas thioredoxins m and h by each of the endogenous thioredoxin reductases, NTR and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase, revealed a differential specificity of each enzyme for thioredoxin. Thus, NTR showed increased activity with thioredoxin h and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase with thioredoxins m and f.

  6. Physiological characterization of cadmium-exposed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Anja; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Preud'homme, Hugues; Thondorf, Iris; Wesenberg, Dirk

    2011-12-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a common model organism for investigation of metal stress. This green alga produces phytochelatins in the presence of metal ions. The influence of cadmium is of main interest, because it is a strong activator of phytochelatin synthase. Cell wall bound and intracellular cadmium content was determined after exposition to 70 µm CdCl(2), showing the main portion of the metal outside the cell. Nevertheless, imported cadmium was sufficient to cause significant changes in thiolpeptide metabolism and its transcriptional regulation. Modern analytical approaches enable new insights into phytochelatin (PC) distribution. A new rapid and precise UPLC-MS method allowed high-throughput PC quantification in algal samples after 1, 4, 24 and 48 h cadmium stress. Initially, canonic PCs were synthesized in C. reinhardtii during cadmium exposition, but afterwards CysPCs became the major thiolpeptides. Thus, after 48 h the concentration of the PC-isoforms CysPC(2-3) and CysGSH attained between 105 and 199 nmol g(-1) fresh weight (FW), whereas the PC(2-3) concentrations were only 15 nmol g(-1) FW. The relative quantification of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) mRNA suggests the generation of CysPCs by glutamate cleavage from canonic PCs by γ-GT. Furthermore, a homology model of C. reinhardtii phytochelatin synthase was constructed to verify the use of crystal structures from Anabaena sp. phytochelatin synthase (PCS) for docking studies with canonical PCs and CysPCs. From the difference in energy scores, we hypothesize that CysPC may prevent the synthesis of canonical PCs by blocking the binding pocket. Finally, possible physiological reasons for the high abundance of CysPC compared with their canonic precursors are discussed.

  7. A photorespiratory mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Marek, L.F.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1990-05-01

    A mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, designated 18-7F, has been isolated and characterized. 18-7F requires a high CO{sub 2} concentration for photoautrophic growth in spite of the apparent induction of a functional CO{sub 2} concentrating mechanism in air-adapted cells. In 2% O{sub 2} the photosynthetic characteristics of 18-7F and wild type are similar. In 21% O{sub 2}, photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution is severely inhibited in the mutant by preillumination in limiting CO{sub 2}, although the apparent photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon is similar in preilluminated cells and in cells incubated in the dark prior to O{sub 2} evolution measurements. Net CO{sub 2} uptake is also inhibited when the cells are exposed to air (21% O{sub 2}, 0.035% CO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2}) for longer than a few minutes. ({sup 14}C)Phosphoglycolate accumulates within 5 minutes of photosynthetic {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation in cells of 18-7F. Phosphoglycolate does not accumulate in wild type. Phosphoglycolate phosphatase activity in extracts from air-adapted cells of 18-7F is 10 to 20% of that in wild-type Chlamydomonas. The activity of phosphoglycolate phosphatase in heterozygous diploids is intermediate between that of homozygous mutant and wild-type diploids. It was concluded that the high-CO{sub 2} requiring phenotype in 18-7F results from a phosphoglycolate phosphatase deficiency. Genetic analyses indicate that this deficiency results from a single-gene, nuclear mutation. We have named the locus pgp-1.

  8. Gene silencing by artificial microRNAs in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tao; Wang, Wei; Bai, Xue; Qi, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga. It is a model system for studying functions of the chloroplast, basal body and flagella. The completion of the Chlamydomonas genome sequence makes it possible to use reverse genetic approaches in this organism. Chlamydomonas contains a set of endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) that down-regulate their target gene expression through mRNA cleavage. Here we developed an artificial miRNA-based strategy to knock down gene expression in Chlamydomonas. Using an endogenous Chlamydomonas miRNA precursor as the backbone, we constructed two artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) targeting the MAA7 and RBCS1/2 genes, respectively. When overexpressed, these two amiRNAs could cleave their respective targets precisely at the predicted sites, resulting in greatly decreased accumulation of MAA7 and RBCS1/2 transcripts and expected mutant phenotypes. We further showed that the two amiRNAs could be produced simultaneously from a dimeric amiRNA precursor. We anticipate that the amiRNA technology developed in this study will be very useful in assessing the functions of individual genes and in genome-wide approaches.

  9. Comparative analysis of cryopreservation methods in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Scarbrough, Chasity; Wirschell, Maureen

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydomonas is a model organism used for studies of many important biological processes. Traditionally, strains have been propagated on solid agar, which requires routine passaging for long-term maintenance. Cryopreservation of Chlamydomonas is possible, yet long-term viability is highly variable. Thus, improved cryopreservation methods for Chlamydomonas are an important requirement for sustained study of genetically defined strains. Here, we tested a commercial cryopreservation kit and directly compared it's effectiveness to a methanol-based method. We also tested thaw-back procedures comparing the growth of cells in liquid culture or on solid agar media. We demonstrated that methanol was the superior cryopreservation method for Chlamydomonas compared to the commercial kit and that post-thaw culture conditions dramatically affect viability. We also demonstrated that cryopreserved cells could be successfully thawed and plated directly onto solid agar plates. Our findings have important implications for the long-term storage of Chlamydomonas that can likely be extended to other algal species. PMID:27452475

  10. Chemical screening methods for flagellar phenotypes in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Marshall, Wallace F

    2013-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are important organelles used for sensing the external cellular environment or for motility. Abnormalities in ciliary structure or function can have devastating pathological consequences ranging from sinusitis and obesity to polycystic kidney disease, retinal degeneration, and mental retardation. Chlamydomonas flagella are excellent models to study the regulation and normal function of cilia. We utilized the 1280 compound Sigma LOPAC annotated library to screen for phenotypes in Chlamydomonas flagellar length, motility, deflagellation, and cellular toxicity. Phenotypes were assessed by quantitation from direct microscopic visualization and custom-designed motility/viability assays. Compounds were clustered based on data across all assays to facilitate the identification of novel pathways regulating flagella in Chlamydomonas. These methods can both aid our understanding of the basic biology of flagellar regulation and provide useful points of therapeutic intervention for cilia-related disorders.

  11. Swimming of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in weakly elastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Gollub, Jerry; Arratia, Paulo

    2012-11-01

    The swimming behavior of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in weakly elastic fluids is investigated in experiments using microscopy and tracking methods. The effects of fluid viscosity and elasticity on the swimming speed, flagellar shape, beating frequency, and efficiency are examined. Here, the fluid viscosity is varied using water and sucrose solutions, while fluid elasticity is introduced by adding flexible polymer CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) to the buffer solution. Swimming experiments are performed in a thin-film apparatus equipped with a microscope and high-speed camera. We find that even small amounts of fluid elasticity can have a significant effect on the swimming kinematics and dynamics of Chlamydomonas because of the relatively high beating frequency of its flagella (50-60 Hz). For example, the Chlamydomonas swimming speed is hindered by fluid elasticity compared to Newtonian fluids. In addition, the algae swimming speed decreases as the fluid elasticity is increased. This research is supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1104705.

  12. Generation of Chlamydomonas strains that efficiently express nuclear transgenes.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Juliane; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2009-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is both an invaluable model organism for plant biology and an attractive biotechnological production system. Despite the availability of efficient methods for introduction of foreign genes into the nuclear genome of the alga, transgene expression levels are usually very poor. This is a serious limitation that has severely hampered both post-genomics research in Chlamydomonas and use of the alga in molecular farming. Here we report a solution to this problem. We have designed a genetic screen that facilitates isolation of algal strains that efficiently express introduced transgenes. The levels of accumulation of foreign protein in our expression strains are almost uniformly high in all transgenic clones and are little influenced by position effects. The possibility of expressing transgenes to high levels will greatly facilitate post-genomics research in Chlamydomonas, and will also boost exploitation of the alga as an inexpensive production host for biopharmaceuticals and other valuable compounds.

  13. Triacylglycerol mobilization is suppressed by brefeldin A in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naohiro; Dong, Trung; Bailey, Michael; Lum, Tony; Ingram, Drury

    2013-10-01

    Brefeldin A suppresses vesicle trafficking by inhibiting exchange of GDP for GTP in ADP-ribosylation factor. We report that brefeldin A suppresses mobilization of triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a model organism of green microalgae. Analyses revealed that brefeldin A causes Chlamydomonas to form lipid droplets in which triacylglycerols accumulate in a dose-dependent manner. Pulse labeling experiment using fluorescent fatty acids suggested that brefeldin A inhibits the cells from degrading fatty acids. The experiment also revealed that the cells transiently form novel compartments that accumulate exogenously added fatty acids in the cytoplasm, designated fatty acid-induced microbodies (FAIMs). Brefeldin A up-regulates the formation of FAIMs, whereas nitrogen deprivation that up-regulates triacylglycerol synthesis in Chlamydomonas does not cause the cells to form FAIMs. These results underscore the role of the vesicle trafficking machinery in triacylglycerol metabolism in green microalgae.

  14. Photoperiodic control of germination in the unicell Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Lena; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2002-03-01

    Photoperiodic time measurement is a well-documented adaptation of multicellular plants and animals to seasonal changes in the environment, but it is unclear whether unicellular organisms can exhibit bona fide photoperiodic responses. We demonstrate that the occurrence of zygospore germination of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas is a genuine photoperiodic response. Germination efficiency is enhanced in long days as compared with short days. While the total amount of light exposure influences the efficiency of germination, the photoperiod is a significant cue for germination. The developmental stage that senses the photoperiod is just prior to mating and during the first days of zygospore development, so there may be a critical window of zygospore maturation that is regulated by photoperiod. Because zygospores are resistant to freezing injury, whereas vegetative cells are not, it is likely that the suppression of germination by short days is an adaptive response for overwintering of Chlamydomonas. Therefore, Chlamydomonas is a single-celled organism that is capable of photoperiodic responses.

  15. Patching Holes in the Chlamydomonas Genome.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-07-07

    The Chlamydomonas genome has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated to produce a rich resource for genetics and molecular biology in this well-studied model organism. However, the current reference genome contains ∼1000 blocks of unknown sequence ('N-islands'), which are frequently placed in introns of annotated gene models. We developed a strategy to search for previously unknown exons hidden within such blocks, and determine the sequence, and exon/intron boundaries, of such exons. These methods are based on assembly and alignment of short cDNA and genomic DNA reads, completely independent of prior reference assembly or annotation. Our evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of the annotated intronic N-islands contain hidden exons. For most of these, our algorithm recovers full exonic sequence with associated splice junctions and exon-adjacent intronic sequence. These new exons represent de novo sequence generally present nowhere in the assembled genome, and the added sequence improves evolutionary conservation of the predicted encoded peptides.

  16. Genetic tools and techniques for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mussgnug, Jan H

    2015-07-01

    The development of tools has always been a major driving force for the advancement of science. Optical microscopes were the first instruments that allowed discovery and descriptive studies of the subcellular features of microorganisms. Although optical and electron microscopes remained at the forefront of microbiological research tools since their inventions, the advent of molecular genetics brought about questions which had to be addressed with new "genetic tools". The unicellular green microalgal genus Chlamydomonas, especially the most prominent species C. reinhardtii, has become a frequently used model organism for many diverse fields of research and molecular genetic analyses of C. reinhardtii, as well as the available genetic tools and techniques, have become increasingly sophisticated throughout the last decades. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the molecular key features of C. reinhardtii and summarize the progress related to the development of tools and techniques for genetic engineering of this organism, from pioneering DNA transformation experiments to state-of-the-art techniques for targeted nuclear genome editing and high-throughput screening approaches.

  17. Genetics of the deflagellation pathway in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Finst, R J; Kim, P J; Quarmby, L M

    1998-01-01

    Signal-induced deflagellation in Chlamydomonas involves Ca2+-activated breakage of the nine outer-doublet axonemal microtubules at a specific site in the flagellar transition zone. In this study, we isolated 13 new deflagellation mutants that can be divided into two phenotypic classes, the Adf class and the Fa class. Cells with the Adf deflagellation phenotype are defective in acid-stimulated Ca2+ influx, but can be induced to deflagellate by treatment with nonionic detergent and Ca2+. Genetic analyses show that the five new Adf mutations, as well as the previously identified adf1 mutation, are alleles of the ADF1 gene. Mutants in the second phenotypic class, the Fa mutants, fail to deflagellate in response to any known chemical stimulus and are defective in Ca2+-activated microtubule severing. Genetic analysis of these eight new Fa strains demonstrated that they define two complementation groups, and one of these contains the previously identified fa1 mutation. Diploid analysis showed that five alleles map to the FA1 gene, whereas four alleles define a novel gene that we have named FA2. The isolation of multiple mutant alleles of each gene, generated by either ultraviolet irradiation or insertional mutagenesis, indicates that ADF1, FA1, and FA2 may be the only genes that can be identified in a loss-of-function screen. These alleles should provide a better understanding of the regulation of microtubule severing by Ca2+. PMID:9611203

  18. Studies on flagellar shortening in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Cherniack, J.

    1985-01-01

    Flagellar shortening of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was promoted by sodium chloride, pyrophosphate (sodium, potassium and ammonium salts), EDTA and EGTA, succinate, citrate and oxalate (sodium salts), caffeine and aminophylline. Removal of calcium from the medium potentiated the effects of these agents in inducing shortening. Investigations of the release of phosphorylated compounds to the medium during pyrophosphate-induced flagellar shortening of cells pre-labelled with /sup 32/P, revealed an as yet unidentified /sup 32/P-labelled compound with distinct chromatographic properties. Chromatography and electrophoresis indicates that it is a small, highly polar molecule with a high charge to mass ratio, containing thermo- and acid-labile phosphate linkages. Investigations showed of the release of /sup 35/S-labelled protein to the medium from cells pre-labelled with /sup 35/S-sulfate showed that flagellated cells released two prominent polypeptides which comigrated with ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-flagellar tubulin on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, while deflagellated cells did not.

  19. Recording and analyzing IFT in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William; Vanderwaal, Kristyn; Porter, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    The transport of materials to and from the cell body and tips of eukaryotic flagella and cilia is carried out by a process called intraflagellar transport, or IFT. This process is essential for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and flagella: in the absence of IFT, cilia cannot assemble and, if IFT is arrested in ciliated cells, the cilia disassemble. The major IFT complex proteins and the major motor proteins, kinesin-2 and osm-3 (which transport particles from the cell body to ciliary tips) and cytoplasmic dynein 1b (which transports particles from ciliary tips to the cell body) have been identified. However, we have little understanding of the structure of the IFT particles, the cargo that these particles carry, how cargo is loaded and unloaded from the particles, or how the motor proteins are regulated. The focus of this chapter is to provide methods to observe and quantify the movements of IFT particles in Chlamydomonas flagella. IFT movements can be visualized in paralyzed or partially arrested flagella using either differential interference contrast (IFT) microscopy or, in cells with fluorescently tagged IFT components, with fluorescence microscopy. Methods for recording IFT movements and analyzing movements using kymograms are described. PMID:20409816

  20. Patching Holes in the Chlamydomonas Genome

    PubMed Central

    Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R.

    2016-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas genome has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated to produce a rich resource for genetics and molecular biology in this well-studied model organism. However, the current reference genome contains ∼1000 blocks of unknown sequence (‘N-islands’), which are frequently placed in introns of annotated gene models. We developed a strategy to search for previously unknown exons hidden within such blocks, and determine the sequence, and exon/intron boundaries, of such exons. These methods are based on assembly and alignment of short cDNA and genomic DNA reads, completely independent of prior reference assembly or annotation. Our evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of the annotated intronic N-islands contain hidden exons. For most of these, our algorithm recovers full exonic sequence with associated splice junctions and exon-adjacent intronic sequence. These new exons represent de novo sequence generally present nowhere in the assembled genome, and the added sequence improves evolutionary conservation of the predicted encoded peptides. PMID:27175017

  1. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  2. Drosophila roadblock and Chlamydomonas Lc7

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Aaron B.; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Benashski, Sharon E.; McCaffery, J. Michael; Goldstein, Lawrence S.B.; King, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms utilize microtubule-dependent motors of the kinesin and dynein superfamilies to generate intracellular movement. To identify new genes involved in the regulation of axonal transport in Drosophila melanogaster, we undertook a screen based upon the sluggish larval phenotype of known motor mutants. One of the mutants identified in this screen, roadblock (robl), exhibits diverse defects in intracellular transport including axonal transport and mitosis. These defects include intra-axonal accumulations of cargoes, severe axonal degeneration, and aberrant chromosome segregation. The gene identified by robl encodes a 97–amino acid polypeptide that is 57% identical (70% similar) to the 105–amino acid Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein–associated protein LC7, also reported here. Both robl and LC7 have homology to several other genes from fruit fly, nematode, and mammals, but not Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we demonstrate that members of this family of proteins are associated with both flagellar outer arm dynein and Drosophila and rat brain cytoplasmic dynein. We propose that roadblock/LC7 family members may modulate specific dynein functions. PMID:10402468

  3. Dynamic regulation of photosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Jun; Tokutsu, Ryutaro

    2015-05-01

    Plants and algae have acquired the ability to acclimatize to ever-changing environments to survive. During photosynthesis, light energy is converted by several membrane protein supercomplexes into electrochemical energy, which is eventually used to assimilate CO2 . The efficiency of photosynthesis is modulated by many environmental factors, including temperature, drought, CO2 concentration, and the quality and quantity of light. Recently, our understanding of such regulators of photosynthesis and the underlying molecular mechanisms has increased considerably. The photosynthetic supercomplexes undergo supramolecular reorganizations within a short time after receiving environmental cues. These reorganizations include state transitions that balance the excitation of the two photosystems: qE quenching, which thermally dissipates excess energy at the level of the light-harvesting antenna, and cyclic electron flow, which supplies the increased ATP demanded by CO2 assimilation and the pH gradient to activate qE quenching. This review focuses on the recent findings regarding the environmental regulation of photosynthesis in model organisms, paying particular attention to the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which offer a glimpse into the dynamic behavior of photosynthetic machinery in nature.

  4. Patching Holes in the Chlamydomonas Genome.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas genome has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated to produce a rich resource for genetics and molecular biology in this well-studied model organism. However, the current reference genome contains ∼1000 blocks of unknown sequence ('N-islands'), which are frequently placed in introns of annotated gene models. We developed a strategy to search for previously unknown exons hidden within such blocks, and determine the sequence, and exon/intron boundaries, of such exons. These methods are based on assembly and alignment of short cDNA and genomic DNA reads, completely independent of prior reference assembly or annotation. Our evidence indicates that a substantial proportion of the annotated intronic N-islands contain hidden exons. For most of these, our algorithm recovers full exonic sequence with associated splice junctions and exon-adjacent intronic sequence. These new exons represent de novo sequence generally present nowhere in the assembled genome, and the added sequence improves evolutionary conservation of the predicted encoded peptides. PMID:27175017

  5. Characterization of the purified Chlamydomonas minus agglutinin

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydomonas flagellar sexual agglutinins are responsible for the adhesion of opposite mating-type (plus and minus) gametes during the first stages of mating. Purification and partial characterization of the plus agglutinin was previously reported (Adair, W. S., C. J. Hwang, and U. W. Goodenough, 1983, Cell, 33:183-193). Here we characterize the purified minus molecule. We show it to be a high molecular weight, hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein that migrates in the 3% stacking region of an SDS-polyacrylamide gel and is absent from two nonagglutinating minus mutants. Plus and minus agglutinins are remarkably similar, although nonidentical, in amino acid composition, molecular morphology, and reactivity in vivo and in vitro with monoclonal antibodies raised against the plus agglutinin. Moreover, the adhesiveness of both plus and minus agglutinins, when coupled to agarose beads, is abolished by thermolysin, trypsin, periodate, alkaline borohydride, reducing agents, or heat, but unaffected by exo- or endoglycosidases. The minus agglutinin, however, migrates just ahead of the plus molecule on SDS PAGE, is excluded from an anion-exchange (Mono Q) column, elutes earlier during hydrophobic interaction (Bio-gel TSK Phenyl 5PW) chromatography, and is sensitive to chymotrypsin digestion (unlike the plus agglutinin); therefore, it differs from the plus agglutinin in apparent molecular weight, net charge, relative hydrophobicity and proteolytic susceptibility. Nevertheless, our results generally demonstrate a high degree of homology between these complementary cell-cell recognition/adhesion molecules, which suggests that they are specified by genes that have a common evolutionary origin. PMID:2411736

  6. Analysis of Axonemal Assembly During Ciliary Regeneration in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emily L; Sale, Winfield S; Alford, Lea M

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an outstanding model genetic organism for study of assembly of cilia. Here, methods are described for synchronization of ciliary regeneration in Chlamydomonas to analyze the sequence in which ciliary proteins assemble. In addition, the methods described allow analysis of the mechanisms involved in regulation of ciliary length, the proteins required for ciliary assembly, and the temporal expression of genes encoding ciliary proteins. Ultimately, these methods can contribute to discovery of conserved genes that when defective lead to abnormal ciliary assembly and human disease.

  7. Analysis of Axonemal Assembly During Ciliary Regeneration in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emily L; Sale, Winfield S; Alford, Lea M

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an outstanding model genetic organism for study of assembly of cilia. Here, methods are described for synchronization of ciliary regeneration in Chlamydomonas to analyze the sequence in which ciliary proteins assemble. In addition, the methods described allow analysis of the mechanisms involved in regulation of ciliary length, the proteins required for ciliary assembly, and the temporal expression of genes encoding ciliary proteins. Ultimately, these methods can contribute to discovery of conserved genes that when defective lead to abnormal ciliary assembly and human disease. PMID:27514926

  8. Separate origins of ice-binding proteins in antarctic chlamydomonas species.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas raudensis is an important primary producer in a number of ice-covered lakes and ponds in Antarctica. A C. raudensis isolate (UWO241) from Lake Bonney in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, like many other Antarctic algae, was found to secrete ice-binding proteins (IBPs), which appear to be essential for survival in icy environments. The IBPs of several Antarctic algae (diatoms, a prymesiophyte, and a prasinophyte) are similar to each other (here designated as type I IBPs) and have been proposed to have bacterial origins. Other IBPs (type II IBPs) that bear no resemblance to type I IBPs, have been found in the Antarctic Chlamydomonas sp. CCMP681, a putative snow alga, raising the possibility that chlamydomonad IBPs developed separately from the IBPs of other algae. To test this idea, we obtained the IBP sequences of C. raudensis UWO241 by sequencing the transcriptome. A large number of transcripts revealed no sequences resembling type II IBPs. Instead, many isoforms resembling type I IBPs were found, and these most closely matched a hypothetical protein from the bacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca. The sequences were confirmed to encode IBPs by the activity of a recombinant protein and by the matching of predicted and observed isoelectric points and molecular weights. Furthermore, a mesophilic sister species, C. raudensis SAG49.72, showed no ice-binding activity or PCR products from UWO241 IBP primers. These results confirm that algal IBPs are required for survival in icy habitats and demonstrate that they have diverse origins that are unrelated to the taxonomic positions of the algae. Last, we show that the C. raudensis UWO241 IBPs can change the structure of ice in a way that could increase the survivability of cells trapped in the ice.

  9. Fermentative Metabolism of Chlamydomonas reinhardii1

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Martin; Gfeller, Rene P.; Chen, Changguo

    1986-01-01

    The anaerobic photodissimilation of acetate by Chlamydomonas reinhardii F-60 adapted to a hydrogen metabolism was studied utilizing manometric and isotopic techniques. The rate of photoanaerobic (N2) acetate uptake was approximately 20 μmoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour or one-half that of the photoaerobic (air) rate. Under N2, cells produced 1.7 moles H2 and 0.8 mole CO2 per mole of acetate consumed. Gas production and acetate uptake were inhibited by monofluoroacetic acid (MFA), 3-(3′,4′-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and by H2. Acetate uptake was inhibited about 50% by 5% H2 (95% N2). H2 in the presence of MFA or DCMU stimulated acetate uptake and the result was interpreted to indicate a transition from oxidative to reductive metabolism. Carbon-14 from both [1-14C]- and [2-14C]acetate was incorporated under N2 or H2 into CO2, lipids, and carbohydrates. The methyl carbon of acetate accumulated principally (75-80%) in the lipid and carbohydrate fractions, whereas the carboxyl carbon contributed isotope primarily to CO2 (56%) in N2. The presence of H2 caused a decrease in carbon lost from the cell as CO2 and a greater proportion of the acetate was incorporated into lipid. The results support the occurrence of anaerobic and light-dependent citric acid and glyoxylate cycles which affect the conversion of acetate to CO2 and H2 prior to its conversion to cellular material. PMID:16664985

  10. Systemic Cold Stress Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Hanak, Anne-Mette; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important model organisms nowadays phylogenetically situated between higher plants and animals (Merchant et al. 2007). Stress adaptation of this unicellular model algae is in the focus because of its relevance to biomass and biofuel production. Here, we have studied cold stress adaptation of C. reinhardtii hitherto not described for this algae whereas intensively studied in higher plants. Toward this goal, high throughput mass spectrometry was employed to integrate proteome, metabolome, physiological and cell-morphological changes during a time-course from 0 to 120 h. These data were complemented with RT-qPCR for target genes involved in central metabolism, signaling, and lipid biosynthesis. Using this approach dynamics in central metabolism were linked to cold-stress dependent sugar and autophagy pathways as well as novel genes in C. reinhardtii such as CKIN1, CKIN2 and a hitherto functionally not annotated protein named CKIN3. Cold stress affected extensively the physiology and the organization of the cell. Gluconeogenesis and starch biosynthesis pathways are activated leading to a pronounced starch and sugar accumulation. Quantitative lipid profiles indicate a sharp decrease in the lipophilic fraction and an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids suggesting this as a mechanism of maintaining membrane fluidity. The proteome is completely remodeled during cold stress: specific candidates of the ribosome and the spliceosome indicate altered biosynthesis and degradation of proteins important for adaptation to low temperatures. Specific proteasome degradation may be mediated by the observed cold-specific changes in the ubiquitinylation system. Sparse partial least squares regression analysis was applied for protein correlation network analysis using proteins as predictors and Fv/Fm, FW, total lipids, and starch as responses. We applied also Granger causality analysis and revealed correlations between proteins and

  11. The uni chromosome of Chlamydomonas: histone genes and nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Walther, Z; Hall, J L

    1995-09-25

    The uni linkage group (ULG) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains many genes involved in the basal body-flagellar system. Recent evidence suggests that the corresponding uni chromosome is located in close proximity to the basal body complex. In the course of studies into its molecular organization, we have found a cluster of four histone genes on the ULG. The genes are arranged as divergently-transcribed pairs: H3-H4 and H2B-H2A. Genomic sequencing reveals that these genes lack introns and contain characteristic 3' palindromes similar to those of animals. The predicted amino acid sequences are highly conserved across species, with greatest similarities to the histone genes of Volvox. Southern analysis shows that each histone gene is present in 15-20 copies in Chlamydomonas and suggests a dispersed genomic organization. Northern analysis of mitotically-synchronized cells shows that, like the replication-dependent histones of higher eukaryotes, Chlamydomonas histone genes are expressed during S-phase. Using a gene-specific probe on Northern blots, we provide evidence that the ULG H4 gene is regulated in the same manner as other Chlamydomonas histone genes. Finally, micrococcal nuclease protection experiments show that the uni chromosome itself associates with histone proteins and displays a conventional nucleosomal banding pattern. PMID:7479007

  12. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Regulation of Diurnal Transcription in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed global transcriptome changes during synchronized cell division in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle consists of a long G1 phase, followed by an S/M phase with multiple rapid, alternating rounds of DNA replication and segregation. We found that the S/M period is associated with strong induction of ∼2300 genes, many with conserved roles in DNA replication or cell division. Other genes, including many involved in photosynthesis, are reciprocally downregulated in S/M, suggesting a gene expression split correlating with the temporal separation between G1 and S/M. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle is synchronized by light-dark cycles, so in principle, these transcriptional changes could be directly responsive to light or to metabolic cues. Alternatively, cell-cycle-periodic transcription may be directly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases. To distinguish between these possibilities, we analyzed transcriptional profiles of mutants in the kinases CDKA and CDKB, as well as other mutants with distinct cell cycle blocks. Initial cell-cycle-periodic expression changes are largely CDK independent, but later regulation (induction and repression) is under differential control by CDKA and CDKB. Deviation from the wild-type transcriptional program in diverse cell cycle mutants will be an informative phenotype for further characterization of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. PMID:26475866

  13. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Dubois, Marine; Crocco, Carlos D; Yin, Ruohe; Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume; Schmid-Siegert, Emanuel; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel; Ulm, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection.

  14. Developing molecular tools for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh

    Microalgae have garnered increasing interest over the years for their ability to produce compounds ranging from biofuels to neutraceuticals. A main focus of researchers has been to use microalgae as a natural bioreactor for the production of valuable and complex compounds. Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. To take full advantage of these organisms' natural abilities, sophisticated molecular tools are needed to be able to introduce and functionally express multiple gene biosynthetic pathways in its genome. To achieve the above objective, we have sought to establish a method to construct, integrate and express multigene operons in the chloroplast and nuclear genome of the model microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast, or by random integration in the nuclear genome of C. reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii and up to three reporter proteins (Ble, AphVIII, and GFP) in its nuclear genome. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated-region selection when constructing a target pathway. In addition, this work focuses on expressing the cofactor regeneration enzyme phosphite dehydrogenase (PTDH) in the chloroplast and nuclear genomes of C. reinhardtii. The PTDH enzyme converts phosphite into phosphate and NAD(P)+ into NAD(P)H. The reduced

  15. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) Microscopy of Chlamydomonas Flagella

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D.; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Witman, George B.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic flagellum is host to a variety of dynamic behaviors, including flagellar beating, the motility of glycoproteins in the flagellar membrane, and intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional traffic of protein particles between the flagellar base and tip. IFT is of particular interest, as it plays integral roles in flagellar length control, cell signaling, development, and human disease. However, our ability to understand dynamic flagellar processes such as IFT is limited in large part by the fidelity with which we can image these behaviors in living cells. This chapter introduces the application of total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualizing the flagella of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The advantages and challenges of TIRF are discussed in comparison to confocal and differential interference contrast (DIC) techniques. This chapter also reviews current IFT insights gleaned from TIRF microscopy of Chlamydomonas and provides an outlook on the future of the technique, with particular emphasis on combining TIRF with other emerging imaging technologies. PMID:20409817

  16. Three light-inducible heat shock genes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    von Gromoff, E D; Treier, U; Beck, C F

    1989-01-01

    Genomic clones representing three Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genes homologous to the Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene were isolated. The mRNAs of genes hsp68, hsp70, and hsp80 could be translated in vitro into proteins of Mr 68,000, 70,000, and 80,000, respectively. Transcription of these genes increased dramatically upon heat shock, and the corresponding mRNAs rapidly accumulated, reaching a peak at around 30 min after a shift to the elevated temperature. Light also induced the accumulation of the mRNAs encoded by these heat shock genes. A shift of dark-grown cells to light resulted in a drastic increase in mRNA levels, which reached a maximum at around 1 h after the shift. Thus, in Chlamydomonas, expression of hsp70-homologous heat shock genes appears to be regulated by thermal stress and light. Images PMID:2779571

  17. Sites of synthesis of chloroplast ribosomal proteins in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were pulse-labeled in vivo in the presence of inhibitors of cytoplasmic (anisomycin) or chloroplast (lincomycin) protein synthesis to ascertain the sites of synthesis of chloroplast ribosomal proteins. Fluorographs of the labeled proteins, resolved on two-dimensional (2-D) charge/SDS and one-dimensional (1-D) SDS-urea gradient gels, demonstrated that five to six of the large subunit proteins are products of chloroplast protein synthesis while 26 to 27 of the large subunit proteins are synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Similarly, 14 of 31 small subunit proteins are products of chloroplast protein synthesis, while the remainder are synthesized in the cytoplasm. The 20 ribosomal proteins shown to be made in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas more than double the number of proteins known to be synthesized in the chloroplast of this alga. PMID:6841455

  18. Relevance of nutrient media composition for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ballester, David; Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae are capable of biological H2 photoproduction from water, solar energy, and a variety of organic substrates. Acclimation responses to different nutrient regimes finely control photosynthetic activity and can influence H2 production. Hence, nutrient stresses are an interesting scenario to study H2 production in photosynthetic organisms. In this review, we mainly focus on the H2-production mechanisms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the physiological relevance of the nutrient media composition when producing H2.

  19. Fermentative metabolism of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. II. Role of plastoquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Gfeller, R.P.; Gibbs, M.

    1985-02-01

    Evidence is presented to substantiate a chloroplastic respiratory pathway in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, whereby reducing equivalents generated during the degradation of starch enter the thylakoidal chain at the plastoquinone site catalyzed by NADH-plastoquinone reductase. In this formulation, the reduced plastoquinone is oxidized either by the photoevolution (photosystem 1) of H/sub 2/ under anaerobic conditions or by O/sub 2/ during dark respiration.

  20. Relevance of nutrient media composition for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ballester, David; Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-09-01

    Microalgae are capable of biological H2 photoproduction from water, solar energy, and a variety of organic substrates. Acclimation responses to different nutrient regimes finely control photosynthetic activity and can influence H2 production. Hence, nutrient stresses are an interesting scenario to study H2 production in photosynthetic organisms. In this review, we mainly focus on the H2-production mechanisms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the physiological relevance of the nutrient media composition when producing H2. PMID:25952745

  1. Homogentisate phytyltransferase from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Valdivieso, Gregorio; Cardeñosa, Rosa; Pineda, Manuel; Aguilar, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Homogentisate phytyltransferase (HPT) (EC 2.5.1.-) catalyzes the first committed step of tocopherol biosynthesis in all photosynthetic organisms. This paper presents the molecular characterization and expression analysis of HPT1 gene, and a study on the accumulation of tocopherols under different environmental conditions in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas HPT1 protein conserves all the prenylphosphate- and divalent cation-binding sites that are found in polyprenyltransferases and all the amino acids that are essential for its catalytic activity. Its hydrophobicity profile confirms that HPT is a membrane-bound protein. Chlamydomonas genomic DNA analysis suggests that HPT is encoded by a single gene, HPT1, whose promoter region contains multiple motifs related to regulation by jasmonate, abscisic acid, low temperature and light, and an ATCTA motif presents in genes involved in tocopherol biosynthesis and some photosynthesis-related genes. Expression analysis revealed that HPT1 is strongly regulated by dark and low-temperature. Under the same treatments, α-tocopherol increased in cultures exposed to darkness or heat, whereas γ-tocopherol did it in low temperature. The regulatory expression pattern of HPT1 and the changes of tocopherol abundance support the idea that different tocopherols play specific functions, and suggest a role for γ-tocopherol in the adaptation to growth under low-temperature.

  2. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis.

  3. D-lactate metabolism in the alga, Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Husic, D.W.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 14/C)D-lactate rapidly accumulates in Chlamydomonas cells under anaerobic conditions from the sugar-phosphate pools which are labeled during photosynthesis with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. A soluble D-lactate dehydrogenase (30 ..mu..mol NADH oxidized/h/mg Chl), which functions only in the direction of pyruvate reduction, has been partially purified and characterized. The D-lactate is reoxidized in Chlamydomonas by a mitochondrial membrane-bound dehydrogenase. This enzyme is known in the plant literature as glycolate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the oxidative photosynthetic carbon (C/sub 2/) cycle. This dehydrogenase may be linked to the mitochondrial electron transport chain, although the direct electron acceptor is unknown. Therefore, D-lactate accumulation may be, in part, due to the shut down of electron transport during anaerobiosis. In vivo chase experiments have shown that the D-lactate turns over rapidly when algal cells, which have been grown with air levels of CO/sub 2/ (0.04%), are returned to aerobic conditions in the light. Such turnover is not observed in cells which had been grown with 1 to 5% CO/sub 2/. Cells grown with high CO/sub 2/ have lower levels of glycolate dehydrogenase activity. They are currently using mutants of Chlamydomonas deficient in mitochondrial respiration to study the role of D-lactate oxidation in these algae.

  4. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  5. N6-Methyldeoxyadenosine Marks Active Transcription Start Sites in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Deng, Xin; Yu, Miao; Han, Dali; Hao, Ziyang; Liu, Jianzhao; Lu, Xingyu; Dore, Louis C; Weng, Xiaocheng; Ji, Quanjiang; Mets, Laurens; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6mA or m6A) is a DNA modification preserved in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It is widespread in bacteria, and functions in DNA mismatch repair, chromosome segregation, and virulence regulation. In contrast, the distribution and function of 6mA in eukaryotes have been unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the 6mA landscape in the genome of Chlamydomonas using new sequencing approaches. We identified the 6mA modification in 84% of genes in Chlamydomonas. We found that 6mA mainly locates at ApT dinucleotides around transcription start sites (TSS) with a bimodal distribution, and appears to mark active genes. A periodic pattern of 6mA deposition was also observed at base resolution, which is associated with nucleosome distribution near the TSS, suggesting a possible role in nucleosome positioning. The new genome-wide mapping of 6mA and its unique distribution in the Chlamydomonas genome suggest potential regulatory roles of 6mA in gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25936837

  6. Actin is required for IFT regulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Onishi, Masayuki; Karpiak, Joel; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Mackinder, Luke; Jonikas, Martin C; Sale, Winfield S; Shoichet, Brian; Pringle, John R; Marshall, Wallace F

    2014-09-01

    Assembly of cilia and flagella requires intraflagellar transport (IFT), a highly regulated kinesin-based transport system that moves cargo from the basal body to the tip of flagella [1]. The recruitment of IFT components to basal bodies is a function of flagellar length, with increased recruitment in rapidly growing short flagella [2]. The molecular pathways regulating IFT are largely a mystery. Because actin network disruption leads to changes in ciliary length and number, actin has been proposed to have a role in ciliary assembly. However, the mechanisms involved are unknown. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, conventional actin is found in both the cell body and the inner dynein arm complexes within flagella [3, 4]. Previous work showed that treating Chlamydomonas cells with the actin-depolymerizing compound cytochalasin D resulted in reversible flagellar shortening [5], but how actin is related to flagellar length or assembly remains unknown. Here we utilize small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants to analyze the role of actin dynamics in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We demonstrate that actin plays a role in IFT recruitment to basal bodies during flagellar elongation and that when actin is perturbed, the normal dependence of IFT recruitment on flagellar length is lost. We also find that actin is required for sufficient entry of IFT material into flagella during assembly. These same effects are recapitulated with a myosin inhibitor, suggesting that actin may act via myosin in a pathway by which flagellar assembly is regulated by flagellar length.

  7. Regulation by glutathionylation of isocitrate lyase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, Mariette; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Marchand, Christophe H; Gao, Xing-Huang; Moslonka-Lefebvre, Mathieu; Michelet, Laure; Decottignies, Paulette; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2009-12-25

    Post-translational modification of protein cysteine residues is emerging as an important regulatory and signaling mechanism. We have identified numerous putative targets of redox regulation in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. One enzyme, isocitrate lyase (ICL), was identified both as a putative thioredoxin target and as an S-thiolated protein in vivo. ICL is a key enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle that allows growth on acetate as a sole source of carbon. The aim of the present study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the redox regulation of Chlamydomonas ICL using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. The results clearly show that purified C. reinhardtii ICL can be inactivated by glutathionylation and reactivated by glutaredoxin, whereas thioredoxin does not appear to regulate ICL activity, and no inter- or intramolecular disulfide bond could be formed under any of the conditions tested. Glutathionylation of the protein was investigated by mass spectrometry analysis, Western blotting, and site-directed mutagenesis. The enzyme was found to be protected from irreversible oxidative inactivation by glutathionylation of its catalytic Cys(178), whereas a second residue, Cys(247), becomes artifactually glutathionylated after prolonged incubation with GSSG. The possible functional significance of this post-translational modification of ICL in Chlamydomonas and other organisms is discussed.

  8. Nucleated assembly of Chlamydomonas and Volvox cell walls.

    PubMed

    Adair, W S; Steinmetz, S A; Mattson, D M; Goodenough, U W; Heuser, J E

    1987-11-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell wall is made up of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, arranged in five distinct layers. The W6 (crystalline) layer contains three major glycoproteins (GP1, GP2, GP3), selectively extractable with chaotropic agents, that self-assemble into crystals in vitro. A system to study W6 assembly in a quantitative fashion was developed that employs perchlorate-extracted Chlamydomonas cells as nucleating agents. Wall reconstitution by biotinylated W6 monomers was monitored by FITC-streptavidin fluorescence and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Optimal reconstitution was obtained at monomer concentrations (0.2-0.3 mg/ml) well below those required for nonnucleated assembly. Assembly occurred from multiple nucleation sites, and faithfully reflected the structure of the intact W6 layer. Specificity of nucleated assembly was demonstrated using two cell-wall mutants (cw-2 and cw-15); neither served as a substrate for assembly of wild-type monomers. In addition, W6 sublayers were assembled from purified components: GP2 and GP3 coassembled to form the inner (W6A) sublayer; this then served as a substrate for self-assembly of GP1 into the outer (W6B) sublayer. Finally, evolutionary relationships between C. reinhardtii and two additional members of the Volvocales (Chlamydomonas eugametos and Volvox carteri) were explored by performing interspecific reconstitutions. Hybrid walls were obtained between C. reinhardtii and Volvox but not with C. eugametos, confirming taxonomic assignments based on structural criteria. PMID:3680387

  9. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  10. Reconstructing the mitochondrial protein import machinery of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Martínez, Francisco; Funes, Soledad; Franzén, Lars-Gunnar; González-Halphen, Diego

    2008-05-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii several nucleus-encoded proteins that participate in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are targeted to the organelle by unusually long mitochondrial targeting sequences. Here, we explored the components of the mitochondrial import machinery of the green alga. We mined the algal genome, searching for yeast and plant homologs, and reconstructed the mitochondrial import machinery. All the main translocation components were identified in Chlamydomonas as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana and in the recently sequenced moss Physcomitrella patens. Some of these components appear to be duplicated, as is the case of Tim22. In contrast, several yeast components that have relatively large hydrophilic regions exposed to the cytosol or to the intermembrane space seem to be absent in land plants and green algae. If present at all, these components of plants and algae may differ significantly from their yeast counterparts. We propose that long mitochondrial targeting sequences in some Chlamydomonas mitochondrial protein precursors are involved in preventing the aggregation of the hydrophobic proteins they carry.

  11. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  12. Lumped pathway metabolic model of organic carbon accumulation and mobilization by the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guest, Jeremy S; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Skerlos, Steven J; Love, Nancy G

    2013-04-01

    Phototrophic microorganisms have significant potential as bioenergy feedstocks, but the sustainability of large-scale cultivation will require the use of wastewater as a renewable resource. A key barrier to this advancement is a lack of bioprocess understanding that would enable the design and implementation of efficient and resilient mixed community, naturally lit cultivation systems. In this study, a lumped pathway metabolic model (denoted the phototrophic process model or PPM) was developed for mixed phototrophic communities subjected to day/night cycling. State variables included functional biomass (XCPO), stored carbohydrates (XCH), stored lipids (XLI), nitrate (SNO), phosphate (SP), and others. PPM metabolic reactions and stoichiometry were based on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii , but experiments for model calibration and validation were performed in flat panel photobioreactors (PBRs) originally inoculated with biomass from a phototrophic system at a wastewater treatment plant. PBRs were operated continuously as cyclostats to poise cells for intrinsic kinetic parameter estimation in batch studies, which included nutrient-available conditions in light and dark as well as nitrogen-starved and phosphorus-starved conditions in light. The model was calibrated and validated and was shown to be a reasonable predictor of growth, lipid and carbohydrate storage, and lipid and carbohydrate mobilization by a mixed microbial community. PMID:23452258

  13. Regulation of cellular manganese and manganese transport rates in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular accumulation and uptake kinetics of manganese by Chlamydomonas sp. were studied in model chelate buffer systems. Cellular manganese concentrations and uptake rates were related to the computed free manganese ion concentration and were independent of the total or chelated manganese concentration. Cellular manganese was constant at about 1 mmol liter/sup -1/ of cellular volume at free manganese ion concentrations of 10/sup -7/ /sup 6/-10/sup -6/ /sup 3/ mol liter/sup -1/ and decreased below this range. Manganese uptake rates followed saturation kinetics and V/sub max/, but not K/sub s/, varied with the free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium. V/sub max/ appeared to be under negative feedback control and increased with decreasing manganese ion concentration. Variations of up to 30-fold in this parameter seemed to be instrumental in limiting the variation in cellular manganese to a sixfold range despite a 1000-fold variation in free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium.

  14. Effective viscosity of non-gravitactic Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii microswimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussler, Matthias; Rafaï, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Wagner, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Active microswimmers are known to affect the macroscopic viscosity of suspensions in a more complex manner than passive particles. For puller-like microswimmers an increase in the viscosity has been observed. It has been suggested that the persistence of the orientation of the microswimmers hinders the rotation that is normally caused by the vorticity. It was previously shown that some sorts of algae are bottom-heavy swimmers, i.e., their centre of mass is not located in the centre of the body. In this way, the algae affect the vorticity of the flow when they are perpendicularly oriented to the axis of gravity. This orientation of gravity to vorticity is given in a rheometer that is equipped with a cone-plate geometry. Here we present measurements of the viscosity both in a cone-plate and a Taylor-Couette cell. The two set-ups yielded the same increase in viscosity although the axis of gravitation in the Taylor-Couette cell is parallel to the direction of vorticity. In a complementary experiment we tested the orientation of the direction of swimming through microscopic observation of single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and could not identify a preferred orientation, i.e., our specific strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are not bottom-heavy swimmers. We thus conclude that bottom heaviness is not a prerequisite for the increase of viscosity and that the effect of gravity on the rheology of our strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is negligible. This finding reopens the question of whether the origin of persistence in the orientation of cells is actually responsible for the increased viscosity of the suspension.

  15. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii.

  16. Individual Flagellar Waveform Affects Collective Behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kage, Azusa; Mogami, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Bioconvection is a form of collective motion that occurs spontaneously in the suspension of swimming microorganisms. In a previous study, we quantitatively described the "pattern transition," a phase transition phenomenon that so far has exclusively been observed in bioconvection of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas. We suggested that the transition could be induced by changes in the balance between the gravitational and shear-induced torques, both of which act to determine the orientation of the organism in the shear flow. As both of the torques should be affected by the geometry of the Chlamydomonas cell, alteration in the flagellar waveform might change the extent of torque generation by altering overall geometry of the cell. Based on this working hypothesis, we examined bioconvection behavior of two flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ida1 and oda2, making reference to the wild type. Flagella of ida1 beat with an abnormal waveform, while flagella of oda2 show a normal waveform but lower beat frequency. As a result, both mutants had swimming speed of less than 50% of the wild type. ida1 formed bioconvection patterns with smaller spacing than those of wild type and oda2. Two-axis view revealed the periodic movement of the settling blobs of ida1, while oda2 showed qualitatively similar behavior to that of wild type. Unexpectedly, ida1 showed stronger negative gravitaxis than did wild type, while oda2 showed relatively weak gravitaxis. These findings suggest that flagellar waveform, not swimming speed or beat frequency, strongly affect bioconvection behavior in C. reinhardtii. PMID:26245228

  17. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals.

  18. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  19. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  20. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide computational analysis of alternative splicing (AS) in several flowering plants has revealed that pre-mRNAs from about 30% of genes undergo AS. Chlamydomonas, a simple unicellular green alga, is part of the lineage that includes land plants. However, it diverged from land plants about one billion years ago. Hence, it serves as a good model system to study alternative splicing in early photosynthetic eukaryotes, to obtain insights into the evolution of this process in plants, and to compare splicing in simple unicellular photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes. We performed a global analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using its recently completed genome sequence and all available ESTs and cDNAs. Results Our analysis of AS using BLAT and a modified version of the Sircah tool revealed AS of 498 transcriptional units with 611 events, representing about 3% of the total number of genes. As in land plants, intron retention is the most prevalent form of AS. Retained introns and skipped exons tend to be shorter than their counterparts in constitutively spliced genes. The splice site signals in all types of AS events are weaker than those in constitutively spliced genes. Furthermore, in alternatively spliced genes, the prevalent splice form has a stronger splice site signal than the non-prevalent form. Analysis of constitutively spliced introns revealed an over-abundance of motifs with simple repetitive elements in comparison to introns involved in intron retention. In almost all cases, AS results in a truncated ORF, leading to a coding sequence that is around 50% shorter than the prevalent splice form. Using RT-PCR we verified AS of two genes and show that they produce more isoforms than indicated by EST data. All cDNA/EST alignments and splice graphs are provided in a website at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/chlamy. Conclusions The extent of AS in Chlamydomonas that we observed is much smaller than observed in

  1. Extracellular phosphatases of Chlamydomonas reinhardi and their regulation.

    PubMed

    Patni, N J; Dhawale, S W; Aaronson, S

    1977-04-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardi, cultured under normal growth conditions, secreted significant amounts of protein and carbohydrates but not lipids or nucleic acids. A fivefold increase in light intensity led to a tenfold increase in secreted protein and carbohydrate. Among the proteins secreted was acid phosphatase with a pH optimum at 4.8 like the enzyme in the cells. Phosphorus depleted algae grown on minimal orthophosphate contained and secreted both acid and alkaline phosphatase. The pH optimum of the intracellular alkaline phosphatase was 9.2. When phosphorus-depleted cells were grown with increasing orthophosphate, intra- and extracellular alkaline phosphatase was almost completely repressed and intra- and extracellular acid phosphatase was partially repressed. Extracellular acid and alkaline phosphatase increased with the age of the culture. Electrophoresis indicated only one acid and one alkaline phosphatase in phosphorus-satisfied and phosphorus-depleted cells. Chlamydomonas cells suspended in an inorganic salt solution secreted only acid phosphatase; the absence of any extr-cellular cytoplasmic marker enzyme indicated that there was little, if any, autolysis to account for the extracellular acid enzyme. Phosphorus-depleted cells were able to grow on organic phosphates as the sole source of orthophosphate. Ribose-5-phosphate was the best for cell multiplication, and its utility was shown to be due to the cell's ability to use the ribose as well as the orthophosphatase for cell multiplication.

  2. A role for the membrane in regulating Chlamydomonas flagellar length.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William

    2013-01-01

    Flagellar assembly requires coordination between the assembly of axonemal proteins and the assembly of the flagellar membrane and membrane proteins. Fully grown steady-state Chlamydomonas flagella release flagellar vesicles from their tips and failure to resupply membrane should affect flagellar length. To study vesicle release, plasma and flagellar membrane surface proteins were vectorially pulse-labeled and flagella and vesicles were analyzed for biotinylated proteins. Based on the quantity of biotinylated proteins in purified vesicles, steady-state flagella appeared to shed a minimum of 16% of their surface membrane per hour, equivalent to a complete flagellar membrane being released every 6 hrs or less. Brefeldin-A destroyed Chlamydomonas Golgi, inhibited the secretory pathway, inhibited flagellar regeneration, and induced full-length flagella to disassemble within 6 hrs, consistent with flagellar disassembly being induced by a failure to resupply membrane. In contrast to membrane lipids, a pool of biotinylatable membrane proteins was identified that was sufficient to resupply flagella as they released vesicles for 6 hrs in the absence of protein synthesis and to support one and nearly two regenerations of flagella following amputation. These studies reveal the importance of the secretory pathway to assemble and maintain full-length flagella.

  3. A simple method for chloroplast transformation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vellupillai M; Bingham, Scott E; Webber, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a multisubunit pigment-protein complex that uses light energy to transfer electrons from plastocyanin to ferredoxin. Application of genetic engineering to photosynthetic reaction center proteins has led to a significant advancement in our understanding of primary electron transfer events and the role of the protein environment in modulating these processes. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provides a system particularly amenable to analyze the structure-function relationship of Photosystem I. C. reinhardtii is also a particularly favorable organism for chloroplast transformation because it contains only a single chloroplast and grows heterotrophically when supplemented with acetate. Chlamydomonas has, therefore, served as a model organism for the development of chloroplast transformation procedures and the study of photosynthetic mutants generated using this method. Exogenous cloned cpDNA can be introduced into the chloroplast by using this biolistic gene gun method. DNA-coated tungsten or gold particles are bombarded onto cells. Upon its entry into chloroplasts, the transforming DNA is released from the particles and integrated into the chloroplast genome through homologous recombination. The most versatile chloroplast selectable marker is aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (aadA), which can be expressed in the chloroplast to confer resistance to spectinomycin or streptomycin. This article describes the procedures for chloroplast transformation.

  4. Metabolism of acyl-lipids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Riekhof, Wayne

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae are emerging platforms for production of a suite of compounds targeting several markets, including food, nutraceuticals, green chemicals, and biofuels. Many of these products, such as biodiesel or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derive from lipid metabolism. A general picture of lipid metabolism in microalgae has been deduced from well characterized pathways of fungi and land plants, but recent advances in molecular and genetic analyses of microalgae have uncovered unique features, pointing out the necessity to study lipid metabolism in microalgae themselves. In the past 10 years, in addition to its traditional role as a model for photosynthetic and flagellar motility processes, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a model organism to study lipid metabolism in green microalgae. Here, after summarizing data on total fatty acid composition, distribution of acyl-lipid classes, and major acyl-lipid molecular species found in C. reinhardtii, we review the current knowledge on the known or putative steps for fatty acid synthesis, glycerolipid desaturation and assembly, membrane lipid turnover, and oil remobilization. A list of characterized or putative enzymes for the major steps of acyl-lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii is included, and subcellular localizations and phenotypes of associated mutants are discussed. Biogenesis and composition of Chlamydomonas lipid droplets and the potential importance of lipolytic processes in increasing cellular oil content are also highlighted.

  5. Molecular techniques to interrogate and edit the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome.

    PubMed

    Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-05-01

    The success of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism is to a large extent due to the wide range of molecular techniques that are available for its characterization. Here, we review some of the techniques currently used to modify and interrogate the C. reinhardtii nuclear genome and explore several technologies under development. Nuclear mutants can be generated with ultraviolet (UV) light and chemical mutagens, or by insertional mutagenesis. Nuclear transformation methods include biolistic delivery, agitation with glass beads, and electroporation. Transforming DNA integrates into the genome at random sites, and multiple strategies exist for mapping insertion sites. A limited number of studies have demonstrated targeted modification of the nuclear genome by approaches such as zinc-finger nucleases and homologous recombination. RNA interference is widely used to knock down expression levels of nuclear genes. A wide assortment of transgenes has been successfully expressed in the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, including transformation markers, fluorescent proteins, reporter genes, epitope tagged proteins, and even therapeutic proteins. Optimized expression constructs and strains help transgene expression. Emerging technologies such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system, high-throughput mutant identification, and a whole-genome knockout library are being developed for this organism. We discuss how these advances will propel future investigations.

  6. Characterization and optimization of production of exopolysaccharide from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bafana, Amit

    2013-06-20

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain RAC was isolated based on its ability to secrete large amount of exopolysaccharide (EPS). The purified EPS had a molecular weight of 2.25×10(5)Da, and showed fibrillar structure with surfaces having sheet-like appearance. Chemical analysis showed the presence of galacturonic acid, ribose, arabinose, xylose, glucose, galactose and rhamnose sugars. The production of EPS was optimized by the classical one-at-a-time approach and Plackett-Burman design, followed by response surface methodology. The resulting response surface model was statistically significant (p<0.5) and predicted maximum EPS production of 628 mg/L. The optimum production medium consisted of CaCl2 - 74, NaNO3 - 422, K2HPO4 - 10 and MgSO4 - 200mg/L with a pH 7. The EPS showed significant antioxidant activity, which can have several industrial applications. This is the first report on characterization and production of EPS from a Chlamydomonas strain isolated from India. Its differences from the earlier reported EPS are discussed.

  7. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas as exemplified by disruption of the PHOT gene.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Boris; Lu, Yinghong; Sizova, Irina; Hegemann, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most powerful photosynthetic eukaryotic unicellular model organism. However, its potential is not fully exploitable since as in most green plants specific targeting of nuclear genes is not routinely possible. Recently, we have shown by repair of an introduced truncated model gene that transformation of Chlamydomonas with single stranded DNA greatly suppresses random integration of the DNA in the genome whereas homologous recombination (HR) is left unchanged. However, endogenous genes still could not be targeted. Here we present optimized transformation conditions that further improved HR and suppressed non-homologous DNA integration (NHI). The improved transformation strategy allowed us now to specifically inactivate in two different Chlamydomonas strains the nuclear PHOT gene, which encodes for the blue light photoreceptor phototropin (PHOT). The option to target moderately expressed Chlamydomonas nuclear genes with high efficiency now further improves the utility of this this alga for basic science and biotechnology.

  8. Comparison of three Chlamydomonas strains which show distinctive oxidative stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Shioi, Yuzo; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Tamoi, Masahiro; Takeda, Toru; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Harada, Kazuo; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2011-11-01

    Methyl viologen (MV) causes severe oxidative stress by generating superoxide in the photosystem. The marine Chlamydomonas strain W80 is highly tolerant to MV (inhibitory concentration 50% [IC₅₀]=110 μM), and another marine Chlamydomonas strain HS5 shows also relatively a high tolerance (IC₅₀=12 μM). These two marine strains and a freshwater Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which is highly sensitive to MV (IC₅₀=0.03 μM), were compared with respect to their reactive oxygen species (ROS) eliminating enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and ascorbate peroxidase), intracellular free amino acids, and antioxidant activities of the cell extracts. The marked difference between the marine Chlamydomonas strains and C. reinhardtii is the much higher (more than 5 fold) ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity in the marine strains. The marine strains also kept the high APX activities (more than 100% of non-stressed condition) under the MV stressed condition, while the APX activity in C. reinhardtii was significantly decreased (36% of non-stressed condition) under the stressed condition, indicating that APX activity potentially contributes to the oxidative stress tolerance in Chlamydomonas. In addition, the levels of intracellular free proline, which is supposed to ameliorate oxidative stress, were several tens of times higher in the marine Chlamydomonas strains than in C. reinhardtii.

  9. Rapid triacylglycerol turnover in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires a lipase with broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Benning, Christoph; Kuo, Min-Hao

    2012-12-01

    When deprived of nitrogen (N), the photosynthetic microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates large quantities of triacylglycerols (TAGs), making it a promising source of biofuel. Prominent transcriptional changes associated with the conditions leading to TAG accumulation have been found, suggesting that the key enzymes for TAG metabolism might be among those that fluctuate in their expression during TAG synthesis and breakdown. Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae lipase null mutant strain for functional complementation, we identified the CrLIP1 gene from Chlamydomonas based on its ability to suppress the lipase deficiency-related phenotypes of the yeast mutant. In Chlamydomonas, an inverse correlation was found between the CrLIP1 transcript level and TAG abundance when Chlamydomonas cultures were reversibly deprived of N. The CrLIP1 protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli exhibited lipolytic activity against diacylglycerol (DAG) and polar lipids. The lipase domain of CrLIP1 is most similar to two human DAG lipases, DAGLα and DAGLβ. The involvement of CrLIP1 in Chlamydomonas TAG hydrolysis was corroborated by reducing the abundance of the CrLIP1 transcript with an artificial micro-RNA, which resulted in an apparent delay in TAG lipolysis when N was resupplied. Together, these data suggest that CrLIP1 facilitates TAG turnover in Chlamydomonas primarily by degrading the DAG presumably generated from TAG hydrolysis.

  10. Mechanosensitive physiology of chlamydomonas reinhardtii under direct membrane distortion

    PubMed Central

    Min, Seul Ki; Yoon, Gwang Heum; Joo, Jung Hyun; Sim, Sang Jun; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2014-01-01

    Cellular membrane distortion invokes variations in cellular physiology. However, lack of an appropriate system to control the stress and facilitate molecular analyses has hampered progress of relevant studies. In this study, a microfluidic system that finely manipulates membrane distortion of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was developed. The device facilitated a first-time demonstration that directs membrane distortion invokes variations in deflagellation, cell cycle, and lipid metabolism. C. reinhardtii showed a prolonged G1 phase with an extended total cell cycle time, and upregulated Mat3 regulated a cell size and cell cycle. Additionally, increased TAG compensated for the loss of cell mass. Overall, this study suggest that cell biology that requires direct membrane distortion can be realized using this system, and the implication of cell cycle with Mat3 expression of C. reinhardtii was first demonstrated. Finally, membrane distortion can be an attractive inducer for biodiesel production since it is reliable and robust. PMID:24728350

  11. LCIB in the Chlamydomonas CO2-concentrating mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Spalding, Martin H

    2014-09-01

    The CO2-concentrating mechanism confers microalgae a versatile and efficient strategy for adapting to a wide range of environmental CO2 concentrations. LCIB, which has been demonstrated as a key player in the eukaryotic algal CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), is a novel protein in Chlamydomonas lacking any recognizable domain or motif, and its exact function in the CCM has not been clearly defined. The unique air-dier growth phenotype and photosynthetic characteristics in the LCIB mutants, and re-localization of LCIB between different subcellular locations in response to different levels of CO2, have indicated that the function of LCIB is closely associated with a distinct low CO2 acclimation state. Here, we review physiological and molecular evidence linking LCIB with inorganic carbon accumulation in the CCM and discuss the proposed function of LCIB in several inorganic carbon uptake/accumulation pathways. Several new molecular characteristics of LCIB also are presented.

  12. Chlororespiration: An adaptation to nitrogen deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, G.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1991-06-01

    When grown under nitrogen limitation, pronounced chlororespiratory activity develops together with an altered composition of thylakoid membranes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Relative to control cultures, the flash-inhibited, chlororespiration-dependent O{sub 2} consumption signal increases 10-fold. Also augmented is the light-sensitive respiratory activity responsible of the Kok effect, reflecting competitive inhibition of chlororespiratory electron transport by photosystem I. Fluoresscence measurements show that the thylakoid plastoquinone pool is extensively reduced in dark-adapted, N-limited cells. Thylakoids of N-limited cells have reduced amounts of cytochrome b{sub 6}, cytochrome f, and light-harvesting complexes. However, thylakoid-bound NADH-PQ oxidoreductase, with major subunits of 51 kDa and 17 kDa, is increased 7-fold and two novel cytochromes of 34 and 12.5 kDa are highly abundant. Thus, components of photosynthetic and chlororespiratory electron transport pathways are differentially regulated by N availability.

  13. Antiphase Synchronization in a Flagellar-Dominance Mutant of Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptos, Kyriacos C.; Wan, Kirsty Y.; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-10-01

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  14. Ammonium removal from anaerobically treated effluent by Chlamydomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Ania; Blanco, Fernando; Lacalle, Arrate; Pinto, Miriam

    2014-02-01

    Several batch culture studies were carried out to evaluate an anaerobically treated effluent as a low-cost growth medium for the microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila and to study the effectiveness of the microalga in removing NH4-N from the effluent. An initial decrease in the effluent pH to 3 was required for adequate growth of C. acidophila and removal of NH4-N. Growth of the microalgae was inhibited at high light intensity (224μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1) at the surface of the vessels). However, the growth was not greatly affected by the high solid content and turbidity of the effluent. The microalga was able to grow in media containing NH4-N at concentrations of up to 1000mgL(-1) (50% of effluent) and to remove 88mg of NH4-NL(-1) in 10days. C. acidophila therefore appears a promising agent for the removal of NH4-N from anaerobically treated effluents.

  15. Triacylglycerol profiling of microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bensheng; Vieler, Astrid; Li, Chao; Jones, A Daniel; Benning, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) from microalgae can serve as feedstock for the production of biofuels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of TAG metabolism in algae through genetic and molecular approaches, and to improve algal biofuel production, efficient and quantitative phenotyping methods focusing on TAGs are required. Towards this end, a facile ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry protocol was developed for TAG profiling, achieving identification and quantification of intact TAG molecular species in two algae. TAG profiling was performed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nannochloropsis oceanica grown in nitrogen (N)-replete or N-depleted medium. For the quantification of algal TAGs and fatty acids, two sets of internal standards were developed by taking advantage of the presence of pheophytin and specific fatty acids in algal samples. Comparison of algal TAG levels was simplified by using these internal standards for TAG analysis, paving the way for high-throughput mutant screening. PMID:23948268

  16. Isolation of intraflagellar transport particle proteins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Richey, Elizabeth; Qin, Hongmin

    2013-01-01

    Cilia, the hair-like protrusions found on most eukaryotic cells, were once considered vestigial organelles. The recent renaissance of research in cilia arose from the discoveries of intraflagellar transport (IFT) and the involvement of IFT particle proteins in human diseases. Many IFT particle proteins have since been identified, and research on IFT particle complexes and their protein components continues to provide insight into the mechanism of IFT and the etiology of ciliopathies. In this chapter, we describe the methods of isolating IFT particles from the flagella of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Two methods, sucrose density gradient fractionation and immunoprecipitation, are explained in detail. Troubleshooting information is presented to illustrate the critical steps of the procedure to ensure successful implementation of these methods in individual labs.

  17. Bioaccessibility of carotenoids from Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gille, Andrea; Trautmann, Andreas; Posten, Clemens; Briviba, Karlis

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae can contribute to a balanced diet because of their composition. Beside numerous essential nutrients, carotenoids are in the focus for food applications. The bioavailability of carotenoids from photoautotrophic-cultivated Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii) was compared. An in vitro digestion model was used to investigate carotenoid bioaccessibility. Furthermore, the effect of sonication on bioaccessibility was assessed. Lutein was the main carotenoid in both species. C. reinhardtii showed higher amounts of lutein and β-carotene than C. vulgaris. In contrast to C. reinhardtii, no β-carotene and only 7% of lutein were bioaccessible in nonsonicated C. vulgaris. Sonication increased the bioaccessibility of carotenoids from C. vulgaris to a level comparable with C. reinhardtii (β-carotene: ≥ 10%; lutein: ≥ 15%). Thus, C. reinhardtii represents a good carotenoid source for potential use in foods without processing, while the application of processing methods, like sonication, is necessary for C. vulgaris. PMID:27146695

  18. Antiphase synchronization in a flagellar-dominance mutant of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Leptos, Kyriacos C; Wan, Kirsty Y; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Pesci, Adriana I; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-10-11

    Groups of beating flagella or cilia often synchronize so that neighboring filaments have identical frequencies and phases. A prime example is provided by the unicellular biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which typically displays synchronous in-phase beating in a low-Reynolds number version of breaststroke swimming. We report the discovery that ptx1, a flagellar-dominance mutant of C. reinhardtii, can exhibit synchronization in precise antiphase, as in the freestyle swimming stroke. High-speed imaging shows that ptx1 flagella switch stochastically between in-phase and antiphase states, and that the latter has a distinct waveform and significantly higher frequency, both of which are strikingly similar to those found during phase slips that stochastically interrupt in-phase beating of the wild-type. Possible mechanisms underlying these observations are discussed.

  19. Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Mark A; Nguyen, Ginnie TDT; Rico, Juan; Lambert, Devinn; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach. Significance Statement Chlamydomonas reinhardtii offers potential as a host for the production of high value compounds for industrial biotechnology. Synthetic biology provides a mechanism to generate generic, well characterised tools for application in the rational genetic manipulation of organisms: if synthetic biology principles were adopted for manipulation of C. reinhardtii, development of this microalga as an industrial biotechnology platform would be expedited. PMID:25641561

  20. Glucose respiration in the intact chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Changguo Chen; Gibbs, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Chloroplastic respiration was monitored by measuring {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from {sup 14}C glucose in the darkened Chlamydomonas reinhardtii F-60 chloroplast, The patterns of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution from labeled glucose in the absence and presence of the inhibitors iodoacetamide, glycolate-2-phosphate, and phosphoenolypyruvate were those expected from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle and glycolysis. The K{sub m} for glucose was 56 micromolar and for MgATP was 200 micromolar. Release of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was inhibited by phloretin and inorganic phosphate. Comparing the inhibition of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by pH 7.5 with respect to pH 8.2 (optimum) in chloroplasts given C-1, C-2, and C-6 labeled glucose indicated that a suboptimum pH affects the recycling of the pentose phosphate intermediates to a greater extent than CO{sub 2} evolution from C-1 of glucose. Respiratory inhibition by pH 7.5 in the darkened chloroplast was alleviated by NH{sub 4}Cl and KCl (stromal alkalating agents), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), or phosphoenolypyruvate (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiration in the darkened Chlamydomonas chloroplast is the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction. The respiratory pathways described here can account for the total oxidation of a hexose to Co{sub 2} and for interactions between carbohydrate metabolism and the oxyhydrogen reaction in algal cells adapted to a hydrogen metabolism.

  1. Analysis of Chlamydomonas thiamin metabolism in vivo reveals riboswitch plasticity.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Michael; Nguyen, Ginnie T D T; Scaife, Mark A; Smith, Alison G; Fitzpatrick, Teresa B

    2013-09-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1) is an essential micronutrient needed as a cofactor for many central metabolic enzymes. Animals must have thiamin in their diet, whereas bacteria, fungi, and plants can biosynthesize it de novo from the condensation of a thiazole and a pyrimidine moiety. Although the routes to biosynthesize these two heterocycles are not conserved in different organisms, in all cases exogenous thiamin represses expression of one or more of the biosynthetic pathway genes. One important mechanism for this control is via thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches, regions of the mRNA to which TPP can bind directly, thus facilitating fine-tuning to maintain homeostasis. However, there is little information on how modulation of riboswitches affects thiamin metabolism in vivo. Here we use the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which regulates both thiazole and pyrimidine biosynthesis with riboswitches in the THI4 (Thiamin 4) and THIC (Thiamin C) genes, respectively, to investigate this question. Our study reveals that regulation of thiamin metabolism is not the simple dogma of negative feedback control. Specifically, balancing the provision of both of the heterocycles of TPP appears to be an important requirement. Furthermore, we show that the Chlamydomonas THIC riboswitch is controlled by hydroxymethylpyrimidine pyrophosphate, as well as TPP, but with an identical alternative splicing mechanism. Similarly, the THI4 gene is responsive to thiazole. The study not only provides insight into the plasticity of the TPP riboswitches but also shows that their maintenance is likely to be a consequence of evolutionary need as a function of the organisms' environment and the particular pathway used.

  2. High-throughput phenotyping of chlamydomonas swimming mutants based on nanoscale video analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shohei; Matsuo, Takuya; Ishiura, Masahiro; Kikkawa, Masahide

    2014-07-15

    Studies on biflagellated algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants have resulted in significant contributions to our understanding of the functions of cilia/flagella components. However, visual inspection conducted under a microscope to screen and classify Chlamydomonas swimming requires considerable time, effort, and experience. In addition, it is likely that identification of mutants by this screening is biased toward individual cells with severe swimming defects, and mutants that swim slightly more slowly than wild-type cells may be missed by these screening methods. To systematically screen Chlamydomonas swimming mutants, we have here developed the cell-locating-with-nanoscale-accuracy (CLONA) method to identify the cell position to within 10-nm precision through the analysis of high-speed video images. Instead of analyzing the shape of the flagella, which is not always visible in images, we determine the position of Chlamydomonas cell bodies by determining the cross-correlation between a reference image and the image of the cell. From these positions, various parameters related to swimming, such as velocity and beat frequency, can be accurately estimated for each beat cycle. In the examination of wild-type and seven dynein arm mutants of Chlamydomonas, we found characteristic clustering on scatter plots of beat frequency versus swimming velocity. Using the CLONA method, we have screened 38 Chlamydomonas strains and detected believed-novel motility-deficient mutants that would be missed by visual screening. This CLONA method can automate the screening for mutants of Chlamydomonas and contribute to the elucidation of the functions of motility-associated proteins.

  3. Treatment with NaHSO3 greatly enhances photobiological H2 production in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weimin; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lianjun; Wei, Lanzhen; Wang, Quanxi

    2011-09-01

    Treatment with NaHSO3 induces a 10-fold increase in H2 photoproduction in the filamentous N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. However, it is unclear whether this treatment also increases H2 photoproduction in green alga. In this study, treatment with 13 mM NaHSO3 resulted in about a 200-fold increase in H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and this increase was most probably the result of reduced O2 content and enhanced hydrogenase activity. Compared to the conventional strategy of sulfur deprivation, NaHSO3 treatment results in a higher maximum rate of H2 photoproduction, greater efficiency of conversion of light energy into H2, shorter half-time to produce the maximum accumulated H2 levels, and reduced costs because no centrifugation is involved. We therefore conclude that NaHSO3 treatment is an efficient, rapid, and economic strategy for improving photobiological H2 production in the green alga C. reinhardtii. PMID:21489780

  4. Activation of a chloroplast type of fructose bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by light-mediated agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1989-01-01

    A chloroplast type of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, a central regulatory enzyme of photosynthetic carbon metabolism, has been partially purified from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike its counterpart from spinach chloroplasts, the algal FBPase showed a strict requirement for a dithiol reductant irrespective of Mg2+ concentration. The enzymes from the two sources resembled each other immunologically, in subunit molecular mass and response to pH. In the presence of dithiothreitol, the pH optimum for both the algal and spinach enzymes shifted from 8.5 to a more physiologic value of 8.0 as the Mg2+ concentration was increased from 1 to 16 mM. At 1 mM Mg2+, a concentration estimated to be close to physiological, the Chlamydomonas FBPase was active only in the presence of reduced thioredoxin and was most active with Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f. Under these conditions, the enzyme showed a pH optimum of 8.0. The data suggest that the Chlamydomonas enzyme resembles its spinach counterpart in most respects, but it has a stricter requirement for reduction and less strict reductant specificity. A comparison of the properties of the FBPases from Chlamydomonas and spinach will be helpful for elucidating the mechanism of the reductive activation of this enzyme.

  5. Metabolism of D-lactate and structurally related organic acids in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Husic, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    During the initial minutes of anaerobiosis, /sup 14/C-labeled D-lactate, derived from the photosynthetic sugar phosphate pool, accumulated in the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The production of the D-isomer of lactate by algae is in contrast to plant and mammalian cells in which L-lactate is formed. After initial lactate formation, Chlamydomonas exhibits a mixed-acid type fermentation, thereby avoiding lactate accumulation and enabling the cells to tolerate extended periods of anaerobiosis. A pyruvate reductase which catalyzes the formation of D-lactate in Chlamydomonas was partially purified and characterized. Lactate produced anaerobically was metabolized only when Chlamydomonas cells were returned to aerobic conditions, and reoxidation of the D-lactate was apparently catalyzed by a mitochondrial membrane-bound dehydrogenase, rather than by the soluble pyruvate reductase. Mutants of Chlamydomonas, deficient in mitochondrial respiration, were used to demonstrate that lactate metabolism was linked to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. In addition, the oxidation of glycolate, a structural analog of lactate, was also linked to mitochondrial electron transport in vivo.

  6. Carbon dioxide concentrating mechanism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: inorganic carbon transport and CO2 recapture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Duanmu, Deqiang; Spalding, Martin H

    2011-09-01

    Many microalgae are capable of acclimating to CO(2) limited environments by operating a CO(2) concentrating mechanism (CCM), which is driven by various energy-coupled inorganic carbon (Ci; CO(2) and HCO(3)(-)) uptake systems. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (hereafter, Chlamydomonas), a versatile genetic model organism, has been used for several decades to exemplify the active Ci transport in eukaryotic algae, but only recently have many molecular details behind these Ci uptake systems emerged. Recent advances in genetic and molecular approaches, combined with the genome sequencing of Chlamydomonas and several other eukaryotic algae have unraveled some unique characteristics associated with the Ci uptake mechanism and the Ci-recapture system in eukaryotic microalgae. Several good candidate genes for Ci transporters in Chlamydomonas have been identified, and a few specific gene products have been linked with the Ci uptake systems associated with the different acclimation states. This review will focus on the latest studies on characterization of functional components involved in the Ci uptake and the Ci-recapture in Chlamydomonas.

  7. Proteomic analysis of hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Zhao, Le; Sun, Yong-Le; Cui, Su-Xia; Zhang, Li-Fang; Yang, Bin; Wang, Jie; Kuang, Ting-Yun; Huang, Fang

    2010-08-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism to study H(2) metabolism in photosynthetic eukaryotes. To understand the molecular mechanism of H(2) metabolism, we used 2-DE coupled with MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS to investigate proteomic changes of Chlamydomonas cells that undergo sulfur-depleted H(2) photoproduction process. In this report, we obtained 2-D PAGE soluble protein profiles of Chlamydomonas at three time points representing different phases leading to H(2) production. We found over 105 Coomassie-stained protein spots, corresponding to 82 unique gene products, changed in abundance throughout the process. Major changes included photosynthetic machinery, protein biosynthetic apparatus, molecular chaperones, and 20S proteasomal components. A number of proteins related to sulfate, nitrogen and acetate assimilation, and antioxidative reactions were also changed significantly. Other proteins showing alteration during the sulfur-depleted H(2) photoproduction process were proteins involved in cell wall and flagella metabolisms. In addition, among these differentially expressed proteins, 11 were found to be predicted proteins without functional annotation in the Chlamydomonas genome database. The results of this proteomic analysis provide new insight into molecular basis of H(2) photoproduction in Chlamydomonas under sulfur depletion.

  8. Phase-dependent forcing and synchronization in the three-sphere model of Chlamydomonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2013-07-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas swims with synchronized beating of its two flagella, and is experimentally observed to exhibit run-and-tumble behaviour similar to bacteria. Recently, we studied a simple hydrodynamic three-sphere model of Chlamydomonas with a phase-dependent driving force that can produce run-and-tumble behaviour when intrinsic noise is added, due to the nonlinear mechanics of the system. Here, we consider the noiseless case and explore numerically the parameter space in the driving force profiles, which determine whether or not the synchronized state evolves from a given initial condition, as well as the stability of the synchronized state. We find that phase-dependent forcing, or a beat pattern, is necessary for stable synchronization in the geometry we work with. The phase-dependent forcing allows this simple model of Chlamydomonas to produce a rich variety of behaviours.

  9. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  10. The Chlamydomonas genome reveals the evolution of key animal and plant functions.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Sabeeha S; Prochnik, Simon E; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H; Karpowicz, Steven J; Witman, George B; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R; Sanderfoot, Anton A; Spalding, Martin H; Kapitonov, Vladimir V; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Lobanov, Alexey V; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V; Paulsen, Ian T; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-10-12

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the approximately 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  11. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Prochnik, Simon E.; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Witman, George B.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F.; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Spalding, Martin H.; Kapitonov, Vladimir V.; Ren, Qinghu; Ferris, Patrick; Lindquist, Erika; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan M.; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Cardol, Pierre; Cerutti, Heriberto; Chanfreau, Guillaume; Chen, Chun-Long; Cognat, Valérie; Croft, Martin T.; Dent, Rachel; Dutcher, Susan; Fernández, Emilio; Ferris, Patrick; Fukuzawa, Hideya; González-Ballester, David; González-Halphen, Diego; Hallmann, Armin; Hanikenne, Marc; Hippler, Michael; Inwood, William; Jabbari, Kamel; Kalanon, Ming; Kuras, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul A.; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Lobanov, Alexey V.; Lohr, Martin; Manuell, Andrea; Meier, Iris; Mets, Laurens; Mittag, Maria; Mittelmeier, Telsa; Moroney, James V.; Moseley, Jeffrey; Napoli, Carolyn; Nedelcu, Aurora M.; Niyogi, Krishna; Novoselov, Sergey V.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Pazour, Greg; Purton, Saul; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Riekhof, Wayne; Rymarquis, Linda; Schroda, Michael; Stern, David; Umen, James; Willows, Robert; Wilson, Nedra; Zimmer, Sara Lana; Allmer, Jens; Balk, Janneke; Bisova, Katerina; Chen, Chong-Jian; Elias, Marek; Gendler, Karla; Hauser, Charles; Lamb, Mary Rose; Ledford, Heidi; Long, Joanne C.; Minagawa, Jun; Page, M. Dudley; Pan, Junmin; Pootakham, Wirulda; Roje, Sanja; Rose, Annkatrin; Stahlberg, Eric; Terauchi, Aimee M.; Yang, Pinfen; Ball, Steven; Bowler, Chris; Dieckmann, Carol L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Green, Pamela; Jorgensen, Richard; Mayfield, Stephen; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T.; Brokstein, Peter; Dubchak, Inna; Goodstein, David; Hornick, Leila; Huang, Y. Wayne; Jhaveri, Jinal; Luo, Yigong; Martínez, Diego; Ngau, Wing Chi Abby; Otillar, Bobby; Poliakov, Alexander; Porter, Aaron; Szajkowski, Lukasz; Werner, Gregory; Zhou, Kemin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the ∼120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella. PMID:17932292

  12. Stimulation of growth and photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with triacontanol

    SciTech Connect

    Houtz, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Treatment of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard cells (-, strain N. 90), cultured at 5% CO/sub 2/, with 1 to 1000 ..mu..g/L triacontanol (TRIA) resulted in a 21% to 35% increase in cell density, 7% to 31% increase in total chlorophyll, and 20% to 100% increase in photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation. Chlamydomonas cells responded to a broad range of TRIA concentrations that were at least 10-fold above the optimum concentration for higher plants. Octacosanol inhibited the effect of TRIA on photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation. TRIA did not alter glycolate excretion, the CO/sub 2/ compensation point or sensitivity of photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation to O/sub 2/ in Chlamydomonas. Kinetic analysis of TRIA-treated cells showed that the increase in photosynthetic CO/sub 2/ assimilation was a result of an increase in the whole-cell apparent Vmax. The activity of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase was significantly higher in cell lysates from TRIA-treated cells than those from control cells. However, quantification of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase levels by /sup 14/CABP binding did not show increased enzyme levels in TRIA-treated cells. Therefore, there was an increase in the specific activity of RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase extracted from Chlamydomonas cells treated with TRIA. TRIA alone had no effect in vitro on the activity of RuBPcarboxylase/oxygenase purified from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves or from cell lysates of Chlamydomonas. RuBP levels were significantly higher in TRIA-treated cells at high and low CO/sub 2/. Increased RuBP levels in TRIA-treated Chlamydomonas cells were also observed in the absence of CO/sub 2/ with atmospheres of N/sub 2/ and 21% O/sub 2/.

  13. Calcium titration of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin and its structural changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Wanda; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2014-07-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin is a highly conserved calcium binding protein belonging to the EF-hand superfamily. Centrin, like other calcium binding proteins, changes conformation upon calcium binding. In addition, the calcium binding sites are comprised mainly of aspartates and glutamates which would serve as probes for a calcium binding event. 2D IR correlation spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable technique to determine the differences in the molecular behavior of the EF-hand domains within centrin. Moreover, the differences in affinity for calcium displayed by these domains were correlated to differences in the molecular behavior of these EF-hand domains when compared with each other and the full-length protein. We were able to confirm the nature of the two independent domains within centrin. Furthermore, we established the mechanism of aggregation was self-association due to adsorption of centrin to the ZnSe ATR crystal and estimated the extent of aggregation of the full-length protein.

  14. Site-specific basal body duplication in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Correct centriole/basal body positioning is required for numerous biological processes, yet how the cell establishes this positioning is poorly understood. Analysis of centriolar/basal body duplication provides a key to understanding basal body positioning and function. Chlamydomonas basal bodies contain structural features that enable specific triplet microtubules to be specified. Electron tomography of cultures enriched in mitotic cells allowed us to follow basal body duplication and identify a specific triplet at which duplication occurs. Probasal bodies elongate in prophase, assemble transitional fibers (TF) and are segregated with a mature basal body near the poles of the mitotic spindle. A ring of nine-singlet microtubules is initiated at metaphase, orthogonal to triplet eight. At telophase/cytokinesis, triplet microtubule blades assemble first at the distal end, rather than at the proximal cartwheel. The cartwheel undergoes significant changes in length during duplication, which provides further support for its scaffolding role. The uni1-1 mutant contains short basal bodies with reduced or absent TF and defective transition zones, suggesting that the UNI1 gene product is important for coordinated probasal body elongation and maturation. We suggest that this site-specific basal body duplication ensures the correct positioning of the basal body to generate landmarks for intracellular patterning in the next generation.

  15. Reduced tubulin polyglutamylation suppresses flagellar shortness in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Hirono, Masafumi; Aikawa, Takumi; Kamiya, Ritsu; Witman, George B

    2015-08-01

    Ciliary length control is an incompletely understood process essential for normal ciliary function. The flagella of Chlamydomonas mutants lacking multiple axonemal dyneins are shorter than normal; previously it was shown that this shortness can be suppressed by the mutation suppressor of shortness 1 (ssh1) via an unknown mechanism. To elucidate this mechanism, we carried out genetic analysis of ssh1 and found that it is a new allele of TPG2 (hereafter tpg2-3), which encodes FAP234 functioning in tubulin polyglutamylation in the axoneme. Similar to the polyglutamylation-deficient mutants tpg1 and tpg2-1, tpg2-3 axonemal tubulin has a greatly reduced level of long polyglutamate side chains. We found that tpg1 and tpg2-1 mutations also promote flagellar elongation in short-flagella mutants, consistent with a polyglutamylation-dependent mechanism of suppression. Double mutants of tpg1 or tpg2-1 and fla10-1, a temperature-sensitive mutant of intraflagellar transport, underwent slower flagellar shortening than fla10-1 at restrictive temperatures, indicating that the rate of tubulin disassembly is decreased in the polyglutamylation-deficient flagella. Moreover, α-tubulin incorporation into the flagellar tips in temporary dikaryons was retarded in polyglutamylation-deficient flagella. These results show that polyglutamylation deficiency stabilizes axonemal microtubules, decelerating axonemal disassembly at the flagellar tip and shifting the axonemal assembly/disassembly balance toward assembly.

  16. Microalgal carbon-dioxide-concentrating mechanisms: Chlamydomonas inorganic carbon transporters.

    PubMed

    Spalding, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    Aquatic photosynthetic micro-organisms have adapted to the variable and often-limiting availability of CO(2), and inorganic carbon (Ci) in general, by development of inducible CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that allow them to optimize carbon acquisition. Both microalgal and cyanobacterial CCMs function to facilitate CO(2) assimilation when Ci is limiting via active Ci uptake systems to increase internal Ci accumulation and carbonic anhydrase activity to provide elevated internal CO(2) concentrations through the dehydration of accumulated bicarbonate. These CCMs have been studied over several decades, and details of the cyanobacterial CCM function have emerged over recent years. However, significant advances in understanding of the microalgal CCM have been more recent. With the aid of mutational approaches and the availability of multiple microalgal genome sequences, an integrated picture of the functional components of the microalgal CCMs is emerging, together with the molecular details regarding the function and regulation of the CCM. This review will focus on the recent advances in identifying and characterizing the Ci transport components of the microalgal CCM, especially in the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard.

  17. The biological clock of Chlamydomonas reinhardii in space.

    PubMed

    Mergenhagen, D; Mergenhagen, E

    1987-04-01

    The overt circadian rhythm in a wildtype (wt+) and a short period (s-) strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardii has been studied in space using the photoaccumulation behavior as the recorded parameter. The period of the wt+ was 29.6 h, of the s- 21.4 h and did not deviate significantly from ground controls performed exactly at the same time. The phase was delayed in space by 4.2 h in the wt+, but was not altered in the s-. In both strains the amplitudes were significantly higher in space than in the ground controls. During the recording period of 6.5 days the cell density increased in both strains. The survival rate, i.e. the ability to form colonies on agar petri dishes, was higher in space than on ground. The period was in both strains by 1.1 h longer in Florida (Kennedy Space Center) in both the flight and the control samples than in Europe. The significance of these results is discussed with respect to the endogenous nature of the biological clock and the role of the microgravity environment.

  18. Singlet oxygen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ankush; Ferretti, Ursula; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, singlet oxygen formation by lipid peroxidation induced by heat stress (40 °C) was studied in vivo in unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Primary and secondary oxidation products of lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde, were generated under heat stress as detected using swallow-tailed perylene derivative fluorescence monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by enzymatic reaction as inhibition of lipoxygenase by catechol and caffeic acid prevented hydroperoxide formation. Ultra-weak photon emission showed formation of electronically excited species such as triplet excited carbonyl, which, upon transfer of excitation energy, leads to the formation of either singlet excited chlorophyll or singlet oxygen. Alternatively, singlet oxygen is formed by direct decomposition of hydroperoxide via Russell mechanisms. Formation of singlet oxygen was evidenced by the nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and the imaging of green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Suppression of singlet oxygen formation by lipoxygenase inhibitors indicates that singlet oxygen may be formed via enzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase. PMID:26831215

  19. Retrograde bilin signaling enables Chlamydomonas greening and phototrophic survival.

    PubMed

    Duanmu, Deqiang; Casero, David; Dent, Rachel M; Gallaher, Sean; Yang, Wenqiang; Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Pellegrini, Matteo; Niyogi, Krishna K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Grossman, Arthur R; Lagarias, J Clark

    2013-02-26

    The maintenance of functional chloroplasts in photosynthetic eukaryotes requires real-time coordination of the nuclear and plastid genomes. Tetrapyrroles play a significant role in plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants to ensure that nuclear gene expression is attuned to the needs of the chloroplast. Well-known sites of synthesis of chlorophyll for photosynthesis, plant chloroplasts also export heme and heme-derived linear tetrapyrroles (bilins), two critical metabolites respectively required for essential cellular activities and for light sensing by phytochromes. Here we establish that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, one of many chlorophyte species that lack phytochromes, can synthesize bilins in both plastid and cytosol compartments. Genetic analyses show that both pathways contribute to iron acquisition from extracellular heme, whereas the plastid-localized pathway is essential for light-dependent greening and phototrophic growth. Our discovery of a bilin-dependent nuclear gene network implicates a widespread use of bilins as retrograde signals in oxygenic photosynthetic species. Our studies also suggest that bilins trigger critical metabolic pathways to detoxify molecular oxygen produced by photosynthesis, thereby permitting survival and phototrophic growth during the light period. PMID:23345435

  20. Modes of flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Johanna L; Lacomble, Sylvain; O’Toole, Eileen T; Hoenger, Andreas; McIntosh, J Richard; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Defects in flagella growth are related to a number of human diseases. Central to flagellar growth is the organization of microtubules that polymerize from basal bodies to form the axoneme, which consists of hundreds of proteins. Flagella exist in all eukaryotic phyla, but neither the mechanism by which flagella grow nor the conservation of this process in evolution are known. Here, we study how protein complexes assemble onto the growing axoneme tip using (cryo) electron tomography. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microtubules and associated proteins are added simultaneously. However, in Trypanosoma brucei, disorganized arrays of microtubules are arranged into the axoneme structure by the later addition of preformed protein complexes. Post assembly, the T. brucei transition zone alters structure and its association with the central pair loosens. We conclude that there are multiple ways to form a flagellum and that species-specific structural knowledge is critical before evaluating flagellar defects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01479.001 PMID:24448408

  1. Modes of flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Höög, Johanna L; Lacomble, Sylvain; O'Toole, Eileen T; Hoenger, Andreas; McIntosh, J Richard; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Defects in flagella growth are related to a number of human diseases. Central to flagellar growth is the organization of microtubules that polymerize from basal bodies to form the axoneme, which consists of hundreds of proteins. Flagella exist in all eukaryotic phyla, but neither the mechanism by which flagella grow nor the conservation of this process in evolution are known. Here, we study how protein complexes assemble onto the growing axoneme tip using (cryo) electron tomography. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microtubules and associated proteins are added simultaneously. However, in Trypanosoma brucei, disorganized arrays of microtubules are arranged into the axoneme structure by the later addition of preformed protein complexes. Post assembly, the T. brucei transition zone alters structure and its association with the central pair loosens. We conclude that there are multiple ways to form a flagellum and that species-specific structural knowledge is critical before evaluating flagellar defects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01479.001. PMID:24448408

  2. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) during assembly and disassembly of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Dentler, William

    2005-08-15

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) of particles along flagellar microtubules is required for the assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella and cilia. In Chlamydomonas, anterograde and retrograde particles viewed by light microscopy average 0.12-microm and 0.06-microm diameter, respectively. Examination of IFT particle structure in growing flagella by electron microscopy revealed similar size aggregates composed of small particles linked to each other and to the membrane and microtubules. To determine the relationship between the number of particles and flagellar length, the rate and frequency of IFT particle movement was measured in nongrowing, growing, and shortening flagella. In all flagella, anterograde and retrograde IFT averaged 1.9 microm/s and 2.7 microm/s, respectively, but retrograde IFT was significantly slower in flagella shorter than 4 mum. The number of flagellar IFT particles was not fixed, but depended on flagellar length. Pauses in IFT particle entry into flagella suggest the presence of a periodic "gate" that permits up to 4 particles/s to enter a flagellum. PMID:16103230

  3. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Steven J.; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A.; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G.; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD+-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a ‘lactate valve’ for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  4. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD(+)-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a 'lactate valve' for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm.

  5. Lipidomic Analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under Nitrogen and Sulfur Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dawei; Song, Donghui; Kind, Tobias; Ma, Yan; Hoefkens, Jens; Fiehn, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates lipids under complete nutrient starvation conditions while overall growth in biomass stops. In order to better understand biochemical changes under nutrient deprivation that maintain production of algal biomass, we used a lipidomic assay for analyzing the temporal regulation of the composition of complex lipids in C. reinhardtii in response to nitrogen and sulfur deprivation. Using a chip-based nanoelectrospray direct infusion into an ion trap mass spectrometer, we measured a diversity of lipid species reported for C. reinhardtii, including PG phosphatidylglycerols, PI Phosphatidylinositols, MGDG monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, DGDG digalactosyldiacylglycerols, SQDG sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols, DGTS homoserine ether lipids and TAG triacylglycerols. Individual lipid species were annotated by matching mass precursors and MS/MS fragmentations to the in-house LipidBlast mass spectral database and MS2Analyzer. Multivariate statistics showed a clear impact on overall lipidomic phenotypes on both the temporal and the nutrition stress level. Homoserine-lipids were found up-regulated at late growth time points and higher cell density, while triacyclglycerols showed opposite regulation of unsaturated and saturated fatty acyl chains under nutritional deprivation. PMID:26375463

  6. Insecticides induced biochemical changes in freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Muthukannan Satheesh; Kabra, Akhil N; Min, Booki; El-Dalatony, Marwa M; Xiong, Jiuqiang; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of insecticides (acephate and imidacloprid) on a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana was investigated with respect to photosynthetic pigments, carbohydrate and protein contents, fatty acids composition and induction of stress indicators including proline, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). C. mexicana was cultivated with 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg L(-1) of acephate and imidacloprid. The microalga growth increased with increasing concentrations of both insecticides up to 15 mg L(-1), beyond which the growth declined compared to control condition (without insecticides). C. mexicana cultivated with 15 mg L(-1) of both insecticides for 12 days was used for further analysis. The accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids), carbohydrates and protein was decreased in the presence of both insecticides. Acephate and imidacloprid induced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and increased the concentration of proline in the microalga, which play a defensive role against various environmental stresses. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the fraction of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased on exposure to both insecticides. C. mexicana also promoted 25 and 21% removal of acephate and imidacloprid, respectively. The biochemical changes in C. mexicana on exposure to acephate and imidacloprid indicate that the microalga undergoes an adaptive change in response to the insecticide-induced oxidative stress.

  7. Site-specific basal body duplication in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Eileen T; Dutcher, Susan K

    2014-02-01

    Correct centriole/basal body positioning is required for numerous biological processes, yet how the cell establishes this positioning is poorly understood. Analysis of centriolar/basal body duplication provides a key to understanding basal body positioning and function. Chlamydomonas basal bodies contain structural features that enable specific triplet microtubules to be specified. Electron tomography of cultures enriched in mitotic cells allowed us to follow basal body duplication and identify a specific triplet at which duplication occurs. Probasal bodies elongate in prophase, assemble transitional fibers (TF) and are segregated with a mature basal body near the poles of the mitotic spindle. A ring of nine-singlet microtubules is initiated at metaphase, orthogonal to triplet eight. At telophase/cytokinesis, triplet microtubule blades assemble first at the distal end, rather than at the proximal cartwheel. The cartwheel undergoes significant changes in length during duplication, which provides further support for its scaffolding role. The uni1-1 mutant contains short basal bodies with reduced or absent TF and defective transition zones, suggesting that the UNI1 gene product is important for coordinated probasal body elongation and maturation. We suggest that this site-specific basal body duplication ensures the correct positioning of the basal body to generate landmarks for intracellular patterning in the next generation. PMID:24166861

  8. MLT1 links cytoskeletal asymmetry to organelle placement in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M.; Thompson, Mark D.; Lamb, Mary Rose; Lin, Huawen; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric placement of the photosensory eyespot organelle in Chlamydomonas is patterned by mother-daughter differences between the two basal bodies, which template the anterior flagella. Each basal body is associated with two bundled microtubule rootlets, one with two microtubules and one with four, forming a cruciate pattern. In wild type cells, the single eyespot is positioned at the equator in close proximity to the plus end of the daughter rootlet comprising four microtubules, the D4. Here we identify mutations in two linked loci, MLT1 and MLT2, which cause multiple eyespots. Antiserum raised against MLT1 localized the protein along the D4 rootlet microtubules, from the basal bodies to the eyespot. MLT1 associates immediately with the new D4 as it extends during cell division, before microtubule acetylation. MLT1 is a low-complexity protein of over 300,000 daltons. The expression or stability of MLT1 is dependent on MLT2, predicted to encode a second large, low-complexity protein. MLT1 was not restricted to the D4 rootlet in cells with the vfl2-220 mutation in the gene encoding the basal body-associated protein centrin. The cumulative data highlight the role of mother-daughter basal body differences in establishing asymmetry in associated rootlets, and suggest that eyespot components are directed to the correct location by MLT1 on the D4 microtubules. PMID:25809438

  9. MLT1 links cytoskeletal asymmetry to organelle placement in chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Thompson, Mark D; Lamb, Mary Rose; Lin, Huawen; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2015-03-01

    Asymmetric placement of the photosensory eyespot organelle in Chlamydomonas is patterned by mother-daughter differences between the two basal bodies, which template the anterior flagella. Each basal body is associated with two bundled microtubule rootlets, one with two microtubules and one with four, forming a cruciate pattern. In wild-type cells, the single eyespot is positioned at the equator in close proximity to the plus end of the daughter rootlet comprising four microtubules, the D4. Here we identify mutations in two linked loci, MLT1 and MLT2, which cause multiple eyespots. Antiserum raised against MLT1 localized the protein along the D4 rootlet microtubules, from the basal bodies to the eyespot. MLT1 associates immediately with the new D4 as it extends during cell division, before microtubule acetylation. MLT1 is a low-complexity protein of over 300,000 Daltons. The expression or stability of MLT1 is dependent on MLT2, predicted to encode a second large, low-complexity protein. MLT1 was not restricted to the D4 rootlet in cells with the vfl2-220 mutation in the gene encoding the basal body-associated protein centrin. The cumulative data highlight the role of mother-daughter basal body differences in establishing asymmetry in associated rootlets, and suggest that eyespot components are directed to the correct location by MLT1 on the D4 microtubules. PMID:25809438

  10. Spontaneous transitions in the synchronisation states of a Chlamydomonas mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Kirsty; Leptos, Kyriacos; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Goldstein, Raymond

    2011-03-01

    The mechanisms by which eukaryotic flagella are found to synchronise is poorly understood; the origins being dependent upon the hydrodynamics, as well as the underlying molecular biochemistry. Exemplifying how available phenotypic variations in a species may be exploited to extend our mathematical models for flagellar coupling, we turn to ptx1 - a non-phototactic mutant strain of the biflagellated alga Chlamydomonas with seemingly intact flagellar apparatus, which does not exhibit any gross motility defects. Intriguingly however, our high-speed imaging analysis of flagellar dynamics in ptx1 have revealed that rather unlike their wildtype predecessors, which beat mostly in synchrony interrupted by brief periods of drifts or slip, the two flagella of ptx1 are observed to consistently revert from synchrony to a state of stable, coupled, anti-phase beating dynamics. Incorporating the interpretation of the flagella pair as coupled noisy oscillators, we show how such behaviour corroborates readily with a secondary contribution to the coupling, which is further conjectured to be inherent in the wildtype.

  11. Modes of flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Höög, Johanna L; Lacomble, Sylvain; O'Toole, Eileen T; Hoenger, Andreas; McIntosh, J Richard; Gull, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Defects in flagella growth are related to a number of human diseases. Central to flagellar growth is the organization of microtubules that polymerize from basal bodies to form the axoneme, which consists of hundreds of proteins. Flagella exist in all eukaryotic phyla, but neither the mechanism by which flagella grow nor the conservation of this process in evolution are known. Here, we study how protein complexes assemble onto the growing axoneme tip using (cryo) electron tomography. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii microtubules and associated proteins are added simultaneously. However, in Trypanosoma brucei, disorganized arrays of microtubules are arranged into the axoneme structure by the later addition of preformed protein complexes. Post assembly, the T. brucei transition zone alters structure and its association with the central pair loosens. We conclude that there are multiple ways to form a flagellum and that species-specific structural knowledge is critical before evaluating flagellar defects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01479.001.

  12. In vivo imaging of IFT in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, Karl F

    2013-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is a specialized intracellular transport which is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia and eukaryotic flagella. IFT protein particles move bidirectionally along the flagella in the space between the flagellar membrane and the axonemal doublets. The particles consist of more than 20 different polypeptides and are transported by kinesin-2 from the cell body to the flagellar tip and by cytoplasmic dynein back to the cell body. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is unique in that IFT can be visualized by two distinct microscopic approaches: differential interference contrast (DIC) and tracking of fluorescently tagged IFT proteins. In vivo imaging of IFT is critical to determine, for example, the role of individual proteins in the IFT pathway and how flagellar proteins are transported by IFT. Here, the microscopic requirements and the procedures for the imaging of IFT by DIC and by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy will be described. Kymograms, graphical representations of spatial position over time, provide a convenient way to analyze in vivo recordings of IFT. In the future, multicolor in vivo imaging of IFT and its cargoes will be used to understand how flagella are assembled, maintained, and repaired.

  13. Identification of the Elusive Pyruvate Reductase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Taha, Hussein; Yeoman, Justin A; Iamshanova, Oksana; Chan, Kher Xing; Boehm, Marko; Behrends, Volker; Bundy, Jacob G; Bialek, Wojciech; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Under anoxic conditions the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii activates various fermentation pathways leading to the creation of formate, acetate, ethanol and small amounts of other metabolites including d-lactate and hydrogen. Progress has been made in identifying the enzymes involved in these pathways and their subcellular locations; however, the identity of the enzyme involved in reducing pyruvate to d-lactate has remained unclear. Based on sequence comparisons, enzyme activity measurements, X-ray crystallography, biochemical fractionation and analysis of knock-down mutants, we conclude that pyruvate reduction in the chloroplast is catalyzed by a tetrameric NAD(+)-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenase encoded by Cre07.g324550. Its expression during aerobic growth supports a possible function as a 'lactate valve' for the export of lactate to the mitochondrion for oxidation by cytochrome-dependent d-lactate dehydrogenases and by glycolate dehydrogenase. We also present a revised spatial model of fermentation based on our immunochemical detection of the likely pyruvate decarboxylase, PDC3, in the cytoplasm. PMID:26574578

  14. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  15. Singlet oxygen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Ferretti, Ursula; Sedlářová, Michaela; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, singlet oxygen formation by lipid peroxidation induced by heat stress (40 °C) was studied in vivo in unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Primary and secondary oxidation products of lipid peroxidation, hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde, were generated under heat stress as detected using swallow-tailed perylene derivative fluorescence monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was initiated by enzymatic reaction as inhibition of lipoxygenase by catechol and caffeic acid prevented hydroperoxide formation. Ultra-weak photon emission showed formation of electronically excited species such as triplet excited carbonyl, which, upon transfer of excitation energy, leads to the formation of either singlet excited chlorophyll or singlet oxygen. Alternatively, singlet oxygen is formed by direct decomposition of hydroperoxide via Russell mechanisms. Formation of singlet oxygen was evidenced by the nitroxyl radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping spectroscopy and the imaging of green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Suppression of singlet oxygen formation by lipoxygenase inhibitors indicates that singlet oxygen may be formed via enzymatic lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase. PMID:26831215

  16. Metabolic acclimation to excess light intensity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Davis, Maria C; Fiehn, Oliver; Durnford, Dion G

    2013-07-01

    There are several well-described acclimation responses to excess light in green algae but the effect on metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study examines the metabolic changes during photoacclimation to high-light (HL) stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Using principal component analysis, a clear metabolic response to HL intensity was observed on global metabolite pools, with major changes in the levels of amino acids and related nitrogen metabolites. Amino acid pools increased during short-term photoacclimation, but were especially prominent in HL-acclimated cultures. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in mitochondrial metabolism through downstream photorespiratory pathways. The expression of two genes encoding key enzymes in the photorespiratory pathway, glycolate dehydrogenase and malate synthase, were highly responsive to the HL stress. We propose that this pathway contributes to metabolite pools involved in nitrogen assimilation and may play a direct role in photoacclimation. Our results suggest that primary and secondary metabolism is highly pliable and plays a critical role in coping with the energetic imbalance during HL exposure and a necessary adjustment to support an increased growth rate that is an effective energy sink for the excess reducing power generated during HL stress.

  17. Establishing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology host.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark A; Nguyen, Ginnie T D T; Rico, Juan; Lambert, Devinn; Helliwell, Katherine E; Smith, Alison G

    2015-05-01

    Microalgae constitute a diverse group of eukaryotic unicellular organisms that are of interest for pure and applied research. Owing to their natural synthesis of value-added natural products microalgae are emerging as a source of sustainable chemical compounds, proteins and metabolites, including but not limited to those that could replace compounds currently made from fossil fuels. For the model microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this has prompted a period of rapid development so that this organism is poised for exploitation as an industrial biotechnology platform. The question now is how best to achieve this? Highly advanced industrial biotechnology systems using bacteria and yeasts were established in a classical metabolic engineering manner over several decades. However, the advent of advanced molecular tools and the rise of synthetic biology provide an opportunity to expedite the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform, avoiding the process of incremental improvement. In this review we describe the current status of genetic manipulation of C. reinhardtii for metabolic engineering. We then introduce several concepts that underpin synthetic biology, and show how generic parts are identified and used in a standard manner to achieve predictable outputs. Based on this we suggest that the development of C. reinhardtii as an industrial biotechnology platform can be achieved more efficiently through adoption of a synthetic biology approach.

  18. Insight into Protein S-nitrosylation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Morisse, Samuel; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Gao, Xing-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein S-nitrosylation, a post-translational modification (PTM) consisting of the covalent binding of nitric oxide (NO) to a cysteine thiol moiety, plays a major role in cell signaling and is recognized to be involved in numerous physiological processes and diseases in mammals. The importance of nitrosylation in photosynthetic eukaryotes has been less studied. The aim of this study was to expand our knowledge on protein nitrosylation by performing a large-scale proteomic analysis of proteins undergoing nitrosylation in vivo in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells under nitrosative stress. Results: Using two complementary proteomic approaches, 492 nitrosylated proteins were identified. They participate in a wide range of biological processes and pathways, including photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, translation, protein folding or degradation, cell motility, and stress. Several proteins were confirmed in vitro by western blot, site-directed mutagenesis and activity measurements. Moreover, 392 sites of nitrosylation were also identified. These results strongly suggest that S-nitrosylation could constitute a major mechanism of regulation in C. reinhardtii under nitrosative stress conditions. Innovation: This study constitutes the largest proteomic analysis of protein nitrosylation reported to date. Conclusion: The identification of 381 previously unrecognized targets of nitrosylation further extends our knowledge on the importance of this PTM in photosynthetic eukaryotes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange repository with identifier PXD000569. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1271–1284. PMID:24328795

  19. Photoreceptor current and photoorientation in chlamydomonas mediated by 9-demethylchlamyrhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, E G; Sineshchekov, O A; Gärtner, W; Chunaev, A S; Hegemann, P

    2001-01-01

    Green flagellates possess rhodopsin-like photoreceptors involved in control of their behavior via generation of photocurrents across the plasma membrane. Chlamydomonas mutants blocked in retinal biosynthesis are "blind," but they can be rescued by the addition of exogenous retinoids. Photosignaling by chlamyrhodopsin regenerated with 9-demethylretinal was investigated by recording photocurrents from single cells and cell suspensions, and by measuring phototactic orientation. The addition of a saturating concentration of this analog led to reconstitution of all receptor molecules. However, sensitivity of the photoreceptor current in cells reconstituted with the analog was smaller compared with retinal-reconstituted cells, indicating a decreased signaling efficiency of the analog receptor protein. Suppression of the photoreceptor current in double-flash experiments was smaller and its recovery faster with 9-demethylretinal than with retinal, as it would be expected from a decreased PC amplitude in the analog-reconstituted cells. Cells reconstituted with either retinal or the analog displayed negative phototaxis at low light and switched to positive one upon an increase in stimulus intensity, as opposed to the wild type. The reversal of the phototaxis direction in analog-reconstituted cells was shifted to a higher fluence rate compared with cells reconstituted with retinal, which corresponded to the decreased signaling efficiency of 9-demethylchlamyrhodopsin. PMID:11606300

  20. FINE STRUCTURE OF CELL DIVISION IN CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDI

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ursula G.; Porter, Keith R.

    1968-01-01

    Cell division in log-phase cultures of the unicellular, biflagellate alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardi, has been studied with the electron microscope. The two basal bodies of the cell replicate prior to cytokinesis; stages in basal body formation are presented. At the time of cell division, the original basal bodies detach from the flagella, and the four basal bodies appear to be involved in the orientation of the plane of the cleavage furrow. Four sets of microtubules participate in cell division. Spindle microtubules are involved in a mitosis that is marked by the presence of an intact nuclear envelope. A band of microtubules arcs over the mitotic nucleus, indicating the future cleavage plane. A third set of microtubules appears between the daughter nuclei at telophase, and microtubules comprising the "cleavage apparatus" radiate from the basal bodies and extend along both sides of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Features of cell division in C. reinhardi are discussed and related to cell division in other organisms. It is proposed that microtubules participate in the formation of the cleavage furrow in C. reinhardi. PMID:5664210

  1. Ammonium removal from anaerobically treated effluent by Chlamydomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Ania; Blanco, Fernando; Lacalle, Arrate; Pinto, Miriam

    2014-02-01

    Several batch culture studies were carried out to evaluate an anaerobically treated effluent as a low-cost growth medium for the microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila and to study the effectiveness of the microalga in removing NH4-N from the effluent. An initial decrease in the effluent pH to 3 was required for adequate growth of C. acidophila and removal of NH4-N. Growth of the microalgae was inhibited at high light intensity (224μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1) at the surface of the vessels). However, the growth was not greatly affected by the high solid content and turbidity of the effluent. The microalga was able to grow in media containing NH4-N at concentrations of up to 1000mgL(-1) (50% of effluent) and to remove 88mg of NH4-NL(-1) in 10days. C. acidophila therefore appears a promising agent for the removal of NH4-N from anaerobically treated effluents. PMID:24342946

  2. Characterizing the anaerobic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([(13)C(6)]arginine/[(12)C(6)]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  3. Partial Purification of Intact Chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Belknap, W R

    1983-08-01

    Partially purified intact chloroplasts were prepared from batch cultures of both wild type (Wt) and a mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Protoplasts were generated from log phase cultures of Wt (137c) and the phosphoribulokinase-deficient mutant F60 by incubation of the cells in autolysine. These protoplasts were suspended in an osmoticum, cooled, and then subjected to a 40 pounds per square inch pressure shock using a Yeda pressure bomb. The resulting preparation was fractionated on a Percoll step gradient which separated the intact chloroplasts from both broken chloroplasts and protoplasts.The chloroplast preparation was not significantly contaminated with the cytoplasmic enzyme activity phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (>5%), and contained (100%) stromal enzyme activity ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. The chloroplast preparation is significantly contaminated by mitochondria, as determined by succinate dehydrogenase activity. Chloroplasts prepared from Wt cells retained CO(2)-dependent O(2) photoevolution at rates in excess of 60 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, an activity which is severely inhibited by the addition of 10 millimolar KH(2)PO(4). The chloroplasts are osmotically sensitive as determined by ferricyanide-dependent O(2) photoevolution.

  4. Analysis of cargo transport by IFT and GFP imaging of IFT in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Diener, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the organism in which intraflagellar transport (IFT) was first visualized and in which the composition of IFT particles was originally elucidated. As the universality of IFT among ciliated/flagellated cells was uncovered, the diversity of organisms used to study IFT has grown. Still, because of the ease of isolation of flagella from Chlamydomonas and the battery of temperature-sensitive mutants affecting IFT proteins and motors, this unicellular alga remains the principal model for biochemical studies of IFT motors and cargo; furthermore, the long, exposed flagella of this cell are ideally suited for observing IFT in real time with GFP-tagged components of IFT.

  5. Heavy metal-activated synthesis of peptides in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, G.; Merchant, S. )

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the authors have addressed the capacity of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce metal-binding peptides in response to stress induced by the heavy metals Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+}, and Ag{sup +}. Cells cultured in the presence of sublethal concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} synthesized and accumulated oligopeptides consisting solely of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine in an average ratio of 3:3:1. Cadmium-induced peptides were isolated in their native form as higher molecular weight peptide-metal complexes with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 6.5 {times} 10{sup 3}. The isolated complex bound cadmium (as evidenced by absorption spectroscopy) and sequestered (with a stoichiometry of 0.7 moles of cadmium per mole of cysteine) up to 70% of the total cadmium found in extracts of cadmium-treated cells. In Hg{sup 2+}-treated cells, the principal thiol-containing compound induced by Hg{sup 2+} ion was glutathione. It is possible that glutathione functions in plant cells (as it does in animal cells) to detoxify heavy metals. Cells treated with Ag{sup +} ions also synthesized a sulfur-containing component with a charge to mass ratio similar to Cd{sup 2+}-induced peptides. But, in contrast to the results obtained using Cd{sup 2+} as an inducer, these molecules did not accumulate to significant levels in Ag{sup +}-treated cells. The presence of physiological concentrations of Cu{sup 2+} in the growth medium blocked the synthesis of the Ag{sup +}-inducible component(s) and rendered cells resistant to the toxic effects of Ag{sup +}, suggesting competition between Cu{sup 2+} and Ag{sup +} ions, possibly at the level of metal uptake.

  6. Nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunahay, T.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Efficient nuclear transformation of cell wall-deficient strains of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be accomplished by vortexing the cells in the presence of glass beads and polyethylene glycol (Kindle 1990 PNAS 87:1228). Intact (walled) cells can also be transformed using this protocol, but at very low efficiencies. Two recent reports have described the use of silicon carbide fibers to mediate DNA entry into plant suspension cells (Kaeppler et al. 1990 Plant Cell Rep. 9:414; Asano et al. 1991 Plant Sci. 79:247). The author has found that nuclear transformation efficiencies of walled cells of C. reinhardtii can be increased 3 to 10 fold by vortexing the cells in the presence of silicon carbide fibers and PEG. Using a modification of the glass bead transformation procedure, the wild-type nitrate reductase structural gene was used to complement a NR-deficient mutant of C. reinhardtii, nit-1-305. The transformation efficiency increased with longer vortexing times, although the absolute number of transformants varied between experiments, ranging from 10 to 40 transformants per 10[sup 7] cells. In contrast to vortexing with glass beads, cell viability was very high, with greater than 80% cell survival even after vortexing for 10 minutes. Neither cell death nor transformation efficiency increased when cell wall-deficient mutants (cw15 nit-1-305) were used as compared to intact cells. Experiments are in progress to test the applicability of silicon carbide-mediated transformation to other algal strains for which cell wall mutants or protoplasting procedures are unavailabile.

  7. How the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii keeps time.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Thomas; Prager, Katja; Dathe, Hannes; Kelm, Juliane; Kiessling, Peter; Mittag, Maria

    2010-08-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two flagella and a primitive visual system, the eyespot apparatus, which allows the cell to phototax. About 40 years ago, it was shown that the circadian clock controls its phototactic movement. Since then, several circadian rhythms such as chemotaxis, cell division, UV sensitivity, adherence to glass, or starch metabolism have been characterized. The availability of its entire genome sequence along with homology studies and the analysis of several sub-proteomes render C. reinhardtii as an excellent eukaryotic model organism to study its circadian clock at different levels of organization. Previous studies point to several potential photoreceptors that may be involved in forwarding light information to entrain its clock. However, experimental data are still missing toward this end. In the past years, several components have been functionally characterized that are likely to be part of the oscillatory machinery of C. reinhardtii since alterations in their expression levels or insertional mutagenesis of the genes resulted in defects in phase, period, or amplitude of at least two independent measured rhythms. These include several RHYTHM OF CHLOROPLAST (ROC) proteins, a CONSTANS protein (CrCO) that is involved in parallel in photoperiodic control, as well as the two subunits of the circadian RNA-binding protein CHLAMY1. The latter is also tightly connected to circadian output processes. Several candidates including a significant number of ROCs, CrCO, and CASEIN KINASE1 whose alterations of expression affect the circadian clock have in parallel severe effects on the release of daughter cells, flagellar formation, and/or movement, indicating that these processes are interconnected in C. reinhardtii. The challenging task for the future will be to get insights into the clock network and to find out how the clock-related factors are functionally connected. In this respect, system biology approaches will certainly

  8. Adaptation prevents the extinction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under toxic beryllium

    PubMed Central

    Baselga-Cervera, Beatriz; Costas, Eduardo; Bustillo-Avendaño, Estéfano

    2016-01-01

    The current biodiversity crisis represents a historic challenge for natural communities: the environmental rate of change exceeds the population’s adaptation capability. Integrating both ecological and evolutionary responses is necessary to make reliable predictions regarding the loss of biodiversity. The race against extinction from an eco-evolutionary perspective is gaining importance in ecological risk assessment. Here, we performed a classical study of population dynamics—a fluctuation analysis—and evaluated the results from an adaption perspective. Fluctuation analysis, widely used with microorganisms, is an effective empirical procedure to study adaptation under strong selective pressure because it incorporates the factors that influence demographic, genetic and environmental changes. The adaptation of phytoplankton to beryllium (Be) is of interest because human activities are increasing the concentration of Be in freshwater reserves; therefore, predicting the effects of human-induced pollutants is necessary for proper risk assessment. The fluctuation analysis was performed with phytoplankton, specifically, the freshwater microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, under acute Be exposure. High doses of Be led to massive microalgae death; however, by conducting a fluctuation analysis experiment, we found that C. reinhardtii was able to adapt to 33 mg/l of Be due to pre-existing genetic variability. The rescuing adapting genotype presented a mutation rate of 9.61 × 10−6 and a frequency of 10.42 resistant cells per million wild-type cells. The genetic adaptation pathway that was experimentally obtained agreed with the theoretical models of evolutionary rescue (ER). Furthermore, the rescuing genotype presented phenotypic and physiologic differences from the wild-type genotype, was 25% smaller than the Be-resistant genotype and presented a lower fitness and quantum yield performance. The abrupt distinctions between the wild-type and the Be-resistant genotype

  9. Adaptation prevents the extinction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under toxic beryllium.

    PubMed

    Baselga-Cervera, Beatriz; Costas, Eduardo; Bustillo-Avendaño, Estéfano; García-Balboa, Camino

    2016-01-01

    The current biodiversity crisis represents a historic challenge for natural communities: the environmental rate of change exceeds the population's adaptation capability. Integrating both ecological and evolutionary responses is necessary to make reliable predictions regarding the loss of biodiversity. The race against extinction from an eco-evolutionary perspective is gaining importance in ecological risk assessment. Here, we performed a classical study of population dynamics-a fluctuation analysis-and evaluated the results from an adaption perspective. Fluctuation analysis, widely used with microorganisms, is an effective empirical procedure to study adaptation under strong selective pressure because it incorporates the factors that influence demographic, genetic and environmental changes. The adaptation of phytoplankton to beryllium (Be) is of interest because human activities are increasing the concentration of Be in freshwater reserves; therefore, predicting the effects of human-induced pollutants is necessary for proper risk assessment. The fluctuation analysis was performed with phytoplankton, specifically, the freshwater microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, under acute Be exposure. High doses of Be led to massive microalgae death; however, by conducting a fluctuation analysis experiment, we found that C. reinhardtii was able to adapt to 33 mg/l of Be due to pre-existing genetic variability. The rescuing adapting genotype presented a mutation rate of 9.61 × 10(-6) and a frequency of 10.42 resistant cells per million wild-type cells. The genetic adaptation pathway that was experimentally obtained agreed with the theoretical models of evolutionary rescue (ER). Furthermore, the rescuing genotype presented phenotypic and physiologic differences from the wild-type genotype, was 25% smaller than the Be-resistant genotype and presented a lower fitness and quantum yield performance. The abrupt distinctions between the wild-type and the Be-resistant genotype suggest

  10. Flagellar coordination in Chlamydomonas cells held on micropipettes.

    PubMed

    Rüffer, U; Nultsch, W

    1998-01-01

    The two flagella of Chlamydomonas are known to beat synchronously: During breaststroke beating they are generally coordinated in a bilateral way while in shock responses during undulatory beating coordination is mostly parallel [Rüffer and Nultsch, 1995: Botanica Acta 108:169-276]. Analysis of a great number of shock responses revealed that in undulatory beats also periods of bilateral coordination are found and that the coordination type may change several times during a shock response, without concomitant changes of the beat envelope and the beat period. In normal wt cells no coordination changes are found during breaststroke beating, but only short temporary asynchronies: During 2 or 3 normal beats of the cis flagellum, the trans flagellum performs 3 or 4 flat beats with a reduced beat envelope and a smaller beat period, resulting in one additional trans beat. Long periods with flat beats of the same shape and beat period are found in both flagella of the non-phototactic mutant ptx1 and in defective wt 622E cells. During these periods, the coordination is parallel, the two flagella beat alternately. A correlation between normal asynchronous trans beats and the parallel-coordinated beats in the presumably cis defective cells and also the undulatory beats is discussed. In the cis defective cells, a perpetual spontaneous change between parallel beats with small beat periods (higher beat frequency) and bilateral beats with greater beat periods (lower beat frequency) are observed and render questionable the existence of two different intrinsic beat frequencies of the two flagella cis and trans. Asynchronies occur spontaneously but may also be induced by light changes, either step-up or step-down, but not by both stimuli in turn as breaststroke flagellar photoresponses (BFPRs). Asynchronies are not involved in phototaxis. They are independent of the BFPRs, which are supposed to be the basis of phototaxis. Both types of coordination must be assumed to be regulated

  11. Rubisco mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Pinto, T S; Malcata, F X; Arrabaça, J D; Silva, J M; Spreitzer, R J; Esquível, M G

    2013-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is an ideal fuel characterized by high enthalpy change and lack of greenhouse effects. This biofuel can be released by microalgae via reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen catalyzed by hydrogenases. The main competitor for the reducing power required by the hydrogenases is the Calvin cycle, and rubisco plays a key role therein. Engineered Chlamydomonas with reduced rubisco levels, activity and stability was used as the basis of this research effort aimed at increasing hydrogen production. Biochemical monitoring in such metabolically engineered mutant cells proceeded in Tris/acetate/phosphate culture medium with S-depletion or repletion, both under hypoxia. Photosynthetic activity, maximum photochemical efficiency, chlorophyll and protein levels were all measured. In addition, expression of rubisco, hydrogenase, D1 and Lhcb were investigated, and H2 was quantified. At the beginning of the experiments, rubisco increased followed by intense degradation. Lhcb proteins exhibited monomeric isoforms during the first 24 to 48 h, and D1 displayed sensitivity under S-depletion. Rubisco mutants exhibited a significant decrease in O2 evolution compared with the control. Although the S-depleted medium was much more suitable than its complete counterpart for H2 production, hydrogen release was observed also in sealed S-repleted cultures of rubisco mutated cells under low-moderate light conditions. In particular, the rubisco mutant Y67A accounted for 10-15-fold higher hydrogen production than the wild type under the same conditions and also displayed divergent metabolic parameters. These results indicate that rubisco is a promising target for improving hydrogen production rates in engineered microalgae.

  12. Functional and Spectroscopic Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Truncated Hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Droghetti, Enrica; Tundo, Grazia R; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Polticelli, Fabio; Visca, Paolo; Smulevich, Giulietta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The single-cell green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii harbors twelve truncated hemoglobins (Cr-TrHbs). Cr-TrHb1-1 and Cr-TrHb1-8 have been postulated to be parts of the nitrogen assimilation pathway, and of a NO-dependent signaling pathway, respectively. Here, spectroscopic and reactivity properties of Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4, all belonging to clsss 1 (previously known as group N or group I), are reported. The ferric form of Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 displays a stable 6cLS heme-Fe atom, whereas the hexa-coordination of the ferrous derivative appears less strongly stabilized. Accordingly, kinetics of azide binding to ferric Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are independent of the ligand concentration. Conversely, kinetics of CO or NO2- binding to ferrous Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are ligand-dependent at low CO or NO2- concentrations, tending to level off at high ligand concentrations, suggesting the presence of a rate-limiting step. In agreement with the different heme-Fe environments, the pH-dependent kinetics for CO and NO2-binding to ferrous Cr-TrHb1-1, Cr-TrHb1-2, and Cr-TrHb1-4 are characterized by different ligand-linked protonation events. This raises the question of whether the simultaneous presence in C. reinhardtii of multiple TrHb1s may be related to different regulatory roles. PMID:25993270

  13. Photosynthetic H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular green algae).

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2007-10-01

    Unicellular green algae have the ability to operate in two distinctly different environments (aerobic and anaerobic), and to photosynthetically generate molecular hydrogen (H2). A recently developed metabolic protocol in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii permitted separation of photosynthetic O2-evolution and carbon accumulation from anaerobic consumption of cellular metabolites and concomitant photosynthetic H2-evolution. The H2 evolution process was induced upon sulfate nutrient deprivation of the cells, which reversibly inhibits photosystem-II and O2-evolution in their chloroplast. In the absence of O2, and in order to generate ATP, green algae resorted to anaerobic photosynthetic metabolism, evolved H2 in the light and consumed endogenous substrate. This study summarizes recent advances on green algal hydrogen metabolism and discusses avenues of research for the further development of this method. Included is the mechanism of a substantial tenfold starch accumulation in the cells, observed promptly upon S-deprivation, and the regulated starch and protein catabolism during the subsequent H2-evolution. Also discussed is the function of a chloroplast envelope-localized sulfate permease, and the photosynthesis-respiration relationship in green algae as potential tools by which to stabilize and enhance H2 metabolism. In addition to potential practical applications of H2, approaches discussed in this work are beginning to address the biochemistry of anaerobic H2 photoproduction, its genes, proteins, regulation, and communication with other metabolic pathways in microalgae. Photosynthetic H2 production by green algae may hold the promise of generating a renewable fuel from nature's most plentiful resources, sunlight and water. The process potentially concerns global warming and the question of energy supply and demand. PMID:17721788

  14. Carbonic anhydrase activity in isolated chloroplasts of chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Katzman, G.; Togasaki, R.K. ); Marcus, Y. ); Moroney, J.V. )

    1989-04-01

    In a new assay of carbonic anhydrase, NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} solution at the bottom of a sealed vessel releases {sup 14}CO{sub 3} which diffuses to the top of the vessel to be assimilated by actively photosynthesizing Chlamydomonas cells. The assay is initiated by illuminating cells and stopped by turning the light off and killing the cells with acid. Enzyme activity was estimated from acid stable radioactivity above the uncatalyzed background level. With bovine carbonic anhydrase, 1.5 Wilbur Anderson Unit (WAU) can be consistantly measured at 5-6 fold above background. Sonicated whole cells of air adapted wild type (+)gave 741.1 {plus minus} 12.4 WAU/mg chl. Intact washed cells of mixotrophically grown wall-less mutant CWD(-) and a high CO2 requiring wall-less double mutant CIA-3/CW15 (-) gave 7.1 {plus minus} 1.9 and 2.8 {plus minus} 7.8 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplasts isolated from CWD and CIA-3/CW15 and subsequently disrupted gave 64.0 {plus minus} 14.7 and 2.8 {plus minus} 3.2 WAU/mg chl respectively. Chloroplast sonicate from another wall-less mutant CW15(-) gave activity comparable to CWD. Thus on a chlorophyll basis, enzyme activity in chloroplasts from mixotrophically grown cells is about 1/10th of the level found in air adapted wild type cells. CIA-3 seems to lack this activity.

  15. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  16. Respiratory-deficient mutants of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas: a review.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Thalia; Larosa, Véronique; Cardol, Pierre; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Remacle, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Genetic manipulation of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is straightforward. Nuclear genes can be interrupted by insertional mutagenesis or targeted by RNA interference whereas random or site-directed mutagenesis allows the introduction of mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This, combined with a screen that easily allows discriminating respiratory-deficient mutants, makes Chlamydomonas a model system of choice to study mitochondria biology in photosynthetic organisms. Since the first description of Chlamydomonas respiratory-deficient mutants in 1977 by random mutagenesis, many other mutants affected in mitochondrial components have been characterized. These respiratory-deficient mutants increased our knowledge on function and assembly of the respiratory enzyme complexes. More recently some of these mutants allowed the study of mitochondrial gene expression processes poorly understood in Chlamydomonas. In this review, we update the data concerning the respiratory components with a special focus on the assembly factors identified on other organisms. In addition, we make an inventory of different mitochondrial respiratory mutants that are inactivated either on mitochondrial or nuclear genes.

  17. Historical perspective on Chlamydomonas as a model for basic research: 1950-1970.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Ursula

    2015-05-01

    During the period 1950-1970, groundbreaking research on the genetic mapping of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the use of mutant strains to analyze photosynthesis was conducted in the laboratory of R. Paul Levine at Harvard University. An account of this era, based in part on interviews with Levine, is presented.

  18. New insights into the roles of molecular chaperones in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

    PubMed

    Nordhues, André; Miller, Stephen M; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used as a model organism for many decades, mainly to study photosynthesis and flagella/cilia. Only recently, Chlamydomonas has received much attention because of its ability to produce hydrogen and nonpolar lipids that have promise as biofuels. The best-studied multicellular cousin of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is Volvox carteri, whose life cycle comprises events that have clear parallels in higher plants and/or animals, making it an excellent system in which to study fundamental developmental processes. Molecular chaperones are proteins that guide other cellular proteins through their life cycle. They assist in de novo folding of nascent chains, mediate assembly and disassembly of protein complexes, facilitate protein transport across membranes, disassemble protein aggregates, fold denatured proteins back to the native state, and transfer unfoldable proteins to proteolytic degradation. Hence, molecular chaperones regulate protein function under all growth conditions and play important roles in many basic cellular and developmental processes. The aim of this chapter is to describe recent advances toward understanding molecular chaperone biology in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

  19. Similar relative mutation rates in the three genetic compartments of Mesostigma and Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jimeng; Smith, David Roy; Borza, Tudor; Lee, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Levels of nucleotide substitution at silent sites in organelle versus nuclear DNAs have been used to estimate relative mutation rates among these compartments and explain lineage-specific features of genome evolution. Synonymous substitution divergence values in animals suggest that the rate of mutation in the mitochondrial DNA is 10-50 times higher than that of the nuclear DNA, whereas overall data for most seed plants support relative mutation rates in mitochondrial, plastid, and nuclear DNAs of 1:3:10. Little is known about relative mutation rates in green algae, as substitution rate data is limited to only the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas. Here, we measure silent-site substitution rates in the plastid DNA of Chlamydomonas and the three genetic compartments of the streptophyte green alga Mesostigma. In contrast to the situation in animals and land plants, our results support similar relative mutation rates among the three genetic compartments of both Chlamydomonas and Mesostigma. These data are discussed in relation to published intra-species genetic diversity data for the three genetic compartments of Chlamydomonas and are ultimately used to address contemporary hypotheses on the organelle genome evolution. To guide future work, we describe evolutionary divergence data of all publically available Mesostigma viride strains and identify, for the first time, three distinct lineages of Mesostigma.

  20. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  1. Identification and Regulation of Plasma Membrane Sulfate Transporters in Chlamydomonas1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Gonzalez-Ballester, David; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) exhibits several responses following exposure to sulfur (S)-deprivation conditions, including an increased efficiency of import and assimilation of the sulfate anion (SO42−). Aspects of SO42− transport during S-replete and S-depleted conditions were previously studied, although the transporters had not been functionally identified. We employed a reverse genetics approach to identify putative SO42− transporters, examine their regulation, establish their biogenesis and subcellular locations, and explore their functionality. Upon S starvation of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells, the accumulation of transcripts encoding the putative SO42− transporters SLT1 (for SAC1-like transporter 1), SLT2, and SULTR2 markedly increased, suggesting that these proteins function in high-affinity SO42− transport. The Chlamydomonas sac1 and snrk2.1 mutants (defective for acclimation to S deprivation) exhibited much less of an increase in the levels of SLT1, SLT2, and SULTR2 transcripts and their encoded proteins in response to S deprivation compared with wild-type cells. All three transporters were localized to the plasma membrane, and their rates of turnover were significantly impacted by S availability; the turnover of SLT1 and SLT2 was proteasome dependent, while that of SULTR2 was proteasome independent. Finally, mutants identified for each of the S-deprivation-responsive transporters were used to establish their critical role in the transport of SO42− into S-deprived cells. PMID:20498339

  2. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-01-01

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  3. Manipulating the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas: Present realities and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.; Gillham, N.; Hauser, C.; Heifetz, P.; Lers, A.; Newman, S.; Osmond, B.

    1992-12-31

    Biotechnology is being applied in vitro modification and stable reintroduction of chloroplast genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nicotiana tabacum by homologous recombination. We are attempting the function analyses of plastid encoded proteins involved in photosynthesis, characterization of sequences which regulate expression of plastid genes at the transcriptional and translational levels, targeted disruption of chloroplast genes and molecular analysis of processes involved in chloroplast recombination.

  4. Phytochelatins do not correlate with the level of Cd accumulation in Chlamydomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Kahoko; Onodera, Ai; Tominaga, Noriko

    2006-06-01

    Chlamydomonas acidophila KT-1 and Chlamydomonas acidophila DVB238 exhibit a strong heavy metal tolerance, but C. acidophila DVB238 can accumulate a much higher amount of Cadmium (Cd) than C. acidophila KT-1. Phytochelatins (PCs) are known to play an important role in the detoxification of several toxic heavy metals, but the relationship between PCs and Cd accumulation is not clear. PC metabolism and Cd accumulation were investigated by using three Chlamydomonas strains including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii C-9 as a standard alga. The results showed that the PC content did not correlate closely with the level of Cd accumulation, maintenance of a high GSH level seeming to be more important for Cd accumulation. The ultrastructure of C. acidophila KT-1 was extremely disrupted by a great increase in starch granules, which resulted in a moribund state, but hyper-accumulator C. acidophila DVB238 did not exhibit an increase in starch granules in its cells, in spite of Cd accumulation in its chloroplasts, cytosol and vacuoles. These results indicated that C. acidophila DVB238 probably has a developed detoxification system preventing such as destruction of the cells due to Cd toxicity.

  5. Appearance of Novel Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Growth on Nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Huppe, H. C.; Turpin, D. H.

    1996-01-01

    Extractable glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is higher from N-limited Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells than from N-sufficient cells. Native gels reveal that the isoform complexity varies depending on the form of N supplied. The isoforms associated with NO3- growth appear within 2 h of switching cells from NH4+ to NO3-. PMID:12226271

  6. Utilizing the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for microbial electricity generation: a living solar cell.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Schröder, Uwe; Scholz, Fritz

    2005-10-01

    By employing living cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we demonstrate the possibility of direct electricity generation from microbial photosynthetic activity. The presented concept is based on an in situ oxidative depletion of hydrogen, photosynthetically produced by C. reinhardtii under sulfur-deprived conditions, by polymer-coated electrocatalytic electrodes. PMID:15696280

  7. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PsbS Protein Is Functional and Accumulates Rapidly and Transiently under High Light.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Tania; Auroy, Pascaline; Peltier, Gilles; Caffarri, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms must respond to excess light in order to avoid photo-oxidative stress. In plants and green algae the fastest response to high light is non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), a process that allows the safe dissipation of the excess energy as heat. This phenomenon is triggered by the low luminal pH generated by photosynthetic electron transport. In vascular plants the main sensor of the low pH is the PsbS protein, while in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii LhcSR proteins appear to be exclusively responsible for this role. Interestingly, Chlamydomonas also possesses two PsbS genes, but so far the PsbS protein has not been detected and its biological function is unknown. Here, we reinvestigated the kinetics of gene expression and PsbS and LhcSR3 accumulation in Chlamydomonas during high light stress. We found that, unlike LhcSR3, PsbS accumulates very rapidly but only transiently. In order to determine the role of PsbS in NPQ and photoprotection in Chlamydomonas, we generated transplastomic strains expressing the algal or the Arabidopsis psbS gene optimized for plastid expression. Both PsbS proteins showed the ability to increase NPQ in Chlamydomonas wild-type and npq4 (lacking LhcSR3) backgrounds, but no clear photoprotection activity was observed. Quantification of PsbS and LhcSR3 in vivo indicates that PsbS is much less abundant than LhcSR3 during high light stress. Moreover, LhcSR3, unlike PsbS, also accumulates during other stress conditions. The possible role of PsbS in photoprotection is discussed. PMID:27329221

  8. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  9. High-Throughput Genetics Strategies for Identifying New Components of Lipid Metabolism in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal lipid metabolism is of broad interest because microalgae accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) that can be used for biodiesel production (Durrett et al Plant J 54(4):593-607, 2008; Hu et al Plant J 54(4):621-639, 2008). Additionally, green algae are close relatives of land plants and serve as models to understand conserved lipid metabolism pathways in the green lineage. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas hereafter) is a powerful model organism for understanding algal lipid metabolism. Various methods have been used to screen Chlamydomonas mutants for lipid amount or composition, and for identification of the mutated loci in mutants of interest. In this chapter, we summarize the advantages and caveats for each of these methods with a focus on screens for mutants with perturbed TAG content. We also discuss technical opportunities and new tools that are becoming available for screens of mutants altered in TAG content or perturbed in other processes in Chlamydomonas.

  10. High-Throughput Genetics Strategies for Identifying New Components of Lipid Metabolism in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal lipid metabolism is of broad interest because microalgae accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAGs) that can be used for biodiesel production (Durrett et al Plant J 54(4):593-607, 2008; Hu et al Plant J 54(4):621-639, 2008). Additionally, green algae are close relatives of land plants and serve as models to understand conserved lipid metabolism pathways in the green lineage. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlamydomonas hereafter) is a powerful model organism for understanding algal lipid metabolism. Various methods have been used to screen Chlamydomonas mutants for lipid amount or composition, and for identification of the mutated loci in mutants of interest. In this chapter, we summarize the advantages and caveats for each of these methods with a focus on screens for mutants with perturbed TAG content. We also discuss technical opportunities and new tools that are becoming available for screens of mutants altered in TAG content or perturbed in other processes in Chlamydomonas. PMID:27023238

  11. Sustained hydrogen photoproduction by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Effects of culture parameters.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Tsygankov, Anatoly; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2002-06-30

    The green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is capable of sustained H(2) photoproduction when grown under sulfur-deprived conditions. This phenomenon is a result of the partial deactivation of photosynthetic O(2)-evolution activity in response to sulfur deprivation. At these reduced rates of water-oxidation, oxidative respiration under continuous illumination can establish an anaerobic environment in the culture. After 10-15 hours of anaerobiosis, sulfur-deprived algal cells induce a reversible hydrogenase and start to evolve H(2) gas in the light. Using a computer-monitored photobioreactor system, we investigated the behavior of sulfur-deprived algae and found that: (1) the cultures transition through five consecutive phases: an aerobic phase, an O(2)-consumption phase, an anaerobic phase, a H(2)-production phase and a termination phase; (2) synchronization of cell division during pre-growth with 14:10 h light:dark cycles leads to earlier establishment of anaerobiosis in the cultures and to earlier onset of the H(2)-production phase; (3) re-addition of small quantities of sulfate (12.5-50 microM MgSO(4), final concentration) to either synchronized or unsynchronized cell suspensions results in an initial increase in culture density, a higher initial specific rate of H(2) production, an increase in the length of the H(2)-production phase, and an increase in the total amount of H(2) produced; and (4) increases in the culture optical density in the presence of 50 microM sulfate result in a decrease in the initial specific rates of H(2) production and in an earlier start of the H(2)-production phase with unsynchronized cells. We suggest that the effects of sulfur re-addition on H(2) production, up to an optimal concentration, are due to an increase in the residual water-oxidation activity of the algal cells. We also demonstrate that, in principle, cells synchronized by growth under light:dark cycles can be used in an outdoor H(2)-production system without loss of

  12. Hydrogen evolution as a consumption mode of reducing equivalents in green algal fermentation. [Chlamydomonas reinhardii; Chlorella pyrenoidosa; Chlorococcum minutum

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, S.; Miyamoto, K.; Miura, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Dark anaerobic fermentation in the green algae Chlamydomonas MGA 161, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, and Chlorococcum minutum was studied. Their isolate, Chlamydomonas MGA 161, was unusual in having high H/sub 2/ but almost no formate. The fermentation pattern in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 was altered by changes in the NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl concentration. Glycerol formation increased at low (0.1%) and high (7%) NaCl concentrations starch degradation, and formation of ethanol, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/ increased with the addition of NH/sub 4/Cl to above 5 millimolar in N-deficient cells. C. reinhardtii and C.pyrenoidosa exhibited a very similar anaerobic metabolism, forming formate, acetate and ethanol in a ratio of about 2:2:1. C. minimum was also unusual in forming acetate, glycerol, and CO/sub 2/ as its main products, with H/sub 2/, formate, and ethanol being formed in negligible amounts. In the presence of CO, ethanol formation increased twofold in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii, but the fermentation pattern in C. minimum did not change. An experiment with hypophosphite addition showed that dark H/sub 2/ evolution of the Escherichia coli type could be ruled out in Chlamydomonas MGA 161 and C. reinhardtii. Among the green algae investigated, three fermentation types were identified by the distribution pattern of the end products, which reflected the consumption model of reducing equivalents in the cells.

  13. Rescue of a paralyzed-flagella mutant of Chlamydomonas by transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, D.R.; Curry, A.M.; Johnson, K.A.; Williams, B.D.; Rosenbaum, J.L. ); Lefebvre, P.A. ); Kindle, K.L. )

    1990-08-01

    The biflagellate alga Chlamydomonas has been used extensively in the genetic and biochemical analysis of flagellar assembly and motility. The authors have restored motility to a paralyzed-flagella mutant of Chlamydomonas by transforming with the corresponding wild-type gene. A nitrate reductase-deficient paralyzed-flagella strain, nit1-305 pf-14, carrying mutations in the genes for nitrate reductase and radial spoke protein 3, was transformed with wild-type copies of both genes. Two-thirds of the cells that survived nitrate selection also regained motility, indicating that they had been transformed with both the nitrate reductase and radial spoke protein 3 genes. Transformants typically contained multiple copies of both genes, genetically linked to each other, but not linked to the original mutant loci. Complementation of paralyzed-flagella mutants by transformation is a powerful tool for investigating flagellar assembly and function.

  14. Polarity and asymmetry in the arrangement of dynein and related structures in the Chlamydomonas axoneme.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh Huy; Yagi, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Ryosuke; Kamiya, Ritsu; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the molecular architecture of the flagellum is crucial to elucidate the bending mechanism produced by this complex organelle. The current known structure of the flagellum has not yet been fully correlated with the complex composition and localization of flagellar components. Using cryoelectron tomography and subtomogram averaging while distinguishing each one of the nine outer doublet microtubules, we systematically collected and reconstructed the three-dimensional structures in different regions of the Chlamydomonas flagellum. We visualized the radial and longitudinal differences in the flagellum. One doublet showed a distinct structure, whereas the other eight were similar but not identical to each other. In the proximal region, some dyneins were missing or replaced by minor dyneins, and outer-inner arm dynein links were variable among different microtubule doublets. These findings shed light on the intricate organization of Chlamydomonas flagella, provide clues to the mechanism that produces asymmetric flagellar beating, and pose a new challenge for the functional study of the flagella.

  15. A rapid, modular and marker-free chloroplast expression system for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bertalan, Ivo; Munder, Matthias C; Weiß, Caroline; Kopf, Judith; Fischer, Dirk; Johanningmeier, Udo

    2015-02-10

    In search of alternative expression platforms heterologous protein production in microalgae has gained increasing importance in the last years. Particularly, the chloroplast of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been adopted to successfully express foreign proteins like vaccines and antibodies. However, when compared with other expression systems, the development of the algal chloroplast to a powerful production platform for recombinant proteins is still in its early stages. In an effort to further improve methods for a reliable and rapid generation of transplastomic Chlamydomonas strains we constructed the key plasmid pMM2 containing the psbA gene and a multiple cloning site for foreign gene insertion. The psbA gene allows a marker-free selection procedure using as a recipient the Fud7 strain of Chlamydomonas, which grows on media containing acetate as a carbon source, but is unable to grow photoautotrophically due to the lack of an intact psbA gene. Biolistic transformation of Fud7 with vectors containing this gene restores photoautotrophic growth and thus permits selection in the light on media without carbon sources and antibiotics. The multiple cloning site with a BsaI recognition sequence allows type IIs restriction enzyme-based modular cloning which rapidly generates new gene constructs without sequences, which could influence the expression and characteristics of the foreign protein. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a codon optimized version of the gene for the bacterial protein MPT64 has been integrated into the plastome. Several strains with different promoter/UTR combinations show a stable expression of the HA tagged MPT64 protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplasts.

  16. Prolongation of H2 Photoproduction by Immobilized, Sulfur-Limited Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinavichene, T. V.; Kosourov, S. N.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Seibert, M.; Tsygankov, A. A.

    2008-04-30

    Two approaches to prolong the duration of hydrogen production by immobilized, sulfur-limited Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells are examined. The results demonstrate that continuous H{sub 2} photoproduction can occur for at least 90 days under constant flow of TAP medium containing micromolar sulfate concentrations. Furthermore, it is also possible to prolong the duration of H{sub 2} production by cycling immobilized cells between minus and plus sulfate conditions.

  17. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chlorophyll biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grovenstein, Phillip B; Wilson, Darryel A; Lennox, Cameron G; Smith, Katherine P; Contractor, Alisha A; Mincey, Jonathan L; Lankford, Kathryn D; Smith, Jacqueline M; Haye, Tashana C; Mitra, Mautusi

    2013-01-01

    The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl) and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms and are synthesized via a common branched tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel) which inserts Mg (2+) into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto) to form magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto), the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. MgChel is a multimeric enzyme that consists of three subunits designated CHLD, CHLI and CHLH. Plants have two isozymes of CHLI (CHLI1 and CHLI2) which are 70%-81% identical in protein sequences. Although the functional role of CHLI1 is well characterized, that of CHLI2 is not. We have isolated a non-photosynthetic light sensitive mutant 5A7 by random DNA insertional mutagenesis that is devoid of any detectable Chl. PCR based analyses show that 5A7 is missing the CHLI1 gene and at least eight additional functionally uncharacterized genes. 5A7 has an intact CHLI2 gene. Complementation with a functional copy of the CHLI1 gene restored Chl biosynthesis, photo-autotrophic growth and light tolerance in 5A7. We have identified the first chli1 (chli1-1) mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in green algae. Our results show that in the wild type Chlamydomonas CHLI2 protein amount is lower than that of CHLI1 and the chli1-1 mutant has a drastic reduction in CHLI2 protein levels although it possesses the CHLI2 gene. Our chli1-1 mutant opens up new avenues to explore the functional roles of CHLI1 and CHLI2 in Chl biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas, which has never been studied before.

  18. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mautusi

    2013-01-01

    The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl) and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms and are synthesized via a common branched tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel) which inserts Mg 2+ into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto) to form magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto), the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. MgChel is a multimeric enzyme that consists of three subunits designated CHLD, CHLI and CHLH. Plants have two isozymes of CHLI (CHLI1 and CHLI2) which are 70%-81% identical in protein sequences. Although the functional role of CHLI1 is well characterized, that of CHLI2 is not. We have isolated a non-photosynthetic light sensitive mutant 5A7 by random DNA insertional mutagenesis that is devoid of any detectable Chl. PCR based analyses show that 5A7 is missing the CHLI1 gene and at least eight additional functionally uncharacterized genes. 5A7 has an intact CHLI2 gene. Complementation with a functional copy of the CHLI1 gene restored Chl biosynthesis, photo-autotrophic growth and light tolerance in 5A7. We have identified the first chli1 (chli1-1) mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in green algae. Our results show that in the wild type Chlamydomonas CHLI2 protein amount is lower than that of CHLI1 and the chli1-1 mutant has a drastic reduction in CHLI2 protein levels although it possesses the CHLI2 gene. Our chli1-1 mutant opens up new avenues to explore the functional roles of CHLI1 and CHLI2 in Chl biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas, which has never been studied before. PMID:24555064

  19. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Irina; Greiner, Andre; Awasthi, Mayanka; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a versatile model for fundamental and biotechnological research. A wide range of tools for genetic manipulation have been developed for this alga, but specific modification of nuclear genes is still not routinely possible. Here, we present a nuclear gene targeting strategy for Chlamydomonas that is based on the application of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Our approach includes (i) design of gene-specific ZFNs using available online tools, (ii) evaluation of the designed ZFNs in a Chlamydomonas in situ model system, (iii) optimization of ZFN activity by modification of the nuclease domain, and (iv) application of the most suitable enzymes for mutagenesis of an endogenous gene. Initially, we designed a set of ZFNs to target the COP3 gene that encodes the light-activated ion channel channelrhodopsin-1. To evaluate the designed ZFNs, we constructed a model strain by inserting a non-functional aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII) selection marker interspaced with a short COP3 target sequence into the nuclear genome. Upon co-transformation of this recipient strain with the engineered ZFNs and an aphVIII DNA template, we were able to restore marker activity and select paromomycin-resistant (Pm-R) clones with expressing nucleases. Of these Pm-R clones, 1% also contained a modified COP3 locus. In cases where cells were co-transformed with a modified COP3 template, the COP3 locus was specifically modified by homologous recombination between COP3 and the supplied template DNA. We anticipate that this ZFN technology will be useful for studying the functions of individual genes in Chlamydomonas.

  20. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures.

  1. A rapid, modular and marker-free chloroplast expression system for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Bertalan, Ivo; Munder, Matthias C; Weiß, Caroline; Kopf, Judith; Fischer, Dirk; Johanningmeier, Udo

    2015-02-10

    In search of alternative expression platforms heterologous protein production in microalgae has gained increasing importance in the last years. Particularly, the chloroplast of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been adopted to successfully express foreign proteins like vaccines and antibodies. However, when compared with other expression systems, the development of the algal chloroplast to a powerful production platform for recombinant proteins is still in its early stages. In an effort to further improve methods for a reliable and rapid generation of transplastomic Chlamydomonas strains we constructed the key plasmid pMM2 containing the psbA gene and a multiple cloning site for foreign gene insertion. The psbA gene allows a marker-free selection procedure using as a recipient the Fud7 strain of Chlamydomonas, which grows on media containing acetate as a carbon source, but is unable to grow photoautotrophically due to the lack of an intact psbA gene. Biolistic transformation of Fud7 with vectors containing this gene restores photoautotrophic growth and thus permits selection in the light on media without carbon sources and antibiotics. The multiple cloning site with a BsaI recognition sequence allows type IIs restriction enzyme-based modular cloning which rapidly generates new gene constructs without sequences, which could influence the expression and characteristics of the foreign protein. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a codon optimized version of the gene for the bacterial protein MPT64 has been integrated into the plastome. Several strains with different promoter/UTR combinations show a stable expression of the HA tagged MPT64 protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplasts. PMID:25554634

  2. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures. PMID:26614282

  3. Reduction of PII signaling protein enhances lipid body production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Kharatyan, Nina; Forchhammer, Karl; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-11-01

    In all examined organisms that have the PII signal transduction machinery, PII coordinates the central C/N anabolic metabolism. In green algae and land plants, PII is localized in the chloroplast and controls the L-arginine biosynthetic pathway pathway. To elucidate additional functions of PII in the model photosynthetic organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrPII), we generated and analyzed four strains, in which PII was strongly under-expressed by artificial microRNA (GLB1-amiRNA strains). In response to nitrogen deficiency, Chlamydomonas produces triacylglycerols (TAGs) that are accumulated in lipid bodies (LB). Quantification of LBs by confocal microscopy in four GLB1-amiRNA strains showed that reduced PII levels resulted in over-accumulation of LBs compared to their parental strains. Moreover, knock-down of PII caused also an increase in the total TAG level. We propose that the larger yields of TAG-filled LBs in N-starved GLB1-amiRNA cells can be attributed to the strain's depleted PII level and their inability to properly control acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity (ACCase). Together, our results imply that PII in Chlamydomonas negatively controls TAG accumulation in LBs during acclimation to nitrogen starvation of the alga.

  4. The Hsp70 and Hsp40 chaperones influence microtubule stability in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Silflow, Carolyn D; Sun, Xiaoqing; Haas, Nancy A; Foley, Joseph W; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2011-12-01

    Mutations at the APM1 and APM2 loci in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii confer resistance to phosphorothioamidate and dinitroaniline herbicides. Genetic interactions between apm1 and apm2 mutations suggest an interaction between the gene products. We identified the APM1 and APM2 genes using a map-based cloning strategy. Genomic DNA fragments containing only the DNJ1 gene encoding a type I Hsp40 protein rescue apm1 mutant phenotypes, conferring sensitivity to the herbicides and rescuing a temperature-sensitive growth defect. Lesions at five apm1 alleles include missense mutations and nucleotide insertions and deletions that result in altered proteins or very low levels of gene expression. The HSP70A gene, encoding a cytosolic Hsp70 protein known to interact with Hsp40 proteins, maps near the APM2 locus. Missense mutations found in three apm2 alleles predict altered Hsp70 proteins. Genomic fragments containing the HSP70A gene rescue apm2 mutant phenotypes. The results suggest that a client of the Hsp70-Hsp40 chaperone complex may function to increase microtubule dynamics in Chlamydomonas cells. Failure of the chaperone system to recognize or fold the client protein(s) results in increased microtubule stability and resistance to the microtubule-destabilizing effect of the herbicides. The lack of redundancy of genes encoding cytosolic Hsp70 and Hsp40 type I proteins in Chlamydomonas makes it a uniquely valuable system for genetic analysis of the function of the Hsp70 chaperone complex.

  5. Whole-Genome Resequencing Reveals Extensive Natural Variation in the Model Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Jonathan M; Hazzouri, Khaled M; Pham, Gina M; Rosas, Ulises; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Khraiwesh, Basel; Nelson, David R; Jijakli, Kenan; Abdrabu, Rasha; Harris, Elizabeth H; Lefebvre, Paul A; Hom, Erik F Y; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Purugganan, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    We performed whole-genome resequencing of 12 field isolates and eight commonly studied laboratory strains of the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to characterize genomic diversity and provide a resource for studies of natural variation. Our data support previous observations that Chlamydomonas is among the most diverse eukaryotic species. Nucleotide diversity is ∼3% and is geographically structured in North America with some evidence of admixture among sampling locales. Examination of predicted loss-of-function mutations in field isolates indicates conservation of genes associated with core cellular functions, while genes in large gene families and poorly characterized genes show a greater incidence of major effect mutations. De novo assembly of unmapped reads recovered genes in the field isolates that are absent from the CC-503 assembly. The laboratory reference strains show a genomic pattern of polymorphism consistent with their origin as the recombinant progeny of a diploid zygospore. Large duplications or amplifications are a prominent feature of laboratory strains and appear to have originated under laboratory culture. Extensive natural variation offers a new source of genetic diversity for studies of Chlamydomonas, including naturally occurring alleles that may prove useful in studies of gene function and the dissection of quantitative genetic traits.

  6. A simple, low-cost method for chloroplast transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Economou, Chloe; Wannathong, Thanyanan; Szaub, Joanna; Purton, Saul

    2014-01-01

    The availability of routine techniques for the genetic manipulation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has allowed a plethora of reverse-genetic studies of chloroplast biology using this alga as a model organism. These studies range from fundamental investigations of chloroplast gene function and regulation to sophisticated metabolic engineering programs and to the development of the algal chloroplast as a platform for producing high-value recombinant proteins. The established method for delivering transforming DNA into the Chlamydomonas chloroplast involves microparticle bombardment, with the selection of transformant lines most commonly involving the use of antibiotic resistance markers. In this chapter we describe a simpler and cheaper delivery method in which cell/DNA suspensions are agitated with glass beads: a method that is more commonly used for nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas. Furthermore, we highlight the use of an expression vector (pASapI) that employs an endogenous gene as a selectable marker, thereby avoiding the contentious issue of antibiotic resistance determinants in transgenic lines.

  7. Isolation of the Chlamydomonas Regulatory Gene Nit2 by Transposon Tagging

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, R. A.; Lefebvre, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that the NIT2 gene of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii encodes a positive regulator of the nitrate-assimilation pathway. To learn more about the function of the NIT2 gene product, we isolated the gene using a transposon-tagging strategy. A nit2 mutation caused by the insertion of a transposon was identified by testing spontaneous nit2 mutants for the presence of new copies of Gulliver or TOC1, transposable elements that have been identified in Chlamydomonas. In 2 of the 14 different mutants that were analyzed, a Gulliver element was found to be genetically and phenotypically associated with the nit2 mutation. Using the Gulliver element as a probe, one of the transposon-induced nit2 alleles was isolated, and a sequence adjoining the transposon was used to isolate the corresponding wild-type locus. The NIT2 gene was delimited by mapping DNA rearrangements associated with nit2 mutations and mutant rescue by genetic transformation. The NIT2 gene encodes a 6-kb transcript that was not detected in cells grown in the presence of ammonium. Likewise, NIT2-dependent genes are repressed in ammonium-grown cells. These results suggest that repression of the NIT2 gene may mediate metabolite repression of the nitrate assimilation pathway in Chlamydomonas. PMID:8394263

  8. Functional Genomics of Eukaryotic Photosynthesis Using Insertional Mutagenesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Rachel M.; Haglund, Cat M.; Chin, Brian L.; Kobayashi, Marilyn C.; Niyogi, Krishna K.

    2005-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a widely used model organism for studies of oxygenic photosynthesis in eukaryotes. Here we describe the development of a resource for functional genomics of photosynthesis using insertional mutagenesis of the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome. Chlamydomonas cells were transformed with either of two plasmids conferring zeocin resistance, and insertional mutants were selected in the dark on acetate-containing medium to recover light-sensitive and nonphotosynthetic mutants. The population of insertional mutants was subjected to a battery of primary and secondary phenotypic screens to identify photosynthesis-related mutants that were pigment deficient, light sensitive, nonphotosynthetic, or hypersensitive to reactive oxygen species. Approximately 9% of the insertional mutants exhibited 1 or more of these phenotypes. Molecular analysis showed that each mutant line contains an average of 1.4 insertions, and genetic analysis indicated that approximately 50% of the mutations are tagged by the transforming DNA. Flanking DNA was isolated from the mutants, and sequence data for the insertion sites in 50 mutants are presented and discussed. PMID:15653810

  9. Cytoplasmic Dynein Heavy Chain 1b Is Required for Flagellar Assembly in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mary E.; Bower, Raqual; Knott, Julie A.; Byrd, Pamela; Dentler, William

    1999-01-01

    A second cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (cDhc) has recently been identified in several organisms, and its expression pattern is consistent with a possible role in axoneme assembly. We have used a genetic approach to ask whether cDhc1b is involved in flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas. Using a modified PCR protocol, we recovered two cDhc sequences distinct from the axonemal Dhc sequences identified previously. cDhc1a is closely related to the major cytoplasmic Dhc, whereas cDhc1b is closely related to the minor cDhc isoform identified in sea urchins, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Tetrahymena. The Chlamydomonas cDhc1b transcript is a low-abundance mRNA whose expression is enhanced by deflagellation. To determine its role in flagellar assembly, we screened a collection of stumpy flagellar (stf) mutants generated by insertional mutagenesis and identified two strains in which portions of the cDhc1b gene have been deleted. The two mutants assemble short flagellar stumps (<1–2 μm) filled with aberrant microtubules, raft-like particles, and other amorphous material. The results indicate that cDhc1b is involved in the transport of components required for flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas. PMID:10069812

  10. Purification and cDNA isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, M; Togasaki, R K

    1995-01-01

    Chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) was purified to homogeneity from a soluble fraction of chloroplasts of a cell-wall-deficient mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (cw-15) using ammonium sulfate fractionation, Reactive Blue-72 column chromatography, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PGK activity was attributed to a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 42 kD. Relative purity and identity of the isolated enzyme was confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequence determination. Antiserum against this enzyme was raised and a western blot analysis of whole-cell lysate from cw-15 cells using this anti-chloroplastic PGK serum detected a single polypeptide with a molecular mass of 42 kD. The cDNA clone corresponding to the Chlamydomonas chloroplastic PGK was isolated from a Chlamydomonas cDNA expression library using the anti-PGK serum. The cDNA sequence was determined and apparently codes for the entire precursor peptide, which consists of 461 codons. The results from Southern and northern blot analyses suggest that the chloroplastic PGK gene exists as a single copy in the nuclear genome of C. reinhardtii and is expressed as a 1.8-kb transcript. The C. reinhardtii chloroplastic PGK cDNA has 71 and 66% homology with wheat chloroplastic PGK and spinach chloroplastic PGK, respectively. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the chloroplastic PGK of C. reinhardtii has more similarity to plant PGKs than to other PGKs, having both prokaryotic and eukaryotic features. PMID:7724671

  11. A simple, low-cost method for chloroplast transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Economou, Chloe; Wannathong, Thanyanan; Szaub, Joanna; Purton, Saul

    2014-01-01

    The availability of routine techniques for the genetic manipulation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has allowed a plethora of reverse-genetic studies of chloroplast biology using this alga as a model organism. These studies range from fundamental investigations of chloroplast gene function and regulation to sophisticated metabolic engineering programs and to the development of the algal chloroplast as a platform for producing high-value recombinant proteins. The established method for delivering transforming DNA into the Chlamydomonas chloroplast involves microparticle bombardment, with the selection of transformant lines most commonly involving the use of antibiotic resistance markers. In this chapter we describe a simpler and cheaper delivery method in which cell/DNA suspensions are agitated with glass beads: a method that is more commonly used for nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas. Furthermore, we highlight the use of an expression vector (pASapI) that employs an endogenous gene as a selectable marker, thereby avoiding the contentious issue of antibiotic resistance determinants in transgenic lines. PMID:24599870

  12. Anaerobic acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: anoxic gene expression, hydrogenase induction, and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mus, Florence; Dubini, Alexandra; Seibert, Michael; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2007-08-31

    Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic photosynthetic microbes experience conditions of anoxia, especially during the night when photosynthetic activity ceases. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, dark anoxia is characterized by the activation of an extensive set of fermentation pathways that act in concert to provide cellular energy, while limiting the accumulation of potentially toxic fermentative products. Metabolite analyses, quantitative PCR, and high density Chlamydomonas DNA microarrays were used to monitor changes in metabolite accumulation and gene expression during acclimation of the cells to anoxia. Elevated levels of transcripts encoding proteins associated with the production of H2, organic acids, and ethanol were observed in congruence with the accumulation of fermentation products. The levels of over 500 transcripts increased significantly during acclimation of the cells to anoxic conditions. Among these were transcripts encoding transcription/translation regulators, prolyl hydroxylases, hybrid cluster proteins, proteases, transhydrogenase, catalase, and several putative proteins of unknown function. Overall, this study uses metabolite, genomic, and transcriptome data to provide genome-wide insights into the regulation of the complex metabolic networks utilized by Chlamydomonas under the anaerobic conditions associated with H2 production. PMID:17565990

  13. An energy balance from absorbed photons to new biomass for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas acidophila under neutral and extremely acidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Langner, Uwe; Jakob, Torsten; Stehfest, Katja; Wilhelm, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydomonas is one of the most well-studied photosynthetic organisms that had important biotechnological potential for future bioproductions of biofuels. However, an energy balance from incident photons to the energy stored in the new biomass is still lacking. In this study, we applied a recently developed system to measure the energy balance for steady state growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown at pH 6.5, and C. acidophila that was grown at pH 6.5 and 2.6. Energy use efficiency was quantified on the basis of light absorption, photosynthetic quantum yield, photosynthetic and respiratory quotient, and electron partitioning into proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. The results showed that lower growth rates of C. acidophila under both pH conditions were not caused by the differences in the photosynthetic quantum yield or in alternative electron cycling, but rather by differences in the efficiency of light absorption and increased dark respiration. Analysis of the macromolecular composition of the cells during the light phase showed that C. acidophila uses biosynthetic electrons preferentially for carbohydrate synthesis but not for synthesis of lipids. This led to a strong diurnal cycle of the C/N ratio and could explain the higher dark respiration of C. acidophila compared with C. reinhardtii. PMID:19054351

  14. Between a rock and a hard place: trace element nutrition in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Sabeeha S; Allen, Michael D; Kropat, Janette; Moseley, Jeffrey L; Long, Joanne C; Tottey, Stephen; Terauchi, Aimee M

    2006-07-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are among the earliest life forms on earth and their biochemistry is strictly dependent on a wide range of inorganic nutrients owing to the use of metal cofactor-dependent enzymes in photosynthesis, respiration, inorganic nitrogen and sulfur assimilation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photosynthetic eukaryotic model organism for the study of trace metal homeostasis. Chlamydomonas spp. are widely distributed and can be found in soil, glaciers, acid mines and sewage ponds, suggesting that the genus has significant capacity for acclimation to micronutrient availability. Analysis of the draft genome indicates that metal homeostasis mechanisms in Chlamydomonas represent a blend of mechanisms operating in animals, plants and microbes. A combination of classical genetics, differential expression and genomic analysis has led to the identification of homologues of components known to operate in fungi and animals (e.g., Fox1, Ftr1, Fre1, Fer1, Ctr1/2) as well as novel molecules involved in copper and iron nutrition (Crr1, Fea1/2). Besides activating iron assimilation pathways, iron-deficient Chlamydomonas cells re-adjust metabolism by reducing light delivery to photosystem I (to avoid photo-oxidative damage resulting from compromised FeS clusters) and by modifying the ferredoxin profile (perhaps to accommodate preferential allocation of reducing equivalents). Up-regulation of a MnSOD isoform may compensate for loss of FeSOD. Ferritin could function to buffer the iron released from programmed degradation of iron-containing enzymes in the chloroplast. Some metabolic adjustments are made in anticipation of deficiency while others occur only with sustained or severe deficiency. Copper-deficient Chlamydomonas cells induce a copper assimilation pathway consisting of a cell surface reductase and a Cu(+) transporter (presumed CTR homologue). There are metabolic adaptations in addition: the synthesis of "back-up" enzymes for plastocyanin in photosynthesis

  15. Regulation of flagellar biogenesis by a calcium dependent protein kinase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yinwen; Pan, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a bi-flagellated green alga, is a model organism for studies of flagella or cilia related activities including cilia-based signaling, flagellar motility and flagellar biogenesis. Calcium has been shown to be a key regulator of these cellular processes whereas the signaling pathways linking calcium to these cellular functions are less understood. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are present in plants but not in animals, are also present in ciliated microorganisms which led us to examine their possible functions and mechanisms in flagellar related activities. By in silico analysis of Chlamydomonas genome we have identified 14 CDPKs and studied one of the flagellar localized CDPKs--CrCDPK3. CrCDPK3 was a protein of 485 amino acids and predicted to have a protein kinase domain at the N-terminus and four EF-hand motifs at the C-terminus. In flagella, CrCDPK3 was exclusively localized in the membrane matrix fraction and formed an unknown 20 S protein complex. Knockdown of CrCDPK3 expression by using artificial microRNA did not affect flagellar motility as well as flagellar adhesion and mating. Though flagellar shortening induced by treatment with sucrose or sodium pyrophosphate was not affected in RNAi strains, CrCDPK3 increased in the flagella, and pre-formed protein complex was disrupted. During flagellar regeneration, CrCDPK3 also increased in the flagella. When extracellular calcium was lowered to certain range by the addition of EGTA after deflagellation, flagellar regeneration was severely affected in RNAi cells compared with wild type cells. In addition, during flagellar elongation induced by LiCl, RNAi cells exhibited early onset of bulbed flagella. This work expands new functions of CDPKs in flagellar activities by showing involvement of CrCDPK3 in flagellar biogenesis in Chlamydomonas.

  16. Novel shuttle markers for nuclear transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Vallon, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii today is a premier model organism for the study of green algae and plants. Yet the efficient engineering of its nuclear genome requires development of new antibiotic resistance markers. We have recoded, based on codon usage in the nuclear genome, the AadA marker that has been used previously for chloroplast transformation. The recoded AadA gene, placed under the control of the HSP70A-RBCS2 hybrid promoter and preceded by the RbcS2 chloroplast-targeting peptide, can be integrated into the nuclear genome by electroporation, conferring resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. Transformation efficiency is markedly increased when vector sequences are completely eliminated from the transforming DNA. Antibiotic resistance is stable for several months in the absence of selection pressure. Shuttle markers allowing selection in both Chlamydomonas and Escherichia coli would also be a useful asset. By placing an artificial bacterial promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence in frame within the AadA coding sequence, we generated such a shuttle marker. To our surprise, we found that the classical AphVIII construct already functions as a shuttle marker. Finally, we developed a method to introduce the AadA and AphVIII markers into the vector part of the bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of the Chlamydomonas genomic DNA library. Our aim was to facilitate complementation studies whenever the test gene cannot be selected for directly. After transformation of a petC mutant with a modified BAC carrying the AphVIII marker along with the PETC gene in the insert, almost half of the paromomycin-resistant transformants obtained showed restoration of phototrophy, indicating successful integration of the unselected test gene. With AadA, cotransformation was also observed, but with a lower efficiency.

  17. The Purification of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ClpP complex: additional subunits and structural features

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Benoît; Majeran, Wojciech; Effantin, Grégory; Ebenezer, Joseph; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Vallon, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The ClpP peptidase is a major constituent of the proteolytic machinery of bacteria and organelles. The chloroplast ClpP complex is unusual, in that it associates a large number of subunits, one of which (ClpP1) is encoded in the chloroplast, the others in the nucleus. The complexity of these large hetero-oligomeric complexes has been a major difficulty in their overproduction and biochemical characterization. In this paper, we describe the purification of native chloroplast ClpP complex from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using a strain that carries the Strep-tag II at the C-terminus of the ClpP1 subunit. Similar to land plants, the algal complex comprises active and inactive subunits (3 ClpP and 5 ClpR, respectively). Evidence is presented that a sub-complex can be produced by dissociation, comprising ClpP1 and ClpR1, 2, 3 and 4, similar to the ClpR-ring described in land plants. Our Chlamydomonas ClpP preparation also contains two ClpT subunits, ClpT3 and ClpT4, which like the land plant ClpT1 and ClpT2 show 2 Clp-N domains. ClpTs are believed to function in substrate binding and/or assembly of the two heptameric rings. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ClpT subunits have appeared independently in Chlorophycean algae, in land plants and in dispersed cyanobacterial genomes. Negative staining electron microscopy shows that the Chlamydomonas complex retains the barrel-like shape of homo-oligomeric ClpPs, with 4 additional peripheral masses that we speculate represent either the additional IS1 domain of ClpP1 (a feature unique to algae) or ClpTs or extensions of ClpR subunits PMID:22772861

  18. The Hsp70 and Hsp40 Chaperones Influence Microtubule Stability in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Silflow, Carolyn D.; Sun, Xiaoqing; Haas, Nancy A.; Foley, Joseph W.; Lefebvre, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations at the APM1 and APM2 loci in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii confer resistance to phosphorothioamidate and dinitroaniline herbicides. Genetic interactions between apm1 and apm2 mutations suggest an interaction between the gene products. We identified the APM1 and APM2 genes using a map-based cloning strategy. Genomic DNA fragments containing only the DNJ1 gene encoding a type I Hsp40 protein rescue apm1 mutant phenotypes, conferring sensitivity to the herbicides and rescuing a temperature-sensitive growth defect. Lesions at five apm1 alleles include missense mutations and nucleotide insertions and deletions that result in altered proteins or very low levels of gene expression. The HSP70A gene, encoding a cytosolic Hsp70 protein known to interact with Hsp40 proteins, maps near the APM2 locus. Missense mutations found in three apm2 alleles predict altered Hsp70 proteins. Genomic fragments containing the HSP70A gene rescue apm2 mutant phenotypes. The results suggest that a client of the Hsp70–Hsp40 chaperone complex may function to increase microtubule dynamics in Chlamydomonas cells. Failure of the chaperone system to recognize or fold the client protein(s) results in increased microtubule stability and resistance to the microtubule-destabilizing effect of the herbicides. The lack of redundancy of genes encoding cytosolic Hsp70 and Hsp40 type I proteins in Chlamydomonas makes it a uniquely valuable system for genetic analysis of the function of the Hsp70 chaperone complex. PMID:21940683

  19. Novel shuttle markers for nuclear transformation of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Vallon, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii today is a premier model organism for the study of green algae and plants. Yet the efficient engineering of its nuclear genome requires development of new antibiotic resistance markers. We have recoded, based on codon usage in the nuclear genome, the AadA marker that has been used previously for chloroplast transformation. The recoded AadA gene, placed under the control of the HSP70A-RBCS2 hybrid promoter and preceded by the RbcS2 chloroplast-targeting peptide, can be integrated into the nuclear genome by electroporation, conferring resistance to spectinomycin and streptomycin. Transformation efficiency is markedly increased when vector sequences are completely eliminated from the transforming DNA. Antibiotic resistance is stable for several months in the absence of selection pressure. Shuttle markers allowing selection in both Chlamydomonas and Escherichia coli would also be a useful asset. By placing an artificial bacterial promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence in frame within the AadA coding sequence, we generated such a shuttle marker. To our surprise, we found that the classical AphVIII construct already functions as a shuttle marker. Finally, we developed a method to introduce the AadA and AphVIII markers into the vector part of the bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) of the Chlamydomonas genomic DNA library. Our aim was to facilitate complementation studies whenever the test gene cannot be selected for directly. After transformation of a petC mutant with a modified BAC carrying the AphVIII marker along with the PETC gene in the insert, almost half of the paromomycin-resistant transformants obtained showed restoration of phototrophy, indicating successful integration of the unselected test gene. With AadA, cotransformation was also observed, but with a lower efficiency. PMID:22002656

  20. The SEC6 protein is required for contractile vacuole function in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Stephan, Lisa Marie; Becker, Burkhard

    2012-06-15

    Contractile vacuoles (CVs) are essential for osmoregulation in many protists. To investigate the mechanism of CV function in Chlamydomonas, we isolated novel osmoregulatory mutants. Four of the isolated mutant cell lines carried the same 33,641 base deletion, rendering the cell lines unable to grow under strong hypotonic conditions. One mutant cell line (Osmo75) was analyzed in detail. The CV morphology was variable in mutant cells, and most cells had multiple small CVs. In addition, one or two enlarged CVs or no visible CVs at all, were observed by light microscopy. These findings suggest that the mutant is impaired in homotypic vacuolar and exocytotic membrane fusion. Furthermore the mutants had long flagella. One of the affected genes is the only SEC6 homologue in Chlamydomonas (CreSEC6). The SEC6 protein is a component of the exocyst complex that is required for efficient exocytosis. Transformation of the Osmo75 mutant with a CreSEC6-GFP construct rescued the mutant completely (osmoregulation and flagellar length). Rescued strains overexpressed CreSEC6 (as a GFP-tagged protein) and displayed a modified CV activity. CVs were larger, whereas the CV contraction interval remained unchanged, leading to increased water efflux rates. Electron microscopy analysis of Osmo75 cells showed that the mutant is able to form the close contact zones between the plasma membrane and the CV membrane observed during late diastole and systole. These results indicate that CreSEC6 is essential for CV function and required for homotypic vesicle fusion during diastole and water expulsion during systole. In addition, CreSEC6 is not only necessary for CV function, but possibly influences the CV cycle in an indirect manner and flagellar length in Chlamydomonas.

  1. Centrin deficiency in Chlamydomonas causes defects in basal body replication, segregation and maturation.

    PubMed

    Koblenz, Bettina; Schoppmeier, Jutta; Grunow, Andrea; Lechtreck, Karl-Ferdinand

    2003-07-01

    Centrin, a 20 kDa calcium-binding protein, is a constituent of contractile basal body-associated fibers in protists and of various centrosomal structures. A construct inducing centrin RNAi was used to study the effect of centrin deficiency in Chlamydomonas. Transformants contained variable amounts of residual centrin (down to 5% of wild-type) and lacked centrin fibers. They displayed a variable flagellar number phenotype with mostly nonflagellate cells, suggesting that centrin is required for basal body assembly. Furthermore, basal bodies often failed to dock to the plasma membrane and to assemble flagella, and displayed defects in the flagellar root system indicating that centrin deficiency interferes with basal body development. Multiple basal bodies caused the formation of additional microtubular asters, whereas the microtubular cytoskeleton was disordered in most cells without basal bodies. The number of multinucleated cells was increased, indicating that aberrant numbers of basal bodies interfered with the cytokinesis of Chlamydomonas. In contrast to wild-type cells, basal bodies in centrin-RNAi cells were separated from the spindle poles, suggesting a role of centrin in tethering basal bodies to the spindle. To test whether an association with the spindle poles is required for correct basal body segregation, we disrupted centrin fibers in wild-type cells by over-expressing a nonfunctional centrin-GFP. In these cells, basal bodies were disconnected from the spindle but segregation errors were not observed. We propose that basal body segregation in Chlamydomonas depends on an extranuclear array of microtubules independent of the mitotic spindle.

  2. The purification of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplast ClpP complex: additional subunits and structural features.

    PubMed

    Derrien, Benoît; Majeran, Wojciech; Effantin, Grégory; Ebenezer, Joseph; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J; Steven, Alasdair C; Maurizi, Michael R; Vallon, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    The ClpP peptidase is a major constituent of the proteolytic machinery of bacteria and organelles. The chloroplast ClpP complex is unusual, in that it associates a large number of subunits, one of which (ClpP1) is encoded in the chloroplast, the others in the nucleus. The complexity of these large hetero-oligomeric complexes has been a major difficulty in their overproduction and biochemical characterization. In this paper, we describe the purification of native chloroplast ClpP complex from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using a strain that carries the Strep-tag II at the C-terminus of the ClpP1 subunit. Similar to land plants, the algal complex comprises active and inactive subunits (3 ClpP and 5 ClpR, respectively). Evidence is presented that a sub-complex can be produced by dissociation, comprising ClpP1 and ClpR1, 2, 3 and 4, similar to the ClpR-ring described in land plants. Our Chlamydomonas ClpP preparation also contains two ClpT subunits, ClpT3 and ClpT4, which like the land plant ClpT1 and ClpT2 show 2 Clp-N domains. ClpTs are believed to function in substrate binding and/or assembly of the two heptameric rings. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that ClpT subunits have appeared independently in Chlorophycean algae, in land plants and in dispersed cyanobacterial genomes. Negative staining electron microscopy shows that the Chlamydomonas complex retains the barrel-like shape of homo-oligomeric ClpPs, with 4 additional peripheral masses that we speculate represent either the additional IS1 domain of ClpP1 (a feature unique to algae) or ClpTs or extensions of ClpR subunits.

  3. Low oxygen levels contribute to improve photohydrogen production in mixotrophic non-stressed Chlamydomonas cultures

    DOE PAGES

    Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Dubini, Alexandra; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Gonzalez-Ballester, David

    2015-09-17

    Currently, hydrogen fuel is derived mainly from fossil fuels, but there is an increasing interest in clean and sustainable technologies for hydrogen production. In this context, the ability of some photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly cyanobacteria and microalgae, to produce hydrogen is a promising alternative for renewable, clean-energy production. Among a diverse array of photosynthetic microorganisms able to produce hydrogen, the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the model organism widely used to study hydrogen production. Furthermore, the well-known fact that acetate-containing medium enhances hydrogen production in this algae, little is known about the precise role of acetate during this process.

  4. Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Rachel R.; Golestanian, Ramin

    2013-04-01

    Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. Our study suggests that nonlinear mechanics could be a significant contributing factor to how the trajectories of the microorganism are selected.

  5. Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, W. A.

    2004-01-01

    This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NREL's photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The previous study had looked mainly at incident light intensities, batch cycles and light adsorption without directly attempting to model the saturation effects seen in algal cultures. This study takes a more detailed look at the effects that cell density, light adsorption and light saturation have on algal hydrogen production. Performance estimates based on actual solar data are also included in this study. Based on this analysis, the estimated future selling price of hydrogen produced from algae ranges $0.57/kg to $13.53/kg.

  6. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a new model system for studying the molecular basis of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Takuya; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2011-05-20

    The genome of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has both plant-like and animal-like genes. It is of interest to know which types of clock genes this alga has. Recent forward and reverse genetic studies have revealed that its clock has both plant-like and algal clock components. In addition, since C. reinhardtii is a useful model organism also called "green yeast", the identification of clock genes will make C. reinhardtii a powerful model for studying the molecular basis of the eukaryotic circadian clock. In this review, we describe our forward genetic approach in C. reinhardtii and discuss some recent findings about its circadian clock.

  7. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the model of choice to study mitochondria from unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Funes, Soledad; Franzén, Lars-Gunnar; González-Halphen, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism to study photosynthesis, cellular division, flagellar biogenesis, and, more recently, mitochondrial function. It has distinct advantages in comparison to higher plants because it is unicellular, haploid, and amenable to tetrad analysis, and its three genomes are subject to specific transformation. It also has the possibility to grow either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on acetate, making the assembly of the photosynthetic machinery not essential for cell viability. Methods developed allow the isolation of C. reinhardtii mitochondria free of thylakoid contaminants. We review the general procedures used for the biochemical characterization of mitochondria from this green alga.

  8. [Effect of microwaves on Chlamydomonas actinochloris culture in the stationary phase of growth].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, O O; Berezovskaia, M A; Datsenko, A I

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the microwave radiation on the culture of Chlamydomonas actinochloris green flagellar alga in the stationary phase of growth are studied. After exposure to radiation at the maximum dose of 125 J/g, the cell functional state worsened but all the studied parameters were restored in 20 days and in the long run found to be even better than the control indices. The data are compared with the similar ones obtained earlier for the lag phase culture. The studied sample is found to be more resistant to the irradiation than the previous one.

  9. Flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas: a model system for studying organelle assembly.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Rosenbaum, J L

    1993-05-01

    How do the many different components of an organelle assemble into a functional structure at an appropriate place and time? Flagellar regeneration by the biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas is one experimental system in which genetics, biochemistry and ultrastructural analysis are being combined to investigate the assembly of a microtubule-containing organelle. Recent advances in the molecular biology of this 'green yeast' have made possible several new approaches to the problem of flagellar assembly; insights from these new approaches are the focus of this review.

  10. [Ultrastructural organization and composition of carotenoids in the eyespot in the mutant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G; Semenova, G A

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of the ultrastructure of the eyespot in the chloroplasts of unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been studied. We have found that the development of the structure of the eyespot correlates with the accumulation of carotenoids. Depending on their accumulation, the eyespots form from 1 to 4 lines of lipid-carotenoid globules. It has been shown that only carotenes are accumulated in the globules of the eyespots. We first have found that the composition of carotenes in the eyespots of the mutants may vary due to the changes in their composition in the membranes of chloroplasts. PMID:25509143

  11. Protocol: methodology for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We report on a detailed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protocol is suitable for the analysis of nucleosome occupancy, histone modifications and transcription factor binding sites at the level of mononucleosomes for targeted and genome-wide studies. We describe the optimization of conditions for crosslinking, chromatin fragmentation and antibody titer determination and provide recommendations and an example for the normalization of ChIP results as determined by real-time PCR. PMID:22050920

  12. Ciliary kinematics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in Complex Fluids: Role of viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Qin, Boyang; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. Guided by our experiments on the swimming gait of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in viscoelastic fluids, we focus on ciliary waveforms in Newtonian fluids and systematically study the effect of increasing viscosity. We find that the beat frequency as well as the wave speed are both strongly influenced by fluid viscosity. Interestingly, ciliary waveforms at low viscosity show a larger influence of the cell body than waveforms at higher viscosity. We use slender body theory and principal component analysis to elucidate the role of fluid viscosity in regulating the kinematics of the swimming process.

  13. Low oxygen levels contribute to improve photohydrogen production in mixotrophic non-stressed Chlamydomonas cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Jurado-Oller, Jose Luis; Dubini, Alexandra; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Gonzalez-Ballester, David

    2015-09-17

    Currently, hydrogen fuel is derived mainly from fossil fuels, but there is an increasing interest in clean and sustainable technologies for hydrogen production. In this context, the ability of some photosynthetic microorganisms, particularly cyanobacteria and microalgae, to produce hydrogen is a promising alternative for renewable, clean-energy production. Among a diverse array of photosynthetic microorganisms able to produce hydrogen, the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the model organism widely used to study hydrogen production. Furthermore, the well-known fact that acetate-containing medium enhances hydrogen production in this algae, little is known about the precise role of acetate during this process.

  14. Multiple facets of anoxic metabolism and hydrogen production in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Arthur R; Catalanotti, Claudia; Yang, Wenqiang; Dubini, Alexandra; Magneschi, Leonardo; Subramanian, Venkataramanan; Posewitz, Matthew C; Seibert, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Many microbes in the soil environment experience micro-oxic or anoxic conditions for much of the late afternoon and night, which inhibit or prevent respiratory metabolism. To sustain the production of energy and maintain vital cellular processes during the night, organisms have developed numerous pathways for fermentative metabolism. This review discusses fermentation pathways identified for the soil-dwelling model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, its ability to produce molecular hydrogen under anoxic conditions through the activity of hydrogenases, and the molecular flexibility associated with fermentative metabolism that has only recently been revealed through the analysis of specific mutant strains. PMID:21563367

  15. Altered Fermentative Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Mutants Lacking Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Both Pyruvate Formate Lyase and Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Catalanotti, C.; Dubini, A.; Subramanian, V.; Yang, W. Q.; Magneschi, L.; Mus, F.; Seibert, M.; Posewitz, M. C.; Grossman, A. R.

    2012-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, often experiences hypoxic/anoxic soil conditions that activate fermentation metabolism. We isolated three Chlamydomonas mutants disrupted for the pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) gene; the encoded PFL1 protein catalyzes a major fermentative pathway in wild-type Chlamydomonas cells. When the pfl1 mutants were subjected to dark fermentative conditions, they displayed an increased flux of pyruvate to lactate, elevated pyruvate decarboxylation, ethanol accumulation, diminished pyruvate oxidation by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and lowered H2 production. The pfl1-1 mutant also accumulated high intracellular levels of lactate, succinate, alanine, malate, and fumarate. To further probe the system, we generated a double mutant (pfl1-1 adh1) that is unable to synthesize both formate and ethanol. This strain, like the pfl1 mutants, secreted lactate, but it also exhibited a significant increase in the levels of extracellular glycerol, acetate, and intracellular reduced sugars and a decrease in dark, fermentative H2 production. Whereas wild-type Chlamydomonas fermentation primarily produces formate and ethanol, the double mutant reroutes glycolytic carbon to lactate and glycerol. Although the metabolic adjustments observed in the mutants facilitate NADH reoxidation and sustained glycolysis under dark, anoxic conditions, the observed changes could not have been predicted given our current knowledge of the regulation of fermentation metabolism.

  16. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-12-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho-Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry-mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis.

  17. Dissecting the heat stress response in Chlamydomonas by pharmaceutical and RNAi approaches reveals conserved and novel aspects.

    PubMed

    Schmollinger, Stefan; Schulz-Raffelt, Miriam; Strenkert, Daniela; Veyel, Daniel; Vallon, Olivier; Schroda, Michael

    2013-11-01

    To study how conserved fundamental concepts of the heat stress response (HSR) are in photosynthetic eukaryotes, we applied pharmaceutical and antisense/amiRNA approaches to the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas HSR appears to be triggered by the accumulation of unfolded proteins, as it was induced at ambient temperatures by feeding cells with the arginine analog canavanine. The protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine strongly retarded the HSR, demonstrating the importance of phosphorylation during activation of the HSR also in Chlamydomonas. While the removal of extracellular calcium by the application of EGTA and BAPTA inhibited the HSR in moss and higher plants, only the addition of BAPTA, but not of EGTA, retarded the HSR and impaired thermotolerance in Chlamydomonas. The addition of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytosolic protein synthesis, abolished the attenuation of the HSR, indicating that protein synthesis is necessary to restore proteostasis. HSP90 inhibitors induced a stress response when added at ambient conditions and retarded attenuation of the HSR at elevated temperatures. In addition, we detected a direct physical interaction between cytosolic HSP90A/HSP70A and heat shock factor 1, but surprisingly this interaction persisted after the onset of stress. Finally, the expression of antisense constructs targeting chloroplast HSP70B resulted in a delay of the cell's entire HSR, thus suggesting the existence of a retrograde stress signaling cascade that is desensitized in HSP70B-antisense strains.

  18. Complementation cloning and sequence analysis of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hemL gene encoding glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Matters, G.L.; Beale, S.I. )

    1993-05-01

    Glutamate-1-semialdehyde amino-transferase (GSAT) catalyzes formation of the tetrapyrrole precursor, [delta]-aminolevulinic acid. GSAT is encoded by the hemL gene. A Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hemL cDNA was selected from a vegetative stage expression library by complementation of Escherichia coli hemL mutant GE 1377. In vitro GSAT activity was ten-fold higher in an extract of the complemented hemL cells than in an extract of uncomplemented mutant cells. The complementing cDNA is 2010 bp long and includes 591 bp of 3' noncoding DNA and an estimated 27 bp of 5' noncoding DNA. The coding region includes the sequence for a putative 30-amino acid chloroplast transit peptide and a 433-amino acid mature protein. The mature protein deduced from the Chlamydomonas cDNA sequence has a molecular weight of 45,880, compared to the value of 43,000 reported for purified Chlamydomonas GSAT (d. Jahn et al., 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266:161-167). The deduced peptide is 74% identical to Synechococcus GSAT, 70% identical to barley GSAT and 66% identical to tobacco GSAT. The putative pyridoxal binding region has the sequence TTMGKVIGG, which differs somewhat from those reported for other aminotransferases. The deduced putative chloroplast transit peptide has recognizable similarity to barley GSAT transit peptide. Southern analysis of genomic DNA from Chlamydomonas strain CC124, using the cDNA as a probe, indicates that GSAT is probably encoded by a single gene.

  19. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho–Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry–mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis. PMID:26446842

  20. Inhibition of protein synthesis by TOR inactivation revealed a conserved regulatory mechanism of the BiP chaperone in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Pérez-Martín, Marta; Moes, Suzette; Jeno, Paul; Florencio, Francisco J; Crespo, José L

    2011-10-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase integrates nutritional and stress signals to coordinately control cell growth in all eukaryotes. TOR associates with highly conserved proteins to constitute two distinct signaling complexes termed TORC1 and TORC2. Inactivation of TORC1 by rapamycin negatively regulates protein synthesis in most eukaryotes. Here, we report that down-regulation of TOR signaling by rapamycin in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced phosphorylation of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone BiP. Our results indicated that Chlamydomonas TOR regulates BiP phosphorylation through the control of protein synthesis, since rapamycin and cycloheximide have similar effects on BiP modification and protein synthesis inhibition. Modification of BiP by phosphorylation was suppressed under conditions that require the chaperone activity of BiP, such as heat shock stress or tunicamycin treatment, which inhibits N-linked glycosylation of nascent proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. A phosphopeptide localized in the substrate-binding domain of BiP was identified in Chlamydomonas cells treated with rapamycin. This peptide contains a highly conserved threonine residue that might regulate BiP function, as demonstrated by yeast functional assays. Thus, our study has revealed a regulatory mechanism of BiP in Chlamydomonas by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events and assigns a role to the TOR pathway in the control of BiP modification.

  1. On the Evolution and Expression of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Nucleus-Encoded Transfer RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cognat, Valérie; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Vinogradova, Elizaveta; Salinas, Thalia; Remacle, Claire; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, 259 tRNA genes were identified and classified into 49 tRNA isoaccepting families. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we determined the evolutionary history for each tRNA gene family. The majority of the tRNA sequences are more closely related to their plant counterparts than to animals ones. Northern experiments also permitted us to show that at least one member of each tRNA isoacceptor family is transcribed and correctly processed in vivo. A short stretch of T residues known to be a signal for termination of polymerase III transcription was found downstream of most tRNA genes. It allowed us to propose that the vast majority of the tRNA genes are expressed and to confirm that numerous tRNA genes separated by short spacers are indeed cotranscribed. Interestingly, in silico analyses and hybridization experiments show that the cellular tRNA abundance is correlated with the number of tRNA genes and is adjusted to the codon usage to optimize translation efficiency. Finally, we studied the origin of SINEs, short interspersed elements related to tRNAs, whose presence in Chlamydomonas is exceptional. Phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that tRNAAsp-related SINEs originate from a prokaryotic-type tRNA either horizontally transferred from a bacterium or originally present in mitochondria or chloroplasts. PMID:18493044

  2. Atomic Resolution Modeling of the Ferredoxin:[FeFe] Hydrogenase Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; King, P. W.; Ghirardi, M. L.; Kim, K.

    2007-11-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases HydA1 and HydA2 in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii catalyze the final reaction in a remarkable metabolic pathway allowing this photosynthetic organism to produce H2 from water in the chloroplast. A [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin is a critical branch point in electron flow from Photosystem I toward a variety of metabolic fates, including proton reduction by hydrogenases. To better understand the binding determinants involved in ferredoxin:hydrogenase interactions, we have modeled Chlamydomonas PetF1 and HydA2 based on amino-acid sequence homology, and produced two promising electron-transfer model complexes by computational docking. To characterize these models, quantitative free energy calculations at atomic resolution were carried out, and detailed analysis of the interprotein interactions undertaken. The protein complex model we propose for ferredoxin:HydA2 interaction is energetically favored over the alternative candidate by 20kcal/mol. This proposed model of the electron-transfer complex between PetF1 and HydA2 permits a more detailed view of the molecular events leading up to H2 evolution, and suggests potential mutagenic strategies to modulate electron flow to HydA2.

  3. Systems biology approach in Chlamydomonas reveals connections between copper nutrition and multiple metabolic steps.

    PubMed

    Castruita, Madeli; Casero, David; Karpowicz, Steven J; Kropat, Janette; Vieler, Astrid; Hsieh, Scott I; Yan, Weihong; Cokus, Shawn; Loo, Joseph A; Benning, Christoph; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we query the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii copper regulon at a whole-genome level. Our RNA-Seq data simulation and analysis pipeline validated a 2-fold cutoff and 10 RPKM (reads per kilobase of mappable length per million mapped reads) (~1 mRNA per cell) to reveal 63 CRR1 targets plus another 86 copper-responsive genes. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses captured 25% of the corresponding proteins, whose abundance was also dependent on copper nutrition, validating transcriptional regulation as a major control mechanism for copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. The impact of copper deficiency on the expression of several O₂-dependent enzymes included steps in lipid modification pathways. Quantitative lipid profiles indicated increased polyunsaturation of fatty acids on thylakoid membrane digalactosyldiglycerides, indicating a global impact of copper deficiency on the photosynthetic apparatus. Discovery of a putative plastid copper chaperone and a membrane protease in the thylakoid suggest a mechanism for blocking copper utilization in the chloroplast. We also found an example of copper sparing in the N assimilation pathway: the replacement of copper amine oxidase by a flavin-dependent backup enzyme. Forty percent of the targets are previously uncharacterized proteins, indicating considerable potential for new discovery in the biology of copper.

  4. TAG, you're it! Chlamydomonas as a reference organism for understanding algal triacylglycerol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Sabeeha S; Kropat, Janette; Liu, Bensheng; Shaw, Johnathan; Warakanont, Jaruswan

    2012-06-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are responsible for converting sunlight into organic matter, and they are therefore seen as a resource for the renewable fuel industry. Ethanol and esterified fatty acids (biodiesel) are the most common fuel products derived from these photosynthetic organisms. The potential of algae as producers of biodiesel precursor (or triacylglycerols (TAGs)) has yet to be realized because of the limited knowledge of the underlying biochemistry, cell biology and genetics. Well-characterized pathways from fungi and land plants have been used to identify algal homologs of key enzymes in TAG synthesis, including diacylglcyerol acyltransferases, phospholipid diacylglycerol acyltransferase and phosphatidate phosphatases. Many laboratories have adopted Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a reference organism for discovery of algal-specific adaptations of TAG metabolism. Stressed Chlamydomonas cells, grown either photoautotrophically or photoheterotrophically, accumulate TAG in plastid and cytoplasmic lipid bodies, reaching 46-65% of dry weight in starch accumulation (sta) mutants. State of the art genomic technologies including expression profiling and proteomics have identified new proteins, including key components of lipid droplets, candidate regulators and lipid/TAG degrading activities. By analogy with crop plants, it is expected that advances in algal breeding and genome engineering may facilitate realizing the potential in algae.

  5. The Chlamydomonas mutant pf27 reveals novel features of ciliary radial spoke assembly.

    PubMed

    Alford, Lea M; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Hunter, Emily L; Lin, Huawen; Dutcher, Susan K; Sale, Winfield S

    2013-12-01

    To address the mechanisms of ciliary radial spoke assembly, we took advantage of the Chlamydomonas pf27 mutant. The radial spokes that assemble in pf27 are localized to the proximal quarter of the axoneme, but otherwise are fully assembled into 20S radial spoke complexes competent to bind spokeless axonemes in vitro. Thus, pf27 is not defective in radial spoke assembly or docking to the axoneme. Rather, our results suggest that pf27 is defective in the transport of spoke complexes. During ciliary regeneration in pf27, radial spoke assembly occurs asynchronously from other axonemal components. In contrast, during ciliary regeneration in wild-type Chlamydomonas, radial spokes and other axonemal components assemble concurrently as the axoneme grows. Complementation in temporary dikaryons between wild-type and pf27 reveals rescue of radial spoke assembly that begins at the distal tip, allowing further assembly to proceed from tip to base of the axoneme. Notably, rescued assembly of radial spokes occurred independently of the established proximal radial spokes in pf27 axonemes in dikaryons. These results reveal that 20S radial spokes can assemble proximally in the pf27 cilium but as the cilium lengthens, spoke assembly requires transport. We postulate that PF27 encodes an adaptor or modifier protein required for radial spoke–IFT interaction.

  6. Spontaneous dominant mutations in chlamydomonas highlight ongoing evolution by gene diversification.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Alix; Drapier, Dominique; Razafimanantsoa, Hélène; Wostrikoff, Katia; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Pascal, Kevin; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Vallon, Olivier; Wollman, Francis-André; Choquet, Yves

    2015-04-01

    We characterized two spontaneous and dominant nuclear mutations in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ncc1 and ncc2 (for nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression), which affect two octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins encoded in a cluster of paralogous genes on chromosome 15. Both mutations cause a single amino acid substitution in one OPR repeat. As a result, the mutated NCC1 and NCC2 proteins now recognize new targets that we identified in the coding sequences of the chloroplast atpA and petA genes, respectively. Interaction of the mutated proteins with these targets leads to transcript degradation; however, in contrast to the ncc1 mutation, the ncc2 mutation requires on-going translation to promote the decay of the petA mRNA. Thus, these mutants reveal a mechanism by which nuclear factors act on chloroplast mRNAs in Chlamydomonas. They illustrate how diversifying selection can allow cells to adapt the nuclear control of organelle gene expression to environmental changes. We discuss these data in the wider context of the evolution of regulation by helical repeat proteins.

  7. High-Level Accumulation of Triacylglycerol and Starch in Photoautotrophically Grown Chlamydomonas debaryana NIES-2212.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Microalgae have the potential to produce triacylglycerol (TAG) and starch, which provide alternative sources of biofuel. A problem in using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model for TAG production has been that this alga lacks phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is thought to be important for TAG synthesis in plants. We found that C. debaryana is one of the rare species of Chlamydomonas having PC. Here we show that this strain, grown under complete photoautotrophic conditions, accumulated TAG and starch up to 20 and 250 pg per cell, respectively, during the stationary phase without nutrient deprivation. Addition of nutrients in this state did not cause loss of TAG, which was found in dilution with fresh medium. The photosynthetically produced TAG contained a high level of monounsaturated fatty acids, which is a preferred property as a material for biodiesel. The oil bodies were present in the cytoplasm, either between the cytoplasmic membrane and the chloroplast or between the chloroplast and the nucleus, whereas the starch granules were present within the chloroplast. Oil bodies were also deposited as a broad layer in the peripheral space of the cytoplasm outside the chloroplast, and might be easily released from the cells by genetic, chemical or mechanical manipulation. These results suggest that C. debaryana is a promising seed organism for developing a good biofuel producer.

  8. 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone is the dominant naphthoquinone of PSI in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Shin-ichiro; Kosugi, Makiko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Sugimura, Takashi; Takahashi, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    Thylakoid membranes contain two types of quinones, benzoquinone (plastoquinone) and naphthoquinone, which are involved in photosynthetic electron transfer. Unlike the benzoquinone, the chemical species of naphthoquinone present (phylloquinone, menaquinone-4 and 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone) varies depending on the oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used as a model organism to study the function of the naphthoquinone bound to PSI. However, the level of phylloquinone and the presence of other naphthoquinones in this organism remain unknown. In the present study, we found that 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone is the predominant naphthoquinone in cell and thylakoid extracts based on the retention time during reverse phase HPLC, absorption and mass spectrometry measurements. It was shown that 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone is enriched 2.5-fold in the PSI complex as compared with thylakoid membranes but that it is absent from PSI-deficient mutant cells. We also found a small amount of phylloquinone in the cells and in the PSI complex and estimated that accumulated 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone and phylloquinone account for approximately 90 and 10%, respectively, of the total naphthoquinone content. The ratio of these two naphthoquinones remained nearly constant in the cells and in the PSI complexes from logarithmic and stationary cell growth stages. We conclude that both 5'-monohydroxyphylloquinone and phylloquinone stably co-exist as major and minor naphthoquinones in Chlamydomonas PSI.

  9. A forward genetic screen identifies mutants deficient for mitochondrial complex I assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, M Rosario; Larosa, Véronique; Nouet, Cécile; Subrahmanian, Nitya; Remacle, Claire; Hamel, Patrice P

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the largest multimeric enzyme of the respiratory chain. The lack of a model system with facile genetics has limited the molecular dissection of complex I assembly. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an experimental system to screen for complex I defects, we isolated, via forward genetics, amc1-7 nuclear mutants (for assembly of mitochondrial complex I) displaying reduced or no complex I activity. Blue native (BN)-PAGE and immunoblot analyses revealed that amc3 and amc4 accumulate reduced levels of the complex I holoenzyme (950 kDa) while all other amc mutants fail to accumulate a mature complex. In amc1, -2, -5-7, the detection of a 700 kDa subcomplex retaining NADH dehydrogenase activity indicates an arrest in the assembly process. Genetic analyses established that amc5 and amc7 are alleles of the same locus while amc1-4 and amc6 define distinct complementation groups. The locus defined by the amc5 and amc7 alleles corresponds to the NUOB10 gene, encoding PDSW, a subunit of the membrane arm of complex I. This is the first report of a forward genetic screen yielding the isolation of complex I mutants. This work illustrates the potential of using Chlamydomonas as a genetically tractable organism to decipher complex I manufacture.

  10. Biochemical characterization of the extracellular phosphatases produced by phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Quisel, J D; Wykoff, D D; Grossman, A R

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the extracellular phosphatases produced by the terrestrial green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to phosphorus deprivation. Phosphorus-deprived cells increase extra-cellular alkaline phosphatase activity 300-fold relative to unstarved cells. The alkaline phosphatases are released into the medium by cell-wall-deficient strains and by wild-type cells after treatment with autolysin, indicating that they are localized to the periplasm. Anion-exchange chromatography and analysis by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that there are two major inducible alkaline phosphatases. A calcium-dependent enzyme composed of 190-kD glycoprotein subunits accounts for 85 to 95% of the Alkaline phosphatase activity. This phosphatase has optimal activity at pH 9.5 and a Km of 120 to 262 microns for all physiological substrates tested, with the exception of phytic acid, which it cleaved with a 50-fold lower efficiency. An enzyme with optimal activity at pH 9 and no requirement for divalent cations accounts for 2 to 10% of the alkaline phosphatase activity. This phosphatase was only able to efficiently hydrolyze arylphosphates. The information reported here, in conjunction with the results of previous studies, defines the complement of extracellular phosphatases produced by phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas cells. PMID:8754684

  11. An Indexed, Mapped Mutant Library Enables Reverse Genetics Studies of Biological Processes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Gang, Spencer S; Blum, Sean R; Ivanova, Nina; Yue, Rebecca; Robertson, Jacob M; Lefebvre, Paul A; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T; Grossman, Arthur R; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-02-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a leading unicellular model for dissecting biological processes in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, its usefulness has been limited by difficulties in obtaining mutants in specific genes of interest. To allow generation of large numbers of mapped mutants, we developed high-throughput methods that (1) enable easy maintenance of tens of thousands of Chlamydomonas strains by propagation on agar media and by cryogenic storage, (2) identify mutagenic insertion sites and physical coordinates in these collections, and (3) validate the insertion sites in pools of mutants by obtaining >500 bp of flanking genomic sequences. We used these approaches to construct a stably maintained library of 1935 mapped mutants, representing disruptions in 1562 genes. We further characterized randomly selected mutants and found that 33 out of 44 insertion sites (75%) could be confirmed by PCR, and 17 out of 23 mutants (74%) contained a single insertion. To demonstrate the power of this library for elucidating biological processes, we analyzed the lipid content of mutants disrupted in genes encoding proteins of the algal lipid droplet proteome. This study revealed a central role of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase LCS2 in the production of triacylglycerol from de novo-synthesized fatty acids. PMID:26764374

  12. Overexpression of Ferredoxin, PETF, Enhances Tolerance to Heat Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  13. A Photoperiod-Regulating Gene CONSTANS Is Correlated to Lipid Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiaodong; Fan, Xinzhao; Li, Ping; Fei, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background. The regulation of lipid biosynthesis is essential in photosynthetic eukaryotic cells. Thus far, no regulatory genes have been reported in the lipid metabolism pathway. Plant CONSTANS (CO) gene regulates blooming by participating in photoperiod and biological clock. Apart from regulating photoperiod, the Chlamydomonas CO gene also regulates starch content. Results. In this study, the results showed that, under HSM-S condition, cells accumulated more lipids at short-day conditions than at long-day conditions. The silencing of the CrCO gene via RNA interference resulted in an increase in lipid content and an increase in triacylglyceride (TAG) level by 24.5%. CrCO RNAi strains accumulated more lipids at short-day conditions than at long-day conditions. The decrease in CrCO expression resulted in the increased expression of TAG biosynthesis-related genes, such as DGAT2, PAP2, and PDAT3, whereas CIS and FBP1 genes showed a decrease in their mRNA when the CrCO expression was suppressed. On the other hand, the overexpression of CrCO resulted in the decrease in lipid content and TAG level. Conclusions. The results of this study revealed a relationship between CrCO gene and lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas, suggesting that increasing oil by suppressing CrCO expression in microalgae is feasible. PMID:25654119

  14. mRNA abundance changes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, J A; Silflow, C D; Rosenbaum, J L

    1984-01-01

    Flagellar amputation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii induces the accumulation of a specific set of RNAs, many of which encode flagellar proteins. We prepared a cDNA clone bank from RNA isolated from cells undergoing flagellar regeneration. From this bank, we selected clones that contain RNA sequences that display several different patterns of abundance regulation. Based on quantitation of the relative amounts of labeled, cloned cDNAs hybridizing to dots of RNA on nitrocellulose filters, the cloned sequences were divided into five regulatory classes: class I RNAs remain at constant abundance during flagellar regeneration; classes II, III, and IV begin to increase in abundance within a few minutes after deflagellation, reach maximal abundance at successively later times during regeneration, and return to control cell levels within 2 to 3 h; and class V RNA abundance decreases during flagellar regeneration. Alpha- and beta-tubulin mRNAs are included in regulatory class IV. The abundance kinetics of alpha-tubulin mRNAs differ slightly from those of beta-tubulin mRNAs. The availability of these clones makes possible studies on the mechanisms controlling the abundance of a wide variety of different RNA species during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas. Images PMID:6546968

  15. Flagellar root contraction and nuclear movement during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    When Chlamydomonas cells are deflagellated by pH shock or mechanical shear the nucleus rapidly moves toward the flagellar basal apparatus at the anterior end of the cell. During flagellar regeneration the nucleus returns to a more central position within the cell. The nucleus is connected to the flagellar apparatus by a system of fibers, the flagellar roots (rhizoplasts), which undergo a dramatic contraction that coincides with anterior nuclear movement. A corresponding extension of the root system, back to its preshock configuration is observed as the nucleus retracts to a central position. Anterior displacement of the nucleus and flagellar root contraction require free calcium in the medium. Nuclear movement and flagellar root contraction and extension are not sensitive to inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide), or drugs that influence either microtubules (colchicine) or actin-based microfilaments (cytochalasin D). Detergent- extracted cell models contract and extend their flagellar roots and move their nuclei in response to alterations of free calcium levels in the medium. Cycles of nuclear movement in detergent-extracted models require ATP to potentiate the contractile mechanism for subsequent calcium-induced contraction. Flagellar root contraction and nuclear movement in Chlamydomonas may be causally related to signaling of induction of flagellar precursor genes or to the transport of flagellar precursors or their messages to sites of synthesis or assembly near the basal apparatus of the cell. PMID:3667698

  16. The small molecule fenpropimorph rapidly converts chloroplast membrane lipids to triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanul; Jang, Sunghoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Hong, Daewoong; Song, Won-Yong; Nishida, Ikuo; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Lee, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Concern about global warming has prompted an intense interest in developing economical methods of producing biofuels. Microalgae provide a promising platform for biofuel production, because they accumulate high levels of lipids, and do not compete with food or feed sources. However, current methods of producing algal oil involve subjecting the microalgae to stress conditions, such as nitrogen deprivation, and are prohibitively expensive. Here, we report that the fungicide fenpropimorph rapidly causes high levels of neutral lipids to accumulate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. When treated with fenpropimorph (10 μg mL(-1)) for 1 h, Chlamydomonas cells accumulated at least fourfold the amount of triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in the untreated control cells. Furthermore, the quantity of TAGs present after 1 h of fenpropimorph treatment was over twofold higher than that formed after 9 days of nitrogen starvation in medium with no acetate supplement. Biochemical analysis of lipids revealed that the accumulated TAGs were derived mainly from chloroplast polar membrane lipids. Such a conversion of chloroplast polar lipids to TAGs is desirable for biodiesel production, because polar lipids are usually removed during the biodiesel production process. Thus, our data exemplified that a cost and time effective method of producing TAGs is possible using fenpropimorph or similar drugs.

  17. System Response of Metabolic Networks in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Total Available Ammonium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do Yup; Park, Jeong-Jin; Barupal, Dinesh K.; Fiehn, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Drastic alterations in macronutrients are known to cause large changes in biochemistry and gene expression in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, metabolomic and proteomic responses to subtle reductions in macronutrients have not yet been studied. When ammonium levels were reduced by 25–100% compared with control cultures, ammonium uptake and growth rates were not affected at 25% or 50% nitrogen-reduction for 28 h. However, primary metabolism and enzyme expression showed remarkable changes at acute conditions (4 h and 10 h after ammonium reduction) compared with chronic conditions (18 h and 28 h time points). Responses of 145 identified metabolites were quantified using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry; 495 proteins (including 187 enzymes) were monitored using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry with label-free spectral counting. Stress response and carbon assimilation processes (Calvin cycle, acetate uptake and chlorophyll biosynthesis) were altered first, in addition to increase in enzyme contents for lipid biosynthesis and accumulation of short chain free fatty acids. Nitrogen/carbon balance metabolism was found changed only under chronic conditions, for example in the citric acid cycle and amino acid metabolism. Metabolism in Chlamydomonas readily responds to total available media nitrogen with temporal increases in short-chain free fatty acids and turnover of internal proteins, long before nitrogen resources are depleted. PMID:22787274

  18. A rhodopsin is the functional photoreceptor for phototaxis in the unicellular eukaryote Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Foster, K W; Saranak, J; Patel, N; Zarilli, G; Okabe, M; Kline, T; Nakanishi, K

    Rhodopsin is a visual pigment ubiquitous in multicellular animals. If visual pigments have a common ancient origin, as is believed, then some unicellular organisms might also use a rhodopsin photoreceptor. We show here that the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas does indeed use a rhodopsin photoreceptor. We incorporated analogues of its retinal chromophore into a blind mutant; normal photobehaviour was restored and the colour of maximum sensitivity was shifted in a manner consistent with the nature of the retinal analogue added. The data suggest that 11-cis-retinal is the natural chromophore and that the protein environment of this retinal is similar to that found in bovine rhodopsin, suggesting homology with the rhodopsins of higher organisms. This is the first demonstration of a rhodopsin photoreceptor in an alga or eukaryotic protist and also the first report of behavioural spectral shifts caused by exogenous synthetic retinals in a eukaryote. A survey of the morphology and action spectra of other protists suggests that rhodopsins may be common photoreceptors of chlorophycean, prasinophycean and dinophycean algae. Thus, Chlamydomonas represents a useful new model for studying photoreceptor cells.

  19. The contractile vacuole as a key regulator of cellular water flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Wöstehoff, Luisa; Becker, Burkhard

    2014-11-01

    Most freshwater flagellates use contractile vacuoles (CVs) to expel excess water. We have used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a green model system to investigate CV function during adaptation to osmotic changes in culture medium. We show that the contractile vacuole in Chlamydomonas is regulated in two different ways. The size of the contractile vacuoles increases during cell growth, with the contraction interval strongly depending on the osmotic strength of the medium. In contrast, there are only small fluctuations in cytosolic osmolarity and plasma membrane permeability. Modeling of the CV membrane permeability indicates that only a small osmotic gradient is necessary for water flux into the CV, which most likely is facilitated by the aquaporin major intrinsic protein 1 (MIP1). We show that MIP1 is localized to the contractile vacuole, and that the expression rate and protein level of MIP1 exhibit only minor fluctuations under different osmotic conditions. In contrast, SEC6, a protein of the exocyst complex that is required for the water expulsion step, and a dynamin-like protein are upregulated under strong hypotonic conditions. The overexpression of a CreMIP1-GFP construct did not change the physiology of the CV. The functional implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25217463

  20. C2 domain protein MIN1 promotes eyespot organization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Berthold, Peter; Danon, Avihai; Lamb, Mary Rose; Levitan, Alexander; Rice, Michael E; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2008-12-01

    Assembly and asymmetric localization of the photosensory eyespot in the biflagellate, unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires coordinated organization of photoreceptors in the plasma membrane and pigment granule/thylakoid membrane layers in the chloroplast. min1 (mini-eyed) mutant cells contain abnormally small, disorganized eyespots in which the chloroplast envelope and plasma membrane are no longer apposed. The MIN1 gene, identified here by phenotypic rescue, encodes a protein with an N-terminal C2 domain and a C-terminal LysM domain separated by a transmembrane sequence. This novel domain architecture led to the hypothesis that MIN1 is in the plasma membrane or the chloroplast envelope, where membrane association of the C2 domain promotes proper eyespot organization. Mutation of conserved C2 domain loop residues disrupted association of the MIN1 C2 domain with the chloroplast envelope in moss cells but did not abolish eyespot assembly in Chlamydomonas. In min1 null cells, channelrhodopsin-1 (ChR1) photoreceptor levels were reduced, indicating a role for MIN1 in ChR1 expression and/or stability. However, ChR1 localization was only minimally disturbed during photoautotrophic growth of min1 cells, conditions under which the pigment granule layers are disorganized. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that neither MIN1 nor proper organization of the plastidic components of the eyespot is essential for localization of ChR1. PMID:18849467

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including “safe harboring” techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  2. Subunit Interactions and Organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Intraflagellar Transport Complex A Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Behal, Robert H.; Miller, Mark S.; Qin, Hongmin; Lucker, Ben F.; Jones, Alexis; Cole, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles can be biochemically resolved into two smaller assemblies, complexes A and B, that contain up to six and 15 protein subunits, respectively. We provide here the proteomic and immunological analyses that verify the identity of all six Chlamydomonas A proteins. Using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and antibody pulldowns, we show that all six A subunits are associated in a 16 S complex in both the cell bodies and flagella. A significant fraction of the cell body IFT43, however, exhibits a much slower sedimentation of ∼2 S and is not associated with the IFT A complex. To identify interactions between the six A proteins, we combined exhaustive yeast-based two-hybrid analysis, heterologous recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli, and analysis of the newly identified complex A mutants, ift121 and ift122. We show that IFT121 and IFT43 interact directly and provide evidence for additional interactions between IFT121 and IFT139, IFT121 and IFT122, IFT140 and IFT122, and IFT140 and IFT144. The mutant analysis further allows us to propose that a subset of complex A proteins, IFT144/140/122, can form a stable 12 S subcomplex that we refer to as the IFT A core. Based on these results, we propose a model for the spatial arrangement of the six IFT A components. PMID:22170070

  3. VMP1-deficient Chlamydomonas exhibits severely aberrant cell morphology and disrupted cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The versatile Vacuole Membrane Protein 1 (VMP1) has been previously investigated in six species. It has been shown to be essential in macroautophagy, where it takes part in autophagy initiation. In addition, VMP1 has been implicated in organellar biogenesis; endo-, exo- and phagocytosis, and protein secretion; apoptosis; and cell adhesion. These roles underly its proven involvement in pancreatitis, diabetes and cancer in humans. Results In this study we analyzed a VMP1 homologue from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. CrVMP1 knockdown lines showed severe phenotypes, mainly affecting cell division as well as the morphology of cells and organelles. We also provide several pieces of evidence for its involvement in macroautophagy. Conclusion Our study adds a novel role to VMP1's repertoire, namely the regulation of cytokinesis. Though the directness of the observed effects and the mechanisms underlying them remain to be defined, the protein's involvement in macroautophagy in Chlamydomonas, as found by us, suggests that CrVMP1 shares molecular characteristics with its animal and protist counterparts. PMID:24885763

  4. Transformation of Chloroplast Ribosomal RNA Genes in Chlamydomonas: Molecular and Genetic Characterization of Integration Events

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S. M.; Boynton, J. E.; Gillham, N. W.; Randolph-Anderson, B. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Harris, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of chloroplast ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in Chlamydomonas has been achieved by the biolistic process using cloned chloroplast DNA fragments carrying mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. The sites of exchange employed during the integration of the donor DNA into the recipient genome have been localized using a combination of antibiotic resistance mutations in the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms that flank these genes. Complete or nearly complete replacement of a region of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cell by the corresponding sequence from the donor plasmid was the most common integration event. Exchange events between the homologous donor and recipient sequences occurred preferentially near the vector:insert junctions. Insertion of the donor rRNA genes and flanking sequences into one inverted repeat of the recipient genome was followed by intramolecular copy correction so that both copies of the inverted repeat acquired identical sequences. Increased frequencies of rRNA gene transformants were achieved by reducing the copy number of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cells and by decreasing the heterology between donor and recipient DNA sequences flanking the selectable markers. In addition to producing bona fide chloroplast rRNA transformants, the biolistic process induced mutants resistant to low levels of streptomycin, typical of nuclear mutations in Chlamydomonas. PMID:1981764

  5. The trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsins into the Chlamydomonas eyespot and flagella is IFT mediated

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mayanka; Ranjan, Peeyush; Sharma, Komal; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial type rhodopsins are present in all the three domains of life. In contrast to the animal type rhodopsin that performs mainly sensory functions in higher eukaryotes, the bacterial type rhodopsin could function as ion channel, pumps and as sensory proteins. The functioning of rhodopsin in higher eukaryotes requires the transport of rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the ciliated outer segment of the photoreceptive cells. However, the trafficking of bacterial type rhodopsin from its site of synthesis to the position of action is not characterized. Here we present the first report for the existence of an IFT-interactome mediated trafficking of the bacterial type rhodopsins into eyespot and flagella of the Chlamydomonas. We show that there is a light-dependent, dynamic localization of rhodopsins between flagella and eyespot of Chlamydomonas. The involvement of IFT components in the rhodopsin trafficking was elucidated by the use of conditional IFT mutants. We found that rhodopsin can be co-immunoprecipitated with the components of IFT machinery and with other protein components required for the IFT-cargo complex formation. These findings show that light-regulated localization of rhodopsin is not restricted to animals thereby suggesting that rhodopsin trafficking is an IFT dependent ancient process. PMID:27694882

  6. Spontaneous Dominant Mutations in Chlamydomonas Highlight Ongoing Evolution by Gene Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Alix; Drapier, Dominique; Razafimanantsoa, Hélène; Wostrikoff, Katia; Tourasse, Nicolas J.; Pascal, Kevin; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Vallon, Olivier; Wollman, Francis-André; Choquet, Yves

    2015-01-01

    We characterized two spontaneous and dominant nuclear mutations in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ncc1 and ncc2 (for nuclear control of chloroplast gene expression), which affect two octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins encoded in a cluster of paralogous genes on chromosome 15. Both mutations cause a single amino acid substitution in one OPR repeat. As a result, the mutated NCC1 and NCC2 proteins now recognize new targets that we identified in the coding sequences of the chloroplast atpA and petA genes, respectively. Interaction of the mutated proteins with these targets leads to transcript degradation; however, in contrast to the ncc1 mutation, the ncc2 mutation requires on-going translation to promote the decay of the petA mRNA. Thus, these mutants reveal a mechanism by which nuclear factors act on chloroplast mRNAs in Chlamydomonas. They illustrate how diversifying selection can allow cells to adapt the nuclear control of organelle gene expression to environmental changes. We discuss these data in the wider context of the evolution of regulation by helical repeat proteins. PMID:25804537

  7. The Contractile Vacuole as a Key Regulator of Cellular Water Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Wöstehoff, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Most freshwater flagellates use contractile vacuoles (CVs) to expel excess water. We have used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a green model system to investigate CV function during adaptation to osmotic changes in culture medium. We show that the contractile vacuole in Chlamydomonas is regulated in two different ways. The size of the contractile vacuoles increases during cell growth, with the contraction interval strongly depending on the osmotic strength of the medium. In contrast, there are only small fluctuations in cytosolic osmolarity and plasma membrane permeability. Modeling of the CV membrane permeability indicates that only a small osmotic gradient is necessary for water flux into the CV, which most likely is facilitated by the aquaporin major intrinsic protein 1 (MIP1). We show that MIP1 is localized to the contractile vacuole, and that the expression rate and protein level of MIP1 exhibit only minor fluctuations under different osmotic conditions. In contrast, SEC6, a protein of the exocyst complex that is required for the water expulsion step, and a dynamin-like protein are upregulated under strong hypotonic conditions. The overexpression of a CreMIP1-GFP construct did not change the physiology of the CV. The functional implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25217463

  8. Experimental Genome-Wide Determination of RNA Polyadenylation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Stephen A.; Shen, Chi; Brown, Alishea; Hunt, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    The polyadenylation of RNA is a near-universal feature of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. This process has been studied in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using low-throughput (gene-by-gene) and high-throughput (transcriptome sequencing) approaches that recovered poly(A)-containing sequence tags which revealed interesting features of this critical process in Chlamydomonas. In this study, RNA polyadenylation has been studied using the so-called Poly(A) Tag Sequencing (PAT-Seq) approach. Specifically, PAT-Seq was used to study poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in four different media types—Tris-Phosphate (TP), Tris-Phosphate-Acetate (TAP), High-Salt (HS), and High-Salt-Acetate (HAS). The results indicate that: 1. As reported before, the motif UGUAA is the primary, and perhaps sole, cis-element that guides mRNA polyadenylation in the nucleus; 2. The scope of alternative polyadenylation events with the potential to change the coding sequences of mRNAs is limited; 3. Changes in poly(A) site choice in cultures grown in the different media types are very few in number and do not affect protein-coding potential; 4. Organellar polyadenylation is considerable and affects primarily ribosomal RNAs in the chloroplast and mitochondria; and 5. Organellar RNA polyadenylation is a dynamic process that is affected by the different media types used for cell growth. PMID:26730730

  9. The small molecule fenpropimorph rapidly converts chloroplast membrane lipids to triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanul; Jang, Sunghoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Hong, Daewoong; Song, Won-Yong; Nishida, Ikuo; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Lee, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Concern about global warming has prompted an intense interest in developing economical methods of producing biofuels. Microalgae provide a promising platform for biofuel production, because they accumulate high levels of lipids, and do not compete with food or feed sources. However, current methods of producing algal oil involve subjecting the microalgae to stress conditions, such as nitrogen deprivation, and are prohibitively expensive. Here, we report that the fungicide fenpropimorph rapidly causes high levels of neutral lipids to accumulate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. When treated with fenpropimorph (10 μg mL-1) for 1 h, Chlamydomonas cells accumulated at least fourfold the amount of triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in the untreated control cells. Furthermore, the quantity of TAGs present after 1 h of fenpropimorph treatment was over twofold higher than that formed after 9 days of nitrogen starvation in medium with no acetate supplement. Biochemical analysis of lipids revealed that the accumulated TAGs were derived mainly from chloroplast polar membrane lipids. Such a conversion of chloroplast polar lipids to TAGs is desirable for biodiesel production, because polar lipids are usually removed during the biodiesel production process. Thus, our data exemplified that a cost and time effective method of producing TAGs is possible using fenpropimorph or similar drugs. PMID:25759683

  10. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including "safe harboring" techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  11. The small molecule fenpropimorph rapidly converts chloroplast membrane lipids to triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanul; Jang, Sunghoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Yamaoka, Yasuyo; Hong, Daewoong; Song, Won-Yong; Nishida, Ikuo; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Lee, Youngsook

    2015-01-01

    Concern about global warming has prompted an intense interest in developing economical methods of producing biofuels. Microalgae provide a promising platform for biofuel production, because they accumulate high levels of lipids, and do not compete with food or feed sources. However, current methods of producing algal oil involve subjecting the microalgae to stress conditions, such as nitrogen deprivation, and are prohibitively expensive. Here, we report that the fungicide fenpropimorph rapidly causes high levels of neutral lipids to accumulate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. When treated with fenpropimorph (10 μg mL(-1)) for 1 h, Chlamydomonas cells accumulated at least fourfold the amount of triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in the untreated control cells. Furthermore, the quantity of TAGs present after 1 h of fenpropimorph treatment was over twofold higher than that formed after 9 days of nitrogen starvation in medium with no acetate supplement. Biochemical analysis of lipids revealed that the accumulated TAGs were derived mainly from chloroplast polar membrane lipids. Such a conversion of chloroplast polar lipids to TAGs is desirable for biodiesel production, because polar lipids are usually removed during the biodiesel production process. Thus, our data exemplified that a cost and time effective method of producing TAGs is possible using fenpropimorph or similar drugs. PMID:25759683

  12. An Indexed, Mapped Mutant Library Enables Reverse Genetics Studies of Biological Processes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Gang, Spencer S; Blum, Sean R; Ivanova, Nina; Yue, Rebecca; Robertson, Jacob M; Lefebvre, Paul A; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T; Grossman, Arthur R; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-02-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a leading unicellular model for dissecting biological processes in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, its usefulness has been limited by difficulties in obtaining mutants in specific genes of interest. To allow generation of large numbers of mapped mutants, we developed high-throughput methods that (1) enable easy maintenance of tens of thousands of Chlamydomonas strains by propagation on agar media and by cryogenic storage, (2) identify mutagenic insertion sites and physical coordinates in these collections, and (3) validate the insertion sites in pools of mutants by obtaining >500 bp of flanking genomic sequences. We used these approaches to construct a stably maintained library of 1935 mapped mutants, representing disruptions in 1562 genes. We further characterized randomly selected mutants and found that 33 out of 44 insertion sites (75%) could be confirmed by PCR, and 17 out of 23 mutants (74%) contained a single insertion. To demonstrate the power of this library for elucidating biological processes, we analyzed the lipid content of mutants disrupted in genes encoding proteins of the algal lipid droplet proteome. This study revealed a central role of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase LCS2 in the production of triacylglycerol from de novo-synthesized fatty acids.

  13. The Chlamydomonas mutant pf27 reveals novel features of ciliary radial spoke assembly

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Lea M.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Hunter, Emily L.; Lin, Huawen; Dutcher, Susan K.; Sale, Winfield S.

    2014-01-01

    To address the mechanisms of ciliary radial spoke assembly, we took advantage of the Chlamydomonas pf27 mutant. The radial spokes that assemble in pf27 are localized to the proximal quarter of the axoneme, but otherwise are fully assembled into 20S radial spoke complexes competent to bind spokeless axonemes in vitro. Thus, pf27 is not defective in radial spoke assembly or docking to the axoneme. Rather, our results suggest that pf27 is defective in the transport of spoke complexes. During ciliary regeneration in pf27, radial spoke assembly occurs asynchronously from other axonemal components. In contrast, during ciliary regeneration in wild-type Chlamydomonas, radial spokes and other axonemal components assemble concurrently as the axoneme grows. Complementation in temporary dikaryons between wild-type and pf27 reveals rescue of radial spoke assembly that begins at the distal tip, allowing further assembly to proceed from tip to base of the axoneme. Notably, rescued assembly of radial spokes occurred independently of the established proximal radial spokes in pf27 axonemes in dikaryons. These results reveal that 20S radial spokes can assemble proximally in the pf27 cilium but as the cilium lengthens, spoke assembly requires transport. We postulate that PF27 encodes an adaptor or modifier protein required for radial spoke – IFT interaction. PMID:24124175

  14. Overexpression of ferredoxin, PETF, enhances tolerance to heat stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsien; Pan, Kui-You; Hung, Ching-Hui; Huang, Hsiang-En; Chen, Ching-Lian; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Li-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by plants in adverse environments can cause damage to organelles and trigger cell death. Removal of excess ROS can be achieved through the ascorbate scavenger pathway to prevent plant cell death. The amount of this scavenger can be regulated by ferredoxin (FDX). Chloroplastic FDXs are electron transfer proteins that perform in distributing photosynthetic reducing power. In this study, we demonstrate that overexpression of the endogenous photosynthetic FDX gene, PETF, in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii could raise the level of reduced ascorbate and diminish H2O2 levels under normal growth conditions. Furthermore, the overexpressing PETF transgenic Chlamydomonas lines produced low levels of H2O2 and exhibited protective effects that were observed through decreased chlorophyll degradation and increased cell survival under heat-stress conditions. The findings of this study suggest that overexpression of PETF can increase the efficiency of ROS scavenging in chloroplasts to confer heat tolerance. The roles of PETF in the downregulation of the ROS level offer a method for potentially improving the tolerance of crops against heat stress. PMID:24141188

  15. Robust expression of heterologous genes by selection marker fusion system in improved Chlamydomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fantao; Yamasaki, Tomohito; Kurniasih, Sari Dewi; Hou, Liyuan; Li, Xiaobo; Ivanova, Nina; Okada, Shigeru; Ohama, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydomonas is a very attractive candidate plant cell factory. However, its main drawback is the difficulty to find the transformants that robustly express heterologous genes randomly inserted in the nuclear genome. We previously showed that domestic squalene synthase (SQS) gene of Chlamydomonas was much more efficiently overexpressed in a mutant strain [UV-mediated mutant (UVM) 4] than in wild type. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of a new mutant strain, met1, which contains a tag in the maintenance type methyltransferase gene that is expected to play a key role in the maintenance of transcriptional gene silencing. The versatile usefulness of the UVM4 strain to express heterologous genes was also analyzed. We failed to overexpress CrSSL3 cDNA, which is the codon-adjusted squalene synthase-like gene originated from Botryococcus braunii, using the common expression cassette in the wild-type CC-1690 and UVM4 strains. However, we succeeded in isolating western blot-positive transformants through the combinational use of the UVM4 strain and ble2A expression system of which expression cassette bears a fused ORF of the target gene and the antibiotic resistance gene ble via the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) self-cleaving 2A sequence. It is noteworthy that even with this system, huge deviations in the accumulated protein levels were still observed among the UVM4 transformants. PMID:25660568

  16. Spontaneous mutations in the ammonium transport gene AMT4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Seo; Feild, Eithne; King, Natalie; Yaoi, Takuro; Kustu, Sydney; Inwood, William

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in several microorganisms indicates that Amt proteins are gas channels for NH(3) and CH(3)NH(2), and this has been confirmed structurally. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has at least four AMT genes, the most reported for a microorganism. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions all AMT genes are transcribed and Chlamydomonas is sensitive to methylammonium toxicity. All 16 spontaneous methylammonium-resistant mutants that we analyzed had defects in accumulation of [(14)C]methylammonium. Genetic crosses indicated that 12 had lesions in a single locus, whereas two each had lesions in other loci. Lesions in different loci were correlated with different degrees of defect in [(14)C]methylammonium uptake. One mutant in the largest class had an insert in the AMT4 gene, and the insert cosegregated with methylammonium resistance in genetic crosses. The other 11 strains in this class also had amt4 lesions, which we characterized at the molecular level. Properties of the amt4 mutants were clearly different from those of rh1 RNAi lines. They indicated that the physiological substrates for Amt and Rh proteins, the only two members of their protein superfamily, are NH(3) and CO(2), respectively. PMID:15802504

  17. Spontaneous Mutations in the Ammonium Transport Gene AMT4 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang-Seo; Feild, Eithne; King, Natalie; Yaoi, Takuro; Kustu, Sydney; Inwood, William

    2005-01-01

    Evidence in several microorganisms indicates that Amt proteins are gas channels for NH3 and CH3NH2, and this has been confirmed structurally. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has at least four AMT genes, the most reported for a microorganism. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions all AMT genes are transcribed and Chlamydomonas is sensitive to methylammonium toxicity. All 16 spontaneous methylammonium-resistant mutants that we analyzed had defects in accumulation of [14C]methylammonium. Genetic crosses indicated that 12 had lesions in a single locus, whereas two each had lesions in other loci. Lesions in different loci were correlated with different degrees of defect in [14C]methylammonium uptake. One mutant in the largest class had an insert in the AMT4 gene, and the insert cosegregated with methylammonium resistance in genetic crosses. The other 11 strains in this class also had amt4 lesions, which we characterized at the molecular level. Properties of the amt4 mutants were clearly different from those of rh1 RNAi lines. They indicated that the physiological substrates for Amt and Rh proteins, the only two members of their protein superfamily, are NH3 and CO2, respectively. PMID:15802504

  18. The contractile vacuole as a key regulator of cellular water flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Wöstehoff, Luisa; Becker, Burkhard

    2014-11-01

    Most freshwater flagellates use contractile vacuoles (CVs) to expel excess water. We have used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a green model system to investigate CV function during adaptation to osmotic changes in culture medium. We show that the contractile vacuole in Chlamydomonas is regulated in two different ways. The size of the contractile vacuoles increases during cell growth, with the contraction interval strongly depending on the osmotic strength of the medium. In contrast, there are only small fluctuations in cytosolic osmolarity and plasma membrane permeability. Modeling of the CV membrane permeability indicates that only a small osmotic gradient is necessary for water flux into the CV, which most likely is facilitated by the aquaporin major intrinsic protein 1 (MIP1). We show that MIP1 is localized to the contractile vacuole, and that the expression rate and protein level of MIP1 exhibit only minor fluctuations under different osmotic conditions. In contrast, SEC6, a protein of the exocyst complex that is required for the water expulsion step, and a dynamin-like protein are upregulated under strong hypotonic conditions. The overexpression of a CreMIP1-GFP construct did not change the physiology of the CV. The functional implications of these results are discussed.

  19. Function of the Chloroplast Hydrogenase in the Microalga Chlamydomonas: The Role of Hydrogenase and State Transitions during Photosynthetic Activation in Anaerobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghysels, Bart; Godaux, Damien; Matagne, René F.; Cardol, Pierre; Franck, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Like a majority of photosynthetic microorganisms, the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may encounter O2 deprived conditions on a regular basis. In response to anaerobiosis or in a respiration defective context, the photosynthetic electron transport chain of Chlamydomonas is remodeled by a state transition process to a conformation that favours the photoproduction of ATP at the expense of reductant synthesis. In some unicellular green algae including Chlamydomonas, anoxia also triggers the induction of a chloroplast-located, oxygen sensitive hydrogenase, which accepts electrons from reduced ferredoxin to convert protons into molecular hydrogen. Although microalgal hydrogen evolution has received much interest for its biotechnological potential, its physiological role remains unclear. By using specific Chlamydomonas mutants, we demonstrate that the state transition ability and the hydrogenase function are both critical for induction of photosynthesis in anoxia. These two processes are thus important for survival of the cells when they are transiently placed in an anaerobic environment. PMID:23717558

  20. PCR analysis of chloroplast double-strand break (DSB) repair products induced by I-CreII in Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taegun; Odom, Obed W; Qiu, Weihua; Herrin, David L

    2014-01-01

    Homing endonuclease I-CreII has been used to study the consequences and repair of a double-strand break (DSB) in the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis. Since I-CreII is from a mobile psbA intron of Chlamydomonas, it cleaves the psbA gene of an intronless-psbA strain of Chlamydomonas. And it cleaves specifically in the psbA gene of Arabidopsis, which is naturally intronless. We have shown further that most of the repair products of an I-CreII-induced break in chloroplast DNA can be defined by PCR analysis with total nucleic acids and the appropriate primers. Here, we provide protocols for small-scale preparation of nucleic acids from Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis, as well as guidelines for the subsequent PCR analysis.

  1. Function of the chloroplast hydrogenase in the microalga Chlamydomonas: the role of hydrogenase and state transitions during photosynthetic activation in anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Ghysels, Bart; Godaux, Damien; Matagne, René F; Cardol, Pierre; Franck, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    Like a majority of photosynthetic microorganisms, the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may encounter O2 deprived conditions on a regular basis. In response to anaerobiosis or in a respiration defective context, the photosynthetic electron transport chain of Chlamydomonas is remodeled by a state transition process to a conformation that favours the photoproduction of ATP at the expense of reductant synthesis. In some unicellular green algae including Chlamydomonas, anoxia also triggers the induction of a chloroplast-located, oxygen sensitive hydrogenase, which accepts electrons from reduced ferredoxin to convert protons into molecular hydrogen. Although microalgal hydrogen evolution has received much interest for its biotechnological potential, its physiological role remains unclear. By using specific Chlamydomonas mutants, we demonstrate that the state transition ability and the hydrogenase function are both critical for induction of photosynthesis in anoxia. These two processes are thus important for survival of the cells when they are transiently placed in an anaerobic environment. PMID:23717558

  2. Dispensability of a sulfolipid for photoautotrophic cell growth and photosynthesis in a marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Kamimura, Ryohei; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2016-09-01

    Sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, which mainly comprises thylakoid membranes in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, plays species-dependent roles in freshwater microbes. In this study, a sulfoquinovosyl-diacylglycerol deficient mutant was generated in a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, for the first time among marine microbes to gain more insight into its physiological significance. The mutation had little deleterious impact on photoautotrophic cell growth, and functional and structural properties of the photosystem II complex. These findings were similar to previous observations for a freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, but were distinct from those for another freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both of which require sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol for cell growth and/or photosystem II. Therefore, the functionality of PSII to dispense with sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, similar to that in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, seemed to have been excluded from the evolution of the PSII complex from cyanobacteria to green algal chloroplasts. Meanwhile, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol was found to contribute to photoheterotrophic growth of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, which revealed a novel species-dependent strategy for utilizing SQDG in physiological processes. PMID:27372425

  3. Comparison of denitrification between Paracoccus sp. and Diaphorobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Srinandan S; Pande, Samay; Kapoor, Ashish; Nerurkar, Anuradha S

    2011-09-01

    Denitrification was compared between Paracoccus sp. and Diaphorobacter sp. in this study, both of which were isolated from activated sludge of a denitrifying reactor. Denitrification of both isolates showed contrasting patterns, where Diaphorobacter sp. showed accumulation of nitrite in the medium while Paracoccus sp. showed no accumulation. The nitrate reduction rate was 1.5 times more than the nitrite reduction in Diaphorobacter sp., as analyzed by the resting state denitrification kinetics. Increasing the nitrate concentration in the medium increased the nitrite accumulation in Diaphorobacter sp., but not in Paracoccus sp., indicating a branched electron transfer during denitrification. Diaphorobacter sp. was unable to denitrify efficiently at high nitrate concentrations from 1 M, but Paracoccus sp. could denitrify even up to 2 M nitrate. Paracoccus sp. was found to be an efficient denitrifier with insignificant amounts of nitrite accumulation, and it could also denitrify high amounts of nitrate up to 2 M. Efficient denitrification without accumulation of intermediates like nitrite is desirable in the removal of high nitrates from wastewaters. Paracoccus sp. is shown to suffice this demand and could be a potential organism to remove high nitrates effectively. PMID:21509603

  4. SP-100 surety evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    This report describes surety evaluations conducted during GFY 1985 in support of the General Electric design for a Space Nuclear Power System - SP-100. Those surety evaluations address both safety and safeguards requirements, which are derived from OSNP-1 and supporting documents. The report includes results of neutronics (criticality) calculations performed by Los Alamos. The results have been benchmarked against independent calculations performed by General Electric with different codes. These comparisons show close agreement, and are summarized. Los Alamos has also provided specifications of explosion and fire environments, which have been used in evaluation of the GE SP-100 concept. Following the summary of key results, surety requirements are given and recommendations toward specification of requirements for later SP-100 project phases are presented. A conceptual design summary is presented. To establish a comprehensive background for surety evaluations, a reference mission profile and potential accidents for each phase of the mission are identified. The main body of the report addresses surety of the General Electric Thermoelectric Conversion design. GE has also developed a Stirling Engine concept, and performed comprehensive surety evaluations for it. These evaluations are reported.

  5. [Aspergillus insulicola Sp. Nov].

    PubMed

    de Montemayor, L; Santiago, A R

    1975-04-30

    A strain of Aspergillus sp. is described and proposed as a new species under the name "Aspergillus insulicola sp. nov." Montemayor & Santiago, 1973. This strain was isolated from soil samples taken in "Aves Island" during a scientific expedition.--Aves Island, situated at 15 degrees, 40 feet, 42 inches N and 63 degrees, 36 feet, 47 inches W, about 665 Km of the coast of Venezuela, has very special ecological conditions. Due to its smallness: 550 m long and 40 to 120 m across and to its low profile only 3 m over sea level, it is swept by the sea during the periodical storms and hurricanes in the area. It has thus a very interesting fauna and flora. We took a series of soil samples to study its mycological flora. Forty samples were inoculated by dilution method. In this first paper a species is described and proposed as a new species because of its macroscopic and microscopic characteristics, as well as by its biological properties, under the name "Aspergillus insulicola sp. nov.". In its study we have tried to follow as closely as possible the methods recommended by Kennet B. Raper & Dorothy Fenell, world authorities on the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. The strain is being kept in USB under the number T1, and has been sent to ATCC & CBSC to be incorporated in their collections.

  6. Experimental evolution of an alternating uni- and multicellular life cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Herron, Matthew D.; Howell, Kathryn; Pentz, Jennifer T.; Rosenzweig, Frank; Travisano, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity enabled the evolution of large, complex organisms, but early steps in this transition remain poorly understood. Here we show that multicellular complexity, including development from a single cell, can evolve rapidly in a unicellular organism that has never had a multicellular ancestor. We subject the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to conditions that favour multicellularity, resulting in the evolution of a multicellular life cycle in which clusters reproduce via motile unicellular propagules. While a single-cell genetic bottleneck during ontogeny is widely regarded as an adaptation to limit among-cell conflict, its appearance very early in this transition suggests that it did not evolve for this purpose. Instead, we find that unicellular propagules are adaptive even in the absence of intercellular conflict, maximizing cluster-level fecundity. These results demonstrate that the unicellular bottleneck, a trait essential for evolving multicellular complexity, can arise rapidly via co-option of the ancestral unicellular form. PMID:24193369

  7. [LIGHT-DEPENDENT SYNTHESIS OF CELL MEMBRANES IN THE Brc-1 MUTANT OF CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII].

    PubMed

    Semenova, G A; Chekunova, E M; Ladygin, V G

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of cells of the Brc-1 mutant of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in the light and in the dark has been studied. The Brc-1 mutant contains the brc-1 mutation in the nucleus gene LTS3. In the light, all membrane structures in mutant cells form normally and are well developed. In the dark under heterotrophic conditions, the mutant cells grew and divided well, however, all its cell membranes: plasmalemma, tonoplast, mitochondrial membranes, membranes of the nucleus shell and chloroplast, thylakoids, and the membranes of dictiosomes of the Golgi apparatus were not detected. In the dark under heterotrophic conditions, mutant cells well grow and divide. It were shown that a short-term (1-10 min) exposure of Brc-1 mutant cells to light leads to the restoration of all above-mentioned membrane structures. Possible reasons for the alterations of membrane structures are discussed.

  8. Isolation and genetic analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains resistant to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Collard, J M; Matagne, R F

    1990-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, cadmium induces reduction of growth, reduction of chlorophyll content, and lethality. The toxicity was higher in a cell wall-deficient strain than in the wild type. By growing the cells on agar medium containing cadmium at concentrations inducing high lethality, stable resistant clones were isolated. The resistance was due to a nuclear mutation (cadAR) which probably preexisted in the wild-type cell population, as suggested by the fluctuation test. A double mutant (cadAR cadBR) was selected on media containing higher concentrations of cadmium. The cadBR mutation, which is unlinked to cadAR, determines a resistance intermediate between the CadAR mutant and the wild-type strain. Both cadAR and cadBR mutations are partially dominant. PMID:2389932

  9. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are model systems for studying how mechanical forces control morphology. The periodic bending motion of cilia and flagella is thought to arise from mechanical feedback: dynein motors generate sliding forces that bend the flagellum, and bending leads to deformations and stresses, which feed back and regulate the motors. Three alternative feedback mechanisms have been proposed: regulation by the sliding forces, regulation by the curvature of the flagellum, and regulation by the normal forces that deform the cross-section of the flagellum. In this work, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to show that the curvature control mechanism is the one that accords best with the bending waveforms of Chlamydomonas flagella. We make the surprising prediction that the motors respond to the time derivative of curvature, rather than curvature itself, hinting at an adaptation mechanism controlling the flagellar beat. PMID:27166516

  10. Rubisco small-subunit α-helices control pyrenoid formation in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Moritz T; Genkov, Todor; Skepper, Jeremy N; Jouhet, Juliette; Mitchell, Madeline C; Spreitzer, Robert J; Griffiths, Howard

    2012-11-20

    The pyrenoid is a subcellular microcompartment in which algae sequester the primary carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The pyrenoid is associated with a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which improves the operating efficiency of carbon assimilation and overcomes diffusive limitations in aquatic photosynthesis. Using the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we show that pyrenoid formation, Rubisco aggregation, and CCM activity relate to discrete regions of the Rubisco small subunit (SSU). Specifically, pyrenoid occurrence was shown to be conditioned by the amino acid composition of two surface-exposed α-helices of the SSU: higher plant-like helices knock out the pyrenoid, whereas native algal helices establish a pyrenoid. We have also established that pyrenoid integrity was essential for the operation of an active CCM. With the algal CCM being functionally analogous to the terrestrial C(4) pathway in higher plants, such insights may offer a route toward transforming algal and higher plant productivity for the future.

  11. A chloroplast pathway for the de novo biosynthesis of triacylglycerol in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.; Andre, C.

    2011-06-23

    Neutral lipid metabolism has been extensively studied in yeast, plants and mammals. In contrast, little information is available regarding the biochemical pathway, enzymes and regulatory factors involved in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) in microalgae. In the conventional TAG biosynthetic pathway widely accepted for yeast, plants and mammals, TAG is assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from its immediate precursor diacylglycerol (DAG) made by ER-specific acyltransferases, and is deposited exclusively in lipid droplets in the cytosol. Here, we demonstrated that the unicellular microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii employs a distinct pathway that uses DAG derived almost exclusively from the chloroplast to produce TAG. This unique TAG biosynthesis pathway is largely dependent on de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the TAG formed in this pathway is stored in lipid droplets in both the chloroplast and the cytosol. These findings have wide implications for understanding TAG biosynthesis and storage and other areas of lipid metabolism in microalgae and other organisms.

  12. Membrane-associated polypeptides induced in Chlamydomonas by limiting CO sub 2 concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, M.H.; Jeffrey, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and other unicellular green algae have a high apparent affinity for CO{sub 2}, little O{sub 2} inhibition of photosynthesis, and reduced photorespiration. These characteristics result from operation of a CO{sub 2}-concentrating system. The CO{sub 2}-concentrating system involves active inorganic carbon transport and is under environmental control. Cells grown at limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations have inorganic carbon transport activity, but cells grown at 5% CO{sub 2} do not. Four membrane-associated polypeptides (M{sub r}, 19, 21, 35, and 36 kilodaltons) have been identified which either appear or increase in abundance during adaptation to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The appearance of two of the polypeptides occurs over roughly the same time course as the appearance of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system activity in response to CO{sub 2} limitation.

  13. Growth of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under red and blue lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Sara S.; Cuello, Joel L.; Myhre, Graham; Pau, Stanley

    2011-03-01

    Red and blue lasers, holding promise as an electric light source for photosynthetic systems on account of being true monochromatic, high-power, and having high electrical-conversion efficiency, were employed in growing a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The laser treatments tested included: 655-nm Red; 680-nm Red; 655-nm Red+474-nm Blue and 680-nm Red+474-nm Blue. A white cold cathode lamp with spectral output similar to that of white fluorescent lamp served as control. C. reinhardtii successfully grew and divided under the 655 and 680-nm red lasers as well as under the white-light control. Supplementing either red with blue laser, however, resulted in increased algae cell count that significantly exceeded those under both red lasers and the white-light control on average by 241%.

  14. Chlamydomonas cryopreparation methods for the 3-D analysis of cellular organelles.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Eileen T

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a popular model organism in modern cell biology. Historically, methods for preparing this cell for transmission electron microscopy have used conventional chemical fixation that can result in artifacts that affect the 3-D organization of the cell. We have developed improved methods of specimen preparation that involve high-pressure freezing followed by freeze-substitution that are particularly well suited for 3-D studies (O'Toole et al., 2003, 2007). In this chapter, we describe the details of our cryopreparation methods for the optimal preservation of whole cells for immunocytochemistry and electron tomography. Examples are presented that show the utility of this approach for studying the 3-D architecture of membrane systems and cytoskeletal arrays in intact cells.

  15. The chloroplast proteome: a survey from the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii perspective with a focus on distinctive features.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Hippler, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged to be an important model organism for the study of oxygenic eukaryotic photosynthesis as well as other processes occurring in the chloroplast. However, the chloroplast proteome in C. reinhardtii has only recently been comprehensively characterized, made possible by proteomics emerging as an accessible and powerful tool over the last decade. In this review, we introduce a compiled list of 996 experimentally chloroplast-localized proteins for C. reinhardtii, stemming largely from our previous proteomic dataset comparing chloroplasts and mitochondria samples to localize proteins. In order to get a taste of some cellular functions taking place in the C. reinhardtii chloroplast, we will focus this review particularly on metabolic differences between chloroplasts of C. reinhardtii and higher plants. Areas that will be covered are photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, fermentative metabolism, ferredoxins and ferredoxin-interacting proteins.

  16. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Kage, Azusa; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-19

    Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume.

  17. Successful expression of heterologous egfp gene in the mitochondria of a photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhangli; Zhao, Zhonglin; Wu, Zhihua; Fan, Zhun; Chen, Jun; Wu, Jinxia; Li, Jiancheng

    2011-09-01

    The efficient expression of exogenous gene in mitochondria of photosynthetic organism has been an insurmountable problem. In this study, the pBsLPNCG was constructed by inserting the egfp gene into a site between TERMINVREP-Left repeats and the cob gene in a fragment of mitochondrial DNA of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-124 and introduced into the mitochondria of respiratory deficient dum-1 mutation of C. reinhardtii CC-2654. Sequencing and DNA Southern analyses revealed that egfp gene had been integrated into the mitochondrial genome of transgenic algae as expected and no other copy of egfp existed in their nucleic genome. Both the fluorescence detection and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of eGFP protein in the transgenic algae; it indicated that the egfp gene was successfully expressed in the mitochondria of C. reinhardtii. PMID:21664493

  18. Chlamydomonas alpha-tubulin is posttranslationally modified in the flagella during flagellar assembly

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The principal alpha-tubulin within Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar axonemes differs from the major alpha-tubulin in the cell body. We show that these two isoelectric variants of alpha-tubulin are related to one another since posttranslational modification of the cell body precursor form converts it to the axonemal form. During flagellar assembly, precursor alpha-tubulin enters the flagella and is posttranslationally modified within the flagellar matrix fraction prior to or at the time of its addition to the growing axonemal microtubules. Experiments designed to identify the nature of this posttranslational modification have also been conducted. When flagella are induced to assemble in the absence of de novo protein synthesis, tritiated acetate can be used to posttranslationally label alpha-tubulin in vivo and, under these conditions, no other flagellar polypeptides exhibit detectable labeling. PMID:6863393

  19. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGES

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient tomore » confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.« less

  20. Comparative structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella and cilia from Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Maheshwari, Aditi; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shingyoji, Chikako; Kamimura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Although eukaryotic flagella and cilia all share the basic 9+2 microtubule-organization of their internal axonemes, and are capable of generating bending-motion, the waveforms, amplitudes, and velocities of the bending-motions are quite diverse. To explore the structural basis of this functional diversity of flagella and cilia, we here compare the axonemal structure of three different organisms with widely divergent bending-motions by electron cryo-tomography. We reconstruct the 3D structure of the axoneme of Tetrahymena cilia, and compare it with the axoneme of the flagellum of sea urchin sperm, as well as with the axoneme of Chlamydomonas flagella, which we analyzed previously. This comparative structural analysis defines the diversity of molecular architectures in these organisms, and forms the basis for future correlation with their different bending-motions. PMID:22406282

  1. Recombinant Reconstitution and Purification of the IFT-B Core Complex from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Lorentzen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are assembled and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional transport of proteins between the ciliary base and tip. IFT is mediated by the multi-subunit IFT complex, which simultaneously binds cargo proteins and the ciliary motors. So far 22 subunits of the IFT complex have been identified, but insights into the biochemical architecture and especially the three-dimensional structure of this machinery are only starting to emerge because of difficulties in obtaining homogeneous material suitable for structural analysis. Here, we describe a protocol for the purification and reconstitution of a complex containing nine Chlamydomonas reinhardtii IFT proteins, commonly known as the IFT-B core complex. In our hands, this protocol routinely yields several milligrams of pure complex suitable for structural analysis by X-ray crystallography and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:27514916

  2. Critical role of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ferredoxin-5 in maintaining membrane structure and dark metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenqiang; Wittkopp, Tyler M; Li, Xiaobo; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Dubini, Alexandra; Catalanotti, Claudia; Kim, Rick G; Nowack, Eva C M; Mackinder, Luke C M; Aksoy, Munevver; Page, Mark Dudley; D'Adamo, Sarah; Saroussi, Shai; Heinnickel, Mark; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Boehm, Marko; Jonikas, Martin C; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Posewitz, Matthew C; Grossman, Arthur R

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms typically have multiple isoforms of the electron transfer protein ferredoxin, although we know little about their exact functions. Surprisingly, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant null for the ferredoxin-5 gene (FDX5) completely ceased growth in the dark, with both photosynthetic and respiratory functions severely compromised; growth in the light was unaffected. Thylakoid membranes in dark-maintained fdx5 mutant cells became severely disorganized concomitant with a marked decrease in the ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol to digalactosyldiacylglycerol, major lipids in photosynthetic membranes, and the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Furthermore, FDX5 was shown to physically interact with the fatty acid desaturases CrΔ4FAD and CrFAD6, likely donating electrons for the desaturation of fatty acids that stabilize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Our results suggest that in photosynthetic organisms, specific redox reactions sustain dark metabolism, with little impact on daytime growth, likely reflecting the tailoring of electron carriers to unique intracellular metabolic circuits under these two very distinct redox conditions. PMID:26627249

  3. Chlamydomonas swims with two "gears" in a eukaryotic version of run-and-tumble locomotion.

    PubMed

    Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan; Drescher, Knut; Gollub, J P; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2009-07-24

    The coordination of eukaryotic flagella is essential for many of the most basic processes of life (motility, sensing, and development), yet its emergence and regulation and its connection to locomotion are poorly understood. Previous studies show that the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas, widely regarded as an ideal system in which to study flagellar biology, swims forward by the synchronous action of its two flagella. Using high-speed imaging over long intervals, we found a richer behavior: A cell swimming in the dark stochastically switches between synchronous and asynchronous flagellar beating. Three-dimensional tracking shows that these regimes lead, respectively, to nearly straight swimming and to abrupt large reorientations, which yield a eukaryotic version of the "run-and-tumble" motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria.

  4. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Kage, Azusa; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume. PMID:26787679

  5. Quantification of phytochelatins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using ferrocene-based derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Anja; Bomke, Susanne; Pfeifer, Thorben; Karst, Uwe; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Wesenberg, Dirk

    2010-08-01

    A method for the identification and quantification of canonic and isoforms of phytochelatins (PCs) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was developed. After disulfide reduction with tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) PCs were derivatized with ferrocenecarboxylic acid (2-maleimidoyl)ethylamide (FMEA) in order to avoid oxidation of the free thiol functions during analysis. Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for rapid and quantitative analysis of the precolumn derivatized PCs. PC(2-4), CysGSH, CysPC(2-4), CysPC(2)desGly, CysPC(2)Glu and CysPC(2)Ala were determined in the algal samples depending on the exposure of the cells to cadmium ions. PMID:21072341

  6. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Pablo; Geyer, Veikko F; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are model systems for studying how mechanical forces control morphology. The periodic bending motion of cilia and flagella is thought to arise from mechanical feedback: dynein motors generate sliding forces that bend the flagellum, and bending leads to deformations and stresses, which feed back and regulate the motors. Three alternative feedback mechanisms have been proposed: regulation by the sliding forces, regulation by the curvature of the flagellum, and regulation by the normal forces that deform the cross-section of the flagellum. In this work, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to show that the curvature control mechanism is the one that accords best with the bending waveforms of Chlamydomonas flagella. We make the surprising prediction that the motors respond to the time derivative of curvature, rather than curvature itself, hinting at an adaptation mechanism controlling the flagellar beat. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13258.001 PMID:27166516

  7. Effects of a cationic PAMAM dendrimer on photosynthesis and ROS production of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Petit, Anne-Noëlle; Debenest, Timothée; Eullaffroy, Philippe; Gagné, François

    2012-05-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers hold great promises for biomedicine. This study sought to examine the toxicity of generation 4 (G4) cationic PAMAM dendrimer to the green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, using physiological and molecular biomarkers. Results revealed that the G4 dendrimer at 15 and 25 nM stimulated the photosynthetic process and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in algae. However, the over-production of ROS did not induce the expression of antioxidant enzyme genes, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, genes encoding light-harvesting proteins (lhca and lhcb), a ferredoxin (fdx) and an oxygen-evolving enhancer protein (psb) involved in photosynthesis were repressed after treatment. Nevertheless, the expression of the lhcbm9 gene, encoding a major light harvesting polypeptide, was increased. These results suggest that the strong modulation of photosynthesis induced by the dendrimer could lead to elevated ROS levels in microalgae.

  8. Transfer RNA maturation in Chlamydomonas mitochondria, chloroplast and the nucleus by a single RNase P protein.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Géraldine; Gobert, Anthony; Arrivé, Mathilde; Pinker, Franziska; Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The maturation of tRNA precursors involves the 5' cleavage of leader sequences by an essential endonuclease called RNase P. Beyond the ancestral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) RNase P, a second type of RNase P called PRORP (protein-only RNase P) evolved in eukaryotes. The current view on the distribution of RNase P in cells is that multiple RNPs, multiple PRORPs or a combination of both, perform specialised RNase P activities in the different compartments where gene expression occurs. Here, we identify a single gene encoding PRORP in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii while no RNP is found. We show that its product, CrPRORP, is triple-localised to mitochondria, the chloroplast and the nucleus. Its downregulation results in impaired tRNA biogenesis in both organelles and the nucleus. CrPRORP, as a single-subunit RNase P for an entire organism, makes up the most compact and versatile RNase P machinery described in either prokaryotes or eukaryotes.

  9. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  10. [LIGHT-DEPENDENT SYNTHESIS OF CELL MEMBRANES IN THE Brc-1 MUTANT OF CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII].

    PubMed

    Semenova, G A; Chekunova, E M; Ladygin, V G

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of cells of the Brc-1 mutant of the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in the light and in the dark has been studied. The Brc-1 mutant contains the brc-1 mutation in the nucleus gene LTS3. In the light, all membrane structures in mutant cells form normally and are well developed. In the dark under heterotrophic conditions, the mutant cells grew and divided well, however, all its cell membranes: plasmalemma, tonoplast, mitochondrial membranes, membranes of the nucleus shell and chloroplast, thylakoids, and the membranes of dictiosomes of the Golgi apparatus were not detected. In the dark under heterotrophic conditions, mutant cells well grow and divide. It were shown that a short-term (1-10 min) exposure of Brc-1 mutant cells to light leads to the restoration of all above-mentioned membrane structures. Possible reasons for the alterations of membrane structures are discussed. PMID:26281212

  11. Comparative structural analysis of eukaryotic flagella and cilia from Chlamydomonas, Tetrahymena, and sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Pigino, Gaia; Maheshwari, Aditi; Bui, Khanh Huy; Shingyoji, Chikako; Kamimura, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Although eukaryotic flagella and cilia all share the basic 9+2 microtubule-organization of their internal axonemes, and are capable of generating bending-motion, the waveforms, amplitudes, and velocities of the bending-motions are quite diverse. To explore the structural basis of this functional diversity of flagella and cilia, we here compare the axonemal structure of three different organisms with widely divergent bending-motions by electron cryo-tomography. We reconstruct the 3D structure of the axoneme of Tetrahymena cilia, and compare it with the axoneme of the flagellum of sea urchin sperm, as well as with the axoneme of Chlamydomonas flagella, which we analyzed previously. This comparative structural analysis defines the diversity of molecular architectures in these organisms, and forms the basis for future correlation with their different bending-motions.

  12. Purification, properties and complete amino acid sequence of the ferredoxin from a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, J M; Jacquot, J P; de Lamotte-Guéry, F; Beauvallet, C; Dutka, S; Gadal, P; Decottignies, P

    1988-03-01

    The ferredoxin was purified from the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The protein showed typical absorption and circular dichroism spectra of a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin. When compared with spinach ferredoxin, the C. reinhardtii protein was less effective in the catalysis of NADP+ photoreduction, but its activity was higher in the light activation of C. reinhardtii malate dehydrogenase (NADP). The complete amino acid sequence was determined by automated Edman degradation of the whole protein and of peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestions and by CNBr cleavage. The protein consists of 94 residues, with Tyr at both NH2 and COOH termini. The positions of the four cysteines binding the two iron atoms are similar to those found in other [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The primary structure of C. reinhardtii ferredoxin showed a great homology (about 80%) with ferredoxins from two other green algae.

  13. Inhomogeneous distribution of Chlamydomonas in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Numayama-Tsuruta, Keiko; Kage, Azusa; Ueno, Hironori; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Swimming microalgae show various taxes, such as phototaxis and gravitaxis, which sometimes result in the formation of a cell-rich layer or a patch in a suspension. Despite intensive studies on the effects of shear flow and turbulence on the inhomogeneous distribution of microalgae, the effect of a bubble plume has remained unclear. In this study, we used Chlamydomonas as model microalgae, and investigated the spatial distribution of cells in a cylindrical container with a bubble plume. The results illustrate that cells become inhomogeneously distributed in the suspension due to their motility and photo-responses. A vortical ring distribution was observed below the free surface when the bubble flow rate was sufficiently small. We performed a scaling analysis on the length scale of the vortical ring, which captured the main features of the experimental results. These findings are important in understanding transport phenomena in a microalgae suspension with a bubble plume. PMID:26787679

  14. Quantification of phytochelatins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using ferrocene-based derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Anja; Bomke, Susanne; Pfeifer, Thorben; Karst, Uwe; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Wesenberg, Dirk

    2010-08-01

    A method for the identification and quantification of canonic and isoforms of phytochelatins (PCs) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was developed. After disulfide reduction with tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) PCs were derivatized with ferrocenecarboxylic acid (2-maleimidoyl)ethylamide (FMEA) in order to avoid oxidation of the free thiol functions during analysis. Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for rapid and quantitative analysis of the precolumn derivatized PCs. PC(2-4), CysGSH, CysPC(2-4), CysPC(2)desGly, CysPC(2)Glu and CysPC(2)Ala were determined in the algal samples depending on the exposure of the cells to cadmium ions.

  15. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells adjust the metabolism to maintain viability in response to atrazine stress.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Seoane, Marta; Rioboo, Carmen; Herrero, Concepción; Cid, Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were exposed to a sublethal concentration of the widespread herbicide atrazine for 3 and 24h. Physiological parameters related to cellular energy status, such as cellular activity and mitochondrial and cytoplasmic membrane potentials, monitored by flow cytometry, were altered in microalgal cells exposed to 0.25μM of atrazine. Transcriptomic analyses, carried out by RNA-Seq technique, displayed 12 differentially expressed genes between control cultures and atrazine-exposed cultures at both tested times. Many cellular processes were affected, but the most significant changes were observed in genes implicated in amino acid catabolism and respiratory cellular process. Obtained results suggest that photosynthesis inhibition by atrazine leads cells to get energy through a heterotrophic metabolism to maintain their viability.

  16. Lack of mutagenic activity of crude and refined oils in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermeulen, J.H.; Lee, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Over the past several years, an increasing number of studies have presented evidence for the mutagenicity and/or carcinogenic potential of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons. These most usually were obtained with individual hydrocarbons, and using either specialized bacterial strains (e.g. Ames' strains) or mammalian tissue preparations. While providing important insights into mutagenic mechanisms involving xenobiotic compounds, the relevance of these studies to the natural aquatic environment is not always evident. This applies especially to the mutagenic potential of water-soluble fractions of hydrocarbon mixtures, as in whole oils or in complex distillate fractions, and involving typical marine biota. Accordingly, the authors have examined the mutagenic potential of the water-soluble fractions of four oils (two crude oils and two refined oils) using the unicellular haploid alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  17. Critical role of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ferredoxin-5 in maintaining membrane structure and dark metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Warakanont, Jaruswan; Dubini, Alexandra; Catalanotti, Claudia; Kim, Rick G.; Nowack, Eva C. M.; Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Aksoy, Munevver; Page, Mark Dudley; D’Adamo, Sarah; Saroussi, Shai; Heinnickel, Mark; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Boehm, Marko; Jonikas, Martin C.; Benning, Christoph; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms typically have multiple isoforms of the electron transfer protein ferredoxin, although we know little about their exact functions. Surprisingly, a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant null for the ferredoxin-5 gene (FDX5) completely ceased growth in the dark, with both photosynthetic and respiratory functions severely compromised; growth in the light was unaffected. Thylakoid membranes in dark-maintained fdx5 mutant cells became severely disorganized concomitant with a marked decrease in the ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol to digalactosyldiacylglycerol, major lipids in photosynthetic membranes, and the accumulation of triacylglycerol. Furthermore, FDX5 was shown to physically interact with the fatty acid desaturases CrΔ4FAD and CrFAD6, likely donating electrons for the desaturation of fatty acids that stabilize monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Our results suggest that in photosynthetic organisms, specific redox reactions sustain dark metabolism, with little impact on daytime growth, likely reflecting the tailoring of electron carriers to unique intracellular metabolic circuits under these two very distinct redox conditions. PMID:26627249

  18. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity. PMID:27466170

  19. Structural Insight into the Complex of Ferredoxin and [FeFe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Rumpel, Sigrun; Siebel, Judith F; Diallo, Mamou; Farès, Christophe; Reijerse, Edward J; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-07-27

    The transfer of photosynthetic electrons by the ferredoxin PetF to the [FeFe] hydrogenase HydA1 in the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key step in hydrogen production. Electron delivery requires a specific interaction between PetF and HydA1. However, because of the transient nature of the electron-transfer complex, a crystal structure remains elusive. Therefore, we performed protein-protein docking based on new experimental data from a solution NMR spectroscopy investigation of native and gallium-substituted PetF. This provides valuable information about residues crucial for complex formation and electron transfer. The derived complex model might help to pinpoint residue substitution targets for improved hydrogen production. PMID:26010059

  20. An ISFET-algal (Chlamydomonas) hybrid provides a system for eco-toxicological tests.

    PubMed

    Schubnell, D; Lehmann, M; Baumann, W; Rott, F G; Wolf, B; Beck, C F

    1999-05-31

    A cellular sensoring system was designed in which metabolism-dedicated pH-ISFETs and the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a biological component, were combined. The system permits on-line detection of pH changes caused by the metabolic and photosynthetic activities of the cells. Photosynthetic activity results in a basification of the medium caused by uptake of CO2. In darkness, an acidification of the medium, resulting from the production of CO2 by degradation of starch was observed. Both, acidification and basification, are sensitive indicators for the physiological activity of the alga. Experiments using inhibitors of energy metabolism or photosynthesis illustrate the utility of this system for an on-line monitoring of substances of eco-toxicological importance. PMID:10451914

  1. Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics study of the association between hydrogenase and ferredoxin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Chang, Christopher H; King, Paul W; Ghirardi, Maria L; Kim, Kwiseon

    2008-10-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can catalyze the reduction of protons to hydrogen gas using electrons supplied from photosystem I and transferred via ferredoxin. To better understand the association of the hydrogenase and the ferredoxin, we have simulated the process over multiple timescales. A Brownian dynamics simulation method gave an initial thorough sampling of the rigid-body translational and rotational phase spaces, and the resulting trajectories were used to compute the occupancy and free-energy landscapes. Several important hydrogenase-ferredoxin encounter complexes were identified from this analysis, which were then individually simulated using atomistic molecular dynamics to provide more details of the hydrogenase and ferredoxin interaction. The ferredoxin appeared to form reasonable complexes with the hydrogenase in multiple orientations, some of which were good candidates for inclusion in a transition state ensemble of configurations for electron transfer. PMID:18621810

  2. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  3. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-07-28

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity.

  4. DNA-free two-gene knockout in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kwangryul; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Jeong, Jooyeon; Sim, Sang Jun; Melis, Anastasios; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jin, EonSeon; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are versatile organisms capable of converting CO2, H2O, and sunlight into fuel and chemicals for domestic and industrial consumption. Thus, genetic modifications of microalgae for enhancing photosynthetic productivity, and biomass and bio-products generation are crucial for both academic and industrial applications. However, targeted mutagenesis in microalgae with CRISPR-Cas9 is limited. Here we report, a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by the DNA-free CRISPR-Cas9 method rather than plasmids that encode Cas9 and guide RNAs. Outcome was the sequential CpFTSY and ZEP two-gene knockout and the generation of a strain constitutively producing zeaxanthin and showing improved photosynthetic productivity. PMID:27466170

  5. CHLOROPLAST STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN ac-20, A MUTANT STRAIN OF CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDI

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Ursula W.; Levine, R. P.

    1970-01-01

    The fine structure of the ac-20 strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardi is described. Cells grown mixotrophically in the presence of acetate have a highly disordered chloroplast membrane organization and usually lack pyrenoids. Chloroplast ribosome levels are only 5–10% of wild-type levels. Cells grown phototrophically without acetate possess more chloroplast ribosomes and have more normal membrane and pyrenoid organization. Chloroplast ribosome levels rise rapidly when cells are transferred from acetate to minimal medium, whereas membrane reorganization occurs only after a lag. These results, combined with earlier studies of the photosynthetic properties of the mutant strain, suggest that proper membrane organization, Photosystem II activity, and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase formation are dependent on the presence of chloroplast ribosomes. Other chloroplast components tested are unaffected by a 10-fold reduction in levels of chloroplast ribosomes. PMID:5415236

  6. Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and its supramolecular organization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Drop, Bartlomiej; Webber-Birungi, Mariam; Yadav, Sathish K N; Filipowicz-Szymanska, Alicja; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Boekema, Egbert J; Croce, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    LHCII is the most abundant membrane protein on earth. It participates in the first steps of photosynthesis by harvesting sunlight and transferring excitation energy to the core complex. Here we have analyzed the LHCII complex of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and its association with the core of Photosystem II (PSII) to form multiprotein complexes. Several PSII supercomplexes with different antenna sizes have been purified, the largest of which contains three LHCII trimers (named S, M and N) per monomeric core. A projection map at a 13Å resolution was obtained allowing the reconstruction of the 3D structure of the supercomplex. The position and orientation of the S trimer are the same as in plants; trimer M is rotated by 45° and the additional trimer (named here as LHCII-N), which is taking the position occupied in plants by CP24, is directly associated with the core. The analysis of supercomplexes with different antenna sizes suggests that LhcbM1, LhcbM2/7 and LhcbM3 are the major components of the trimers in the PSII supercomplex, while LhcbM5 is part of the "extra" LHCII pool not directly associated with the supercomplex. It is also shown that Chlamydomonas LHCII has a slightly lower Chlorophyll a/b ratio than the complex from plants and a blue shifted absorption spectrum. Finally the data indicate that there are at least six LHCII trimers per dimeric core in the thylakoid membranes, meaning that the antenna size of PSII of C. reinhardtii is larger than that of plants.

  7. Potassium Fluxes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (I.Kinetics and Electrical Potentials).

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, B.; Glass, ADM.

    1995-01-01

    Potassium influx and cellular [K+] were measured in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after pretreatment in either 10 or 0 mM external K+ ([K]0). K+ (42K+ or 86Rb+) influx was mediated by a saturable, high-affinity transport system (HATS) at low [K+]0 and a linear, low-affinity transport system at high [K+]o. The HATS was typically more sensitive to metabolic inhibition (and darkness) than the low-affinity transport system. Membrane electrical potentials were determined by measuring the equilibrium distribution of tetraphenylphosphonium. These values, together with estimates of cytoplasmic [K+] (B. Malhotra and A.D.M. Glass [1995] Plant Physiol 108: 1537-1545), demonstrated that at 0.1 mM [K+]0 K+ uptake must be active. At higher [K+]0 (>0.3 mM) K+ influx appeared to be passive and possibly channel mediated. When cells were deprived of K+ for 24 h, the Vmax for the HATS increased from 50 x 10-6 to 85 x 10-6 nmol h-1 cell-1 and the Km value decreased from 0.25 to 0.162 mM. Meanwhile, cellular [K+] declined from 24 x 10-6 to 9 x 10-6 nmol cell-1. During this period influx increased exponentially, reaching its peak value after 18 h of K+ deprivation. This increase of K+ influx was not expressed when cells were exposed to inhibitors of protein synthesis. The use of 42K+ and 86Rb+ in parallel experiments demonstrated that Chlamydomonas discriminated in favor of K+ over Rb+, and this effect increased with the duration of K+ deprivation. PMID:12228559

  8. CO2 acquisition in Chlamydomonas acidophila is influenced mainly by CO2, not phosphorus, availability.

    PubMed

    Spijkerman, Elly; Stojkovic, Slobodanka; Beardall, John

    2014-09-01

    The extremophilic green microalga Chlamydomonas acidophila grows in very acidic waters (pH 2.3-3.4), where CO2 is the sole inorganic carbon source. Previous work has revealed that the species can accumulate inorganic carbon (Ci) and exhibits high affinity CO2 utilization under low-CO2 (air-equilibrium) conditions, similar to organisms with an active CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), whereas both processes are down-regulated under high CO2 (4.5 % CO2) conditions. Responses of this species to phosphorus (Pi)-limited conditions suggested a contrasting regulation of the CCM characteristics. Therefore, we measured external carbonic anhydrase (CAext) activities and protein expression (CAH1), the internal pH, Ci accumulation, and CO2-utilization in cells adapted to high or low CO2 under Pi-replete and Pi-limited conditions. Results reveal that C. acidophila expressed CAext activity and expressed a protein cross-reacting with CAH1 (the CAext from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Although the function of this CA remains unclear, CAext activity and high affinity CO2 utilization were the highest under low CO2 conditions. C. acidophila accumulated Ci and expressed the CAH1 protein under all conditions tested, and C. reinhardtii also contained substantial amounts of CAH1 protein under Pi-limitation. In conclusion, Ci utilization is optimized in C. acidophila under ecologically relevant conditions, which may enable optimal survival in its extreme Ci- and Pi-limited habitat. The exact physiological and biochemical acclimation remains to be further studied.

  9. Regulation of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle by a stable, chromatin-associated retinoblastoma tumor suppressor complex.

    PubMed

    Olson, Bradley J S C; Oberholzer, Michael; Li, Yubing; Zones, James M; Kohli, Harjivan S; Bisova, Katerina; Fang, Su-Chiung; Meisenhelder, Jill; Hunter, Tony; Umen, James G

    2010-10-01

    We examined the cell cycle dynamics of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein complex in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that has single homologs for each subunit-RB, E2F, and DP. We found that Chlamydomonas RB (encoded by MAT3) is a cell cycle-regulated phosphoprotein, that E2F1-DP1 can bind to a consensus E2F site, and that all three proteins interact in vivo to form a complex that can be quantitatively immunopurified. Yeast two-hybrid assays revealed the formation of a ternary complex between MAT3, DP1, and E2F1 that requires a C-terminal motif in E2F1 analogous to the RB binding domain of plant and animal E2Fs. We examined the abundance of MAT3/RB and E2F1-DP1 in highly synchronous cultures and found that they are synthesized and remain stably associated throughout the cell cycle with no detectable fraction of free E2F1-DP1. Consistent with their stable association, MAT3/RB and DP1 are constitutively nuclear, and MAT3/RB does not require DP1-E2F1 for nuclear localization. In the nucleus, MAT3/RB remains bound to chromatin throughout the cell cycle, and its chromatin binding is mediated through E2F1-DP1. Together, our data show that E2F-DP complexes can regulate the cell cycle without dissociation of their RB-related subunit and that other changes may be sufficient to convert RB-E2F-DP from a cell cycle repressor to an activator.

  10. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions.

  11. An electro-optic monitor of the behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cilia.

    PubMed

    Josef, Keith; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W

    2005-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii steers through water with a pair of cilia (eukaryotic flagella). Long-term observation of the beating of its cilia with controlled stimulation is improving our understanding of how a cell responds to sensory inputs. Here we describe how to record ciliary motion continuously for long periods. We also report experiments on the network of intracellular signaling that connects the environment inputs with response outputs. Local spatial changes in ciliary response on the time scale of the underlying biochemical dynamics are observed. Near-infrared light monitors the cells held by a micropipette. This condition is tolerated well for hours, not interfering with ciliary beating or sensory transduction. A computer integrates the light stimulation of the eye of Chlamydomonas with the ciliary motion making possible long-term correlations. Measures of ciliary responses include the beating frequency, stroke velocity, and stroke duration of each cilium, and the relative phase of the cis and trans cilia. The stationarity and dependence of the system on light intensity was investigated. About 150,000,000 total beat cycles and up to 8 h on one cell have been recorded. Each beat cycle is resolved so that each asynchronous beat is detected. Responses extend only a few hundred milliseconds, but there is a persistence of momentary changes that last much longer. Interestingly, we see a response that is linear with absolute light intensity as well as different kinds of response that are clearly nonlinear, implying two signaling pathways from the cell body to the cilia.

  12. Toxicity assessment of manufactured nanomaterials using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangxin; Zhang, Xuezhi; Chen, Yongsheng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2008-10-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, there is an increasing risk of human and environmental exposure to nanotechnology-based materials and products. As water resources are particularly vulnerable to direct and indirect contamination of nonomaterials (NMs), the potential toxicity and environmental implication of NMs to aquatic organisms must be evaluated. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used NMs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and quantum dots (QDs), using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhartii as a model system. The response of the organism to NMs was assessed at physiological, biochemical, and molecular genetic levels. Growth kinetics showed that growth inhibition occurred during the first two to three days of cultivation in the presence of TiO(2) or QDs. Measurements of lipid peroxidation measurement indicated that oxidative stress of the cells occurred as early as 6 h after exposure to TiO(2) or QDs. The transcriptional expression profiling of four stress response genes (sod1, gpx, cat, and ptox2) revealed that transient up-regulation of these genes occurred in cultures containing as low as 1.0 mg L(-1) of TiO(2) or 0.1 mg L(-1) of QDs, and the maximum transcripts of cat, sod1, gpx, and ptox2 occurred at 1.5, 3, 3, and 6 h, respectively, and were proportional to the initial concentration of the NMs. As the cultures continued, recovery in growth was observed and the extent of recovery, as indicated by the final cell concentration, was dosage-dependent. QDs were found to be more toxic to Chlamydomonas cells than TiO(2) under our experimental conditions. PMID:18768203

  13. How Chlamydomonas keeps track of the light once it has reached the right phototactic orientation.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, K; David, R; Uhl, R

    1997-01-01

    By using a real-time assay that allows measurement of the phototactic orientation of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas with millisecond time resolution, it can be shown that single photons not only induce transient direction changes but that fluence rates as low as 1 photon cell(-1) s(-1) can already lead to a persistent orientation. Orientation is a binary variable, i.e., in a partially oriented population some organisms are fully oriented while the rest are still at random. Action spectra reveal that the response to a pulsed stimulus follows the Dartnall-nomogram for a rhodopsin while the response to a persistent stimulus falls off more rapidly toward the red end of the spectrum. Thus light of 540 nm, for which chlamy-rhodopsin is equally sensitive as for 440-nm light, induces no measurable persistent orientation while 440-nm light does. A model is presented which explains not only this behavior, but also how Chlamydomonas can track the light direction and switches between a positive and negative phototaxis. According to the model the ability to detect the direction of light, to make the right turn and to stay oriented, is a direct consequence of the helical path of the organism, the orientation of its eyespot relative to the helix-axis, and the special shielding properties of eyespot and cell body. The model places particular emphasis on the fact that prolonged swimming into the correct direction not only requires making a correct turn initially, but also avoiding further turns once the right direction has been reached. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9284323

  14. An electro-optic monitor of the behavior of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cilia.

    PubMed

    Josef, Keith; Saranak, Jureepan; Foster, Kenneth W

    2005-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii steers through water with a pair of cilia (eukaryotic flagella). Long-term observation of the beating of its cilia with controlled stimulation is improving our understanding of how a cell responds to sensory inputs. Here we describe how to record ciliary motion continuously for long periods. We also report experiments on the network of intracellular signaling that connects the environment inputs with response outputs. Local spatial changes in ciliary response on the time scale of the underlying biochemical dynamics are observed. Near-infrared light monitors the cells held by a micropipette. This condition is tolerated well for hours, not interfering with ciliary beating or sensory transduction. A computer integrates the light stimulation of the eye of Chlamydomonas with the ciliary motion making possible long-term correlations. Measures of ciliary responses include the beating frequency, stroke velocity, and stroke duration of each cilium, and the relative phase of the cis and trans cilia. The stationarity and dependence of the system on light intensity was investigated. About 150,000,000 total beat cycles and up to 8 h on one cell have been recorded. Each beat cycle is resolved so that each asynchronous beat is detected. Responses extend only a few hundred milliseconds, but there is a persistence of momentary changes that last much longer. Interestingly, we see a response that is linear with absolute light intensity as well as different kinds of response that are clearly nonlinear, implying two signaling pathways from the cell body to the cilia. PMID:15838839

  15. How Chlamydomonas keeps track of the light once it has reached the right phototactic orientation.

    PubMed

    Schaller, K; David, R; Uhl, R

    1997-09-01

    By using a real-time assay that allows measurement of the phototactic orientation of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas with millisecond time resolution, it can be shown that single photons not only induce transient direction changes but that fluence rates as low as 1 photon cell(-1) s(-1) can already lead to a persistent orientation. Orientation is a binary variable, i.e., in a partially oriented population some organisms are fully oriented while the rest are still at random. Action spectra reveal that the response to a pulsed stimulus follows the Dartnall-nomogram for a rhodopsin while the response to a persistent stimulus falls off more rapidly toward the red end of the spectrum. Thus light of 540 nm, for which chlamy-rhodopsin is equally sensitive as for 440-nm light, induces no measurable persistent orientation while 440-nm light does. A model is presented which explains not only this behavior, but also how Chlamydomonas can track the light direction and switches between a positive and negative phototaxis. According to the model the ability to detect the direction of light, to make the right turn and to stay oriented, is a direct consequence of the helical path of the organism, the orientation of its eyespot relative to the helix-axis, and the special shielding properties of eyespot and cell body. The model places particular emphasis on the fact that prolonged swimming into the correct direction not only requires making a correct turn initially, but also avoiding further turns once the right direction has been reached. PMID:9284323

  16. A comparison of hydrogen photoproduction by sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey; Patrusheva, Elena; Ghirardi, Maria L; Seibert, Michael; Tsygankov, Anatoly

    2007-03-10

    Continuous photoproduction of H(2) by the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, is observed after incubating the cultures for about a day in the absence of sulfate and in the presence of acetate. Sulfur deprivation causes the partial and reversible inactivation of photosynthetic O(2) evolution in algae, resulting in the light-induced establishment of anaerobic conditions in sealed photobioreactors, expression of two [FeFe]-hydrogenases in the cells, and H(2) photoproduction for several days. We have previously demonstrated that sulfur-deprived algal cultures can produce H(2) gas in the absence of acetate, when appropriate experimental protocols were used (Tsygankov, A.A., Kosourov, S.N., Tolstygina, I.V., Ghirardi, M.L., Seibert, M., 2006. Hydrogen production by sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under photoautotrophic conditions. Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 31, 1574-1584). We now report the use of an automated photobioreactor system to compare the effects of photoautotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photomixotrophic growth conditions on the kinetic parameters associated with the adaptation of the algal cells to sulfur deprivation and H(2) photoproduction. This was done under the experimental conditions outlined in the above reference, including controlled pH. From this comparison we show that both acetate and CO(2) are required for the most rapid inactivation of photosystem II and the highest yield of H(2) gas production. Although, the presence of acetate in the system is not critical for the process, H(2) photoproduction under photoautotrophic conditions can be increased by optimizing the conditions for high starch accumulation. These results suggest ways of engineering algae to improve H(2) production, which in turn may have a positive impact on the economics of applied systems for H(2) production. PMID:17275940

  17. Photo-oxidative stress in a xanthophyll-deficient mutant of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Baroli, Irene; Gutman, Benjamin L; Ledford, Heidi K; Shin, Jai W; Chin, Brian L; Havaux, Michel; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2004-02-20

    When there is an imbalance between the light energy absorbed by a photosynthetic organism and that which can be utilized in photosynthesis, photo-oxidative stress can damage pigments, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. In this work we compared the wild type and a xanthophyll-deficient mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in their response to high amounts of light. Wild-type Chlamydomonas cells were able to acclimate to high amounts of light following transfer from low light conditions. In contrast, the npq1 lor1 double mutant, which lacks protective xanthophylls (zeaxanthin and lutein) in the chloroplast, progressively lost viability and photosynthetic capacity along with destruction of thylakoid membrane protein-pigment complexes and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxides. Loss of viability was partially rescued by lowered oxygen tension, suggesting that the high sensitivity of the mutant to light stress is caused by the production of reactive oxygen species in the chloroplast. Cell death was not prevented by the addition of an organic carbon source to the growth medium, demonstrating that the photo-oxidative damage can target other essential chloroplast processes besides photosynthesis. From the differential sensitivity of the mutant to exogenously added pro-oxidants, we infer that the reactive oxygen species produced during light stress in npq1 lor1 may be singlet oxygen and/or superoxide but not hydrogen peroxide. The bleaching phenotype of npq1 lor1 was not due to enhanced photodamage to photosystem II but rather to a less localized phenomenon of accumulation of photo-oxidation products in chloroplast membranes. PMID:14665619

  18. Microtubule sliding in mutant Chlamydomonas axonemes devoid of outer or inner dynein arms

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To clarify the functional differentiation between the outer and inner dynein arms in eukaryotic flagella, their mechanochemical properties were assessed by measuring the sliding velocities of outer-doublet microtubules in disintegrating axonemes of Chlamydomonas, using wild- type and mutant strains that lack either of the arms. A special procedure was developed to induce sliding disintegration in Chlamydomonas axonemes which is difficult to achieve by ordinary methods. The flagella were first fragmented by sonication, demembranated by Nonidet P-40, and then perfused under a microscope with Mg-ATP and nagarse, a bacterial protease with broad substrate specificity. The sliding velocity varied with the Mg-ATP concentration in a Michaelis-Menten manner in the axonemes from the wild type and a motile mutant lacking the outer dynein arm (oda38). The maximal sliding velocity and apparent Michaelis constant for Mg-ATP were measured to be 13.2 +/- 1.0 micron/s and 158 +/- 36 microM for the wild type and 2.0 +/- 0.1 micron/s and 64 +/- 18 microM for oda38. These maximal sliding velocities were significantly smaller than those estimated in beating axonemes; the reason is not clear. The velocities in the presence or absence of 10(-5) M Ca2+ did not differ noticeably. The axonemes of nonmotile mutants lacking either outer arms (pf13A, pf22) or inner arms (pf23) were examined for their ability to undergo sliding disintegration in the presence of 0.1 mM Mg-ATP. Whereas pf13A axonemes underwent normal sliding disintegration, the other two species displayed it only very poorly. The poor ability of pf23 axonemes to undergo sliding disintegration raises the possibility that the outer dynein arm cannot function well in the absence of the inner arm. PMID:2946702

  19. Combined intracellular nitrate and NIT2 effects on storage carbohydrate metabolism in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Vigeolas, H.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are receiving increasing attention as alternative production systems for renewable energy such as biofuel. The photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is widely recognized as the model system to study all aspects of algal physiology, including the molecular mechanisms underlying the accumulation of starch and triacylglycerol (TAG), which are the precursors of biofuel. All of these pathways not only require a carbon (C) supply but also are strongly dependent on a source of nitrogen (N) to sustain optimal growth rate and biomass production. In order to gain a better understanding of the regulation of C and N metabolisms and the accumulation of storage carbohydrates, the effect of different N sources (NH4NO3 and ) on primary metabolism using various mutants impaired in either NIA1, NIT2 or both loci was performed by metabolic analyses. The data demonstrated that, using NH4NO3, nia1 strain displayed the most striking phenotype, including an inhibition of growth, accumulation of intracellular nitrate, and strong starch and TAG accumulation. The measurements of the different C and N intermediate levels (amino, organic, and fatty acids), together with the determination of acetate and remaining in the medium, clearly excluded the hypothesis of a slower and acetate assimilation in this mutant in the presence of NH4NO3. The results provide evidence of the implication of intracellular nitrate and NIT2 in the control of C partitioning into different storage carbohydrates under mixotrophic conditions in Chlamydomonas. The underlying mechanisms and implications for strategies to increase biomass yield and storage product composition in oleaginous algae are discussed. PMID:24187418

  20. Structure of the Chlamydomonas agglutinin and related flagellar surface proteins in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Using the quick-freeze, deep-etch technique, we compare the structure of the cane-shaped plus and minus sexual agglutinin molecules purified from gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. We also describe the structure of three additional gamete-specific fibrillar molecules, called short canes, loops, and crescents, which are structurally related to the agglutinins. Four non-agglutinating mutant strains are found to produce the three latter fibrils but not canes, supporting our identification of the cane-shaped molecule as the agglutinin. The heads of the plus and minus canes are shown to differ in morphology. Moreover, two treatments that inactivate the plus agglutinin in vitro--thermolysin digestion and disulfide reduction/alkylation--bring about detectable structural changes only in the head domain of the cane, suggesting that the head may play an indispensible role in affecting gametic recognition/adhesion. We also present quick-freeze, deep-etch images of the flagellar surfaces of gametic, vegetative, and mutant cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardi. The gametic flagella are shown to carry the canes, short canes, loops, and crescents present in in vitro preparations. The cane and crescent proteins self-associate on the flagellar surface into stout fibers of uniform caliber, and they align along the longitudinal axis of the flagellum. The short canes and loops co-purify with flagella but, in the presence of mica, dissociate so that they lie to the sides of the flagella. The agglutinin canes of both mating types are oriented with their hooks at the membrane surface and their heads directed outward, where they are positioned to participate in the initial events of sexual agglutination. PMID:4030899

  1. Zinc Deficiency Impacts CO2 Assimilation and Disrupts Copper Homeostasis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Malasarn, Davin; Kropat, Janette; Hsieh, Scott I.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Casero, David; Loo, Joseph A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Wollman, Francis-André; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because of its role in catalysis and in protein stabilization, but excess zinc is deleterious. We distinguished four nutritional zinc states in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: toxic, replete, deficient, and limited. Growth is inhibited in zinc-limited and zinc-toxic cells relative to zinc-replete cells, whereas zinc deficiency is visually asymptomatic but distinguished by the accumulation of transcripts encoding ZIP family transporters. To identify targets of zinc deficiency and mechanisms of zinc acclimation, we used RNA-seq to probe zinc nutrition-responsive changes in gene expression. We identified genes encoding zinc-handling components, including ZIP family transporters and candidate chaperones. Additionally, we noted an impact on two other regulatory pathways, the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and the nutritional copper regulon. Targets of transcription factor Ccm1 and various CAH genes are up-regulated in zinc deficiency, probably due to reduced carbonic anhydrase activity, validated by quantitative proteomics and immunoblot analysis of Cah1, Cah3, and Cah4. Chlamydomonas is therefore not able to grow photoautotrophically in zinc-limiting conditions, but supplementation with 1% CO2 restores growth to wild-type rates, suggesting that the inability to maintain CCM is a major consequence of zinc limitation. The Crr1 regulon responds to copper limitation and is turned on in zinc deficiency, and Crr1 is required for growth in zinc-limiting conditions. Zinc-deficient cells are functionally copper-deficient, although they hyperaccumulate copper up to 50-fold over normal levels. We suggest that zinc-deficient cells sequester copper in a biounavailable form, perhaps to prevent mismetallation of critical zinc sites. PMID:23439652

  2. Temperature dependence of photosynthesis and thylakoid lipid composition in the red snow alga Chlamydomonas cf. nivalis (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Lukeš, Martin; Procházková, Lenka; Shmidt, Volha; Nedbalová, Linda; Kaftan, David

    2014-08-01

    Here, we report an effect of short acclimation to a wide span of temperatures on photosynthetic electron transfer, lipid and fatty acid composition in the snow alga Chlamydomonas cf. nivalis. The growth and oxygen evolution capacity were low at 2 °C yet progressively enhanced at 10 °C and were significantly higher at temperatures from 5 to 15 °C in comparison with the mesophilic control Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In search of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the adaptation of photosynthesis to low temperatures, we have found unprecedented high rates of QA to QB electron transfer. The thermodynamics of the process revealed the existence of an increased structural flexibility that we explain with the amino acid changes in the D1 protein combined with the physico-chemical characteristics of the thylakoid membrane composed of > 80% negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol.

  3. Stable isotope fractionation in photosynthesis: Analysis of autotrophic competence following transformation of the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.E.; Gillham, N.W.; Osmond, C.B.

    1991-06-15

    Isotopic techniques needed to assess the interactions between photosynthesis and respiration in Chlamydomonas have been devised for {sup 13}C, using plate and liquid cultures. The effectiveness of various transformation strategies for the chloroplast psbA gene has been evaluated with respect to their utility in constructing and characterizing strains homoplasmic for site-directed mutations in an otherwise isogenic background. Our analysis of the first site-directed change in the D-1 protein of Chlamydomonas indicates that a second site mutation (arg{sub 238} > lys) in the loop between transmembrane helices IV -- V can partially compensate for the reduced photosynthetic performance that accompanies the atrazine resistant mutation (ser{sub 264} > ala/gly) in this alga and in higher plants grown under high light intensities. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Chlamydomonas flagellar outer row dynein assembly protein ODA7 interacts with both outer row and I1 inner row dyneins.

    PubMed

    Freshour, Judy; Yokoyama, Ruth; Mitchell, David R

    2007-02-23

    We previously found that a mutation at the ODA7 locus in Chlamydomonas prevents axonemal outer row dynein assembly by blocking association of heavy chains and intermediate chains in the cytoplasm. We have now cloned the ODA7 locus by walking in the Chlamydomonas genome from nearby molecular markers, confirmed the identity of the gene by rescuing the mutant phenotype with genomic clones, and identified the ODA7 gene product as a 58-kDa leucine-rich repeat protein unrelated to outer row dynein LC1. Oda7p is missing from oda7 mutant flagella but is present in flagella of other outer row or inner row dynein assembly mutants. However, Oda7 levels are greatly reduced in flagella that lack both outer row dynein and inner row I1 dynein. Biochemical fractionation and rebinding studies support a model in which Oda7 participates in a previously uncharacterized structural link between inner and outer row dyneins.

  5. Temperature effect on production of hydrogen and oxygen by Chlamydomonas cold strain CCMP1619 and wild-type 137c

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Blankinship, S.L.; Greenbaum, E.

    1995-12-31

    Photosynthetic water splitting for hydrogen and oxygen production is a promising biological process that converts sunlight into useful chemical energy. In green algae, this process becomes active when hydrogenase is induced. In this process, water is split into molecular oxygen, protons, and electrons by photosystem II (PSII). The electrons acquired from water splitting are transferred through PSII to photosystem I (PSI). At PSI, these electrons are further energized by the PSI photochemical reaction. The energized electrons emergent from the reducing side of PSI are transferred to hydrogenase via ferredoxin (Fd), and thereby utilized in a hydrogenase-catalyzed reaction, the reduction of protons and production of molecular hydrogen. The protons consumed in the reduction reaction are derived ultimately from water splitting. The net result of this process is cleavage of water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogenase is a key enzyme in the photoproduction of hydrogen. In multicellular algae and higher plants, this enzyme is lost or no longer inducible for photoproduction of hydrogen. This enzyme is, however, inducible for photoevolution of hydrogen in certain microscopic algae such as Chlamydomonas. However, not all species of Chlamydomonas have an inducible enzyme to produce hydrogen in the light. In the work described in this article, a Chlamydomonas cold strain, CCMP1619, was assayed for its potential hydrogenase activity by measuring anaerobically induced production of dark- and light-dependent hydrogen. This cold strain was originally isolated from Lake Bonney (ice-covered), Antarctica, and known to grow at low temperatures. The effect of temperature on hydrogen production by CCMP1619 was compared with the wild-type Chlamydomonas st rain 137c. The results indicated that 137c and CCMP1619 contain inducible hydrogenase, and that temperature had a significant effect on the rates of hydrogenase induction and on the kinetics of hydrogen production.

  6. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  7. Increase in peroxisome number and the gene expression of putative glyoxysomal enzymes in Chlamydomonas cells supplemented with acetate.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yasuko; Sato, Nagisa; Shinozaki, Akiko; Watanabe, Mariko

    2015-01-01

    We cultured Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells in a minimal culture medium supplemented with various concentrations of acetate, fatty acids, ethanol, fatty alcohols, or sucrose. The presence of acetate (0.5 or 1.0%, w/v) was advantageous for cell growth. To determine whether peroxisomes are involved in fatty acid and fatty alcohol metabolism, we investigated the dynamics of peroxisomes, including changes in their number and size, in the presence of acetate, ethanol, and sucrose. The total volume of peroxisomes increased when cells were grown with acetate, but did not change when cells were grown with ethanol or sucrose. We analyzed cell growth on minimal culture medium supplemented with various fatty acids (carbon chain length ranging from one to ten) to investigate which fatty acids are metabolized by C. reinhardtii. Among them, acetate caused the greatest increase in growth when added to minimal culture media. We analyzed the transcript levels of genes encoding putative glyoxysomal enzymes. The transcript levels of genes encoding malate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, isocitrate lyase, and citrate synthase increased when Chlamydomonas cells were grown on minimal culture medium supplemented with acetate. Our results suggest that Chlamydomonas peroxisomes are involved in acetate metabolism via the glyoxylate cycle.

  8. An improved ARS2-derived nuclear reporter enhances the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Specht, Elizabeth A; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Hoang, Kevin T D; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    The model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to pioneer genetic engineering techniques for high-value protein and biofuel production from algae. To date, most studies of transgenic Chlamydomonas have utilized the chloroplast genome due to its ease of engineering, with a sizeable suite of reporters and well-characterized expression constructs. The advanced manipulation of algal nuclear genomes has been hampered by limited strong expression cassettes, and a lack of high-throughput reporters. We have improved upon an endogenous reporter gene - the ARS2 gene encoding an arylsulfatase enzyme - that was first cloned and characterized decades ago but has not been used extensively. The new construct, derived from ARS2 cDNA, expresses significantly higher levels of reporter protein and transforms more efficiently, allowing qualitative and quantitative screening using a rapid, inexpensive 96-well assay. The improved arylsulfatase expression cassette was used to screen a new transgene promoter from the ARG7 gene, and found that the ARG7 promoter can express the ARS2 reporter as strongly as the HSP70-RBCS2 chimeric promoter that currently ranks as the best available promoter, thus adding to the list of useful nuclear promoters. This enhanced arylsulfatase reporter construct improves the efficiency and ease of genetic engineering within the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, with potential application to other algal strains.

  9. Characterization of a Mutant Deficient for Ammonium and Nitric Oxide Signalling in the Model System Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio; de Montaigu, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous signalling molecule Nitric Oxide (NO) is characterized not only by the variety of organisms in which it has been described, but also by the wealth of biological processes that it regulates. In contrast to the expanding repertoire of functions assigned to NO, however, the mechanisms of NO action usually remain unresolved, and genes that work within NO signalling cascades are seldom identified. A recent addition to the list of known NO functions is the regulation of the nitrogen assimilation pathway in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a well-established model organism for genetic and molecular studies that offers new possibilities in the search for mediators of NO signalling. By further exploiting a collection of Chlamydomonas insertional mutant strains originally isolated for their insensitivity to the ammonium (NH4+) nitrogen source, we found a mutant which, in addition to its ammonium insensitive (AI) phenotype, was not capable of correctly sensing the NO signal. Similarly to what had previously been described in the AI strain cyg56, the expression of nitrogen assimilation genes in the mutant did not properly respond to treatments with various NO donors. Complementation experiments showed that NON1 (NO Nitrate 1), a gene that encodes a protein containing no known functional domain, was the gene underlying the mutant phenotype. Beyond the identification of NON1, our findings broadly demonstrate the potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be used as a model system in the search for novel components of gene networks that mediate physiological responses to NO.

  10. High-Resolution Profiling of a Synchronized Diurnal Transcriptome from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Reveals Continuous Cell and Metabolic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zones, James Matt; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Umen, James G

    2015-10-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a useful model organism for investigating diverse biological processes, such as photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis, flagella and basal body structure/function, cell growth and division, and many others. We combined a highly synchronous photobioreactor culture system with frequent temporal sampling to characterize genome-wide diurnal gene expression in Chlamydomonas. Over 80% of the measured transcriptome was expressed with strong periodicity, forming 18 major clusters. Genes associated with complex structures and processes, including cell cycle control, flagella and basal bodies, ribosome biogenesis, and energy metabolism, all had distinct signatures of coexpression with strong predictive value for assigning and temporally ordering function. Importantly, the frequent sampling regime allowed us to discern meaningful fine-scale phase differences between and within subgroups of genes and enabled the identification of a transiently expressed cluster of light stress genes. Coexpression was further used both as a data-mining tool to classify and/or validate genes from other data sets related to the cell cycle and to flagella and basal bodies and to assign isoforms of duplicated enzymes to their cognate pathways of central carbon metabolism. Our diurnal coexpression data capture functional relationships established by dozens of prior studies and are a valuable new resource for investigating a variety of biological processes in Chlamydomonas and other eukaryotes.

  11. Characterization of a Mutant Deficient for Ammonium and Nitric Oxide Signalling in the Model System Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Ocaña-Calahorro, Francisco; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio; de Montaigu, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous signalling molecule Nitric Oxide (NO) is characterized not only by the variety of organisms in which it has been described, but also by the wealth of biological processes that it regulates. In contrast to the expanding repertoire of functions assigned to NO, however, the mechanisms of NO action usually remain unresolved, and genes that work within NO signalling cascades are seldom identified. A recent addition to the list of known NO functions is the regulation of the nitrogen assimilation pathway in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a well-established model organism for genetic and molecular studies that offers new possibilities in the search for mediators of NO signalling. By further exploiting a collection of Chlamydomonas insertional mutant strains originally isolated for their insensitivity to the ammonium (NH4+) nitrogen source, we found a mutant which, in addition to its ammonium insensitive (AI) phenotype, was not capable of correctly sensing the NO signal. Similarly to what had previously been described in the AI strain cyg56, the expression of nitrogen assimilation genes in the mutant did not properly respond to treatments with various NO donors. Complementation experiments showed that NON1 (NO Nitrate 1), a gene that encodes a protein containing no known functional domain, was the gene underlying the mutant phenotype. Beyond the identification of NON1, our findings broadly demonstrate the potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be used as a model system in the search for novel components of gene networks that mediate physiological responses to NO. PMID:27149516

  12. Cell-to-Cell Diversity in a Synchronized Chlamydomonas Culture As Revealed by Single-Cell Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Garz, Andreas; Sandmann, Michael; Rading, Michael; Ramm, Sascha; Menzel, Ralf; Steup, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In a synchronized photoautotrophic culture of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, cell size, cell number, and the averaged starch content were determined throughout the light-dark cycle. For single-cell analyses, the relative cellular starch was quantified by measuring the second harmonic generation (SHG). In destained cells, amylopectin essentially represents the only biophotonic structure. As revealed by various validation procedures, SHG signal intensities are a reliable relative measure of the cellular starch content. During photosynthesis-driven starch biosynthesis, synchronized Chlamydomonas cells possess an unexpected cell-to-cell diversity both in size and starch content, but the starch-related heterogeneity largely exceeds that of size. The cellular volume, starch content, and amount of starch/cell volume obey lognormal distributions. Starch degradation was initiated by inhibiting the photosynthetic electron transport in illuminated cells or by darkening. Under both conditions, the averaged rate of starch degradation is almost constant, but it is higher in illuminated than in darkened cells. At the single-cell level, rates of starch degradation largely differ but are unrelated to the initial cellular starch content. A rate equation describing the cellular starch degradation is presented. SHG-based three-dimensional reconstructions of Chlamydomonas cells containing starch granules are shown. PMID:23009858

  13. High-Resolution Profiling of a Synchronized Diurnal Transcriptome from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Reveals Continuous Cell and Metabolic Differentiation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a useful model organism for investigating diverse biological processes, such as photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis, flagella and basal body structure/function, cell growth and division, and many others. We combined a highly synchronous photobioreactor culture system with frequent temporal sampling to characterize genome-wide diurnal gene expression in Chlamydomonas. Over 80% of the measured transcriptome was expressed with strong periodicity, forming 18 major clusters. Genes associated with complex structures and processes, including cell cycle control, flagella and basal bodies, ribosome biogenesis, and energy metabolism, all had distinct signatures of coexpression with strong predictive value for assigning and temporally ordering function. Importantly, the frequent sampling regime allowed us to discern meaningful fine-scale phase differences between and within subgroups of genes and enabled the identification of a transiently expressed cluster of light stress genes. Coexpression was further used both as a data-mining tool to classify and/or validate genes from other data sets related to the cell cycle and to flagella and basal bodies and to assign isoforms of duplicated enzymes to their cognate pathways of central carbon metabolism. Our diurnal coexpression data capture functional relationships established by dozens of prior studies and are a valuable new resource for investigating a variety of biological processes in Chlamydomonas and other eukaryotes. PMID:26432862

  14. Whole-Genome Resequencing Reveals Extensive Natural Variation in the Model Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hazzouri, Khaled M.; Rosas, Ulises; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Nelson, David R.; Abdrabu, Rasha; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We performed whole-genome resequencing of 12 field isolates and eight commonly studied laboratory strains of the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to characterize genomic diversity and provide a resource for studies of natural variation. Our data support previous observations that Chlamydomonas is among the most diverse eukaryotic species. Nucleotide diversity is ∼3% and is geographically structured in North America with some evidence of admixture among sampling locales. Examination of predicted loss-of-function mutations in field isolates indicates conservation of genes associated with core cellular functions, while genes in large gene families and poorly characterized genes show a greater incidence of major effect mutations. De novo assembly of unmapped reads recovered genes in the field isolates that are absent from the CC-503 assembly. The laboratory reference strains show a genomic pattern of polymorphism consistent with their origin as the recombinant progeny of a diploid zygospore. Large duplications or amplifications are a prominent feature of laboratory strains and appear to have originated under laboratory culture. Extensive natural variation offers a new source of genetic diversity for studies of Chlamydomonas, including naturally occurring alleles that may prove useful in studies of gene function and the dissection of quantitative genetic traits. PMID:26392080

  15. Evidence that an internal carbonic anhydrase is present in 5% CO/sub 2/-grown and air-grown Chlamydomonas. [Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Moroney, J.V.; Togasaki, R.K.; Husic, H.D.; Tolbert, N.E.

    1987-07-01

    Inorganic carbon (C/sub i/) uptake was measured in wild-type cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in cia-3, a mutant strain of C. reinhardtii that cannot grow with air levels of CO/sub 2/. Both air-grown cells, that have a CO/sub 2/ concentrating system, and 5% CO/sub 2/-grown cells that do not have this system, were used. When the external pH was 5.1 or 7.3, air-grown, wild-type cells accumulated inorganic carbon (C/sub i/) and this accumulation was enhanced when the permeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, ethoxyzolamide, was added. When the external pH was 5.1, 5% CO/sub 2/-grown cells also accumulated some C/sub i/, although not as much as air-grown cells and this accumulation was stimulated by the addition of ethoxyzolamide. At the same time, ethoxyzolamide inhibited CO/sub 2/ fixation by high CO/sub 2/-grown, wild-type cells at both pH 5.1 and 7.3. These observations imply that 5% CO/sub 2/-grown, wild-type cells, have a physiologically important internal carbonic anhydrase, although the major carbonic anhydrase located in the periplasmic space is only present in air-grown cells. Inorganic carbon uptake by cia-3 cells supported this conclusion. This mutant strain, which is thought to lack an internal carbonic anhydrase, was unaffected by ethoxyzolamide at pH 5.1. Other physiological characteristics of cia-3 resemble those of wild-type cells that have been treated with ethoxyzolamide. It is concluded that an internal carbonic anhydrase is under different regulatory control than the periplasmic carbonic anhydrase.

  16. Laser sculpting of atomic sp, sp(2) , and sp(3) hybrid orbitals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunmei; Manz, Jörn; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-01-12

    Atomic sp, sp(2) , and sp(3) hybrid orbitals were introduced by Linus Pauling to explain the nature of the chemical bond. Quantum dynamics simulations show that they can be sculpted by means of a selective series of coherent laser pulses, starting from the 1s orbital of the hydrogen atom. Laser hybridization generates atoms with state-selective electric dipoles, opening up new possibilities for the study of chemical reaction dynamics and heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:25257703

  17. Oil accumulation in the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: characterization, variability between common laboratory strains and relationship with starch reserves

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When cultivated under stress conditions, many microalgae species accumulate both starch and oil (triacylglycerols). The model green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has recently emerged as a model to test genetic engineering or cultivation strategies aiming at increasing lipid yields for biodiesel production. Blocking starch synthesis has been suggested as a way to boost oil accumulation. Here, we characterize the triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation process in Chlamydomonas and quantify TAGs in various wild-type and starchless strains. Results In response to nitrogen deficiency, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii produced TAGs enriched in palmitic, oleic and linoleic acids that accumulated in oil-bodies. Oil synthesis was maximal between 2 and 3 days following nitrogen depletion and reached a plateau around day 5. In the first 48 hours of oil deposition, a ~80% reduction in the major plastidial membrane lipids occurred. Upon nitrogen re-supply, mobilization of TAGs started after starch degradation but was completed within 24 hours. Comparison of oil content in five common laboratory strains (CC124, CC125, cw15, CC1690 and 11-32A) revealed a high variability, from 2 μg TAG per million cell in CC124 to 11 μg in 11-32A. Quantification of TAGs on a cell basis in three mutants affected in starch synthesis (cw15sta1-2, cw15sta6 and cw15sta7-1) showed that blocking starch synthesis did not result in TAG over-accumulation compared to their direct progenitor, the arginine auxotroph strain 330. Moreover, no significant correlation was found between cellular oil and starch levels among the twenty wild-type, mutants and complemented strains tested. By contrast, cellular oil content was found to increase steeply with salt concentration in the growth medium. At 100 mM NaCl, oil level similar to nitrogen depletion conditions could be reached in CC124 strain. Conclusion A reference basis for future genetic studies of oil metabolism in Chlamydomonas is provided. Results

  18. Gaussia-luciferase as a sensitive reporter gene for monitoring promoter activity in the nucleus of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ruecker, Ovidiu; Zillner, Karina; Groebner-Ferreira, Regina; Heitzer, Markus

    2008-08-01

    For the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a codon-adapted gene variant of the extracellular luciferase of Gaussia princeps was generated as a sensitive molecular tool to study gene expression from the nuclear genome. In the past, monitoring promoter activity in Chlamydomonas employing the commonly used luciferase encoded by Renilla reniformis was hampered due to the detection limit of the reporter assay, especially if analyzing weak promoters. In this work, the expression of Gaussia-luciferase from such promoters resulted in an average luminescent activity at least 500 times higher than that detected for the Renilla enzyme. The wildtype signal peptide of Gaussia princeps efficiently mediated the export of the luciferase into the culture medium of Chlamydomonas strain cw15arg ( - ), and the characterization of the secreted protein showed an unexpected temperature instability, probably arising from post-translational modifications made by the algae. To further test the utility of Gaussia-luciferase, promoter sequences originating from different viral genomes were analyzed for their ability to drive transgene expression in Chlamydomonas. Solely, the 35S-promoter of the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) displayed a significant transcriptional activity and this happened only when the shunting region of the 5'-untranslated region of the 35S-sequence was omitted from the luciferase expression cassette. Gaussia-luciferase proved to be a superior quantifiable reporter gene for the analysis of constitutive promoter sequences in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  19. Retinal chromophore structure and Schiff base interactions in red-shifted channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae.

    PubMed

    Ogren, John I; Mamaev, Sergey; Russano, Daniel; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2014-06-24

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs), which form a distinct branch of the microbial rhodopsin family, control phototaxis in green algae. Because ChRs can be expressed and function in neuronal membranes as light-gated cation channels, they have rapidly become an important optogenetic tool in neurobiology. While channelrhodopsin-2 from the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2) is the most commonly used and extensively studied optogenetic ChR, little is known about the properties of the diverse group of other ChRs. In this study, near-infrared confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy along with hydrogen-deuterium exchange and site-directed mutagenesis were used to study the structure of red-shifted ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1). These measurements reveal that (i) CaChR1 has an all-trans-retinal structure similar to those of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and sensory rhodopsin II but different from that of the mixed retinal composition of CrChR2, (ii) lowering the pH from 7 to 2 or substituting neutral residues for Glu169 or Asp299 does not significantly shift the ethylenic stretch frequency more than 1-2 cm(-1) in contrast to BR in which a downshift of 7-9 cm(-1) occurs reflecting neutralization of the Asp85 counterion, and (iii) the CaChR1 protonated Schiff base (SB) has stronger hydrogen bonding than BR. A model is proposed to explain these results whereby at pH 7 the predominant counterion to the SB is Asp299 (the homologue to Asp212 in BR) while Glu169 (the homologue to Asp85 in BR) exists in a neutral state. We observe an unusual constancy of the resonance Raman spectra over the broad range from pH 9 to 2 and discuss its implications. These results are in accord with recent visible absorption and current measurements of CaChR1 [Sineshchekov, O. A., et al. (2013) Intramolecular proton transfer in channelrhodopsins. Biophys. J. 104, 807-817; Li, H., et al. (2014) Role of a helix B lysine residue in the photoactive site in

  20. Centrin-mediated microtubule severing during flagellar excision in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Chlamydomonas cells excise their flagella in response to a variety of experimental conditions (e.g., extremes of temperature or pH, alcohol or detergent treatment, and mechanical shear). Here, we show that flagellar excision is an active process whereby microtubules are severed at select sites within the transition zone. The transition zone is located between the flagellar axoneme and the basal body; it is characterized by a pair of central cylinders that have an H shape when viewed in longitudinal section. Both central cylinders are connected to the A tubule of each microtubule doublet of the transition zone by fibers (approximately 5 nm diam). When viewed in cross section, these fibers are seen to form a distinctive stellate pattern characteristic of the transition zone (Manton, I. 1964. J. R. Microsc. Soc. 82:279- 285; Ringo. D. L. 1967. J. Cell Biol. 33:543-571). We demonstrate that at the time of flagellar excision these fibers contract and displace the microtubule doublets of the axoneme inward. We believe that the resulting shear force and torsional load act to sever the axonemal microtubules immediately distal to the central cylinder. Structural alterations of the transition zone during flagellar excision occur both in living cells and detergent-extracted cell models, and are dependent on the presence of calcium (greater than or equal to 10(-6) M). Immunolocalization using monoclonal antibodies against the calcium- binding protein centrin demonstrate the presence of centrin in the fiber-based stellate structure of the transition zone of wild-type cells. Examination of the flagellar autotomy mutant, fa-1, which fails to excise its flagella (Lewin, R., and C. Burrascano. 1983. Experientia. 39:1397-1398), demonstrates that the fa-1 lacks the ability to completely contract the fibers of the stellate structure. We conclude that flagellar excision in Chlamydomonas involves microtubule severing that is mediated by the action of calcium-sensitive contractile fibers

  1. Retinal chromophore structure and Schiff base interactions in red-shifted channelrhodopsin-1 from Chlamydomonas augustae.

    PubMed

    Ogren, John I; Mamaev, Sergey; Russano, Daniel; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2014-06-24

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs), which form a distinct branch of the microbial rhodopsin family, control phototaxis in green algae. Because ChRs can be expressed and function in neuronal membranes as light-gated cation channels, they have rapidly become an important optogenetic tool in neurobiology. While channelrhodopsin-2 from the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2) is the most commonly used and extensively studied optogenetic ChR, little is known about the properties of the diverse group of other ChRs. In this study, near-infrared confocal resonance Raman spectroscopy along with hydrogen-deuterium exchange and site-directed mutagenesis were used to study the structure of red-shifted ChR1 from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1). These measurements reveal that (i) CaChR1 has an all-trans-retinal structure similar to those of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and sensory rhodopsin II but different from that of the mixed retinal composition of CrChR2, (ii) lowering the pH from 7 to 2 or substituting neutral residues for Glu169 or Asp299 does not significantly shift the ethylenic stretch frequency more than 1-2 cm(-1) in contrast to BR in which a downshift of 7-9 cm(-1) occurs reflecting neutralization of the Asp85 counterion, and (iii) the CaChR1 protonated Schiff base (SB) has stronger hydrogen bonding than BR. A model is proposed to explain these results whereby at pH 7 the predominant counterion to the SB is Asp299 (the homologue to Asp212 in BR) while Glu169 (the homologue to Asp85 in BR) exists in a neutral state. We observe an unusual constancy of the resonance Raman spectra over the broad range from pH 9 to 2 and discuss its implications. These results are in accord with recent visible absorption and current measurements of CaChR1 [Sineshchekov, O. A., et al. (2013) Intramolecular proton transfer in channelrhodopsins. Biophys. J. 104, 807-817; Li, H., et al. (2014) Role of a helix B lysine residue in the photoactive site in

  2. Acetobacter intermedius, sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Boesch, C; Trcek, J; Sievers, M; Teuber, M

    1998-03-01

    Strains of a new species in the genus Acetobacter, for which we propose the name A. intermedius sp. nov., were isolated and characterized in pure culture from different sources (Kombucha beverage, cider vinegar, spirit vinegar) and different countries (Switzerland, Slovenia). The isolated strains grow in media with 3% acetic acid and 3% ethanol as does A. europaeus, do, however, not require acetic acid for growth. These characteristics phenotypically position A. intermedius between A. europaeus and A. xylinus, DNA-DNA hybridizations of A. intermedius-DNA with DNA of the type strains of Acetobacter europaeus, A. xylinus, A. aceti, A. hansenii, A. liquefaciens, A. methanolicus, A. pasteurianus, A. diazotrophicus, Gluconobacter oxydans and Escherichia coli HB 101 indicated less than 60% DNA similarity. The important features of the new species are described. Acetobacter intermedius strain TF2 (DSM11804) isolated from the liquid phase of a tea fungus beverage (Kombucha) is the type strain.

  3. Yersinia aleksiciae sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa D; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2005-03-01

    Yersinia kristensenii consists of phenotypically heterogeneous strains. This is reflected by the existence of strains with various multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequence types. Strains originally phenotyped as members of Y. kristensenii were studied using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, DNA-DNA hybridization, determination of the DNA base composition and various phenotypic tests. The results were compared to those of Yersinia type strains. Based on levels of DNA-DNA relatedness, a specific 16S rRNA gene sequence type and the presence of lysine decarboxylase activity, a novel species, Yersinia aleksiciae sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is Y159(T) (=WA758(T)=DSM 14987(T)=LMG 22254(T)).

  4. DADiSP processing guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A guide for DADiSP software, intended for use by the Lambda Point Experiment (LPE) Team during and after the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP)-1 mission, is presented. DADiSP is a Data Analysis and Display Software developed and marketed by DSP Development Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts. This guide is intended to be used in addition to the DADiSP Worksheet User Manual and Reference Manual which are supplied by the company with the software. Technical support for DADiSP is available from DSP at (617) 577-1133. Access to DADiSP on Acceleration Characterization and Analysis Project (ACAP) EGSE is being provided to the LPE team during USMP-1 for off-line processing of SAMS data.

  5. Partial purification of the chloroplast ATP synthase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the gamma subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The chloroplast ATP synthase was partially purified from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by extracting membranes with deoxycholate and KCl, followed by centrifugation and ammonium sulfate fractionation of the supernatant. The enzyme assay involved the reconstitution of such fractions with bacteriorhodopsin and soybean phospholipids to form vesicles capable of light-dependent ({sup 32}P)-phosphate esterification. A cDNA for the gamma subunit from Chlamydomonas was isolated, expressed in vitro and sequenced. It contains the entire coding region for the gamma subunit precursor. A 35 amino acid long transit peptide resides at the NH{sub 2}-terminus of a 323 amino acid long mature peptide that is 77% similar to the spinach gamma subunit. Six cysteines were found; three were conserved in Chlamydomonas and spinach.

  6. Trophic transfer of gold nanoparticles from Euglena gracilis or Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Mi; Yoon, Sung-Ji; Shin, Yu-Jin; An, Youn-Joo

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the trophic transfer of nanoparticles (NPs) is important because NPs are small enough to easily penetrate into organisms. In this study, we evaluated the trophic transfer of gold NPs (AuNPs) within the aquatic food chain. We observed AuNPs transfer from 2 species of primary producers (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Euglena gracilis) to the primary consumer (Daphnia magna). Also, bioaccumulation of AuNPs in E. gracilis was higher than that in C. reinhardtii. The reasons for the difference in Au accumulation may be the physical structure of these organisms, and the surface area that is available for interaction with NPs. C. reinhardtii has a cell wall that may act as a barrier to the penetration of NPs. The size of E. gracilis is larger than that of C. reinhardtii. This study demonstrates the trophic transfer of AuNPs from a general producer to a consumer in an aquatic environment.

  7. Enhancement of lipid production and fatty acid profiling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Karpagam, R; Preeti, R; Ashokkumar, B; Varalakshmi, P

    2015-11-01

    Lipid from microalgae is one of the putative oil resources to facilitate the biodiesel production during this era of energy dissipation and environmental pollution. In this study, the key parameters such as biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content were evaluated at the early stationary phase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 cultivated in nutrient starved (nitrogen, phosphorous), glucose (0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15% and 0.2%) and vitamin B12 supplementation (0.001%, 0.002% and 0.003%) in Tris-Acetate-Phosphate (TAP) medium. The lipid content in nitrogen starved media was 61% which is 2.34 folds higher than nutrient sufficient TAP medium. Glucose supplementation has lead to proportional increase in biomass productivity with the increasing concentration of glucose whereas vitamin B12 supplementations had not shown any influence in lipid and biomass production. Further, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of C. reinhardtii, CC 1010 has revealed more than 80% of total SFA (saturated fatty acid) and MUFA (mono unsaturated fatty acid) content. Quality checking parameters of biodiesel like cetane number, saponification value, iodine number and degree of unsaturation were analyzed and the biodiesel fuel properties were found to be appropriate as per the international standards, EN 14214 and ASTM D6751. Conclusively, among all the treatments, nitrogen starvation with 0.1% glucose supplementation had yielded high lipid content in C. reinhardtii, CC 1010.

  8. Exploring the N-glycosylation Pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Unravels Novel Complex Structures*

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu-Rivet, Elodie; Scholz, Martin; Arias, Carolina; Dardelle, Flavien; Schulze, Stefan; Le Mauff, François; Teo, Gavin; Hochmal, Ana Karina; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie-Christine; Fufezan, Christian; Burel, Carole; Lerouge, Patrice; Martinez, Flor; Bardor, Muriel; Hippler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green unicellular eukaryotic model organism for studying relevant biological and biotechnological questions. The availability of genomic resources and the growing interest in C. reinhardtii as an emerging cell factory for the industrial production of biopharmaceuticals require an in-depth analysis of protein N-glycosylation in this organism. Accordingly, we used a comprehensive approach including genomic, glycomic, and glycoproteomic techniques to unravel the N-glycosylation pathway of C. reinhardtii. Using mass-spectrometry-based approaches, we found that both endogenous soluble and membrane-bound proteins carry predominantly oligomannosides ranging from Man-2 to Man-5. In addition, minor complex N-linked glycans were identified as being composed of partially 6-O-methylated Man-3 to Man-5 carrying one or two xylose residues. These findings were supported by results from a glycoproteomic approach that led to the identification of 86 glycoproteins. Here, a combination of in-source collision-induced dissodiation (CID) for glycan fragmentation followed by mass tag-triggered CID for peptide sequencing and PNGase F treatment of glycopeptides in the presence of 18O-labeled water in conjunction with CID mass spectrometric analyses were employed. In conclusion, our data support the notion that the biosynthesis and maturation of N-linked glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus occur via a GnT I-independent pathway yielding novel complex N-linked glycans that maturate differently from their counterparts in land plants. PMID:23912651

  9. Advances in the biotechnology of hydrogen production with the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Torzillo, Giuseppe; Scoma, Alberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Giannelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is being evaluated for use as a fuel, since it is a promising substitute for carbonaceous fuels owing to its high conversion efficiency and high specific energy content. The basic advantages of biological hydrogen production over other "green" energy sources are that it does not compete for agricultural land use, and it does not pollute, as water is the only by-product of the combustion. These characteristics make hydrogen a suitable fuel for the future. Among several biotechnological approaches, photobiological hydrogen production carried out by green microalgae has been intensively investigated in recent years. A select group of photosynthetic organisms has evolved the ability to harness light energy to drive hydrogen gas production from water. Of these, the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is considered one of the most promising eukaryotic H2 producers. In this model microorganism, light energy, H2O and H2 are linked by two excellent catalysts, the photosystem 2 (PSII) and the [FeFe]-hydrogenase, in a pathway usually referred to as direct biophotolysis. This review summarizes the main advances made over the past decade as an outcome of the discovery of the sulfur-deprivation process. Both the scientific and technical barriers that need to be overcome before H2 photoproduction can be scaled up to an industrial level are examined. Actual and theoretical limits of the efficiency of the process are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on algal biohydrogen production outdoors, and guidelines for an optimal photobioreactor design are suggested. PMID:24754449

  10. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  11. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a mutant defective in triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-09-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), a major source of biodiesel production, accumulates in nitrogen-starved Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, the metabolic pathway of starch-to-TAG conversion remains elusive because an enzyme that affects the starch degradation is unknown. Here, we isolated a new class of mutant bgal1, which expressed an overaccumulation of starch granules and defective photosynthetic growth. The bgal1 was a null mutant of a previously uncharacterized β-galactosidase-like gene (Cre02.g119700), which decreased total β-galactosidase activity 40% of the wild type. Upon nitrogen starvation, the bgal1 mutant showed decreased TAG accumulation mainly due to the reduced flux of de novo TAG biosynthesis evidenced by increased unsaturation of fatty acid composition in TAG and reduced TAG accumulation by additional supplementation of acetate to the culture media. Metabolomic analysis of the bgal1 mutant showed significantly reduced levels of metabolites following the hydrolysis of starch and substrates for TAG accumulation, whereas metabolites in TCA cycle were unaffected. Upon nitrogen starvation, while levels of glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and acetyl-CoA remained lower, most of the other metabolites in glycolysis were increased but those in the TCA cycle were decreased, supporting TAG accumulation. We suggest that BGAL1 may be involved in the degradation of starch, which affects TAG accumulation in nitrogen-starved C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner. PMID:27060488

  13. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Chang, Christopher J.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.

  14. Phototropin Influence on Eyespot Development and Regulation of Phototactic Behavior in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W

    PubMed Central

    Trippens, Jessica; Greiner, Andre; Schellwat, Jana; Neukam, Martin; Rottmann, Theresa; Lu, Yinghong; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter; Kreimer, Georg

    2012-01-01

    The eyespot of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a light-sensitive organelle important for phototactic orientation of the alga. Here, we found that eyespot size is strain specific and downregulated in light. In a strain in which the blue light photoreceptor phototropin was deleted by homologous recombination, the light regulation of the eyespot size was affected. We restored this dysfunction in different phototropin complementation experiments. Complementation with the phototropin kinase fragment reduced the eyespot size, independent of light. Interestingly, overexpression of the N-terminal light, oxygen or voltage sensing domains (LOV1+LOV2) alone also affected eyespot size and phototaxis, suggesting that aside from activation of the kinase domain, they fulfill an independent signaling function in the cell. Moreover, phototropin is involved in adjusting the level of channelrhodopsin-1, the dominant primary receptor for phototaxis within the eyespot. Both the level of channelrhodopsin-1 at the onset of illumination and its steady state level during the light period are downregulated by phototropin, whereas the level of channelrhodopsin-2 is not significantly altered. Furthermore, a light intensity–dependent formation of a C-terminal truncated phototropin form was observed. We propose that phototropin is a light regulator of phototaxis that desensitizes the eyespot when blue light intensities increase. PMID:23204408

  15. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane.

  16. Volatile fractions of landfill leachates and their effect on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: In vivo chlorophyll a fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Brack, W.; Rottler, H.; Frank, H.

    1998-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds such as short-chain halogenated hydrocarbons and alkylated benzenes are widely used as solvents or as intermediates in the chemical industry, and some of them are fuel components. Dichloromethane, trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethene have been produced in amounts of 500,000 to 1 million t/year, 80 to 100% of which are released to the environment. The production of toluene, a major component of fuels for internal combustion engines, amounts to about 30 million t/year. A method for identification of toxic volatile constituents of landfill leachates is presented that combines bioassay-compatible sample preparation, chemical analysis, and a bioassay based on in vivo chlorophyll a fluorescence of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Two major pathways of toxicity were identified by comparing fluorescence patterns: specific toxicity of hydrogen sulfide, and narcotic action of nonreactive organic compounds. For quantification, the contributions of identified compounds were calculated using toxic units. The ecotoxicologic relevance of volatile fractions from hazardous waste leachates was shown.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of full-length Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, Elisa; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Sanoguet, Zuleika; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-05-01

    C. reinhardtii centrin, an EF-hand calcium-binding protein localized to the microtubule-organizing center of eukaryotic organisms, has been crystallized in the presence of the model peptide melittin. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin is a member of the EF-hand calcium-binding superfamily. It is found in the basal body complex and is important for flagellar motility. Like other members of the EF-hand family, centrin interacts with and modulates the function of other proteins in a calcium-dependent manner. To understand how C. reinhardtii centrin interacts with its protein targets, it has been crystallized in the presence of the model peptide melittin and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. The crystals are orthorhombic, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.1, b = 114.4, c = 34.8 Å, and are likely to belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2.

  18. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-13

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ~15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix.

  19. Variations in the alternative oxidase in chlamydomonas grown in air or high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1989-03-01

    Chlamydomonas in the resting phase of growth has an equal capacity of about 15 micromole O{sub 2} uptake per hour per milligram of chlorophyll for both the cytochrome c, CN-sensitive respiration, and for the alternative, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration. Alternative respiration capacity was measured as salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited O{sub 2} uptake in the presence of CN, and cytochrome c respiration capacity as CN inhibition of O{sub 2} uptake in the presence of salicylhydroxamic acid. Measured total respiration was considerably less than the combined capacities for respiration. During the log phase of growth on high (2-5%) CO{sub 2}, the alternative respiration capacity decreased about 90% but returned as the culture entered the lag phase. When the alternative oxidase capacity was low, addition of salicylic acid or cyanide induced its reappearance. When cells were grown on low (air-level) CO{sub 2}, which induced a CO{sub 2} concentrating mechanism, the alternative oxidase capacity did not decrease during the growth phase. Attempts to measure in vivo distribution of respiration between the two pathways with either CN or salicylhydroxamic acid alone were inconclusive.

  20. X-Ray structure of a truncated form of cytochrome f from chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Young-In; Huang, Li-Shar; Zhang, Zhaolei; Fernando-Velasquez, Javier G.; Berry, E. A.

    2000-03-01

    A truncated form of cytochrome f from Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii (an important eukaryotic model organism for photosynthetic electron transfer studies) has been crystallized (space group P212121; 3 molecules/ asymmetric unit) and its structure determined to 2.0 Angstrom by molecular replacement using the coordinates of a truncated turnip cytochrome f as a model. The structure displays the same folding and detailed features as turnip cytochrome f including: (a) an unusual heme Fe ligation by alpha-amino group of tyrosine 1, (b) a cluster of lysine residues (proposed docking site of plastocyanin), and (c) the presence of a chain of 7 water molecules bound to conserved residues and extending between the heme pocket and K58 and K66 at the lysine cluster. For this array of waters we propose a structural role. Two cytochrome f molecules are related by a non-crystallographic symmetry operator which is a distorted proper 2-fold rotation. This may represent the dimeric relation of the monomers in situ, however the heme orientation suggested by this model is not consistent with previous epr measurements on oriented membranes.

  1. The Antarctic Chlamydomonas raudensis: an emerging model for cold adaptation of photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Maxwell, Denis P; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2013-09-01

    Permanently cold habitats dominate our planet and psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in cold environments. Environmental adaptations unique to psychrophilic microorganisms have been thoroughly described; however, the vast majority of studies to date have focused on cold-adapted bacteria. The combination of low temperatures in the presence of light is one of the most damaging environmental stresses for a photosynthetic organism: in order to survive, photopsychrophiles (i.e. photosynthetic organisms adapted to low temperatures) balance temperature-independent reactions of light energy capture/transduction with downstream temperature-dependent metabolic processes such as carbon fixation. Here, we review research on photopsychrophiles with a focus on an emerging model organism, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241 (UWO241). UWO241 is a psychrophilic green algal species and is a member of the photosynthetic microbial eukaryote community that provides the majority of fixed carbon for ice-covered lake ecosystems located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The water column exerts a range of environmental stressors on the phytoplankton community that inhabits this aquatic ecosystem, including low temperatures, extreme shade of an unusual spectral range (blue-green), high salinity, nutrient deprivation and extremes in seasonal photoperiod. More than two decades of work on UWO241 have produced one of our most comprehensive views of environmental adaptation in a cold-adapted, photosynthetic microbial eukaryote.

  2. Chlamydomonas as a model for biofuels and bio-products production.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Melissa A; Ostrand, Joseph T; Fields, Francis J; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-05-01

    Developing renewable energy sources is critical to maintaining the economic growth of the planet while protecting the environment. First generation biofuels focused on food crops like corn and sugarcane for ethanol production, and soybean and palm for biodiesel production. Second generation biofuels based on cellulosic ethanol produced from terrestrial plants, has received extensive funding and recently pilot facilities have been commissioned, but to date output of fuels from these sources has fallen well short of what is needed. Recent research and pilot demonstrations have highlighted the potential of algae as one of the most promising sources of sustainable liquid transportation fuels. Algae have also been established as unique biofactories for industrial, therapeutic, and nutraceutical co-products. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii's long established role in the field of basic research in green algae has paved the way for understanding algal metabolism and developing genetic engineering protocols. These tools are now being utilized in C. reinhardtii and in other algal species for the development of strains to maximize biofuels and bio-products yields from the lab to the field.

  3. Loss of chloroplast ClpP elicits an autophagy-like response in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2014-09-01

    Chloroplast genomes contain a single ClpP1 gene encoding one of the catalytic subunits of the evolutionarily conserved ATP-dependent Clp protease. Efforts to inactivate this protease in the chloroplast through targeted disruption of the clpP1 gene have failed, suggesting that it is essential for cell survival in plants. To circumvent this problem, a repressible chloroplast gene expression system was developed in the green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This system takes advantage of the nuclear Nac2 gene fused to the MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch, which can be repressed by adding vitamin B12 and thiamine to the growth medium. Nac2 encodes a chloroplast protein that interacts specifically with the 5'UTR of the psbD mRNA and is involved in processing/translation of this transcript. Loss of Nac2 leads to the specific degradation of psbD mRNA. Because the psbD 5'UTR is necessary and sufficient for the Nac2-dependent stability of psbD mRNA, this dependence can be transferred to any chloroplast gene by linking its coding sequence to the psbD 5 'UTR. In this way it was possible to repress the clpP1 gene in a reversible way with vitamins.

  4. Repressible chloroplast gene expression in Chlamydomonas: a new tool for the study of the photosynthetic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Dinc, Emine; Ramundo, Silvia; Croce, Roberta; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2014-09-01

    A repressible/inducible chloroplast gene expression system has been used to conditionally inhibit chloroplast protein synthesis in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This system allows one to follow the fate of photosystem II and photosystem I and their antennae upon cessation of chloroplast translation. The main results are that the levels of the PSI core proteins decrease at a slower rate than those of PSII. Amongst the light-harvesting complexes, the decrease of CP26 proceeds at the same rate as for the PSII core proteins whereas it is significantly slower for CP29, and for the antenna complexes of PSI this rate is comprised between that of CP26 and CP29. In marked contrast, the components of trimeric LHCII, the major PSII antenna, persist for several days upon inhibition of chloroplast translation. This system offers new possibilities for investigating the biosynthesis and turnover of individual photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membranes. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  5. Exploring the N-glycosylation pathway in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii unravels novel complex structures.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Rivet, Elodie; Scholz, Martin; Arias, Carolina; Dardelle, Flavien; Schulze, Stefan; Le Mauff, François; Teo, Gavin; Hochmal, Ana Karina; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Loutelier-Bourhis, Corinne; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie-Christine; Fufezan, Christian; Burel, Carole; Lerouge, Patrice; Martinez, Flor; Bardor, Muriel; Hippler, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green unicellular eukaryotic model organism for studying relevant biological and biotechnological questions. The availability of genomic resources and the growing interest in C. reinhardtii as an emerging cell factory for the industrial production of biopharmaceuticals require an in-depth analysis of protein N-glycosylation in this organism. Accordingly, we used a comprehensive approach including genomic, glycomic, and glycoproteomic techniques to unravel the N-glycosylation pathway of C. reinhardtii. Using mass-spectrometry-based approaches, we found that both endogenous soluble and membrane-bound proteins carry predominantly oligomannosides ranging from Man-2 to Man-5. In addition, minor complex N-linked glycans were identified as being composed of partially 6-O-methylated Man-3 to Man-5 carrying one or two xylose residues. These findings were supported by results from a glycoproteomic approach that led to the identification of 86 glycoproteins. Here, a combination of in-source collision-induced dissodiation (CID) for glycan fragmentation followed by mass tag-triggered CID for peptide sequencing and PNGase F treatment of glycopeptides in the presence of (18)O-labeled water in conjunction with CID mass spectrometric analyses were employed. In conclusion, our data support the notion that the biosynthesis and maturation of N-linked glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus occur via a GnT I-independent pathway yielding novel complex N-linked glycans that maturate differently from their counterparts in land plants.

  6. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a convenient model system for the study of DNA repair in photoautotrophic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Daniel; Sevcovicová, Andrea; Sviezená, Barbara; Gálová, Eliska; Miadoková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a convenient model organism for the study of basic biological processes, including DNA repair investigations. This review is focused on the studies of DNA repair pathways in C. reinhardtii. Emphasis is given to the connection of DNA repair with other cellular functions, namely the regulation of the cell cycle. Comparison with the results of repair investigations that are already available revealed the presence of all basic repair pathways in C. reinhardtii as well as special features characteristic of this alga. Among others, the involvement of UVSE1 gene in recombinational repair and uniparental inheritance of chloroplast genome, the specific role of TRXH1 gene in strand break repair, the requirement of PHR1 gene for full activity of PHR2 gene, or encoding of two excision repair proteins by the single REX1 gene. Contrary to yeast, mammals and higher plants, C. reinhardtii does not appear to contain the ortholog of RAD6 gene, which plays an important role in DNA translesion synthesis and mutagenesis. Completed genome sequences will be a basis for molecular analyses allowing to explain the differences that have been observed in DNA repair of this alga in comparison with other model organisms.

  7. Glutathionylation in the photosynthetic model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a proteomic survey.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Mirko; Bedhomme, Mariette; Groni, Hayam; Marchand, Christophe H; Puppo, Carine; Gontero, Brigitte; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Decottignies, Paulette; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2012-02-01

    Protein glutathionylation is a redox post-translational modification occurring under oxidative stress conditions and playing a major role in cell regulation and signaling. This modification has been mainly studied in nonphotosynthetic organisms, whereas much less is known in photosynthetic organisms despite their important exposure to oxidative stress caused by changes in environmental conditions. We report a large scale proteomic analysis using biotinylated glutathione and streptavidin affinity chromatography that allowed identification of 225 glutathionylated proteins in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Moreover, 56 sites of glutathionylation were also identified after peptide affinity purification and tandem mass spectrometry. The targets identified belong to a wide range of biological processes and pathways, among which the Calvin-Benson cycle appears to be a major target. The glutathionylation of four enzymes of this cycle, phosphoribulokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, and phosphoglycerate kinase was confirmed by Western blot and activity measurements. The results suggest that glutathionylation could constitute a major mechanism of regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle under oxidative stress conditions.

  8. Genome-wide characterization of genetic variation in the unicellular, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyosik; Ehrenreich, Ian M

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model system for studying cilia, photosynthesis, and other core features of eukaryotes, and is also an emerging source of biofuels. Despite its importance to basic and applied biological research, the level and pattern of genetic variation in this haploid green alga has yet to be characterized on a genome-wide scale. To improve understanding of C. reinhardtii's genetic variability, we generated low coverage whole genome resequencing data for nearly all of the available isolates of this species, which were sampled from a number of sites in North America over the past ∼70 years. Based on the analysis of more than 62,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, we identified two groups of isolates that represent geographical subpopulations of the species. We also found that measurements of genetic diversity were highly variable throughout the genome, in part due to technical factors. We studied the level and pattern of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and observed one chromosome that exhibits elevated LD. Furthermore, we detected widespread evidence of recombination across the genome, which implies that outcrossing occurs in natural populations of this species. In summary, our study provides multiple insights into the sequence diversity of C. reinhardtii that will be useful to future studies of natural genetic variation in this organism.

  9. The circadian clock of the unicellular eukaryotic model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Maria; Wagner, Volker

    2003-05-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, also called 'green yeast', emerged in the past years as a model organism for specific scientific questions such as chloroplast biogenesis and function, the composition of the flagella including its basal apparatus, or the mechanism of the circadian clock. Sequencing of its chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes have already been completed and a first draft of its nuclear genome has also been released recently. In C. reinhardtii several circadian rhythms are physiologically well characterized, and one of them has even been shown to operate in outer space. Circadian expression patterns of nuclear and plastid genes have been studied. The mode of regulation of these genes occurs at the transcriptional level, although there is also evidence for posttranscriptional control. A clock-controlled, phylogenetically conserved RNA-binding protein was characterized in this alga, which interacts with several mRNAs that all contain a common cis-acting motif. Its function within the circadian system is currently under investigation. This review summarizes the current state of the knowledge about the circadian system in C. reinhardtii and points out its potential for future studies.

  10. Anomalies in the motion dynamics of long-flagella mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Khona, Dolly K; Rao, Venkatramanan G; Motiwalla, Mustafa J; Varma, P C Sreekrishna; Kashyap, Anisha R; Das, Koyel; Shirolikar, Seema M; Borde, Lalit; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K; Mukhopadhyay, Siuli; Mathur, Deepak; D'Souza, Jacinta S

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been used as a model organism in studies of cell motility and flagellar dynamics. The motility of the well-conserved '9+2' axoneme in its flagella remains a subject of immense curiosity. Using high-speed videography and morphological analyses, we have characterized long-flagella mutants (lf1, lf2-1, lf2-5, lf3-2, and lf4) of C. reinhardtii for biophysical parameters such as swimming velocities, waveforms, beat frequencies, and swimming trajectories. These mutants are aberrant in proteins involved in the regulation of flagellar length and bring about a phenotypic increase in this length. Our results reveal that the flagellar beat frequency and swimming velocity are negatively correlated with the length of the flagella. When compared to the wild-type, any increase in the flagellar length reduces both the swimming velocities (by 26-57%) and beat frequencies (by 8-16%). We demonstrate that with no apparent aberrations/ultrastructural deformities in the mutant axonemes, it is this increased length that has a critical role to play in the motion dynamics of C. reinhardtii cells, and, provided there are no significant changes in their flagellar proteome, any increase in this length compromises the swimming velocity either by reduction of the beat frequency or by an alteration in the waveform of the flagella.

  11. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism.

  12. The response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to nitrogen deprivation: a systems biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Jin; Wang, Hongxia; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Deshpande, Rahul R; Skepper, Jeremy N; Holguin, F Omar; Juergens, Matthew T; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M; Gang, David R

    2015-02-01

    Drastic alteration in macronutrients causes large changes in gene expression in the photosynthetic unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Preliminary data suggested that cells follow a biphasic response to this change hinging on the initiation of lipid accumulation, and we hypothesized that drastic repatterning of metabolism also followed this biphasic modality. To test this hypothesis, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolite changes that occur under nitrogen (N) deprivation were analyzed. Eight sampling times were selected covering the progressive slowing of growth and induction of oil synthesis between 4 and 6 h after N deprivation. Results of the combined, systems-level investigation indicated that C. reinhardtii cells sense and respond on a large scale within 30 min to a switch to N-deprived conditions turning on a largely gluconeogenic metabolic state, which then transitions to a glycolytic stage between 4 and 6 h after N depletion. This nitrogen-sensing system is transduced to carbon- and nitrogen-responsive pathways, leading to down-regulation of carbon assimilation and chlorophyll biosynthesis, and an increase in nitrogen metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. For example, the expression of nearly all the enzymes for assimilating nitrogen from ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, urea, formamide/acetamide, purines, pyrimidines, polyamines, amino acids and proteins increased significantly. Although arginine biosynthesis enzymes were also rapidly up-regulated, arginine pool size changes and isotopic labeling results indicated no increased flux through this pathway.

  13. Relief of arsenate toxicity by Cd-stimulated phytochelatin synthesis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Isao; Fujiwara, Shoko; Saegusa, Hirotaka; Inouhe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2006-01-01

    In most photosynthetic organisms, inorganic arsenic taken up into the cells inhibits photosynthesis and cellular growth. In a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, 0.5 mM arsenate inhibited photosynthesis almost completely within 30 min. However, in cells acclimated with a sublethal concentration (0.05 to 0.1 mM) of Cd, the inhibition of photosynthesis at 30 min after the addition of arsenate was relieved by more than 50%. The concentrations of arsenic incorporated into the cells were not significantly different between the Cd-acclimated and the non-acclimated cells. The Cd-acclimated cells accumulated Cd and synthesized phytochelatin (PC) peptides, which are known to play an important role in detoxification of heavy metals in plants. By the addition of an inhibitor of glutathione (an intermediate in the PC biosynthetic pathway) biosynthesis, buthionine sulfoximine, cells lost not only Cd tolerance but also arsenate tolerance. These results suggest that glutathione and/or PCs synthesized in Cd-acclimated cells are involved in mechanisms of arsenate tolerance.

  14. Production of biodiesel from microalgae Chlamydomonas polypyrenoideum grown on dairy industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Prasad, Ravindra; Kumar, Virendra; Singh, D P

    2013-09-01

    This study involves a process of phyco-remediation of dairy industry wastewater by algal strain Chlamydomonas polypyrenoideum. The results of selected algal strain indicated that dairy industry wastewater was good nutrient supplement for algal growth in comparable with BG-11 growth medium. Alga grown on dairy industry wastewater reduced the pollution load of nitrate (90%), nitrite (74%), phosphate (70%), chloride (61%), fluoride (58%), and ammonia (90%) on 10th day of its growth as compared to that of uninoculated wastewater. The lipid content of algal biomass grown on dairy wastewater on 10th day (1.6g) and 15th day (1.2 g) of batch experiment was found to be higher than the lipid content of algal biomass grown in BG-11 growth medium on 10th day (1.27 g) and 15th day (1.0 g) of batch experiment. The results on FTIR analysis of the extracted bio-oil through transesterification reaction was comparable with bio-oil obtained from other sources. PMID:23896442

  15. Involvement of phosphatidate phosphatase in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerols in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii * #

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xiao-dong; Cai, Jia-jia; Fei, Xiao-wen

    2013-01-01

    Lipid biosynthesis is essential for eukaryotic cells, but the mechanisms of the process in microalgae remain poorly understood. Phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase or 3-sn-phosphatidate phosphohydrolase (PAP) catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to form diacylglycerols and inorganic orthophosphates. This reaction is integral in the synthesis of triacylglycerols. In this study, the mRNA level of the PAP isoform CrPAP2 in a species of Chlamydomonas was found to increase in nitrogen-free conditions. Silencing of the CrPAP2 gene using RNA interference resulted in the decline of lipid content by 2.4%–17.4%. By contrast, over-expression of the CrPAP2 gene resulted in an increase in lipid content by 7.5%–21.8%. These observations indicate that regulation of the CrPAP2 gene can control the lipid content of the algal cells. In vitro CrPAP2 enzyme activity assay indicated that the cloned CrPAP2 gene exhibited biological activities. PMID:24302712

  16. SPONTANEOUS MUTATION ACCUMULATION IN MULTIPLE STRAINS OF THE GREEN ALGA, CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Andrew D; Ness, Rob W; Keightley, Peter D; Colegrave, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of mutational parameters, such as the average fitness effect of a new mutation and the rate at which new genetic variation for fitness is created by mutation, are important for the understanding of many biological processes. However, the causes of interspecific variation in mutational parameters and the extent to which they vary within species remain largely unknown. We maintained multiple strains of the unicellular eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for approximately 1000 generations under relaxed selection by transferring a single cell every ∼10 generations. Mean fitness of the lines tended to decline with generations of mutation accumulation whereas mutational variance increased. We did not find any evidence for differences among strains in any of the mutational parameters estimated. The overall change in mean fitness per cell division and rate of input of mutational variance per cell division were more similar to values observed in multicellular organisms than to those in other single-celled microbes. However, after taking into account differences in genome size among species, estimates from multicellular organisms and microbes, including our new estimates from C. reinhardtii, become substantially more similar. Thus, we suggest that variation in genome size is an important determinant of interspecific variation in mutational parameters. PMID:24826801

  17. PF20 gene product contains WD repeats and localizes to the intermicrotubule bridges in Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E F; Lefebvre, P A

    1997-01-01

    The central pair of microtubules and their associated structures play a significant role in regulating flagellar motility. To begin a molecular analysis of these components, we generated central apparatus-defective mutants in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using insertional mutagenesis. One paralyzed mutant recovered in our screen contains an allele of a previously identified mutation, pf20. Mutant cells have paralyzed flagella, and the entire central apparatus is missing in isolated axonemes. We have cloned the wild-type PF20 gene and confirmed its identity by rescuing the pf20 mutant phenotype upon transformation. Rescued transformants were wild type in motility and in axonemal ultrastructure. A cDNA clone containing a single, long open reading frame was obtained and sequenced. Database searches using the predicted 606-amino acid sequence of PF20 indicate that the protein contains five contiguous WD repeats. These repeats are found in a number of proteins with diverse cellular functions including beta-transducin and dynein intermediate chains. An antibody was raised against a fusion protein expressed from the cloned cDNA. Immunogold labeling of wild-type axonemes indicates that the PF20 protein is localized along the length of the C2 microtubule on the intermicrotubule bridges connecting the two central microtubules. We suggest that the PF20 gene product is a new member of the family of WD repeat proteins and is required for central microtubule assembly and/or stability and flagellar motility. Images PMID:9188098

  18. On the localization of voltage-sensitive calcium channels in the flagella of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to prove that voltage-sensitive calcium channels controlling the photophobic stop response of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are exclusively found in the flagellar region of the cell and to answer the question as to their exact localization within the flagellar membrane. The strategy used was to amputate flagella to a variable degree without perturbing the electrical properties of the cell and measure flagellar currents shortly after amputation and during the subsequent regeneration process. Under all conditions, a close correlation was found between current size and flagellar length, strongly suggesting that the channels that mediate increases in intraflagellar calcium concentration are confined to and distributed over the total flagellar length. Bald mutants yielded tiny flagellar currents, in agreement with the existence of residual flagellar stubs. In the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, flagellar length and flagellar currents also recovered in parallel. Recovery came to an earlier end, however, leveling off at a time when in the absence of cycloheximide only half maximal values were achieved. This suggests the existence of a pool of precursors, which permits the maintenance of a constant ratio between voltage-sensitive calcium channels and other intraflagellar proteins. PMID:8195293

  19. Defective flagellar assembly and length regulation in LF3 null mutants in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Lai-Wa; Dentler, William L.; Lefebvre, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Four long-flagella (LF) genes are important for flagellar length control in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we characterize two new null lf3 mutants whose phenotypes are different from previously identified lf3 mutants. These null mutants have unequal-length flagella that assemble more slowly than wild-type flagella, though their flagella can also reach abnormally long lengths. Prominent bulges are found at the distal ends of short, long, and regenerating flagella of these mutants. Analysis of the flagella by electron and immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western blots revealed that the bulges contain intraflagellar transport complexes, a defect reported previously (for review see Cole, D.G., 2003. Traffic. 4:435–442) in a subset of mutants defective in intraflagellar transport. We have cloned the wild-type LF3 gene and characterized a hypomorphic mutant allele of LF3. LF3p is a novel protein located predominantly in the cell body. It cosediments with the product of the LF1 gene in sucrose density gradients, indicating that these proteins may form a functional complex to regulate flagellar length and assembly. PMID:14610061

  20. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ODA3 Gene Encodes a Protein of the Outer Dynein Arm Docking Complex

    PubMed Central

    Koutoulis, Anthony; Pazour, Gregory J.; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Inaba, Kazuo; Sheng, Hong; Takada, Saeko; Witman, George B.

    1997-01-01

    We have used an insertional mutagenesis/ gene tagging technique to generate new Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants that are defective in assembly of the outer dynein arm. Among 39 insertional oda mutants characterized, two are alleles of the previously uncloned ODA3 gene, one is an allele of the uncloned ODA10 gene, and one represents a novel ODA gene (termed ODA12). ODA3 is of particular interest because it is essential for assembly of both the outer dynein arm and the outer dynein arm docking complex (ODA-DC) onto flagellar doublet microtubules (Takada, S., and R. Kamiya. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:737– 745). Beginning with the inserted DNA as a tag, the ODA3 gene and a full-length cDNA were cloned. The cloned gene rescues the phenotype of oda3 mutants. The cDNA sequence predicts a novel 83.4-kD protein with extensive coiled-coil domains. The ODA-DC contains three polypeptides; direct amino acid sequencing indicates that the largest of these polypeptides corresponds to ODA3. This protein is likely to have an important role in the precise positioning of the outer dynein arms on the flagellar axoneme. PMID:9166407

  1. The Awesome Power of Dikaryons for Studying Flagella and Basal Bodies in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Dutcher, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia/flagella and basal bodies/centrioles play key roles in human health and homeostasis. Among the organisms used to study these microtubule-based organelles, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has several advantages. One is the existence of a temporary phase of the life cycle, termed the dikaryon. These cells are formed during mating when the cells fuse and the behavior of flagella from two genetically distinguishable parents can be observed. During this stage, the cytoplasms mix allowing for a defect in the flagella of one parent to be rescued by proteins from the other parent. This offers the unique advantage of adding back wild-type gene product or labeled protein at endogenous levels that can used to monitor various flagellar and basal body phenotypes. Mutants that show rescue and ones that fail to show rescue are both informative about the nature of the flagella and basal body defects. When rescue occurs, it can be used to determine the mutant gene product and to follow the temporal and spatial patterns of flagellar assembly. This review describes many examples of insights into basal body and flagellar proteins’ function and assembly that have been discovered using dikaryons and discusses the potential for further analyses. PMID:24272949

  2. Genetic Analysis of the Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii I-Crei Mobile Intron Homing System in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, L. M.; Stephens, K. M.; Savage, J. H.; Monnat-Jr., R. J.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed and used a genetic selection system in Escherichia coli to study functional requirements for homing site recognition and cleavage by a representative eukaryotic mobile intron endonuclease. The homing endonuclease, I-CreI, was originally isolated from the chloroplast of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. I-CreI homing site mutants contained base pair substitutions or single base deletions that altered the rate of homing site cleavage and/or product release. I-CreI endonuclease mutants fell into six phenotypic classes that differed in in vivo activity, toxicity or genetic dominance. Inactivating mutations clustered in the N-terminal 60% of the I-CreI amino acid sequence, and two frameshift mutations were isolated that resulted in premature translation termination though retained partial activity. These mutations indicate that the N-terminal two-thirds of the I-CreI endonuclease is sufficient for homing site recognition and cleavage. Substitution mutations altered in four potential active site residues were examined: D20N, Q47H or R70A substitutions inactivated endonuclease activity, whereas S22A did not. The genetic approach we have taken complements phylogenetic and structural studies of mobile intron endonucleases and has provided new information on the mechanistic basis of I-CreI homing site recognition and cleavage. PMID:9409828

  3. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M; Gang, David R

    2015-08-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism.

  4. Genetic analysis of suppressors of the PF10 mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, S.K.; Gibbons, W.; Inwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    A mutation at the PF10 locus of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii leads to abnormal cell motility. The asymmetric form of the ciliary beat stroke characteristic of wild-type flagella is modified by this mutation to a nearly symmetric beat. We report here that this abnormal motility is a conditional phenotype that depends on light intensity. In the absence of light or under low light intensities, the motility is more severely impaired than at higher light intensities. By UV mutagenesis we obtained 11 intragenic and 70 extragenic strains that show reversion of the pf10 motility phenotype observed in low light. The intragenic events reverted the motility phenotype of the pf10 mutation completely. The extragenic events define at least seven suppressor loci; these map to linkage groups IV, VII, IX, XI, XII and XVII. Suppressor mutations at two of the seven loci (LIS1 and LIS2) require light for their suppressor activity. Forty-eight of the 70 extragenic suppressors were examined in heterozygous diploid cells; 47 of these mutants were recessive to the wild-type allele and one mutant (bop5-1) was dominant to the wild-type allele. Complementation analysis of the 47 recessive mutants showed unusual patterns. Most mutants within a recombinationally defined group failed to complement one another, although there were pairs that showed intra-allelic complementation. Additionally, some of the mutants at each recombinationally defined locus failed to complement mutants at other loci. They define dominant enhancers of one another.

  5. Toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lanzhou; Zhou, Lina; Liu, Yongding; Deng, Songqiang; Wu, Hao; Wang, Gaohong

    2012-10-01

    The toxicological effects of nanometer titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) on a unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were assessed by investigating the changes of the physiology and cyto-ultrastructure of this species under treatment. We found that nano-TiO2 inhibited photosynthetic efficiency and cell growth, but the content of chlorophyll a content in algae did not change, while carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents increased. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content reached maximum values after 8h exposure and then decreased to a moderately low level at 72 h. Electron microscopy images indicated that as concentrations of nano-TiO2 increased, a large number of C. reinhardtii cells were noted to be damaged: the number of chloroplasts declined, various other organelles were degraded, plasmolysis occurred, and TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be located inside cell wall and membrane. It was also noted that cell surface was surrounded by TiO2 particles, which could present an obstacle to the exchange of substances between the cell and its surrounding environment. To sum up, the effect of nano-TiO2 on C. reinhardtii included cell surface aggregation, photosynthesis inhibition, lipid peroxidation and new protein synthesis, while the response of C. reinhardtii to nano-TiO2 was a rapid process which occurs during 24 h after exposing and may relate to physiological stress system to mitigate damage. PMID:22883605

  6. Mitochondrial Genetics of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii: Resistance Mutations Marking the Cytochrome B Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bennoun, P.; Delosme, M.; Kuck, U.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the genetic and molecular analysis of the first non-Mendelian mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resistant to myxothiazol, an inhibitor of the respiratory cytochrome bc1 complex. Using a set of seven oligonucleotide probes, restriction fragments containing the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene from C. reinhardtii were isolated from a mitochondrial DNA library. This gene is located adjacent to the gene for subunit 4 of the mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase (ND4), near one end of the 15.8-kb linear mitochondrial genome of C. reinhardtii. The algal cytochrome b apoprotein contains 381 amino-acid residues and exhibits a sequence similarity of about 59% with other plant cytochrome b proteins. The cyt b gene from four myxothiazol resistant mutants of C. reinhardtii was amplified for DNA sequence analysis. In comparison to the wild-type strain, all mutants contain an identical point mutation in the cyt b gene, leading to a change of a phenylalanine codon to a leucine codon at amino acid position 129 of the cytochrome b protein. Segregation analysis in tetrads from reciprocal crosses of mutants with wild type shows a strict uniparental inheritance of this mutation from the mating type minus parent (UP(-)). However, mitochondrial markers from both parents are recovered in vegetative diploids in variable proportions from one experiment to the next for a given cross. On the average, a strong bias is seen for markers inherited from the mating type minus parent. PMID:2004707

  7. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii thermal tolerance enhancement mediated by a mutualistic interaction with vitamin B12-producing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo; Bishop, Shawn; Stessman, Dan; Wright, David; Spalding, Martin H; Halverson, Larry J

    2013-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors affecting the growth and survival of microorganisms and in light of current global patterns is of particular interest. Here, we highlight studies revealing how vitamin B12 (cobalamin)-producing bacteria increase the fitness of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii following an increase in environmental temperature. Heat stress represses C. reinhardtii cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (METE) gene expression coinciding with a reduction in METE-mediated methionine synthase activity, chlorosis and cell death during heat stress. However, in the presence of cobalamin-producing bacteria or exogenous cobalamin amendments C. reinhardtii cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase METH-mediated methionine biosynthesis is functional at temperatures that result in C. reinhardtii death in the absence of cobalamin. Artificial microRNA silencing of C. reinhardtii METH expression leads to nearly complete loss of cobalamin-mediated enhancement of thermal tolerance. This suggests that methionine biosynthesis is an essential cellular mechanism for adaptation by C. reinhardtii to thermal stress. Increased fitness advantage of METH under environmentally stressful conditions could explain the selective pressure for retaining the METH gene in algae and the apparent independent loss of the METE gene in various algal species. Our results show that how an organism acclimates to a change in its abiotic environment depends critically on co-occurring species, the nature of that interaction, and how those species interactions evolve. PMID:23486253

  8. The conserved ciliary protein Bug22 controls planar beating of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dan; Cao, Muqing; Oda, Toshiyuki; Pan, Junmin

    2014-01-15

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia can exhibit planar and non-planar beating, and the mechanism controlling these beating patterns is not well understood. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella beat in approximately the same plane with either an asymmetric ciliary-type or symmetric flagellar-type waveform. Each B-tubule of the number 1, 5 and 6 doublets of the flagellar axoneme possesses a beak-like structure. The number 5 and 6 beak structures are implicated in conversion of ciliary motion into flagellar motion. Here, we show that in a null mutant of Bug22, the asymmetric ciliary waveform is converted into a three-dimensional (non-planar) symmetric flagellar waveform. Bug22 is localized to approximately the proximal half to two-thirds of the flagellum, similar to localization of beak-like structures. However, as shown by immunogold labeling, Bug22 associates with axonemal microtubules without apparent preference for any particular doublets. Interestingly, bug22 mutants lack all beak-like structures. We propose that one function of Bug22 is to regulate the anchoring of the beak-like structures to the doublet microtubules and confine flagellar beating to a plane. PMID:24259666

  9. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  10. The Involvement of hybrid cluster protein 4, HCP4, in Anaerobic Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Adam C.; Carter, Clay J.

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been studied for its unique fermentation pathways and has been evaluated as a candidate organism for biofuel production. Fermentation in C. reinhardtii is facilitated by a network of three predominant pathways producing four major byproducts: formate, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen. Previous microarray studies identified many genes as being highly up-regulated during anaerobiosis. For example, hybrid cluster protein 4 (HCP4) was found to be one of the most highly up-regulated genes under anoxic conditions. Hybrid cluster proteins have long been studied for their unique spectroscopic properties, yet their biological functions remain largely unclear. To probe its role during anaerobiosis, HCP4 was silenced using artificial microRNAs (ami-hcp4) followed by extensive phenotypic analyses of cells grown under anoxic conditions. Both the expression of key fermentative enzymes and their respective metabolites were significantly altered in ami-hcp4, with nitrogen uptake from the media also being significantly different than wild-type cells. The results strongly suggest a role for HCP4 in regulating key fermentative and nitrogen utilization pathways. PMID:26930496

  11. The Involvement of hybrid cluster protein 4, HCP4, in Anaerobic Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Olson, Adam C; Carter, Clay J

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been studied for its unique fermentation pathways and has been evaluated as a candidate organism for biofuel production. Fermentation in C. reinhardtii is facilitated by a network of three predominant pathways producing four major byproducts: formate, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen. Previous microarray studies identified many genes as being highly up-regulated during anaerobiosis. For example, hybrid cluster protein 4 (HCP4) was found to be one of the most highly up-regulated genes under anoxic conditions. Hybrid cluster proteins have long been studied for their unique spectroscopic properties, yet their biological functions remain largely unclear. To probe its role during anaerobiosis, HCP4 was silenced using artificial microRNAs (ami-hcp4) followed by extensive phenotypic analyses of cells grown under anoxic conditions. Both the expression of key fermentative enzymes and their respective metabolites were significantly altered in ami-hcp4, with nitrogen uptake from the media also being significantly different than wild-type cells. The results strongly suggest a role for HCP4 in regulating key fermentative and nitrogen utilization pathways.

  12. Advances in the biotechnology of hydrogen production with the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Torzillo, Giuseppe; Scoma, Alberto; Faraloni, Cecilia; Giannelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Biological hydrogen production is being evaluated for use as a fuel, since it is a promising substitute for carbonaceous fuels owing to its high conversion efficiency and high specific energy content. The basic advantages of biological hydrogen production over other "green" energy sources are that it does not compete for agricultural land use, and it does not pollute, as water is the only by-product of the combustion. These characteristics make hydrogen a suitable fuel for the future. Among several biotechnological approaches, photobiological hydrogen production carried out by green microalgae has been intensively investigated in recent years. A select group of photosynthetic organisms has evolved the ability to harness light energy to drive hydrogen gas production from water. Of these, the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is considered one of the most promising eukaryotic H2 producers. In this model microorganism, light energy, H2O and H2 are linked by two excellent catalysts, the photosystem 2 (PSII) and the [FeFe]-hydrogenase, in a pathway usually referred to as direct biophotolysis. This review summarizes the main advances made over the past decade as an outcome of the discovery of the sulfur-deprivation process. Both the scientific and technical barriers that need to be overcome before H2 photoproduction can be scaled up to an industrial level are examined. Actual and theoretical limits of the efficiency of the process are also discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on algal biohydrogen production outdoors, and guidelines for an optimal photobioreactor design are suggested.

  13. Comparative study of phototactic and photophobic receptor chromophore properties in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zacks, D N; Derguini, F; Nakanishi, K; Spudich, J L

    1993-07-01

    The motile, unicellular, eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits two distinct behavioral reactions to light stimuli, phototaxis and the photophobic response. Both are mediated by retinal-containing receptors. This paper focuses on a direct comparison of the two photoresponses and the chromophore requirements for their photoreceptor(s). Using computerized motion analysis assays for phototaxis and photophobic responses by the same populations of cells, we measured the ability of various isomers and analogues of retinal to reconstitute photobehavior in the pigment-deficient mutant FN68. The results indicate that photophobic and phototaxis responses each require chromophores with an all-trans polyene chain configuration, planar ionone ring/polyene chain conformation, and the ability to isomerize around the retinal C13-C14 double bond. One difference between the two behaviors is that the photophobic response becomes highly desensitized after light stimuli to which the phototaxis response does not become desensitized, indicating the existence of at least one distinct step in the photophobic response pathway. A second difference is that the retinal regeneration of the photophobic response but not of phototaxis is inhibited by a 5-membered ring 13-trans-locked analogue. While showing close similarity in the chromophore structural requirements of the two behaviors, the results indicate that differences exist between the two responses at the level of their photoreceptor proteins and/or in their transduction processes.

  14. Influence of sulphate on the reduction of cadmium toxicity in the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium is considered as one of the most hazardous metals for living organism and ecosystems. Environmental factors play an important role since they alter the toxicity of metals by varying the bioavailability of these elements for the organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate, using the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii, the existence of an interaction between cadmium and sulphate as a factor that varied the toxicity of this metal. Different cell parameters such as cell growth, content of chlorophylls and biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were determined. A two-way ANOVA showed that the interaction had a significant effect size of 21% (p<0.001) for the growth of this microalga and around of a 6% on the content of chlorophylls/cell. The effect of this inhibition was that when the concentration of sulphate increased, a lower toxic effect of cadmium on the growth and on the content of chlorophylls was observed. In addition, the increase of sulphate concentration allowed the biosynthesis of a higher amount of PCs and/or PCs with higher chain length. This higher biosynthesis was responsible for the reduction of the toxic effect of cadmium and explained the interaction. PMID:26963118

  15. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. PMID:26663146

  16. Rubisco small-subunit α-helices control pyrenoid formation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Moritz T.; Genkov, Todor; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Jouhet, Juliette; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Spreitzer, Robert J.; Griffiths, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The pyrenoid is a subcellular microcompartment in which algae sequester the primary carboxylase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The pyrenoid is associated with a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which improves the operating efficiency of carbon assimilation and overcomes diffusive limitations in aquatic photosynthesis. Using the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we show that pyrenoid formation, Rubisco aggregation, and CCM activity relate to discrete regions of the Rubisco small subunit (SSU). Specifically, pyrenoid occurrence was shown to be conditioned by the amino acid composition of two surface-exposed α-helices of the SSU: higher plant-like helices knock out the pyrenoid, whereas native algal helices establish a pyrenoid. We have also established that pyrenoid integrity was essential for the operation of an active CCM. With the algal CCM being functionally analogous to the terrestrial C4 pathway in higher plants, such insights may offer a route toward transforming algal and higher plant productivity for the future. PMID:23112177

  17. Phytohormone supplementation significantly increases growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultivated for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Kun; Yoo, Gursong; Moon, Myounghoon; Kim, Chul Woong; Choi, Yoon-E; Yang, Ji-Won

    2013-11-01

    Cultivation is the most expensive step in the production of biodiesel from microalgae, and substantial research has been devoted to developing more cost-effective cultivation methods. Plant hormones (phytohormones) are chemical messengers that regulate various aspects of growth and development and are typically active at very low concentrations. In this study, we investigated the effect of different phytohormones on microalgal growth and biodiesel production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and their potential to lower the overall cost of commercial biofuel production. The results indicated that all five of the tested phytohormones (indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellic acid, kinetin, 1-triacontanol, and abscisic acid) promoted microalgal growth. In particular, hormone treatment increased biomass production by 54 to 69 % relative to the control growth medium (Tris-acetate-phosphate, TAP). Phytohormone treatments also affected microalgal cell morphology but had no effect on the yields of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as a percent of biomass. We also tested the effect of these phytohormones on microalgal growth in nitrogen-limited media by supplementation in the early stationary phase. Maximum cell densities after addition of phytohormones were higher than in TAP medium, even when the nitrogen source was reduced to 40 % of that in TAP medium. Taken together, our results indicate that phytohormones significantly increased microalgal growth, particularly in nitrogen-limited media, and have potential for use in the development of efficient microalgal cultivation for biofuel production. PMID:23881782

  18. Methanol-Promoted Lipid Remodelling during Cooling Sustains Cryopreservation Survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Duanpeng; Li, Weiqi

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments and cryoprotective agents (CPAs) determine the survival rate of organisms that undergo cryopreservation, but their mechanisms of operation have not yet been characterised adequately. In particular, the way in which membrane lipids respond to cryogenic treatments and CPAs is unknown. We developed comparative profiles of the changes in membrane lipids among cryogenic treatments and between the CPAs dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and methanol (MeOH) for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We found that freezing in liquid nitrogen led to a dramatic degradation of lipids, and that thawing at warm temperature (35°C) induced lipid remodelling. DMSO did not protect membranes, but MeOH significantly attenuated lipid degradation. The presence of MeOH during cooling (from 25°C to -55°C at a rate of 1°C/min) sustained the lipid composition to the extent that membrane integrity was maintained; this phenomenon accounts for successful cryopreservation. An increase in monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and a decrease in diacylglycerol were the major changes in lipid composition associated with survival rate, but there was no transformation between these lipid classes. Phospholipase D-mediated phosphatidic acid was not involved in freezing-induced lipid metabolism in C. reinhardtii. Lipid unsaturation changed, and the patterns of change depended on the cryogenic treatment. Our results provide new insights into the cryopreservation of, and the lipid metabolism in, algae. PMID:26731741

  19. The Involvement of hybrid cluster protein 4, HCP4, in Anaerobic Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Olson, Adam C; Carter, Clay J

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has long been studied for its unique fermentation pathways and has been evaluated as a candidate organism for biofuel production. Fermentation in C. reinhardtii is facilitated by a network of three predominant pathways producing four major byproducts: formate, ethanol, acetate and hydrogen. Previous microarray studies identified many genes as being highly up-regulated during anaerobiosis. For example, hybrid cluster protein 4 (HCP4) was found to be one of the most highly up-regulated genes under anoxic conditions. Hybrid cluster proteins have long been studied for their unique spectroscopic properties, yet their biological functions remain largely unclear. To probe its role during anaerobiosis, HCP4 was silenced using artificial microRNAs (ami-hcp4) followed by extensive phenotypic analyses of cells grown under anoxic conditions. Both the expression of key fermentative enzymes and their respective metabolites were significantly altered in ami-hcp4, with nitrogen uptake from the media also being significantly different than wild-type cells. The results strongly suggest a role for HCP4 in regulating key fermentative and nitrogen utilization pathways. PMID:26930496

  20. A microspectrophotometric study of the shielding properties of eyespot and cell body in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, K; Uhl, R

    1997-01-01

    The eyespot apparatus of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas exhibits a clear directivity, i.e., it perceives light from different directions with different sensitivity. Using a newly constructed confocal microscope we have studied how absorption and reflection of eyespot and cell body shape this directivity. In agreement with previous results the eyespot was found to be highly reflectant, owing to its interference reflector design, but only for yellow light. Light of 490 nm, the maximum of absorption of the photoreceptor, was hardly reflected at all, even when the reflector was "tuned" to lower wavelengths by tilting it relative to the incoming light. The absorption of the carotenoids in the interference reflector also contributed little to the shielding properties of the cell, leaving the major contribution to the cell body. Thus most of the attenuation of light reaching the eyespot from the rear is due to chlorophyll and other pigments within the cell. In its peak around 490 nm the "contrast-ratio" reached a value of 8-10. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9284324

  1. Integrated quantitative analysis of nitrogen stress response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using metabolite and protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Wase, Nishikant; Black, Paul N; Stanley, Bruce A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen starvation induces a global stress response in microalgae that results in the accumulation of lipids as a potential source of biofuel. Using GC-MS-based metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling, we examined and correlated the metabolic and proteomic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under nitrogen stress. Key amino acids and metabolites involved in nitrogen sparing pathways, methyl group transfer reactions, and energy production were decreased in abundance, whereas certain fatty acids, citric acid, methionine, citramalic acid, triethanolamine, nicotianamine, trehalose, and sorbitol were increased in abundance. Proteins involved in nitrogen assimilation, amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, starch, and lipid metabolism were elevated compared with nonstressed cultures. In contrast, the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, one carbon metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway, the Calvin cycle, photosynthetic and light harvesting complex, and ribosomes were reduced. A noteworthy observation was that citrate accumulated during nitrogen stress coordinate with alterations in the enzymes that produce or utilize this metabolite, demonstrating the value of comparing protein and metabolite profiles to understand complex patterns of metabolic flow. Thus, the current study provides unique insight into the global metabolic adjustments leading to lipid storage during N starvation for application toward advanced biofuel production technologies.

  2. Prevalence, Evolution, and cis-Regulation of Diel Transcription in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Panchy, Nicholas; Wu, Guangxi; Newton, Linsey; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Chen, Jin; Benning, Christoph; Farré, Eva M.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous (circadian) and exogenous (e.g., diel) biological rhythms are a prominent feature of many living systems. In green algal species, knowledge of the extent of diel rhythmicity of genome-wide gene expression, its evolution, and its cis-regulatory mechanism is limited. In this study, we identified cyclically expressed genes under diel conditions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and found that ~50% of the 17,114 annotated genes exhibited cyclic expression. These cyclic expression patterns indicate a clear succession of biological processes during the course of a day. Among 237 functional categories enriched in cyclically expressed genes, >90% were phase-specific, including photosynthesis, cell division, and motility-related processes. By contrasting cyclic expression between C. reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana putative orthologs, we found significant but weak conservation in cyclic gene expression patterns. On the other hand, within C. reinhardtii cyclic expression was preferentially maintained between duplicates, and the evolution of phase between paralogs is limited to relatively minor time shifts. Finally, to better understand the cis regulatory basis of diel expression, putative cis-regulatory elements were identified that could predict the expression phase of a subset of the cyclic transcriptome. Our findings demonstrate both the prevalence of cycling genes as well as the complex regulatory circuitry required to control cyclic expression in a green algal model, highlighting the need to consider diel expression in studying algal molecular networks and in future biotechnological applications. PMID:25354782

  3. The Regulation of Photosynthetic Structure and Function during Nitrogen Deprivation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Matthew T.; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Lucker, Ben F.; Park, Jeong-Jin; Wang, Hongxia; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Holguin, F. Omar; Disbrow, Bradley; Schaub, Tanner; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Kramer, David M.; Gang, David R.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of carbon storage compounds by many unicellular algae after nutrient deprivation occurs despite declines in their photosynthetic apparatus. To understand the regulation and roles of photosynthesis during this potentially bioenergetically valuable process, we analyzed photosynthetic structure and function after nitrogen deprivation in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and lipid profiling and microscopic time course data were combined with multiple measures of photosynthetic function. Levels of transcripts and proteins of photosystems I and II and most antenna genes fell with differing trajectories; thylakoid membrane lipid levels decreased, while their proportions remained similar and thylakoid membrane organization appeared to be preserved. Cellular chlorophyll (Chl) content decreased more than 2-fold within 24 h, and we conclude from transcript protein and 13C labeling rates that Chl synthesis was down-regulated both pre- and posttranslationally and that Chl levels fell because of a rapid cessation in synthesis and dilution by cellular growth rather than because of degradation. Photosynthetically driven oxygen production and the efficiency of photosystem II as well as P700+ reduction and electrochromic shift kinetics all decreased over the time course, without evidence of substantial energy overflow. The results also indicate that linear electron flow fell approximately 15% more than cyclic flow over the first 24 h. Comparing Calvin-Benson cycle transcript and enzyme levels with changes in photosynthetic 13CO2 incorporation rates also pointed to a coordinated multilevel down-regulation of photosynthetic fluxes during starch synthesis before the induction of high triacylglycerol accumulation rates. PMID:25489023

  4. A Simple and Non-Invasive Method for Nuclear Transformation of Intact-walled Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sora; Lee, Young-Chul; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Uk; Huh, Yun Suk; Kim, Geun-Joong; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Genetic engineering in microalgae is gaining attraction but nuclear transformation methods available so far are either inefficient or require special equipment. In this study, we employ positively charged nanoparticles, 3-aminopropyl-functionalized magnesium phyllosilicate (aminoclay, approximate unit cell composition of [H2N(CH2)3]8Si8Mg6O12(OH)4), for nuclear transformation into eukaryotic microalgae. TEM and EDX analysis of the process of transformation reveals that aminoclay coats negatively-charged DNA biomolecules and forms a self-assembled hybrid nanostructure. Subsequently, when this nanostructure is mixed with microalgal cells and plated onto selective agar plates with high friction force, cell wall is disrupted facilitating delivery of plasmid DNA into the cell and ultimately to the nucleus. This method is not only simple, inexpensive, and non-toxic to cells but also provides efficient transformation (5.03×102 transformants/µg DNA), second only to electroporation which needs advanced instrumentation. We present optimized parameters for efficient transformation including pre-treatment, friction force, concentration of foreign DNA/aminoclay, and plasticity of agar plates. It is also confirmed the successful integration and stable expression of foreign gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii through molecular methods. PMID:24988123

  5. Production of biodiesel from microalgae Chlamydomonas polypyrenoideum grown on dairy industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Prasad, Ravindra; Kumar, Virendra; Singh, D P

    2013-09-01

    This study involves a process of phyco-remediation of dairy industry wastewater by algal strain Chlamydomonas polypyrenoideum. The results of selected algal strain indicated that dairy industry wastewater was good nutrient supplement for algal growth in comparable with BG-11 growth medium. Alga grown on dairy industry wastewater reduced the pollution load of nitrate (90%), nitrite (74%), phosphate (70%), chloride (61%), fluoride (58%), and ammonia (90%) on 10th day of its growth as compared to that of uninoculated wastewater. The lipid content of algal biomass grown on dairy wastewater on 10th day (1.6g) and 15th day (1.2 g) of batch experiment was found to be higher than the lipid content of algal biomass grown in BG-11 growth medium on 10th day (1.27 g) and 15th day (1.0 g) of batch experiment. The results on FTIR analysis of the extracted bio-oil through transesterification reaction was comparable with bio-oil obtained from other sources.

  6. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    DOE PAGES

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; et al

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labelingmore » demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.« less

  7. Spontaneous mutation accumulation in multiple strains of the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew D; Ness, Rob W; Keightley, Peter D; Colegrave, Nick

    2014-09-01

    Estimates of mutational parameters, such as the average fitness effect of a new mutation and the rate at which new genetic variation for fitness is created by mutation, are important for the understanding of many biological processes. However, the causes of interspecific variation in mutational parameters and the extent to which they vary within species remain largely unknown. We maintained multiple strains of the unicellular eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for approximately 1000 generations under relaxed selection by transferring a single cell every ~10 generations. Mean fitness of the lines tended to decline with generations of mutation accumulation whereas mutational variance increased. We did not find any evidence for differences among strains in any of the mutational parameters estimated. The overall change in mean fitness per cell division and rate of input of mutational variance per cell division were more similar to values observed in multicellular organisms than to those in other single-celled microbes. However, after taking into account differences in genome size among species, estimates from multicellular organisms and microbes, including our new estimates from C. reinhardtii, become substantially more similar. Thus, we suggest that variation in genome size is an important determinant of interspecific variation in mutational parameters. PMID:24826801

  8. Integration of carbon assimilation modes with photosynthetic light capture in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Berger, Hanna; Blifernez-Klassen, Olga; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Wobbe, Lutz; Kruse, Olaf

    2014-10-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of using organic and inorganic carbon sources simultaneously, which requires the adjustment of photosynthetic activity to the prevailing mode of carbon assimilation. We obtained novel insights into the regulation of light-harvesting at photosystem II (PSII) following altered carbon source availability. In C. reinhardtii, synthesis of PSII-associated light-harvesting proteins (LHCBMs) is controlled by the cytosolic RNA-binding protein NAB1, which represses translation of particular LHCBM isoform transcripts. This mechanism is fine-tuned via regulation of the nuclear NAB1 promoter, which is activated when linear photosynthetic electron flow is restricted by CO(2)-limitation in a photoheterotrophic context. In the wild-type, accumulation of NAB1 reduces the functional PSII antenna size, thus preventing a harmful overexcited state of PSII, as observed in a NAB1-less mutant. We further demonstrate that translation control as a newly identified long-term response to prolonged CO(2)-limitation replaces LHCII state transitions as a fast response to PSII over-excitation. Intriguingly, activation of the long-term response is perturbed in state transition mutant stt7, suggesting a regulatory link between the long- and short-term response. We depict a regulatory circuit operating on distinct timescales and in different cellular compartments to fine-tune light-harvesting in photoheterotrophic eukaryotes.

  9. Light/electricity conversion by defined cocultures of Chlamydomonas and Geobacter.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-04-01

    Biological energy-conversion systems are attractive in terms of their self-organizing and self-sustaining properties and are expected to be applied towards environmentally friendly bioenergy processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that sustainable light/electricity-conversion systems, termed microbial solar cells (MSCs), can be constructed using naturally occurring microbial communities. To better understand the energy-conversion mechanisms in microbial communities, the present study attempted to construct model MSCs comprised of defined cocultures of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and an iron-reducing bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens, and examined their metabolism and interactions in MSCs. When MSC bioreactors were inoculated with these microbes and irradiated on a 12-h light/dark cycle, periodic current was generated in the dark with energy-conversion efficiencies of 0.1%. Metabolite analyses revealed that G. sulfurreducens generated current by oxidizing formate that was produced by C. reinhardtii in the dark. These results demonstrate that the light/electricity conversion occurs via syntrophic interactions between phototrophs and electricity-generating bacteria. Based on the results and data in literatures, it is estimated that the excretion of organics by the phototroph was the bottleneck step in the syntrophic light/electricity conversion. We also discuss differences between natural-community and defined-coculture MSCs.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Manganese-deficient Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Provides Insight on the Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lockhart, Ainsley; Zvenigorodsky, Natasha; Pedraza, Mary Ann; Lindquist, Erika

    2011-08-11

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll and other tetrapyrroles is a vital but poorly understood process. Recent genomic advances with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have created opportunity to more closely examine the mechanisms of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway via transcriptome analysis. Manganese is a nutrient of interest for complex reactions because of its multiple stable oxidation states and role in molecular oxygen coordination. C. reinhardtii was cultured in Manganese-deplete Tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) media for 24 hours and used to create cDNA libraries for sequencing using Illumina TruSeq technology. Transcriptome analysis provided intriguing insight on possible regulatory mechanisms in the pathway. Evidence supports similarities of GTR (Glutamyl-tRNA synthase) to its Chlorella vulgaris homolog in terms of Mn requirements. Data was also suggestive of Mn-related compensatory up-regulation for pathway proteins CHLH1 (Manganese Chelatase), GUN4 (Magnesium chelatase activating protein), and POR1 (Light-dependent protochlorophyllide reductase). Intriguingly, data suggests possible reciprocal expression of oxygen dependent CPX1 (coproporphyrinogen III oxidase) and oxygen independent CPX2. Further analysis using RT-PCR could provide compelling evidence for several novel regulatory mechanisms in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway.

  11. Asymmetric properties of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cytoskeleton direct rhodopsin photoreceptor localization.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Boyd, Joseph S; Lamb, Mary Rose; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2011-05-16

    The eyespot of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a photoreceptive organelle required for phototaxis. Relative to the anterior flagella, the eyespot is asymmetrically positioned adjacent to the daughter four-membered rootlet (D4), a unique bundle of acetylated microtubules extending from the daughter basal body toward the posterior of the cell. Here, we detail the relationship between the rhodopsin eyespot photoreceptor Channelrhodopsin 1 (ChR1) and acetylated microtubules. In wild-type cells, ChR1 was observed in an equatorial patch adjacent to D4 near the end of the acetylated microtubules and along the D4 rootlet. In cells with cytoskeletal protein mutations, supernumerary ChR1 patches remained adjacent to acetylated microtubules. In mlt1 (multieyed) mutant cells, supernumerary photoreceptor patches were not restricted to the D4 rootlet, and more anterior eyespots correlated with shorter acetylated microtubule rootlets. The data suggest a model in which photoreceptor localization is dependent on microtubule-based trafficking selective for the D4 rootlet, which is perturbed in mlt1 mutant cells. PMID:21555459

  12. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation.

    PubMed

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  13. Proteomic Analysis of a Fraction with Intact Eyespots of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Assignment of Protein Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Eitzinger, Nicole; Wagner, Volker; Weisheit, Wolfram; Geimer, Stefan; Boness, David; Kreimer, Georg; Mittag, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Flagellate green algae possess a visual system, the eyespot. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii it is situated at the edge of the chloroplast and consists of two carotenoid rich lipid globule layers subtended by thylakoid membranes (TM) that are attached to both chloroplast envelope membranes and a specialized area of the plasma membrane (PM). A former analysis of an eyespot fraction identified 203 proteins. To increase the understanding of eyespot related processes, knowledge of the protein composition of the membranes in its close vicinity is desirable. Here, we present a purification procedure that allows isolation of intact eyespots. This gain in intactness goes, however, hand in hand with an increase of contaminants from other organelles. Proteomic analysis identified 742 proteins. Novel candidates include proteins for eyespot development, retina-related proteins, ion pumps, and membrane-associated proteins, calcium sensing proteins as well as kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins. Methylation of proteins at Arg or Lys is known as an important posttranslational modification involved in, e.g., signal transduction. Here, we identify several proteins from eyespot fractions that are methylated at Arg and/or Lys. Among them is the eyespot specific SOUL3 protein that influences the size and position of the eyespot and EYE2, a protein important for its development. PMID:26697039

  14. Color tuning in binding pocket models of the chlamydomonas-type channelrhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Welke, Kai; Frähmcke, Jan S; Watanabe, Hiroshi C; Hegemann, Peter; Elstner, Marcus

    2011-12-22

    We examined the shift of absorption maxima between the chlamydomonas-type channelrhodopsins (ChRs) and bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Starting from the BR X-ray structure, we modeled the color tuning in the binding pockets of the ChRs by mutating up to 28 amino acids in the vicinity of the chromophore. By applying the efficient self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method in a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) framework, including explicit polarization and calculating excitation energies with the semiempirical OM2/MRCI method and the ab initio SORCI method, we have shown that multiple mutations in the binding pocket of BR causes large hypsochromic shifts that are of the same order as the experimentally observed shifts of the absorption maxima between BR and the ChRs. This study further demonstrates that mutations in the proximity of the Schiff base and complex counterion lead to a stronger but more flexible interaction with the retinal, which could serve as a possible explanation for the spectral patterns found in the ChRs. PMID:22077286

  15. The selective breeding of the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for growth in salinity.

    PubMed

    Takouridis, Simon J; Tribe, David E; Gras, Sally L; Martin, Gregory J O

    2015-05-01

    The potential for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to be utilized for biofuel production was strengthened by developing it for growth in elevated salinity via the selective breeding method of genome shuffling. A population was constructed via random mutagenesis and subjected to multiple rounds of sex and growth in increasing salinity. This sexual line was capable of growth in up to 700 mM NaCl, unlike its progenitor, which could only grow in 300 mM NaCl. An asexual control line was capable of growth in 500 mM NaCl. Palmelloid aggregations increased in size and the concentration of final biomass decreased as a function of NaCl concentration, which poses considerations for future strain development. The sexual line maintained sexual efficiencies of up to 50% over the course of selection. This investigation achieved significant strain improvement of C. reinhardtii and demonstrated the clear advantage of its ability to participate in laboratory controlled and reproducible high efficiency sex. PMID:25466995

  16. Live cell imaging compatible immobilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in microfluidic platform for biodiesel research.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Woo; Na, Sang Cheol; Nguyen, Thanh Qua; Paik, Sang-Min; Kang, Myeongwoo; Hong, Daewha; Choi, Insung S; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a novel surface immobilization method for live-cell imaging of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii for continuous monitoring of lipid droplet accumulation. Microfluidics allows high-throughput manipulation and analysis of single cells in precisely controlled microenvironment. Fluorescence imaging based quantitative measurement of lipid droplet accumulation in microalgae had been difficult due to their intrinsic motile behavior. We present a simple surface immobilization method using gelatin coating as the "biological glue." We take advantage of hydroxyproline (Hyp)-based non-covalent interaction between gelatin and the outer cell wall of microalgae to anchor the cells inside the microfluidic device. We have continuously monitored single microalgal cells for up to 6 days. The immobilized microalgae remain viable (viability was comparable to bulk suspension cultured controls). When exposed to wall shear stress, most of the cells remain attached up to 0.1 dyne/cm(2) . Surface immobilization allowed high-resolution, live-cell imaging of mitotic process in real time-which followed previously reported stages in mitosis of suspension cultured cells. Use of gelatin coated microfluidics devices can result in better methods for microalgae strain screening and culture condition optimization that will help microalgal biodiesel become more economically viable. PMID:25220860

  17. Isolation and characterization of a mutant defective in triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chun-Hsien; Kanehara, Kazue; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-09-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG), a major source of biodiesel production, accumulates in nitrogen-starved Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, the metabolic pathway of starch-to-TAG conversion remains elusive because an enzyme that affects the starch degradation is unknown. Here, we isolated a new class of mutant bgal1, which expressed an overaccumulation of starch granules and defective photosynthetic growth. The bgal1 was a null mutant of a previously uncharacterized β-galactosidase-like gene (Cre02.g119700), which decreased total β-galactosidase activity 40% of the wild type. Upon nitrogen starvation, the bgal1 mutant showed decreased TAG accumulation mainly due to the reduced flux of de novo TAG biosynthesis evidenced by increased unsaturation of fatty acid composition in TAG and reduced TAG accumulation by additional supplementation of acetate to the culture media. Metabolomic analysis of the bgal1 mutant showed significantly reduced levels of metabolites following the hydrolysis of starch and substrates for TAG accumulation, whereas metabolites in TCA cycle were unaffected. Upon nitrogen starvation, while levels of glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and acetyl-CoA remained lower, most of the other metabolites in glycolysis were increased but those in the TCA cycle were decreased, supporting TAG accumulation. We suggest that BGAL1 may be involved in the degradation of starch, which affects TAG accumulation in nitrogen-starved C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Lipid Biology edited by Kent D. Chapman and Ivo Feussner.

  18. The conserved ciliary protein Bug22 controls planar beating of Chlamydomonas flagella.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dan; Cao, Muqing; Oda, Toshiyuki; Pan, Junmin

    2014-01-15

    Eukaryotic flagella and cilia can exhibit planar and non-planar beating, and the mechanism controlling these beating patterns is not well understood. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella beat in approximately the same plane with either an asymmetric ciliary-type or symmetric flagellar-type waveform. Each B-tubule of the number 1, 5 and 6 doublets of the flagellar axoneme possesses a beak-like structure. The number 5 and 6 beak structures are implicated in conversion of ciliary motion into flagellar motion. Here, we show that in a null mutant of Bug22, the asymmetric ciliary waveform is converted into a three-dimensional (non-planar) symmetric flagellar waveform. Bug22 is localized to approximately the proximal half to two-thirds of the flagellum, similar to localization of beak-like structures. However, as shown by immunogold labeling, Bug22 associates with axonemal microtubules without apparent preference for any particular doublets. Interestingly, bug22 mutants lack all beak-like structures. We propose that one function of Bug22 is to regulate the anchoring of the beak-like structures to the doublet microtubules and confine flagellar beating to a plane.

  19. The global phosphoproteome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveals complex organellar phosphorylation in the flagella and thylakoid membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Gau, Brian; Slade, William O; Juergens, Matthew; Li, Ping; Hicks, Leslie M

    2014-09-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most intensively-studied and well-developed model for investigation of a wide-range of microalgal processes ranging from basic development through understanding triacylglycerol production. Although proteomic technologies permit interrogation of these processes at the protein level and efforts to date indicate phosphorylation-based regulation of proteins in C. reinhardtii is essential for its underlying biology, characterization of the C. reinhardtii phosphoproteome has been limited. Herein, we report the richest exploration of the C. reinhardtii proteome to date. Complementary enrichment strategies were used to detect 4588 phosphoproteins distributed among every cellular component in C. reinhardtii. Additionally, we report 18,160 unique phosphopeptides at <1% false discovery rate, which comprise 15,862 unique phosphosites - 98% of which are novel. Given that an estimated 30% of proteins in a eukaryotic cell are subject to phosphorylation, we report the majority of the phosphoproteome (23%) of C. reinhardtii. Proteins in key biological pathways were phosphorylated, including photosynthesis, pigment production, carbon assimilation, glycolysis, and protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and it is noteworthy that hyperphosphorylation was observed in flagellar proteins. This rich data set is available via ProteomeXchange (ID: PXD000783) and will significantly enhance understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular process and will serve as a critical resource for the microalgal community.

  20. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  1. Phytotoxicity Evaluation of Type B Trichothecenes Using a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Model System

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tadahiro; Iwahashi, Yumiko

    2014-01-01

    Type B trichothecenes, which consist of deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) as the major end products, are produced by phytotoxic fungi, such as the Fusarium species, and pollute arable fields across the world. The DON toxicity has been investigated using various types of cell systems or animal bioassays. The evaluation of NIV toxicity, however, has been relatively restricted because of its lower level compared with DON. In this study, the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii testing system, which has been reported to have adequate NIV sensitivity, was reinvestigated under different mycotoxin concentrations and light conditions. The best concentration of DON and NIV, and their derivatives, for test conditions was found to be 25 ppm (2.5 × 10−2 mg/mL). In all light test conditions, DON, NIV, and fusarenon-X (FusX) indicated significant growth inhibition regardless of whether a light source existed, or under differential wavelength conditions. FusX growth was also influenced by changes in photon flux density. These results suggest that C. reinhardtii is an appropriate evaluation system for type B trichothecenes. PMID:24476708

  2. Phytohormone supplementation significantly increases growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultivated for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Park, Won-Kun; Yoo, Gursong; Moon, Myounghoon; Kim, Chul Woong; Choi, Yoon-E; Yang, Ji-Won

    2013-11-01

    Cultivation is the most expensive step in the production of biodiesel from microalgae, and substantial research has been devoted to developing more cost-effective cultivation methods. Plant hormones (phytohormones) are chemical messengers that regulate various aspects of growth and development and are typically active at very low concentrations. In this study, we investigated the effect of different phytohormones on microalgal growth and biodiesel production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and their potential to lower the overall cost of commercial biofuel production. The results indicated that all five of the tested phytohormones (indole-3-acetic acid, gibberellic acid, kinetin, 1-triacontanol, and abscisic acid) promoted microalgal growth. In particular, hormone treatment increased biomass production by 54 to 69 % relative to the control growth medium (Tris-acetate-phosphate, TAP). Phytohormone treatments also affected microalgal cell morphology but had no effect on the yields of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) as a percent of biomass. We also tested the effect of these phytohormones on microalgal growth in nitrogen-limited media by supplementation in the early stationary phase. Maximum cell densities after addition of phytohormones were higher than in TAP medium, even when the nitrogen source was reduced to 40 % of that in TAP medium. Taken together, our results indicate that phytohormones significantly increased microalgal growth, particularly in nitrogen-limited media, and have potential for use in the development of efficient microalgal cultivation for biofuel production.

  3. High light induced changes in organization, protein profile and function of photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Nama, Srilatha; Madireddi, Sai Kiran; Devadasu, Elsin Raju; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-11-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas (C.) reinhardtii is used as a model organism to understand the efficiency of photosynthesis along with the organization and protein profile of photosynthetic apparatus under various intensities of high light exposure for 1h. Chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence induction, OJIPSMT transient was decreased with increase in light intensity indicating the reduction in photochemical efficiency. Further, circular dichroism studies of isolated thylakoids from high light exposed cells showed considerable change in the pigment-pigment interactions and pigment-proteins interactions. Furthermore, the organization of supercomplexes from thylakoids is studied, in which, one of the hetero-trimer of light harvesting complex (LHC) II is affected significantly in comparison to other complexes of LHC's monomers. Also, other supercomplexes, photosystem (PS)II reaction center dimer and PSI complexes are reduced. Additionally, immunoblot analysis of thylakoid proteins revealed that PSII core proteins D1 and D2 were significantly decreased during high light treatment. Similarly, the PSI core proteins PsaC, PsaD and PsaG were drastically changed. Further, the LHC antenna proteins of PSI and PSII were differentially affected. From our results it is clear that LHCs are damaged significantly, consequently the excitation energy is not efficiently transferred to the reaction center. Thus, the photochemical energy transfer from PSII to PSI is reduced. The inference of the study deciphers the structural and functional changes driven by light may therefore provide plants/alga to regulate the light harvesting capacity in excess light conditions.

  4. Phosphoribulokinase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a Benson-Calvin cycle enzyme enslaved to its cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Remy, Thérèse; Lignon, Sabrina; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-04-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a finely regulated and well-studied enzyme of the Benson-Calvin cycle. PRK can form a complex with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and the small chloroplast protein CP12. This study aimed to determine the molecular determinants on PRK involved in the complex and the mechanism of action of a recently described novel regulation of PRK that involves glutathionylation. A combination of mass spectrometry, mutagenesis and activity analyses showed that Cys16, besides its role as the binding site of ATP, was also the site for S-glutathionylation. Previous kinetic analysis of the C55S mutant showed that in the oxidized inactive form of PRK, this residue formed a disulfide bridge with the Cys16 residue. This is the only bridge reported for PRK in the literature. Our data show for the first time that a disulfide bridge between Cys243 and Cys249 on PRK is required to form the PRK-GAPDH-CP12 complex. These results uncover a new mechanism for the PRK-GAPDH-CP12 formation involving a thiol disulfide exchange reaction with CP12 and identify Cys16 of PRK as a target of glutathionylation acting against oxidative stress. Although Cys16 is the key residue involved in binding ATP and acting as a defense against oxidative damage, the formation of the algal ternary complex requires the formation of another disulfide bridge on PRK involving Cys243 and Cys249.

  5. Towards elucidation of the toxic mechanism of copper on the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongguang; Zhu, Yanli; Hu, Zhangli; Lei, Anping; Wang, Jiangxin

    2016-09-01

    Toxic effects of copper on aquatic organisms in polluted water bodies have garnered particular attention in recent years. Microalgae play an important role in aquatic ecosystems, and they are sensitive to heavy metal pollution. Thus, it is important to clarify the mechanism of copper toxicity first for ecotoxicology studies. In this study, the physiological, biochemical and gene expression characteristics of a model green microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with 0, 50, 150 and 250 μM copper treatments were investigated. The response of C. reinhardtii to copper stress was significantly shown at a dose dependent manner. Inhibition of cell growth and variation of total chlorophyll content were observed with copper treatments. The maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII, actual photochemical efficiency of PSII and photochemical quenching value decreased in the 250 μM copper treatment with minimum values equal to 28, 24 and 60 % of the control values respectively. The content of lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde with copper treatments increased with a maximum value sevenfold higher than the control value. Inhibition of cell growth and photosynthesis was ascribed to peroxidation of membrane lipids. The glutathione content and activities of antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were induced by copper. Interestingly, the expression of antioxidant genes and the photosynthetic gene decreased in most copper treatments. In conclusion, oxidative stress caused by production of excess reactive oxidative species might be the major mechanism of copper toxicity on C. reinhardtii. PMID:27395008

  6. Phosphoregulation of an Inner Dynein Arm Complex in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Is Altered in Phototactic Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a further understanding of axonemal dynein regulation, mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had defects in both phototactic behavior and flagellar motility were identified and characterized. ptm1, ptm2, and ptm3 mutant strains exhibited motility phenotypes that resembled those of known inner dynein arm region mutant strains, but did not have biochemical or genetic phenotypes characteristic of other inner dynein arm mutations. Three other mutant strains had defects in the f class of inner dynein arms. Dynein extracts from the pf9-4 strain were missing the entire f complex. Strains with mutations in pf9/ida1, ida2, or ida3 failed to assemble the f dynein complex and did not exhibit phototactic behavior. Fractionated dynein from mia1-1 and mia2-1 axonemes exhibited a novel f class inner dynein arm biochemical phenotype; the 138-kD f intermediate chain was present in altered phosphorylation forms. In vitro axonemal dynein activity was reduced by the mia1-1 and mia2-1 mutations. The addition of kinase inhibitor restored axonemal dynein activity concomitant with the dephosphorylation of the 138-kD f intermediate chain. Dynein extracts from uni1-1 axonemes, which specifically assemble only one of the two flagella, contained relatively high levels of the altered phosphorylation forms of the 138-kD intermediate chain. We suggest that the f dynein complex may be phosphoregulated asymmetrically between the two flagella to achieve phototactic turning. PMID:9008712

  7. Chlamydomonas Outer Arm Dynein Alters Conformation in Response to Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Sakato, Miho; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that Ca2+ directly activates ATP-sensitive microtubule binding by a Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein subparticle containing the β and γ heavy chains (HCs). The γ HC–associated LC4 light chain is a member of the calmodulin family and binds 1-2 Ca2+ with KCa = 3 × 10−5 M in vitro, suggesting it may act as a Ca2+ sensor for outer arm dynein. Here we investigate interactions between the LC4 light chain and γ HC. Two IQ consensus motifs for binding calmodulin-like proteins are located within the stem domain of the γ heavy chain. In vitro experiments indicate that LC4 undergoes a Ca2+-dependent interaction with the IQ motif domain while remaining tethered to the HC. LC4 also moves into close proximity of the intermediate chain IC1 in the presence of Ca2+. The sedimentation profile of the γ HC subunit changed subtly upon Ca2+ addition, suggesting that the entire complex had become more compact, and electron microscopy of the isolated γ subunit revealed a distinct alteration in conformation of the N-terminal stem in response to Ca2+ addition. We propose that Ca2+-dependent conformational change of LC4 has a direct effect on the stem domain of the γ HC, which eventually leads to alterations in mechanochemical interactions between microtubules and the motor domain(s) of the outer dynein arm. PMID:17634291

  8. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii alternative oxidase 1 is regulated by heat stress.

    PubMed

    Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Lapina, Tatiana; Ermilova, Elena

    2015-12-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase that has emerged as an important mitochondrial component of the cell stress responses. Although the most studied abiotic condition in relation to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is high temperature, changes in AOX capacity of the alga were studied only under oxidative stress and cold. To examine whether elevated temperatures affected AOX1 expression, we applied quantitative real-time PCR and pharmaceutical approaches. In this work, we demonstrated a sharp increase in AOX1 transcript and protein abundance under heat stress. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii cells displayed a large increase in alternative respiration in response to high temperature. Feeding with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine strongly retarded the AOX1 transcription. Finally, the addition of the calcium chelator EGTA prevented heat-induced AOX1 expression. Together, our results imply that heat-inducible Ca(2+) influx and protein kinase(s) may mediate AOX1 expression at elevated temperatures. Characterization of heat-induced AOX1 regulation in the green alga C. reinhardtii provides a framework for a more complete understanding of the function of this conserved protein.

  9. Extensive de novo mutation rate variation between individuals and across the genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Rob W.; Morgan, Andrew D.; Vasanthakrishnan, Radhakrishnan B.; Colegrave, Nick; Keightley, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Describing the process of spontaneous mutation is fundamental for understanding the genetic basis of disease, the threat posed by declining population size in conservation biology, and much of evolutionary biology. Directly studying spontaneous mutation has been difficult, however, because new mutations are rare. Mutation accumulation (MA) experiments overcome this by allowing mutations to build up over many generations in the near absence of natural selection. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 85 MA lines derived from six genetically diverse strains of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We identified 6843 new mutations, more than any other study of spontaneous mutation. We observed sevenfold variation in the mutation rate among strains and that mutator genotypes arose, increasing the mutation rate approximately eightfold in some replicates. We also found evidence for fine-scale heterogeneity in the mutation rate, with certain sequence motifs mutating at much higher rates, and clusters of multiple mutations occurring at closely linked sites. There was little evidence, however, for mutation rate heterogeneity between chromosomes or over large genomic regions of 200 kbp. We generated a predictive model of the mutability of sites based on their genomic properties, including local GC content, gene expression level, and local sequence context. Our model accurately predicted the average mutation rate and natural levels of genetic diversity of sites across the genome. Notably, trinucleotides vary 17-fold in rate between the most and least mutable sites. Our results uncover a rich heterogeneity in the process of spontaneous mutation both among individuals and across the genome. PMID:26260971

  10. Nitrogen-Sparing Mechanisms in Chlamydomonas Affect the Transcriptome, the Proteome, and Photosynthetic Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Schmollinger, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Boyle, Nanette R.; Blaby, Ian K.; Casero, David; Mettler, Tabea; Moseley, Jeffrey L.; Kropat, Janette; Sommer, Frederik; Strenkert, Daniela; Hemme, Dorothea; Pellegrini, Matteo; Grossman, Arthur R.; Stitt, Mark; Schroda, Michael; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient that limits global primary productivity; hence, N-use efficiency is of compelling interest in agriculture and aquaculture. We used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a reference organism for a multicomponent analysis of the N starvation response. In the presence of acetate, respiratory metabolism is prioritized over photosynthesis; consequently, the N-sparing response targets proteins, pigments, and RNAs involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast function over those involved in respiration. Transcripts and proteins of the Calvin-Benson cycle are reduced in N-deficient cells, resulting in the accumulation of cycle metabolic intermediates. Both cytosolic and chloroplast ribosomes are reduced, but via different mechanisms, reflected by rapid changes in abundance of RNAs encoding chloroplast ribosomal proteins but not cytosolic ones. RNAs encoding transporters and enzymes for metabolizing alternative N sources increase in abundance, as is appropriate for the soil environmental niche of C. reinhardtii. Comparison of the N-replete versus N-deplete proteome indicated that abundant proteins with a high N content are reduced in N-starved cells, while the proteins that are increased have lower than average N contents. This sparing mechanism contributes to a lower cellular N/C ratio and suggests an approach for engineering increased N-use efficiency. PMID:24748044

  11. Phosphoprotein SAK1 is a regulator of acclimation to singlet oxygen in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Wakao, Setsuko; Chin, Brian L; Ledford, Heidi K; Dent, Rachel M; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2014-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is a highly toxic and inevitable byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is capable of acclimating specifically to singlet oxygen stress, but the retrograde signaling pathway from the chloroplast to the nucleus mediating this response is unknown. Here we describe a mutant, singlet oxygen acclimation knocked-out 1 (sak1), that lacks the acclimation response to singlet oxygen. Analysis of genome-wide changes in RNA abundance during acclimation to singlet oxygen revealed that SAK1 is a key regulator of the gene expression response during acclimation. The SAK1 gene encodes an uncharacterized protein with a domain conserved among chlorophytes and present in some bZIP transcription factors. The SAK1 protein is located in the cytosol, and it is induced and phosphorylated upon exposure to singlet oxygen, suggesting that it is a critical intermediate component of the retrograde signal transduction pathway leading to singlet oxygen acclimation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02286.001 PMID:24859755

  12. The Chloroplast Calcium Sensor CAS Is Required for Photoacclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W

    PubMed Central

    Petroutsos, Dimitris; Busch, Andreas; Janßen, Ingrid; Trompelt, Kerstin; Bergner, Sonja Verena; Weinl, Stefan; Holtkamp, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Kudla, Jörg; Hippler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The plant-specific calcium binding protein CAS (calcium sensor) has been localized in chloroplast thylakoid membranes of vascular plants and green algae. To elucidate the function of CAS in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated and analyzed eight independent CAS knockdown C. reinhardtii lines (cas-kd). Upon transfer to high-light (HL) growth conditions, cas-kd lines were unable to properly induce the expression of LHCSR3 protein that is crucial for nonphotochemical quenching. Prolonged exposure to HL revealed a severe light sensitivity of cas-kd lines and caused diminished activity and recovery of photosystem II (PSII). Remarkably, the induction of LHCSR3, the growth of cas-kd lines under HL, and the performance of PSII were fully rescued by increasing the calcium concentration in the growth media. Moreover, perturbing cellular Ca2+ homeostasis by application of the calmodulin antagonist W7 or the G-protein activator mastoparan impaired the induction of LHCSR3 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that CAS and Ca2+ are critically involved in the regulation of the HL response and particularly in the control of LHCSR3 expression. PMID:21856795

  13. An organelle K+ channel is required for osmoregulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Wu, Xiaoan; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hucheng; Pan, Junmin

    2016-08-01

    Fresh water protozoa and algae face hypotonic challenges in their living environment. Many of them employ a contractile vacuole system to uptake excessive water from the cytoplasm and expel it to the environment to achieve cellular homeostasis. K(+), a major osmolyte in contractile vacuole, is predicted to create higher osmolarity for water influx. Molecular mechanisms for K(+) permeation through the plasma membrane have been well studied. However, how K(+) permeates organelles such as the contractile vacuole is not clear. Here, we show that the six-transmembrane K(+) channel KCN11 in Chlamydomonas is exclusively localized to contractile vacuole. Ectopic expression of KCN11 in HEK293T cells results in voltage-gated K(+) channel activity. Disruption of the gene or mutation of key residues for K(+) permeability of the channel leads to dysfunction of cell osmoregulation in very hypotonic conditions. The contractile cycle is inhibited in the mutant cells with a slower rate of contractile vacuole swelling, leading to cell death. These data demonstrate a new role for six-transmembrane K(+) channels in contractile vacuole functioning and provide further insights into osmoregulation mediated by the contractile vacuole.

  14. Enhancement of lipid production and fatty acid profiling in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Karpagam, R; Preeti, R; Ashokkumar, B; Varalakshmi, P

    2015-11-01

    Lipid from microalgae is one of the putative oil resources to facilitate the biodiesel production during this era of energy dissipation and environmental pollution. In this study, the key parameters such as biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content were evaluated at the early stationary phase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, CC1010 cultivated in nutrient starved (nitrogen, phosphorous), glucose (0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15% and 0.2%) and vitamin B12 supplementation (0.001%, 0.002% and 0.003%) in Tris-Acetate-Phosphate (TAP) medium. The lipid content in nitrogen starved media was 61% which is 2.34 folds higher than nutrient sufficient TAP medium. Glucose supplementation has lead to proportional increase in biomass productivity with the increasing concentration of glucose whereas vitamin B12 supplementations had not shown any influence in lipid and biomass production. Further, fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiling of C. reinhardtii, CC 1010 has revealed more than 80% of total SFA (saturated fatty acid) and MUFA (mono unsaturated fatty acid) content. Quality checking parameters of biodiesel like cetane number, saponification value, iodine number and degree of unsaturation were analyzed and the biodiesel fuel properties were found to be appropriate as per the international standards, EN 14214 and ASTM D6751. Conclusively, among all the treatments, nitrogen starvation with 0.1% glucose supplementation had yielded high lipid content in C. reinhardtii, CC 1010. PMID:25838071

  15. The sac Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Reveal Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Control of Cysteine Biosynthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Ravina, Cristina G.; Chang, Chwenn-In; Tsakraklides, George P.; McDermott, Jeffery P.; Vega, Jose M.; Leustek, Thomas; Gotor, Cecilia; Davies, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Algae and vascular plants are cysteine (Cys) prototrophs. They are able to import, reduce, and assimilate sulfate into Cys, methionine, and other organic sulfur-containing compounds. Characterization of genes encoding the enzymes required for Cys biosynthesis from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii reveals that transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms regulate the pathway. The derived amino acid sequences of the C. reinhardtii genes encoding 5′-adenylylsulfate (APS) reductase and serine (Ser) acetyltransferase are orthologous to sequences from vascular plants. The Cys biosynthetic pathway of C. reinhardtii is regulated by sulfate availability. The steady-state level of transcripts and activity of ATP sulfurylase, APS reductase, Ser acetyltransferase, and O-acetyl-Ser (thiol) lyase increase when cells are deprived of sulfate. The sac1 mutation, which impairs C. reinhardtii ability to acclimate to sulfur-deficient conditions, prevents the increase in accumulation of the transcripts encoding these enzymes and also prevents the increase in activity of all the enzymes except APS reductase. The sac2 mutation, which does not affect accumulation of APS reductase transcripts, blocks the increase in APS reductase activity. These results suggest that APS reductase activity is regulated posttranscriptionally in a SAC2-dependent process. PMID:12481091

  16. Chlamydomonas as a model for biofuels and bio-products production.

    PubMed

    Scranton, Melissa A; Ostrand, Joseph T; Fields, Francis J; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-05-01

    Developing renewable energy sources is critical to maintaining the economic growth of the planet while protecting the environment. First generation biofuels focused on food crops like corn and sugarcane for ethanol production, and soybean and palm for biodiesel production. Second generation biofuels based on cellulosic ethanol produced from terrestrial plants, has received extensive funding and recently pilot facilities have been commissioned, but to date output of fuels from these sources has fallen well short of what is needed. Recent research and pilot demonstrations have highlighted the potential of algae as one of the most promising sources of sustainable liquid transportation fuels. Algae have also been established as unique biofactories for industrial, therapeutic, and nutraceutical co-products. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii's long established role in the field of basic research in green algae has paved the way for understanding algal metabolism and developing genetic engineering protocols. These tools are now being utilized in C. reinhardtii and in other algal species for the development of strains to maximize biofuels and bio-products yields from the lab to the field. PMID:25641390

  17. Sub-cellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-01-01

    We identified a Cu accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulated Cu, dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but was functionally Cu-deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. NanoSIMS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bio-available for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mis-metallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein (re)-metallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  18. Regulated copper uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to copper availability.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K L; Hassett, R; Kosman, D; Merchant, S

    1996-01-01

    A saturable and temperature-dependent copper uptake pathway has been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uptake system has a high affinity for copper ions (Km approximately 0.2 microM) and is more active in cells that are adapted to copper deficiency than to cells grown in a medium containing physiological (submicromolar to micromolar) copper ion concentrations. The maximum velocity of copper uptake by copper-deficient cells (169 pmol h-1 10(6) cells-1 or 62 ng min-1 mg-1 chlorophyll) is up to 20-fold greater than that of fully copper-supplemented cells, and the Km (approximately 2 x 10(2) nM) is unaffected. Thus, the same uptake system appears to operate in both copper-replete and copper-deficient cells, but its expression or activity must be induced under copper-deficient conditions. A cupric reductase activity is also increased in copper-deficient compared with copper-sufficient cells. The physiological characteristics of the regulation of this cupric reductase are compatible with its involvement in the uptake pathway. Despite the operation of the uptake pathway under both copper-replete and copper-deficient conditions, C. reinhardtii cells maintained in fully copper-supplemented cells do not accumulate copper in excess of their metabolic need. These results provide evidence for a homeostatic mechanism for copper metabolism in C. reinhardtii. PMID:8883382

  19. Toxicity of atrazine and its bioaccumulation and biodegradation in a green microalga, Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Akhil N; Ji, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Jung Rae; Govindwar, Sanjay P; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2014-11-01

    This study evaluated the toxicity of herbicide atrazine, along with its bioaccumulation and biodegradation in the green microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana. At low concentration (10 μg L(-1)), atrazine had no profound effect on the microalga, while higher concentrations (25, 50, and 100 μg L(-1)) imposed toxicity, leading to inhibition of cell growth and chlorophyll a accumulation by 22 %, 33 %, and 36 %, and 13 %, 24 %, and 27 %, respectively. Atrazine 96-h EC50 for C. mexicana was estimated to be 33 μg L(-1). Microalga showed a capability to accumulate atrazine in the cell and to biodegrade the cell-accumulated atrazine resulting in 14-36 % atrazine degradation at 10-100 μg L(-1). Increasing atrazine concentration decreased the total fatty acids (from 102 to 75 mg g(-1)) and increased the unsaturated fatty acid content in the microalga. Carbohydrate content increased gradually with the increase in atrazine concentration up to 15 %. This study shows that C. mexicana has the capability to degrade atrazine and can be employed for the remediation of atrazine-contaminated streams.

  20. Building Blocks of the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex in Chlamydomonas Flagella*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianfeng; Tritschler, Douglas; Song, Kangkang; Barber, Cynthia F.; Cobb, Jennifer S.; Porter, Mary E.; Nicastro, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    The directional flow generated by motile cilia and flagella is critical for many processes, including human development and organ function. Normal beating requires the control and coordination of thousands of dynein motors, and the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) has been identified as an important regulatory node for orchestrating dynein activity. The nexin link appears to be critical for the transformation of dynein-driven, linear microtubule sliding to flagellar bending, yet the molecular composition and mechanism of the N-DRC remain largely unknown. Here, we used proteomics with special attention to protein phosphorylation to analyze the composition of the N-DRC and to determine which subunits may be important for signal transduction. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of WT and mutant flagellar axonemes from Chlamydomonas identified 12 N-DRC-associated proteins, including all seven previously observed N-DRC components. Sequence and PCR analyses identified the mutation responsible for the phenotype of the sup-pf-4 strain, and biochemical comparison with a radial spoke mutant revealed two components that may link the N-DRC and the radial spokes. Phosphoproteomics revealed eight proteins with phosphorylated isoforms for which the isoform patterns changed with the genotype as well as two components that may play pivotal roles in N-DRC function through their phosphorylation status. These data were assembled into a model of the N-DRC that explains aspects of its regulatory function. PMID:21700706

  1. Effects of Light Intensity and Oxidized Nitrogen Sources on Hydrogen Production by Chlamydomonas reinhardii1

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Pedro J.; Azuara, María P.; Ballesteros, Antonio; Fernández, Victor M.

    1985-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells, after a period of dark anaerobic adaptation, evolve H2 not only in the dark but also in the light. Our results show that high irradiances impair prolonged H2 evolution, while under low irradiances or darkness H2 evolution proceeds for more than 50 hours. NO3− and NO2− suppress H2 evolution both in the dark or under low irradiance. Apparently the cells prefer these oxidized nitrogen sources to protons as electron acceptors, since both NO3− and NO2− become reduced to NH4+, which is excreted to the culture medium in high amounts. H2 evolution started once these oxidized anions were largely depleted from the medium. Moreover, H2 evolution was consistently associated with NH4+ excretion even if NH4+ was already present in high amounts in the medium. This observation indicates that the cells utilize not only their carbohydrate but also their protein reserves as sources of reducing power for H2 evolution. This conclusion was supported by the observation that when nitrogen-starved cells were made anaerobic in a nitrogen-free medium, they not only evolved H2 at very high rates but excreted concomitantly NH4+ up to concentrations in the millimolar range. PMID:16664329

  2. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M.; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A.; Porter, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  3. An omics based assessment of cadmium toxicity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Jamers, An; Blust, Ronny; De Coen, Wim; Griffin, Julian L; Jones, Oliver A H

    2013-01-15

    The effects of cadmium were assessed in the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Algae were exposed to concentrations of 0, 8.1 or 114.8 μM of cadmium and growth rates, gene transcription and metabolite profiles were examined after 48 and 72 h of exposure. In algae exposed to 8.1 μM Cd, several genes were differentially transcribed after 48 h but no adverse growth related effects were detected. A transient effect on both gene transcription patterns and metabolite profiles could be discerned after 48 h of exposure but the majority of these changes disappeared after 72 h. In contrast, all effects were more pronounced at the 114.8 μM cadmium exposure. Here growth was clearly reduced and transcription of a large number of genes involved in oxidative stress defense mechanisms was differentially increased. Metabolites involved in the glutathione synthesis pathway (an important antioxidant defense) were also affected but the effects of cadmium were found to be more pronounced at the transcript level than in the metabolome, suggesting that the former exhibits greater sensitivity toward cadmium exposure. PMID:23063003

  4. The metabolome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii following induction of anaerobic H2 production by sulfur depletion.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Timmins; Zhou, Wenxu; Rupprecht, Jens; Lim, Lysha; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Doebbe, Anja; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Marx, Ute C; Smith, Steven M; Schenk, Peer M

    2009-08-28

    The metabolome of the model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been analyzed during 120 h of sulfur depletion to induce anaerobic hydrogen (H(2)) production, using NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and TLC. The results indicate that these unicellular green algae consume freshly supplied acetate in the medium to accumulate energy reserves during the first 24 h of sulfur depletion. In addition to the previously reported accumulation of starch, large amounts of triacylglycerides were deposited in the cells. During the early 24- to 72-h time period fermentative energy metabolism lowered the pH, H(2) was produced, and amino acid levels generally increased. In the final phase from 72 to 120 h, metabolism slowed down leading to a stabilization of pH, even though some starch and most triacylglycerides remained. We conclude that H(2) production does not slow down due to depletion of energy reserves but rather due to loss of essential functions resulting from sulfur depletion or due to a build-up of the toxic fermentative products formate and ethanol. PMID:19478077

  5. Identification of regulatory network hubs that control lipid metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Park, Jeong-Jin; Holguin, F. Omar; Kim, Min-Jeong; Wang, Hongxia; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Hicks, Leslie M.; Gang, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae-based biofuels are promising sources of alternative energy, but improvements throughout the production process are required to establish them as economically feasible. One of the most influential improvements would be a significant increase in lipid yields, which could be achieved by altering the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and accumulation. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii accumulates oil (triacylglycerols, TAG) in response to nitrogen (N) deprivation. Although a few important regulatory genes have been identified that are involved in controlling this process, a global understanding of the larger regulatory network has not been developed. In order to uncover this network in this species, a combined omics (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic) analysis was applied to cells grown in a time course experiment after a shift from N-replete to N-depleted conditions. Changes in transcript and protein levels of 414 predicted transcription factors (TFs) and transcriptional regulators (TRs) were monitored relative to other genes. The TF and TR genes were thus classified by two separate measures: up-regulated versus down-regulated and early response versus late response relative to two phases of polar lipid synthesis (before and after TAG biosynthesis initiation). Lipidomic and primary metabolite profiling generated compound accumulation levels that were integrated with the transcript dataset and TF profiling to produce a transcriptional regulatory network. Evaluation of this proposed regulatory network led to the identification of several regulatory hubs that control many aspects of cellular metabolism, from N assimilation and metabolism, to central metabolism, photosynthesis and lipid metabolism. PMID:26022256

  6. Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii high-CO sub 2 -requiring mutants to limiting CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Spalding, M.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics of four high-CO{sub 2}-requiring mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were compared to those of wild type before and after a 24-hour exposure to limiting CO{sub 2} concentrations. The four mutants represent two loci involved in the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system of this unicellular alga. All mutants had a lower photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon than did the wild type when grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration, indicating that the genetic lesion in each is expressed even at elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Wild type and all four mutants exhibited adaptive responses to limiting CO{sub 2} characteristic of the induction of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system, resulting in an increased affinity for inorganic carbon only in wild type. Although other components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system were induced in these mutants, the defective component in each was sufficient to prevent any increase in the affinity for inorganic carbon. It was concluded that the genes corresponding to the ca-1 and pmp-1 loci exhibit at least partially constitutive expression and that all components of the CO{sub 2}-concentrating system may be required to significantly affect the photosynthetic affinity for inorganic carbon.

  7. Characterization of the EYE2 gene required for eyespot assembly in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D G; Lamb, M R; Dieckmann, C L

    2001-01-01

    The unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can perceive light and respond by altering its swimming behavior. The eyespot is a specialized structure for sensing light, which is assembled de novo at every cell division from components located in two different cellular compartments. Photoreceptors and associated signal transduction components are localized in a discrete patch of the plasma membrane. This patch is tightly packed against an underlying sandwich of chloroplast membranes and carotenoid-filled lipid granules, which aids the cell in distinguishing light direction. In a prior screen for mutant strains with eyespot defects, the EYE2 locus was defined by the single eye2-1 allele. The mutant strain has no eyespot by light microscopy and has no organized carotenoid granule layers as judged by electron microscopy. Here we demonstrate that the eye2-1 mutant is capable of responding to light, although the strain is far less sensitive than wild type to low light intensities and orients imprecisely. Therefore, pigment granule layer assembly in the chloroplast is not required for photoreceptor localization in the plasma membrane. A plasmid-insertion mutagenesis screen yielded the eye2-2 allele, which allowed the isolation and characterization of the EYE2 gene. The EYE2 protein is a member of the thioredoxin superfamily. Site-directed mutagenesis of the active site cysteines demonstrated that EYE2 function in eyespot assembly is redox independent, similar to the auxiliary functions of other thioredoxin family members in protein folding and complex assembly. PMID:11454753

  8. Adenosine 3′:5′-Cyclic Monophosphate in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Isolation and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Amrhein, Nikolaus; Filner, Philip

    1973-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains a factor that can replace adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the stimulation of rabbit-muscle protein kinase. The factor cochromatographs and coelectrophoreses with authentic cAMP, and is inactivated by beef heart cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. When C. reinhardtii is exposed to aminophylline (theophylline2 ethylenediamine), the concentration of the factor in the cells increases within 1 hr, from about 25 pmol of cAMP equivalents per g dry weight to more than 250 pmol. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is present in crude extract of C. reinhardtii and is inhibited by theophylline. We conclude that cAMP occurs in C. reinhardtii and that the endogenous concentration is governed at least in part by a theophylline-sensitive cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. These findings provide a sound basis for attributing the effects of methylxanthines on flagellar function and regeneration in C. reinhardtii to the resultant elevation of endogenous cAMP. PMID:16592076

  9. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-12-01

    We identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu(+) accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu(+) became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  10. Effect of aluminum on cellular division and photosynthetic electron transport in Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Perreault, François; Dewez, David; Fortin, Claude; Juneau, Philippe; Diallo, Amirou; Popovic, Radovan

    2010-04-01

    The present study investigated aluminum's effect on cellular division and the photosynthetic processes in Euglena gracilis and Chlamydomonas acidophila at pH 3.0, at which Al is present mostly as Al(3+), AlSO(4) (+), and Al(SO(4))(2) (-). These algal species were exposed to 100, 188, and 740 microM Al, and after 24 h cell-bound Al was significantly different from control only for the highest concentration tested. However, very different effects of Al on algal cellular division, biomass per cell, and photosynthetic activity were found. Aluminum stimulated cell division but decreased at some level biomass per cell in C. acidophila. Primary photochemistry of photosynthesis, as Photosystem II quantum yield, and energy dissipation via nonphotochemical activity were slightly affected. However, for E. gracilis, under the same conditions, Al did not show a stimulating effect on cellular division or photosynthetic activity. Primary photochemical activity was diminished, and energy dissipation via nonphotochemical pathways was strongly increased. Therefore, when Al is highly available in aquatic ecosystems, these effects may indicate very different response mechanisms that are dependent on algal species. PMID:20821518

  11. New insights into Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hydrogen production processes by combined microarray/RNA-seq transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Toepel, Jörg; Illmer-Kephalides, Maike; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Straube, Jasmin; May, Patrick; Goesmann, Alexander; Kruse, Olaf

    2013-08-01

    Hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii induced by sulphur starvation is a multiphase process while the cell internal metabolism is completely remodelled. The first cellular response is characterized by induction of genes with regulatory functions, followed by a total remodelling of the metabolism to provide reduction equivalents for cellular processes. We were able to characterize all major processes that provide energy and reduction equivalents during hydrogen production. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii showed a strong transcript increase for gene models responsible for stress response and detoxification of oxygen radicals. Finally, we were able to determine potential bottlenecks and target genes for manipulation to increase hydrogen production or to prolong the hydrogen production phase. The investigation of transcriptomic changes during the time course of hydrogen production in C. reinhardtii with microarrays and RNA-seq revealed new insights into the regulation and remodelling of the cell internal metabolism. Both methods showed a good correlation. The microarray platform can be used as a reliable standard tool for routine gene expression analysis. RNA-seq additionally allowed a detailed time-dependent study of gene expression and determination of new genes involved in the hydrogen production process. PMID:23551401

  12. Process development for hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based on growth and product formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Florian; Morweiser, Michael; Rosello Sastre, Rosa; Kruse, Olaf; Posten, Clemens

    2012-11-30

    Certain strains of microalgae are long known to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase enzyme recombines electrons from the chloroplast electron transport chain with protons to form molecular hydrogen directly inside the chloroplast. A sustained hydrogen production can be obtained under low sulfur conditions in C. reinhardtii, reducing the net oxygen evolution by reducing the photosystem II activity and thereby overcoming the inhibition of the hydrogenases. The development of specially adapted hydrogen production strains led to higher yields and optimized biological process preconditions. So far sustainable hydrogen production required a complete exchange of the growth medium to establish sulfur-deprived conditions after biomass growth. In this work we demonstrate the transition from the biomass growth phase to the hydrogen production phase in a single batch culture only by exact dosage of sulfur. This eliminates the elaborate and energy intensive solid-liquid separation step and establishes a process strategy to proceed further versus large scale production. This strategy has been applied to determine light dependent biomass growth and hydrogen production kinetics to assess the potential of H₂ production with C. reinhardtii as a basis for scale up and further process optimization. PMID:22750091

  13. Alternative photosynthetic electron transport pathways during anaerobiosis in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis uses light as energy source to generate an oxidant powerful enough to oxidize water into oxygen, electrons and protons. Upon linear electron transport, electrons extracted from water are used to reduce NADP(+) to NADPH. The oxygen molecule has been integrated into the cellular metabolism, both as the most efficient electron acceptor during respiratory electron transport and as oxidant and/or "substrate" in a number of biosynthetic pathways. Though photosynthesis of higher plants, algae and cyanobacteria produces oxygen, there are conditions under which this type of photosynthesis operates under hypoxic or anaerobic conditions. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, this condition is induced by sulfur deficiency, and it results in the production of molecular hydrogen. Research on this biotechnologically relevant phenomenon has contributed largely to new insights into additional pathways of photosynthetic electron transport, which extend the former concept of linear electron flow by far. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about various electron sources and sinks of oxygenic photosynthesis besides water and NADP(+) in the context of their contribution to hydrogen photoproduction by C. reinhardtii. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. PMID:21376011

  14. A dual strategy to cope with high light in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Allorent, Guillaume; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Roach, Thomas; Peers, Graham; Cardol, Pierre; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Kuntz, Marcel; Breyton, Cécile; Franck, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-André; Niyogi, Krishna K; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Minagawa, Jun; Finazzi, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Absorption of light in excess of the capacity for photosynthetic electron transport is damaging to photosynthetic organisms. Several mechanisms exist to avoid photodamage, which are collectively referred to as nonphotochemical quenching. This term comprises at least two major processes. State transitions (qT) represent changes in the relative antenna sizes of photosystems II and I. High energy quenching (qE) is the increased thermal dissipation of light energy triggered by lumen acidification. To investigate the respective roles of qE and qT in photoprotection, a mutant (npq4 stt7-9) was generated in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by crossing the state transition-deficient mutant (stt7-9) with a strain having a largely reduced qE capacity (npq4). The comparative phenotypic analysis of the wild type, single mutants, and double mutants reveals that both state transitions and qE are induced by high light. Moreover, the double mutant exhibits an increased photosensitivity with respect to the single mutants and the wild type. Therefore, we suggest that besides qE, state transitions also play a photoprotective role during high light acclimation of the cells, most likely by decreasing hydrogen peroxide production. These results are discussed in terms of the relative photoprotective benefit related to thermal dissipation of excess light and/or to the physical displacement of antennas from photosystem II. PMID:23424243

  15. An organelle K+ channel is required for osmoregulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Wu, Xiaoan; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hucheng; Pan, Junmin

    2016-08-01

    Fresh water protozoa and algae face hypotonic challenges in their living environment. Many of them employ a contractile vacuole system to uptake excessive water from the cytoplasm and expel it to the environment to achieve cellular homeostasis. K(+), a major osmolyte in contractile vacuole, is predicted to create higher osmolarity for water influx. Molecular mechanisms for K(+) permeation through the plasma membrane have been well studied. However, how K(+) permeates organelles such as the contractile vacuole is not clear. Here, we show that the six-transmembrane K(+) channel KCN11 in Chlamydomonas is exclusively localized to contractile vacuole. Ectopic expression of KCN11 in HEK293T cells results in voltage-gated K(+) channel activity. Disruption of the gene or mutation of key residues for K(+) permeability of the channel leads to dysfunction of cell osmoregulation in very hypotonic conditions. The contractile cycle is inhibited in the mutant cells with a slower rate of contractile vacuole swelling, leading to cell death. These data demonstrate a new role for six-transmembrane K(+) channels in contractile vacuole functioning and provide further insights into osmoregulation mediated by the contractile vacuole. PMID:27311484

  16. The role of the dynein light intermediate chain in retrograde IFT and flagellar function in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Reck, Jaimee; Schauer, Alexandria M; VanderWaal Mills, Kristyn; Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Perrone, Catherine A; Porter, Mary E

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of cilia and flagella depends on the activity of two microtubule motor complexes, kinesin-2 and dynein-2/1b, but the specific functions of the different subunits are poorly defined. Here we analyze Chlamydomonas strains expressing different amounts of the dynein 1b light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Disruption of D1bLIC alters the stability of the dynein 1b complex and reduces both the frequency and velocity of retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), but it does not eliminate retrograde IFT. Flagellar assembly, motility, gliding, and mating are altered in a dose-dependent manner. iTRAQ-based proteomics identifies a small subset of proteins that are significantly reduced or elevated in d1blic flagella. Transformation with D1bLIC-GFP rescues the mutant phenotypes, and D1bLIC-GFP assembles into the dynein 1b complex at wild-type levels. D1bLIC-GFP is transported with anterograde IFT particles to the flagellar tip, dissociates into smaller particles, and begins processive retrograde IFT in <2 s. These studies demonstrate the role of D1bLIC in facilitating the recycling of IFT subunits and other proteins, identify new components potentially involved in the regulation of IFT, flagellar assembly, and flagellar signaling, and provide insight into the role of D1bLIC and retrograde IFT in other organisms. PMID:27251063

  17. High-resolution crystal structure and redox properties of chloroplastic triosephosphate isomerase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Mirko; Michelet, Laure; Sciabolini, Chiara; Di Giacinto, Nastasia; Morisse, Samuel; Marchand, Christophe H; Trost, Paolo; Fermani, Simona; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2014-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) catalyzes the interconversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate. Photosynthetic organisms generally contain two isoforms of TPI located in both cytoplasm and chloroplasts. While the cytoplasmic TPI is involved in the glycolysis, the chloroplastic isoform participates in the Calvin-Benson cycle, a key photosynthetic process responsible for carbon fixation. Compared with its cytoplasmic counterpart, the functional features of chloroplastic TPI have been poorly investigated and its three-dimensional structure has not been solved. Recently, several studies proposed TPI as a potential target of different redox modifications including dithiol/disulfide interchanges, glutathionylation, and nitrosylation. However, neither the effects on protein activity nor the molecular mechanisms underlying these redox modifications have been investigated. Here, we have produced recombinantly and purified TPI from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr). The biochemical properties of the enzyme were delineated and its crystallographic structure was determined at a resolution of 1.1 Å. CrTPI is a homodimer with subunits containing the typical (β/α)8-barrel fold. Although no evidence for TRX regulation was obtained, CrTPI was found to undergo glutathionylation by oxidized glutathione and trans-nitrosylation by nitrosoglutathione, confirming its sensitivity to multiple redox modifications. PMID:24157611

  18. Plastid terminal oxidase 2 (PTOX2) is the major oxidase involved in chlororespiration in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Houille-Vernes, Laura; Rappaport, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-André; Alric, Jean; Johnson, Xenie

    2011-01-01

    By homology with the unique plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) found in plants, two genes encoding oxidases have been found in the Chlamydomonas genome, PTOX1 and PTOX2. Here we report the identification of a knockout mutant of PTOX2. Its molecular and functional characterization demonstrates that it encodes the oxidase most predominantly involved in chlororespiration in this algal species. In this mutant, the plastoquinone pool is constitutively reduced under dark-aerobic conditions, resulting in the mobile light-harvesting complexes being mainly, but reversibly, associated with photosystem I. Accordingly, the ptox2 mutant shows lower fitness than wild type when grown under phototrophic conditions. Single and double mutants devoid of the cytochrome b6f complex and PTOX2 were used to measure the oxidation rates of plastoquinols via PTOX1 and PTOX2. Those lacking both the cytochrome b6f complex and PTOX2 were more sensitive to light than the single mutants lacking either the cytochrome b6f complex or PTOX2, which discloses the role of PTOX2 under extreme conditions where the plastoquinone pool is overreduced. A model for chlororespiration is proposed to relate the electron flow rate through these alternative pathways and the redox state of plastoquinones in the dark. This model suggests that, in green algae and plants, the redox poise results from the balanced accumulation of PTOX and NADPH dehydrogenase. PMID:22143777

  19. Ecotoxicological effects of perfluorooctanoic acid on freshwater microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changwei; Luo, Qi; Huang, Qingguo

    2014-05-01

    As a persistent bioaccumulative compound, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is found in various ecosystems and receives growing attention. The acute toxicity of PFOA was tested on 2 freshwater microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Scenedesmus obliquus. The 96-h concentration for 50% of maximal effect (EC50) values were measured, physiological responses of the algae were investigated, and uptake of PFOA by the algae was quantified. The EC50 values for C. reinhardtii and S. obliquus were 51.9 ± 1.0 mg/L and 44.0 ± 1.5 mg/L PFOA, respectively. After 8-d exposure to PFOA ranging from 10 mg/L to 40 mg/L, the growth of C. reinhardtii was significantly inhibited, whereas that of S. obliquus was only slightly suppressed. Increases in malonaldehyde and proline levels were observed in the 2 algae when exposed to PFOA at certain concentrations, for instance, 20 mg/L and 40 mg/L, which is indicative of the trigger of a defensive mechanism. The percentage of PFOA that was adsorbed by the algae after 8-d exposure at a dosage between 5 mg/L and 20 mg/L ranged from 5.5% to 7.5%, and the uptake of PFOA by the algae exceeded 10%. PMID:24464740

  20. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584