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Sample records for chloride salt occluded

  1. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, M.A.; Pereira, C.

    1997-03-18

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000 K to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  2. Method of preparing sodalite from chloride salt occluded zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A.; Pereira, Candido

    1997-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal starting with a substantially dry zeolite and sufficient glass to form leach resistant sodalite with occluded radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material. The zeolite and glass are heated to a temperature up to about 1000.degree. K. to convert the zeolite to sodalite and thereafter maintained at a pressure and temperature sufficient to form a sodalite product near theoretical density. Pressure is used on the formed sodalite to produce the required density.

  3. Salt-occluded zeolite waste forms: Crystal structures and transformability

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Neutron diffraction studies of salt-occluded zeolite and zeolite/glass composite samples, simulating nuclear waste forms loaded with fission products, have revealed complex structures, with cations assuming the dual roles of charge compensation and occlusion (cluster formation). These clusters roughly fill the 6--8 {angstrom} diameter pores of the zeolites. Samples are prepared by equilibrating zeolite-A with complex molten Li, K, Cs, Sr, Ba, Y chloride salts, with compositions representative of anticipated waste systems. Samples prepared using zeolite 4A (which contains exclusively sodium cations) as starting material are observed to transform to sodalite, a denser aluminosilicate framework structure, while those prepared using zeolite 5A (sodium and calcium ions) more readily retain the zeolite-A structure. Because the sodalite framework pores are much smaller than those of zeolite-A, clusters are smaller and more rigorously confined, with a correspondingly lower capacity for waste containment. Details of the sodalite structures resulting from transformation of zeolite-A depend upon the precise composition of the original mixture. The enhanced resistance of salt-occluded zeolites prepared from zeolite 5A to sodalite transformation is thought to be related to differences in the complex chloride clusters present in these zeolite mixtures. Data relating processing conditions to resulting zeolite composition and structure can be used in the selection of processing parameters which lead to optimal waste forms.

  4. Method for immobilizing mixed waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and other hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1993-09-07

    The invention is a method for the encapsulation of soluble radioactive waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as strontium, cesium and hazardous wastes such as barium so that they may be permanently stored without future threat to the environment. The process consists of contacting the salts containing the radionuclides and hazardous wastes with certain zeolites which have been found to ion exchange with the radionuclides and to occlude the chloride salts so that the resulting product is leach resistant.

  5. Method for immobilizing mixed waste chloride salts containing radionuclides and other hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Michele A.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a method for the encapsulation of soluble radioactive waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as strontium, cesium and hazardous wastes such as barium so that they may be permanently stored without future threat to the environment. The process consists of contacting the salts containing the radionuclides and hazardous wastes with certain zeolites which have been found to ion exchange with the radionuclides and to occlude the chloride salts so that the resulting product is leach resistant.

  6. Production of chlorine from chloride salts

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.

    1981-01-01

    A process for converting chloride salts and sulfuric acid to sulfate salts and elemental chlorine is disclosed. A chloride salt and sulfuric acid are combined in a furnace where they react to produce a sulfate salt and hydrogen chloride. Hydrogen chloride from the furnace contacts a molten salt mixture containing an oxygen compound of vanadium, an alkali metal sulfate and an alkali metal pyrosulfate to recover elemental chlorine. In the absence of an oxygen-bearing gas during the contacting, the vanadium is reduced, but is regenerated to its active higher valence state by separately contacting the molten salt mixture with an oxygen-bearing gas.

  7. Densification of salt-occluded zeolite a powders to a leach-resistant monolith

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Murhpy, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) yields a salt waste of LiCl-KCl that contains approximately 6 wt% fission products, primarily as CsCl and SrCl{sub 2}. Past work has shown that zeolite A will preferentially sorb cesium and strontium and will encapsulate the salt waste in a leach-resistant, radiation-resistant aluminosilicate matrix. However, a method is sill needed to convert the salt-occluded zeolite powders into a form suitable for geologic disposal. We are thus investigating a method that forms bonded zeolite by hot pressing a mixture of glass frit and salt-occluded zeolite powders at 990 K (717{degree}C) and 28 MPa. The leach resistance of the bonded zeolite was measured in static leach tests run for 28 days in 363 K (90{degree}C) deionized water. Normalized release rates of all elements in the bonded zeolite were low, <1 g/m{sup 2} d. Thus, the bonded zeolite may be a suitable waste form for IFR salt waste.

  8. Sodium (Salt or Sodium Chloride)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the salt in your diet and for information, strategies, and tools you need to lead a healthier ... reduce the salt in your diet and get information, strategies, and tools you need to lead a healthier ...

  9. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  10. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  11. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  12. Method for the production of uranium chloride salt

    DOEpatents

    Westphal, Brian R.; Mariani, Robert D.

    2013-07-02

    A method for the production of UCl.sub.3 salt without the use of hazardous chemicals or multiple apparatuses for synthesis and purification is provided. Uranium metal is combined in a reaction vessel with a metal chloride and a eutectic salt- and heated to a first temperature under vacuum conditions to promote reaction of the uranium metal with the metal chloride for the production of a UCl.sub.3 salt. After the reaction has run substantially to completion, the furnace is heated to a second temperature under vacuum conditions. The second temperature is sufficiently high to selectively vaporize the chloride salts and distill them into a condenser region.

  13. Apparatus and method for making metal chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Richmann, Michael K.

    2007-05-15

    A method of producing metal chlorides is disclosed in which chlorine gas is introduced into liquid Cd. CdCl.sub.2 salt is floating on the liquid Cd and as more liquid CdCl.sub.2 is formed it separates from the liquid Cd metal and dissolves in the salt. The salt with the CdCl.sub.2 dissolved therein contacts a metal which reacts with CdCl.sub.2 to form a metal chloride, forming a mixture of metal chloride and CdCl.sub.2. After separation of bulk Cd from the salt, by gravitational means, the metal chloride is obtained by distillation which removes CdCl.sub.2 and any Cd dissolved in the metal chloride.

  14. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  15. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  16. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  17. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt...

  18. Salt passivation during anodic iridium dissolution in chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Saltykova, N.A.; Pechorskaya, L.S.; Baraboshkin, A.N.; Kotovskii, S.N.; Kosikhin, L.T.

    1986-11-01

    Anodic iridium dissolution in chloride melts at 500-700/sup 0/C was studied by potentiostatic, potentiodynamic, and galvanostatic techniques. It was found that an iridium anode is passivated by hexachloroiridates, first by the iridium (III) salt and at more positive potentials by the iridium (IV) salt. Values for anode resistance during passivation by salt films were calculated. It was shown that the morphology of the dissolving anode surface is determined by the value of polarization.

  19. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  20. [Determination of Chloride Salt Solution by NIR Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Jian-hong; Jiao, Ming-xing

    2015-07-01

    Determination of chloride salt solution by near infrared spectrum plays a very important role in Biomedicine. The near infrared spectrum analysis of Sodium chloride, potassium chloride, calcium chloride aqueous solution shows that the concentration change of chloride salt can affect hydrogen bond, resulting in the variation of near infrared spectrum of water. The temperature influence on NIR spectrum has been decreased by choosing reasonable wavelength range and the wavelength where the temperature effects are zero (isosbestic point). Chlorine salt prediction model was established based on partial least squares method and used for predicting the concentration of the chlorine ion. The impact on near infrared spectrum of the cation ionic radius, the number of ionic charge, the complex effect of ionic in water has also discussed in this article and the reason of every factor are analysed. Experimental results show that the temperature and concentration will affect the near-infrared spectrum of the solution, It is found that the effect of temperature plays the dominant role at low concentrations of chlorine salt; rather, the ionic dominates at high concentration. Chloride complexes are formed in aqueous solution, It has an effect on hydrogen bond of water combining with the cations in chlorine salt solution, Comparing different chloride solutions at the same concentration, the destruction effects of chloride complexes and catnions on the hydrogen bond of water increases in the sequences: CaCl2 >NaCl>KC. The modeling result shows that the determination coefficients (R2) = 99.97%, the root mean square error of cross validation (RM- SECV) = 4.51, and the residual prediction deviation (RPD) = 62.7, it meets the daily requirements of biochemical detection accuracy.

  1. Urinary sodium and chloride during renal salt retention.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R A; Eisinger, R P

    1983-09-01

    One hundred ten episodes of renal salt retention (urinary sodium and/or chloride less than 10 mEq/L) were studied retrospectively to determine the significance of discordance of urinary sodium from chloride. In 16 episodes the urinary sodium exceeded chloride by at least 15 mEq/L. This disparity was associated with the necessity for urinary excretion of substantial quantities of poorly reabsorbed anions (penicillin, ketones, or diatrizoate), a rapidly falling serum bicarbonate level (due to resolving metabolic or developing respiratory alkalosis), or substantial renal insufficiency (serum creatinine greater than 3 mg/dL). In 14 of 110 episodes, urinary chloride exceeded urinary sodium by at least 15 mEq/L. These patients were more often oliguric and had a higher mean serum chloride than patients without this dissociation. In patients with oliguria, hyponatremia, or metabolic alkalosis, measurement of urinary sodium or chloride alone will, in a substantial number of cases, fail to detect renal salt retention. When evidence is sought for renal salt retention, both urinary sodium and chloride should be determined. PMID:6613992

  2. Is sodium chloride worth its salt?

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Euan; Andrews, Peter J

    2013-06-11

    The choice of fluid for resuscitation of the brain-injured patient remains controversial, and the 'ideal' resuscitation fluid has yet to be identified. Large volumes of hypotonic solutions must be avoided because of the risk of cerebral swelling and intracranial hypertension. Traditionally, 0.9% sodium chloride has been used in patients at risk of intracranial hypertension, but there is increasing recognition that 0.9% saline is not without its problems. Roquilly and colleagues show a reduction in the development of hyperchloremic acidosis in brain-injured patients given 'balanced' solutions for maintenance and resuscitation compared with 0.9% sodium chloride. In this commentary, we explore the idea that we should move away from 0.9% sodium chloride in favor of a more 'physiological' solution.

  3. Hydration patterns and salting effects in sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-10-01

    The salting effects of 2M sodium chloride electrolyte are studied based on a series of model solutes with properties ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Generally, hydrophobic solutes will be salted out and hydrophilic solutes will be salted in by NaCl solution. The solvation free energy changes are highly correlated with Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The underlying mechanism resorts to the preferential binding of ions and water to solutes. Our results demonstrate that the salting effect not only depends on the salt's position in Hofmeister series, but also on the solutes' specifics. Taking the hydration free energies of solutes and ions as independent variables, a schematic diagram of salting effects is suggested. The resolved multifaceted salting effects rely on the sensitive balance of the tripartite interaction among solutes, ions, and water.

  4. Substituent effects on ferrocenes in aluminum chloride-butylpyridinium chloride molten-salt mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Edgecombe, A.L.; Fowler, J.S.; Gibbard, H.F. ); Slocum, D.W. ); Phillips, J. )

    1990-02-01

    The visible absorption spectra and reduction potentials of 11 ferrocenes containing electron-withdrawing substituents were determined in an N-n-butylpyridinium chloride-aluminum chloride molten salt. When the substituent(s) on the cyclopentadienyl ring(s) of ferrocene were varied, the reduction potential was caused to range over 1.25 V, and the wavelength for maximum absorption of visible light was varied by nearly 200 nm. These changes are greater than have been observed for similar ferrocenes in other nonaqueous solvents. Evidence is presented for specific interactions of particular ferrocenes with the molten salt.

  5. Continuous extraction of molten chloride salts with liquid cadmium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    A pyrochemical method is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide contnuous multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and liquid cadmium alloys at 500{degrees}C. The extraction method will be used to recover transuranic (TRU) elements from the process salt in the electroretiner used in the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). The IFR is one of the Department of Energy`s advanced power reactor concepts. The recovered TRU elements are returned to the electrorefiner. The extracted salt undergoes further processing to remove rare earths and other fission products so that most of the purified salt can also be returned to the electrorefiner, thereby extending the useful life of the process salt many times.

  6. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may be safely used in foods for...

  7. Measurements of the partial electronic conductivity in lithium chloride - potassium chloride molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, G.J.; Huggins, R.A.; Lee, M.C.Y.

    1983-05-01

    The partial electronic conductivity of the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt electrolyte has been studied as a function of lithium activity, temperature and melt composition using the Wagner asymmetric d-c polarization technique. Measurements were made over the temperature range 383-465/sup 0/C and at lithium activities extending from 1.95 X 10/sup -7/ to unity. The results confirmed the applicability of this technique to molten salt systems. The partial electronic conductivity was shown to be much greater than the partial hole conductivity over the range of lithium activities investigated, and was found to increase monotonically with temperature and lithium activity, but decreased on addition of excess LiCl to the eutectic composition. Approximate values of self-discharge currents for cells utilizing an ''Al/LiAl'' negative electrode and a LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte have been calculated.

  8. Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Frozen Chloride Salts on Icy Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Paul; Thomas, Elena C.; Hodyss, Robert; Vu, Tuan; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Currently, our understanding of the chemical composition of Europa's surface is our best means of inferring constraints on the subsurface ocean composition and its subsequent habitability. The bulk of our knowledge of Europa surface chemistry can be traced to near infrared spectra recorded by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on the Galileo spacecraft. However, the usefulness of this and other remote sensing data is limited by the availability of spectral libraries of candidate materials under relevant conditions (temperature, thermal/radiation history, etc.). Chloride salts are expected to exist on the surface of Europa, and other icy bodies, based on geochemical predictions of the ocean composition. In order to help improve our understanding of Europa's surface composition, we have conducted a study of frozen chloride-salt brines prepared under simulated Europa surface conditions (vacuum, temperature, and UV irradiation) using both near IR and Raman spectroscopies. Specifically, Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the hydration states of various chloride salts as a function of temperature. Near IR spectroscopy of identically prepared samples was used to provide reference reflectance spectra of the identified hydrated salts. Our results indicate that at temperatures ranging from 80 K to 233 K, hydrohalite is formed from the freezing of NaCl brines, while the freezing of KCl solutions does not form KCl hydrates. In addition, the freezing of MgCl2 solutions forms a stable hexahydrate, and the freezing of CaCl2 solutions forms a hexahydrate, a tetrahydrate, and a dihydrate. Dehydration of the salts was observed as temperatures were increased, leading to a succession of hydration states in the case of CaCl2.

  9. Hydrodynamic simulation of a lithium chloride salt system.

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C. S.; Herrmann, S. D.; Knighton, G. C.

    1999-02-12

    A fused lithium chloride salt system's constitutive properties were evaluated and compared to a number of fluid properties, and water was shown to be an excellent simulant of lithium chloride salt. With a simple flow model, the principal scaling term was shown to be a function of the kinematic viscosity. A water mock-up of the molten salt was also shown to be within a {+-}3% error in the scaling analysis. This made it possible to consider developing water scaled tests of the molten salt system. Accurate flow velocity and pressure measurements were acquired by developing a directional velocity probe. The device was constructed and calibrated with a repeatable accuracy of {+-}15%. This was verified by a detailed evaluation of the probe. Extensive flow measurements of the engineering scale mockup were conducted, and the results were carefully compared to radial flow patterns of a straight blade stirrer. The flow measurements demonstrated an anti-symmetric nature of the stirring, and many additional effects were also identified. The basket design was shown to prevent fluid penetration into the fuel baskets when external stirring was the flow mechanism.

  10. Molten Chloride Salts for Heat Transfer in Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosek, James Wallace

    2011-12-01

    A forced convection loop was designed and constructed to examine the thermal-hydraulic performance of molten KCl-MgCl2 (68-32 at %) salt for use in nuclear co-generation facilities. As part of this research, methods for prediction of the thermo-physical properties of salt mixtures for selection of the coolant salt were studied. In addition, corrosion studies of 10 different alloys were exposed to the KCl-MgCl2 to determine a suitable construction material for the loop. Using experimental data found in literature for unary and binary salt systems, models were found, or developed to extrapolate the available experimental data to unstudied salt systems. These property models were then used to investigate the thermo-physical properties of the LINO3-NaNO3-KNO 3-Ca(NO3), system used in solar energy applications. Using these models, the density, viscosity, adiabatic compressibility, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and melting temperatures of higher order systems can be approximated. These models may be applied to other molten salt systems. Coupons of 10 different alloys were exposed to the chloride salt for 100 hours at 850°C was undertaken to help determine with which alloy to construct the loop. Of the alloys exposed, Haynes 230 had the least amount of weight loss per area. Nickel and Hastelloy N performed best based on maximum depth of attack. Inconel 625 and 718 had a nearly uniform depletion of Cr from the surface of the sample. All other alloys tested had depletion of Cr along the grain boundaries. The Nb in Inconel 625 and 718 changed the way the Cr is depleted in these alloys. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. A high temperature pump, thermal flow meter, and pressure differential device was designed, constructed and tested for use in the loop, The heat transfer of the molten chloride salt was found to

  11. The salt (sodium chloride) requirements of growing bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestler, R.B.

    1949-01-01

    In the two experiments involving 452 bobwhite quail chicks, seven diets containing the following salt supplements, were compared: No additional salt; 0.25 per cent KaCl; 0.50 per cent NaC1; 0.75per cent NaCl; 1.00 per cent NaCl; 0.25 per cent Na2SO4; and 0.50 per cent KCl. All four diets containing sodium chloride gave about equal results in bird-growth, and produced better weights than the diet containing no additional salt. Survival was high on the 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 per cent levels, especially the 0.75 per cent level. Feed consumption increased directly as the salt level of the diet was raised.....The results on the Na2SO4 and KCl while better than those on no saline supplementation, and somewhat inferior to those on NaCl, nevertheless are inconclusive because of inconsistency.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of threadlike cetyltrimethylammonium chloride micelles: effects of sodium chloride and sodium salicylate salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuowei; Larson, Ronald G

    2009-10-22

    We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to probe the effects of added sodium chloride (NaCl) and sodium salicylate (NaSal) salts on the spherical-to-threadlike micelle shape transition in aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) surfactants. Long threadlike micelles are found to be unstable and break into spherical micelles at low concentrations of NaCl, but remain stable for 20 ns above a threshold value of [NaCl] approximately 3.0 M, which is about 2.5 times larger than the experimental salt concentration at which the transition between spherical and rodlike micelles occurs. The chloride counterions associate weakly on the surface of the CTAC micelles with the degree of counterion dissociation decreasing slightly with increasing [NaCl] on spherical micelles, but dropping significantly on the threadlike micelles at high [NaCl]. This effect indicates that the electrolyte ions drive the micellar shape transition by screening the electrostatic repulsions between the micellar headgroups. The aromatic salicylate counterions, on the other hand, penetrate inside the micelle with their hydrophilic groups staying in the surfactant headgroup region and the hydrophobic groups partially embedded into the hydrophobic core of the micelle. The strong association of the salicylate ions with the surfactant headgroups leads to dense packing of the surfactant molecules, which effectively reduces the surface area per surfactant, and increases intramicellar ordering of the surfactant headgroups, favoring the formation of long threadlike micelles. Simulation predictions of the geometric and electrostatic properties of the spherical and threadlike micelles are in good agreement with experiments.

  13. Implicit Occluders

    SciTech Connect

    Pesco, S; Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V; Silva, C T

    2004-02-03

    In this paper we propose a novel visibility-culling technique for optimizing the computation and rendering of opaque isosurfaces. Given a continuous scalar field f (x) over a domain D and an isovalue w, our technique exploits the continuity of f to determine conservative visibility bounds implicitly, i.e., without the need for actually computing the isosurface f{sup -1}(w). We generate Implicit Occluders based on the change in sign of f *(x) = f (x)-w, from positive to negative (or vice versa) in the neighborhood of the isosurface. Consider, for example, the sign of f * along a ray r cast from the current viewpoint. The first change in sign of f * within D must contain an intersection of r with the isosurface. Any additional intersection of the isosurface with r is not visible. Implicit Occluders constitute a general concept that can be exploited algorithmically in different ways depending on the framework adopted for visibility computations. In this paper, we propose a simple from-point approach that exploits well-known hardware occlusion queries.

  14. Constraints on the composition and particle size of chloride salt-bearing deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotch, Timothy D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Wolff, Michael J.; Arnold, Jessica A.; Che, Congcong

    2016-03-01

    Chloride salt-bearing deposits on Mars were discovered using the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and have been characterized by both mid-infrared (MIR) and visible-to-near-infrared (VNIR) remote sensing instruments. The chloride salt-bearing deposits exhibit a blue slope at MIR wavelengths and a featureless red slope at VNIR wavelengths. These deposits also lack strong 3 µm bands in VNIR spectra, indicating that they are desiccated compared to the surrounding regolith. The lack of VNIR spectral features suggests that an anhydrous chloride salt, the most likely of which is halite, is responsible for the observed spectral slope. In this work, we use laboratory spectra and a hybrid T-matrix/Hapke light scattering model to constrain the particle sizes and salt abundances of the Martian chloride salt-bearing deposits. Our work shows that the two broad spectral classes of these deposits observed by THEMIS can be explained by a difference in the particle size of the admixed silicate regolith. In all cases, chloride salt abundances of 10-25% are required to match the THEMIS data. The chloride salt abundances determined in this work suggest deposition in a lacustrine/playa setting or in association with late-stage groundwater upwelling.

  15. Physicochemical changes in dry-cured hams salted with potassium, calcium and magnesium chloride as a partial replacement for sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Aliño, M; Grau, R; Toldrá, F; Barat, J M

    2010-10-01

    The reduction of added sodium chloride in dry-cured ham has been proposed to reduce dietary sodium intake in Mediterranean countries. The effect of substituting sodium chloride with potassium chloride, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride on some physicochemical characteristics of dry-cured ham during processing was evaluated. The results showed that hams salted with a mixture of sodium and potassium chloride registered higher salt concentrations and lower water contents and thus, needed less time to reach the required weight loss at the end of the process. The opposite effect was observed when calcium and magnesium chloride were added to the salt mixture. The observed differences in the texture and colour parameters were mainly due to differences in water and salt content.

  16. Chloride ion transport and mass balance in a metropolitan area using road salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Eric V.; Sander, Andrew R.; Mohseni, Omid; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2009-12-01

    In the Twin Cities metropolitan area (TCMA) of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, an estimated 317,000 metric tons (t) of road salt were used annually for road deicing between 2000 and 2005. To determine the annual retention of road salt, a chloride budget was conducted for a 4150 km2 watershed encompassing the populated areas of the TCMA. In addition to inflows and outflows in the major rivers of the TCMA, multiple sources of chloride were examined, but only road salt and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents were large enough to be included in the analysis. According to the chloride budget, 235,000 t of chloride entered the TCMA annually with the Mississippi and Minnesota rivers, and 355,000 t exited through the Mississippi River. Of the 120,000 t of chloride added annually to the rivers inside the TCMA watershed boundaries, 87,000 t came from WWTPs and 33,000 t came from road salt. Of the 142,000 t of chloride applied annually in the TCMA watershed as road salt (241,000 t NaCl), only 23% (33,000 t) were exported through the Mississippi River and 109,000 t or 77% were retained in the TCMA watershed. Chloride budgets for 10 subwatersheds within the TCMA analyzed in a similar way, gave an average chloride retention rate of 72%. The retention is occurring in the soils, surface waters (numerous lakes, wetlands, and ponds) and in the groundwater. Chloride concentrations in many of these urban water bodies are now considerably higher than the presettlement background levels of less than 3 mg/L with concentrations as high as 2000 mg/L in shallow groundwater wells. The continued accumulation of chloride in the groundwater and surface waters is a cause for concern.

  17. Relating road salt to exceedances of the water quality standard for chloride in New Hampshire streams.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Philip R; Kahl, J Steve; Sassan, Dari A; Heath, Douglas L; Walsh, Edward M

    2010-07-01

    Six watersheds in New Hampshire were studied to determine the effects of road salt on stream water quality. Specific conductance in streams was monitored every 15 min for one year using dataloggers. Chloride concentrations were calculated from specific conductance using empirical relationships. Stream chloride concentrations were directly correlated with development in the watersheds and were inversely related to streamflow. Exceedances of the EPA water quality standard for chloride were detected in the four watersheds with the most development. The number of exceedances during a year was linearly related to the annual average concentration of chloride. Exceedances of the water quality standard were not predicted for streams with annual average concentrations less than 102 mg L(-1). Chloride was imported into three of the watersheds at rates ranging from 45 to 98 Mg Cl km(-2) yr(-1). Ninety-one percent of the chloride imported was road salt for deicing roadways and parking lots. A simple, mass balance equation was shown to predict annual average chloride concentrations from streamflow and chloride import rates to the watershed. This equation, combined with the apparent threshold for exceedances of the water quality standard, can be used for screening-level TMDLs for road salt in impaired watersheds.

  18. GmCLC1 Confers Enhanced Salt Tolerance through Regulating Chloride Accumulation in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Peipei; Wang, Longchao; Liu, Ailin; Yu, Bingjun; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The family of chloride channel proteins that mediate Cl- transportation play vital roles in plant nutrient supply, cellular action potential and turgor pressure adjustment, stomatal movement, hormone signal recognition and transduction, Cl- homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The anionic toxicity, mainly caused by chloride ions (Cl-), on plants under salt stress remains poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the function of soybean Cl-/H+ antiporter GmCLC1 under salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, soybean, and yeast. We found that GmCLC1 enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic A. thaliana by reducing the Cl- accumulation in shoots and hence released the negative impact of salt stress on plant growth. Overexpression of GmCLC1 in the hairy roots of soybean sequestered more Cl- in their roots and transferred less Cl- to their shoots, leading to lower relative electrolyte leakage values in the roots and leaves. When either the soybean GmCLC1 or the yeast chloride transporter gene, GEF1, was transformed into the yeast gef1 mutant, and then treated with different chloride salts (MnCl2, KCl, NaCl), enhanced survival rate was observed. The result indicates that GmCLC1 and GEF1 exerted similar effects on alleviating the stress of diverse chloride salts on the yeast gef1 mutant. Together, this work suggests a protective function of GmCLC1 under Cl- stress. PMID:27504114

  19. GmCLC1 Confers Enhanced Salt Tolerance through Regulating Chloride Accumulation in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peipei; Wang, Longchao; Liu, Ailin; Yu, Bingjun; Lam, Hon-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The family of chloride channel proteins that mediate Cl(-) transportation play vital roles in plant nutrient supply, cellular action potential and turgor pressure adjustment, stomatal movement, hormone signal recognition and transduction, Cl(-) homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. The anionic toxicity, mainly caused by chloride ions (Cl(-)), on plants under salt stress remains poorly understood. In this work, we investigated the function of soybean Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter GmCLC1 under salt stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, soybean, and yeast. We found that GmCLC1 enhanced salt tolerance in transgenic A. thaliana by reducing the Cl(-) accumulation in shoots and hence released the negative impact of salt stress on plant growth. Overexpression of GmCLC1 in the hairy roots of soybean sequestered more Cl(-) in their roots and transferred less Cl(-) to their shoots, leading to lower relative electrolyte leakage values in the roots and leaves. When either the soybean GmCLC1 or the yeast chloride transporter gene, GEF1, was transformed into the yeast gef1 mutant, and then treated with different chloride salts (MnCl2, KCl, NaCl), enhanced survival rate was observed. The result indicates that GmCLC1 and GEF1 exerted similar effects on alleviating the stress of diverse chloride salts on the yeast gef1 mutant. Together, this work suggests a protective function of GmCLC1 under Cl(-) stress. PMID:27504114

  20. Aqueous DMSO Mediated Conversion of (2-(Arylsulfonyl)vinyl)iodonium Salts to Aldehydes and Vinyl Chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zawia, Eman; Moran, Wesley J

    2016-01-01

    Vinyl(aryl)iodonium salts are useful compounds in organic synthesis but they are under-utilized and their chemistry is under-developed. Herein is described the solvolysis of some vinyl(phenyl)iodonium salts, bearing an arylsulfonyl group, in aqueous DMSO leading to aldehyde formation. This unusual process is selective and operates under ambient conditions. Furthermore, the addition of aqueous HCl and DMSO to these vinyl(aryl)iodonium salts allows their facile conversion to vinyl chlorides. PMID:27537866

  1. Effects of sodium chloride salting and substitution with potassium chloride on whey expulsion of Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; McMahon, D J

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in manufacturing reduced-sodium cheese is that whey expulsion after salting decreases when less salt is applied. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether changing the salting method would increase whey syneresis when making a lower sodium cheese and (2) to better understand factors contributing to salt-induced curd syneresis. Unsalted milled Cheddar curds were salted using different salting intervals (5 or 10 min), different salting levels (20, 25, or 30g/kg), different numbers of applications when using only 20g/kg salt (1, 2, or 3 applications), and salting with the equivalent of 30g/kg NaCl using a 2:1 molar ratio of NaCl and KCl. Whey from these curds was collected every 5 or 10 min until 30 or 40 min after the start of salting, and curds were subsequently pressed for 3h. Additional trials were conducted in which salted milled Cheddar cheese curd was immersed at 22°C for 6h in various solutions to determine how milled curd pieces respond to different levels of salt and Ca. The use of 10-min intervals delayed whey syneresis without influencing total whey expulsion or cheese composition after pressing. Lowering the salt level reduced whey expulsion, resulting in cheeses with higher moisture and slightly lower pH. Adding salt faster did not increase whey expulsion in reduced-salt cheese. Partial substitution with KCl restored the extent of whey expulsion. When salted milled curd was immersed in a 30g/L salt solution, there was a net influx of salt solution into the curd and curd weight increased. When curd was immersed in 60g/L salt solution, a contraction of curd occurred. Curd shrinkage was more pronounced as the salt solution concentration was increased to 90 and 120g/L. Increasing the Ca concentration in test solutions (such that both serum and total Ca in the curd increased) also promoted curd contraction, resulting in lower curd moisture and pH and less weight gain by the curd. The proportion of Ca in the curd that was bound to the para

  2. Effects of sodium chloride salting and substitution with potassium chloride on whey expulsion of Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; McMahon, D J

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in manufacturing reduced-sodium cheese is that whey expulsion after salting decreases when less salt is applied. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether changing the salting method would increase whey syneresis when making a lower sodium cheese and (2) to better understand factors contributing to salt-induced curd syneresis. Unsalted milled Cheddar curds were salted using different salting intervals (5 or 10 min), different salting levels (20, 25, or 30g/kg), different numbers of applications when using only 20g/kg salt (1, 2, or 3 applications), and salting with the equivalent of 30g/kg NaCl using a 2:1 molar ratio of NaCl and KCl. Whey from these curds was collected every 5 or 10 min until 30 or 40 min after the start of salting, and curds were subsequently pressed for 3h. Additional trials were conducted in which salted milled Cheddar cheese curd was immersed at 22°C for 6h in various solutions to determine how milled curd pieces respond to different levels of salt and Ca. The use of 10-min intervals delayed whey syneresis without influencing total whey expulsion or cheese composition after pressing. Lowering the salt level reduced whey expulsion, resulting in cheeses with higher moisture and slightly lower pH. Adding salt faster did not increase whey expulsion in reduced-salt cheese. Partial substitution with KCl restored the extent of whey expulsion. When salted milled curd was immersed in a 30g/L salt solution, there was a net influx of salt solution into the curd and curd weight increased. When curd was immersed in 60g/L salt solution, a contraction of curd occurred. Curd shrinkage was more pronounced as the salt solution concentration was increased to 90 and 120g/L. Increasing the Ca concentration in test solutions (such that both serum and total Ca in the curd increased) also promoted curd contraction, resulting in lower curd moisture and pH and less weight gain by the curd. The proportion of Ca in the curd that was bound to the para

  3. Salt equivalence and temporal dominance of sensations of different sodium chloride substitutes in butter.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Vanessa Rios; Freire, Tassyana Vieira Marques; Saraiva, Carla Gonçalves; de Deus Souza Carneiro, João; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Nunes, Cleiton Antônio

    2013-08-01

    Studies indicate a positive association between dietary salt intake and some diseases, which has promoted the tendency to reduce the sodium in foods. The objective of this study was to determine the equivalent amount of different sodium chloride replacements required to promote the same degree of ideal saltiness in butter and to study the sensory profile of sodium chloride and the substitutes using the analysis of Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS). Using the magnitude estimation method, it was determined that the potencies of potassium chloride, monosodium glutamate and potassium phosphate relative to the 1% sodium chloride in butter are 83·33, 31·59 and 33·32, respectively. Regarding the sensory profile of the tested salt substitutes, a bitter taste was perceived in the butter with potassium chloride, a sour taste was perceived in the butter with potassium phosphate and sweet and umami tastes were dominant in the butter with monosodium glutamate. Of all the salt substitutes tested calcium lactate, potassium lactate, calcium chloride and magnesium chloride were impractical to use in butter.

  4. Method for Making a Uranium Chloride Salt Product

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William F.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    2004-10-05

    The subject apparatus provides a means to produce UCl3, in large quantities without incurring corrosion of the containment vessel or associated apparatus. Gaseous Cl is injected into a lower layer of Cd where CdCl2 is formed. Due to is lower density, the CdCl2 rises through the Cd layer into a layer of molten LiCl-KCL salt where a rotatable basket containing uranium ingots is suspended. The CdCl2 reacts with the uranium to form UCl, and Cd. Due to density differences, the Cd sinks down to the liquid Cd layer and is reused. The UCl3 combines with the molten salt. During production the temperature is maintained at about 600 degrees C. while after the uranium has been depleted the salt temperature is lowered, the molten salt is pressure siphoned from the vessel, and the salt product LiCl-KCl-30 mol% UCl3 is solidified.

  5. Iron, copper, and nickel behavior in buffered, neutral aluminum chloride:1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Pye, S.; Winnick, J.; Kohl, P.A.

    1997-06-01

    Iron, copper, and nickel electrodes were examined as possible metal/metal(II) chloride cathodes for the room temperature sodium/metal chloride battery in a molten salt composed of sodium chloride (NaCl), aluminum chloride (AlCl{sub 3}), and 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (MEIC). The iron electrode was investigated in basic, neutral-like, and acidic MEIC:AlCl{sub 3} melts. The solubility and the kinetics of the reduction of Fe(II) was a function of acidity. In the basic melt, the FeCl{sub 2} was soluble; however, its reduction was not observed due to slow kinetics. In the neutral-like and acidic melts, the quasi-reversible reduction of Fe(II) to Fe(0) was observed. The redox potential of copper was approximately 1 V more positive of iron; however, the oxidized copper was soluble in the neutral-like melt, making it unacceptable without a separator. The oxidized and reduced forms of nickel were insoluble and the redox potential was 2.5 V positive of Na/Na{sup +}. The nickel electrode supported a charge density of 3.5 mC/cm{sup 2} at room temperature, suggesting that a high-surface-area electrode would be needed in a practical device.

  6. Salting our Freshwater: A Macrosystems Study of Global Chloride Patterns and Trends in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, H.; Bartlett, S.; Burke, S.; Doubek, J.; Krivak-Tetley, F.; Skaff, N.; Summers, J.; Farrell, K.; McCullough, I.; Morales, A. M.; Roberts, D.; Yang, Z.; Scordo, F.; Hanson, P. C.; Weathers, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Chloride is a naturally occurring ion in freshwater lakes that can have adverse ecological impacts if concentrations rise above natural background levels. Many lakes worldwide, including the Great Lakes, have seen increased chloride concentrations over the past few decades. Regional drivers include both natural processes (e.g., sea salt deposition and long periods of drought) and anthropogenic influences (e.g., runoff from road salt application and agricultural fertilizer and discharge of industrial effluent). While these trends and drivers have been studied at the watershed scale, there has been no large-scale analyses of chloride trends in freshwater lakes. Here, we have compiled a dataset of long-term (> 10 years) chloride concentrations in over 500 freshwater lakes, ponds and reservoirs worldwide (>0.04 ha), predominantly in the United States, Canada, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The geographic and morphometric range of lakes in this dataset allows us to assess the impact of ecoregion, lake area, residence time, and lake depth on relative changes in chloride concentrations. For the United States, we combined our dataset with the National Land Cover Database and the National Hydrography Dataset to quantify percent impervious surface, as a proxy for road density, within the near-shore environment of our study lakes. We find that urban lakes, especially in the American Midwest (Wisconsin, Minnesota) have strong positive trends in chloride concentrations, whereas remote lakes, such as ponds in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, have had stable or decreasing chloride levels. In states with seasonal road-salt application, the percent impervious surface within 100 m of a lake is strongly correlated with increases in chloride. Road salt runoff is just one ecological threat to urban lakes, but can be abated with proper management.

  7. Effect of chloride content of molten nitrate salt on corrosion of A516 carbon steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-11-01

    The corrosion behavior of A516 carbon steel was evaluated to determine the effect of the dissolved chloride content in molten binary Solar Salt. Corrosion tests were conducted in a molten salt consisting of a 60-40 weight ratio of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} at 400{sup o}C and 450{sup o}C for up to 800 hours. Chloride concentrations of 0, 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% were investigated to determine the effect on corrosion of this impurity, which can be present in comparable amounts in commercial grades of the constituent salts. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses, corrosion morphology was examined by metallographic sectioning, and the types of corrosion products were determined by x-ray diffraction. Corrosion proceeded by uniform surface scaling and no pitting or intergranular corrosion was observed. Corrosion rates increased significantly as the concentration of dissolved chloride in the molten salt increased. The adherence of surface scales, and thus their protective properties, was degraded by dissolved chloride, fostering more rapid corrosion. Magnetite was the only corrosion product formed on the carbon steel specimens, regardless of chloride content or temperature.

  8. Method for making a uranium chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    2004-10-05

    The subject apparatus provides a means to produce UCl.sub.3 in large quantities without incurring corrosion of the containment vessel or associated apparatus. Gaseous Cl is injected into a lower layer of Cd where CdCl.sub.2 is formed. Due to is lower density, the CdCl.sub.2 rises through the Cd layer into a layer of molten LiCl--KCL salt where a rotatable basket containing uranium ingots is suspended. The CdCl.sub.2 reacts with the uranium to form UCl.sub.3 and Cd. Due to density differences, the Cd sinks down to the liquid Cd layer and is reused. The UCl.sub.3 combines with the molten salt. During production the temperature is maintained at about 600.degree. C. while after the uranium has been depleted the salt temperature is lowered, the molten salt is pressure siphoned from the vessel, and the salt product LiCl--KCl-30 mol % UCl.sub.3 is solidified.

  9. LOCALIZED CORROSION OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELEXPOSED TO MIXTURES OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE AND CHLORIDE SALTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P; Kerry Dunn, K; Jonathan Duffey, J; Ron Livingston, R; Zane Nelson, Z

    2008-11-21

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride (PuO{sub 2}/Cl-) salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The two flat coupons were placed so that the solid oxide/salt mixture contacted about one half of the coupon surface. One teardrop coupon was placed in contact with solid mixture; the second teardrop was in contact with the headspace gas only. The mixtures were loaded with nominally 0.5 wt % water under a helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration and on the composition of the salt. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas, nor in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2} or no CaCl{sub 2}. The corrosion results point to the significance of the interaction between water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salt CaCl{sub 2} in the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to corrosion.

  10. Chloride Released from Three Permeable Pavement Surfaces after Winter Salt Application - journal

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA does not classify chloride as a priority pollutant. It is often unregulated in stormwater runoff but has been a target stressor for Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) allotments developed for multiple waterbodies. Previous research has shown that road salt applications increas...

  11. Chloride Released from Three Permeable Pavement Surfaces after Winter Salt Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA does not classify chloride as a priority pollutant. It is often unregulated in stormwater runoff but has been a target stressor for Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) allotments developed for multiple waterbodies. Previous research has shown that road salt applications increas...

  12. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of chloride salt deposits in Terra Sirenum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloo, M. M.; Glotch, T. D.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chloride salt-bearing deposits have been identified throughout the southern highlands of Mars [1] based on the lack of diagnostic spectral features of anhydrous chlorides in both the visible near infrared (VNIR) and middle infrared (MIR) wavelength ranges [1,2]. A puzzling aspect of martian chloride deposits is the apparent lack of other weathering or evaporite phases associated with most of the deposits. A global analysis over the chloride salt sites conducted by [3] found that only ~9% of the deposits they analyzed were associated with minerals such as phyllosilicates. Most of these occurrences are in Terra Sirenum where [4] noted that salt-bearing deposits lie stratigraphically above Noachian phyllosilicates. Although a variety of formation mechanisms have been proposed for these intriguing deposits, detailed geologic mapping by [5] suggests that surface water and evaporation played a dominant role. On Earth, evaporative settings are often characterized by a multitude of evaporite and phyllosilicate phases including carbonates, sulfates, and nitrates. [6] evaluated chemical divides and brine evolution for martian systems and their results indicate three pathways wherein late-stage brines favor chloride precipitation. In each case the pathway to chloride formation includes precipitation of carbonates (calcite, siderite, and/or magnesite) and sulfates (gypsum, melanterite, and/or epsomite). Here, we present the results of our detailed and systematic spectroscopic study to identify additional evaporite phases associated with salt/silicate mixtures in Terra Sirenum. [1] Osterloo et al. (2008) Science, 319, [2] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2013) Lunar and Planet. Sci. XLIV, abstract #1549 [3] Ruesch, O. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00J13 [4] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2010) Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L16202, [5] Osterloo, M. M. and B. M Hynek (2015) Lunar and Planet. Sci XLVI. Abstract #1054 [6] Tosca, N. J. and S. M. McLennan (2006), Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 241.

  13. Groundwater chloride response in the Highland Creek watershed due to road salt application: A re-assessment after 20 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Nandana; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Howard, Ken

    2013-02-01

    SummaryChloride from road salt enters streams primarily through surface runoff and groundwater discharge. Monitoring of dry-weather flow chloride concentrations in the Highland Creek watershed of the eastern Greater Toronto Area indicates the presence of a previously unrecognised, dual porosity aquifer system whereby preferential flow associated with "urban karst" exerts a significant influence on baseflow chloride concentrations early in the year. A chloride mass balance undertaken annually over four successive salting seasons suggests that as much as 40% of the chloride applied as road salt enters the shallow aquifer resulting in a net accumulation of chloride and a gradual increase in mean baseflow chloride concentrations. Assuming current road salt application rates are continued, late summer baseflow chloride concentrations will reach around 505 mg/L, almost double present levels. Elevated chloride concentrations can affect the potability of water (the Canadian aesthetic drinking water quality guideline for chloride is 250 mg/L) and can also be toxic to aquatic organisms (CCME aquatic chronic toxicity guideline is 208 mg/L). Meeting these guidelines would require that the release of salt-laden runoff to the subsurface be reduced by over 50%.

  14. Hydrogeologic Processes Impacting Storage, Fate, and Transport of Chloride from Road Salt in Urban Riparian Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Sarah H; Lautz, Laura K; Stella, John C

    2016-05-17

    Detrimental effects of road salt runoff on urban streams are compounded by its facilitated routing via storm drains, ditches, and flood channels. Elevated in-stream salinity may also result from seasonal storage and discharge of chloride in groundwater, and previous work has hypothesized that groundwater discharge to streams may have the effect of diluting stream chloride concentrations in winter and enriching them in summer. However, the hydrogeological processes controlling these patterns have not been thoroughly investigated. Our research focuses on an urban stream and floodplain system in Syracuse, NY, to understand how groundwater and surface water exchange impacts chloride storage, fate, and transport. We created a 3D groundwater flow and solute transport model of the floodplain, calibrated to the distributions of floodplain hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes to the stream throughout the reach. We used a sensitivity analysis to calibrate and evaluate the influence of model parameters, and compared model outputs to field observations. The main source mechanism of chloride to the floodplain aquifer was high-concentration, overbank flood events in winter that directly recharged groundwater. The modeled residence time and storage capacity of the aquifer indicate that restoration projects designed to promote floodplain reconnection and the frequency of overbank flooding in winter have the potential to temporarily store chloride in groundwater, buffer surface water concentrations, and reduce stream concentrations following periods of road salting.

  15. Hydrogeologic Processes Impacting Storage, Fate, and Transport of Chloride from Road Salt in Urban Riparian Aquifers.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Sarah H; Lautz, Laura K; Stella, John C

    2016-05-17

    Detrimental effects of road salt runoff on urban streams are compounded by its facilitated routing via storm drains, ditches, and flood channels. Elevated in-stream salinity may also result from seasonal storage and discharge of chloride in groundwater, and previous work has hypothesized that groundwater discharge to streams may have the effect of diluting stream chloride concentrations in winter and enriching them in summer. However, the hydrogeological processes controlling these patterns have not been thoroughly investigated. Our research focuses on an urban stream and floodplain system in Syracuse, NY, to understand how groundwater and surface water exchange impacts chloride storage, fate, and transport. We created a 3D groundwater flow and solute transport model of the floodplain, calibrated to the distributions of floodplain hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes to the stream throughout the reach. We used a sensitivity analysis to calibrate and evaluate the influence of model parameters, and compared model outputs to field observations. The main source mechanism of chloride to the floodplain aquifer was high-concentration, overbank flood events in winter that directly recharged groundwater. The modeled residence time and storage capacity of the aquifer indicate that restoration projects designed to promote floodplain reconnection and the frequency of overbank flooding in winter have the potential to temporarily store chloride in groundwater, buffer surface water concentrations, and reduce stream concentrations following periods of road salting. PMID:27077530

  16. Chloride salt mixtures affect Gordal cv. green Spanish-style table olive fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bautista Gallego, J; Arroyo López, F N; Romero Gil, V; Rodríguez Gómez, F; García García, P; Garrido Fernández, A

    2011-10-01

    This work studies the effects of different sodium (in the range of 4-10%), potassium (0-4%) and calcium (0-6%) chloride salt mixtures on the fermentation profile of Gordal olives processed according to the Spanish style. For this purpose, response surface methodology based on a simplex centroid mixture design with constrain (sum of salt percentages = 10%) was used. All treatments reached appropriate titratable acidity levels, but this parameter could not be related to the initial chloride salt concentration. The presence of CaCl(2) led to lower initial and after-fermentation pHs, delayed sugar diffusion into the brine, its maximum concentration and titratable acidity formation. CaCl(2) also delayed Enterobacteriaceae and yeast sprang, decreasing their overall growth. This chloride salt also showed a tendency to reduce overall lactic acid bacteria growth. KCl had a similar behaviour to NaCl but, in general, increased overall microbial growth. Thus, a partial substitution of NaCl in Spanish-style green olives with KCl and CaCl(2) does not substantially modify the fermentation profile but does produce some changes, which, when properly managed, could help to improve product processing.

  17. Chloride salt mixtures affect Gordal cv. green Spanish-style table olive fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bautista Gallego, J; Arroyo López, F N; Romero Gil, V; Rodríguez Gómez, F; García García, P; Garrido Fernández, A

    2011-10-01

    This work studies the effects of different sodium (in the range of 4-10%), potassium (0-4%) and calcium (0-6%) chloride salt mixtures on the fermentation profile of Gordal olives processed according to the Spanish style. For this purpose, response surface methodology based on a simplex centroid mixture design with constrain (sum of salt percentages = 10%) was used. All treatments reached appropriate titratable acidity levels, but this parameter could not be related to the initial chloride salt concentration. The presence of CaCl(2) led to lower initial and after-fermentation pHs, delayed sugar diffusion into the brine, its maximum concentration and titratable acidity formation. CaCl(2) also delayed Enterobacteriaceae and yeast sprang, decreasing their overall growth. This chloride salt also showed a tendency to reduce overall lactic acid bacteria growth. KCl had a similar behaviour to NaCl but, in general, increased overall microbial growth. Thus, a partial substitution of NaCl in Spanish-style green olives with KCl and CaCl(2) does not substantially modify the fermentation profile but does produce some changes, which, when properly managed, could help to improve product processing. PMID:21839381

  18. Selenium assimilation and differential response to elevated sulfate and chloride salt concentrations in two saltgrass ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Enberg, A; Wu, L

    1995-11-01

    A comparative study of selenium (Se) assimilation under the influence of sulfate and chloride salt salinity was conducted on two saltgrass ecotypes. The inland saltgrass grows successfully on the soil contaminated with elevated Se concentrations at Kesterson, Merced County, California. The coastal saltgrass colonizes a tidal salt marsh in Bodega Bay on the coast of California. The saltgrass samples were grown in sand culture and irrigated with quarter concentration of modified Hoagland solution supplemented with different concentrations of Se with or without sulfate or chloride salt. The Bodega Bay plants exhibited greater tolerance to both the sulfate and chloride salinity than the Kesterson plants. The plants of both ecotypes accumulated about 90% of their total tissue Se in the nonprotein fraction. When sulfate was present in the irrigation solution, the Kesterson plants assimilated significantly less Se in its protein and nonprotein fractions than in the Bodega Bay plants. Under Se treatment, chlorosis symptoms were found on the leaves of the Bodega Bay plants, but not on the leaves of the Kesterson plants. The above results demonstrate that the two saltgrasses are distinct ecotypes in respect to their salinity tolerance and the ability of mitigation of selenium assimilation in the presence of sulfate.

  19. ROAD SALT APPLICATION CREATES A UNIQUE CHLORIDE BIOCHEMISTRY IN AN URBAN STREAM OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence from the mid-Atlantic suggests that freshwater supplies are threatened by chronic chloride inputs from road salts applied to improve highway safety. Elevated chloride levels also may limit the ability of aquatic systems to microbially process nitrate nitrogen, a ...

  20. Interactions of D-cellobiose with selected chloride salts: A 13C NMR and FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S.; Wiredu, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The interactions of cellulose model compound D-cellobiose with chloride salts of Zn2 +, Ca2 +, Li+, Sn2 +, La3 +, Mg2 +, K+ and NH4+ were evaluated by measuring the 13C NMR chemical shift changes (Δδ) of the disaccharide due to the addition of salts in D2O. The KCl and NH4Cl showed similar Δδ changes due to interactions only with the Cl- anion. Whereas other chloride salts showed interactions with both cation and anion. Among these salts the total interactions are in the order: Zn2 + > Sn2 + > Li+ > Ca2 + ~ La3 + > Mg2 +. The FT-IR spectra of D-cellobiose-chloride salt 1:2 mixtures also indicate that KCl and NH4Cl interacts similarly with D-cellobiose in the solid state.

  1. Investigation of residual anode material after electrorefining uranium in molten chloride salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M. A.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J.

    2015-12-01

    A buildup of material at uranium anodes during uranium electrorefining in molten chloride salts has been observed. Potentiodynamic testing has been conducted using a three electrode cell, with a uranium working electrode in both LiCl/KCl eutectic and LiCl each containing ∼5 mol% UCl3. The anodic current response was observed at 50° intervals between 450 °C and 650 °C in the eutectic salt. These tests revealed a buildup of material at the anode in LiCl/KCl salt, which was sampled at room temperature, and analyzed using ICP-MS, XRD and SEM techniques. Examination of the analytical data, current response curves and published phase diagrams has established that as the uranium anode dissolves, the U3+ ion concentration in the diffusion layer surrounding the electrode rises precipitously to levels, which may at low temperatures exceed the solubility limit for UCl3 or in the case of the eutectic salt for K2UCl5. The reduction in current response observed at low temperature in eutectic salt is eliminated at 650 °C, where K2UCl5 is absent due to its congruent melting and only simple concentration polarization effects are seen. In LiCl similar concentration effects are seen though significantly longer time at applied potential is required to effect a reduction in the current response as compared to the eutectic salt.

  2. Using chloride and other ions to trace sewage and road salt in the Illinois Waterway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, W.R.; Panno, S.V.; Hackley, Keith C.; Hwang, H.-H.; Martinsek, A.T.; Markus, M.

    2010-01-01

    Chloride concentrations in waterways of northern USA are increasing at alarming rates and road salt is commonly assumed to be the cause. However, there are additional sources of Cl- in metropolitan areas, such as treated wastewater (TWW) and water conditioning salts, which may be contributing to Cl- loads entering surface waters. In this study, the potential sources of Cl- and Cl- loads in the Illinois River Basin from the Chicago area to the Illinois River's confluence with the Mississippi River were investigated using halide data in stream samples and published Cl- and river discharge data. The investigation showed that road salt runoff and TWW from the Chicago region dominate Cl- loads in the Illinois Waterway, defined as the navigable sections of the Illinois River and two major tributaries in the Chicago region. Treated wastewater discharges at a relatively constant rate throughout the year and is the primary source of Cl- and other elements such as F- and B. Chloride loads are highest in the winter and early spring as a result of road salt runoff which can increase Cl- concentrations by up to several hundred mg/L. Chloride concentrations decrease downstream in the Illinois Waterway due to dilution, but are always elevated relative to tributaries downriver from Chicago. The TWW component is especially noticeable downstream under low discharge conditions during summer and early autumn when surface drainage is at a minimum and agricultural drain tiles are not flowing. Increases in population, urban and residential areas, and roadways in the Chicago area have caused an increase in the flux of Cl- from both road salt and TWW. Chloride concentrations have been increasing in the Illinois Waterway since around 1960 at a rate of about 1 mg/L/a. The increase is largest in the winter months due to road salt runoff. Shallow groundwater Cl- concentrations are also increasing, potentially producing higher base flow concentrations. Projected increases in population and

  3. Dechlorination and stabilization of radioactive chloride salt waste in a molten state

    SciTech Connect

    In-Tae Kim; Hwan-Seo Park; Yong-Jun Cho; Hwan-Young Kim; Seong-Won Park; Eung-Ho Kim

    2007-07-01

    This study suggests a new method to stabilize the molten salt wastes generated from he pyro-processing of a LWR spent fuel. Using a conventional sol-gel process, an inorganic material (SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, SAP) reactive to metal chlorides was prepared. In this paper, the reactivity of the SAP on the metal chlorides at 650-850 deg. C, the thermal stability of the reaction products and their leach-resistance under the PCT-A leach test were investigated. In the SAP, three different kinds of chains are available; Si-O-Si (main chain), Si-O-Al (side chain) and Al-O-P/P-O-P (reactive chain). Alkali metal chlorides were converted into metal aluminosilicate (Li{sub x}Al{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}O{sub 2-x}) and metal phosphate(Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Cs{sub 2}AlP{sub 3}O{sub 10}) while the alkaline earth and rare earth chlorides were changed into only metal phosphates (Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl and CePO{sub 4}). The conversion rate was about 96% at a salt waste/SAP weight ratio of 0.5 and a weight loss up to 1100 deg. C measured by the thermo-gravimetric analysis was below 1 Wt%. The leach rates of Cs and Sr under the PCT-A leaching condition were about 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -4} g/m{sup 3}.day, respectively. From these results, it could be concluded that the SAP developed in this study can be considered as an effective stabilizer for metal chlorides and the method of using the SAP could provide a chance to minimize the final waste volume to be disposed off. (authors)

  4. Chloride absorption in salt-sensitive Carrizo citrange and salt-tolerant Cleopatra mandarin citrus rootstocks is linked to water use.

    PubMed

    Moya, José Luís; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Talon, Manuel

    2003-02-01

    In this work, seedlings of two citrus rootstocks, the salt-tolerant Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) and the salt-sensitive Carrizo citrange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osb. x Poncirus trifoliata [L.] Raf.) were used to study the relationship between chloride and water uptake. The results indicated that net chloride uptake rates in both genotypes were alike and decreased linearly with the time of salinity exposure, although they were more rapidly reduced in the tolerant genotype. In each rootstock, chloride uptake rates paralleled the decreases in transpiration rates. When transpiration was modified, concomitant changes in leaf Cl(-) concentrations were observed. There was a high positive correlation between total chloride content per plant and total water absorbed. In addition, the data indicate that the tolerant genotype "excluded" more chloride, i.e. it absorbed lower amounts of chloride per volume of water. Cleopatra also possessed a less efficient root system for water uptake and a higher shoot-to-root ratio. The results show that, overall, chloride absorption is linked to water use and that further tolerance in Cleopatra is mostly conferred by superior root resistance to Cl(-) uptake. Therefore, it is proposed that chloride absorption and, hence, salt tolerance in citrus depends to a great extent upon water use.

  5. Geopolymer encapsulation of a chloride salt phase change material for high temperature thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rhys; Trout, Neil; Raud, Ralf; Clarke, Stephen; Steinberg, Theodore A.; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost and increase the material compatibility of encapsulated phase change materials (EPCMs) a new encapsulated system has been proposed. In the current study a molten salt eutectic of barium chloride (53% wt.), potassium chloride (28% wt.) and sodium chloride (19% wt.) has been identified as a promising candidate for low cost EPCM storage systems. The latent heat, melting point and thermal stability of the phase change material (PCM) was determined by DSC and was found to be in good agreement with results published in the literature. To cope with the corrosive nature of the PCM, it was decided that a fly-ash based geopolymer met the thermal and economic constraints for encapsulation. The thermal stability of the geopolymer shell was also tested with several formulations proving to form a stable shell for the chosen PCM at 200°C and/or 600°C. Lastly several capsules of the geopolymer shell with a chloride PCM were fabricated using a variety of methods with several samples remaining stable after exposure to 600°C testing.

  6. Recovery of soluble chloride salts from the wastewater generated during the washing process of municipal solid wastes incineration fly ash.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailong; Erzat, Aris; Liu, Yangsheng

    2014-01-01

    Water washing is widely used as the pretreatment method to treat municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, which facilitates the further solidification/stabilization treatment or resource recovery of the fly ash. The wastewater generated during the washing process is a kind of hydrosaline solution, usually containing high concentrations of alkali chlorides and sulphates, which cause serious pollution to environment. However, these salts can be recycled as resources instead of discharge. This paper explored an effective and practical recovery method to separate sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride salts individually from the hydrosaline water. In laboratory experiments, a simulating hydrosaline solution was prepared according to composition of the waste washing water. First, in the three-step evaporation-crystallization process, pure sodium chloride and solid mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides were obtained separately, and the remaining solution contained potassium and calcium chlorides (solution A). And then, the solid mixture was fully dissolved into water (solution B obtained). Finally, ethanol was added into solutions A and B to change the solubility of sodium, potassium, and calcium chlorides within the mixed solvent of water and ethanol. During the ethanol-adding precipitation process, each salt was separated individually, and the purity of the raw production in laboratory experiments reached about 90%. The ethanol can be recycled by distillation and reused as the solvent. Therefore, this technology may bring both environmental and economic benefits.

  7. Recovery of soluble chloride salts from the wastewater generated during the washing process of municipal solid wastes incineration fly ash.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailong; Erzat, Aris; Liu, Yangsheng

    2014-01-01

    Water washing is widely used as the pretreatment method to treat municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, which facilitates the further solidification/stabilization treatment or resource recovery of the fly ash. The wastewater generated during the washing process is a kind of hydrosaline solution, usually containing high concentrations of alkali chlorides and sulphates, which cause serious pollution to environment. However, these salts can be recycled as resources instead of discharge. This paper explored an effective and practical recovery method to separate sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride salts individually from the hydrosaline water. In laboratory experiments, a simulating hydrosaline solution was prepared according to composition of the waste washing water. First, in the three-step evaporation-crystallization process, pure sodium chloride and solid mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides were obtained separately, and the remaining solution contained potassium and calcium chlorides (solution A). And then, the solid mixture was fully dissolved into water (solution B obtained). Finally, ethanol was added into solutions A and B to change the solubility of sodium, potassium, and calcium chlorides within the mixed solvent of water and ethanol. During the ethanol-adding precipitation process, each salt was separated individually, and the purity of the raw production in laboratory experiments reached about 90%. The ethanol can be recycled by distillation and reused as the solvent. Therefore, this technology may bring both environmental and economic benefits. PMID:25176491

  8. Preliminary projections of the effects of chloride-control structures on the Quaternary aquifer at Great Salt Plains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    About 1,200 tons of chloride per day are added to the salt load of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River at Great Salt Plains Lake from natural sources. The source of this chloride is brine discharge from the rocks of Permian age in the vicinity of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has planned a chloride-control project. The Corps requested that the U.S. Geological Survey use a digital model to project the effects of the chloride-control plan on ground water. Ground-water flow and ground-water transport models were calibrated to represent the Quaternary aquifer that is the near-surface part of the flow system. The models were used to project the effects of planned chloride-control structures. Based on model results, ground-water levels are projected to rise as much as 19 feet. However, these water-level rises will occur only in areas near three reservoirs. Changes in ground-water level caused by the project will be small throughout most of the area. Chloride concentration of ground water is projected to increase by more than 90,000 milligrams per liter at one location. However, significant increases in chloride concentration during the 50-year period simulated are projected to be limited to areas where the ground water already contains excessive chloride concentrations.

  9. Why Do Tetrapropylammonium Chloride and Sulphate Salts Destabilize the Native State of Globular Proteins?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been shown that aqueous solutions of tetrapropylammonium chloride and sulphate salts destabilize the folded conformation of Trp-peptides (Dempsey et al., 2011). This result is rationalized by the application of a statistical thermodynamic approach (Graziano, 2010). It is shown that the magnitude of the solvent-excluded volume effect, the main contribution for the native state stability, decreases in both aqueous 2 M TPACl solution and aqueous 1 M TPA2SO4 solution. This happens because TPA+ ions are so large in size and interact so weakly with water molecules, due to their very low charge density, to be able to counteract the electrostrictive effect of chloride and sulphate ions on the water structure, so that the density of their aqueous solutions is smaller or only slightly larger than that of water. PMID:24616650

  10. The surface epithelium of teleostean fish gills. Cellular and junctional adaptations of the chloride cell in relation to salt adaptation

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Various species of teleostean fishes were adapted to fresh or salt water and their gill surface epithelium was examined using several techniques of electron microscopy. In both fresh and salt water the branchial epithelium is mostly covered by flat respiratory cells. They are characterized by unusual outer membrane fracture faces containing intramembranous particles and pits in various stages of ordered aggregation. Freeze fracture studies showed that the tight junctions between respiratory cells are made of several interconnecting strands, probably representing high resistance junctions. The organization of intramembranous elements and the morphological characteristics of the junctions do not vary in relation to the external salinity. Towards the base of the secondary gill lamellae, the layer of respiratory cells is interrupted by mitochondria-rich cells ("chloride cells"), also linked to respiratory cells by multistranded junctions. There is a fundamental reorganization of the chloride cells associated with salt water adaptation. In salt water young adjacent chloride cells send interdigitations into preexisting chloride cells. The apex of the seawater chloride cell is therefore part of a mosaic of sister cells linked to surrounding respiratory cells by multistranded junctions. The chloride cells are linked to each other by shallow junctions made of only one strand and permeable to lanthanum. It is therefore suggested that salt water adaptation triggers a cellular reorganization of the epithelium in such a way that leaky junctions (a low resistance pathway) appear at the apex of the chloride cells. Chloride cells are characterized by an extensive tubular reticulum which is an extension of the basolateral plasma membrane. It is made of repeating units and is the site of numerous ion pumps. The presence of shallow junctions in sea water-adapted fish makes it possible for the reticulum to contact the external milieu. In contrast in the freshwater-adapted fish the

  11. Determination of cadmium, copper, and lead in sodium chloride food salts by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alvarez De Eulate, M J; Montoro, R; Ybañez, N; De La Guardia, M

    1986-01-01

    A method for determination of Cd, Cu, and Pb in sodium chloride food salt samples has been developed. It consists of extraction in 4-methyl-2-pentanone of the complexes formed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and further analysis of the extracts by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Detection limits in ng/g salt were 0.2 for Cd, 0.7 for Cu, and 10.0 for Pb. The coefficients of variation of 12 independent analyses were 13% for Cd (at a level of 0.4 ppb), 18% for Cu (1.6 ppb), and 5% for Pb (40 ppb). The recoveries were 100 +/- 0% for Cd, 115 +/- 14% for Cu, and 100 +/- 13% for Pb. PMID:3771460

  12. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  13. The Composition and Physical Properties of Chloride Salt-bearing Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotch, T. D.; Bandfield, J.; Wolff, M. J.; Arnold, J. A.; Che, C.

    2015-12-01

    Anhydrous chloride salt deposits were first discovered on Mars by the 2001 Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) and have been further characterized by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter CRISM and Mars Express visible/near-IR (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging spectrometers. At mid-IR wavelengths, the salt-bearing deposits display a blue slope superimposed on the regional regolith spectral shape. At VNIR wavelengths, ratio spectra display a featureless red slope between 1.0 and 2.5 μm and a reduced 3 μm band, indicating that the deposits are desiccated compared to the surrounding terrain. In this work, we compare laboratory and model spectra to THEMIS spectra to evaluate the abundance and physical properties of salt in these deposits. We acquired mid-IR emissivity spectra of a suite of halite/basalt mixtures separated to <10 μm, 63-90 μm, 125-180 μm, and 250-355 μm. Halite concentrations for each size separate ranged from 1-75%. Laboratory spectra of the coarsest particulates do not adequately reproduce the spectral shapes associated with any of the Martian salt deposits. The finest particulates display spectral characteristics associated with salt deposits found in high albedo, dusty regions of Mars, and those in the middle size ranges are consistent with the spectra of most Martian salt deposits and suggest abundances between 10 and 25 wt.% salt. The increase in salt content from ~10-25% coincides with a shift in the THEMIS emissivity maximum from band 3 to band 4, suggesting this can be used as a rough indicator of salt content in remote sensing studies. We also used a hybrid T-matrix/Hapke light scattering model to model the scattering properties and mid-IR spectra of clusters of salt/silicate spheres. The model results show that as halite content is increased, the transparency of the cluster increases substantially, resulting in multiple internal scattering, and substantially reduced emissivity, consistent with the THEMIS data and laboratory spectra. Phase

  14. Hydration of alkylammonium salt micelles--influence of bromide and chloride counterions.

    PubMed

    Rózycka-Roszak, B; Zyłka, R; Sarapuk, J

    2000-01-01

    The micellization process of dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) and bromide (DTAB) was studied. Nuclear magnetic resonance method was used. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra were taken at higher and lower concentrations than the critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of the compounds studied. Chemical shifts were analysed. The studies performed were prompted by earlier calorimetric measurements which showed that there were significant qualitative and quantitative differences in the micellization process of the compounds studied. Namely, DTAB micelle dissociation was found to be an endothermic process while that of DTAC was exothermic. The differences found must be the result of differentiated influence of bromide and chloride counterions on the micellization process, including the phenomenon of micelle hydration. The objective of the work was to check whether cationic surfactant counterions can influence the micelle hydration process. Indeed, DTAB and DTAC, as monomers, exhibit similar hydrophobic hydration, but DTAB micelles are more hydrated than DTAC ones. It seems that the differences found in micellization of both salts studied may be attributed to different physicochemical properties of bromide and chloride ions, such as their mobilities and radii of their hydrated forms. Moreover, the effect of anions on the water structure must be taken into account. It is important whether the anions can be classified as water ordering kosmotropes, that hold the first hydration shell tightly, or water disordering chaotropes, that hold water molecules in that shell loosely.

  15. Characterization of chloride transport in the unsaturated zone near salted road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lax, Samanta; Peterson, Eric W.

    2009-09-01

    The application of road salts as deicing agents contributes to the anthropogenic loading of chloride (Cl-) on the environment. Using a 2D solute model, the potential of the unsaturated zone to serve as a reservoir and the mechanisms controlling the movement of Cl- were examined. Physical properties and initial pore-water Cl- concentrations were derived from an array of soil borings. Initial pore-water concentrations show the presence of a Cl- “slug” approximately 0.75 m below the surface. Simulations show that within the unsaturated zone, Cl- transport is predominantly vertical, driven by molecular diffusion. After a 1-year simulation, a Cl- slug similar to the background observation was noted. While Cl- is retained in the unsaturated zone, a net loss of Cl- from the unsaturated zone was simulated for the first 10 years. In year 11, an equilibrium between the Cl- input and output is achieved. The presence of Cl- in the unsaturated zone becomes a long-term source of chloride to the groundwater, which eventually discharges into the surface water. Historically, surface water chemistry data support the continual discharge of chloride to the surface water in the area, further supporting the hypothesis that the unsaturated zone serves as a Cl- reservoir.

  16. A reactive distillation process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing rare earth chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, H. C.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, N. Y.; Lee, T. K.; Han, S. Y.; Lee, K. R.; Park, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    The pyrochemical process, which recovers useful resources (U/TRU metals) from used nuclear fuel using an electrochemical method, generates LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt containing radioactive rare earth chlorides (RECl3). It is necessary to develop a simple process for the treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt in a hot-cell facility. For this reason, a reactive distillation process using a chemical agent was achieved as a method to separate rare earths from the LiCl-KCl waste salt. Before conducting the reactive distillation, thermodynamic equilibrium behaviors of the reactions between rare earth (Nd, La, Ce, Pr) chlorides and the chemical agent (K2CO3) were predicted using software. The addition of the chemical agent was determined to separate the rare earth chlorides into an oxide form using these equilibrium results. In the reactive distillation test, the rare earth chlorides in LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were decontaminated at a decontamination factor (DF) of more than 5000, and were mainly converted into oxide (Nd2O3, CeO2, La2O3, Pr2O3) or oxychloride (LaOCl, PrOCl) forms. The LiCl-KCl was purified into a form with a very low concentration (<1 ppm) for the rare earth chlorides.

  17. Salting out of methane by sodium chloride: A scaled particle theory study.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Giuseppe

    2008-08-28

    The salting out of methane by adding NaCl to water at 25 degrees C and 1 atm is investigated by calculating the work of cavity creation by means of scaled particle theory and the methane-solvent energy of attraction. The latter quantity changes to little extent on passing from pure water to an aqueous 4M NaCl solution, whereas the magnitude of the work of cavity creation increases significantly, accounting for the salting out effect. There is quantitative agreement between the experimental values of the hydration Gibbs energy and the calculated ones. The behavior of the work of cavity creation is due to the increase in the volume packing density of NaCl solutions, since the average effective molecular diameter does not change, being always 2.80 A. The same approach allows the rationalization of the difference in methane salting out along the alkali chloride series. These results indicate that, fixed the aqueous solution density, the solubility of nonpolar species is mainly determined by the effective diameter of solvent molecules and the corresponding volume packing density. There is no need to take into account the H-bond rearrangement because it is characterized by an almost complete enthalpy-entropy compensation.

  18. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-01

    The sodium-nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250-350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β″-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. The cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  19. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-15

    The sodium–nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250–350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. Finally, the cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  20. The influence of nitrogen oxides on the activation of bromide and chloride in salt aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, S.; Buxmann, J. C.; Sander, R.; Riedel, T. P.; Thornton, J. A.; Platt, U.; Zetzsch, C.

    2014-04-01

    Experiments on salt aerosol with different salt contents were performed in a Teflon chamber under tropospheric light conditions with various initial contents of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2). A strong activation of halogens was found at high NOx mixing ratios, even in samples with lower bromide contents such as road salts. The ozone depletion by reactive halogen species released from the aerosol, was found to be a function of the initial NOx mixing ratio. Besides bromine, large amounts of chlorine have been released in our smog chamber. Time profiles of the halogen species Cl2, Br2, ClNO2, BrNO2 and BrO, ClO, OClO and Cl atoms were simultaneously measured by various techniques (chemical ionization mass spectrometry, differential optical absorption spectrometry coupled with a multi-reflection cell and gas chromatography of hydrocarbon tracers for Cl and OH, employing cryogenic preconcentration and flame ionization detection). Measurements are compared to calculations by the CAABA/MECCA 0-D box model, which was adapted to the chamber conditions and took the aerosol liquid water content and composition into account. The model results agree reasonably with the observations and provide important information about the prerequisites for halogen release, such as the time profiles of the aerosol bromide and chloride contents as well as the aerosol pH.

  1. Individual effects of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium chloride salts on Lactobacillus pentosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernandez, A

    2008-07-01

    A quantitative investigation on the individual effects of sodium (NaCl), potassium (KCl), calcium (CaCl2), and magnesium (MgCl2) chloride salts against Lactobacillus pentosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two representative microorganisms of table olives and other fermented vegetables, was carried out. In order to assess their potential activities, both the kinetic growth parameters and dose-response profiles in synthetic media (deMan Rogosa Sharpe broth medium and yeast-malt-peptone-glucose broth medium, respectively) were obtained and analyzed. Microbial growth was monitored via optical density measurements as a function of contact time in the presence of progressive chloride salt concentrations. Relative maximum specific growth rate and lag-phase period were modeled as a function of the chloride salt concentrations. Moreover, for each salt and microorganism tested, the noninhibitory concentrations and the MICs were estimated and compared. All chloride salts exerted a significant antimicrobial effect on the growth cycle; particularly, CaCl2 showed a similar effect to NaCl, while KCl and MgCl2 were progressively less inhibitory. Microbial susceptibility and resistance were found to be nonlinearly dose related.

  2. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide). PMID:26867107

  3. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide).

  4. Influence of volatile chlorides on the molten salt synthesis of ternary oxide nanorods and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rørvik, Per Martin; Lyngdal, Tone; Saeterli, Ragnhild; van Helvoort, Antonius T J; Holmestad, Randi; Grande, Tor; Einarsrud, Mari-Ann

    2008-04-21

    A molten salt synthesis route, previously reported to yield BaTiO3, PbTiO3, and Na2Ti6O13 nanorods, has been re-examined to elucidate the role of volatile chlorides. A precursor mixture containing barium (or lead) and titanium was annealed in the presence of NaCl at 760 or 820 degrees C. The main products were respectively isometric nanocrystalline BaTiO3 and PbTiO3. Nanorods were also detected, but electron diffraction revealed that the composition of the nanorods was respectively BaTi2O5/BaTi5O11 and Na2Ti6O13 for the two different systems, in contradiction to the previous studies. It was shown that NaCl reacted with BaO (PbO) resulting in loss of volatile BaCl2 (PbCl2) and formation and preferential growth of titanium oxide-rich nanorods instead of the target phase BaTiO3 (or PbTiO3). The molten salt synthesis route may therefore not necessarily yield nanorods of the target ternary oxide as reported previously. In addition, the importance of NaCl(g) for the growth of nanorods below the melting point of NaCl was demonstrated in a special experimental setup, where NaCl and the precursors were physically separated.

  5. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + alkaline earth chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkaline earth chlorides of calcium and strontium, and in the molten (lithium chloride + potassium chloride + actinide chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with the actinide chloride of uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Lexa, D.; Chemical Engineering

    2003-04-01

    The interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl n (Me=Ca, Sr, U; x{sub MeCLn} $$ = to 0.45; and x {sub KCl}/x LiCl=0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. An irreversible chemical reaction has been observed in the LiCl-KCl-UCl{sup 3+}zeolite system. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl n in the zeolite and is equal to 10{+-}1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 12}, at infinite MeCl n dilution. The ion-exchange mole-fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of the concentration of SrCl{sub 2} and UCl{sub 3}, but an increasing function of the concentration of CaCl{sub 2} in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl n dilution, they are equal to 0.9, 11.9, and 13 for CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2}, and UCl{sub 3}, respectively. The standard ion-exchange chemical potentials are equal to -50.0, -84, and -101.1 kJ x mol-1 for Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and U{sup 3+}, respectively.

  6. Interactive role of nitric oxide and calcium chloride in enhancing tolerance to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Nasir; Siddiqui, Manzer H; Mohammad, Firoz; Naeem, M

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a small diffusible, ubiquitous bioactive molecule, acts as prooxidant as well as antioxidant, and also regulates remarkable spectrum of plant cellular mechanisms. The present work was undertaken to investigate the role of nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and/or calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) in the tolerance of excised mustard leaves to salt stress. After 24h, salt stressed leaves treated with SNP and/or CaCl(2), showed an improvement in the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and nitrate reductase (NR), and leaf chlorophyll (Chl) content, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and leaf ion concentration as compared with the leaves treated with NaCl only. Salinity stress caused a significant increase in H(2)O(2) content and membrane damage which is witnessed by enhanced levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and electrolyte leakage. By contrast, such increases were blocked by the application of 0.2mM SNP and 10mM CaCl(2) to salt stressed leaves. Application of SNP and/or CaCl(2) alleviated NaCl stress by enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and by enhancing proline (Pro) and glycinebetaine (GB) accumulation with a concomitant decrease in H(2)O(2) content, TBARS and electrolyte leakage, which is manifested in the tolerance of plants to salinity stress. Moreover, application of SNP with CaCl(2) was more effective to reduce the detrimental effects of NaCl stress on excised mustard leaves. In addition to this, ameliorating effect of SNP was not effective in presence of NO scavenger cPTIO [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide]. To put all these in a nut shell, the results advocate that SNP in association with CaCl(2) plays a role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to salt stress by improving antioxidative defence system, osmolyte accumulation and ionic

  7. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-11-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  8. Biochemical and sensory changes in dry-cured ham salted with partial replacements of NaCl by other chloride salts.

    PubMed

    Armenteros, Mónica; Aristoy, María-Concepción; Barat, José Manuel; Toldrá, Fidel

    2012-02-01

    The reduction of the content of sodium chloride in dry-cured ham was studied in to prevent the problems related to high sodium intake (i.e. the hypertension). One of the possibilities to reduce the sodium content is the partial replacement of sodium chloride by mixtures of potassium, magnesium and calcium chloride salts. The effect of two salting formulations (formulation II: 50% NaCl-50% KCl and formulation III: 55% NaCl, 25% KCl, 15 CaCl(2) and 5 MgCl(2)) on the protease activity through the dry-curing process and on the sensory characteristics of the final product was evaluated and compared to those of control hams (formulation I, 100% NaCl). Sensory attributes were all affected in the hams containing CaCl(2) and MgCl(2) while hams containing 50% KCl and NaCl (formulation II) were better valued, except for the attribute taste probably due to the potassium contribution to bitter taste.

  9. Laminar iridium coating produced by pulse current electrodeposition from chloride molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li'an; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2013-10-01

    Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, Iridium (Ir) is one of the most promising oxidation-resistant coatings for refractory materials above 1800 °C in aerospace field. However, the Ir coatings prepared by traditional methods are composed of columnar grains throughout the coating thickness. The columnar structure of the coating is considered to do harm to its oxidation resistance. The laminar Ir coating is expected to have a better high-temperature oxidation resistance than the columnar Ir coating does. The pulse current electrodeposition, with three independent parameters: average current density (Jm), duty cycle (R) and pulse frequency (f), is considered to be a promising method to fabricate layered Ir coating. In this study, laminar Ir coatings were prepared by pulse current electrodeposition in chloride molten salt. The morphology, roughness and texture of the coatings were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), profilometer and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the laminar Ir coatings were composed of a nucleation layer with columnar structure and a growth layer with laminar structure. The top surfaces of the laminar Ir coatings consisted of cauliflower-like aggregates containing many fine grains, which were separated by deep grooves. The laminar Ir coating produced at the deposition condition of 20 mA/cm2 (Jm), 10% (R) and 6 Hz (f) was quite smooth (Ra 1.01 ± 0.09 μm) with extremely high degree of preferred orientation of <1 1 1>, and its laminar structure was well developed with clear boundaries and uniform thickness of sub-layers.

  10. Ground Water is a Chronic Source of Chloride to Surface Water of an Urban Stream Exposed to Road Salt in a Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, P.; Doheny, E.; Kaushal, S.; Groffman, P.; Striz, E.

    2006-05-01

    Recent evidence from the mid-Atlantic suggests that freshwater supplies are threatened by chronic chloride inputs from road salts applied to improve highway safety. Elevated chloride levels also may limit the ability of aquatic systems to microbially process nitrate nitrogen, a nutrient whose elevated levels pose human and ecological threats. Understanding the behavior of chloride in urban watersheds where road salts are applied is critical to predicting subsequent impacts to ecosystem health and drinking water supplies. Here we report on a long-term study of water chemistry in Minebank Run, a recently restored stream in an urban watershed of Towson, MD that receives chronic chloride inputs from the 695 Beltway highway and connecting arteries. Chloride, sodium, and specific conductance were greatly elevated in the both surface water and ground water of Minebank Run, spiking in correspondence to road salt application in the winter. Chloride levels were consistently higher in ground water of the bank side of a minor roadway and downstream of the 695 Beltway. Surface water chloride levels remained elevated throughout the year apparently because ground water continued to supply surface water with chloride even after road salt application ceased. Thus, ground water may represent a chronic source of chloride to surface water, thereby contributing to the upward trend in freshwater salinity in urbanizing areas. Stream susceptibility to road salt impacts may depend upon ground water hydrology and stream geomorphology. However, geomorphic stream restoration practices widely used in the mid-Atlantic are not designed to address salinity effects. Source control of road salts may be necessary to reduce environmental risk.

  11. Analysis of the corrosion of carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-04-01

    An analysis of literature data on the corrosion of carbon steels in anoxic brines and acid chloride solutions was performed, and the results were used to assess the expected life of high-level nuclear waste package containers in a salt repository environment. The corrosion rate of carbon steels in moderately acidic aqueous chloride environments obeys an Arrhenius dependence on temperature and a (pH{sub 2}){sup {minus}1/2} dependence on hydrogen partial pressure. The cathodic reduction of water to produce hydrogen is the rate-controlling step in the corrosion process. An expression for the corrosion rate incorporating these two dependencies was used to estimate the corrosion life of several proposed waste package configurations. 42 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  13. Bromination of aromatic compounds by residual bromide in sodium chloride matrix modifier salt during heated headspace GC/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Fine, Dennis D; Ko, Saebom; Huling, Scott

    2013-12-15

    Analytical artifacts attributed to the bromination of toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes were found during the heated headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of aqueous samples. The aqueous samples were produced from Fenton-like chemical oxidation reactions and contained aromatic compounds, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and ferric sulfate. Prior to GC/MS headspace analysis, the samples were acidified (pH<2), and sodium chloride was amended to the headspace vial as a matrix modifier. The brominated artifacts were generated during heated headspace analysis. Further, when samples were spiked with a mixture of volatile chlorinated and aromatic compounds (50 µg/L), poor spike recoveries of toluene and xylenes occurred, and in some cases complete loss of trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene resulted. Where poor recovery of aromatic spike compounds occurred, brominated aromatic compounds were found. The only significant source of bromine in the reaction scheme is the bromide typically present (<0.01% w/w) in the sodium chloride amended to the samples. Conversely, brominated artifacts were absent when a buffered salt mixture composed of sodium chloride and potassium phosphate dibasic/monobasic was used as a matrix modifier and raised the sample pH (pH~6). This indicated that the brominated artifacts resulted from the reaction of the aromatic compounds with BrCl, which was formed by the reaction of H2O2, chloride, and bromide under acidic conditions. An alternative matrix modifier salt is recommended that prevents the bromination reaction and avoids these deleterious effects on sample integrity during headspace analysis.

  14. Damage development, phase changes, transport properties, and freeze-thaw performance of cementitious materials exposed to chloride based salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnam, Yaghoob

    Recently, there has been a dramatic increase in premature deterioration in concrete pavements and flat works that are exposed to chloride based salts. Chloride based salts can cause damage and deterioration in concrete due to the combination of factors which include: increased saturation, ice formation, salt crystallization, osmotic pressure, corrosion in steel reinforcement, and/or deleterious chemical reactions. This thesis discusses how chloride based salts interact with cementitious materials to (1) develop damage in concrete, (2) create new chemical phases in concrete, (3) alter transport properties of concrete, and (4) change the concrete freeze-thaw performance. A longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) was developed to simultaneously measure heat flow, damage development, and phase changes in mortar samples exposed to sodium chloride (NaCl), calcium chloride (CaCl 2), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) under thermal cycling. Acoustic emission and electrical resistivity measurements were used in conjunction with the LGCC to assess damage development and electrical response of mortar samples during cooling and heating. A low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC) was used to evaluate the chemical interaction that occurs between the constituents of cementitious materials (i.e., pore solution, calcium hydroxide, and hydrated cement paste) and salts. Salts were observed to alter the classical phase diagram for a salt-water system which has been conventionally used to interpret the freeze-thaw behavior in concrete. An additional chemical phase change was observed for a concrete-salt-water system resulting in severe damage in cementitious materials. In a cementitious system exposed to NaCl, the chemical phase change occurs at a temperature range between -6 °C and 8 °C due to the presence of calcium sulfoaluminate phases in concrete. As a result, concrete exposed to NaCl can experience additional freeze-thaw cycles due to the chemical

  15. Analysis of corrosion data for carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Hull, A.B.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-03-01

    Carbon steel is currently the leading candidate material for fabrication of a container for isolation of high level nuclear waste in a salt repository. Since brine entrapped in the bedded salt can migrate to the container by several transport processes, corrosion is an important consideration in the long-term performance of the waste package. A detailed literature search was performed to compile relevant corrosion data for carbon steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions, and simulated salt repository brines at temperatures between approx. 20 and 400/sup 0/C. The hydrolysis of Mg/sup 2 +/ ions in simulated repository brines containing high magnesium concentrations causes acidification at temperatures above 25/sup 0/C, which, in turn, influences the protective nature of the magnetite corrosion product layer on carbon steel. The corrosion data for the steels were analyzed, and an analytical model for general corrosion was developed to calculate the amount of penetration (i.e., wall thinning) as a function of time, temperature, and the pressure of corrosion product hydrogen than can build up during exposure in a closed system (e.g., a sealed capsule). Both the temperature and pressure dependence of the corrosion rate of steels in anoxic acid chloride solutions indicate that the rate-controlling partial reaction is the cathodic reduction of water to form hydrogen. Variations in the composition and microstructure of the steels or the concentration of the ionic species in the chloride solutions (provided that they do not change the pH significantly) do not appear to strongly influence the corrosion rate.

  16. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  17. Damage development, phase changes, transport properties, and freeze-thaw performance of cementitious materials exposed to chloride based salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnam, Yaghoob

    Recently, there has been a dramatic increase in premature deterioration in concrete pavements and flat works that are exposed to chloride based salts. Chloride based salts can cause damage and deterioration in concrete due to the combination of factors which include: increased saturation, ice formation, salt crystallization, osmotic pressure, corrosion in steel reinforcement, and/or deleterious chemical reactions. This thesis discusses how chloride based salts interact with cementitious materials to (1) develop damage in concrete, (2) create new chemical phases in concrete, (3) alter transport properties of concrete, and (4) change the concrete freeze-thaw performance. A longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) was developed to simultaneously measure heat flow, damage development, and phase changes in mortar samples exposed to sodium chloride (NaCl), calcium chloride (CaCl 2), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) under thermal cycling. Acoustic emission and electrical resistivity measurements were used in conjunction with the LGCC to assess damage development and electrical response of mortar samples during cooling and heating. A low-temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC) was used to evaluate the chemical interaction that occurs between the constituents of cementitious materials (i.e., pore solution, calcium hydroxide, and hydrated cement paste) and salts. Salts were observed to alter the classical phase diagram for a salt-water system which has been conventionally used to interpret the freeze-thaw behavior in concrete. An additional chemical phase change was observed for a concrete-salt-water system resulting in severe damage in cementitious materials. In a cementitious system exposed to NaCl, the chemical phase change occurs at a temperature range between -6 °C and 8 °C due to the presence of calcium sulfoaluminate phases in concrete. As a result, concrete exposed to NaCl can experience additional freeze-thaw cycles due to the chemical

  18. Chemical compositions of sulfate and chloride salts over the last termination reconstructed from the Dome Fuji ice core, inland Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyabu, Ikumi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Uemura, Ryu; Miyake, Takayuki; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Motoyama, Hideaki; Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Suzuki, Toshitaka; Hondoh, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The flux and chemical composition of aerosols impact the climate. Antarctic ice cores preserve the record of past atmospheric aerosols, providing useful information about past atmospheric environments. However, few studies have directly measured the chemical composition of aerosol particles preserved in ice cores. Here we present the chemical compositions of sulfate and chloride salts from aerosol particles in the Dome Fuji ice core. The analysis method involves ice sublimation, and the period covers the last termination, 25.0-11.0 thousand years before present (kyr B.P.), with a 350 year resolution. The major components of the soluble particles are CaSO4, Na2SO4, and NaCl. The dominant sulfate salt changes at 16.8 kyr B.P. from CaSO4, a glacial type, to Na2SO4, an interglacial type. The sulfate salt flux (CaSO4 plus Na2SO4) inversely correlates with δ18O in Dome Fuji over millennial timescales. This correlation is consistent with the idea that sulfate salt aerosols contributed to the last deglacial warming of inland Antarctica by reducing the aerosol indirect effect. Between 16.3 and 11.0 kyr B.P., the presence of NaCl suggests that winter atmospheric aerosols are preserved. A high NaCl/Na2SO4 fraction between 12.3 and 11.0 kyr B.P. indicates that the contribution from the transport of winter atmospheric aerosols increased during this period.

  19. Potassium nitrate application alleviates sodium chloride stress in winter wheat cultivars differing in salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhai; Jia, Aijun; Ning, Tangyuan; Xu, Jialin; Li, Zengjia; Jiang, Gaoming

    2008-09-29

    A sand culture experiment was conducted to answer the question whether or not exogenous KNO(3) can alleviate adverse effects of salt stress in winter wheat by monitoring plant growth, K(+)/Na(+) accumulation and the activity of some antioxidant enzymes. Seeds of two wheat cultivars (CVs), DK961 (salt-tolerant) and JN17 (salt-sensitive), were planted in sandboxes and controls germinated and raised with Hoagland nutrient solution (6 mM KNO(3), no NaCl). Experimental seeds were exposed to seven modified Hoagland solutions containing increased levels of KNO(3) (11, 16, 21 mM) or 100 mM NaCl in combination with the four KNO(3) concentrations (6, 11, 16 and 21 mM). Plants were harvested 30 d after imbibition, with controls approximately 22 cm in height. Both CVs showed significant reduction in plant height, root length and dry weight of shoots and roots under KNO(3) or NaCl stress. However, the combination of increased KNO(3) and NaCl alleviated symptoms of the individual salt stresses by improving growth of shoots and roots, reducing electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde and soluble sugar contents and enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes. The salt-tolerant cultivar accumulated more K(+) in both shoots and roots compared with the higher Na(+) accumulation typical for the salt-sensitive cultivar. Soluble sugar content and activities of antioxidant enzymes were found to be more stable in the salt-tolerant cultivar. Our findings suggest that the optimal K(+)/Na(+) ratio of the nutrient solution should be 16:100 for both the salt-tolerant and the salt-sensitive cultivar under the experimental conditions used, and that the alleviation of NaCl stress symptoms through simultaneously applied elevated KNO(3) was more effective in the salt-tolerant than in the salt-sensitive cultivar.

  20. Chloride dynamics in a restored urban stream and the influence of road salts on water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the connection between road salts and water quality is essential to assess the implications for human health and ecosystem services from these widely used de-icers. Preliminary analysis identified a probable connection between road salt application and a stream wat...

  1. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  2. Salting-out solvent extraction for the off-line preconcentration of benzalkonium chloride in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    So, T S; Huie, C W

    2001-07-01

    The use of salting-out effect for the off-line preconcentration of charged analytes in capillary electrophoresis is demonstrated for the first time. Using benzalkonium chloride (BAK) as model compound, a mixture of cationic surfactants consisting of even-numbered alkylbenzyl quaternary ammonium homologues (C8-C18), the addition of appropriate amounts of sodium chloride and acetonitrile in the sample solution (2 mL sample volume) was found to be capable of providing ca. 40-fold enhancement in detection sensitivity. In addition to affording a preconcentrating effect due to the extraction of BAK in the smaller volume water-miscible organic solvent phase (acetonitrile), the organic solvent also serves to improve the peak area and shape of the longer chain surfactants. Optimal experimental conditions, such as volume of acetonitrile and concentration of sodium chloride, for the preconcentration of BAK with good preconcentration factors and reproducibility were investigated. The usefulness of the present method was demonstrated for the improved determination of BAK present in commercially available industrial and pharmaceutical products.

  3. Norepinephrine-evoked salt-sensitive hypertension requires impaired renal sodium chloride cotransporter activity in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kathryn R; Kuwabara, Jill T; Shim, Joon W; Wainford, Richard D

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have implicated a role of norepinephrine (NE) in the activation of the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) to drive the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. However, the interaction between NE and increased salt intake on blood pressure remains to be fully elucidated. This study examined the impact of a continuous NE infusion on sodium homeostasis and blood pressure in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats challenged with a normal (NS; 0.6% NaCl) or high-salt (HS; 8% NaCl) diet for 14 days. Naïve and saline-infused Sprague-Dawley rats remained normotensive when placed on HS and exhibited dietary sodium-evoked suppression of peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide. NE infusion resulted in the development of hypertension, which was exacerbated by HS, demonstrating the development of the salt sensitivity of blood pressure [MAP (mmHg) NE+NS: 151 ± 3 vs. NE+HS: 172 ± 4; P < 0.05]. In these salt-sensitive animals, increased NE prevented dietary sodium-evoked suppression of peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide, suggesting impaired NCC activity contributes to the development of salt sensitivity [peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide (μeq/min) Naïve+NS: 9.4 ± 0.2 vs. Naïve+HS: 7 ± 0.1; P < 0.05; NE+NS: 11.1 ± 1.1; NE+HS: 10.8 ± 0.4). NE infusion did not alter NCC expression in animals maintained on NS; however, dietary sodium-evoked suppression of NCC expression was prevented in animals challenged with NE. Chronic NCC antagonism abolished the salt-sensitive component of NE-mediated hypertension, while chronic ANG II type 1 receptor antagonism significantly attenuated NE-evoked hypertension without restoring NCC function. These data demonstrate that increased levels of NE prevent dietary sodium-evoked suppression of the NCC, via an ANG II-independent mechanism, to stimulate the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:26608659

  4. Norepinephrine-evoked salt-sensitive hypertension requires impaired renal sodium chloride cotransporter activity in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kathryn R; Kuwabara, Jill T; Shim, Joon W; Wainford, Richard D

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have implicated a role of norepinephrine (NE) in the activation of the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) to drive the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. However, the interaction between NE and increased salt intake on blood pressure remains to be fully elucidated. This study examined the impact of a continuous NE infusion on sodium homeostasis and blood pressure in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats challenged with a normal (NS; 0.6% NaCl) or high-salt (HS; 8% NaCl) diet for 14 days. Naïve and saline-infused Sprague-Dawley rats remained normotensive when placed on HS and exhibited dietary sodium-evoked suppression of peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide. NE infusion resulted in the development of hypertension, which was exacerbated by HS, demonstrating the development of the salt sensitivity of blood pressure [MAP (mmHg) NE+NS: 151 ± 3 vs. NE+HS: 172 ± 4; P < 0.05]. In these salt-sensitive animals, increased NE prevented dietary sodium-evoked suppression of peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide, suggesting impaired NCC activity contributes to the development of salt sensitivity [peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide (μeq/min) Naïve+NS: 9.4 ± 0.2 vs. Naïve+HS: 7 ± 0.1; P < 0.05; NE+NS: 11.1 ± 1.1; NE+HS: 10.8 ± 0.4). NE infusion did not alter NCC expression in animals maintained on NS; however, dietary sodium-evoked suppression of NCC expression was prevented in animals challenged with NE. Chronic NCC antagonism abolished the salt-sensitive component of NE-mediated hypertension, while chronic ANG II type 1 receptor antagonism significantly attenuated NE-evoked hypertension without restoring NCC function. These data demonstrate that increased levels of NE prevent dietary sodium-evoked suppression of the NCC, via an ANG II-independent mechanism, to stimulate the development of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  5. Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal Setschenow Salting Constants in Sulfate, Nitrate, and Chloride Solutions: Measurements and Gibbs Energies.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Eleanor M; Elm, Jonas; Kurtén, Theo; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Ziemann, Paul J; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge about Setschenow salting constants, KS, the exponential dependence of Henry's Law coefficients on salt concentration, is of particular importance to predict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from soluble species in atmospheric waters with high salt concentrations, such as aerosols. We have measured KS of glyoxal and methylglyoxal for the atmospherically relevant salts (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NaNO3, and NaCl and find that glyoxal consistently "salts-in" (KS of -0.16, -0.06, -0.065, -0.1 molality(-1), respectively) while methylglyoxal "salts-out" (KS of +0.16, +0.075, +0.02, +0.06 molality(-1)). We show that KS values for different salts are additive and present an equation for use in atmospheric models. Additionally, we have performed a series of quantum chemical calculations to determine the interactions between glyoxal/methylglyoxal monohydrate with Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Na(+), and NH4(+) and find Gibbs free energies of water displacement of -10.9, -22.0, -22.9, 2.09, and 1.2 kJ/mol for glyoxal monohydrate and -3.1, -10.3, -7.91, 6.11, and 1.6 kJ/mol for methylglyoxal monohydrate with uncertainties of 8 kJ/mol. The quantum chemical calculations support that SO4(2-), NO3(-), and Cl(-) modify partitioning, while cations do not. Other factors such as ion charge or partitioning volume effects likely need to be considered to fully explain salting effects. PMID:26335375

  6. Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal Setschenow Salting Constants in Sulfate, Nitrate, and Chloride Solutions: Measurements and Gibbs Energies.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Eleanor M; Elm, Jonas; Kurtén, Theo; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Ziemann, Paul J; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge about Setschenow salting constants, KS, the exponential dependence of Henry's Law coefficients on salt concentration, is of particular importance to predict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from soluble species in atmospheric waters with high salt concentrations, such as aerosols. We have measured KS of glyoxal and methylglyoxal for the atmospherically relevant salts (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NaNO3, and NaCl and find that glyoxal consistently "salts-in" (KS of -0.16, -0.06, -0.065, -0.1 molality(-1), respectively) while methylglyoxal "salts-out" (KS of +0.16, +0.075, +0.02, +0.06 molality(-1)). We show that KS values for different salts are additive and present an equation for use in atmospheric models. Additionally, we have performed a series of quantum chemical calculations to determine the interactions between glyoxal/methylglyoxal monohydrate with Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Na(+), and NH4(+) and find Gibbs free energies of water displacement of -10.9, -22.0, -22.9, 2.09, and 1.2 kJ/mol for glyoxal monohydrate and -3.1, -10.3, -7.91, 6.11, and 1.6 kJ/mol for methylglyoxal monohydrate with uncertainties of 8 kJ/mol. The quantum chemical calculations support that SO4(2-), NO3(-), and Cl(-) modify partitioning, while cations do not. Other factors such as ion charge or partitioning volume effects likely need to be considered to fully explain salting effects.

  7. EVIDENCE OF CORROSIVE GAS FORMED BY RADIOLYSIS OF CHLORIDE SALTS IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.

    2010-02-01

    Corrosion and pitting have been observed in headspace regions of stainless steel containers enclosing plutonium oxide/salt mixtures. These observations are consistent with the formation of a corrosive gas, probably HCl, and transport of that gas to the headspace regions of sealed containers. The NH{sub 4}Cl films found on the walls of the sealed containers is also indicative of the presence of HCl gas. Radiolysis of hydrated alkaline earth salts is the probable source of HCl.

  8. Upregulation of apical sodium-chloride cotransporter and basolateral chloride channels is responsible for the maintenance of salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Giovambattista; Rizzo, Maria; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Trepiccione, Francesco; Zacchia, Miriam; Mugione, Alessandra; Ferrari, Patrizia; Paulmichl, Markus; Lang, Florian; Loffing, Johannes; Carrel, Monique; Damiano, Sara; Wagner, Carsten A; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Meyer, Giuliano

    2008-08-01

    We investigated which of the NaCl transporters are involved in the maintenance of salt-sensitive hypertension. Milan hypertensive (MHS) rats were studied 3 mo after birth. In MHS, compared with normotensive strain (MNS), mRNA abundance, quantified by competitive PCR on isolated tubules, was unchanged, both for Na+/H+ isoform 3 (NHE3) and Na+-K+-2Cl- (NKCC2), but higher (119%, n = 5, P < 0.005) for Na+-Cl- (NCC) in distal convoluted tubules (DCT). These results were confirmed by Western blots, which revealed: 1) unchanged NHE3 in the cortex and NKCC2 in the outer medulla; 2) a significant increase (52%, n = 6, P < 0.001) of NCC in the cortex; 3) alpha- and beta-sodium channels [epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC)] unaffected in renal cortex and slightly reduced in the outer medulla, while gamma-ENaC remained unchanged. Pendrin protein expression was unaffected. The role of NCC was reinforced by immunocytochemical studies showing increased NCC on the apical membrane of DCT cells of MHS animals, and by clearance experiments demonstrating a larger sensitivity (P < 0.001) to bendroflumethiazide in MHS rats. Kidney-specific chloride channels (ClC-K) were studied by Western blot experiments on renal cortex and by patch-clamp studies on primary culture of DCT dissected from MNS and MHS animals. Electrophysiological characteristics of ClC-K channels were unchanged in MHS rats, but the number of active channels in a patch was 0.60 +/- 0.21 (n = 35) in MNS rats and 2.17 +/- 0.59 (n = 23) in MHS rats (P < 0.05). The data indicate that, in salt-sensitive hypertension, there is a strong upregulation, both of NCC and ClC-K along the DCT, which explains the persistence of hypertension.

  9. Microbial stability and quality of seasoned cracked green Aloreña table olives packed in diverse chloride salt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Romero-Gil, V; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; García-García, P; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2013-11-01

    This work was conducted to determine the effect of the partial replacement of NaCl by KCl and CaCl2 (expressed as percentages, wt/vol) on the microbial stability and physicochemical characteristics of seasoned cracked olives using a simplex centroid mixture design. Neither Enterobacteriaceae nor lactic acid bacteria were found during the 50 days that olive packages were monitored. Therefore, microbial instability was considered due to the growth of yeasts, which were the only detected microorganisms; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia membranifaciens were the most relevant species. Yeasts decreased during the first 21 to 30 days after packing, but their populations rose to 3.5 log CFU/ml by the end of the storage period, clearly causing product deterioration. The partial substitution of NaCl with the other chloride salts slightly altered the phase of microbial inhibition and regrowth. Most of the quality characteristics were not affected by the use of the alternative salt mixtures, but the pH values and Cl(-) concentrations in brine decreased as the CaCl2 concentration increased. Hence, seasoned cracked table olives can be produced using a lower proportion of NaCl without causing significant changes in the shelf life and product quality, although further detailed studies are necessary to guarantee the stability of products packed with specific salt mixtures.

  10. Modulating the structure and properties of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) multilayers with concentrated salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Han, Lulu; Mao, Zhengwei; Wuliyasu, He; Wu, Jindan; Gong, Xiao; Yang, Yuguang; Gao, Changyou

    2012-01-10

    Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) multilayers were treated with 1-5 M NaCl solutions, resulting in continuous changes in the physicochemical properties of the multilayers. Significant mass loss was observed when the salt concentration was higher than 2 M and reached as high as 72% in a 5 M NaCl solution. The disassembly occurred initially in the superficial layers and then developed in the bulk multilayers. For the multilayers with PDADMAC as the outmost layer, the molar ratio of PSS/PDADMAC was increased and the surface chemistry was changed from PDADMAC domination below 2 M NaCl to PSS domination above 3 M NaCl. Owing to the higher concentrations of uncompensated for polyelectrolytes at both lower and higher salt concentrations, the swelling ratio of the multilayers was decreased until reaching 3 M NaCl and then was increased significantly again. The salt-treated PSS/PDADMAC thin films are expected to show different behaviors in terms of the physical adsorption of various functional substances, cell adhesion and proliferation, and chemical reaction activity.

  11. Dietary salt regulates the phosphorylation of OSR1/SPAK kinases and the sodium chloride cotransporter through aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Chiga, Motoko; Rai, Tatemitsu; Yang, Sung-Sen; Ohta, Akihito; Takizawa, Toichiro; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2008-12-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is caused by mutations in the WNK1 and WNK4 genes (WNK with-no-lysine kinase). In a mouse model of this disease where a mutant of Wnk4 D561A was knocked in, increased phosphorylation of the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) was found and the transporter was concentrated on the apical membrane of the distal tubules. In addition, we recently found that other kinases, such as the oxidative stress response kinase-1/STE20/SPS1-related proline alanine-rich kinase (OSR1/SPAK), also showed increased phosphorylation in these mice. Here we determined whether this kinase cascade is regulated by dietary salt intake. We found that the phosphorylation states of NCC and OSR1/SPAK were increased by low-salt diets and decreased by high-salt diets; a regulation completely lost in the knock-in mice. Increased phosphorylation was reversed by spironolactone and this decreased phosphorylation was reversed by administration of exogenous aldosterone. These studies suggest that that the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade may be a novel effector system of aldosterone action in the kidney.

  12. Nano spray-dried sodium chloride and its effects on the microbiological and sensory characteristics of surface-salted cheese crackers.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Marvin; Astete, Carlos; Sabliov, Cristina; Olson, Douglas; Boeneke, Charles; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2015-09-01

    Reducing particle size of salt to approximately 1.5 µm would increase its surface area, leading to increased dissolution rate in saliva and more efficient transfer of ions to taste buds, and hence, perhaps, a saltier perception of foods. This has a potential for reducing the salt level in surface-salted foods. Our objective was to develop a salt using a nano spray-drying method, to use the developed nano spray-dried salt in surface-salted cheese cracker manufacture, and to evaluate the microbiological and sensory characteristics of cheese crackers. Sodium chloride solution (3% wt/wt) was sprayed through a nano spray dryer. Particle sizes were determined by dynamic light scattering, and particle shapes were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Approximately 80% of the salt particles produced by the nano spray dryer, when drying a 3% (wt/wt) salt solution, were between 500 and 1,900 nm. Cheese cracker treatments consisted of 3 different salt sizes: regular salt with an average particle size of 1,500 µm; a commercially available Microsized 95 Extra Fine Salt (Cargill Salt, Minneapolis, MN) with an average particle size of 15 µm; and nano spray-dried salt with an average particle size of 1.5 µm, manufactured in our laboratory and 3 different salt concentrations (1, 1.5, and 2% wt/wt). A balanced incomplete block design was used to conduct consumer analysis of cheese crackers with nano spray-dried salt (1, 1.5, and 2%), Microsized salt (1, 1.5, and 2%) and regular 2% (control, as used by industry) using 476 participants at 1wk and 4mo. At 4mo, nano spray-dried salt treatments (1, 1.5, and 2%) had significantly higher preferred saltiness scores than the control (regular 2%). Also, at 4mo, nano spray-dried salt (1.5 and 2%) had significantly more just-about-right saltiness scores than control (regular 2%). Consumers' purchase intent increased by 25% for the nano spray-dried salt at 1.5% after they were notified about the 25% reduction in sodium content of the

  13. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  14. Preparation of Ferrotitanium Alloy from Ilmenite by Electrochemical Reduction in Chloride Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Can-can; Hua, Yi-xin; Chen, Kong-hao; Jie, Ya-fei; Zhou, Zhong-ren; Ru, Juan-jian; Xiong, Li; Gong, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Ferrotitanium alloy is prepared by electrochemical reduction from ilmenite in LiCl-KCl and LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 molten salts, respectively. The products prepared are observed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). It is shown that Fe2Ti can be prepared from ilmenite in LiCl-KCl molten salt at 1073 K with a cell voltage of 3.2 V. Ilmenite can be electrochemically reduced to FeTi in LiCl-KCl-CaCl2 molten salt under the same condition. It is indicated that CaCl2 can promote the reaction and is favors the deoxidization of the FeTiO3.

  15. Loss of CFTR chloride channels alters salt absorption by cystic fibrosis airway epithelia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zabner, J; Smith, J J; Karp, P H; Widdicombe, J H; Welsh, M J

    1998-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss of functional CFTR Cl- channels. However, it is not understood how this defect disrupts salt and liquid movement in the airway or whether it alters the NaCl concentration in the thin liquid film covering the airway surface. Using a new approach, we found that CF airway surface liquid had a higher NaCl concentration than normal. Both CF and non-CF epithelia absorbed salt and liquid; however, expression of CFTR Cl- channels was required for maximal absorption. Thus, loss of CFTR elevates the salt concentration in CF airway surface liquid and in sweat by related mechanisms; the elevated NaCl concentration is due to a block in transcellular Cl- movement. The high NaCl may predispose CF airways to bacterial infections by inhibiting endogenous antibacterial defenses. PMID:9774978

  16. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  17. Sodium Chloride Diffusion during Muscle Salting Evidenced by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, Rénata; Peyrin, Frédéric; Vénien, Annie; Hénot, Jean Marc; Astruc, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    To better understand the relationship between the muscle structure and NaCl transfers in meat, we used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze brined and dry-salted rat muscles. The muscles were freeze-dried to avoid the delocalization of soluble ions that happens in regular dehydration through a graded series of ethanol. Na and Cl maps were superimposed on SEM images to combine the muscle structure and NaCl diffusion. Brining causes rapid diffusion of NaCl through the tissue. Most brine diffuses in a linear front from the muscle surface, but a small proportion enters through the perimysium network. The muscle area penetrated by brine shows heterogeneous patterns of NaCl retention, with some connective tissue islets containing more NaCl than other parts of perimysium. NaCl penetration is considerably slower after dry salting than after brining.

  18. Volume change effect on the salt-finger stability of directionally solidifying ammonium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Chen, Falin

    1995-09-01

    The effect of the volume change due to phase transformation on the stability of salt-finger convection of directionally solidifying NH 4Cl aqueous solution cooling from below is investigated. The basic flow, induced by the volume change, not only changes the morphology and the depth of the dendritic mushy layer, but also influences the stability of salt-finger convection. A new mathematical model is proposed, which differs from the previous one mainly on the dynamical condition at the melt/mush interface. This difference not only leads to a less stable state, but can also be crucial to the dynamical behavior of the oscillatory instability mode since the convection cells of this mode are coupled viscously through the interface. In the discussion, special emphasis is placed on the volume change effect on the instability mode competition, which may be influential to the stability characteristics of the subsequent plume convection.

  19. Candidate waste forms for immobilisation of waste chloride salt from pyroprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Olufson, K.; Chironi, I.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Farnan, I.

    2012-01-01

    Sodalite/glass bodies prepared by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) at ˜850 °C/100 MPa are candidates for immobilising fission product-bearing waste KCl-LiCl pyroprocessing salts. To study the capacity of sodalite to structurally incorporate such pyroprocessing salts, K, Li, Cs, Sr, Ba and La were individually targeted for substitution in a Na site in sodalite (Na vacancies targeted as charge compensators for alkaline and rare earths) and studied by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy after sintering in the range of 800-1000 °C. K and Li appeared to enter the sodalite, but Cs, Sr and Ba formed aluminosilicate phases and La formed an oxyapatite phase. However these non-sodalite phases have reasonable resistance to water leaching. Pure chlorapatite gives superior leach resistance to sodalite, and alkalis, alkaline and rare earth ions are generally known to enter chlorapatite, but attempts to incorporate simulated waste salt formulations into HIPed chlorapatite-based preparations or to substitute Cs alone into the structure of Ca-based chlorapatite were not successful on the basis of scanning electron microscopy. The materials exhibited severe water leachability, mainly in regard to Cs release. Attempts to substitute Cs into Ba- and Sr-based chlorapatites also did not look encouraging. Consequently the use of apatite alone to retain fission product-bearing waste pyroprocessing salts from electrolytic nuclear fuel reprocessing is problematical, but chlorapatite glass-ceramics may be feasible, albeit with reduced waste loadings. Spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl, does not appear to be suitable for incorporation of Cl-bearing waste containing fission products.

  20. Hypertension, dietary salt intake, and the role of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride transporter NCCT.

    PubMed

    Glover, Mark; Zuber, Annie Mercier; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2011-02-01

    A high salt intake in industrialized countries is an important cardiovascular risk factor. It remains at typically twice the maximum recommended levels of 5-6 g/day, and halving this would have enormous public health benefit in preventing stroke and cardiovascular disease. Salt homeostasis can also be affected pharmacologically by diuretic drugs that target mechanisms within the distal kidney nephron to cause salt wasting. Indeed, thiazide-type diuretics are among the most widely used agents in the management of hypertension and work by blocking NCCT, the NaCl-transporter in the distal nephron. The biology of this membrane transporter was not previously well understood until the discovery of the molecular basis of a rare familial form of hypertension called Gordon syndrome (pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2, PHAII). This has established that the NCCT transporter is dynamically regulated in the kidney by WNK kinases and a signaling cascade using a second kinase called SPAK. Common polymorphisms in the SPAK gene have recently been shown to affect blood pressure in human cohorts and removing its function lowers blood pressure in mice. The SPAK-deficient mouse actually has a phenotype reminiscent of Gitelman syndrome. This suggests that specific inhibitors of SPAK kinase may provide a novel class of diuretic drugs to lower blood pressure through salt wasting. The expectation is that SPAK inhibitors would mimic the on-target effects of thiazides but not their adverse off-target effects. An antihypertensive drug that could lower blood pressure with the efficacy of a thiazide without producing metabolic side effects such as hyperuricaemia or impaired glucose tolerance is therapeutically very attractive. It also exemplifies how data coming from the rare monogenic hypertension syndromes can together with genome-wide association studies in hypertension deliver novel druggable targets.

  1. The electrodeposition of cobalt, iron, antimony and their aluminum alloys from acidic aluminum chloride 1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride room-temperature molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, John Anthony

    The electrodeposition of cobalt, iron, antimony, and their aluminum alloys was investigated in the room-temperature molten salt, aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (AlClsb3-MeEtimCl). Solutions of Co(II), Fe(II), and Sb(III) were prepared by controlled-potential coulometric anodization of the respective metal in Lewis acidic melt. The plating and stripping of these metals was investigated using cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk and rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry, controlled potential coulometry, and potential step chronoamperometry. Bulk deposits of the pure and aluminum-alloyed metals were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction methods. The underpotential co-deposition of aluminum was observed during the electrodeposition of cobalt and iron; however, this phenomenon did not occur during the electrodeposition of antimony. The results of this investigation suggest that both a positive work function difference between the transition metal and aluminum and the mutual solubility of these components determine whether or not the co-deposition of aluminum takes place. Two electroanalytical techniques were developed for the analysis of co-deposited aluminum alloys: the first was based on anodic linear sweep voltammetry at a rotating-ring-disk electrode. The second was derived from the transition metal ion concentration changes observed during bulk deposition experiments. In the first technique, an alloy deposit was stripped from the disk electrode while the ring potential was held at a value where only one of the ions oxidized from the alloy could be reduced. In the second technique, the concentration of transition metal ions was monitored in an undivided cell with an anode made from the depositing metal. The co-deposition of aluminum was signalled by an increase in the transition metal ion concentration. The alloy composition data resulting from

  2. Optimization of the iron-ion/hydrogen redox flow cell with iron chloride catholyte salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.

    2014-01-01

    A redox flow cell utilizing the Fe2+/Fe3+ and H2/H+ couples is investigated as an energy-storage device. A conventional polymer-electrolyte-fuel-cell anode and membrane design is employed, with a cathode containing a carbon porous electrode flooded with iron chloride in an aqueous acidic solution. Foam, paper, and fabric carbon electrodes are studied, and it is found that SGL Sigracet 10AA carbon paper provides the best performance. This carbon paper is then impregnated with a wide variety of carbon powders, and it is found that none improve performance significantly, with several reducing it. Membranes of varying thickness and composition are studied, and there is a trade-off between charge/discharge performance and self-discharge. It is found that the concentration of HCl supporting electrolyte has a dramatic impact on charging performance and OCV. Charge currents in excess of 1 A cm-2 are achieved for 4 and 6 M HCl. The maximum discharge power density, 257 mW cm-2, is achieved for 0.9 M iron chloride with 0.9 M HCl.

  3. Interfacial behavior of perchlorate versus chloride ions in saturated aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S; Kuo, I W; Baer, M D; Bluhm, H

    2009-04-14

    In recent years combination of theoretical and experimental work have presented a novel view of the aqueous interface wherein hard and/or multiply charged ions are excluded from the interface, but large polarizable anions show interfacial enhancement relative to the bulk. The observed trend in the propensity of anions to adsorb at the air/water interface appears to be reverse of the Hofmeister series for anions. This study focuses on experimental and theoretical examination of the partitioning behavior of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions at the air/water interface. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique to directly probe the interfacial concentrations of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions in sodium perchlorate and sodium chloride solutions, respectively. Experimental observations are compared with first principles molecular dynamics simulations. Both experimental and simulation results show enhancement of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ion at the interface, compared with the absence of such enhancement in the case of Cl{sup -} ion. These observations are in agreement with the expected trend in the interfacial propensity of anions based on the Hofmeister series.

  4. Effects of pH, sodium chloride, and curing salt on the infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts.

    PubMed

    Pott, S; Koethe, M; Bangoura, B; Zöller, B; Daugschies, A; Straubinger, R K; Fehlhaber, K; Ludewig, M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common zoonotic parasites in the world. The parasite causes no or mild symptoms in immunocompetent humans. However, a high potential hazard exists for seronegative pregnant women and immunocompromised patients. The consumption of meat containing tissue cysts or oocyst-contaminated vegetables and fruits or the handling of cat feces poses a high risk of infection with T. gondii. It is known that raw minced meat, raw fresh sausages, and locally produced raw meat products are possible causes of T. gondii infection. The infectivity of T. gondii tissue cysts in meat products depends, among other factors, on the pH and the salt concentration. Therefore, the impact of these two factors on the tissue cysts was examined. For this purpose, dissected musculature and brain from experimentally infected mice (donor mice) were placed in a cell culture medium (RPMI 1640). The medium was adjusted to different pH values (pH 5, 6, and 7) with lactic acid and to different salt concentrations (2.0, 2.5, and 3.0%) with sodium chloride (NaCl) or nitrite-enriched curing salt (NCS) for the various tests. After storage at 4°C for different time periods, the materials were fed to bioassay mice. Later, the brains were examined for presence of T. gondii to assess the infectivity. The data show that T. gondii tissue cysts have a high pH tolerance. Cysts were infectious in the muscle for up to 26 days (pH 5). In contrast to their tolerance to pH, cysts were very sensitive to salt. Muscle cysts survived at an NaCl concentration of up to 2.0% only, and for no longer than 8 days. At NaCl concentrations of 2.5 and 3.0%, the cysts lost their infectivity after 1 day. When NCS instead of NaCl was used under the same conditions, T. gondii muscle cysts retained infectivity for only 4 days at 2.0%. Consequently, NCS (NaCl plus 0.5% nitrite) has a stronger effect on T. gondii cysts than does common table salt. Sausages produced with low NaCl concentration and short

  5. Occlusion and ion exchange in the molten (lithium chloride-potassium chloride-alkali metal chloride) salt + zeolite 4A system with alkali metal chlorides of sodium, rubidium, and cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexa, Dusan; Johnson, Irving

    2001-06-01

    Interaction between molten salts of the type LiCl-KCl-MeCl (Me = Na, Rb, Cs, x MeCl = 0 to 0.5, x KCl/ x LiCl = 0.69) and zeolite 4A have been studied at 823 K. The main interactions between these salts and zeolite are molten salt occlusion to form salt-loaded zeolite and ion exchange between the molten salt and salt-loaded zeolite. No chemical reaction has been observed. The extent of occlusion is a function of the concentration of MeCl in the zeolite and is equal to 11±1 Cl- per zeolite unit cell, (AlSiO4)12, at infinite MeCl dilution. The ion-exchange mole fraction equilibrium constants (separation factors) with respect to Li are decreasing functions of concentration of MeCl in the zeolite. At infinite MeCl dilution, they are equal to 0.84, 0.87, and 2.31 for NaCl, RbCl, and CsCl, respectively, and increase in the order Na

  6. Regeneration of bleaching clay waste by chemical activation with chloride salts.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Chen, H P; Hsieh, M F; Sun, H F; Lai, C W

    2003-04-01

    Spent bleaching earth (SBE) was regenerated by chemical activation with low cost and low pollution chlorides as activating agents. Under the conditions of activation temperature of 600d egrees C and holding time of 1 h investigated, results show that fresh bleaching earth and regenerated bleaching earth are type IV with hysteresis loops corresponding to type H3 from nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, indicating slit-shaped mesoporous structure. It is also found that the effect of the regeneration treatment studied in the present work on the pore structures and chemical properties of the resulting solids is negligible compared to the fresh bleaching earth. On the other hand, the pore properties of these chemically activated solids are higher than those of the sample regenerated from heat regeneration, but only approximate 45% of surface area are reclaimed. It implies that the carbon residues could be retained within pores and/or clogs the entrance of pores, resulting in a decrease in pore properties.

  7. Development of a niobium-doped titania inert anode for titanium electrowinning in molten chloride salts.

    PubMed

    Snook, Graeme A; McGregor, Katherine; Urban, Andrew J; Lanyon, Marshall R; Donelson, R; Pownceby, Mark I

    2016-08-15

    The direct electrochemical reduction of solid titanium dioxide in a chloride melt is an attractive method for the production of titanium metal. It has been estimated that this type of electrolytic approach may reduce the costs of producing titanium sponge by more than half, with the additional benefit of a smaller environmental footprint. The process utilises a consumable carbon anode which releases a mixture of CO2 and CO gas during electrolysis, but suffers from low current efficiency due to the occurrence of parasitic side reactions involving carbon. The replacement of the carbon anode with a cheap, robust inert anode offers numerous benefits that include: elimination of carbon dioxide emissions, more efficient cell operation, opportunity for three-dimensional electrode configurations and reduced electrode costs. This paper reports a study of Nb-doped titania anode materials for inert anodes in a titanium electrolytic reduction cell. The study examines the effect of niobium content and sintering conditions on the performance of Nb-doped TiO2 anodes in laboratory-scale electrolysis tests. Experimental findings, including performance in a 100 h laboratory electrolysis test, are described. PMID:27265026

  8. The Influence of Calcium Chloride Deicing Salt on Phase Changes and Damage Development in Cementitious Materials

    PubMed Central

    Farnam, Yaghoob; Dick, Sarah; Wiese, Andrew; Davis, Jeffrey; Bentz, Dale; Weiss, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The conventional CaCl2-H2O phase diagram is often used to describe how calcium chloride behaves when it is used on a concrete pavement undergoing freeze-thaw damage. However, the chemistry of the concrete can alter the appropriateness of using the CaCl2-H2O phase diagram. This study shows that the Ca(OH)2 present in a hydrated portland cement can interact with CaCl2 solution creating a behavior that is similar to that observed in isoplethal sections of a ternary phase diagram for a Ca(OH)2-CaCl2-H2O system. As such, it is suggested that such isoplethal sections provide a reasonable model that can be used to describe the behavior of concrete exposed to CaCl2 solution as the temperature changes. Specifically, the Ca(OH)2 can react with CaCl2 and H2O resulting in the formation of calcium oxychloride. The formation of the calcium oxychloride is expansive and can produce damage in concrete at temperatures above freezing. Its formation can also cause a significant decrease in fluid ingress into concrete. For solutions with CaCl2 concentrations greater than about 11.3 % (by mass), it is found that calcium oxychloride forms rapidly and is stable at room temperature (23 °C). PMID:26692655

  9. Mapping of road-salt-contaminated groundwater discharge and estimation of chloride load to a small stream in southern New Hampshire, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Trowbridge, P.R.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations of chloride in excess of State of New Hampshire water-quality standards (230 mg/l) have been measured in watersheds adjacent to an interstate highway (I-93) in southern New Hampshire. A proposed widening plan for I-93 has raised concerns over further increases in chloride. As part of this effort, road-salt-contaminated groundwater discharge was mapped with terrain electrical conductivity (EC) electromagnetic (EM) methods in the fall of 2006 to identify potential sources of chloride during base-flow conditions to a small stream, Policy Brook. Three different EM meters were used to measure different depths below the streambed (ranging from 0 to 3 m). Results from the three meters showed similar patterns and identified several reaches where high EC groundwater may have been discharging. Based on the delineation of high (up to 350 mmhos/m) apparent terrain EC, seven-streambed piezometers were installed to sample shallow groundwater. Locations with high specific conductance in shallow groundwater (up to 2630 mmhos/m) generally matched locations with high streambed (shallow subsurface) terrain EC. A regression equation was used to convert the terrain EC of the streambed to an equivalent chloride concentration in shallow groundwater unique for this site. Utilizing the regression equation and estimates of onedimensional Darcian flow through the streambed, a maximum potential groundwater chloride load was estimated at 188 Mg of chloride per year. Changes in chloride concentration in stream water during streamflow recessions showed a linear response that indicates the dominant process affecting chloride is advective flow of chloride-enriched groundwater discharge. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Reshaping the folding energy landscape by chloride salt: impact on molten-globule formation and aggregation behavior of carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Borén, Kristina; Grankvist, Hannah; Hammarström, Per; Carlsson, Uno

    2004-05-21

    During chemical denaturation different intermediate states are populated or suppressed due to the nature of the denaturant used. Chemical denaturation by guanidine-HCl (GuHCl) of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) leads to a three-state unfolding process (Cm,NI=1.0 and Cm,IU=1.9 M GuHCl) with formation of an equilibrium molten-globule intermediate that is stable at moderate concentrations of the denaturant (1-2 M) with a maximum at 1.5 M GuHCl. On the contrary, urea denaturation gives rise to an apparent two-state unfolding transition (Cm=4.4 M urea). However, 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding and decreased refolding capacity revealed the presence of the molten globule in the middle of the unfolding transition zone, although to a lesser extent than in GuHCl. Cross-linking studies showed the formation of moderate oligomer sized (300 kDa) and large soluble aggregates (>1000 kDa). Inclusion of 1.5 M NaCl to the urea denaturant to mimic the ionic character of GuHCl leads to a three-state unfolding behavior (Cm,NI=3.0 and Cm,IU=6.4 M urea) with a significantly stabilized molten-globule intermediate by the chloride salt. Comparisons between NaCl and LiCl of the impact on the stability of the various states of HCA II in urea showed that the effects followed what could be expected from the Hofmeister series, where Li+ is a chaotropic ion leading to decreased stability of the native state. Salt addition to the completely urea unfolded HCA II also led to an aggregation prone unfolded state, that has not been observed before for carbonic anhydrase. Refolding from this state only provided low recoveries of native enzyme.

  11. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  12. Effects of temperature, concentration, and uranium chloride mixture on zirconium electrochemical studies in LiClsbnd KCl eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Robert O.; Yoon, Dalsung; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies were performed to provide measurement and analysis of zirconium (Zr) electrochemistry in LiClsbnd KCl eutectic salt at different temperatures and concentrations using cyclic voltammetry (CV). An additional experimental set with uranium chloride added into the system forming UCl3sbnd ZrCl4sbnd LiClsbnd KCl was performed to explore the general behavior of these two species together. Results of CV experiments with ZrCl4 show complicated cathodic and anodic peaks, which were identified along with the Zr reactions. The CV results reveal that diffusion coefficients (D) of ZrCl4 and ZrCl2 as the function of temperature can be expressed as DZr(IV) = 0.00046exp(-3716/T) and DZr(II) = 0.027exp(-5617/T), respectively. The standard rate constants and apparent standard potentials of ZrCl4 at different temperatures were calculated. Furthermore, the results from the mixture of UCl3 and ZrCl4 indicate that high concentrations of UCl3 hide the features of the smaller concentration of ZrCl4 while Zr peaks become prominent as the concentration of ZrCl4 increases.

  13. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  14. Synthesis of 8-phenyl-10H-pyrido(1,2-. cap alpha. )indole salts from 2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indole chlorides with cinnamaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Shachkus, A.A.; Degutis, Yu.A.

    1987-10-01

    Reaction of 2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indole chloride with cinnamic and 4-dimethylaminocinnamic aldehydes led to salts of 8-phenyl and 8-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-10,10-dimethyl-10H-pyrido(1,2-..cap alpha..)indole. PMR spectra were recorded on a Tesla BS-487C (80 MHz) instrument (internal standard HMDS) and IR spectra on a UR-20 spectrometer (KBr pellets).

  15. Characteristics of nitrogen release from synthetic zeolite Na-P1 occluding NH4NO3.

    PubMed

    Park, Man; Kim, Jong Su; Choi, Choong Lyeal; Kim, Jang-Eok; Heo, Nam Ho; Komarneni, Sridhar; Choi, Jyung

    2005-08-18

    Zeolites can accommodate a considerable amount of occluded salt such as NH4NO3, which can serve as a good source of slow-release plant nutrient. This study evaluates the kinetics of ion release from NH4NO3-occluded Na-P1 (N-NaP) using a simulated soil solution and deionized water as leaching solutions. The patterns of ion releases were examined as a function of leaching time under both static and continuous-flow conditions for more than one month. Releases of both NH4+ and NO3- from N-NaP were found to be slow and steady under both the above conditions. The soil solution affected the release of NH4+ and NO3- differently, while deionized water released nearly the same equivalents of these ions. This clearly indicates that ion release from salt-occluded zeolite involves two different reactions, cation exchange and dissolution. The kinetics of ion release from occluded NH4NO3 under static condition was best described by the standard Elovich model while the power function model best expressed these under continuous-flow condition. The initial ion release patterns under both conditions exhibited considerable deviation from the simulated models, probably as a result of the presence of hydrated occluded NH4NO3. Flow condition and the presence of electrolytes in leaching solution affected the release kinetics significantly. Release of occluded NH4NO3 was delayed by the presence of the NH4NO3 coated on zeolite crystals. These results indicate that the ion release property of occluded salt could be predicted and controlled. This study clearly shows that NH4NO3-occluded zeolites could be developed as slow release fertilizers. PMID:15963593

  16. Characteristics of nitrogen release from synthetic zeolite Na-P1 occluding NH4NO3.

    PubMed

    Park, Man; Kim, Jong Su; Choi, Choong Lyeal; Kim, Jang-Eok; Heo, Nam Ho; Komarneni, Sridhar; Choi, Jyung

    2005-08-18

    Zeolites can accommodate a considerable amount of occluded salt such as NH4NO3, which can serve as a good source of slow-release plant nutrient. This study evaluates the kinetics of ion release from NH4NO3-occluded Na-P1 (N-NaP) using a simulated soil solution and deionized water as leaching solutions. The patterns of ion releases were examined as a function of leaching time under both static and continuous-flow conditions for more than one month. Releases of both NH4+ and NO3- from N-NaP were found to be slow and steady under both the above conditions. The soil solution affected the release of NH4+ and NO3- differently, while deionized water released nearly the same equivalents of these ions. This clearly indicates that ion release from salt-occluded zeolite involves two different reactions, cation exchange and dissolution. The kinetics of ion release from occluded NH4NO3 under static condition was best described by the standard Elovich model while the power function model best expressed these under continuous-flow condition. The initial ion release patterns under both conditions exhibited considerable deviation from the simulated models, probably as a result of the presence of hydrated occluded NH4NO3. Flow condition and the presence of electrolytes in leaching solution affected the release kinetics significantly. Release of occluded NH4NO3 was delayed by the presence of the NH4NO3 coated on zeolite crystals. These results indicate that the ion release property of occluded salt could be predicted and controlled. This study clearly shows that NH4NO3-occluded zeolites could be developed as slow release fertilizers.

  17. On the function and fate of chloride ions in amyloidogenic self-assembly of insulin in an acidic environment: salt-induced condensation of fibrils.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Viktoria; Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2015-02-24

    Formation of amyloid fibrils is often facilitated in the presence of specific charge-compensating ions. Dissolved sodium chloride is known to accelerate insulin fibrillation at low pH that has been attributed to the shielding of electrostatic repulsion between positively charged insulin molecules by chloride ions. However, the subsequent fate of Cl(-) anions; that is, possible entrapment within elongating fibrils or escape into the bulk solvent, remains unclear. Here, we show that, while the presence of NaCl at the onset of insulin aggregation induces structural variants of amyloid with distinct fingerprint infrared features, a delayed addition of salt to fibrils that have been already formed in its absence and under quiescent conditions triggers a "condensation effect": amyloid superstructures with strong chiroptical properties are formed. Chloride ions appear to stabilize these superstructures in a manner similar to stabilization of DNA condensates by polyvalent cations. The concentration of residual chloride ions trapped within bovine insulin fibrils grown in 0.1 M NaCl, at pD 1.9, and rinsed extensively with water afterward is less than 1 anion per 16 insulin monomers (as estimated using ion chromatography) implying absence of defined solvent-sequestered nesting sites for chloride counterions. Our results have been discussed in the context of mechanisms of insulin aggregation.

  18. Alloy 22 Localized Corrosion Susceptibility In Aqueous Solutions Of Chloride And Nitrate Salts Of Sodium And Potassium At 110 - 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, S; Hailey, P D; Lian, T; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-01-17

    Alloy 22 (a nickel-chromium-molybdenum-tungsten alloy) is being investigated for use as the outer barrier of waste containers for a high-level nuclear waste repository in the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Experiments were conducted to assess crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in de-aerated aqueous solutions of chloride and nitrate salts of potassium and sodium in the temperature range 110-150 C (some limited testing was also conducted at 90 C). Electrochemical tests were run in neutral salt solutions without acid addition and others were run in salt solutions with an initial hydrogen ion concentration of 10{sup -4} molal. The Alloy 22 specimens were weld prism specimens and de-aeration was performed with nitrogen gas. No evidence of crevice corrosion was observed in the range 125-150 C. In the 120 to 160 C temperature range, the anionic concentration of stable aqueous solutions is dominated by nitrate relative to chloride. At nominally 120 C, the minimum nitrate to chloride ratio is about 4.5, and it increases to about 22 at nominally 155 C. The absence of localized corrosion susceptibility in these solutions is attributed to the known inhibiting effect of the nitrate anion. At 110 C, aqueous solutions can have dissolved chloride in excess of nitrate. Localized corrosion was observed at nitrate to chloride ratios up to 1.0, the highest ratio tested. The extent of localized corrosion was confined to the crevice region of the samples, and was limited for nitrate to chloride ratios greater than or equal to 0.3. Aqueous solution chemistry studies indicate that nitrate to chloride ratios of less than 0.5 are possible for temperatures up to nominally 116 C. However, the exact upper temperature limit is unknown and no electrochemical testing was done at these temperatures. Limited comparison between 8 m Cl aqueous solutions of Na + K on the one hand and Ca on the other indicated similar electrochemical E{sub crit} values and similar morphology of attack

  19. Diagnosis of sources of current inefficiency in industrial molten salt electrolysis cells by Raman spectroscopy: A topical report on chlorides: Topical report, June 1982-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-06-01

    Molten salt electrolysis, a very energy-intensive process, is used in the extraction of light metals. Aluminum production by the Hall process and magnesium production in the Dow and I.G. Farbenindustrie cells constitute the major commercial applications of metal electrowinning from molten-salt media at present. The energy input into the electrolysis cell is in the form of direct current, and the energy efficiencies in the magnesium or aluminum processes are only in the 30 to 40% range. Major energy reductions are achieved by reducing the cell voltage or by increasing the current efficiency. Goal of the research is to identify the sources of the current losses occurring in molten salt electrolysis. This research worked on the systems of I.G. Farben magnesium chloride and Alcoa smelting aluminum chloride processes. Raman spectra were measured and analyzed for each component or their mixtures of the electrolyte for magnesium and aluminum reduction in chloride melts. Raman measurements were also conducted on the melts of industrial composition for aluminum and magnesium electrolysis. In laboratory-scale cells which imitated industrial practice, Raman spectra were measured in situ during electrolysis in attempts to identify the streamers, coloration of electrolyte, and any subvalent species. They were known to occur only during electrolysis, and they have been reported to be possible current losses. Cyclic voltammetry was conducted to obtain information about the generation of subvalent species which were not detected by Raman measurement. These were thought to be kinetic entities present only during electrolysis. Results of Raman spectroscopy and electrochemistry of magnesium and aluminum reduction from molten chloride bath are presented. The results would be useful to establish the basis for the study of electrolysis of aluminum from molten fluoride media. 119 refs., 66 figs.

  20. Identification and characterization of steady and occluded water in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huiyan; Zhao, Peng; Zhang, Hongwei; Tian, Yimei; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Weigao; Li, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Deterioration and leakage of drinking water in distribution systems have been a major issue in the water industry for years, which are associated with corrosion. This paper discovers that occluded water in the scales of the pipes has an acidic environment and high concentration of iron, manganese, chloride, sulfate and nitrate, which aggravates many pipeline leakage accidents. Six types of water samples have been analyzed under the flowing and stagnant periods. Both the water in the exterior of the tubercles and stagnant water carry suspended iron particles, which explains the occurrence of "red water" when the system hydraulic conditions change. Nitrate is more concentrated in occluded water under flowing condition in comparison with that in flowing water. However, the concentration of nitrate in occluded water under stagnant condition is found to be less than that in stagnant water. A high concentration of manganese is found to exist in steady water, occluded water and stagnant water. These findings impact secondary pollution and the corrosion of pipes and containers used in drinking water distribution systems. The unique method that taking occluded water from tiny holes which were drilled from the pipes' exteriors carefully according to the positions of corrosion scales has an important contribution to research on corrosion in distribution systems. And this paper furthers our understanding and contributes to the growing body of knowledge regarding occluded environments in corrosion scales.

  1. Effects of supplemental potassium and sodium chloride salts on ruminal turnover rates, acid-base and mineral status of lactating dairy cows during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P L; Beede, D K; Wilcox, C J

    1988-01-01

    Effects of added dietary sodium and potassium chloride salts on ruminal turnover rates, acid-base balance and mineral status of lactating dairy cows experiencing a nycterohemeral cycle of heat stress were examined. Black globe-humidity index in the chambers averaged 94 during the daytime and 68 during the nighttime. Four ruminally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows in mid-lactation were confined in climatic chambers for a single-reversal experiment consisting of two 17-d periods. To the basal diet (50% corn silage: 50% concentrate, which contained .97% potassium, .19% sodium and .20% chloride), 1.25% sodium chloride plus 1.85% potassium chloride were added, making the high mineral treatment (1.93% potassium, 68% sodium and 1.85% chloride). Liquid dilution rates from the rumen were measured by chromium-ethylenediaminetetraacetate disappearance. Turnover rates of solids were determined by appearance of ytterbium in feces. Ruminal contents, arterial blood and urine were collected hourly for 26 h. Grab samples of feces were sampled over 6 d. Dry matter intakes and milk yields were not affected by the diets (averaging 17.8 and 21.1 kg/d, respectively). Cows fed the high mineral diet drank 17% more water (P less than .01). Tests for homogeneity of regression were utilized to compare chromium disappearance and ytterbium appearance data, which were best described by second-order polynomial functions. Increased ruminal chromium disappearance (P less than .01) and decreased total volatile fatty acid concentrations (P less than .01) suggested faster liquid dilution rates with high mineral diet, but turnover rates of solids were not affected. Urinary potassium secretion compensated for the high potassium content of the high mineral diet without an alkalogenic effect on acid-base status. Lower urine pH and higher urine ammonium concentrations during cool hours suggested that the high chloride content of the high mineral diet had an acidogenic effect. The results are

  2. Evaluation of the aggressive potential of marine chloride and sulfate salts on mortars applied as renders in the Metropolitan Region of Salvador--Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Eduardo A L; Campos, Vânia P; da Silva Filho, Luiz C P; Greven, Hélio A

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, growing interest has focused on determining the performance of materials and evaluating the service life of structures exposed to various environmental forces. In this context, the determination of the aggressive potential of marine salts on mortars used as external renders is critical. The present study aimed to evaluate the spatial distribution of marine salts relative to distance from the sea. This was done by monitoring the deposition rate of chlorides and sulfates in wet candle sensors, located at nine stations scattered around the Metropolitan Region of Salvador, state of Bahia, Brazil. The study also determined the effectiveness of water-soluble salts at penetrating three different types of mortars of varying cement content via deposition and diffusion. The methodology employed enabled an evaluation of the efficiency of the monitoring sensors' measurement of the aggressiveness potential of local marine aerosol, and determination of the comparative performance of the three mortars tested, from the standpoint of resistance to salt penetration. The type and amount of salts captured both in solution and in powder samples extracted from the mortars were determined by ion chromatography. The analysis of the various types of mortars tested indicated which types are more resistant to the aggressive potential of the region's marine aerosol and the distance from the shore where local buildings are liable to be most strongly affected.

  3. Molecular modeling of salt (lithium chloride) effects on the enantioselectivity of diethylzinc addition to benzaldehyde in the presence of chiral beta-amino alcohols.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Rivadeneyra, Martha; Muñoz-Muñiz, Omar; Anaya de Parrodi, Cecilia; Quintero, Leticia; Juaristi, Eusebio

    2003-03-21

    Beta-amino alcohols (S,S,S)-1 and (R,R,S)-1, derived from cyclohexene oxide and containing alpha-phenylethyl auxiliaries, were examined as chiral promoters in the addition of diethylzinc to benzaldehyde. In agreement with literature precedent, the N-alpha-phenylethyl chiral auxiliary had no significant impact on enantioinduction, which is determined by the configuration of the framework's C(OH), with unlike induction. Contrary to some literature reports, stereoinduction by lithium salt derivatives of (S,S,S)-1 and (R,R,S)-1 was lower than that obtained with the free amino alcohol. Remarkable lithium chloride salt effects were observed in the reaction. In particular, an opposite chiral induction was found with (S,S,S)-1-Li(2) as ligand and in the presence of "inert" salt. N-Alkylated derivatives (S,S,S)-3-7 proved to be more efficient ligands, providing higher yields and enantioselectivities in the formation of carbinols (R)- or (S)-2. BP86/DN**//PM3 theoretical calculations proved remarkably successful in reproducing the experimental observations and permitted expansion of Noyori's catalytic cycle [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 6327] to understand the relevant N-substitution and medium salt effects that determine the enantioselection in this catalytic asymmetric reaction.

  4. Dietary salt modulates the sodium chloride cotransporter expression likely through an aldosterone-mediated WNK4-ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lingyun; Feng, Xiuyan; Liu, Defeng; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Yiqian; Niu, Bowen; Gu, Yong; Cai, Hui

    2012-03-01

    WNK is a serine/threonine kinase. Mutation in WNK1 or WNK4 kinase results in pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHA II) featuring hypertension, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis. Sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is known to be regulated by phosphorylation and trafficking. Dietary salt and hormonal stimulation, such as aldosterone, also affect the regulation of NCC. We have previously reported that WNK4 inhibits NCC protein expression. To determine whether dietary salt affects NCC abundance through WNK4-mediated mechanism, we investigated the effects of dietary salt change with or without aldosterone infusion (1 mg/kg/day) on NCC and WNK4 expression in rats. We found that high-salt (HS, 4% NaCl) diet significantly inhibits NCC mRNA expression and protein abundance while enhancing WNK4 mRNA and protein expression, whereas low-salt (LS, 0.07% NaCl) diet increases NCC mRNA expression and protein abundance while reducing WNK4 expression. We also found that aldosterone infusion in HS-fed rats increases NCC mRNA expression and protein abundance, but decreases WNK4 expression. Administration with spironolactone (0.1 g/kg/day) in LS-fed rats decreases NCC mRNA expression and protein abundance while increasing WNK4 expression. We further showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in HS-fed rats, but decreased in LS-fed rats. In HEK293 cells, over-expressed WNK4 increases ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas knockdown of WNK4 expression decreases ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Aldosterone treatment for 3 h decreases ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These data suggest that dietary salt change affects NCC protein abundance in an aldosterone-dependent mechanism likely via the WNK4-ERK1/2-mediated pathway.

  5. Ammonium chloride salting out extraction/cleanup for trace-level quantitative analysis in food and biological matrices by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Padivitage, Nilusha L T

    2013-03-20

    A sample extraction and purification procedure that uses ammonium-salt-induced acetonitrile/water phase separation was developed and demonstrated to be compatible with the recently reported method for pesticide residue analysis based on fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry (FED-FI-MS). The ammonium salts evaluated were chloride, acetate, formate, carbonate, and sulfate. A mixture of NaCl and MgSO4, salts used in the well-known QuEChERS method, was also tested for comparison. With thermal decomposition/evaporation temperature of <350°C, ammonium salts resulted in negligible ion source residual under typical electrospray conditions, leading to consistent method performance and less instrument cleaning. Although all ammonium salts tested induced acetonitrile/water phase separation, NH4Cl yielded the best performance, thus it was the preferred salting out agent. The NH4Cl salting out method was successfully coupled with FI/MS/MS and tested for fourteen pesticide active ingredients: chlorantraniliprole, cyantraniliprole, chlorimuron ethyl, oxamyl, methomyl, sulfometuron methyl, chlorsulfuron, triflusulfuron methyl, azimsulfuron, flupyrsulfuron methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, aminocyclopyrachlor methyl, diuron and hexazinone. A validation study was conducted with nine complex matrices: sorghum, rice, grapefruit, canola, milk, eggs, beef, urine and blood plasma. The method is applicable to all analytes, except aminocyclopyrachlor. The method was deemed appropriate for quantitative analysis in 114 out of 126 analyte/matrix cases tested (applicability rate=0.90). The NH4Cl salting out extraction/cleanup allowed expansion of FI/MS/MS for analysis in food of plant and animal origin, and body fluids with increased ruggedness and sensitivity, while maintaining high-throughput (run time=30s/sample). Limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 0.01mgkg(-1) (ppm), the 'well-accepted standard' in pesticide residue analysis, were achieved in >80% of cases tested; while

  6. Ammonium chloride salting out extraction/cleanup for trace-level quantitative analysis in food and biological matrices by flow injection tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nanita, Sergio C; Padivitage, Nilusha L T

    2013-03-20

    A sample extraction and purification procedure that uses ammonium-salt-induced acetonitrile/water phase separation was developed and demonstrated to be compatible with the recently reported method for pesticide residue analysis based on fast extraction and dilution flow injection mass spectrometry (FED-FI-MS). The ammonium salts evaluated were chloride, acetate, formate, carbonate, and sulfate. A mixture of NaCl and MgSO4, salts used in the well-known QuEChERS method, was also tested for comparison. With thermal decomposition/evaporation temperature of <350°C, ammonium salts resulted in negligible ion source residual under typical electrospray conditions, leading to consistent method performance and less instrument cleaning. Although all ammonium salts tested induced acetonitrile/water phase separation, NH4Cl yielded the best performance, thus it was the preferred salting out agent. The NH4Cl salting out method was successfully coupled with FI/MS/MS and tested for fourteen pesticide active ingredients: chlorantraniliprole, cyantraniliprole, chlorimuron ethyl, oxamyl, methomyl, sulfometuron methyl, chlorsulfuron, triflusulfuron methyl, azimsulfuron, flupyrsulfuron methyl, aminocyclopyrachlor, aminocyclopyrachlor methyl, diuron and hexazinone. A validation study was conducted with nine complex matrices: sorghum, rice, grapefruit, canola, milk, eggs, beef, urine and blood plasma. The method is applicable to all analytes, except aminocyclopyrachlor. The method was deemed appropriate for quantitative analysis in 114 out of 126 analyte/matrix cases tested (applicability rate=0.90). The NH4Cl salting out extraction/cleanup allowed expansion of FI/MS/MS for analysis in food of plant and animal origin, and body fluids with increased ruggedness and sensitivity, while maintaining high-throughput (run time=30s/sample). Limits of quantitation (LOQs) of 0.01mgkg(-1) (ppm), the 'well-accepted standard' in pesticide residue analysis, were achieved in >80% of cases tested; while

  7. Laboratory studies of the low-temperature deliquescence of calcium chloride salts: Relevance to aqueous solutions on Mars and in the Antarctic Dry Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    There is significant interest in the possible existence of liquid water on current Mars. This water would likely exist as a brine in order to be stable on Mars today. It has been proposed that soil salts could form aqueous solutions through either the melting of ice by low-eutectic salts, or by the deliquescence of hygroscopic salts present in the Martian soil. The focus thus far has largely been on perchlorate species, which can melt ice at temperatures as low as 206 K and can deliquesce at relative humidity values as low as 38% RH. A Mars-relevant salt that has been neglected thus far is calcium chloride (CaCl2). Calcium has been reported to be an abundant cation at the Phoenix landing site and Mars Science Laboratory instruments have recently identified calcium as well. Simulations suggest subsurface CaCl2 is an ideal candidate to produce brines with seasonality consistent with observed recurring slope lineae (RSL) (Chevrier et al., 2012). Finally, the only terrestrial site where RSL-like features have been observed (near Don Juan Pond in the Antarctic Dry Valleys) contains abundant CaCl2. These seasonal slope streaks are thought to form when CaCl2 in the soil deliquesces due to contact with atmospheric water vapor (Dickson et al., 2013). It is important to understand how this CaCl2 interacts with water vapor at low temperatures relevant to Mars and the Martian analog sites. Here we use a Raman microscope and environmental cell to monitor the low-temperature (223 - 273 K) deliquescence (solid to aqueous phase transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid phase transition) of three hydration states of CaCl2 (dihydrate, tetrahydrate, hexahydrate). We have found that the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) increases with increasing hydration state, which is an expected result. Average DRH values over the temperature range studied are 20.0 × 2.6% RH for the dihydrate, 31.8 × 6.3% RH for the tetrahydrate and 60.7 × 1.6% RH for the hexahydrate. Once the aqueous

  8. Deliquescence-induced wetting and RSL-like darkening of a Mars analogue soil containing various perchlorate and chloride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Jacob; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2016-05-01

    Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are flow-like features on Mars characterized by a local darkening of the soil thought to be generated by the formation and flow of liquid brines. One possible mechanism responsible for forming these brines could be the deliquescence of salts present in the Martian soil. We show that the JSC Mars-1a analogue soil undergoes a darkening process when salts dispersed in the soil deliquesce, but forming continuous liquid films and larger droplets takes much longer than previously assumed. Thus, RSL may not necessarily require concurrent flowing liquid water/brine or a salt-recharge mechanism, and their association with gullies may be the result of previously flowing water and deposited salts during an earlier warmer and wetter period. In addition, our results show that electrical conductivity measurements correlate well with the deliquescence rates and provide better overall characterization than either Raman spectroscopy or estimates based on deliquescence relative humidity.

  9. Effect of road salt application on seasonal chloride concentrations and toxicity in south-central Indiana streams.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kristin M; Royer, Todd V

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary information on road salt runoff is needed for management of water resources in regions experiencing urbanization and increased road density. We investigated seasonal Cl(-) concentrations among five streams in south-central Indiana that drained watersheds varying in degree of urbanization and ranging in size from 9.3 to 27 km(2). We also conducted acute toxicity tests with Daphnia pulex to assess the potential effects of the observed Cl(-) concentrations on aquatic life. Periods of elevated Cl(-) concentrations were observed during the winters of 2007-08 and 2008-09 at all sites except the reference site. The highest Cl(-) concentration observed during the study was 2100 mg L(-1) and occurred at the most urbanized site. The Cl(-) concentration at the reference site never exceeded 22 mg L(-1). The application of road salt caused large increases in stream Cl(-) concentrations, but the elevated Cl(-) levels did not appear to be a significant threat to aquatic life based on our toxicity testing. Only the most urbanized site showed evidence of salt retention within the watershed, whereas the other sites exported the road salt relatively quickly after its application, suggesting storm drains and impervious surfaces minimized interaction between soils and salt-laden runoff. During winter at these sites, the response in stream Cl(-) concentrations appeared to be controlled by the timing and intensity of road salt application, the magnitude of precipitation, and the occurrence of air temperatures that caused snowmelt and generated runoff.

  10. Effects of Road Density and Road-Salt Application Practices on Sodium and Chloride Loads to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, M. C.; Nimiroski, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Scituate Reservoir drainage basin is the drinking-water source area for two thirds of the population of Rhode Island. The effects of road density and road-salt-application practices on sodium and chloride concentrations in streams in the drainage basin were examined using concentration data collected at intervals of one to six months from January 1982 through June 2000 at 32 stream sites distributed throughout the basin. Median concentrations of sodium and chloride for individual streams during the period of data collection were related to 1995 road densities (road miles per square mile of subbasin) for roads maintained by the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (State-maintained roads) and for roads maintained by the four municipalities in the drainage basin (locally maintained roads). Nearly 60 percent of the variation in median stream sodium and chloride concentrations was accounted for by the variation in density of State-maintained roads (R2= 0.595, p < 0.0001). In contrast, no correlations could be identified between median concentrations of sodium and chloride in streams and the densities of locally maintained roads in the subbasins (R2 = 0.001, p = 0.8771). Also, there was no difference in the relations between median stream sodium concentrations and subbasin road densities for data collected before and after a 1990 State-mandated reduction in the rate of application of sodium during winter deicing of State-maintained roads. Analysis of data on sources of sodium and chloride in the Scituate Reservoir drainage basin during water year 2000 (October 1999 through September 2000) indicates that, while the lengths and densities of locally maintained roads were greater than those of State-maintained roads in most subbasins, the total amount of sodium applied during water year 2000 was nearly three times greater for State-maintained roads than for locally maintained roads. This would be expected, given that State-maintained roads carry more traffic at

  11. Effect of the partial replacement of sodium chloride by other salts on the formation of volatile compounds during ripening of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Armenteros, Mónica; Toldrá, Fidel; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Ventanas, Jesús; Estévez, Mario

    2012-08-01

    The effect of the partial NaCl replacement by other salts (potassium, calcium, and magnesium chloride) on the formation of volatile compounds through the processing of dry-cured ham was studied using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Three salt formulations were considered, namely, I (100% NaCl), II (50% NaCl and 50% KCl), and III (55% NaCl, 25% KCl, 15% CaCl(2), and 5% MgCl(2)). There was an intense formation of volatile compounds throughout the processing of dry-cured hams, particularly during the "hot-cellar" stage. The differences between treatments were found to be more remarkable at the end of the curing process. Hams from formulations I and II had significantly higher amounts of lipid-derived volatiles such as hexanal than hams from formulation III, whereas the latter had significantly higher amounts of Strecker aldehydes and alcohols. Plausible mechanisms by which salt replacement may affect the generation of volatile compounds include the influence of such replacement on lipid oxidation and proteolysis phenomena. The potential influence of the volatiles profile on the aroma of the products is also addressed in the present paper.

  12. Combined effect of concentrations of algal food (Chlorella vulgaris) and salt (sodium chloride) on the population growth of Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus patulus (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Peredo-Alvarez, Víctor M; Sarma, S S; Nandini, S

    2003-06-01

    Salinity is an important variable influencing the density and diversity of rotifers. Studies on salt tolerance of rotifers have so far concentrated on euryhaline species while very little information is available on non-euryhaline taxa. In the present work, we have evaluated the combined effects of Chlorella vulgaris and sodium chloride on the population growth of two freshwater rotifers B. calyciflorus and B. patulus. A 24 hr acute tolerance test using NaCl revealed that B. calyciflorus was more resistant (LC50 = 3.75 +/- 0.04 g l-1) than B. patulus (2.14 +/- 0.09 g l-1). The maximal population density (mean +/- standard error) for B. calyciflorus in the control at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 (algal level) was 80 +/- 5 ind. ml-1, which was nearly a fifth of the one for B. patulus (397 +/- 7 ind. ml-1) under comparable conditions. Data on population growth revealed that regardless of salt concentration, the density of B. calyciflorus increased with increasing food levels, while for B. patulus, this trend was evident only in the controls. Regardless of salt concentration and algal food level, the day of maximal population density was lower (4 +/- 0.5 days) for B. calyciflorus than for B. patulus (11 +/- 1 day). The highest rates of population increase (r values) for B. calyciflorus and B. patulus were 0.429 +/- 0.012 and 0.367 +/- 0.004, respectively, recorded at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 of Chlorella in the controls. The protective role of algae in reducing the effect of salt stress was more evident in B. calyciflorus than B. patulus. PMID:15162733

  13. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  14. Effects of road salts on groundwater and surface water dynamics of socium and chloride in an urban restored stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Road salts are a growing environmental concern in urban watersheds. We examined groundwater (GW) and surface water (SW) dynamics of Na+ and Cl− in Minebank Run (MBR), an urban stream in Maryland, USA. We observed an increasing salinity trend in this restored stream. Current basef...

  15. Ion pairing with bile salts modulates intestinal permeability and contributes to food-drug interaction of BCS class III compound trospium chloride.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Christian A; Reuss, Stefan; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2013-11-01

    In the current study the involvement of ion pair formation between bile salts and trospium chloride (TC), a positively charged Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) class III substance, showing a decrease in bioavailability upon coadministration with food (negative food effect) was investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry provided evidence of a reaction between TC and bile acids. An effect of ion pair formation on the apparent partition coefficient (APC) was examined using (3)H-trospium. The addition of bovine bile and bile extract porcine led to a significant increase of the APC. In vitro permeability studies of trospium were performed across Caco-2-monolayers and excised segments of rat jejunum in a modified Ussing chamber. The addition of bile acids led to an increase of trospium permeation across Caco-2-monolayers and rat excised segments by approximately a factor of 1.5. The addition of glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) was less effective than taurodeoxycholate (TDOC). In the presence of an olive oil emulsion, a complete extinction of the permeation increasing effects of bile salts was observed. Thus, although there are more bile acids in the intestine in the fed state compared to the fasted state, these are not able to form ion pairs with trospium in fed state, because they are involved in the emulsification of dietary fats. In conclusion, the formation of ion pairs between trospium and bile acids can partially explain its negative food effect. Our results are presumably transferable to other organic cations showing a negative food effect.

  16. Fermentation profiles of Manzanilla-Aloreña cracked green table olives in different chloride salt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2010-05-01

    NaCl plays an important role in table olive processing affecting the flavour and microbiological stability of the final product. However, consumers demand foods low in sodium, which makes necessary to decrease levels of this mineral in fruits. In this work, the effects of diverse mixtures of NaCl, CaCl(2) and KCl on the fermentation profiles of cracked directly brined Manzanilla-Aloreña olives, were studied by means of response surface methodology based in a simplex lattice mixture design with constrains. All salt combinations led to lactic acid processes. The growth of Enterobacteriaceae populations was always limited and partially inhibited by the presence of CaCl(2). Only time to reach half maximum populations and decline rates of yeasts, which were higher as concentrations of NaCl or KCl increased, were affected, and correspondingly modelled, as a function of salt mixtures. However, lactic acid bacteria growth parameters could not be related to initial environmental conditions. They had a longer lag phase, slower growth and higher population levels than yeasts. Overall, the presence of CaCl(2) led to a slower Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria growth than the traditional NaCl brine but to higher yeast activity. The presence of CaCl(2) in the fermentation brines also led to higher water activity, lower pH and combined acidity as well as a faster acidification while NaCl and KCl had fairly similar behaviours. Apparently, NaCl may be substituted in diverse proportions with KCl or CaCl(2) without substantially disturbing water activity or the usual fermentation profiles while producing olives with lower salt content.

  17. Fermentation profiles of Manzanilla-Aloreña cracked green table olives in different chloride salt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2010-05-01

    NaCl plays an important role in table olive processing affecting the flavour and microbiological stability of the final product. However, consumers demand foods low in sodium, which makes necessary to decrease levels of this mineral in fruits. In this work, the effects of diverse mixtures of NaCl, CaCl(2) and KCl on the fermentation profiles of cracked directly brined Manzanilla-Aloreña olives, were studied by means of response surface methodology based in a simplex lattice mixture design with constrains. All salt combinations led to lactic acid processes. The growth of Enterobacteriaceae populations was always limited and partially inhibited by the presence of CaCl(2). Only time to reach half maximum populations and decline rates of yeasts, which were higher as concentrations of NaCl or KCl increased, were affected, and correspondingly modelled, as a function of salt mixtures. However, lactic acid bacteria growth parameters could not be related to initial environmental conditions. They had a longer lag phase, slower growth and higher population levels than yeasts. Overall, the presence of CaCl(2) led to a slower Enterobacteriaceae and lactic acid bacteria growth than the traditional NaCl brine but to higher yeast activity. The presence of CaCl(2) in the fermentation brines also led to higher water activity, lower pH and combined acidity as well as a faster acidification while NaCl and KCl had fairly similar behaviours. Apparently, NaCl may be substituted in diverse proportions with KCl or CaCl(2) without substantially disturbing water activity or the usual fermentation profiles while producing olives with lower salt content. PMID:20227606

  18. Flexible Gates Generate Occluded Intermediates in the Transport Cycle of LacY☆

    PubMed Central

    Stelzl, Lukas S.; Fowler, Philip W.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Beckstein, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter lactose permease (LacY) alternates between cytoplasmic and periplasmic open conformations to co-transport a sugar molecule together with a proton across the plasma membrane. Indirect experimental evidence suggested the existence of an occluded transition intermediate of LacY, which would prevent leaking of the proton gradient. As no experimental structure is known, the conformational transition is not fully understood in atomic detail. We simulated transition events from a cytoplasmic open conformation to a periplasmic open conformation with the dynamic importance sampling molecular dynamics method and observed occluded intermediates. Analysis of water permeation pathways and the electrostatic free-energy landscape of a solvated proton indicated that the occluded state contains a solvated central cavity inaccessible from either side of the membrane. We propose a pair of geometric order parameters that capture the state of the pathway through the MFS transporters as shown by a survey of available crystal structures and models. We present a model for the occluded state of apo-LacY, which is similar to the occluded crystal structures of the MFS transporters EmrD, PepTSo, NarU, PiPT and XylE. Our simulations are consistent with experimental double electron spin–spin distance measurements that have been interpreted to show occluded conformations. During the simulations, a salt bridge that has been postulated to be involved in driving the conformational transition formed. Our results argue against a simple rigid-body domain motion as implied by a strict “rocker-switch mechanism” and instead hint at an intricate coupling between two flexible gates. PMID:24513108

  19. Transcatheter closure of hypertensive ductus with amplatzer post infarction muscular VSD occluder after percutaneous retrieval of embolized amplatzer duct occluder

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Milind S; Karur, Satish; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter closure of a large hypertensive patent ductus arteriosus is challenging with scant data about it. Even more challenging is retrieval of an embolized Amplatzer duct occluder. We report successful closure of a 12 mm large ductus with the Amplatzer muscular VSD occluder (post myocardial infarction) after percutaneous retrieval of the embolized, largest available, 16/14 mm Amplatzer duct occluder. PMID:24987259

  20. Hydrogen bonding motifs, spectral characterization, theoretical computations and anticancer studies on chloride salt of 6-mercaptopurine: An assembly of corrugated lamina shows enhanced solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.; Athimoolam, S.; Sridhar, B.

    2015-10-01

    6-Mercaptopurine (an anti cancer drug), is coming under the class II Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). In order to enhance the solubility with retained physiochemical/pharmaceutical properties, the present work was attempted with its salt form. The single crystals of 6-mercaptopurinium chloride (6MPCl) were successfully grown by slow evaporation technique under ambient temperature. The X-ray diffraction study shows that the crystal packing is dominated by N-H⋯Cl classical hydrogen bonds leading to corrugated laminar network. The hydrogen bonds present in the lamina can be dismantled as three chain C21(6), C21(7) and C21(8) motifs running along ab-diagonal of the unit cell. These primary chain motifs are interlinked to each other forming ring R63(21) motifs. These chain and ring motifs are aggregated like a dendrimer structure leading to the above said corrugated lamina. This low dimensional molecular architecture differs from the ladder like arrays in pure drug though it possess lattice water molecule in lieu of the chloride anion in the present compound. Geometrical optimizations of 6MPCl were done by Density Functional Theory (DFT) using B3LYP function with two different basis sets. The optimized molecular geometries and computed vibrational spectra are compared with their experimental counterparts. The Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out to interpret hyperconjugative interaction and Intramolecular Charge Transfer (ICT). The chemical hardness, electronegativity, chemical potential and electrophilicity index of 6MPCl were found along with the HOMO-LUMO plot. The lower band gap value obtained from the Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) analysis reiterates the pharmaceutical activity of the compound. The anticancer studies show that 6MPCl retains its activity against human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). Hence, this anticancer efficacy and improved solubility demands 6MPCl towards the further pharmaceutical applications.

  1. Individual differences in sour and salt sensitivity: detection and quality recognition thresholds for citric acid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S

    2013-05-01

    Taste sensitivity is assessed with various techniques, including absolute detection and quality recognition. For any stimulus, one might expect individual differences in sensitivity to be reflected in all measures, but they are often surprisingly independent. Here, we focus on sensitivity to sour and salty taste, in part because processing of these qualities is poorly understood relative to other tastes. In Study 1, we measured retest reliability for detection (modified, forced-choice staircase method) and recognition (modified Harris-Kalmus procedure) for both citric acid (CA) and sodium chloride (NaCl). Despite good retest reliability, individual differences in detection and recognition were weakly correlated, suggesting that detection and recognition of sour and salty stimuli may reflect different physiological processes. In Study 2, a subset of subjects returned to contribute full detection (psychometric) functions for CA and NaCl. Thresholds estimated from full detection functions correlated with both staircase and recognition thresholds, suggesting that both tasks may reflect absolute sensitivity to some extent. However, the ranges of individual differences were systematically compressed for staircase thresholds relative to those from full detection functions. Thus, individual differences in sensitivity appear to interact with different test methodologies in lawful ways. More work will be required to understand how different taste phenotypes relate to one another.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either...) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains two molecules of water. It is prepared...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-0969-091) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-69-1) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1845 - Stannous chloride (anhydrous and dihydrated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Anhydrous stannous chloride (SnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7772-99-8) is the chloride salt of metallic tin. It is prepared by reacting molten tin with either chlorine or gaseous tin tetrachloride. Dihydrated stannous chloride (SnCl2·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 10025-0969-091) is the chloride salt of metallic tin that contains...

  7. Structural characterization of two benzene-1,2-di-amine complexes of zinc chloride: a mol-ecular compound and a co-crystal salt.

    PubMed

    Zick, Patricia L; Geiger, David K

    2016-07-01

    The structures of two zinc complexes containing bidentate benzene-1,2-di-amine ligands are reported. (Benzene-1,2-di-amine-κ(2) N,N')di-chloro-idozinc, [ZnCl2(C6H8N2)], (I), displays a distorted tetra-hedral coordination sphere for the metal cation. The di-amine ligand and the Zn atom reside on a crystallographic mirror plane. In the 1:1 co-crystal salt trans-di-aqua-bis-(4,5-di-methyl-benzene-1,2-di-amine-κ(2) N,N')zinc chloride-4,5-di-methyl-benzene-1,2-di-amine (1/1), [Zn(C8H12N2)2(H2O)2]Cl2·2C8H12N2, (II), the zinc(II) complex cation exhibits a tetra-gonally distorted octa-hedral coordination sphere. The Zn atom sits on a crystallographically imposed inversion center and the di-amine ligands are tilted 30.63 (6)° with respect to the ZnN4 plane. Both complexes exhibit extensive hydrogen bonding. In (I), a stacked-sheet extended structure parallel to (101) is observed. In (II), the co-crystallized di-amine is hydrogen-bonded to the complex cation via O-H⋯N and N-H⋯N linkages. These units are in turn linked into planes along (200) by O-H⋯Cl and N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. PMID:27555958

  8. Identification of partially occluded firearms through partonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Abdullah N.; Hempelmann, Christian F.; Attardo, Salvatore; Blount, Grady P.; Sirakova, Nona N.; Sirakov, Nikolay M.

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper we study the problem of weapon identification and threat assessment from a single image with a partially occluded weapon. This problem poses very severe restrictions. To successfully identify a weapon from its parts we extend the first firearm ontology with the meronymic (partonomic) principle which lets us distinguish parts of a gun (e.g., lock, barrel, stock, scope). Adding classes of meronymic information provides meta-data (necessary for threat assessment) and allows for fast and accurate search. Searching for a weapon is treated conceptually as searching for the sum of its parts. An expanding active contour and morphological techniques are applied to partition weapons and extract boundaries, and a minimal inscribed complex polygon. Finite numerical sequences are generated, from the extracted geometric features, and are used to label partonomic nodes and perform quick and accurate search. The paper reports experimental results on weapons partitioning and search.

  9. Template occluded SBA-15: An effective dissolution enhancer for poorly water-soluble drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingming, Fu; Liwei, Guo; Kang, Le; Tianyao, Wang; Jin, Lu

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to improve the dissolution rate of piroxicam by inclusion into template occluded SBA-15. Our strategy involves directly introducing piroxicam into as-prepared SBA-15 occluded with P123 (EO 20PO 70EO 20) by self assembling method in acetonitrile/methylene chloride mixture solution. Ultraviolet spectrometry experiment and thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) profiles show that the piroxicam and P123 contents in the inclusion compound are 12 wt% and 28 wt%, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction and DSC analysis reveal that the included piroxicam is arranged in amorphous form. N 2 adsorption-desorption experiment indicates that the piroxicam has been introduced to the mesopores instead of precipitating at the outside of the silica material. The inclusion compound was submitted to in vitro dissolution tests, the results show that the piroxicam dissolve from template occluded inclusion compound more rapidly, than these from the piroxicam crystalline and template removed samples in all tested conditions. Thus a facile method to improve the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drug was established, and this discovery opens a new avenue for the utilization of templates used for the synthesis of mesoporous materials.

  10. Neuronal representation of occluded objects in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ingrid R; Gatenby, J Christopher; Leung, Hoi Chung; Skudlarski, Pawel; Gore, John C

    2004-01-01

    Occluding surfaces frequently obstruct the object of interest yet are easily dealt with by the visual system. Here, we test whether neural areas known to participate in motion perception and eye movements are regions that also process occluded motion. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to assess brain activation while subjects watched a moving ball become occluded. Areas activated during occluded motion included the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) as well as middle temporal (MT) regions analogous to monkey MT/MST. A second experiment showed that these results were not due to motor activity. These findings suggest that human cortical regions involved in perceiving occluded motion are similar to regions that process real motion and regions responsible for eye movements. The intraparietal sulcus may be involved in predicting the location of an unseen target for future hand or eye movements. PMID:14615079

  11. Grapevine and Arabidopsis Cation-Chloride Cotransporters Localize to the Golgi and Trans-Golgi Network and Indirectly Influence Long-Distance Ion Transport and Plant Salt Tolerance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sam W.; Wege, Stefanie; Qiu, Jiaen; Blackmore, Deidre H.; Walker, Amanda R.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Walker, Rob R.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Plant cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) have been implicated in conferring salt tolerance. They are predicted to improve shoot salt exclusion by directly catalyzing the retrieval of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl−) ions from the root xylem. We investigated whether grapevine (Vitis vinifera [Vvi]) CCC has a role in salt tolerance by cloning and functionally characterizing the gene from the cultivar Cabernet Sauvignon. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that VviCCC shares a high degree of similarity with other plant CCCs. A VviCCC-yellow fluorescent protein translational fusion protein localized to the Golgi and the trans-Golgi network and not the plasma membrane when expressed transiently in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mesophyll protoplasts. AtCCC-green fluorescent protein from Arabidopsis also localized to the Golgi and the trans-Golgi network. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, VviCCC targeted to the plasma membrane, where it catalyzed bumetanide-sensitive 36Cl–, 22Na+, and 86Rb+ uptake, suggesting that VviCCC (like AtCCC) belongs to the Na+-K+-2Cl– cotransporter class of CCCs. Expression of VviCCC in an Arabidopsis ccc knockout mutant abolished the mutant’s stunted growth phenotypes and reduced shoot Cl– and Na+ content to wild-type levels after growing plants in 50 mm NaCl. In grapevine roots, VviCCC transcript abundance was not regulated by Cl– treatment and was present at similar levels in both the root stele and cortex of three Vitis spp. genotypes that exhibit differential shoot salt exclusion. Our findings indicate that CCC function is conserved between grapevine and Arabidopsis, but neither protein is likely to directly mediate ion transfer with the xylem or have a direct role in salt tolerance. PMID:26378102

  12. Comparative avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts of Cd, Cu and Zn using filter paper and extruded water agar gels as exposure media.

    PubMed

    Demuynck, Sylvain; Lebel, Aurélie; Grumiaux, Fabien; Pernin, Céline; Leprêtre, Alain; Lemière, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    We studied the avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards Cd, Cu, and Zn, trace elements (TEs) tested as chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts. Sub adults were exposed individually using dual-cell chambers at 20+2°C in the dark. Recordings were realised at different dates from 2h to 32h. We used filter paper and extruded water agar gel as exposure media to evaluate the contribution of the dermal and the digestive exposure routes on the avoidance reactions. Exposures to Cu or Cd (10mgmetal ionL(-1)) resulted in highly significant avoidance reactions through the exposure duration. Worms avoided Zn poorly and reactions towards Zn salts varied along the exposure. Worm sensitivity towards TEs differed between salts and this could result from differential toxicity or accessibility of these TE salts to earthworms. The anion in itself was not the determinant of the avoidance reactions since exposures to similar concentrations of these anions using calcium salts did not result in significant avoidance worm behaviour. Avoidance responses towards TEs were higher in the case of water agar exposures than in filter paper exposures. Thus, dermal contacts with TE solutions would elicit worm avoidance but signals from receptors located inside the digestive tract could reinforce this behaviour. The use of extruded water agar gels as the substrate allows checking the real sensitivity of earthworm species towards TEs since the TE concentrations leading to significant avoidance reactions were below those reported in the literature when using TE-spiked soils.

  13. Influence of the anions on the N-cationic benzethonium salts in the solid state and solution: Chloride, bromide, hydroxide and citrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, Henrich H.; Reichelt, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structures of the hydrated cationic surfactant benzethonium (Bzth) chloride, bromide, hydroxide, and citrate have been determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and compared with their structures in solution well above their critical micelle concentration. The differences in the nature of the various anions of the four Bzth-X materials lead to unique anion environments and 3-D molecular arrangements. The water molecule in the monoclinic Bzth-Cl or Bzth-Br forms is hydrogen bonded to the halides and particularly to the hydrogens of the methoxy groups of the Bzth moiety notwithstanding the weak Brønsted acidity of the methoxy hydrogens. The citrate strongly interacts with the hydrogens of the methoxy group forming an embedded anionic spherical cluster of a radius of 2.6 Å. The Bzth-OH crystallizes in a hexagonal lattice with two water molecules and reveals free water molecules forming hydrogen bonded channels through the Bzth-OH crystal along the c-axis. The distances between the cationic nitrogen and the halides are 4.04 Å and 4.20 Å, significantly longer than expected for typical van der Waals distances of 3.30 Å. The structures show weakly interacting, alternating apolar and polar layers, which run parallel to the crystallographic a-b planes or a-c planes. The Bzth-X salts were also examined in aqueous solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol and 1.0 % (v/v) glycerol well above their critical micelle concentration by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The [1,1,1] planes for the Bzth Cl or Br, the [0,0,2] and [1,1,0] planes for the Bzth-citrate, the [2,-1,0] planes and the [0,0,1] planes for the Bzth-OH found in the crystalline phase were also present in the solution phase, accordingly, the preservation of these phases are a strong indication of periodicity in the solution phase.

  14. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  15. Are hot-spots occluded from water?

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina Sousa; Ramos, Rui Miguel; Martins, Joao Miguel; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of many biological processes and are governed by focused regions with high binding affinities, the warm- and hot-spots. It was proposed that these regions are surrounded by areas with higher packing density leading to solvent exclusion around them - "the O-ring theory." This important inference still lacks sufficient demonstration. We have used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the validity of the O-ring theory in the context of the conformational flexibility of the proteins, which is critical for function, in general, and for interaction with water, in particular. The MD results were analyzed for a variety of solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) features, radial distribution functions (RDFs), protein-water distances, and water residence times. The measurement of the average solvent-accessible surface area features for the warm- and hot-spots and the null-spots, as well as data for corresponding RDFs, identify distinct properties for these two sets of residues. Warm- and hot-spots are found to be occluded from the solvent. However, it has to be borne in mind that water-mediated interactions have significant power to construct an extensive and strongly bonded interface. We observed that warm- and hot-spots tend to form hydrogen bond (H-bond) networks with water molecules that have an occupancy around 90%. This study provides strong evidence in support of the O-ring theory and the results show that hot-spots are indeed protected from the bulk solvent. Nevertheless, the warm- and hot-spots still make water-mediated contacts, which are also important for protein-protein binding. PMID:23384183

  16. Graph Laplace for occluded face completion and recognition.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yue; Dai, Qionghai; Zhang, Zengke

    2011-08-01

    This paper proposes a spectral-graph-based algorithm for face image repairing, which can improve the recognition performance on occluded faces. The face completion algorithm proposed in this paper includes three main procedures: 1) sparse representation for partially occluded face classification; 2) image-based data mining; and 3) graph Laplace (GL) for face image completion. The novel part of the proposed framework is GL, as named from graphical models and the Laplace equation, and can achieve a high-quality repairing of damaged or occluded faces. The relationship between the GL and the traditional Poisson equation is proven. We apply our face repairing algorithm to produce completed faces, and use face recognition to evaluate the performance of the algorithm. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the GL method for occluded face completion.

  17. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5150 - Intravascular occluding catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of a PDP is required. A PMA or a... intravascular occluding catheter shall have an approved PMA or a declared completed PDP in effect before...

  19. Equilibrium Model for Ion Exchange Between Multivalent Cations and Zeolite-A in a Molten Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael Simpson

    2005-10-01

    A two-site equilibrium model that previously only accommodated monovalent cations has been extended to include divalent and trivalent cations for ion exchange between zeolite-A and molten chloride salts, a process being considered for concentrating nuclear fission products into high level waste forms. Equilibrium constants were determined by fitting the model to equilibrium data sets for ion exchange between zeolite-A and Cs ternary salt (CsCl-LiCl-KCl), Rb ternary salt (RbCl-LiCl-KCl), Na ternary salt (NaCl-LiCl-KCl), Sr ternary salt (SrCl2-LiCl-KCl), and U ternary salt (UCl3-LiCl-KCl). The results reveal a good fit between the experimental data sets and the model. The two ion exchange sites, framework sites and occluded sites, demonstrate different relative selectivities for the cations. It was found that Sr2_ is the preferred cation in the ion exchange site, and Cs_ is the preferred cation in the occlusion site. Meanwhile, Li_ has the highest combined selectivity when both ion exchange and occlusion sites are considered. Interestingly, divalent and trivalent species are more preferred in the ion exchange site than the monovalent species with the exception of Li_.

  20. Comparative avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts of Cd, Cu and Zn using filter paper and extruded water agar gels as exposure media.

    PubMed

    Demuynck, Sylvain; Lebel, Aurélie; Grumiaux, Fabien; Pernin, Céline; Leprêtre, Alain; Lemière, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    We studied the avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards Cd, Cu, and Zn, trace elements (TEs) tested as chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts. Sub adults were exposed individually using dual-cell chambers at 20+2°C in the dark. Recordings were realised at different dates from 2h to 32h. We used filter paper and extruded water agar gel as exposure media to evaluate the contribution of the dermal and the digestive exposure routes on the avoidance reactions. Exposures to Cu or Cd (10mgmetal ionL(-1)) resulted in highly significant avoidance reactions through the exposure duration. Worms avoided Zn poorly and reactions towards Zn salts varied along the exposure. Worm sensitivity towards TEs differed between salts and this could result from differential toxicity or accessibility of these TE salts to earthworms. The anion in itself was not the determinant of the avoidance reactions since exposures to similar concentrations of these anions using calcium salts did not result in significant avoidance worm behaviour. Avoidance responses towards TEs were higher in the case of water agar exposures than in filter paper exposures. Thus, dermal contacts with TE solutions would elicit worm avoidance but signals from receptors located inside the digestive tract could reinforce this behaviour. The use of extruded water agar gels as the substrate allows checking the real sensitivity of earthworm species towards TEs since the TE concentrations leading to significant avoidance reactions were below those reported in the literature when using TE-spiked soils. PMID:26995062

  1. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity. PMID:26096890

  2. Chloride-inducible transient apoplastic alkalinizations induce stomata closure by controlling abscisic acid distribution between leaf apoplast and guard cells in salt-stressed Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Mithöfer, Axel; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Zörb, Christian; Muehling, Karl H

    2015-11-01

    Chloride stress causes the leaf apoplast transiently to alkalize, an event that is presumed to contribute to the ability of plants to adapt to saline conditions. However, the initiation of coordinated processes downstream of the alkalinization is unknown. We hypothesize that chloride-inducible pH dynamics are a key chemical feature modulating the compartmental distribution of abscisic acid (ABA) and, as a consequence, affecting stomata aperture. Apoplastic pH and stomata aperture dynamics in intact Vicia faba leaves were monitored by microscopy-based ratio imaging and porometric measurements of stomatal conductance. ABA concentrations in leaf apoplast and guard cells were compared with pH dynamics by gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results demonstrate that, upon chloride addition to roots, an alkalizing factor that initiates the pH dynamic propagates from root to leaf in a way similar to xylem-distributed water. In leaves, it induces a systemic transient apoplastic alkalinization that causes apoplastic ABA concentration to increase, followed by an elevation of endogenous guard cell ABA. We conclude that the transient alkalinization, which is a remote effect of chloride stress, modulates the compartmental distribution of ABA between the leaf apoplast and the guard cells and, in this way, is instrumental in inducing stomata closure during the beginning of salinity.

  3. Motion of half-occluded zones contributes to avoidance of interocular suppression in natural viewing situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the effect of motion on avoidance of interocular suppression in the half-occluded zones, which are non-fusible images projected onto the corresponding retinal areas in natural viewing situations. Six and seven adults participating in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively, measured the amount of suppression in the half-occluded zones. In the moving condition, motion of the occluded surface caused motion of the half-occluded zones in Experiment 1; motion of the occluder caused it in Experiment 2. In the static condition, the occluded surface, half-occluded zones, and occluder were static in Experiments 1 and 2. The results obtained from both experiments indicated that the half-occluded zones were less suppressed in the moving condition than in the static condition. These findings demonstrated that motion of the half-occluded zones contributes to the avoidance of interocular suppression in natural viewing situations.

  4. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt helps maintain the body's balance of fluids. ... select foods that provide 5% or less for sodium, per serving. back to ... substitutes contain potassium chloride and can be used by individuals to replace ...

  5. A Taxonomy of 3D Occluded Objects Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanizadeh, Shiva; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Saba, Tanzila; Al-ghamdi, Jarallah Saleh

    2016-03-01

    The overall performances of object recognition techniques under different condition (e.g., occlusion, viewpoint, and illumination) have been improved significantly in recent years. New applications and hardware are shifted towards digital photography, and digital media. This faces an increase in Internet usage requiring object recognition for certain applications; particularly occulded objects. However occlusion is still an issue unhandled, interlacing the relations between extracted feature points through image, research is going on to develop efficient techniques and easy to use algorithms that would help users to source images; this need to overcome problems and issues regarding occlusion. The aim of this research is to review recognition occluded objects algorithms and figure out their pros and cons to solve the occlusion problem features, which are extracted from occluded object to distinguish objects from other co-existing objects by determining the new techniques, which could differentiate the occluded fragment and sections inside an image.

  6. Hydrogen-bonded and π-interaction assembly in two 8-alkoxycarbonyl-1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-enium chloride salts.

    PubMed

    Mesto, E; Quaranta, E

    2013-04-01

    The crystal structures of 8-phenoxycarbonyl-1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-enium chloride, C16H21N2O2(+)·Cl(-), (I), and 8-methoxycarbonyl-1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-enium chloride monohydrate, C11H19N2O2(+)·Cl(-)·H2O, (II), recently reported by Carafa, Mesto & Quaranta [Eur. J. Org. Chem. (2011), pp. 2458-2465], are analysed and discussed with a focus on crystal interaction assembly. Both compounds crystallize in the space group P2(1)/c. The crystal packings are characterized by dimers linked through π-π stacking interactions and intermolecular nonclassical hydrogen bonds, respectively. Additional intermolecular C-H···Cl interactions [in (I) and (II)] and classical O-H···Cl hydrogen bonds [in (II)] are also evident and contribute to generating three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks.

  7. Robotic Assisted Cannulation of Occluded Retinal Veins

    PubMed Central

    Meenink, Thijs C. M.; Janssens, Tom; Vanheukelom, Valerie; Naus, Gerrit J. L.; Beelen, Maarten J.; Meers, Caroline; Jonckx, Bart; Stassen, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a methodology for cannulating porcine retinal venules using a robotic assistive arm after inducing a retinal vein occlusion using the photosensitizer rose bengal. Methodology Retinal vein occlusions proximal to the first vascular branch point were induced following intravenous injection of rose bengal by exposure to 532nm laser light delivered by slit-lamp or endolaser probe. Retinal veins were cannulated by positioning a glass catheter tip using a robotically controlled micromanipulator above venules with an outer diameter of 80μm or more and performing a preset piercing maneuver, controlled robotically. The ability of a balanced salt (BSS) solution to remove an occlusion by repeat distention of the retinal vein was also assessed. Results Cannulation using the preset piercing program was successful in 9 of 9 eyes. Piercing using the micromanipulator under manual control was successful in only 24 of 52 attempts, with several attempts leading to double piercing. The best location for cannulation was directly proximal to the occlusion. Infusion of BSS did not result in the resolution of the occlusion. Conclusion Cannulation of venules using a robotic microassistive arm can be achieved with consistency, provided the piercing is robotically driven. The model appears robust enough to allow testing of therapeutic strategies aimed at eliminating a retinal vein thrombus and its evolution over time. PMID:27676261

  8. Radiological Recanalization of an Occluded Anterior Resection Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, A. Cowley, J.B.; Hartley, J.E.; Cast, J.E.I.

    2006-12-15

    We present a case of occluded colorectal anastomosis following surgery for rectal tumor. Contrast enema and antegrade ileography confirmed occlusion by a thin membrane. This was thought amenable to needle puncture and placement of a temporary stent under fluoroscopy guidance, avoiding surgery and its associated morbidity. This provides a minimally invasive alternative to surgery and has only been reported once before.

  9. Developments in Young Infants' Reasoning about Occluded Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguiar, Andrea; Baillargeon, Renee

    2002-01-01

    Eight experiments were conducted to examine 3- and 3.5-month-old infants' responses to occlusion events. The results revealed two developments, one in infants' knowledge of when objects should and should not be occluded and the other in infants' ability to posit additional objects to make sense of events that would otherwise violate their…

  10. Atmospheric chloride: Its implication for foliar uptake and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, E. L.; Sealy, R. L.

    Atmospheric chloride is inversely related to distance from the Texas coast; r2 = 0.86. Levels of atmospheric chloride are higher in the early summer than in the winter because of salt storms. Leaf chloride l'evels of Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) reflect the atmospheric chloride levels; r2 = 0.78. The importance of considering the effect of atmospheric chloride on leaf damage to horticultural crops is discussed.

  11. DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS OF DIVALENT SALTS

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HEIDI HAI-LING; LAWLESS, HARRY T.

    2005-01-01

    Many divalent salts (e.g., calcium, iron, zinc), have important nutritional value and are used to fortify food or as dietary supplements. Sensory characterization of some divalent salts in aqueous solutions by untrained judges has been reported in the psychophysical literature, but formal sensory evaluation by trained panels is lacking. To provide this information, a trained descriptive panel evaluated the sensory characteristics of 10 divalent salts including ferrous sulfate, chloride and gluconate; calcium chloride, lactate and glycerophosphate; zinc sulfate and chloride; and magnesium sulfate and chloride. Among the compounds tested, iron compounds were highest in metallic taste; zinc compounds had higher astringency and a glutamate-like sensation; and bitterness was pronounced for magnesium and calcium salts. Bitterness was affected by the anion in ferrous and calcium salts. Results from the trained panelists were largely consistent with the psychophysical literature using untrained judges, but provided a more comprehensive set of oral sensory attributes. PMID:16614749

  12. Chlorine Salts at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J.; Horgan, B.

    2016-09-01

    Although chlorine salts (perchlorates, chlorides) are known to exist at the Phoenix landing site, their distribution and type have not been positively identified yet. We look for these salts through a novel NIR remote sensing technique.

  13. Long-term trends in sodium and chloride in the Mohawk River, New York: the effect of fifty years of road-salt application.

    PubMed

    Godwin, K S; Hafner, S D; Buff, M F

    2003-01-01

    Ecological studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of road-salt, primarily NaCl, on water quality, flora, and fauna. In this study, we quantified changes in ionic composition and solute flux of water draining the Mohawk River Basin (9103 km(2)) in New York State, from 1952 to 1998. Using various statistical, graphical, and modeling techniques, we showed that concentrations ofNa+ and Cl- have increased by 130 and 243%, respectively, while other constituents have decreased or remained constant. The use of de-icing salt on roads within the watershed, which we estimate at 39 kg km(-2) day(-1), appears to be the primary mechanism responsible for reported increases, accounting for the increase in NaCl export from 16 to 46 kg km(-2) day(-1) over the 47-year period.Moreover, despite population decline within this rural upstate watershed, increased environmental stewardship, and The Clean Water Act, concentrations of Na+ and Cl- still increased during the 1990s.

  14. Long-term trends in sodium and chloride in the Mohawk River, New York: the effect of fifty years of road-salt application.

    PubMed

    Godwin, K S; Hafner, S D; Buff, M F

    2003-01-01

    Ecological studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of road-salt, primarily NaCl, on water quality, flora, and fauna. In this study, we quantified changes in ionic composition and solute flux of water draining the Mohawk River Basin (9103 km(2)) in New York State, from 1952 to 1998. Using various statistical, graphical, and modeling techniques, we showed that concentrations ofNa+ and Cl- have increased by 130 and 243%, respectively, while other constituents have decreased or remained constant. The use of de-icing salt on roads within the watershed, which we estimate at 39 kg km(-2) day(-1), appears to be the primary mechanism responsible for reported increases, accounting for the increase in NaCl export from 16 to 46 kg km(-2) day(-1) over the 47-year period.Moreover, despite population decline within this rural upstate watershed, increased environmental stewardship, and The Clean Water Act, concentrations of Na+ and Cl- still increased during the 1990s. PMID:12713927

  15. Vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R

    1999-01-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is an important plastic resin for construction, pipe and tubing, siding, and other uses. Exposures to vinyl chloride monomer during the early years of production resulted in an important sentinel health event: the recognition of an excess of a rare liver cancer, hepatic angiosarcoma, at facilities throughout the world. Several other syndromes, including acro-osteolysis, also have been associated with PVC, but less clearly with vinyl chloride. Extensive research ranging from large-scale epidemiologic studies to biomarker research into molecular mechanisms continues to provide valuable insight into the pathogenesis of occupational cancer.

  16. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts.

  17. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  18. Recognition of 3-D Scene with Partially Occluded Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siwei; Wong, Andrew K. C...

    1987-03-01

    This paper presents a robot vision system which is capable of recognizing objects in a 3-D scene and interpreting their spatial relation even though some objects in the scene may be partially occluded by other objects. An algorithm is developed to transform the geometric information from the range data into an attributed hypergraph representation (AHR). A hypergraph monomorphism algorithm is then used to compare the AHR of objects in the scene with a set of complete AHR's of prototypes. The capability of identifying connected components and interpreting various types of edges in the 3-D scene enables us to distinguish objects which are partially blocking each other in the scene. Using structural information stored in the primitive area graph, a heuristic hypergraph monomorphism algorithm provides an effective way for recognizing, locating, and interpreting partially occluded objects in the range image.

  19. Modeling signal loss in surficial marine sediments containing occluded gas.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Trevor

    2003-03-01

    The presence of occluded gas in inland lakes, harbor muds, and surficial marine sediments is well documented. Surficial gassy sediments cause underlying beds to be acoustically impenetrable to seismic surveys; therefore, the modeling of signal loss arising from mudline reflection and transmission absorption is of particular interest. The Anderson and Hampton [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 1890-1903 (1980)] model for attenuation in gassy sediments was evaluated against the physical and acoustical properties of eight laboratory silty clay soils containing different amounts of occluded gas in bubbles of 0.2- to 1.8-mm diameter. The model was shown to give good agreement with measured data over the lower frequencies of bubble resonance and above resonance. It did not agree with measured data at frequencies below resonance, for which the model did not simulate the bulk properties of the gassy soils. The Mackenzie [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 32, 221-231 (1960)] model for reflection loss was also examined for the gassy soils. The maximum reflection losses of 6 dB, at a grazing angle of 40 degrees, does not wholly support speculation by Levin [Geophysics 27, 35-47 (1962)] of highly reflective pressure-release boundaries arising from substantial reflection and absorption losses in gassy sediments. It was found that mudlines formed from sediments with significant occluded gas may be successfully penetrated, although the substantial absorption loss arising from signal transmission through the sediment prevents penetration of the surficial layers to much beyond a meter in depth.

  20. The evaluation of the pyrochemistry for the treatment of Gen IV nuclear fuels Inert matrix chlorination studies in the gas phase or molten chloride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, S.; Péron, F.; Lacquement, J.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fuels for the future Gen IV nuclear reactors will be totally different from those of PWR, especially for the GFR concept including a closed cycle. In these reactors, fissile materials (carbides or nitrides of actinides) should be surrounded by an inert matrix. In order to build a reprocessing process scheme, the behavior of the potential inert matrices (silicon carbide, titanium nitride, and zirconium carbide and nitride) was studied by hydro- and pyrometallurgy. This paper deals with the chlorination results at high temperature by pyrometallurgy. For the first time, the reactivity of the matrix towards chlorine gas was assessed in the gas phase. TiN, ZrN and ZrC are very reactive from 400 °C whereas it is necessary to be over 900 °C for SiC to be as fast. In molten chloride melts, the bubbling of chlorine gas is less efficient than in gas phase but it is possible to attack the matrices. Electrochemical methods were also used to dissolve the refractory materials, leading to promising results with TiN, ZrN and ZrC. The massive SiC samples used were not conductive enough to be studied and in this case specific SiC-coated carbon electrodes were used. The key point of these studies was to find a method to separate the matrix compounds from the fissile material in order to link the head to the core of the process (electrochemical separation or liquid-liquid reductive extraction in the case of a pyrochemical reprocessing).

  1. Structural characterization of two benzene-1,2-di­amine complexes of zinc chloride: a mol­ecular compound and a co-crystal salt

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Patricia L.; Geiger, David K.

    2016-01-01

    The structures of two zinc complexes containing bidentate benzene-1,2-di­amine ligands are reported. (Benzene-1,2-di­amine-κ2 N,N′)di­chloro­idozinc, [ZnCl2(C6H8N2)], (I), displays a distorted tetra­hedral coordination sphere for the metal cation. The di­amine ligand and the Zn atom reside on a crystallographic mirror plane. In the 1:1 co-crystal salt trans-di­aqua­bis­(4,5-di­methyl­benzene-1,2-di­amine-κ2 N,N′)zinc chloride–4,5-di­methyl­benzene-1,2-di­amine (1/1), [Zn(C8H12N2)2(H2O)2]Cl2·2C8H12N2, (II), the zinc(II) complex cation exhibits a tetra­gonally distorted octa­hedral coordination sphere. The Zn atom sits on a crystallographically imposed inversion center and the di­amine ligands are tilted 30.63 (6)° with respect to the ZnN4 plane. Both complexes exhibit extensive hydrogen bonding. In (I), a stacked-sheet extended structure parallel to (101) is observed. In (II), the co-crystallized di­amine is hydrogen-bonded to the complex cation via O—H⋯N and N—H⋯N linkages. These units are in turn linked into planes along (200) by O—H⋯Cl and N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. PMID:27555958

  2. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  3. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  4. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  5. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  6. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  8. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  9. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  10. Thermoluminescence of ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Louis

    2003-05-01

    Ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride (10 -30 g cm -3) have been irradiated by X- and γ-rays at 77 K, then progressively rewarmed to room temperature. During that phase, their thermoluminescence has been studied and it was found that, despite their dilution beyond the Avogadro number, the emitted light was specific of the original salts dissolved initially.

  11. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generation of waste water containing sodium chloride from cucumber fermentation tank yards could be eliminated if cucumbers were fermented in brines that did not contain this salt. To determine if this is feasible, cucumbers were fermented in brines that contained only calcium chloride to maintain f...

  12. Commercial scale cucumber fermentations brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride instead of NaCl...

  13. Molecular modeling of the structure and dynamics of the interlayer and surface species of mixed-metal layered hydroxides: Chloride and water in hydrocalumite (Friedel's salt)

    SciTech Connect

    KALINICHEV,ANDREY G.; KIRKPATRICK,R. JAMES; CYGAN,RANDALL T

    2000-01-17

    The dynamical behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O molecules in the interlayer and on the (001) surface of the Ca-aluminate hydrate hydrocalumite (Friedel's salt) over a range of temperatures from {minus}100 to 300 C is studied using the technique of isothermal-isobaric molecular dynamics computer simulations. This phase is currently the best available model compound for other, typically more disordered, mixed-metal layered hydroxides. The computed crystallographic parameters and density are in good agreement with available X-ray diffraction data and the force field developed for these simulations preserves the structure and density to within less than 2% of their measured values. In contrast to the highly ordered arrangement of the interlayer water molecules interpreted from the X-ray data, the simulations reveal significant dynamic disorder in water orientations. At all simulated temperatures, the interlayer water molecules undergo rapid librations (hindered hopping rotations) around an axis essentially perpendicular to the layers. This results in breaking and reformation of hydrogen bonds with the neighboring Cl{sup {minus}} anions and in a time-averaged nearly uniaxial symmetry at Cl{sup {minus}}, in good agreement with recent {sup 35}Cl NMR measurements. Power spectra of translational, vibrational, and vibrational motions of interlayer and surface Cl{sup {minus}} and H{sub 2}O were calculated as Fourier transforms of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions and compared with the corresponding spectra and dynamics for a bulk aqueous solution. The ordered interlayer space has significant effects on the motions. Strong electrostatic attraction between interlayer water molecules and Ca atoms in the principal layer makes the Ca{hor_ellipsis}OH{sub 2} bond direction the preferred axis for interlayer water librations. The calculated diffusion coefficient of Cl{sup {minus}} as an outer-sphere surface complex is almost three times that of inner-sphere Cl

  14. l-Nebiviololinium chloride dihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Tuchalski, Gisbert; Hänsicke, Andre; Reck, Günther; Emmerling, Franziska

    2008-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of chiral l-nebivolol {systematic name: (+)−(R,S,S,S)-bis­[2-(6-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-2-yl)-2-hydroxy­ethyl]ammonium chloride dihydrate}, C22H26F2NO4 +·Cl−·2H2O, was obtained by chiral liquid chromatography as a dihydrate. The pyran rings adopt half-chair conformations. Hydrogen bonds between the cation, anions and water mol­ecules contribute to the formation of layers parallel to the ac plane. PMID:21200930

  15. Subintimal Recanalization of Occluded Stents: The Substent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Diamantopoulos, Athanasios Katsanos, Konstantinos; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Siablis, Dimitris

    2013-08-01

    PurposeApplication of metal stents is complicated by neointimal hyperplasia leading to vessel restenosis and reocclusion. Treatment options in cases presenting with complete occlusion of the stented segment and recurrent critical limb ischemia (CLI) are limited. We present the option of the subintimal/substent technique in dealing with occluded stents.MethodsThe study included patients presenting with recurrent CLI due to impaired blood flow as a result of complete occlusion of previously inserted metal stents and unsuccessful intraluminal crossing of the lesion via either the antegrade or retrograde approach. In these cases, crossing the occlusion through the subintimal/substent plane was attempted. Primary end points included technical success, safety of the procedure, clinical improvement, and limb salvage, while secondary end points were patient survival, primary patency, and vessel restenosis rates at 1-year follow-up. Study end points were calculated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis.ResultsBetween July 2006 and October 2011, a total of 14 patients (mean age 69.14 {+-} 12.59 years, 12 men) were treated with the substent technique and included in the analysis. Technical success rate was 85.71 % (12 of 14), with a total lesion length of 193.57 {+-} 90.78 mm. The mean occluded stented segment length was 90.21 {+-} 44.34 mm. In 10 (83.33 %) of 12 cases, a new stent had to be placed by the side of the old occluded one, while the remaining two cases (16.67 %) were treated only with balloon angioplasty. No serious adverse events were noted during the immediate postprocedural period. All successfully treated patients improved clinically. Estimated limb salvage was 90.9 %, and patient survival rate was 90.0 % at 1 year's follow-up. Primary patency was 45.50 % and vessel restenosis 77.30 %.ConclusionSubintimal recanalization of occluded metal stents through the substent plane is a valuable alternative treatment option, especially in patients with recurrent CLI with few

  16. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride.

  17. Effects of Endothelial Injury on the Rate of Thrombus Organization in Canine Carotid Arteries Occluded with Microcoils

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzo, T.; Shengelaia, G.G.; Workman, M.; Cloft, H.J.; Miller, D.A.; Dion, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Thrombus organization in canine carotid arteries occluded with platinum microcoils was studied to determine if endothelial injury created with a Xenon Chloride Excimer Laser (XEL) could acclerate endovascular fibrosis. Ten common carotid artery stumps were created in ten dogs. Each of four stumps were schematically divided into four longitudinally contiguous injury zones (thermal ablation injury, non-ablative injury, proximal and distal non-injury zones) to test the effects of ablative and non-ablative injury and to establish a set of internal controls that would account for proximity to circulating blood at the ostium of the occluded artery. Following XEL irradiation of the endothelium through an arteriotomy, each stump was embolized with microcoils. Four control stumps were subjected to sham laser procedures, and embolized in an identical fashion. Two additional stumps were embolized in the absence of sham surgery. Angiographic, gross and histologic analysis was performed after four weeks. Specimens of freshly clotted whole blood mixed with microcoils were used as an additional control. In irradiated stumps and non-irradiated stumps (sham and embolization only), angiography revealed no evidence of coil compaction or recanalization. In all irradiated stumps the thermal ablation zone contained fibrous tissue and neovascularity without unorganized thrombus. The other zones in the irradiated stumps were indistingnishable from each other and from all zones in the non-irradiated sham stumps, containing primarily unorganized thrombus. Stumps embolized in the absence of sham surgery were filled with material that was grossly and microscopically identical to specimens of freshly clotted whole blood containing microcoils. The results indicate that thermal ablation injury of the endothelium accelerates thrombus organization in canine carotid arteries occluded with platinum microcoils. PMID:20591298

  18. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Mineral Reactivity in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: I. Phase Behavior of Carbon Dioxide - Water - Chloride Salt Systems Across the H2O-Rich to the CO2-Rich Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Ronald D.; Wang, Zheming; Anderko, Andre; Wang, Peiming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-09-05

    Phase equilibria in mixtures containing carbon dioxide, water, and chloride salts have been investigated using a combination of solubility measurements and thermodynamic modeling. The solubility of water in the CO2-rich phase of ternary mixtures of CO2, H2O and NaCl or CaCl2 was determined, using near infrared spectroscopy, at 90 atm and 40 to 100 °C. These measurements fill a gap in the experimental database for CO2 water salt systems, for which phase composition data have been available only for the H2O-rich phases. A thermodynamic model for CO2 water salt systems has been constructed on the basis of the previously developed Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) framework, which is capable of modeling aqueous solutions over broad ranges of temperature and pressure, is valid to high electrolyte concentrations, treats mixed-phase systems (with both scCO2 and water present) and can predict the thermodynamic properties of dry and partially water-saturated supercritical CO2 over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. Within the MSE framework the standard-state properties are calculated from the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state whereas the excess Gibbs energy includes a long-range electrostatic interaction term expressed by a Pitzer-Debye-Hückel equation, a virial coefficient-type term for interactions between ions and a short-range term for interactions involving neutral molecules. The parameters of the MSE model have been evaluated using literature data for both the H2O-rich and CO2-rich phases in the CO2 - H2O binary and for the H2O-rich phase in the CO2 - H2O - NaCl / KCl / CaCl2 / MgCl2 ternary and multicompontent systems. The model accurately represents the properties of these systems at temperatures from 0°C to 300 °C and pressures up to ~4000 atm. Further, the solubilities of H2O in CO2-rich phases that are predicted by the model are in agreement with the new measurements for the CO2 - H2O - NaCl and CO2 - H2O - CaCl2 systems. Thus, the model can be

  19. Electronic eye occluder with time-counting and reflection control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karitans, V.; Ozolinsh, M.; Kuprisha, G.

    2008-09-01

    In pediatric ophthalmology 2 - 3 % of all the children are impacted by a visual pathology - amblyopia. It develops if a clear image isn't presented to the retina during an early stage of the development of the visual system. A common way of treating this pathology is to cover the better-seeing eye to force the "lazy" eye to learn seeing. However, children are often reluctant to wear such an occluder because they are ashamed or simply because they find it inconvenient. This fact requires to find a way how to track the regime of occlusion because results of occlusion is a hint that the actual regime of occlusion isn't that what the optometrist has recommended. We design an electronic eye occluder that allows to track the regime of eye occlusion. We employ real-time clock DS1302 providing time information from seconds to years. Data is stored in the internal memory of the CPU (EEPROM). The MCU (PIC16F676) switches on only if a mechanical switch is closed and temperature has reached a satisfactory level. The occlusion is registered between time moments when the infrared signal appeared and disappeared.

  20. Intuitive physical reasoning about occluded objects by inexperienced chicks

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Questions concerning the role of nature and nurture in higher cognition appear to be intractable if one restricts one's attention to development in humans. However, in other domains, such as sensory development, much information has been gained from controlled rearing studies with animals. Here, we used a similar experimental strategy to investigate intuitive reasoning about occluded objects. Newborn domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) were reared singly with a small object that became their social partner. They were then accustomed to rejoin such an imprinting object when it was made to move and disappear behind either one of two identical opaque screens. After disappearance of the imprinting object, chicks were faced with two screens of different slants, or of different height or different width, which may or may not have been compatible with the presence of the imprinting object hidden beneath/behind them. Chicks consistently chose the screen of slant/height/width compatible with the presence of the object beneath/behind it. Preventing chicks from touching and pecking at the imprinting object before testing did not affect the results, suggesting that intuitive reasoning about physical objects is largely independent of specific experience of interaction with objects and of objects' occluding events. PMID:21270036

  1. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOEpatents

    Pereira, Candido

    1999-01-01

    A method for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700.degree. C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite.

  2. Method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride

    DOEpatents

    Pereira, C.

    1999-02-23

    A method is described for immobilizing waste chlorides salts containing radionuclides and hazardous nuclear material for permanent disposal, and in particular, a method is described for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing cesium, in a synthetic form of pollucite. The method for synthesizing pollucite from chabazite and cesium chloride includes mixing dry, non-aqueous cesium chloride with chabazite and heating the mixture to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the cesium chloride, or above about 700 C. The method further comprises significantly improving the rate of retention of cesium in ceramic products comprised of a salt-loaded zeolite by adding about 10% chabazite by weight to the salt-loaded zeolite prior to conversion at elevated temperatures and pressures to the ceramic composite. 3 figs.

  3. Experimental determination of the solubility constant for magnesium chloride hydroxide hydrate (Mg 3Cl(OH) 5·4H 2O, phase 5) at room temperature, and its importance to nuclear waste isolation in geological repositories in salt formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Deng, Haoran; Nemer, Martin; Johnsen, Shelly

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the solubility constant of magnesium chloride hydroxide hydrate, Mg 3Cl(OH) 5·4H 2O, termed as phase 5, is determined from a series of solubility experiments in MgCl 2-NaCl solutions. The solubility constant in logarithmic units at 25 °C for the following reaction, MgCl(OH)·4HO+5H=3Mg+9HO(l)+Cl is calculated as 43.21 ± 0.33 (2 σ) based on the specific interaction theory (SIT) model for extrapolation to infinite dilution. The Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of formation for phase 5 at 25 °C are derived as -3384 ± 2 (2 σ) kJ mol -1 and -3896 ± 6 (2 σ) kJ mol -1, respectively. MgO (bulk, pure MgO corresponding to the mineral periclase) is the only engineered barrier certified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the US, and an Mg(OH) 2-based engineered barrier (bulk, pure Mg(OH) 2 corresponding to brucite) is to be employed in the Asse repository in Germany. Phase 5, and its similar phase, phase 3 (Mg 2Cl(OH) 3·4H 2O), could have a significant role in influencing the geochemical conditions in geological repositories for nuclear waste in salt formations where MgO or brucite is employed as engineered barriers. Based on our solubility constant for phase 5 in combination with the literature value for phase 3, we predict that the composition for the invariant point of phase 5 and phase 3 would be mMg = 1.70 and pmH = 8.94 in the Mg-Cl binary system. The recent WIPP Compliance Recertification Application Performance Assessment Baseline Calculations indicate that phase 5, instead of phase 3, is indeed a stable phase when the WIPP Generic Weep Brine (GWB), a Na-Mg-Cl-dominated brine associated with the Salado Formation, equilibrates with actinide-source-term phases, brucite, magnesium carbonates, halite and anhydrite. Therefore, phase 5 is important to the WIPP, and potentially important to other repositories in salt formations.

  4. Incomplete endothelialisation of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder device followed by meningitis and late acute bacterial endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Białkowski, Jacek; Pawlak, Szymon; Banaszak, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman with atrial septal defect treated percutaneously with an Amplatzer Septal Occluder 24 months earlier, who presented with a history of bacterial meningitis, was admitted with a diagnosis of endocarditis. After 6 weeks of treatment with antibiotics, the incompletely endothelialised occluder was surgically removed. The present report illustrates the need for long-term follow-up of patients who have received nitinol wire mesh occluders. PMID:26707128

  5. Main occluding area in partially edentulous patients: changes before and after implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Nishinaka, H; Kashiwabara, T; Nagao, K; Ichikawa, T

    2012-09-01

    The 'main occluding area', the location where food crushing occurs during the first stroke of mastication, is reported to be an important concept; however, it is currently limited to findings in individuals with normal dentition. The purpose of this study was to assess the changes in the location, area and bite force of the main occluding area before and after implant treatments. We enrolled 50 partially edentulous and 22 normally dentate subjects. To identify the location of the main occluding area, each subject was instructed to freely bite once on a dental stopping using the partially edentulous side or the normally dentate area. The location, occluding contact area and bite force of the main occluding area before and after the implant treatments were analysed. The main occluding area was located at a reproducible location in the partially edentulous and normally dentate subjects. This location was principally the first molar region, and for the partially edentulous patients with missing teeth in the molar regions, it moved from the premolar region to the first molar region after treatment. The occluding contact area and bite force for the main occluding area increased (P < 0·05) after the implant treatment in the partially edentulous patients with missing teeth in the molar regions. These results suggest that the main occluding area can be restored to the first molar region after implant treatment and may be an important factor in the assessment of prosthodontic treatment. PMID:22672204

  6. Occluding junctions and cytoskeletal components in a cultured transporting epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meza, I; Ibarra, G; Sabanero, M; Martinez-Palomo, A; Cereijido, M

    1980-01-01

    MDCK cells form uninterrupted monolayers and make occluding junctions similar to those of natural epithelia. This aricle explores the relationship between these junctions and the cytoskeleton by combining studies on the distribution of microfilaments and microtubules with the effect of drugs, such as colchicines and cytochalasin B, on the degree of tightness of the occluding junctions. To study the degree of tightness, monolayers were prepared by plating MDCK cells on mylon disks coated with collagen. Disks were mounted as flat sheets between two Lucite chambers, and the sealing capacity of the junctions was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance across the monolayers. Equivalent monolayers on coverslips were used to study the distribution of microtubules and microfilaments by indirect immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against tubulin and actin. This was done both on complete cells and on cytoskeleton preparations in which the cell membranes had been solubilized before fixation. Staining with antiactin shows a reticular pattern of very fine filaments that spread radially toward the periphery where they form a continuous cortical ring underlying the plasma membrane. Staining with antitubulin depicts fibers that extend radially to form a network that occupies the cytoplasm up to the edges of the cell. Colchicine causes a profound disruption of microtubules but only a 27 percent decrease in the electrical resistance of the resting monolayers. Cytochalasin B, when present for prolonged periods, disrupts the cytoplasmic microfilaments and abolishes the electrical resistance. The cortical ring of filaments remains in place but appears fragmented with time. We find that removal of extracellular Ca(++), which causes the tight junctions to open, also causes the microfilaments and microtubules to retract toward the center of the cells. The process of junction opening and fiber retraction is reversed by the restoration of Ca(++). Colchicine has no effect

  7. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fellows, Simon M; Prior, Timothy J

    2016-04-01

    The hydro-chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O(+)·Cl(-), has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro-chloric acid in aceto-nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro-chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol-ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter-actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium-chloride inter-action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  8. Crystal structure of 4-carbamoylpyridinium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Simon M.; Prior, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The hydro­chloride salt of isonicotinamide, C6H7N2O+·Cl−, has been synthesized from a dilute solution of hydro­chloric acid in aceto­nitrile. The compound displays monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) at 150 K, similar to the related hydro­chloride salt of nicotinamide. The asymmetric unit contains one protonated isonicotinamide mol­ecule and a chloride anion. An array of hydrogen-bonding inter­actions, including a peculiar bifurcated pyridinium–chloride inter­action, results in linear chains running almost perpendicularly in the [150] and [1-50] directions within the structure. A description of the hydrogen-bonding network and comparison with similar compounds are presented. PMID:27375858

  9. Thermodynamic Properties of Magnesium Chloride Hydroxide Hydrate (Mg3Cl(OH)5:4H2O, Phase 5), and Its importance to Nuclear Waste Isolation in Geological Repositories in Salt Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y.; Deng, H.; Nemer, M. B.; Johnsen, S.

    2009-12-01

    MgO (bulk, pure MgO corresponding to the mineral periclase) is the only engineered barrier certified by the Environmental Protection Agency for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the US, and an Mg(OH)2-based engineered barrier (bulk, pure Mg(OH)2 corresponding to brucite) is to be employed in the Asse repository in Germany. Both the WIPP and the Asse are located in salt formations. The WIPP is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository being used for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic waste (TRU waste). The repository is 655 m below the surface, and is situated in the Salado Formation, a Permian salt bed mainly composed of halite, and of lesser amounts of polyhalite, anhydrite, gypsum, magnesite, clays and quartz. The WIPP Generic Weep Brine (GWB), a Na-Mg-Cl dominated brine, is associated with the Salado Formation. The previous vendor for MgO for the WIPP was Premier Chemicals and the current vendor is Martin Marietta Materials. Experimental studies of both Premier MgO and Martin Marietta MgO with the GWB at SNL indicate the formation of magnesium chloride hydroxide hydrate, Mg3Cl(OH)5:4H2O, termed as phase 5. However, this important phase is lacking in the existing thermodynamic database. In this study, the solubility constant of phase 5 is determined from a series of solubility experiments in MgCl2-NaCl solutions. The solubility constant at 25 oC for the following reaction, Mg3Cl(OH)5:4H2O + 5H+ = 3Mg2+ + 9H2O(l) + Cl- is recommended as 43.21±0.33 (2σ) based on the Specific Interaction Theory (SIT) model for extrapolation to infinite dilution. The log K obtained via the Pitzer equations is identical to the above value within the quoted uncertainty. The Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of formation for phase 5 at 25 oC are derived as -3384±2 (2σ) kJ mol-1 and -3896±6 (2σ) kJ mol-1, respectively. The standard entropy and heat capacity of phase 5 at 25 oC are estimated as 393±20 J mol-1 K-1 and 374±19 J mol-1 K

  10. Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aneurysm with an Intraaortic Occluder

    PubMed Central

    Liotta, Domingo; Frank, L.; Del Rio, M.; Gallo, A.; Navia, J.; Bertolozzi, E.; Bracco, D.; Cesareo, V.

    1987-01-01

    Elective treatment of descending thoracic aneurysms involves direct surgery, with Dacron graft replacement of the diseased aortic segment. When the patient's condition contraindicates major surgery, however, the surgeon should consider using an extraanatomic approach—implanting an ascending aorta-to-abdominal aorta Dacron bypass graft in a ventral position and leaving the diseased segment undisturbed. After such a procedure, the descending thoracic aorta must be excluded from the normal circulation. For this purpose, we have designed an intraaortic occluding technique in which an umbrella-like device is implanted immediately distal to the left subclavian artery. This technique has proved safe and uncomplicated in canine experiments and is ready for clinical trials. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:196-205) Images PMID:15229741

  11. Relief of the occluded ear sensation to improve earmold comfort.

    PubMed

    French-Saint George, M; Barr-Hamilton, R M

    1978-01-01

    Earmold comfort is an important factor in the overall satisfaction a hearing-impaired person has with a hearing aid system. Recent research into the subjective effects of earmold venting indicates that, for the naive hearing-aid user, the solid mold produces a "closed" and "blocked" sensation that is relieved to a degree, depending on the vent diameter. To improve earmold comfort, all earmolds should be vented. However, there are certain types of hearing loss where conventional venting techniques would be undesirable, in particular, cases of severe to profound hearing loss where venting would not only adversely affect the desired frequency response characteristics of the hearing aid but would also lead to serious acoustic feedback problems. For this reason a simple system has been developed with sintered filters in the vent line, thus allowing all earmolds to be vented to relieve the occluded ear sensation although retaining the acoustic characteristics of the closed earmold.

  12. Inflammatory pseudothrombus on a patent foramen ovale occluder device.

    PubMed

    MacKerrow, Stephen; Farb, Andrew; Sullivan, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we describe late complications after the transcatheter device closure of a patent foramen ovale in a patient with migraine headaches. The clinical presentation included acute neurologic symptoms and new-onset atrial fibrillation. A mass on the left atrial side of the occluder was surgically removed. Histologic results showed an inflammatory lesion that consisted predominantly of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Despite complete surgical closure and the termination of atrial fibrillation, the patient continued to experience neurologic events. Although transcatheter patent foramen ovale closure is associated with low complication rates, a careful risk-benefit evaluation is warranted in view of the potentially severe complications and the current lack of robust pathophysiologic and clinical trial data to support this therapy in the treatment of migraine headaches.

  13. AngioJet Thrombectomy for Occluded Dialysis Fistulae: Outcome Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littler, Peter Cullen, Nicola; Gould, Derek; Bakran, Ali; Powell, Steven

    2009-03-15

    This study evaluates AngioJet thrombectomy of occluded autogenous dialysis fistulae and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts in a UK hemodialysis population. Comparison is made with published data of alternative percutaneous thrombectomy methods. All patients with occluded dialysis fistulae who sought care at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital between October 2006 and June 2008 were included in the study. All patients were treated with the AngioJet Rheolytic Thrombectomy Device (Possis, Minneapolis, MN). Demographics, time of occlusion, adjunctive therapies, complications, and follow-up data have been prospectively recorded. A total of 64 thrombectomy procedures were performed in 48 patients. Forty-four autogenous fistulas were treated in 34 patients (19 brachiocephalic, 8 radiocephalic, and 7 transposed brachiobasilic). Twenty PTFE grafts were treated in 14 patients (9 brachioaxillary, 3 brachiocephalic loop grafts, 1 brachiobasilic, and 1 femoro-femoral). The average length of occlusion was 24 cm. Average time to intervention was 4 days. Immediate primary patency was 91%. Primary patency at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively, was 71%, 60%, and 37%. Secondary patency at 3, 6, and 12 months was 87%, 77%, and 62%, respectively. Angioplasty was carried out in all procedures. Patients required stent insertion in 34 of the 64 thrombectomies to treat angioplasty-resistant stenoses. Complications included a puncture-site hematoma, and three angioplasty-related vein ruptures in one patient, all treated with covered stent grafts. Two cases of distal brachial arterial embolization were successfully treated by thrombosuction. AngioJet thrombectomy in dialysis access occlusion is safe and effective, comparing favorably with other methods.

  14. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  15. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  16. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  17. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  18. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  19. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  20. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  1. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  2. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  3. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  4. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  5. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  6. 7 CFR 58.328 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salt. 58.328 Section 58.328 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....328 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  7. 7 CFR 58.721 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salt. 58.721 Section 58.721 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....721 Salt. Salt shall be free flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet the requirements...

  8. 7 CFR 58.437 - Salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salt. 58.437 Section 58.437 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections....437 Salt. The salt shall be free-flowing, white refined sodium chloride and shall meet...

  9. The Development of Perceptual Completion Abilities: Infants' Perception of Stationary, Partially Occluded Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craton, Lincoln G.

    1996-01-01

    In three studies of infants' ability to perceive partially occluded objects with specific appearances, a screen alternately uncovered and covered either a connected or interrupted rectangle. Pattern of infants' looking times suggests that they perceive the unity of the partially occluded object by 6.5 months but did not perceive the form of the…

  10. Phonation Threshold Pressure Measurement with a Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine if a semi-occluded vocal tract could be used to measure phonation threshold pressure. This is in contrast to the shutter technique, where an alternation between a fully occluded tract and an unoccluded tract is used. Method: Five male and 5 female volunteers phonated through a thin straw held…

  11. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  12. Salt, Chlor-Alkali, and Related Heavy Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommaraju, Tilak V.

    The chemical category of inorganic salts encompasses many substances that dissociate completely in water, but only one salt, sodium chloride, is referred to by the common name, salt. Sodium chloride is ubiquitous in both its occurrence and its many uses. To date, there are over 14,000 uses for salt.1 Salt is used as a feedstock for many chemicals including chlorine, caustic soda (sodium hydroxide), synthetic soda ash (sodium carbonate), sodium chlorate, sodium sulfate, and metallic sodium. By indirect methods, sodium chloride is also used to produce hydrochloric acid and many other sodium salts. In its natural mineral form, salt may take on some color from some of the trace elements and other salts present, however, pure sodium chloride is a white to colorless crystalline substance, fairly soluble in water.2 Also known as halite, the substance is an essential nutrient to humans and animals for proper bodily functions.

  13. Skin and soft tissue necrosis from calcium chloride in a deicer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min P; Raho, Vittorio J; Mak, John; Kaynar, A Murat

    2007-01-01

    Calcium chloride salt is the principle ingredient of many commercially available deicers. Calcium chloride melts snow and ice by its osmotic action. We present a case of skin and soft tissue necrosis associated with the use of a calcium chloride-containing deicer. Although calcium chloride is known to produce soft tissue necrosis if it extravasates during intravenous administration, necrosis and skin sloughing has rarely been described after topical exposure to this salt. Calcium chloride likely produces tissue injury from the heat liberated by mixing calcium chloride with water (exothermic reaction) and from direct calcium deposits in the skin (calcinosis cutis) and soft tissue.

  14. Ecologically valid defocus blur contributes to avoidance of interocular suppression in half-occluded zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the effect of defocus blur on the avoidance of interocular suppression in half-occluded zones, which are the monocular zones formed by occlusion, was examined. Six human adults observed a pair of colored random-dot stereograms, and the cumulative time of disappearance of the half-occluded zones was measured. There were three defocus blur conditions (blurry-background, blurry-occluder, and nonblur) and two fixation conditions (fixation-front and fixation-back). The author found that the cumulative time of disappearance was shorter under the blurrybackground condition of the fixation-front condition and under the blurry-occluder condition of the fixation-back condition than under the other conditions. These results indicate that ecologically valid defocus blur contributes to the avoidance of interocular suppression in the half-occluded zones.

  15. Cleanup of plutonium oxide reduction black salts

    SciTech Connect

    Giebel, R.E.; Wing, R.O.

    1986-12-17

    This work describes pyrochemical processes employed to convert direc oxide reduction (DOR) black salts into discardable white salt and plutonium metal. The DOR process utilizes calcium metal as the reductant in a molten calcium chloride solvent salt to convert plutonium oxide to plutonium metal. An insoluble plutonium-rich dispersion called black salt sometimes forms between the metal phase and the salt phase. Black salts accumulated for processing were treated by one of two methods. One method utilized a scrub alloy of 70 wt % magnesium/30 wt % zinc. The other method utilized a pool of plutonium metal to agglomerate the metal phase. The two processes were similar in that calcium metal reductant and calcium chloride solvent salt were used in both cases. Four runs were performed by each method, and each method produced greater than 93% conversion of the black salt.

  16. Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt successfully treated by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with GDCs.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Koide, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils as performed percutaneously.

  17. Hepatic encephalopathy due to intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt successfully treated by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with GDCs

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Takuji; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Miura, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Koide, Kazuma

    2012-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by balloon occluded retrograde transvenous embolization with Guglielmi and interlocking detachable coils as performed percutaneously. PMID:23986827

  18. Recognizing blurred, nonfrontal, illumination, and expression variant partially occluded faces.

    PubMed

    Punnappurath, Abhijith; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram Narayanan

    2016-09-01

    The focus of this paper is on the problem of recognizing faces across space-varying motion blur, changes in pose, illumination, and expression, as well as partial occlusion, when only a single image per subject is available in the gallery. We show how the blur, incurred due to relative motion between the camera and the subject during exposure, can be estimated from the alpha matte of pixels that straddle the boundary between the face and the background. We also devise a strategy to automatically generate the trimap required for matte estimation. Having computed the motion via the matte of the probe, we account for pose variations by synthesizing from the intensity image of the frontal gallery a face image that matches the pose of the probe. To handle illumination, expression variations, and partial occlusion, we model the probe as a linear combination of nine blurred illumination basis images in the synthesized nonfrontal pose, plus a sparse occlusion. We also advocate a recognition metric that capitalizes on the sparsity of the occluded pixels. The performance of our method is extensively validated on synthetic as well as real face data. PMID:27607514

  19. Layered Graphical Models for Tracking Partially Occluded Objects.

    PubMed

    Ablavsky, Vitaly; Sclaroff, Stan

    2011-09-01

    We propose a representation for scenes containing relocatable objects that can cause partial occlusions of people in a camera's field of view. In many practical applications, relocatable objects tend to appear often; therefore, models for them can be learned offline and stored in a database. We formulate an occluder-centric representation, called a graphical model layer, where a person's motion in the ground plane is defined as a first-order Markov process on activity zones, while image evidence is aggregated in 2D observation regions that are depth-ordered with respect to the occlusion mask of the relocatable object. We represent real-world scenes as a composition of depth-ordered, interacting graphical model layers, and account for image evidence in a way that handles mutual overlap of the observation regions and their occlusions by the relocatable objects. These layers interact: Proximate ground-plane zones of different model instances are linked to allow a person to move between the layers, and image evidence is shared between the observation regions of these models. We demonstrate our formulation in tracking pedestrians in the vicinity of parked vehicles. Our results compare favorably with a sprite-learning algorithm, with a pedestrian tracker based on deformable contours, and with pedestrian detectors. PMID:21383394

  20. Real life identification of partially occluded weapons in video frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempelmann, Christian F.; Arslan, Abdullah N.; Attardo, Salvatore; Blount, Grady P.; Sirakov, Nikolay M.

    2016-05-01

    We empirically test the capacity of an improved system to identify not just images of individual guns, but partially occluded guns and their parts appearing in a videoframe. This approach combines low-level geometrical information gleaned from the visual images and high-level semantic information stored in an ontology enriched with meronymic part-whole relations. The main improvements of the system are handling occlusion, new algorithms, and an emerging meronomy. Well-known and commonly deployed in ontologies, actual meronomies need to be engineered and populated with unique solutions. Here, this includes adjacency of weapon parts and essentiality of parts to the threat of and the diagnosticity for a weapon. In this study video sequences are processed frame by frame. The extraction method separates colors and removes the background. Then image subtraction of the next frame determines moving targets, before morphological closing is applied to the current frame in order to clean up noise and fill gaps. Next, the method calculates for each object the boundary coordinates and uses them to create a finite numerical sequence as a descriptor. Parts identification is done by cyclic sequence alignment and matching against the nodes of the weapons ontology. From the identified parts, the most-likely weapon will be determined by using the weapon ontology.

  1. An Alternative Reaction Course in O-Glycosidation with O-Glycosyl Trichloroacetimidates as Glycosyl Donors and Lewis Acidic Metal Salts as Catalyst: Acid-Base Catalysis with Gold Chloride-Glycosyl Acceptor Adducts.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Schmidt, Richard R

    2015-10-01

    Gold(III) chloride as catalyst for O-glycosyl trichloroacetimidate activation revealed low affinity to the glycosyl donor but high affinity to the hydroxy group of the acceptor alcohol moiety, thus leading to catalyst-acceptor adduct formation. Charge separation in this adduct, increasing the proton acidity and the oxygen nucleophilicity, permits donor activation and concomitant acceptor transfer in a hydrogen-bond mediated S(N)2-type transition state. Hence, the sequential binding between acceptor and catalyst and then with the glycosyl donor enables self-organization of an ordered transition-state. This way, with various acceptors, even at temperatures below -60 °C, fast and high yielding glycosidations in high anomeric selectivities were recorded, showing the power of this gold(III) chloride acid-base catalysis. Alternative reaction courses via hydrogen chloride or HAuCl4 activation or intermediate generation of glycosyl chloride as the real donor could be excluded. With partially O-protected acceptors, prone to bidentate ligation to gold(III) chloride, particularly high reactivities and anomeric selectivities were observed. Gold(I) chloride follows the same catalyst-acceptor adduct driven acid-base catalysis reaction course.

  2. Strategies for salt reduction in foods.

    PubMed

    Toldrá, Fidel; Barat, José M

    2012-04-01

    The amounts of sodium chloride in the formulation of a variety of foods like bakery, meats and dairy foods, ready meals, sauces and snacks, are relatively large and thus, have a strong contribution on the salt dietary intake. There is a clear demand by the consumers and medical associations to reduce the salt content in foods. Different strategies have been proposed and most of them consist of the replacement of sodium chloride by other salts and the addition of other substances for an acceptable sensory quality. The recent patents for salt reduction and their applications in foods are reviewed in this manuscript.

  3. Further studies on the ability of different metal salts to influence the DNA synthesis of human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Nordlind, K

    1986-01-01

    In a further study on the ability of different metal salts to influence the DNA synthesis of human lymphoid cells, aluminum chloride, beryllium chloride, cadmium chloride, cupric sulfate, ferric chloride, manganese chloride, palladium chloride, platinum chloride and silver nitrate, were tested regarding effect on thymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes in children. At certain concentrations in the range of 10(-4)-10(-5)M, all tested compounds but aluminum chloride and ferric chloride, were inhibitory, the latter compounds inhibited at 4.8 X 10(-3)M. A slight stimulation mainly on the thymocytes was obtained with beryllium chloride, cadmium chloride, palladium chloride, platinum chloride and silver nitrate, at certain concentrations in the range of 10(-5)-10(-6)M, while ferric chloride gave a slight stimulation at 1.2 X 10(-3)M. Thus, the tested metal salts should be suitable for use in lymphocyte transformation tests for diagnosis of contact allergy.

  4. Successful Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varix Mainly Draining into the Pericardiophrenic Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken; Nishida, N. Matsui, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakamura, K.; Miki, Y.

    2012-02-15

    Two cases of gastric varices were treated by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein at our hospital, and both were successful. One case developed left hydrothorax. Gastric varices did not bled and esophageal varices were not aggravated in both cases for 24-30 months thereafter. These outcomes indicate the feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration via the pericardiophrenic vein.

  5. Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry: recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Chapman, D.M.; Harward, B.L.; Klatt, L.N.; Smith, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    Molten salt spectroelectrochemistry will be reviewed in this paper. UV-visible transmission, infrared reflectance, resonance and normal Raman, and electron spin resonance spectroelectrochemistry have been used for molten salt studies. Two recent applications of uv-visible transmission spectroelectrochemistry to studies of organic and inorganic solutes in molten SbCl/sub 3/-AlCl/sub 3/-N-(1-butyl)pyridinium chloride and AlCl/sub 3/-NaCl will be described.

  6. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  7. Solution-Derived, Chloride-Containing Minerals as a Waste Form for Alkali Chlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef; McCloy, John S.; Lepry, William C.

    2012-10-01

    Sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2] and cancrinite [(Na,K)6Ca2Al6Si6O24Cl4] are environmentally stable, chloride-containing minerals and are a logical waste form option for the mixed alkali chloride salt waste stream that is generated from a proposed electrochemical separations process during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Due to the volatility of chloride salts at moderate temperatures, the ideal processing route for these salts is a low-temperature approach such as the sol-gel process. The sodalite structure can be easily synthesized by the sol-gel process; however, it is produced in the form of a fine powder with particle sizes on the order of 1–10 µm. Due to the small particle size, these powders require additional treatment to form a monolith. In this study, the sol-gel powders were pressed into pellets and fired to achieve > 90% of theoretical density. The cancrinite structure, identified as the best candidate mineral form in terms of waste loading capacity, was only produced on a limited basis following the sol-gel process and converted to sodalite upon firing. Here we discuss the sol-gel process specifics, chemical durability of select waste forms, and the steps taken to maximize chloride-containing phases, decrease chloride loss during pellet firing, and increase pellet densities.

  8. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING IN CENTER, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT WITH SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  9. Watershed scale chloride storage across a gradient of urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellen, C. C.; Oswald, C. J.; Oni, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Sodium chloride is the main de-icing agent used during the winter in Canada and the northern United States. However, little is known about the long term fate, residence time, and ecological effects of chloride. This talk integrates work taking place across three sites in Southern Ontario, Canada: Hamilton Harbour, the Toronto lakeshore, and Lake Simcoe. We quantify chloride inputs, outputs, and changes in storage for a number of watersheds across a gradient of urbanization. For the three winter months (January, February, March), we show that stream water chloride concentrations approach those of brackish waters for urban watersheds. Chloride is also highly persistent, with stream water chloride concentrations decreasing from the winter months and approaching baseline levels only in July. These baseline levels are greater than 100 mg Cl/l in the urban watersheds, suggesting high levels of chloride storage in soil and groundwater. Using road salt application rates and groundwater levels and chloride concentrations, we estimate the magnitude and residence time of the chloride pools in a number of watersheds across a gradient of urbanization. Our results suggest that the magnitude and residence time of chloride storage varies with urbanization and other factors. We show that summer baseflow concentrations do approach the EPA's chronic exposure guideline of 230 mg Cl/l, implying more work is needed to understand the in stream and downstream ecological effects of chloride.

  10. Time course of spatial and feature selective attention for partly-occluded objects.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Tetsuko; Takeya, Ryuji

    2012-07-01

    Attention selects objects/groups as the most fundamental units, and this may be achieved by an attention-spreading mechanism. Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have found that attention-spreading is reflected by a decrease in the N1 spatial attention effect. The present study tested whether the electrophysiological attention effect is associated with the perception of object unity or amodal completion through the use of partly-occluded objects. ERPs were recorded in 14 participants who were required to pay attention to their left or right visual field and to press a button for a target shape in the attended field. Bilateral stimuli were presented rapidly, and were separated, connected, or connected behind an occluder. Behavioral performance in the connected and occluded conditions was worse than that in the separated condition, indicating that attention spread over perceptual object representations after amodal completion. Consistently, the late N1 spatial attention effect (180-220 ms post-stimulus) and the early phase (230-280 ms) of feature selection effects (target N2) at contralateral sites decreased, equally for the occluded and connected conditions, while the attention effect in the early N1 latency (140-180 ms) shifted most positively for the occluded condition. These results suggest that perceptual organization processes for object recognition transiently modulate spatial and feature selection processes in the visual cortex. PMID:22683447

  11. Chloride chemical form in various types of fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Fenfen Zhu; Masaki Takaoka; Kenji Shiota; Kazuyuki Oshita; Yoshinori Kitajima

    2008-06-01

    Chloride content is a critical problem for the reuse of fly ash as a raw material in cement, and the method used by recyclers to reduce the fly ash chloride content depends on the chemical form of the chlorides. However, limited information is available on the quantitative distribution of chlorides and the identity of some chlorides such as Friedel's salt. We examined chloride forms and percentages using X-ray absorption near edge structure and X-ray diffraction analyses, as well as corresponding washing experiments. Approximately 15% of the chlorine in raw fly ash was estimated to be in the form of NaCl, 10% in KCl, 50% in CaCl{sub 2}, and the remainder in the form of Friedel's salt. Fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of calcium hydroxide for acid gas removal (CaFA) contained 35% chlorine as NaCl, 11% as KCl, 37% as CaCl{sub 2}, 13% as Friedel's salt, and the remaining 4% as CaClOH. In fly ash collected in a bag filter with the injection of sodium bicarbonate for acid gas removal (NaFA), approximately 79% of chlorine was in NaCl, 12% was in KCl, and 9% was in Friedel's salt. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of praseodymium, gadolinium and ytterbium chlorides.

    PubMed

    Basile, A C; Hanada, S; Sertié, J A; Oga, S

    1984-02-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of chloride salts of praseodymium, gadolinium and ytterbium were investigated, using various experimental inflammatory models in rats. The lanthanide salts administered by oral route showed no significant effect, but when injected intraperitoneally they significantly inhibited the carrageenin-induced oedema, proportional to their doses ranging from 15 to 75 mg/kg. They also reduced nystatin-induced oedema and vascular permeability response to histamine and serotonin. Pronounced inhibitory effect of lanthanide salts at the dose of 50 mg/kg, i.p., was observed in histamine- and serotonin-induced changes in vascular permeability. Repeated administration of lanthanide salts in the dose of 20 mg/kg for 13 d significantly inhibited arthritis development. The same dose of these salts for a 6-d period similarly reduced granuloma formation. However, praseodymium, gadolinium and ytterbium chlorides showed no significant difference among themselves and their anti-inflammatory effects were smaller than those from phenylbutazone.

  13. Recycling of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1991-12-01

    The secondary aluminum industry generates more than 110 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of salt-cake waste every year. This waste stream contains about 3--5% aluminum, 15--30% aluminum oxide, 30--40% sodium chloride, and 20--30% potassium chloride. As much as 50% of the content of this waste is combined salt (sodium and potassium chlorides). Salt-cake waste is currently disposed of in conventional landfills. In addition, over 50 {times} 10{sup 3} tons of black dross that is not economical to reprocess a rotary furnace for aluminum recovery ends up in landfills. The composition of the dross is similar to that of salt cake, except that it contains higher concentrations of aluminum (up to 20%) and correspondingly lower amounts of salts. Because of the high solubility of the salts in water, these residues, when put in landfills, represent a potential source of pollution to surface-water and groundwater supplies. The increasing number of environmental regulations on the generation and disposal of industrial wastes are likely to restrict the disposal of these salt-containing wastes in conventional landfills. Processes exist that employ the dissolution and recovery of the salts from the waste stream. These wet-processing methods are economical only when the aluminum concentration in that waste exceeds about 10%. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a study in which existing technologies were reviewed and new concepts that are potentially more cost-effective than existing processes were developed and evaluated. These include freeze crystallization, solvent/antisolvent extraction, common-ion effect, high-pressure/high-temperature process, and capillary-effect systems. This paper presents some of the technical and economic results of the aforementioned ANL study.

  14. The chemistry of sodium chloride involvement in processes related to hot corrosion. [in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Thermodynamic and mass transport calculations, and laboratory experiments elucidating the behavior of sodium chloride in combustion environments, in the deposition process, and in reactions with certain oxides on the surfaces of superalloys are summarized. It was found that some of the ingested salt is separated out of the air stream by the compressor. However, sodium chloride does pass from the compressor to the combustor where numerous chemical reactions take place. Here some of the salt is vaporized to yield gaseous sodium chloride molecules. Hydrogen and oxygen atoms present in the combustion products react with some sodium chloride to yield other gaseous species such as sodium, and a fraction of the salt remains as particulates. Both the gas phase and condensed sodium chloride can lead to sodium sulfate formation by various routes, all of which involve reaction with sulfur oxides and oxygen. In addition to contributing to the formation of sodium sulfate, the sodium chloride can contribute to corrosion directly.

  15. Catching what we can't see: manual interception of occluded fly-ball trajectories.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Gianfranco; Delle Monache, Sergio; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Control of interceptive actions may involve fine interplay between feedback-based and predictive mechanisms. These processes rely heavily on target motion information available when the target is visible. However, short-term visual memory signals as well as implicit knowledge about the environment may also contribute to elaborate a predictive representation of the target trajectory, especially when visual feedback is partially unavailable because other objects occlude the visual target. To determine how different processes and information sources are integrated in the control of the interceptive action, we manipulated a computer-generated visual environment representing a baseball game. Twenty-four subjects intercepted fly-ball trajectories by moving a mouse cursor and by indicating the interception with a button press. In two separate sessions, fly-ball trajectories were either fully visible or occluded for 750, 1000 or 1250 ms before ball landing. Natural ball motion was perturbed during the descending trajectory with effects of either weightlessness (0 g) or increased gravity (2 g) at times such that, for occluded trajectories, 500 ms of perturbed motion were visible before ball disappearance. To examine the contribution of previous visual experience with the perturbed trajectories to the interception of invisible targets, the order of visible and occluded sessions was permuted among subjects. Under these experimental conditions, we showed that, with fully visible targets, subjects combined servo-control and predictive strategies. Instead, when intercepting occluded targets, subjects relied mostly on predictive mechanisms based, however, on different type of information depending on previous visual experience. In fact, subjects without prior experience of the perturbed trajectories showed interceptive errors consistent with predictive estimates of the ball trajectory based on a-priori knowledge of gravity. Conversely, the interceptive responses of subjects

  16. Catching What We Can't See: Manual Interception of Occluded Fly-Ball Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Gianfranco; Delle Monache, Sergio; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Control of interceptive actions may involve fine interplay between feedback-based and predictive mechanisms. These processes rely heavily on target motion information available when the target is visible. However, short-term visual memory signals as well as implicit knowledge about the environment may also contribute to elaborate a predictive representation of the target trajectory, especially when visual feedback is partially unavailable because other objects occlude the visual target. To determine how different processes and information sources are integrated in the control of the interceptive action, we manipulated a computer-generated visual environment representing a baseball game. Twenty-four subjects intercepted fly-ball trajectories by moving a mouse cursor and by indicating the interception with a button press. In two separate sessions, fly-ball trajectories were either fully visible or occluded for 750, 1000 or 1250 ms before ball landing. Natural ball motion was perturbed during the descending trajectory with effects of either weightlessness (0 g) or increased gravity (2 g) at times such that, for occluded trajectories, 500 ms of perturbed motion were visible before ball disappearance. To examine the contribution of previous visual experience with the perturbed trajectories to the interception of invisible targets, the order of visible and occluded sessions was permuted among subjects. Under these experimental conditions, we showed that, with fully visible targets, subjects combined servo-control and predictive strategies. Instead, when intercepting occluded targets, subjects relied mostly on predictive mechanisms based, however, on different type of information depending on previous visual experience. In fact, subjects without prior experience of the perturbed trajectories showed interceptive errors consistent with predictive estimates of the ball trajectory based on a-priori knowledge of gravity. Conversely, the interceptive responses of subjects

  17. Hygroscopic salts and the potential for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Davila, Alfonso F; Duport, Luis Gago; Melchiorri, Riccardo; Jänchen, Jochen; Valea, Sergio; de Los Rios, Asunción; Fairén, Alberto G; Möhlmann, Diedrich; McKay, Christopher P; Ascaso, Carmen; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Hygroscopic salts have been detected in soils in the northern latitudes of Mars, and widespread chloride-bearing evaporitic deposits have been detected in the southern highlands. The deliquescence of hygroscopic minerals such as chloride salts could provide a local and transient source of liquid water that would be available for microorganisms on the surface. This is known to occur in the Atacama Desert, where massive halite evaporites have become a habitat for photosynthetic and heterotrophic microorganisms that take advantage of the deliquescence of the salt at certain relative humidity (RH) levels. We modeled the climate conditions (RH and temperature) in a region on Mars with chloride-bearing evaporites, and modeled the evolution of the water activity (a(w)) of the deliquescence solutions of three possible chloride salts (sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride) as a function of temperature. We also studied the water absorption properties of the same salts as a function of RH. Our climate model results show that the RH in the region with chloride-bearing deposits on Mars often reaches the deliquescence points of all three salts, and the temperature reaches levels above their eutectic points seasonally, in the course of a martian year. The a(w) of the deliquescence solutions increases with decreasing temperature due mainly to the precipitation of unstable phases, which removes ions from the solution. The deliquescence of sodium chloride results in transient solutions with a(w) compatible with growth of terrestrial microorganisms down to 252 K, whereas for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride it results in solutions with a(w) below the known limits for growth at all temperatures. However, taking the limits of a(w) used to define special regions on Mars, the deliquescence of calcium chloride deposits would allow for the propagation of terrestrial microorganisms at temperatures between 265 and 253 K, and for metabolic activity (no growth) at

  18. Hygroscopic salts and the potential for life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Davila, Alfonso F; Duport, Luis Gago; Melchiorri, Riccardo; Jänchen, Jochen; Valea, Sergio; de Los Rios, Asunción; Fairén, Alberto G; Möhlmann, Diedrich; McKay, Christopher P; Ascaso, Carmen; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Hygroscopic salts have been detected in soils in the northern latitudes of Mars, and widespread chloride-bearing evaporitic deposits have been detected in the southern highlands. The deliquescence of hygroscopic minerals such as chloride salts could provide a local and transient source of liquid water that would be available for microorganisms on the surface. This is known to occur in the Atacama Desert, where massive halite evaporites have become a habitat for photosynthetic and heterotrophic microorganisms that take advantage of the deliquescence of the salt at certain relative humidity (RH) levels. We modeled the climate conditions (RH and temperature) in a region on Mars with chloride-bearing evaporites, and modeled the evolution of the water activity (a(w)) of the deliquescence solutions of three possible chloride salts (sodium chloride, calcium chloride, and magnesium chloride) as a function of temperature. We also studied the water absorption properties of the same salts as a function of RH. Our climate model results show that the RH in the region with chloride-bearing deposits on Mars often reaches the deliquescence points of all three salts, and the temperature reaches levels above their eutectic points seasonally, in the course of a martian year. The a(w) of the deliquescence solutions increases with decreasing temperature due mainly to the precipitation of unstable phases, which removes ions from the solution. The deliquescence of sodium chloride results in transient solutions with a(w) compatible with growth of terrestrial microorganisms down to 252 K, whereas for calcium chloride and magnesium chloride it results in solutions with a(w) below the known limits for growth at all temperatures. However, taking the limits of a(w) used to define special regions on Mars, the deliquescence of calcium chloride deposits would allow for the propagation of terrestrial microorganisms at temperatures between 265 and 253 K, and for metabolic activity (no growth) at

  19. Numerical procedure to determine geometric view factors for surfaces occluded by cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical procedure was developed to determine geometric view factors between connected infinite strips occluded by any number of infinite circular cylinders. The procedure requires a two-dimensional cross-sectional model of the configuration of interest. The two-dimensional model consists of a convex polygon enclosing any number of circles. Each side of the polygon represents one strip, and each circle represents a circular cylinder. A description and listing of a computer program based on this procedure are included in this report. The program calculates geometric view factors between individual strips and between individual strips and the collection of occluding cylinders.

  20. The Prosthetic Management of an Infra-Occluded First Permanent Molar: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Beshandeep; Johnson, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    This report describes the prosthetic management of a 15-year-old patient with an infra-occluded first permanent molar due to primary failure of eruption (secondary retention). An indirect composite onlay restoration was used to stimulate the periodontal fibres, improve function and restore occlusal stability. This paper describes the clinical technique involved. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Early detection, diagnosis and management of infra-occluded permanent molar teeth is important to avoid occlusal complications, in addition to improving function and stimulating the periodontal fibres. PMID:27529916

  1. A diffusive anomaly of water in aqueous sodium chloride solutions at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Soo; Yethiraj, Arun

    2008-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are presented for the self-diffusion coefficient of water in aqueous sodium chloride solutions. At temperatures above the freezing point of pure water, the self-diffusion coefficient is a monotonically decreasing function of salt concentration. Below the freezing point of pure water, however, the self-diffusion coefficient is a non-monotonic function of salt concentration, showing a maximum at approximately one molal salt. This suggests that sodium chloride, which is considered a structure-making salt at room temperature, becomes a structure-breaking salt at low temperatures. A qualitative understanding of this effect can be obtained by considering the effect of ions on the residence time of water molecules near other water molecules. A consideration of the freezing point depression of aqueous sodium chloride solutions suggests that the self-diffusion coefficient of water in supercooled sodium chloride solutions is always higher than that in pure (supercooled) water at the same temperature.

  2. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  3. Spectra of Low-Temperature Chlorine Salt Hydrates and Implications for Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J.; Dalton, J. B., III; Chevrier, V. F.; Jamieson, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    Low-temperature spectra of chloride and (per)chlorate salts exhibit diagnostic features that should allow for their detection, if present. Chlorine salts lower the activity of water, limiting potential life.

  4. Analytical chemistry of aluminum salt cake

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Smith, F.P.; Snyder, C.T.

    1997-02-01

    Component phases of Al salt cake or products from processing salt cake, resist dissolution, a key first step in most analysis procedures. In this work (analysis support to a study of conversion of salt cake fines to value-added oxide products), analysis methods were adapted or devised for determining leachable salt, total halides (Cl and F), Al metal, and elemental composition. Leaching of salt cake fines was by ultrasonic agitation with deionized water. The leachate was analyzed for anions by ion chromatography and for cations by ICP-atomic emission spectroscopy. Only chloride could be measured in the anions, and charge balances between cations and chloride were near unity, indicating that all major dissolved species were chloride salts. For total halides, the chloride and fluorides components were first decomposed by KOH fusion, and the dissolved chloride and fluoride were measured by ion chromatography. Al metal in the fines was determined by a hydrogen evolution procedure adapted for submilligram quantities of metallic Al: the Al was reacted with HCl in a closed system containing a measured amount of high-purity He. After reaction, the H/He ratio was measured by mass spectroscopy. Recoveries of Al metal standards (about 30mg) averaged 93%. Comparison of the acid evolution with caustic reaction of the Al metal showed virtually identical results, but reaction was faster in the acid medium. Decomposition of the salt cake with mineral acids left residues that had to be dissolved by fusion with Na carbonate. Better dissolution was obtained by fusing the salt cake with Li tetraborate; the resulting solution could be used for accurate Al assay of salt cake materials by classical 8-hydroxyquinolate gravimetry.

  5. High-temperature vacuum distillation separation of plutonium waste salts

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.

    1996-10-01

    In this task, high-temperature vacuum distillation separation is being developed for residue sodium chloride-potassium chloride salts resulting from past pyrochemical processing of plutonium. This process has the potential of providing clean separation of the salt and the actinides with minimal amounts of secondary waste generation. The process could produce chloride salt that could be discarded as low-level waste (LLW) or low actinide content transuranic (TRU) waste, and a concentrated actinide oxide powder that would meet long-term storage standards (DOE-DTD-3013-94) until a final disposition option for all surplus plutonium is chosen.

  6. Voice Training and Therapy with a Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract: Rationale and Scientific Underpinnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Voice therapy with a semi-occluded vocal tract has a long history. The use of lip trills, tongue trills, bilabial fricatives, humming, and phonation into tubes or straws has been hailed by clinicians, singing teachers, and voice coaches as efficacious for training and rehabilitation. Little has been done, however, to provide the…

  7. The Role of Perceptual Skills in Newborns' Perception of Partly Occluded Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Eloisa; Zulian, Luisa; Leo, Irene

    2005-01-01

    This study explored whether the reported inability of newborns to perceive object unity could result from the limited abilities of newborns to recognize the correspondence between 2 stimuli that were identical except for the presence or absence of an occluder. Five experiments were carried out using a visual habituation technique. The results of…

  8. Recanalization of an Occluded Infrainguinal Vein Graft Complicated by Graft Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Kakani, Nirmal; Travis, Simon; Hancock, John

    2007-11-15

    The technique of subintimal angioplasty has been described for the recanalisation of native vessels after occlusion of infrainguinal vascular bypass grafts. We report a case in which an attempt at such treatment resulted in inadvertent but successful recanalisation of the occluded vein graft instead. This was complicated by graft perforation and subsequent graft aneurysm which was successfully treated with a covered stent.

  9. Transcaval TIPS in Patients with Failed Revision of Occluded Previous TIPS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Joo; Shin, Tae Beom; Park, Hyo Yong; Kim, Tae Hun; Kang, Duk Sik

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of transcaval transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in patients with occluded previous TIPS. Materials and Methods Between February 1996 and December 2000 we performed five transcaval TIPS procedures in four patients with recurrent gastric cardiac variceal bleeding. All four had occluded TIPS, which was between the hepatic and portal vein. The interval between initial TIPS placement and revisional procedures with transcaval TIPS varied between three and 31 months; one patient underwent transcaval TIPS twice, with a 31-month interval. After revision of the occluded shunt failed, direct cavoportal puncture at the retrohepatic segment of the IVC was attempted. Results Transcaval TIPS placement was technically successful in all cases. In three, tractography revealed slight leakage of contrast materials into hepatic subcapsular or subdiaphragmatic pericaval space. There was no evidence of propagation of extravasated contrast materials through the retroperitoneal space or spillage into the peritoneal space. After the tract was dilated by a bare stent, no patient experienced trans-stent bleeding and no serious procedure-related complications occurred. After successful shunt creation, variceal bleeding ceased in all patients. Conclusion Transcaval TIPS placement is an effective and safe alternative treatment in patients with occluded previous TIPS and no hepatic veins suitable for new TIPS. PMID:11754327

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Voice Therapy Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapsner-Smith, Mara R.; Hunter, Eric J.; Kirkham, Kimberly; Cox, Karin; Titze, Ingo R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although there is a long history of use of semi-occluded vocal tract gestures in voice therapy, including phonation through thin tubes or straws, the efficacy of phonation through tubes has not been established. This study compares results from a therapy program on the basis of phonation through a flow-resistant tube (FRT) with Vocal…

  11. Disentangling effects of structure and knowledge in perceiving partly occluded shapes: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Hazenberg, Simon J; van Lier, Rob

    2016-09-01

    Using event-related potentials (ERPs) we investigated the influence of object knowledge on perceiving partly occluded shapes. We created stimuli based on well-known objects of which the middle part was occluded. Object completions that were compatible with structure consisted of the connection of the visible fragments by smoothly extending their contours. In contrast, object completions that were incompatible with structure consisted of separate disconnected completions of the fragments. Furthermore, object completions could be in line with, or conflict with expectations based on knowledge. We measured ERPs when hidden parts were revealed by removing the occluder, and observed an early positive ERP peaking around 115-140ms at occipital sites, presumably triggered by physical differences. Most importantly, we observed a positive ERP peaking around 300-400ms at parieto-occipital sites that could be related to influences of both structure and knowledge. An additional analysis controlling for differential stimulus characteristics revealed similar conclusions. All in all, we demonstrate that the interpretation of partly occluded shapes is not solely driven by stimulus structure, but that it can also be influenced by knowledge of objects.

  12. 18 CFR 270.302 - Occluded natural gas produced from coal seams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... produced from coal seams. 270.302 Section 270.302 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... produced from coal seams. A person seeking a determination that natural gas is occluded natural gas produced from coal seams must file an application with the jurisdictional agency which contains...

  13. 18 CFR 270.302 - Occluded natural gas produced from coal seams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... produced from coal seams. 270.302 Section 270.302 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... produced from coal seams. A person seeking a determination that natural gas is occluded natural gas produced from coal seams must file an application with the jurisdictional agency which contains...

  14. 18 CFR 270.302 - Occluded natural gas produced from coal seams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... produced from coal seams. 270.302 Section 270.302 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... produced from coal seams. A person seeking a determination that natural gas is occluded natural gas produced from coal seams must file an application with the jurisdictional agency which contains...

  15. 18 CFR 270.302 - Occluded natural gas produced from coal seams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... produced from coal seams. 270.302 Section 270.302 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... produced from coal seams. A person seeking a determination that natural gas is occluded natural gas produced from coal seams must file an application with the jurisdictional agency which contains...

  16. 18 CFR 270.302 - Occluded natural gas produced from coal seams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... produced from coal seams. 270.302 Section 270.302 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... produced from coal seams. A person seeking a determination that natural gas is occluded natural gas produced from coal seams must file an application with the jurisdictional agency which contains...

  17. Cotton-Top Tamarins' ("Saguinus Oedipus") Expectations about Occluded Objects: A Dissociation between Looking and Reaching Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Laurie R.; Seelig, David; Hauser, Marc D.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work with human infants and toddlers suggests a dissociation between performance on looking and reaching tasks. Specifically, infants appear to generate accurate representations of occluded objects and their actions when tested in expectancy violation looking tasks but often fail to use this information when reaching for occluded objects.…

  18. Modeling Fate and Transport of Chloride from Deicers in Urban Floodplains: Implications for Urban Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledford, S. H.; Lautz, L.

    2015-12-01

    Road salting in urban areas of the northeastern United States increases chloride concentrations in urban streams. Groundwater storage of saline road runoff results in increased surface water chloride concentrations through time, even in non-winter months. Stream-groundwater (SW-GW) interactions promote buffering of large seasonal swings in stream chloride concentrations, resulting in lower surface water chloride in winter and higher concentrations in summer, relative to streams hydrologically disconnected from riparian floodplains. However, the hydrogeologic processes controlling salt storage and transport in urban floodplain aquifers have not been fully investigated. We developed a 3D numerical groundwater flow and solute transport model of an urban floodplain in Syracuse, New York, using MODFLOW and MT3DMS. We ran the model for 1 year, calibrating to three conditions: water table elevations along a riparian transect, measurements of net groundwater flux to the stream along the 500-m reach, and chloride concentrations in groundwater through time in riparian wells. Chloride enters the riparian aquifer via three pathways: hillslope groundwater discharge, hyporheic exchange, and groundwater recharge during overbank flooding events. Winter overbank flooding events are the primary source of chloride to floodplain sediments. While hillslope groundwater discharge results in relatively uniform chloride through time in high conductivity units, surficial floodplain sediments with lower conductivity have high chloride concentrations from winter overbank flood events. When compared to road salt application rates (up to 20 tons of salt per lane kilometer per year), the 0.013 km2 floodplain holds only a tiny fraction of chloride applied in a watershed (>100 km of road in the watershed). To promote riparian aquifer storage of road salt and buffering of stream chloride concentrations, urban planners should design urban floodplains for frequent winter flooding events, and allow

  19. Recognition of partially occluded threat objects using the annealed Hopefield network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jung H.; Yoon, Sung H.; Park, Eui H.; Ntuen, Celestine A.

    1992-01-01

    Recognition of partially occluded objects has been an important issue to airport security because occlusion causes significant problems in identifying and locating objects during baggage inspection. The neural network approach is suitable for the problems in the sense that the inherent parallelism of neural networks pursues many hypotheses in parallel resulting in high computation rates. Moreover, they provide a greater degree of robustness or fault tolerance than conventional computers. The annealed Hopfield network which is derived from the mean field annealing (MFA) has been developed to find global solutions of a nonlinear system. In the study, it has been proven that the system temperature of MFA is equivalent to the gain of the sigmoid function of a Hopfield network. In our early work, we developed the hybrid Hopfield network (HHN) for fast and reliable matching. However, HHN doesn't guarantee global solutions and yields false matching under heavily occluded conditions because HHN is dependent on initial states by its nature. In this paper, we present the annealed Hopfield network (AHN) for occluded object matching problems. In AHN, the mean field theory is applied to the hybird Hopfield network in order to improve computational complexity of the annealed Hopfield network and provide reliable matching under heavily occluded conditions. AHN is slower than HHN. However, AHN provides near global solutions without initial restrictions and provides less false matching than HHN. In conclusion, a new algorithm based upon a neural network approach was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of the automated inspection of threat objects from x-ray images. The robustness of the algorithm is proved by identifying occluded target objects with large tolerance of their features.

  20. A study of the effects of nickel chloride and calcium chloride on hydration of Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, H.; Cartledge, F.K.; Roy, A.; Tittlebaum, M.E. . Department of Chemistry and Institute for Recyclable Materials)

    1993-07-01

    Portland cement samples containing amounts of CaCl[sub 2] and NiCl[sub 2] ranging from approximately 1% to 20% by weight have been examined by [sup 29]Si and [sup 27]Al solid-state MAS NMR as a function of time, and some of the mature pastes have been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Changes in physical properties that had been previously observed as a function of amounts of salt added are clearly traceable to differences in the silicate matrices. Low concentrations of both salts promote Q[sup 1] formation, but high concentrations result in formation of much more Q[sup 2] at the expense of Q[sup 1]. Both salts accelerate both aluminate and silicate hydration, and the effects appear to be almost entirely due to chloride. Minor variations in hydration rates at high Ni concentrations may be the result of nickel salt precipitation.

  1. Thermoluminescence dosimetric characteristics of beta irradiated salt.

    PubMed

    Murthy, K V R; Pallavi, S P; Rahul, G; Patel, Y S; Sai Prasad, A S; Elangovan, D

    2006-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of sodium chloride (NaCl), known as common salt, used for cooking purposes (iodised salt), have been studied in the present paper considering its usage as an 'accidental dosemeter' in the case of a nuclear fallout. TL characteristics of common salt have been examined under excitation with a beta dose of 20 Gy from a 90Sr beta source. The salt specimens are used in the form of discs. The average salt grain that sticks to the disc is measured to be approximately 1 mg. The TL of the beta irradiated salt is recorded in the conventional TL apparatus. Initially three peaks were observed at 133, 205 and 238 degrees C. All three peaks are well resolved, having maximum intensity at 238 degrees C. The material under investigation, i.e. 'common salt' possesses many good dosimetric properties and therefore this can be considered as an 'accidental dosemeter'.

  2. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  3. Interpretation of postmortem vitreous concentrations of sodium and chloride.

    PubMed

    Zilg, B; Alkass, K; Berg, S; Druid, H

    2016-06-01

    Vitreous fluid can be used to analyze sodium and chloride levels in deceased persons, but it remains unclear to what extent such results can be used to diagnose antemortem sodium or chloride imbalances. In this study we present vitreous sodium and chloride levels from more than 3000 cases. We show that vitreous sodium and chloride levels both decrease with approximately 2.2mmol/L per day after death. Since potassium is a well-established marker for postmortem interval (PMI) and easily can be analyzed along with sodium and chloride, we have correlated sodium and chloride levels with the potassium levels and present postmortem reference ranges relative the potassium levels. We found that virtually all cases outside the reference range show signs of antemortem hypo- or hypernatremia. Vitreous sodium or chloride levels can be the only means to diagnose cases of water or salt intoxication, beer potomania or dehydration. We further show that postmortem vitreous sodium and chloride strongly correlate and in practice can be used interchangeably if analysis of one of the ions fails. It has been suggested that vitreous sodium and chloride levels can be used to diagnose drowning or to distinguish saltwater from freshwater drowning. Our results show that in cases of freshwater drowning, vitreous sodium levels are decreased, but that this mainly is an effect of postmortem diffusion between the eye and surrounding water rather than due to the drowning process, since the decrease in sodium levels correlates with immersion time. PMID:27105154

  4. Optimization of Low Sodium Salts Mix for Shoestring Potatoes.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Heverton Carrara; de Souza, Vanessa Rios; Azevedo, Natália Csizmar; Rodrigues, Daniela Maria; Nunes, Cleiton Antônio; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have shown the close relationship between the sodium consumption and health problems such as hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Thus, the demand for products with reduced sodium content, but with sensory quality, is increasing every day. In this context, this study aimed to optimize a low sodium salts mix using sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and monosodium glutamate to the development of shoestring potatoes with low sodium content and high sensory quality, through mixture design and response surface methodology. The salts mix that promotes the same salting power and similar sensory acceptability that the shoestring potatoes with 1.6% sodium chloride (ideal concentration) and at the same time promotes the greatest possible reduction of sodium, about 65%, should provide the composition as follows: 0.48% of sodium chloride, 0.92% of potassium chloride, and 0.43% of monosodium glutamate.

  5. [Gustatory sensitivity to sodium chloride and potassium chloride and certain parameters of sodium metabolism in patients with bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Mineev, V N; Suparnovich, I Iu

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine threshold gustatory sensitivity (TGS) to sodium chloride and potassium chloride in patients with bronchial asthma (BA) taking into account a number of factors responsible for the enhanced risk of development and progress of this disease. Forty five practically healthy subjects were compared with 139 asthmatic patients; a separate group comprised patients treated permanently with oral glucocorticoids and those having non-pulmonary allergy. Chemically pure solutions of sodium and potassium chlorides were used in the dripping test to assess TGS. Asthmatic patients had enhanced TGS to sodium chloride compared with healthy subjects. TGS values were especially high in non-allergic bronchial asthma and minimal in allergic asthma when they were unrelated to the phase of the disease. TGS to potassium chloride in asthmatic patients also differed from that in healthy subjects; more patients were bitter-insensitive or sensitive only to high concentrations of potassium chloride. Patients treated with systemic glucocorticoids had the highest TGS to sodium chloride. Patients with non-pulmonary allergy and allergic BA had very similar TGS to potassium chloride. TGS to sodium chloride in the former was lower than in healthy subjects and patients with allergic BA. Asthmatic patients had a higher sodium ion concentration in erythrocytes than normal subjects; it reached maximum values in persons used to add salt to fully cooked food.

  6. Phosphonium chloride for thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Development of systems for storage of thermal energy is discussed. Application of phosphonium chloride for heat storage through reversible dissociation is described. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of phosphonium chloride are analyzed and dangers in using phosphonium chloride are explained.

  7. Chloride flux in phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun

    2016-09-01

    Phagocytes, such as neutrophils and macrophages, engulf microbes into phagosomes and launch chemical attacks to kill and degrade them. Such a critical innate immune function necessitates ion participation. Chloride, the most abundant anion in the human body, is an indispensable constituent of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2 O2 -halide system that produces the potent microbicide hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It also serves as a balancing ion to set membrane potentials, optimize cytosolic and phagosomal pH, and regulate phagosomal enzymatic activities. Deficient supply of this anion to or defective attainment of this anion by phagocytes is linked to innate immune defects. However, how phagocytes acquire chloride from their residing environment especially when they are deployed to epithelium-lined lumens, and how chloride is intracellularly transported to phagosomes remain largely unknown. This review article will provide an overview of chloride protein carriers, potential mechanisms for phagocytic chloride preservation and acquisition, intracellular chloride supply to phagosomes for oxidant production, and methods to measure chloride levels in phagocytes and their phagosomes. PMID:27558337

  8. Salt-Formation by Progressive Evaporation of Brine Waters in the Endurance Crater Basin at Meridiani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Wentworth, S. J.; Garrison, D. H.; Herrin, J. S.

    2007-03-01

    The sulfate/chloride vs. Cl and chloride/bromide vs. Br relationships in the salt-assemblages on Meridiani (RAT) rock-rinds indicate that these salts likely formed by progressive evaporative concentration of brine waters filling the Endurance Crater basin

  9. ACTIVE DELIVERY CABLE TUNED TO DEVICE DEPLOYMENT STATE: ENHANCED VISIBILITY OF NITINOL OCCLUDERS DURING PRE-CLINICAL INTERVENTIONAL MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jamie A.; Saikus, Christina E.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Barbash, Israel M.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.; Franson, Dominique N.; Sonmez, Merdim; Slack, Michael C.; Lederman, Robert J.; Kocaturk, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop an active delivery system that enhances visualization of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during deployment under real-time MRI. Materials and Methods We constructed an active delivery cable incorporating a loopless antenna and a custom titanium microscrew to secure the occluder devices. The delivery cable was tuned and matched to 50Ω at 64 MHz with the occluder device attached. We used real-time balanced SSFP in a wide-bore 1.5T scanner. Device-related images were reconstructed separately and combined with surface-coil images. The delivery cable was tested in vitro in a phantom and in vivo in swine using a variety of nitinol cardiac occluder devices. Results In vitro, the active delivery cable provided little signal when the occluder device was detached and maximal signal with the device attached. In vivo, signal from the active delivery cable enabled clear visualization of occluder device during positioning and deployment. Device release resulted in decreased signal from the active cable. Post-mortem examination confirmed proper device placement. Conclusions The active delivery cable enhanced the MRI depiction of nitinol cardiac occluder devices during positioning and deployment, both in conventional and novel applications. We expect enhanced visibility to contribute to effectiveness and safety of new and emerging MRI-guided treatments. PMID:22707441

  10. New salt production dries distillate streams, eliminates haze

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.W.

    1996-04-15

    A new formulation of calcium chloride has proven effective at drying distillate streams in commercial refineries. The product can be used at lower temperatures than rock salt, increasing its drying effectiveness. In addition, the problem of bridging, commonly associated with calcium chloride dryers, is eliminated. Three case studies illustrate the product`s uses and benefits.

  11. Auto localization and segmentation of occluded vessels in robot-assisted partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Amir-Khalili, Alborz; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Abinahed, Julien; Al-Alao, Osama; Al-Ansari, Abdulla; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2014-01-01

    Hilar dissection is an important and delicate stage in partial nephrectomy during which surgeons remove connective tissue surrounding renal vasculature. Potentially serious complications arise when vessels occluded by fat are missed in the endoscopic view and are not appropriately clamped. To aid in vessel discovery, we propose an automatic method to localize and label occluded vasculature. Our segmentation technique is adapted from phase-based video magnification, in which we measure subtle motion from periodic changes in local phase information albeit for labeling rather than magnification. We measure local phase through spatial decomposition of each frame of the endoscopic video using complex wavelet pairs. We then assign segmentation labels based on identifying responses of regions exhibiting temporal local phase changes matching the heart rate frequency. Our method is evaluated with a retrospective study of eight real robot-assisted partial nephrectomies demonstrating utility for surgical guidance that could potentially reduce operation times and complication rates.

  12. Closure of aorto-right ventricular tunnel with Amplatzer duct occluder II.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, I B; Narasimhan, Chitra; Agarwal, Ashish

    2013-04-01

    Aorto-right ventricular tunnel (ARVT) is a very rare, congenital, abnormal extracardiac channel that connects the ascending aorta at or above the sinotubular junction to the cavity of the right ventricle. Only 16 cases have been reported thus far in the English literature. We report the first transcatheter closure of ARVT with the Amplatzer duct occluder II in an infant, with both coronary arteries arising from the left coronary sinus and with biventricular apical non-compaction.

  13. Structure of an antibacterial peptide ATP-binding cassette transporter in a novel outward occluded state

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Hassanul G.; Tong, Zhen; Mathavan, Indran; Li, Yanyan; Iwata, So; Zirah, Séverine; Rebuffat, Sylvie; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Beis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae produce antimicrobial peptides for survival under nutrient starvation. Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is an antimicrobial peptide with a unique lasso topology. It is secreted by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporter McjD, which ensures self-immunity of the producing strain through efficient export of the toxic mature peptide from the cell. Here we have determined the crystal structure of McjD from Escherichia coli at 2.7-Å resolution, which is to the authors’ knowledge the first structure of an antibacterial peptide ABC transporter. Our functional and biochemical analyses demonstrate McjD-dependent immunity to MccJ25 through efflux of the peptide. McjD can directly bind MccJ25 and displays a basal ATPase activity that is stimulated by MccJ25 in both detergent solution and proteoliposomes. McjD adopts a new conformation, termed nucleotide-bound outward occluded. The new conformation defines a clear cavity; mutagenesis and ligand binding studies of the cavity have identified Phe86, Asn134, and Asn302 as important for recognition of MccJ25. Comparisons with the inward-open MsbA and outward-open Sav1866 structures show that McjD has structural similarities with both states without the intertwining of transmembrane (TM) helices. The occluded state is formed by rotation of TMs 1 and 2 toward the equivalent TMs of the opposite monomer, unlike Sav1866 where they intertwine with TMs 3–6 of the opposite monomer. Cysteine cross-linking studies on the McjD dimer in inside-out membrane vesicles of E. coli confirmed the presence of the occluded state. We therefore propose that the outward-occluded state represents a transition intermediate between the outward-open and inward-open conformation of ABC exporters. PMID:24920594

  14. Laser angioplasty of totally occluded coronary arteries and vein grafts: preliminary report on a current trial.

    PubMed

    Foschi, A; Myers, G; Crick, W F; Friedberg, H D; Snyder, D; Nordstrom, L A

    1989-01-01

    CLINICAL PERSPECTIVE: Among the various laser angioplasty systems and atherectomy devices currently in clinical trials, the Lastac system appears to be particularly suitable for treating totally occluded coronary arteries and vein grafts. Preliminary results of a clinical trial in more than 35 patients show a recanalization rate of 92% and no complications attributable to the laser. Restenosis has occurred in five cases; in three of these, the arteries were reopened with laser or conventional angioplasty.

  15. Relief of Buttock Claudication by Percutaneous Recanalization of an Occluded Superior Gluteal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Senechal, Quentin; Auguste, Mario C.; Louail, Bertrand; Lagneau, Pierre; Pernes, Jean Marc

    2000-03-15

    We report a case of a woman presenting with right severe buttock claudication and normal neurological and osteoarticular examination, in whom a guidewire recanalization and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of an occluded right superior gluteal artery (SGA) has provided relief of her symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of percutaneous recanalization of the SGA. PTA can be considered the treatment of choice for buttock claudication caused by SGA stenosis or occlusion.

  16. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  17. Closure of aorto-right ventricular tunnel with Amplatzer duct occluder II.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, I B; Narasimhan, Chitra; Agarwal, Ashish

    2013-04-01

    Aorto-right ventricular tunnel (ARVT) is a very rare, congenital, abnormal extracardiac channel that connects the ascending aorta at or above the sinotubular junction to the cavity of the right ventricle. Only 16 cases have been reported thus far in the English literature. We report the first transcatheter closure of ARVT with the Amplatzer duct occluder II in an infant, with both coronary arteries arising from the left coronary sinus and with biventricular apical non-compaction. PMID:23549501

  18. CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CALCIUM CHLORIDE PLANT LOOKING EAST. CALCIUM CHLORIDE BUILDING ON LEFT, CALCIUM CHLORIDE STORAGE BUILDING ON RIGHT OF CENTER WITH TOP OF SA (SODA ASH) BUILDING IN RIGHT BACKGROUND. - Solvay Process Company, Calcium Chloride Plant, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  19. Strontium-89 Chloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.Strontium-89 chloride is in a class of drugs known as radioisotopes. It delivers radiation to cancer sites and ultimately decreases bone pain. The length of treatment depends on the ...

  20. Hydrogen chloride test set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Detector uses tertiary amine, which makes reaction fairly specific for relatively small highly polarized hydrogen chloride molecule. Reaction is monitored by any microbalance capable of measuring extremely small mass differences in real time.

  1. REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM ACIDIC SOLUTIONS USING NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A; Robert Pierce, R; James Laurinat, J

    2006-08-22

    Chloride (Cl{sup -}) salt processing in strong acids is used to recycle plutonium (Pu) from pyrochemical residues. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is studying the potential application of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas to effectively convert dissolved pyrochemical salt solutions to chloride-free solutions and improve recovery operations. An NO{sub 2} sparge has been shown to effectively remove Cl{sup -} from solutions containing 6-8 M acid (H{sup +}) and up to 5 M Cl{sup -}. Chloride removal occurs as a result of the competition of at least two reactions, one which is acid-dependent. Below 4 M H+, NO2 reacts with Cl- to produce nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). Between 6 M and 8 M H{sup +}, the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), facilitated by the presence of NO{sub 2}, strongly affects the rate of Cl{sup -} removal. The effect of heating the acidic Cl{sup -} salt solution without pre-heating the NO{sub 2} gas has minimal effect on Cl{sup -} removal rates when the contact times between NO{sub 2} and the salt solution are on the order of seconds.

  2. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian-Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the "capture efficiency" (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels.

  3. Endocarditis and Incomplete Endothelialization 12 Years after Amplatzer Septal Occluder Deployment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Allan K; Palafox, Brian A; Starr, Joanne P; Gates, Richard N; Berdjis, Farbouch

    2016-06-01

    A 4-year-old boy had a 15-mm atrial septal defect repaired percutaneously with use of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder. At age 16 years, he presented with a week's history of fever, chills, dyspnea, fatigue, and malaise. Cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.25 × 1.5-cm pedunculated mass on the left aspect of the atrial septum just superior to the mitral valve, and a smaller vegetation on the right inferior medial aspect of the septum. At surgery, visual examination of both sides of the septum revealed granulation tissue, the pedunculated mass, the small vegetation, and exposed metal wires that suggested incomplete endothelialization of the occluder. We removed the occluder and patched the septal defect. The patient returned to full activity after 4 months and was asymptomatic 3 years postoperatively. Our report reinforces the need for further investigation into prosthetic device endothelialization, endocarditis prophylaxis, and recommended levels of physical activity in patients whose devices might be incompletely endothelialized. In addition to reporting our patient's case, we review the medical literature on this topic. PMID:27303238

  4. Realization of an aerial 3D image that occludes the background scenery.

    PubMed

    Kakeya, Hideki; Ishizuka, Shuta; Sato, Yuya

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we describe an aerial 3D image that occludes far background scenery based on coarse integral volumetric imaging (CIVI) technology. There have been many volumetric display devices that present floating 3D images, most of which have not reproduced the visual occlusion. CIVI is a kind of multilayered integral imaging and realizes an aerial volumetric image with visual occlusion by combining multiview and volumetric display technologies. The conventional CIVI, however, cannot show a deep space, for the number of layered panels is limited because of the low transmittance of each panel. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel optical design to attain an aerial 3D image that occludes far background scenery. In the proposed system, a translucent display panel with 120 Hz refresh rate is located between the CIVI system and the aerial 3D image. The system modulates between the aerial image mode and the background image mode. In the aerial image mode, the elemental images are shown on the CIVI display and the inserted translucent display is uniformly translucent. In the background image mode, the black shadows of the elemental images in a white background are shown on the CIVI display and the background scenery is displayed on the inserted translucent panel. By alternation of these two modes at 120 Hz, an aerial 3D image that visually occludes the far background scenery is perceived by the viewer.

  5. Endocarditis and Incomplete Endothelialization 12 Years after Amplatzer Septal Occluder Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Allan K.; Starr, Joanne P.; Gates, Richard N.; Berdjis, Farbouch

    2016-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy had a 15-mm atrial septal defect repaired percutaneously with use of an Amplatzer Septal Occluder. At age 16 years, he presented with a week's history of fever, chills, dyspnea, fatigue, and malaise. Cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. A transesophageal echocardiogram showed a 1.25 × 1.5-cm pedunculated mass on the left aspect of the atrial septum just superior to the mitral valve, and a smaller vegetation on the right inferior medial aspect of the septum. At surgery, visual examination of both sides of the septum revealed granulation tissue, the pedunculated mass, the small vegetation, and exposed metal wires that suggested incomplete endothelialization of the occluder. We removed the occluder and patched the septal defect. The patient returned to full activity after 4 months and was asymptomatic 3 years postoperatively. Our report reinforces the need for further investigation into prosthetic device endothelialization, endocarditis prophylaxis, and recommended levels of physical activity in patients whose devices might be incompletely endothelialized. In addition to reporting our patient's case, we review the medical literature on this topic. PMID:27303238

  6. Iatrogenic salt poisoning in captive sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L.; Fleming, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Salt poisoning developed in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) when sea salt was added to normal drinking water to produce a sodium chloride concentration of 1%. Two of 18 cranes died and 2 were euthanatized when moribund. Muscle weakness, paresis, dyspnea, and depression were observed. Brain and serum sodium, serum uric acid,:and plasma osmolality values were abnormally high. Lesions were those of visceral gout, renal tubular necrosis, nephrosis, and skeletal muscle.necrosis.

  7. Groundwater contamination by road salt: steady-state concentrations in east central Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Huling, E E; Hollocher, T C

    1972-04-21

    The average steady-state contamination of groundwater by road salt in the suburban area around Boston, on the assumption that current rates of application of salt will continue, is about 160 milligrams of sodium chloride per liter of water (100 milligrams of chloride per liter). This value is compared with values of 50 to 100 milligrams of chloride per liter found rather commonly now in town wells in eastern Massachusetts. These salt concentrations may be of concern to persons on low-sodium diets and to persons who obtain water from wells in the vicinity of major highways where salt concentrations could be several times higher than average.

  8. Solvothermal synthesis of strontium phosphate chloride nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, W. M.; Wong, C. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Luk, K. D. K.; Chan, W. K.; Yang, C.; Chiu, K. Y.; Xu, B.; Lu, W. W.

    2007-08-01

    Strontium phosphate chloride nanowire was synthesized via a solvothermal treatment of strontium tri-polyphosphate and Collin salt in 1,4-dioxane at 150 °C. The effects of 1,4-dioxane concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and phase purity were investigated in this study. The specimen morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the concentration of 1,4-dioxane was below 10%, micron-sized whisker was the dominant form. At 20-25% concentration of 1,4-dioxane, strontium phosphate chloride single-crystalline nanowire was 31±12 nm in diameter and 1.43±0.6 μm in length with an aspect ratio of 52.28±29.41. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this nanowire matched with that of strontium phosphate chloride (JCPDS #083-0973). When 1,4-dioxane concentration exceeded 25%, nanorod aggregate was the dominant form instead of nanowire. At 20-25% 1,4-dioxane concentration suitable strontium concentration combine with high chemical potential environment favors the formation of nanowires. By adding 1,4-dioxane impure phase such as β-strontium hydrogen phosphate, nanorod formation was suppressed. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize high aspect ratio strontium phosphate chloride nanowire. It has potential bioactive nanocomposite, high mechanical performance bioactive bone cement filler and fluorescent material applications.

  9. Ferric Chloride-induced Murine Thrombosis Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nieman, Marvin; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis (blood clot) is a common complication of many systemic diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, cancer and chronic autoimmune rheumatologic disorders. Thrombi are the cause of most heart attacks, strokes and extremity loss, making thrombosis an extremely important public health problem. Since these thrombi stem from inappropriate platelet activation and subsequent coagulation, targeting these systems therapeutically has important clinical significance for developing safer treatments. Due to the complexities of the hemostatic system, in vitro experiments cannot replicate the blood-to-vessel wall interactions; therefore, in vivo studies are critical to understand pathological mechanisms of thrombus formation. To this end, various thrombosis models have been developed in mice. Among them, ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation and aggregation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for the development of a thrombus that occludes blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular injury, platelet activation and aggregation that is relevant to thrombotic diseases. We have significantly refined this FeCl3-induced vascular thrombosis model, which makes the data highly reproducible with minimal variation. Here we describe the model and present representative data from several experimental set-ups that demonstrate the utility of this model in thrombosis research. PMID:27684194

  10. Immobilization of IFR salt wastes in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.F.; Johnson, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Portland cement-base mortars are being considered for immobilizing chloride salt wastes produced by the fuel cycles of Integral Fast Reactors (IFR). The IFR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with metal alloy fuels. It has a close-coupled fuel cycle in which fission products are separated from the actinides in an electrochemical cell operating at 500/degree/C. This cell has a liquid cadmium anode in which the fuels are dissolved and a liquid salt electrolyte. The salt will be a mixture of either lithium, potassium, and sodium chlorides or lithium, calcium, barium, and sodium chlorides. One method being considered for immobilizing the treated nontransuranic salt waste is to disperse the salt in a portland cement-base mortar that will be sealed in corrosion-resistant containers. For this application, the grout must be sufficiently fluid that it can be pumped into canister-molds where it will solidify into a strong, leach-resistant material. The set times must be longer than a few hours to allow sufficient time for processing, and the mortar must reach a reasonable compressive strength (/approximately/7 MPa) within three days to permit handling. Because fission product heating will be high, about 0.6 W/kg for a mortar containing 10% waste salt, the effects of elevated temperatures during curing and storage on mortar properties must be considered.

  11. Pan-nitinol occluder and special delivery device for closure of patent ductus arteriosus: a canine-model feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai-bin; Bai, Yuan; Zong, Gang-jun; Han, Lin; Li, Wei-ping; Lu, Yang; Qin, Yong-wen; Zhao, Xian-xian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new type of occluder for patent ductus arteriosus. Patent ductus arteriosus was established in a canine model by anastomosing a length of autologous jugular vein to the descending aorta and the left pulmonary artery in an end-to-side fashion. Transcatheter closure of each patent ductus arteriosus was performed on 10 dogs, which were then monitored for as long as 6 months with aortography, echocardiography, and histologic evaluation. Transcatheter closure with use of the novel pan-nitinol device was successful in all canine models. Postoperative echocardiography showed that the location and shape of the occluders were normal, without any residual shunting. Further histologic evaluation confirmed that the occluder surface was completely endothelialized 3 months after implantation. Transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus closure with the pan-nitinol occluder can be performed safely and successfully in a canine model and shows good biological compatibility and low mortality rates.

  12. Recognition of Partially Occluded Objects Based on the Three Different Color Spaces (RGB, YCbCr, HSV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanizadeh, Shiva; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Saba, Tanzila; Rehman, Amjad

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to propose an algorithm that can recognize partially occluded objects under different variations by computing three histograms of colour spaces (RGB, HSV, YCbCr). The dataset used in this research are from kitchen apparatuses. It is created by the researcher and include two parts: referenced objects (18 single objects) and tested objects (occluded objects) made from two single objects to represent the occluded object under different variations (scale, rotation, transformation) with varying percentage of occlusion (30-90 %). Three different colour spaces histogram (RGB, HIS, YCbCr) are used for extracting the features. Histogram intersection distance works for matching objects. Computation histograms and matching process are used to each block of image that given by image division process and finally compared the performance of each colour space by evaluating the accuracy. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is robust for identifying occluded objects and it could work at high occlusion.

  13. Simultaneous stent implantation for coarctation of the aorta and closure of patent ductus arteriosus using the Amplatzer duct occluder.

    PubMed

    Hakim, F; Hawelleh, A A; Goussous, Y; Hijazi, Z M

    1999-05-01

    We report on a 13-year-old girl with coarctation of the aorta and patent ductus arteriosus who underwent successful simultaneous stent implantation for the coarctation and catheter closure of the ductus using an Amplatzer duct occluder. PMID:10385155

  14. A Trail of Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the relative abundances of sulfur (in the form of sulfur tri-oxide) and chlorine at three Meridiani Planum sites: soil measured in the small crater where Opportunity landed; the rock dubbed 'McKittrick' in the outcrop lining the inner edge of the crater; and the rock nicknamed 'Guadalupe,' also in the outcrop. The 'McKittrick' data shown here were taken both before and after the rover finished grinding the rock with its rock abrasion tool to expose fresh rock underneath. The 'Guadalupe' data were taken after the rover grounded the rock. After grinding both rocks, the sulfur abundance rose to high levels, nearly five times higher than that of the soil. This very high sulfur concentration reflects the heavy presence of sulfate salts (approximately 30 percent by weight) in the rocks. Chloride and bromide salts are also indicated. Such high levels of salts strongly suggest the rocks contain evaporite deposits, which form when water evaporates or ice sublimes into the atmosphere.

  15. Balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous obliteration with or without balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for the management of gastric varices: concept and technical applications.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A; Kitanosono, Takashi; Koizumi, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Alternative routes for transvenous obliteration are sometimes resorted in the management of gastric varices. These alternative routes can be classified into A, portal venous access routes and B, systemic venous access routes. The portal venous approach to transvenous obliteration is called balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous obliteration (BATO) and is a collective definition, including 1-percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO), 2-through an existing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt [(Trans-TIPS), and 3-trans-iliocolic vein obliteration (TIO)]. PTO is usually out of necessity; however, trans-TIPS approach is usually used out of serendipity (because the low-risk access route is there). The TIPS for the trans-TIPS BATO is not formed for mere access, but is done to create a TIPS or is done when there is a preexisting TIPS. The trans-TIPS approach can be resorted to in the United States in up to 19% of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) cases. PTO is resorted to, out of necessity, in the United States and Japan in 10% of BRTO cases (2%-19% of BRTO cases) and can increase the technical and obliterative success rate of the transvenous obliteration procedure from 84%-98% to 98%-100%. The advantage of BATO as an adjunct to BRTO (combining a BRTO and BATO approach to obliterate the gastric varices) is not only limited to increasing the technical success rate of the obliterative procedure. BATO reduces the risk of overspill of the sclerosant from the gastric variceal system into the portal vein. Moreover, if the BATO is performed from a trans-TIPS approach, any overspill of the sclerosant mixture will partly (if not mostly) go through the patent TIPS to the systemic circulation (lung) rather than the intrahepatic portal vein branches (prevent portal vein embolization). This article discusses the clinical and technical applications, technical considerations, and the outcomes of BATO. PMID:23021832

  16. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D F

    1976-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  17. Lithium orotate, carbonate and chloride: pharmacokinetics, polyuria in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F

    1976-04-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion administered as lithium orotate were studied in rats. Parallel studies were carried out with lithium carbonate and lithium chloride. 2 No differences in the uptake, distribution and excretion of the lithium ion were observed between lithium orotate, lithium carbonate and lithium chloride after single intraperitoneal, subcutaneous or intragastric injections (0.5-1.0 mEq lithium/kg) or after administration of the lithium salts for 20 days in the food. 3 The findings oppose the notion that the pharmacokinetics of the lithium ion given as lithium orotate differ from lithium chloride or lithium carbonate. 4 Polyuria and polydipsia developed more slowly in rats given lithium orotate than in those given lithium carbonate or lithium chloride, perhaps due to an effect of the orotate anion. PMID:1260219

  18. Nitrite toxicity of Litopenaeus vannamei in water containing low concentrations of sea salt or mixed salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sowers, A.; Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.; Browdy, C.L.; Tomasso, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake, depuration and toxicity of environmental nitrite was characterized in Litopenaeus vannamei exposed in water containing low concentrations of artificial sea salt or mixed salts. In 2 g/L artificial sea salts, nitrite was concentrated in the hemolymph in a dose-dependent and rapid manner (steady-state in about 2 d). When exposed to nitrite in 2 g/L artificial sea salts for 4 d and then moved to a similar environment without added nitrite, complete depuration occurred within a day. Increasing salinity up to 10 g/L decreased uptake of environmental nitrite. Nitrite uptake in environments containing 2 g/L mixed salts (combination of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium chlorides) was similar to or lower than rates in 2 g/L artificial sea salt. Toxicity was inversely related to total dissolved salt and chloride concentrations and was highest in 2 g/L artificial sea salt (96-h medial lethal concentration = 8.4 mg/L nitrite-N). Animals that molted during the experiments did not appear to be more susceptible to nitrite than animals that did not molt. The shallow slope of the curve describing the relationship between toxicity and salinity suggests that management of nitrite toxicity in low-salinity shrimp ponds by addition of more salts may not be practical. ?? Copyright by the World Aquaculture Society 2004.

  19. Bioenergetics of salt tolerance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, L.

    1986-10-28

    Major findings are presented on how Synechococcus responds to a transition from low salt (12mM NaCl) to high salt (0.5 M NaCl) medium; we have studied immediate and long-term osmotic responses, identified deleterious effects of NaCl on cellular processes, and analyzed adaptations of the bioenergetic systems that permit the organism to tolerate a high salt environment. We have also developed new electron spin resonance methods for measuring intracellular O/sub 2/ concentrations and intracellular pH. In addition studies on the physiology and molecular mechanism of light-driven chloride transport by halorhodopsin in the halobacteria are reported. The ion-transport ATPase of halobacteria and the respiration-linked sodium transport system of the halotolerant bacterium, Bal were studied with respect to the role and functioning of ionic pumps. Chloride transport was shown to be an integral componet of the overall ion circulation in halobacterial cells, one which maintains internal salt concentration and therefore cellular volume. How halorhodopsin functions, its photointermediates, the nature of chloride-binding sites, the role of the deprotonation of the retinal Schiff-base, and how removal of most of the arginine residues, does not affect chloride-binding are reported. Methods were developed for the study of membrane-bound halobacterial ATPase, its solubilization and partial purification. 43 refs., 1 fig.

  20. [Food processing industry--the salt shock to the consumers].

    PubMed

    Doko Jelinić, Jagoda; Nola, Iskra Alexandra; Andabaka, Damir

    2010-05-01

    Industrial food production and processing is necessarily connected with the use of salt. Salt or sodium chloride is used as a preservative, spice, agent for color maintenance, texture, and to regulate fermentation by stopping the growth of bacteria, yeast and mold. Besides kitchen salt, other types of salt that also contain sodium are used in various technological processes in food preparing industry. Most of the "hidden" salt, 70%-75%, can be brought to the body by using industrial food, which, unfortunately, has been increasingly used due to the modern way of life. Bread and bakery products, meat products, various sauces, dried fish, various types of cheese, fast food, conserved vegetables, ready-made soups and food additives are the most common industrial foods rich in sodium. Many actions have been taken all over the world to restrict salt consumption. The World Health Organization recommends the upper limit of salt input of 5 g per day. These actions appeal to food industry to reduce the proportion of salt in their products. Besides lower salt addition during manufacture, food industry can use salt substitutes, in particular potassium chloride (KCl), in combination with additives that can mask the absence of salt, and flavor intensifiers that also enhance the product salinity. However, food industry is still quite resistant to reducing salt in their products for fear from losing profits.

  1. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  2. Subintimal Double-Barrel Restenting of an Occluded Primary Stented Superficial Femoral Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Duterloo, Dirk Lohle, Paul N.M.; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2007-06-15

    In-stent re-stenosis is a frequent complication of endovascular stents, especially in the superficial femoral artery (SFA). Endovascular re-intervention of in- or peri-stent occlusive disease consists of recanilization through the occluded stent. In our case report, we describe the endovascular treatment of a previously placed stent in the SFA. We unintentionally passed the affected stent subintimally, in a double barrel fashion next to the first stent. The procedure was without any complications and with a successful angiographic result. At one year follow-up the patient still has no complaints and the stent is still patent.

  3. On the Silver Effect and the Formation of Chloride-Bridged Digold Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstraction of chloride anion from Au(I) complexes such as JohnPhosAuCl in noncoordinating solvents with 1 equiv of a silver salt, or even larger amounts, leads to the formation of chloride-bridged dinuclear gold(I) complexes, irrespective of the counteranion, which are substantially less reactive as catalysts. This incomplete removal of chloride ligand could lead to false negative results when using the in situ generation of the gold(I) active species by silver-promoted chloride abstraction. PMID:24195441

  4. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  5. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  6. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  7. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  8. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  9. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  10. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  11. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  12. 21 CFR 201.306 - Potassium salt preparations intended for oral ingestion by man.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium salt preparations intended for oral... Drug Products § 201.306 Potassium salt preparations intended for oral ingestion by man. (a) The Food... coated tablets containing potassium chloride or other potassium salts which supply 100 milligrams or...

  13. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  14. 21 CFR 201.306 - Potassium salt preparations intended for oral ingestion by man.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium salt preparations intended for oral... Drug Products § 201.306 Potassium salt preparations intended for oral ingestion by man. (a) The Food... coated tablets containing potassium chloride or other potassium salts which supply 100 milligrams or...

  15. Salt vulnerability assessment methodology for urban streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, A. R.; Gharabaghi, B.; McBean, E. A.

    2014-09-01

    De-icing agents such as road salts while used for winter road maintenance can cause negative effects on urban stream water quality and drinking water supplies. A new methodology using readily available spatial data to identify Salt Vulnerable Areas (SVAs) for urban streams is used to prioritize implementation of best management practices. The methodology calculates the probable chloride concentration statistics at specified points in the urban stream network and compares the results with known aquatic species exposure tolerance limits to characterize the vulnerability scores. The approach prioritizes implementation of best management practices to areas identified as vulnerable to road salt. The vulnerability assessment is performed on seven sites in four watersheds in the Greater Toronto Area and validated using the Hanlon Creek watershed in Guelph. The mean annual in-stream chloride concentration equation uses readily available spatial data - with province-wide coverage - that can be easily used in any urban watershed.

  16. Dense Accumulation of Lipiodol Emulsion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Nodule during Selective Balloon-occluded Transarterial Chemoembolization: Measurement of Balloon-occluded Arterial Stump Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki Kuramochi, Masashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To reveal the mechanism of dense accumulation of lipiodol emulsion (LE) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during selective balloon-occluded transarterial chemoembolization (B-TACE). Methods. Balloon-occluded arterial stump pressure (BOASP) at the embolization portion was measured during selective B-TACE for 43 nodules in 42 patients. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography were prospectively observed during selective B-TACE to note whether dense LE accumulation in HCC occurred. The LE concentration ratio of HCC to embolized liver parenchyma (LECHL ratio) was also calculated for each treatment on the basis of the computed tomographic scan obtained immediately after selective B-TACE. The relationships between degree of LE accumulation and the BOASP, as well as the LECHL ratio, were analyzed. Results. Arterial flow beyond the catheter tip was maintained even after balloon inflation. In 39 of 43 treatments, LE inflow into the nontumorous liver parenchyma ceased immediately after LE droplets were filled in arteries of the nontumorous liver parenchyma while LE inflow into the HCC nodule continued (group 1). More dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was obtained in these 39 treatments. In four treatments, LE inflow both into the nontumorous liver parenchyma and into the HCC nodule continued, and no dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was observed (group 2). In these four treatments, thick anastomotic vessels with collateral artery were noted. The BOASP in group 1 was (mean {+-} SD) 33.8 {+-} 12.8 mmHg (range 13-64 mmHg) and that in group 2 was 92.3 {+-} 7.4 mmHg (range 83-100 mmHg). There was a statistically significant difference in BOASP between groups (p = 0.00004, Welch's t test). The LECHL ratio in group 1 was 18.3 {+-} 13.9 (range 2.9-54.2) and that in group 2 was 2.6 {+-} 1.1 (range 1.7-4.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the LECHL ratio between the groups (p = 0.000034, Welch's t test). Conclusion. Selective B-TACE induced

  17. The effect of chloride ion concentration gradients on the initiation of localized corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    It has been established that for steel reinforced concrete roads treated with deicing salts or exposed to a marine environment, chloride ions are introduced at the surface of the concrete structure. Two models were discussed in which chloride ion concentration gradients would form in a steel reinforced concrete structure. Electrochemical testing to investigate the models was conducted on plain carbon steel specimens in a simulated concrete environment of saturated calcium hydroxide solution with varying concentrations of sodium chloride. The varying chloride ion concentrations promoted open circuit potential shifts. These potential shifts may lead to galvanic corrosion effects depending on the chloride ion concentration gradients in the structure.

  18. Uptake of chloride and carbonate ions by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, Adel; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2012-08-15

    Decommissioning of old nuclear reactors may produce waste streams containing chlorides and carbonates, including radioactive {sup 36}Cl{sup -} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. Their insolubilization by calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate was investigated. Carbonates were readily depleted from the solution, giving at thermodynamic equilibrium monocarboaluminate, monocarboaluminate + calcite, or calcite only, depending on the initial ratio between the anion and calcium monosulfoaluminate hydrate. Chloride ions reacted more slowly and were precipitated as Kuzel's salt, Kuzel's and Friedel's salts, or Friedel's salt only. Rietveld refinement of X-Ray powder diffraction patterns was successfully used to quantify the phase distributions, which were compared to thermodynamic calculations. Moreover, analysing the lattice parameters of Kuzel's salt as a function of its chloride content showed the occurrence of a restricted solid solution towards the sulfate side with general formula 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}xCaCl{sub 2}{center_dot}(1 - x)CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}(12 - 2x){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (0.36 {<=} x {<=} 0.50).

  19. Overexpression of Pendrin in Intercalated Cells Produces Chloride-Sensitive Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Thibaut; Picard, Nicolas; Miller, R. Lance; Riemondy, Kent A.; Houillier, Pascal; Sohet, Fabien; Ramakrishnan, Suresh K.; Büsst, Cara J.; Jayat, Maximilien; Cornière, Nicolas; Hassan, Hatim; Aronson, Peter S.; Hennings, Jean Christopher; Hübner, Christian A.; Nelson, Raoul D.; Chambrey, Régine

    2013-01-01

    Inherited and acquired disorders that enhance the activity of transporters mediating renal tubular Na+ reabsorption are well established causes of hypertension. It is unclear, however, whether primary activation of an Na+-independent chloride transporter in the kidney can also play a pathogenic role in this disease. Here, mice overexpressing the chloride transporter pendrin in intercalated cells of the distal nephron (TgB1-hPDS mice) displayed increased renal absorption of chloride. Compared with normal mice, these transgenic mice exhibited a delayed increase in urinary NaCl and ultimately, developed hypertension when exposed to a high-salt diet. Administering the same sodium intake as NaHCO3 instead of NaCl did not significantly alter BP, indicating that the hypertension in the transgenic mice was chloride-sensitive. Moreover, excessive chloride absorption by pendrin drove parallel absorption of sodium through the epithelial sodium channel ENaC and the sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger (Ndcbe), despite an appropriate downregulation of these sodium transporters in response to the expanded vascular volume and hypertension. In summary, chloride transport in the distal nephron can play a primary role in driving NaCl transport in this part of the kidney, and a primary abnormality in renal chloride transport can provoke arterial hypertension. Thus, we conclude that the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger pendrin plays a major role in controlling net NaCl absorption, thereby influencing BP under conditions of high salt intake. PMID:23766534

  20. Phonation Threshold Pressure Measurement With a Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article was to determine if a semi-occluded vocal tract could be used to measure phonation threshold pressure. This is in contrast to the shutter technique, where an alternation between a fully occluded tract and an unoccluded tract is used. Method Five male and 5 female volunteers phonated through a thin straw held between the lips. Oral pressure behind the lips was measured. Mathematical predictions of phonation threshold pressures were compared to the measured ones over a range of frequencies. Results It was shown that, for a 2.5-mm diameter straw, phonation threshold pressures were obtainable over a 2-octave range of fundamental frequency by all volunteers. In magnitude, the pressures agreed with the 0.2–0.5 kPa values obtained in previous investigations. Sensitivity to viscoelastic and geometric properties of the vocal folds was generally not compromised with greater oral impedance, but some differences were predicted theoretically in contrast to an open mouth configuration. Conclusion Because phonation threshold pressure is always dependent on vocal tract interaction, it may be advantageous to choose an exact and fixed oral semi-occlusion for the measurement and interpret the results in light of the known acoustic load. PMID:19641082

  1. Secondary cyclogenesis along an occluded front leading to damaging wind gusts: windstorm Kyrill, January 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Patrick; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Hoepp, Simona A.; Fink, Andreas H.; Gray, Suzanne L.

    2015-04-01

    Windstorm Kyrill affected large parts of Europe in January 2007. In this study the formation of a secondary cyclone, Kyill II, along the occluded front of the mature cyclone Kyrill and the occurrence of severe wind gusts as Kyrill II passed over Germany are investigated with the help of high-resolution regional climate model simulations. Kyrill underwent an explosive cyclogenesis south of Greenland. Later in its life cycle secondary cyclogenesis occurred just west of the British Isles. The formation of Kyrill II along the occluded front was associated (a) with frontolytic strain and (b) with strong diabatic heating in combination with a developing upper-level shortwave trough. Sensitivity studies with reduced latent heat release feature a similar development but a weaker secondary cyclone, revealing the importance of diabatic processes during the formation of Kyrill II. Kyrill II moved further towards Europe and its development was favoured by a split jet structure aloft, which maintained the cyclone's exceptionally deep core pressure (below 965 hPa) for at least 36 hours. The occurrence of hurricane force winds related to the strong cold front over North and Central Germany is analysed using convection-permitting simulations. The lower troposphere exhibits conditional instability, a turbulent flow and evaporative cooling. Simulation at high spatio-temporal resolution suggests that the downward mixing of high momentum (the wind speed at 875 hPa widely exceeded 45 m s-1) accounts for widespread severe surface wind gusts, which is in agreement with observed widespread losses.

  2. Cochlear excitation by the near-field component during stimulation through the partially occluded round window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weddell, Thomas D.; Yarin, Yury M.; Drexl, Markus; Russell, Ian J.; Elliott, Stephen J.; Lukashkin, Andrei N.

    2015-12-01

    The round window membrane (RW) provides pressure relief when the cochlea is excited by sound. While normal function of the RW is important for effective stimulation of the cochlea through the conventional oval window route, the cochlea can be stimulated successfully in non-conventional ways (e.g. through bone conduction, through the RW, and through perforations in the cochlea's apical turn). We report measurements of cochlear function from guinea pigs when the cochlea was stimulated at acoustic frequencies by movements of a miniature magnet which partially occluded the RW. Neural response latencies to acoustic and RW stimulation were similar and taken to indicate that both means of stimulation resulted in the generation of conventional travelling waves along the cochlear partition. It was concluded that the relatively high impedance of the ossicles, as seen from the cochlea, enabled the region of the RW not occluded by the magnet, to act as a pressure shunt during RW stimulation. We propose that travelling waves, similar to those due to acoustic far-field pressure changes, are driven by a jet-like, near-field component of a complex fluid-pressure field, which is generated by the magnetically vibrated RW.

  3. Utilization of 3 amplatzer occluders for closure of post-myocardial infarction ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Kar, Saibal; Ibebuogu, Uzoma N; Conte, Antonio Hernandez

    2012-05-01

    This case report describes a patient who sustained a post-myocardial infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD) with an associated left ventricular aneurysm who developed cardiogenic shock and required an intra-aortic balloon pump for hemodynamic stabilization. After deployment of a single Amplatzer occluder (AGA Medical), a residual VSD measuring 0.5 cm was noted. Therefore, a second Amplatzer occluder was deployed and a minimal residual VSD remained. The patient remained hemodynamically stable throughout the procedure and was subsequently extubated with removal of intra-aortic balloon pump. Post-discharge, the patient was readmitted with congestive heart failure. A third Amplatzer device was deployed to ameliorate the recurrent VSD shunt. At 9-week follow-up, transthoracic echocardiogram was performed and findings included: 1) left ventricular ejection fraction of 62%; 2) appearance of 3 Amplatzer devices along the interventrcular septum seated well with no motion and residual shunt; 3) moderate diastolic dysfunction with pseudonormal left ventricular filling pattern; and 4) no valvular abnormalities. The patient had increased exercise tolerance with no shortness of breath at rest or with exertion. This case demonstrates the utility and viability of multiple Amplatzer device deployment as a means of repairing a large post-myocardial infarction VSD and recurrent VSDs.

  4. Thermochemolysis of the Murchison meteorite: identification of oxygen bound and occluded units in the organic macromolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jonathan S.; Sephton, Mark A.; Gilmour, Iain

    2010-10-01

    An organic macromolecular residue, prepared from the Murchison meteorite by treatment with hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, was subjected to online thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The most abundant compound released by thermochemolysis was benzoic acid. Other abundant compounds include methyl and dimethyl benzoic acids as well as methoxy benzoic acids. Short chain dicarboxylic acids (C4-8) were also released from the organic macromolecule. Within the C1 and C2 benzoic acids all possible structural isomers are present reflecting the abiotic origin of these units. The most abundant isomers include 3,4-dimethylbenzoic acid (DMBA), 3,5-DMBA, 2,6-DMBA and phenylacetic acid. Thermochemolysis also liberates hydrocarbons that are not observed during thermal desorption; these compounds include naphthalene, methylnaphthalenes, biphenyl, methylbiphenyls, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene and pyrene. The lack of oxygen containing functional groups in these hydrocarbons indicates that they represent non-covalently bound, occluded molecules within the organic framework. This data provides a valuable insight into oxygen bound and physically occluded moieties in the Murchison organic macromolecule and implies a relative order of synthesis or agglomeration for the detected organic constituents.

  5. In Vitro Ability of a Novel Nanohydroxyapatite Oral Rinse to Occlude Dentine Tubules

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert G.; Chen, Xiaohui; Gillam, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a novel nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) desensitizing oral rinse to occlude dentine tubules compared to selected commercially available desensitizing oral rinses. Methods. 25 caries-free extracted molars were sectioned into 1 mm thick dentine discs. The dentine discs (n = 25) were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed with distilled water, prior to a 30-second application of test and control oral rinses. Evaluation was by (1) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the dentine surface and (2) fluid flow measurements through a dentine disc. Results. Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse. However the hydroxyapatite, 1.4% potassium oxalate, and arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinses, appeared to be relatively more effective than the nHA test and negative control rinses (potassium nitrate) in relation to a reduction in fluid flow measurements. Conclusions. Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse. PMID:26161093

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration with Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate Liquid Sclerotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Il Soo; Kwon, So Young; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Shim, Chan Sup; Lee, Tae Yoon; Kim, Jeong Han

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) with sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) liquid sclerotherapy of gastric varices. Materials and Methods Between February 2012 and August 2014, STS liquid sclerotherapy was performed in 17 consecutive patients (male:female = 8:9; mean age 58.6 years, range 44–86 years) with gastric varices. Retrograde venography was performed after occlusion of the gastrorenal shunt using a balloon catheter and embolization of collateral draining veins using coils or gelfoam pledgets, to evaluate the anatomy of the gastric varices. We prepared 2% liquid STS by mixing 3% STS and contrast media in a ratio of 2:1. A 2% STS solution was injected into the gastric varices until minimal filling of the afferent portal vein branch was observed (mean 19.9 mL, range 6–33 mL). Patients were followed up using computed tomography (CT) or endoscopy. Results Technical success was achieved in 16 of 17 patients (94.1%). The procedure failed in one patient because the shunt could not be occluded due to the large diameter of gastrorenal shunt. Complete obliteration of gastric varices was observed in 15 of 16 patients (93.8%) with follow-up CT or endoscopy. There was no rebleeding after the procedure. There was no procedure-related mortality. Conclusion BRTO using STS liquid can be a safe and useful treatment option in patients with gastric varices. PMID:26957907

  7. Association between Myopia, Biometry and Occludable Angle: The Jiangning Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Cai, Xuan; Yu, Wenjing; Yu, Siyi; Wang, Tianyu; Lu, Wuyi; Li, Xiang; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background Myopia subjects usually have long axial lengths and are predisposed to deep anterior chamber depths and open angles. Jiangning eye study is a randomized, population based study in Shanghai to determine whether myopia has an effect on the prevalence of occludable angles. Methods A total of 2478 residents aged 50 years and over were randomly selected, and 2044 (82.5%) individuals of them participated in ophthalmic examinations between November 2012 and February 2013. Eye examinations included autorefraction, noncontact tonometry, measurement of axial length, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Results The crude prevalences of iris trabecular meshwork contact in Jiangning Chinese individuals with myopia, emmetropia, and hyperopia are 1.25%, 6.44%, and 7.43%, respectively. There is also iris trabecular meshwork contact and shallow anterior chamber depth in myopia subjects even with long axial lengths. Conclusions The prevalence of iris trabecular meshwork contact in myopia subjects is lower than their emmetropia or hyperopia counterparts. Axial length is an important factor associate with occludable angle. PMID:27764227

  8. Production and mitigation of acid chlorides in geothermal steam

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    Measurements of the equilibrium distribution of relatively nonvolatile solutes between aqueous liquid and vapor phases have been made at temperatures to 350{degrees}C for HCl(aq) and chloride salts. These data are directly applicable to problems of corrosive-steam production in geothermal steam systems. Compositions of high-temperature brines which could produce steam having given concentrations of chlorides may be estimated at various boiling temperatures. Effects of mitigation methods (e.g., desuperheating) can be calculated based on liquid-vapor equilibrium constants and solute mass balances under vapor-saturation conditions.

  9. Inhibitory effects of beryllium chloride on rat liver microsomal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, C F; Yasaka, W J; Silva, L F; Oshiro, T T; Oga, S

    1990-04-30

    A single i.v. dose (0.1 mmol Be2+/kg) of beryllium chloride prolonged the duration of pentobarbital-induced sleep and zoxazolamine-induced paralysis, in rats. The effects are correlated with changes of the pharmacokinetic parameters and with the in vitro inhibition of both aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylation of pentobarbital and zoxazolamine. In vitro N-demethylation of meperidine and aminopyrine was partially inhibited while O-demethylation of quinidine was unaffected by liver microsomes of rats pretreated with beryllium salt. The findings give clues that beryllium chloride inhibits some forms of cytochrome P-450, especially those responsible for hydroxylation of substrates, like pentobarbital and zoxazolamine.

  10. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  11. The influence of anti-icing salts on the chemical composition of precipitation in Moscow according to monitoring and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Irina; Aloyan, Artasch; Arutunan, Vardan; Larin, Igor; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alex

    2015-04-01

    The monitoring data and results of analysis of variability of acidity and mineral composition of precipitation, which took place in Moscow in 2012, compared with the previous period are presented. It has been found that the source of chloride anions in precipitation in recent years could be mainly chlorides of anti-icing salts. The origin of the chloride anions (together with chlorides of metal components of these reagents), could be partly obliged to dissolution of the hydrogen chloride. It has been shown that appearance of hydrogen chloride in the atmosphere of Moscow (leading to acid rains) could be the result of heterophase chemical reactions involving anti-icing salts. Preliminary assessment of the impact of these chemicals on the mineral composition and the acidity of precipitation has been presented. Keywords: Acid rain, monitoring of atmospheric precipitation mineral composition, the chloride anions, anti-icing salts.

  12. Implications of salt and sodium reduction on microbial food safety.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Excess sodium consumption has been cited as a primary cause of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt (sodium chloride) is considered the main source of sodium in the human diet, and it is estimated that processed foods and restaurant foods contribute 80% of the daily intake of sodium in most of the Western world. However, ample research demonstrates the efficacy of sodium chloride against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in a variety of food systems. Notable examples of the utility and necessity of sodium chloride include the inhibition of growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in processed meats and cheeses. Other sodium salts contributing to the overall sodium consumption are also very important in the prevention of spoilage and/or growth of microorganisms in foods. For example, sodium lactate and sodium diacetate are widely used in conjunction with sodium chloride to prevent the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in ready-to-eat meats. These and other examples underscore the necessity of sodium salts, particularly sodium chloride, for the production of safe, wholesome foods. Key literature on the antimicrobial properties of sodium chloride in foods is reviewed here to address the impact of salt and sodium reduction or replacement on microbiological food safety and quality.

  13. Implications of salt and sodium reduction on microbial food safety.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Excess sodium consumption has been cited as a primary cause of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt (sodium chloride) is considered the main source of sodium in the human diet, and it is estimated that processed foods and restaurant foods contribute 80% of the daily intake of sodium in most of the Western world. However, ample research demonstrates the efficacy of sodium chloride against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in a variety of food systems. Notable examples of the utility and necessity of sodium chloride include the inhibition of growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in processed meats and cheeses. Other sodium salts contributing to the overall sodium consumption are also very important in the prevention of spoilage and/or growth of microorganisms in foods. For example, sodium lactate and sodium diacetate are widely used in conjunction with sodium chloride to prevent the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in ready-to-eat meats. These and other examples underscore the necessity of sodium salts, particularly sodium chloride, for the production of safe, wholesome foods. Key literature on the antimicrobial properties of sodium chloride in foods is reviewed here to address the impact of salt and sodium reduction or replacement on microbiological food safety and quality. PMID:20301012

  14. Evaluation of PFP Furnace Systems for Thermal Stabilization of Washed High Chloride Plutonium Oxide Items

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Christopher M.; Elmore, Monte R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2002-12-17

    High chloride content plutonium (HCP) oxides are impure plutonium oxide scrap which contains NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and/or CaCl2 salts at potentially high concentrations and must be stabilized at 950 C per the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000. The chlorides pose challenges to stabilization because volatile chloride salts and decomposition products can corrode furnace heating elements and downstream ventilation components. A high-temperature furnace (same make and model as used at the RMC at Plutonium Finishing Plant) and the associated offgas system were set up at PNNL to identify system vulnerabilities and to investigate alternative materials and operating conditions that would mitigate any corrosion and plugging of furnace and offgas components. The key areas of interest for this testing were the furnace heating elements, the offgas line located inside the furnace, the offgas line between the furnace and the filter/knockout pot, the filter/knockout pot, the sample boat, and corrosion coupons to evaluate alternative materials of construction. The evaluation was conducted by charging the furnace with CeO2 that had been impregnated with a mixture of chloride salts (selected to represent the expected residual chloride salt level in washed high chloride items) and heated in the furnace in accordance with the temperature ramp rates and hold times used at PFP.

  15. Thermal Characterization of Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson

    2011-09-01

    The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner (ER) may be adversely affected by the buildup of sodium, fission products, and transuranics in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are the following: (1) salt freezing due to an unexpected change in the liquidus temperature, (2) phase separation or non-homogeneity of the molten salt due to the precipitation of solids or formation of immiscible liquids, and (3) any mechanism that can result in the separation and concentration of fissile elements from the molten salt. Any of these situations would result in an off-normal condition outside the established safety basis for electrorefiner (ER) operations. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This report describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, which consist of chlorides of potassium, lithium, strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium chlorides as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium, used for the processing of used nuclear fuels.

  16. Salt excretion in Suaeda fruticosa.

    PubMed

    Labidi, Nehla; Ammari, Manel; Mssedi, Dorsaf; Benzerti, Maali; Snoussi, Sana; Abdelly, C

    2010-09-01

    Suaeda fruticosa is a perennial "includer" halophyte devoid of glands or trichomes with a strong ability of accumulating and sequestrating Na(+) and Cl(-). We were interested in determining whether leaf cuticle salt excretion could be involved as a further mechanism in salt response of this species after long-term treatment with high salinity levels. Seedlings had been treated for three months with seawater (SW) diluted with tap water (0, 25, 50 and 75% SW). Leaf scanning electron microscopy revealed a convex adaxial side sculpture and a higher accumulation of saline crystals at the lamina margin, with a large variability on repartition and size between treatments. No salt gland or salt bladder was found. Threedimensional wax decorations were the only structures found on leaf surface. Washing the leaf surface with water indicated that sodium and chloride predominated in excreted salts, and that potassium was poorly represented. Optimal growth of whole plant was recorded at 25% SW, correlating with maximum Na(+) and Cl(-) absolute secretion rate. The leaves of plants treated with SW retained more water than those of plants treated with tap water due to lower solute potential, especially at 25% SW. Analysis of compatible solute, such as proline, total soluble carbohydrates and glycinebetaine disclosed strong relationship between glycinebetaine and osmotic potential (r = 0.92) suggesting that tissue hydration was partly maintained by glycinebetaine accumulation. Thus in S. fruticosa , increased solute accumulation associated with water retention, and steady intracellular ion homeostasis confirms the "includer" strategy of salt tolerance previously demonstrated. However, salt excretion at leaf surface also participated in conferring to this species a capacity in high salinity tolerance.

  17. Boric ester-type molten salt via dehydrocoupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Noriyoshi; Toyota, Yoshiyuki; Joshi, Prerna; Puneet, Puhup; Vedarajan, Raman; Takekawa, Toshihiro

    2014-11-14

    Novel boric ester-type molten salt was prepared using 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride as a key starting material. After an ion exchange reaction of 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium chloride with lithium (bis-(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide) (LiNTf2), the resulting 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium NTf2 was reacted with 9-borabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (9-BBN) to give the desired boric ester-type molten salt in a moderate yield. The structure of the boric ester-type molten salt was supported by 1H-, 13C-, 11B- and 19F-NMR spectra. In the presence of two different kinds of lithium salts, the matrices showed an ionic conductivity in the range of 1.1 × 10⁻⁴-1.6 × 10⁻⁵ S cm⁻¹ at 51 °C. This was higher than other organoboron molten salts ever reported.

  18. Percutaneous recanalization of totally occluded coarctation of the aorta in children using Brockenbrough needle and covered stents

    PubMed Central

    Tefera, Endale; Leye, Mohamed; Chanie, Yilkal; Raboisson, Marie-Josée; Miró, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatment of totally occluded coarctation of the aorta has been reported predominantly in adults. The success and challenges of this procedure in children is reported in few patients. We report an outcome of percutaneous treatment of three children with completely occluded coarctation of the aorta. The age range was 9-14 years. All the patients had upper limb hypertension. One case had severe left ventricular dysfunction. In all cases, a pediatric Brockenbrough needle and a covered stent were implanted. Recanalization and implantation of a covered stent was successful in all patients. One of these patients developed transient postcoarctectomy syndrome. Percutaneous recanalization of totally occluded coarctation of the aorta using Brockenbrough needle and a covered stent in children is feasible and effective. PMID:27212850

  19. Microwave nondestructive detection of chloride in cement based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benally, Aaron D.; Bois, Karl J.; Zoughi, Reza; Nowak, Paul S.

    1999-12-02

    Preliminary results pertaining to the near-field microwave nondestructive detection and evaluation of chloride in cement paste and mortar specimens are presented. The technique used for this purpose utilizes an open-ended rectangular waveguide at the aperture of which the reflection properties of the specimens are measured. It is shown that the magnitude of reflection coefficient is a useful parameter for detecting chloride in these specimens. Furthermore, the difference in the amount of chloride present in these various specimens, at the time of mixing, can also be determined. Reflection property measurements were conducted in S-band (2.6 GHz-3.95 GHz) and X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) for two sets of four mortar specimens with 0.50 and 0.60 water-to-cement ratio and varying salt (NaCl) contents added to the mixing water used in producing these specimens. It is shown that the reflection properties of these materials vary considerably as a function of their chloride content. Also, by monitoring the daily variation in the reflection coefficient of each specimen during the curing period, the effect of chloride on curing can be nondestructively ascertained. Finally, it is shown that the detection and evaluation of chloride content in cement based materials can be performed using a simple comparative process with respect to a non-contaminated specimen.

  20. Growth and physiological responses of five cotton genotypes to sodium chloride and sodium sulfate saline water irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate the salt tolerance of five cotton genotypes [three Gossypium hirsutum L. (DN 1, DP 491, and FM 989) and two G. barbadense L. (Cobalt and Pima S-7)] under sodium chloride or sodium sulfate salinity conditions at similar osmotic potentials (100 mM sodium chlorid...

  1. Phosphate salts

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken by mouth or used as enemas. Indigestion. Aluminum phosphate and calcium phosphate are FDA-permitted ingredients ... Phosphate salts containing sodium, potassium, aluminum, or calcium are LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term, when sodium phosphate is inserted into the ...

  2. Acquisition of nonlinear forward optics in generative models: two-stage "downside-up" learning for occluded vision.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satohiro; Watanabe, Masataka

    2011-03-01

    We propose a two-stage learning method which implements occluded visual scene analysis into a generative model, a type of hierarchical neural network with bi-directional synaptic connections. Here, top-down connections simulate forward optics to generate predictions for sensory driven low-level representation, whereas bottom-up connections function to send the prediction error, the difference between the sensory based and the predicted low-level representation, to higher areas. The prediction error is then used to update the high-level representation to obtain better agreement with the visual scene. Although the actual forward optics is highly nonlinear and the accuracy of simulated forward optics is crucial for these types of models, the majority of previous studies have only investigated linear and simplified cases of forward optics. Here we take occluded vision as an example of nonlinear forward optics, where an object in front completely masks out the object behind. We propose a two-staged learning method inspired by the staged development of infant visual capacity. In the primary learning stage, a minimal set of object basis is acquired within a linear generative model using the conventional unsupervised learning scheme. In the secondary learning stage, an auxiliary multi-layer neural network is trained to acquire nonlinear forward optics by supervised learning. The important point is that the high-level representation of the linear generative model serves as the input and the sensory driven low-level representation provides the desired output. Numerical simulations show that occluded visual scene analysis can indeed be implemented by the proposed method. Furthermore, considering the format of input to the multi-layer network and analysis of hidden-layer units leads to the prediction that whole object representation of partially occluded objects, together with complex intermediate representation as a consequence of nonlinear transformation from non-occluded to

  3. Salting our landscape: an integrated catchment model using readily accessible data to assess emerging road salt contamination to streams.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Whitehead, Paul; Siegel, Donald I; Findlay, Stuart

    2011-05-01

    A new integrated catchment model for salinity has been developed to assess the transport of road salt from upland areas in watersheds to streams using readily accessible landscape, hydrologic, and meteorological data together with reported salt applications. We used Fishkill Creek (NY) as a representative watershed to test the model. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured stream water chloride concentrations. These results suggest that a dominant mode of catchment simulation that does not entail complex deterministic modeling is an appropriate method to model salinization and to assess effects of future applications of road salt to streams. We heuristically increased and decreased salt applications by 100% and results showed that stream chloride concentrations increased by 13% and decreased by 7%, respectively. The model suggests that future management of salt application can reduce environmental concentrations, albeit over some time.

  4. Jetstream® atherectomy for subacutely or chronically occluded femoro-popliteal prosthetic bypass grafts: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Obon-Dent, Mauricio; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    A failed infrainguinal bypass is associated with poor prognosis for the limb in question, particularly if the graft was initially placed for limb salvage. Revascularization of occluded grafts is an important but challenging issue. We present three patients with occluded femoro-popliteal graft in whom the Jetstream(®) system was used successfully to perform thromboatherectomy. The Jetstream(®) system is minimally invasive and avoids use of thrombolytic therapy and its associated costs and complications. The device seems to be highly effective in removing thrombus beyond the acute setting. PMID:22517514

  5. Electrochemical studies of calcium chloride-based molten salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, T.P. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    Conductance and EMF studies of CaCl{sub 2}-based melts were performed in the temperature range 790--990 C. Conductivity data collected using magnesia tubes and capillaries showed deviations from the data recommended by the National Bureau of Standards. These deviations are attributed to the slow dissolution of magnesia by the CaCl{sub 2}-CaO melt. Conductivity data for molten CaCl{sub 2} using a pyrolytic boron nitride capillary were in reasonable agreement with the recommended data; however, undissolved CaO in CaCl{sub 2} may have caused blockage of the pyrolytic boron nitride capillary, resulting in fluctuations in the measured resistance. The utility of the AgCl/Ag reference electrode in CaCl{sub 2}-AgCl and CaCl{sub 2}-CaO-AgCl melts, using asbestos diaphragms and Vycor glass as reference half-cell membranes, was also investigated. Nernstian behavior was observed using both types of reference half-cell membranes in CaCl{sub 2}-AgCl melts. The AgCl/Ag reference electrode also exhibited Nernstian behavior in CaCl{sub 2}-CaO-AgCl melts using a Vycor reference half-cell membrane and a magnesia crucible. The use of CaCl{sub 2} as a solvent is of interest since it is used in plutonium metal purification, as well as various other commercial applications. 97 refs., 33 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Recognition of partially occluded and rotated images with a network of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joo-Heon; Smith, David; Swiercz, Waldemar; Staley, Kevin; Rickard, J Terry; Montero, Javier; Kurgan, Lukasz A; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel system for recognition of partially occluded and rotated images. The system is based on a hierarchical network of integrate-and-fire spiking neurons with random synaptic connections and a novel organization process. The network generates integrated output sequences that are used for image classification. The proposed network is shown to provide satisfactory predictive performance given that the number of the recognition neurons and synaptic connections are adjusted to the size of the input image. Comparison of synaptic plasticity activity rule (SAPR) and spike timing dependant plasticity rules, which are used to learn connections between the spiking neurons, indicates that the former gives better results and thus the SAPR rule is used. Test results show that the proposed network performs better than a recognition system based on support vector machines.

  7. Glucose Transporters are Abundant in Cells with "Occluding" Junctions at the Blood-Eye Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harik, Sami I.; Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Whitney, Paul M.; Andersson, Lars; Lundahl, Per; Ledbetter, Steven R.; Perry, George

    1990-06-01

    We studied the distribution of the "erythroid/brain" glucose transporter protein in the human and rat eye by immunocytochemistry with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to the C terminus of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter. We found intense immunocytochemical staining in the endothelium of microvessels of the retina, optic nerve, and iris but not in microvessels of the choroid, ciliary body, sclera, and other retro-orbital tissues. In addition, we found marked immunocytochemical staining of retinal pigment epithelium, ciliary body epithelium, and posterior epithelium of the iris. The common feature of all those endothelial and epithelial cells that stained intensely for the glucose transporter is the presence of "occluding" intercellular junctions, which constitute the anatomical bases of the blood-eye barriers. We propose that a high density of the glucose transporter is a biochemical concomitant of epithelial and endothelial cells with barrier characteristics, at least in tissues that have a high metabolic requirement for glucose.

  8. Intraoral pressures produced by thirteen semi-occluded vocal tract gestures

    PubMed Central

    MAXFIELD, LYNN; TITZE, INGO; HUNTER, ERIC; KAPSNER-SMITH, MARA

    2016-01-01

    The use of semi-occluded vocal tract (SOVT) exercises as habilitative and rehabilitative tools has grown substantially in the past two decades. As the use or these exercises has grown, so too has the number of variations of the phonatory gestures used to create oral semi-occlusions. While much of the research on SOVT exercises to this point has been conducted using straw phonation, there has been little discussion or investigation regarding how other phonatory gestures that are considered to be SOVT compare to one another. The current study sought to measure the intraoral pressure produced by 13 phonatory gestures generally thought of as oral semi-occlusions. Twenty subjects (10 male, 10 female) produced three tokens of each gesture, and intraoral pressure was recorded via a thin, flexible-cannula pressure transducer. Pressures ranged between 0.1 and 1.0 kPa, but varied significantly between gestures and between subjects. PMID:24865621

  9. Glucose transporters are abundant in cells with "occluding" junctions at the blood-eye barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Harik, S I; Kalaria, R N; Whitney, P M; Andersson, L; Lundahl, P; Ledbetter, S R; Perry, G

    1990-01-01

    We studied the distribution of the "erythroid/brain" glucose transporter protein in the human and rat eye by immunocytochemistry with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to the C terminus of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter. We found intense immunocytochemical staining in the endothelium of microvessels of the retina, optic nerve, and iris but not in microvessels of the choroid, ciliary body, sclera, and other retro-orbital tissues. In addition, we found marked immunocytochemical staining of retinal pigment epithelium, ciliary body epithelium, and posterior epithelium of the iris. The common feature of all those endothelial and epithelial cells that stained intensely for the glucose transporter is the presence of "occluding" intercellular junctions, which constitute the anatomical bases of the blood-eye barriers. We propose that a high density of the glucose transporter is a biochemical concomitant of epithelial and endothelial cells with barrier characteristics, at least in tissues that have a high metabolic requirement for glucose. Images PMID:2190218

  10. Use of the Amplatzer ASD Occluder for Closing a Persistent Left Vertical Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Zennaro, Marco; Zecchel, Roberto; Mancuso, Daniela; Pedon, Luigi

    2009-05-15

    We report the case of a very large anomalous connection of the veins draining the upper lobe of the left lung to both the left-sided vertical vein and the left atrium, associated with mild rheumatic mitral valve stenosis, in which the atrial septum was intact and the remaining venous system, including the coronary sinus, was otherwise normal (a variant of Lutembacher's syndrome). In order to abolish the left-to-right shunting, a transcatheter approach to close this venous structure was successfully attempted using an Amplatzer ASD Occluder device. The technical aspects and the alternative options of performing a procedure with a device for a purpose outside the scope of its approved label are discussed.

  11. Occluded target viewing and identification high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Dippel, George F.; Cecchetti, Kristen D.; Wikman, John C.; Drouin, David P.; Egbert, Paul I.

    2007-09-01

    BAE SYSTEMS has developed a high-resolution 2D imaging laser radar (LADAR) system that has proven its ability to detect and identify hard targets in occluded environments, through battlefield obscurants, and through naturally occurring image-degrading atmospheres. Limitations of passive infrared imaging for target identification using medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long wavelength infrared (LWIR) atmospheric windows are well known. Of particular concern is that as wavelength is increased the aperture must be increased to maintain resolution, hence, driving apertures to be very larger for long-range identification; impractical because of size, weight, and optics cost. Conversely, at smaller apertures and with large f-numbers images may become photon starved with long integration times. Here, images are most susceptible to distortion from atmospheric turbulence, platform vibration, or both. Additionally, long-range identification using passive thermal imaging is clutter limited arising from objects in close proximity to the target object.

  12. Applying partially occluded fentanyl transdermal patches to manage pain in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Amy; Smith, Howard S

    2010-01-01

    Fentanyl transdermal patches (FTPs) have been used for many years in the treatment armamentarium for chronic pain. By design, FTPs release drug into the skin at a constant rate and thereby provide drug in a fashion similar to continuous intravenous infusion without the disadvantages of a venous catheter and the constant presence of an analgesia pump. Pediatric patients may require doses of FTP other than the five commercially available strengths. Application of a partial FTP allows for more flexibility in dosing. Yet, very little information is provided in the literature to suggest a procedure for applying partial FTP. A technique of using a partially occluded FTP is presented in an effort to encourage further study of this and perhaps other techniques.

  13. Treatment of infra-occluded primary molars in patients with dental ageneses.

    PubMed

    Medio, Marie; de la Dure Molla, Muriel

    2014-09-01

    When dental agenesis is encountered, several treatment solutions can be considered: extraction of the primary tooth and closure of the space or, alternatively, conservation of the space with the primary tooth still on the arch until a prosthesis can be placed. In the presence of premolar agenesis, the corresponding primary molar may be infra-occluded relative to the occlusal plane. This situation complicates the treatment plan. Depending on the clinical setting, it can be useful to restore occlusal contacts using composite overlays. We will demonstrate this treatment option via two clinical cases. Tooth conservation helps maintain the bone volume that will later facilitate placement of an implant and limit extrusion of the antagonists as well as tipping of the neighboring teeth. PMID:25092254

  14. Effect of structural composition and position of occlusion on the legibility of occluded Chinese characters.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yung-Chin; Liao, Ching-Chih

    2015-04-01

    The study examined the effect of structural composition, position of occlusion, and education background on response time and accuracy rate of adult participants in recognition of occluded Chinese characters used in graphic design. Based on 18 Chinese characters selected from the top 4,000 most commonly used characters, a recognition experiment was conducted. Results indicated that, for the characters with two different composition structures, the right position was the best position of occlusion because the recognition of the radical or feature of a character would be least affected, leading to a shorter response time and more accurate reading comprehension. Educational background did not have a significant influence on response time and recognition accuracy. PMID:25914938

  15. Endobronchial Hamartoma Subtotally Occluding the Right Main Bronchus and Mimicking Bronchial Carcinoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lococo, Filippo; Galeone, Carla; Lasagni, Luciano; Carbonelli, Cristiano; Tagliavini, Elena; Piro, Roberto; Zucchi, Luigi; Sgarbi, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hamartomas are very rarely identified as an endobronchial lesion. Herein, we describe a peculiar case of a 55-year-old woman with persistent cough and increasing dyspnea and radiological detection of a solid lesion subtotally occluding the main right bronchus. Despite the radiological and radiometabolic (18-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography scan) features were highly suspected for bronchial carcinoid, the definitive diagnosis after endoscopic removal was indicative of an endobronchial hamartoma. When considering differential diagnosis of an endobronchial lesion, the physicians should take firmly in mind such rare entity and, accordingly, bronchoscopy and bronchoscopic biopsy should be done as first step in management of all cases presenting with endobronchial lesions. PMID:27082600

  16. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varices: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Sato, Morio; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Kimura, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenzo; Kutsukake, Yasumichi; Ushimi, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Hayashi, Seishu; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and every 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.

  17. A new system for early chloride detection in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laferrière, Francine; Inaudi, Daniele; Kronenberg, Pascal; Smith, Ian F. C.

    2008-08-01

    In a national and worldwide context, countless reinforced concrete structures are in an advanced state of deterioration. A principal cause of such degradation is chloride induced corrosion of reinforcement bars. This phenomenon is accentuated in countries where de-icing salts are used for road safety, as well as in maritime zones. To date, no non-destructive method quantifying chloride content during the corrosion initiation phase has been established. Measurement of such a parameter is important for the development of a better understanding of the complexity of corrosion phenomena and, more practically, for better management of existing structures. This paper proposes a new method for non-destructive measurement, for monitoring continuously and in real time free chloride content in concrete pores. In this context, a chemical sensor that employs optical fibers was developed and tested. The sensor functions using the fluorescence of an indicator dye that is sensitive to chlorides. Through fluorescence spectroscopy, variations in the concentration of free chlorides are related to intensity fluctuations of fluorescence. The use of optical fibers also provides an advantage compared with existing electric non-destructive detection systems due to superior electromagnetic stability. Theoretical and experimental studies calibrated and validated the sensor for implementation within mortar samples. Free chloride concentrations between 30 and 350 mM can be detected. Two experiments reproduced climatic variations in a controlled environment. The first test simulated a hot maritime climate and the second test simulated a cold continental climate. These tests confirmed that it is possible to determine with precision the free chloride content. Also, fluorescence spectroscopy with optical fibers offers an innovative means for early and non-destructive detection of free chloride content in concrete. As a result, this new method has potential for improving the science of corrosion

  18. DNA binding in high salt: analysing the salt dependence of replication protein A3 from the halophile Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jody A; Patoli, Bushra; Bunting, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Halophilic archaea maintain intracellular salt concentrations close to saturation to survive in high-salt environments and their cellular processes have adapted to function under these conditions. Little is known regarding halophilic adaptation of the DNA processing machinery, particularly intriguing since protein-DNA interactions are classically salt sensitive. To investigate such adaptation, we characterised the DNA-binding capabilities of recombinant RPA3 from Haloferax volcanii (HvRPA3). Under physiological salt conditions (3 M KCl), HvRPA3 is monomeric, binding 18 nucleotide ssDNA with nanomolar affinity, demonstrating that RPAs containing the single OB-fold/zinc finger architecture bind with broadly comparable affinity to two OB-fold/zinc finger RPAs. Reducing the salt concentration to 1 M KCl induces dimerisation of the protein, which retains its ability to bind DNA. On circular ssDNA, two concentration-dependent binding modes are observed. Conventionally, increased salt concentration adversely affects DNA binding but HvRPA3 does not bind DNA in 0.2 M KCl, although multimerisation may occlude the binding site. The single N-terminal OB-fold is competent to bind DNA in the absence of the C-terminal zinc finger, albeit with reduced affinity. This study represents the first quantitative characterisation of DNA binding in a halophilic protein in extreme salt concentrations.

  19. Warm season chloride concentrations in stream habitats of freshwater mussel species at risk.

    PubMed

    Todd, Aaron K; Kaltenecker, M Georgina

    2012-12-01

    Warm season (May-October) chloride concentrations were assessed in stream habitats of freshwater mussel species at risk in southern Ontario, Canada. Significant increases in concentrations were observed at 96% of 24 long-term (1975-2009) monitoring sites. Concentrations were described as a function of road density indicating an anthropogenic source of chloride. Linear regression showed that 36% of the variation of concentrations was explained by road salt use by the provincial transportation ministry. Results suggest that long-term road salt use and retention is contributing to a gradual increase in baseline chloride concentrations in at risk mussel habitats. Exposure of sensitive mussel larvae (glochidia) to increasing chloride concentrations may affect recruitment to at risk mussel populations.

  20. Use of bromide:Chloride ratios to differentiate potential sources of chloride in a shallow, unconfined aquifer affected by brackish-water intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andreasen, D.C.; Fleck, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Brackish water from Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries has entered the Aquia aquifer in east-central Anne Arundel County, Maryland, USA. This determination was made based on chloride analyses of water samples collected in wells screened in the Aquia aquifer between October 1988 and May 1989. The Aquia aquifer, which is composed of fine- to medium-grained sand, is a shallow, unconfined aquifer in this area. Land use is primarily urban, consisting of a mixture of residential and light commercial areas. Associated with the urban setting is the potential for chloride contamination to enter the Aquia aquifer from anthropogenic sources, such as residential septic-tank effluent, leaky public sewer lines, road-deicing salt, stormwater infiltration basins, and domestic water-conditioning recharge effluent. In order to map the distribution of bay-water intrusion in the Aquia aquifer, chloride derived from Chesapeake Bay was differentiated from chloride derived from anthropogenic sources by comparing the ratio of dissolved bromide to dissolved chloride (bromide:chloride) in groundwater to the distinctive ratio in Chesapeake Bay water. Two additional factors considered in determining the source of the chloride were nitrogen concentrations and well-screen positions of sampled wells in relation to the estimated depth of the fresh-water/brackish-water interface. Of 36 Aquia-aquifer water samples with chloride concentrations greater than 30 mg/L, 22 had bromide:chloride ratios similar to the ratio in Chesapeake Bay water, an indication that bay water is the primary source of the chloride. Of the other 14 samples with bromide:chloride ratios dissimilar to the ratio in Chesapeake Bay water, seven were from wells where screen positions were substantially above the estimated fresh-water/brackish-water interface. Three of these samples had nitrogen concentrations (as nitrite plus nitrate) greater than 3.0 mg/L, an indication that chloride in these groundwater samples comes from

  1. Road Salts as Environmental Constraints in Urban Pond Food Webs

    PubMed Central

    Van Meter, Robin J.; Swan, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater salinization is an emerging environmental filter in urban aquatic ecosystems that receive chloride road salt runoff from vast expanses of impervious surface cover. Our study was designed to evaluate the effects of chloride contamination on urban stormwater pond food webs through changes in zooplankton community composition as well as density and biomass of primary producers and consumers. From May – July 2009, we employed a 2×2×2 full-factorial design to manipulate chloride concentration (low = 177 mg L−1 Cl−/high = 1067 mg L−1 Cl−), gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles (presence/absence) and source of stormwater pond algae and zooplankton inoculum (low conductance/high conductance urban ponds) in 40, 600-L mesocosms. Road salt did serve as a constraint on zooplankton community structure, driving community divergence between the low and high chloride treatments. Phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll [a] µg L−1) in the mesocosms was significantly greater for the high conductance inoculum (P<0.001) and in the high chloride treatment (P = 0.046), whereas periphyton biomass was significantly lower in the high chloride treatment (P = 0.049). Gray treefrog tadpole time to metamorphosis did not vary significantly between treatments. However, mass at metamorphosis was greater among tadpoles that experienced a faster than average time to metamorphosis and exposure to high chloride concentrations (P = 0.039). Our results indicate differential susceptibility to chloride salts among algal resources and zooplankton taxa, and further suggest that road salts can act as a significant environmental constraint on urban stormwater pond communities. PMID:24587259

  2. Threshold for occluded formaldehyde patch test in formaldehyde-sensitive patients. Relationship to repeated open application test with a product containing formaldehyde releaser.

    PubMed

    Flyvholm, M A; Hall, B M; Agner, T; Tiedemann, E; Greenhill, P; Vanderveken, W; Freeberg, F E; Menné, T

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the eliciting threshold concentration of formaldehyde in formaldehyde-sensitive individuals in the occluded and non-occluded patch test, and to evaluate the relationship to repeated open application test (ROAT) with a product containing a formaldehyde releaser. 20 formaldehyde-sensitive patients and a control group of 20 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Occluded and non-occluded patch tests with formaldehyde solutions from 25 to 10,000 ppm, and ROAT for 1 week with a leave-on cosmetic product containing on average 300 ppm formaldehyde, were carried out simultaneously on each subject. In the occluded patch test, 1/2 of the 20 patients only reacted to 10,000 ppm formaldehyde, 9 reacted to 5,000 ppm, 3 reacted to 1,000 ppm, 2 reacted to 500 ppm and 1 reacted to 250 ppm. No definite positive reactions were observed in the non-occluded patch test or in the ROAT. No positive reactions were observed in the control group to any of the test procedures. We concluded that the threshold concentration for occluded patch test to formaldehyde in formaldehyde-sensitive patients was 250 ppm. The threshold in occluded patch test corresponded to the degree of sensitivity. Definite positive reactions in the ROAT were not seen, either indicating that they are unlikely to happen with the type of product used or that the exposure time was too short.

  3. Electrical impedance and HV plasma images of high dilutions of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Assumpção, R

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports impedance data and high voltage plasma photographic plates of high dilutions of sodium chloride in water submitted to the homeopathic dilution and succession up to 30cH. Extremely low concentrations of the original salt, even beyond Avogadro number, clearly differ from 'pure' water and; the action of sodium chloride on the electrical properties of water is inverted at high dilution.

  4. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Attout, H; Guez, S; Seriès, C

    2007-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common cause of cerebral salt wasting syndrome. There are few reports of this condition in infectious meningitis. We describe a patient with hyponatremia and bacterial meningitis. Hyponatremia rapidly improved after administration of sodium chloride. The purpose of this report is to alert clinicians to the fact that hyponatremic patients with central nervous system disease do not necessarily have a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), but may have cerebral salt wasting syndrome. By contrast with SIADH, the treatment requires saline administration.

  5. Effect of magnesium cation on the interfacial properties of aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Karen M; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Xu, Man; Roeselová, Martina; Allen, Heather C; Tobias, Douglas J

    2010-08-19

    Sodium chloride solutions have been used extensively as a model of seawater in both theoretical and experimental studies of the chemistry of sea salt aerosol. Many groups have found that chloride anions are present at the air-solution interface. This observation has been important for the development of a mechanism for the heterogeneous production of molecular chlorine from chloride in sea salt aerosol. However, while sodium chloride is a major constituent of seawater, it is by no means the only salt present. Seawater contains one Mg(2+) for every eight Na(+). Mg(2+) is naturally occurring in ocean waters from mineral deposits in the Earth's crust and biological sources. Mg(2+) forms a hexahydrate structure, rather than contact ion pairs with chloride anion, and this impacts the ordering of water in solution. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations, ab initio calculations, and vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to explore the effect of the Mg(2+) cation and its tightly bound solvation shell on the surface propensity of chloride, ion-ion interactions, and water structure of the air-solution interface of concentrated chloride salt solutions. In addition, we provide molecular level details that may be relevant to the heterogeneous reactions of chloride in deliquesced sea salt aerosols. In particular, we show that the presence of the divalent Mg(2+) cation does not modify the surface propensity of chloride compared to Na(+) and hence, its availability to interfacial reaction, although some differences in the behavior of chloride may occur due to specific ion interactions. In this work, we also discuss the SFG free OH band at the surface of salt solutions and conclude that it is often not straightforward to interpret.

  6. Salt vulnerability assessment methodology for municipal supply wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Andrew; Gharabaghi, Bahram; McBean, Ed; Levison, Jana; Parker, Beth

    2015-12-01

    De-icing agents containing chloride ions used for winter road maintenance have the potential to negatively impact groundwater resources for drinking water supplies. A novel methodology using commonly-available geospatial data (land use, well head protection areas) and public accessible data (salt application rates, hydrometric data) to identify salt vulnerable areas (SVAs) for groundwater wells is developed to prioritize implementation of better management practices for road salt applications. The approach uses simple mass-balance terms to collect chloride input from 3 pathways: surface runoff, shallow interflow and baseflow. A risk score is calculated, which depends on the land use within the respective municipal supply well protection area. Therefore, it is plausible to avoid costly and extensive numerical modeling (which also would bear many assumptions, simplifications and uncertainties). The method is applied to perform a vulnerability assessment on twenty municipal water supply wells in the Grand River watershed, Ontario, Canada. The calculated steady-state groundwater recharge chloride concentration for the supply wells is strongly correlated to the measured transient groundwater chloride concentrations in the case study evaluation, with an R2 = 0.84. The new method provides a simple, robust, and practical method for municipalities to assess the long-term risk of chloride contamination of municipal supply wells due to road salt application.

  7. The relative toxicity of metal salts to immune hemolysis in a mixture of antibody-secreting spleen cells, sheep red blood cells and complement.

    PubMed

    Seko, Y; Koyama, T; Ichiki, A; Sugamata, M; Miura, T

    1982-05-01

    The relative toxicity of metal salts was examined using a mixture of antibody-secreting spleen cells, sheep red blood cells and complement. The amount of immune hemolysis in the mixture was reduced by mercuric chloride, methylmercuric chloride and nickel chloride at concentrations of 14 microM or more, by sodium selenite and zinc chloride at 140 microM or more, and by sodium selenate, cadmium chloride, cadmium acetate, chromic chloride and beryllium chloride at 1400 microM. On the other hand, the amount of immune hemolysis was increased by both cadmium chloride anc cadmium acetate at concentrations of 14 and 140 microM. Mercuric chloride, methylmercuric chloride and nickel chloride were assumed to inhibit the antibody secretion of antibody-forming spleen cells.

  8. Chloride Sources and Losses in Two Tile-Drained Agricultural Watersheds.

    PubMed

    David, Mark B; Mitchell, Corey A; Gentry, Lowell E; Salemme, Ronald K

    2016-01-01

    Chloride is a relatively unreactive plant nutrient that has long been used as a biogeochemical tracer but also can be a pollutant causing aquatic biology impacts when concentrations are high, typically from rock salt applications used for deicing roads. Chloride inputs to watersheds are most often from atmospheric deposition, road salt, or agricultural fertilizer, although studies on agricultural watersheds with large fertilizer inputs are few. We used long-term (21 and 17 yr) chloride water quality data in two rivers of east-central Illinois to better understand chloride biogeochemistry in two agricultural watersheds (Embarras and Kaskaskia), the former with a larger urban land use and both with extensive tile drainage. During our sampling period, the average chloride concentration was 23.7 and 20.9 mg L in the Embarras and Kaskaskia Rivers, respectively. Annual fluxes of chloride were 72.5 and 61.2 kg ha yr in the Embarras and Kaskaskia watersheds, respectively. In both watersheds, fertilizer chloride was the dominant input (∼49 kg ha yr), with road salt likely the other major source (23.2 and 7.2 kg ha yr for the Embarras and Kaskaskia watersheds, respectively). Combining our monitoring data with earlier published data on the Embarras River showed an increase in chloride concentrations as potash use increased in Illinois during the 1960s and 1970s with a lag of about 2 to 6 yr to changes in potash inputs based on a multiple-regression model. In these agricultural watersheds, riverine chloride responds relatively quickly to potash fertilization as a result of tile-drainage.

  9. Chloride Sources and Losses in Two Tile-Drained Agricultural Watersheds.

    PubMed

    David, Mark B; Mitchell, Corey A; Gentry, Lowell E; Salemme, Ronald K

    2016-01-01

    Chloride is a relatively unreactive plant nutrient that has long been used as a biogeochemical tracer but also can be a pollutant causing aquatic biology impacts when concentrations are high, typically from rock salt applications used for deicing roads. Chloride inputs to watersheds are most often from atmospheric deposition, road salt, or agricultural fertilizer, although studies on agricultural watersheds with large fertilizer inputs are few. We used long-term (21 and 17 yr) chloride water quality data in two rivers of east-central Illinois to better understand chloride biogeochemistry in two agricultural watersheds (Embarras and Kaskaskia), the former with a larger urban land use and both with extensive tile drainage. During our sampling period, the average chloride concentration was 23.7 and 20.9 mg L in the Embarras and Kaskaskia Rivers, respectively. Annual fluxes of chloride were 72.5 and 61.2 kg ha yr in the Embarras and Kaskaskia watersheds, respectively. In both watersheds, fertilizer chloride was the dominant input (∼49 kg ha yr), with road salt likely the other major source (23.2 and 7.2 kg ha yr for the Embarras and Kaskaskia watersheds, respectively). Combining our monitoring data with earlier published data on the Embarras River showed an increase in chloride concentrations as potash use increased in Illinois during the 1960s and 1970s with a lag of about 2 to 6 yr to changes in potash inputs based on a multiple-regression model. In these agricultural watersheds, riverine chloride responds relatively quickly to potash fertilization as a result of tile-drainage. PMID:26828190

  10. Equilibrium distribution of lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium between lithium chloride melt and liquid bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagnit'ko, A. V.; Ignat'ev, V. V.

    2013-04-01

    The distribution of lanthanum, neodymium, and thorium between a lithium chloride melt and liquid bismuth with additions of lithium as a reducing agent are investigated at 650°C. Equilibrium values of their distribution constants are measured. It is shown that in contrast to neodymium and lanthanum, thorium cannot be extracted from bismuth into lithium chloride. This allows us to propose an efficient scheme for separating lanthanides and thorium in a system for the extraction of fuel salts in molten-salt nuclear reactors.

  11. Chloride-catalyzed corrosion of plutonium in glovebox atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, M.; Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.; Morales, L.A.; Jarboe, D.M.; Puglisi, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    Characterization of glovebox atmospheres and the black reaction product formed on plutonium surfaces shows that the abnormally rapid corrosion of components in the fabrication line is consistent with a complex salt-catalyzed reaction involving gaseous hydrogen chloride (HCl) and water. Analytical data verify that chlorocarbon and HCl vapors are presented in stagnant glovebox atmospheres. Hydrogen chloride concentrations approach 7 ppm at some locations in the glovebox line. The black corrosion product is identified as plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH), a product formed by hydrolysis of plutonium in liquid water and salt solutions at room temperature. Plutonium trichloride (PuCl{sub 3}) produced by reaction of HCl at the metal surface is deliquescent and apparently forms a highly concentrated salt solution by absorbing moisture from the glovebox atmosphere. Rapid corrosion is attributed to the ensuing salt-catalyzed reaction between plutonium and water. Experimental results are discussed, possible involvement of hydrogen fluoride (HF) is examined, and methods of corrective action are presented in this report.

  12. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress.

  13. Highway deicing salt dynamic runoff to surface water and subsequent infiltration to groundwater during severe UK winters.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Cuthbert, Mark O; Gamble, Richard; Connon, Lucy E; Pearson, Andrew; Shepley, Martin G; Davis, John

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic impact to the water environment of deicing salt application at a major highway (motorway) interchange in the UK is quantitatively evaluated for two recent severe UK winters. The contaminant transport pathway studied allowed controls on dynamic highway runoff and storm-sewer discharge to a receiving stream and its subsequent leakage to an underlying sandstone aquifer, including possible contribution to long-term chloride increases in supply wells, to be evaluated. Logged stream electrical-conductivity (EC) to estimate chloride concentrations, stream flow, climate and motorway salt application data were used to assess salt fate. Stream loading was responsive to salt applications and climate variability influencing salt release. Chloride (via EC) was predicted to exceed the stream Environmental Quality Standard (250mg/l) for 33% and 18% of the two winters. Maximum stream concentrations (3500mg/l, 15% sea water salinity) were ascribed to salt-induced melting and drainage of highway snowfall without dilution from, still frozen, catchment water. Salt persistance on the highway under dry-cold conditions was inferred from stream observations of delayed salt removal. Streambed and stream-loss data demonstrated chloride infiltration could occur to the underlying aquifer with mild and severe winter stream leakage estimated to account for 21 to 54% respectively of the 70t of increased chloride (over baseline) annually abstracted by supply wells. Deicing salt infiltration lateral to the highway alongside other urban/natural sources were inferred to contribute the shortfall. Challenges in quantifying chloride mass/fluxes (flow gauge accuracy at high flows, salt loading from other roads, weaker chloride-EC correlation at low concentrations), may be largely overcome by modest investment in enhanced data acquisition or minor approach modification. The increased understanding of deicing salt dynamic loading to the water environment obtained is relevant to improved

  14. Highway deicing salt dynamic runoff to surface water and subsequent infiltration to groundwater during severe UK winters.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Cuthbert, Mark O; Gamble, Richard; Connon, Lucy E; Pearson, Andrew; Shepley, Martin G; Davis, John

    2016-09-15

    Dynamic impact to the water environment of deicing salt application at a major highway (motorway) interchange in the UK is quantitatively evaluated for two recent severe UK winters. The contaminant transport pathway studied allowed controls on dynamic highway runoff and storm-sewer discharge to a receiving stream and its subsequent leakage to an underlying sandstone aquifer, including possible contribution to long-term chloride increases in supply wells, to be evaluated. Logged stream electrical-conductivity (EC) to estimate chloride concentrations, stream flow, climate and motorway salt application data were used to assess salt fate. Stream loading was responsive to salt applications and climate variability influencing salt release. Chloride (via EC) was predicted to exceed the stream Environmental Quality Standard (250mg/l) for 33% and 18% of the two winters. Maximum stream concentrations (3500mg/l, 15% sea water salinity) were ascribed to salt-induced melting and drainage of highway snowfall without dilution from, still frozen, catchment water. Salt persistance on the highway under dry-cold conditions was inferred from stream observations of delayed salt removal. Streambed and stream-loss data demonstrated chloride infiltration could occur to the underlying aquifer with mild and severe winter stream leakage estimated to account for 21 to 54% respectively of the 70t of increased chloride (over baseline) annually abstracted by supply wells. Deicing salt infiltration lateral to the highway alongside other urban/natural sources were inferred to contribute the shortfall. Challenges in quantifying chloride mass/fluxes (flow gauge accuracy at high flows, salt loading from other roads, weaker chloride-EC correlation at low concentrations), may be largely overcome by modest investment in enhanced data acquisition or minor approach modification. The increased understanding of deicing salt dynamic loading to the water environment obtained is relevant to improved

  15. Electrodeposition of microcrystalline chromium from fused salts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, T.; Varma, R.; Brown, A.

    1987-01-01

    Chromium can be conveniently electroplated from fused chloride electrolytes. The deposition from LiCl-KCl (eutectic)-CrCl/sub 2/ melts is known to produce large crystal grains. Large grain size and other problems encountered in the electrodeposition of microcrystalline chromium from fused salt are discussed. The results indicate that combined use of forced electrolyte convection and a nucleating pulse in conjunction with a periodic reverse pulse produces fine-grained deposits.

  16. Effect of iron and salt on prodigiosin synthesis in Serratia marcescens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1973-01-01

    Iron requirements of Serratia marcescens for growth and prodigiosin synthesis are investigated. Sodium chloride of sea salt is shown to be responsible for inhibition of prodigiosin synthesis in the microorganism. The role of sodium chloride in the terminal biosynthetic pathway of the pigment is discussed.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The pure... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III)...

  1. Four salt phases of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Buist, Amanda R; Kennedy, Alan R; Manzie, Craig

    2014-02-01

    The structures of two anhydrous salt phases of theophylline, namely 1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-7H-purin-9-ium tetrafluoroborate, C7H9N4O2(+)·BF4(-), and 1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-7H-purin-9-ium chloride, C7H9N4O2(+)·Cl(-), are reported together with the structures of two monohydrate salt forms, namely 1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-7H-purin-9-ium chloride monohydrate, C7H9N4O2(+)·Cl(-)·H2O, and 1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-7H-purin-9-ium bromide monohydrate, C7H9N4O2(+)·Br(-)·H2O. The monohydrate structures are mutually isostructural, with the cations and anions lying on crystallographic mirror planes (Z' = ½). The main intermolecular interaction motif is a hydrogen-bonding network in the same mirror plane. The tetrafluoroborate structure is based on planar hydrogen-bonded theopylline cation dimers; the anions interact with the dimers in a pendant fashion. The anhydrous chloride structure has Z' = 2 and in contrast to the other species it does not form planar hydrogen-bonded constructs, instead one-dimensional chains of cations and anions propagate parallel to the crystallographic c direction. An earlier report claiming to describe an anhydrous structure of theophylline hydrochloride is re-examined in light of these results. It is concluded that the earlier structure has been reported in the wrong space group and that it has been chemically misidentified.

  2. Aluminum anodization in a basic ambient temperature molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, R.T.; Osteryoung, R.A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-05-01

    The authors describe aluminum anodization studied in the basic AlCl/sub 3/:1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride (ImCl) ambient temperature molten salt (AlCl/sub 3/:ImCl molar ratio ..e..1.0). The anodization process was studied as a function of chloride anion concentration. Two different anodization processes are observed with onset potentials of approximately -1.1 and 0V. The more cathodic anodization involves formation of the tetrachloroaluminate anion and exhibits a limiting current controlled by diffusion of chloride to the electrode surface. The number of chlorides required for each Al anodized was determined to be 4.6 +- 0.4. The more anodic anodization shows no diffusion control. A value for the diffusion coefficient of chloride was obtained which is lower than previously reported; the difference involves using an n value of 1, rather than 2/3. No reduction of the tetrachloroaluminate anion was observed even at elevated temperatures.

  3. The role of microphysics in the development of mesoscale areas of high winds around occluded cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, T. P.; Knippertz, P.; Blyth, A.

    2012-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones are an integral part of the weather in north-western Europe and can be associated with heavy precipitation and strong winds. While synoptic-scale aspects of these storms are often satisfactorily forecast several days in advance, mesoscale features within these systems such as bands of heavy rain or localized wind maxima, which are often the cause of the most damaging effects, are significantly less well understood and predicted by operational forecasts. Accurate predictions of the location, timing and intensity of these features are, however, highly important for the mitigation of the adverse effects that they bring. This is one of the motivations for the UK consortium DIAMET (DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structures in ExtraTropical storms) that is focused on improving the understanding and predictability of these potentially damaging mesoscale features embedded within larger synoptic-scale extratropical storms. The project is based around a number of field campaigns using the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146 research aircraft along with other remote and in-situ measurements. An overview of the project will be presented by Geraint Vaughan in this session. This study analyses the effects of microphysics on the mesoscale dynamics within extratropical storms, in particular the high wind areas around occluded fronts wrapped around the core of a matured cyclonic storm. It has been hypothesized that evaporation and melting of hydrometeors in this region can lead to downward momentum transport and thereby increase near-surface winds (sometimes referred to as sting jets). The main tool for this study is the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. High-resolution simulations are run for several cases from the DIAMET field campaigns to examine how the development of strong winds around occluded fronts is affected by the microphysics. The model results using different microphysics schemes are compared with the

  4. Benzalkonium Chloride and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Paul L.; Kiland, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma patients routinely take multiple medications, with multiple daily doses, for years or even decades. Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is the most common preservative in glaucoma medications. BAK has been detected in the trabecular meshwork (TM), corneal endothelium, lens, and retina after topical drop installation and may accumulate in those tissues. There is evidence that BAK causes corneal and conjunctival toxicity, including cell loss, disruption of tight junctions, apoptosis and preapoptosis, cytoskeleton changes, and immunoinflammatory reactions. These same effects have been reported in cultured human TM cells exposed to concentrations of BAK found in common glaucoma drugs and in the TM of primary open-angle glaucoma donor eyes. It is possible that a relationship exists between chronic exposure to BAK and glaucoma. The hypothesis that BAK causes/worsens glaucoma is being tested experimentally in an animal model that closely reflects human physiology. PMID:24205938

  5. Cinchonidinium chloride monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shi-Feng; Ma, Lin Lin; Zhao, Gui Fang; Sun, Wen Ji; Jin, Zhi Min

    2008-01-01

    In the title salt, C19H23N2O+·Cl−·H2O, the ions and the water mol­ecule are held together by O—H⋯Cl, N—H⋯Cl, O—H⋯O, O—H⋯N and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework. The vinyl group is disordered over two orientations with refined occupancies of 0.564 (16) and 0.436 (16). The cell parameters of the title compound have been reported previously [Griffiths (1952 ▶). Acta Cryst. 5, 290–291]. PMID:21200758

  6. Molten salt applications in materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.

    2005-02-01

    The science of molten salt electrochemistry for electrowinning of reactive metals, such as calcium, and its in situ application in pyro-reduction has been described. Calcium electrowinning has been performed in a 5 10 wt% calcium oxide calcium chloride molten salt by the electrolytic dissociation of calcium oxide. This electrolysis requires the use of a porous ceramic sheath around the anode to keep the cathodically deposited calcium and the anodic gases separate. Stainless steel cathode and graphite anode have been used in the temperature range of 850 950 °C. This salt mixture is produced as a result of the direct oxide reduction (DOR) of reactive metal oxides by calcium in a calcium chloride bath. The primary purpose of this process is to recover the expensive calcium reductant and to recycle calcium chloride. Experimental data have been included to justify the suitability as well as limitations of the electrowinning process. Transport of oxygen ions through the sheath is found to be the rate controlling step. Under the constraints of the reactor design, a calcium recovery rate of approx. 150 g/h was achieved. Feasibility of a process to produce metals by pyrometallurgical reduction, using the calcium reductant produced electrolytically within the same reactor, has been shown in a hybrid process. Several processes are currently under investigation to use this electrowon calcium for in situ reduction of metal oxides.

  7. Increase of urban lake salinity by road deicing salt.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Eric V; Murphy, Dan; Stefan, Heinz G

    2008-11-15

    Over 317,000 tonnes of road salt (NaCl) are applied annually for road deicing in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area (TCMA) of Minnesota. Although road salt is applied to increase driving safety, this practice influences environmental water quality. Thirteen lakes in the TCMA were studied over 46 months to determine if and how they respond to the seasonal applications of road salt. Sodium and chloride concentrations in these lakes were 10 and 25 times higher, respectively, than in other non-urban lakes in the region. Seasonal salinity/chloride cycles in the lakes were correlated with road salt applications: High concentrations in the winter and spring, especially near the bottom of the lakes, were followed by lower concentrations in the summer and fall due to flushing of the lakes by rainfall runoff. The seasonal salt storage/flushing rates for individual lakes were derived from volume-weighted average chloride concentration time series. The rate ranged from 9 to 55% of a lake's minimum salt content. In some of the lakes studied salt concentrations were high enough to stop spring turnover preventing oxygen from reaching the benthic sediments. Concentrations above the sediments were also high enough to induce convective mixing of the saline water into the sediment pore water. A regional analysis of historical water quality records of 38 lakes in the TCMA showed increases in lake salinity from 1984 to 2005 that were highly correlated with the amount of rock salt purchased by the State of Minnesota. Chloride concentrations in individual lakes were positively correlated with the percent of impervious surfaces in the watershed and inversely with lake volume. Taken together, the results show a continuing degradation of the water quality of urban lakes due to application of NaCl in their watersheds. PMID:18762321

  8. [Properties of benzethonium chloride in micellar solutions and the effect of added sodium chloride].

    PubMed

    Kopecký, F; Kopecká, B; Kaclík, P

    2006-07-01

    Aqueous solutions of the antimicrobially effective quaternary ammonium salt benzethonium chloride (hyamine 1622) were studied using UV spectrophotometry and partially conductometry. The spectra of micellar solutions of benzethonium chloride revealed a concentration-dependent bathochromic and hyperchromic shift of a weak UV absorption band in the region 250-300 nm. This served to elaborate the spectrophotometric determination of the critical micellar concentration (CMC) of benzethonium chloride and the concentration of free benzethonium cations in micellar solutions without an addition of NaCl and with a constant addition of NaCl 0.003, 0.1 and 0.15 mol/l. Premicellar associations were not observed and in NaCl-free solutions CMC 0.0028 mol/l was spectrophotometrically determined. An addition of NaCl resulted in an increased hyperchromic effect and strengthening of micellization, manifested by a more than ten-times decrease in the CMC as well as the concentration of free benzethonium cations in micellar solutions. The courses of the determined concentrations of free benzethonium cations in the solutions both without and with the presence of NaCl were quite similar; their maximal values were always just a little higher than the corresponding CMC and with a further growth of the total concentration of benzethonium chloride there was, on the other hand, a marked decrease in the concentration of its free cations in micellar solution. Possible effects of a decreased concentration of free benzethonium cations due to an added electrolyte on antimicrobial activity and formation of ionic pairs are discussed.

  9. Thermodynamic aspects of the linkage between binding of chloride and oxygen to human hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Robert N.; Hedlund, Bo E.

    1977-01-01

    Oxygen isotherms of human hemoglobin measured in distilled water and in solutions of sodium chloride in the concentration range from 0.02 to 3.0 M indicate that the oxygen affinity decreases up to about 1 M salt and then begins to increase. The isotherms obtained in the range from 0.02 to 0.6 M sodium chloride, at 37° and pH 7.4, have been analyzed in terms of changes in Gibbs free energy of heme ligation, resulting from the differential interaction between the chloride ion and the two forms of hemoglobin. The maximal theoretical change in Gibbs free energy that chloride ion can exert on the oxygen binding of hemoglobin amounts to 4.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol (21 ± 0.8 kJ/mol) of hemoglobin tetramer. A plot of the logarithm of oxygen concentration at half saturation versus the logarithm of the chloride concentration has a slope of 0.40, suggesting 1.6 apparent chloride sites per hemoglobin tetramer. Because the interaction between chloride and hemoglobin is dependent on pH, the apparent thermodynamic linkage between chloride and oxygen binding will also include the salt dependence of the Bohr effect at pH 7.4. The fractional change in Gibbs free energy, measured as a function of the chloride concentration, can be approximated by the binding isotherm between a protein and a ligand, using an association constant of 11 M-1. Thus, if the number of oxygen-linked chloride sites is more than one per hemoglobin tetramer, these sites must be considered independent. PMID:270660

  10. Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL) and Chloride Hydrates within Mars Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Wang, A.

    2012-12-01

    thermodynamics and kinetics properties of chloride hydrates. The goals are to determine (1) the stability fields of Mg-, Fe2+-, Fe3+-, Ca-, Al-, Na-chloride hydrates in RH-T space, especially the phase boundaries of hydrates-deliquescence; (2) the rate of their dehydration, and especially the rate of their deliquescence as function of T, P, and PH2O; (3) the RH level that each chloride hydrate can maintain in an enclosure at T relevant to those within Mars subsurface. We will report the experimental results from (3), and will compare them with a similar set of data from hydrous sulfates (Mg, Fe, Ca, Al). The criticality of learning the property (3) is that the deliquescence of a hydrous salt at a T only occurs when RH is higher than a threshold. For example, deliquescence of ferricopiapite would happen when RH > 75% at 0°C. If the environmental RH is lower, the dehydration of hydrous salt will go through solid-solid phase transition, instead of deliquescence, such that water would be released to the atmosphere and brine would not form. It is possible that deliquescence of both hydrous sulfates and chlorides (as well as the melting of Cl-enriched brines) contributed the RSL. Our working hypothesis favors chloride hydrates because dry chloride (after releasing water) in RSL would not be visible by Vis-NIR spectroscopy, which is consistent with the mission observations.

  11. Laser restoration of flow in occluded ventricular shunts for pediatric neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christens-Barry, William A.; Guarnieri, Michael; Carson, Benjamin S.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the use of short pulses of infrared ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) light from a Ho:YAG laser to photofragment occlusions and restore flow in ventricular shunts, which provide the sole means of maintaining proper intracranial pressure in hydrocephalus patients. These experiments employed model tissues, a polymeric model compound, and patient explants in order to determine appropriate pulse energies and delivery rates for removal of occlusions material. Laser energy doses and rates of occlusion removal were established for these materials. Laser energy doses that do not damage the shunt device or surrounding tissue were identified. Optical fibers (25 ga. or smaller) can be introduced through the dome of current shunt devices and threaded to the occlusion site. Clinical application will require the continued development of an introducer tool for the transcutaneous insertion of the optical fiber into the shunt device and irrigation techniques for removing the occlusion detritus generated by photofragmentation treatment. Using this approach, a minimally invasive and benign procedure for in situ restoration of flow in occluded neurological implant devices becomes possible.

  12. Cleaning of occluded biliary endoprostheses: is shockwave application an alternative to regular stent exchange?

    PubMed

    Farnbacher, Michael J; Kraupa, Werner; Schneider, H Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Occlusion is the major limitation of plastic biliary endoprostheses (PBE), making regular stent exchange necessary. The aim of the in vitro analysis was to evaluate the cleansing effect of shockwave application (SWA) on occluded PBE. Thirty-five PBE removed from 24 patients were analyzed. Three hundred and fifty shockwave pulses were administered every 10 mm along the prosthesis stored in a liquid-filled latex balloon. Occlusion rates were measured before and after SWA. The cleansing rate was calculated in comparison to the native prosthesis. Mean occlusion rate was 76 ± 30% (Range 16-100%) before SWA. Cleansing effect was 47 ± 52% (0-100%) after SWA. Cleaning was complete (100%) in seven (20%) and satisfying (75-99%) in another seven prostheses. Degree of stent occlusion and indwelling time were significantly associated to the cleansing effect. In conclusion, SWA showed a limited cleaning effect in clogged PBE and is no suitable alternative for regular stent replacement to date.

  13. Holographic quantitative imaging of sample hidden by turbid medium or occluding objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, V.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Memmolo, P.; Gennari, O.; Paturzo, Melania; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2015-03-01

    Digital Holography (DH) numerical procedures have been developed to allow imaging through turbid media. A fluid is considered turbid when dispersed particles provoke strong light scattering, thus destroying the image formation by any standard optical system. Here we show that sharp amplitude imaging and phase-contrast mapping of object hidden behind turbid medium and/or occluding objects are possible in harsh noise conditions and with a large field-of view by Multi-Look DH microscopy. In particular, it will be shown that both amplitude imaging and phase-contrast mapping of cells hidden behind a flow of Red Blood Cells can be obtained. This allows, in a noninvasive way, the quantitative evaluation of living processes in Lab on Chip platforms where conventional microscopy techniques fail. The combination of this technique with endoscopic imaging can pave the way for the holographic blood vessel inspection, e.g. to look for settled cholesterol plaques as well as blood clots for a rapid diagnostics of blood diseases.

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract Voice Therapy Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Eric J.; Kirkham, Kimberly; Cox, Karin; Titze, Ingo R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although there is a long history of use of semi-occluded vocal tract gestures in voice therapy, including phonation through thin tubes or straws, the efficacy of phonation through tubes has not been established. This study compares results from a therapy program on the basis of phonation through a flow-resistant tube (FRT) with Vocal Function Exercises (VFE), an established set of exercises that utilize oral semi-occlusions. Method Twenty subjects (16 women, 4 men) with dysphonia and/or vocal fatigue were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment conditions: (a) immediate FRT therapy, (b) immediate VFE therapy, (c) delayed FRT therapy, or (d) delayed VFE therapy. Subjects receiving delayed therapy served as a no-treatment control group. Results Voice Handicap Index (Jacobson et al., 1997) scores showed significant improvement for both treatment groups relative to the no-treatment group. Comparison of the effect sizes suggests FRT therapy is noninferior to VFE in terms of reduction in Voice Handicap Index scores. Significant reductions in Roughness on the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (Kempster, Gerratt, Verdolini Abbott, Barkmeier-Kraemer, & Hillman, 2009) were found for the FRT subjects, with no other significant voice quality findings. Conclusions VFE and FRT therapy may improve voice quality of life in some individuals with dysphonia. FRT therapy was noninferior to VFE in improving voice quality of life in this study. PMID:25675335

  15. Red cell distribution width predicts totally occluded infarct-related artery in NSTEMI.

    PubMed

    Açıkgöz, Sadık Kadri; Akboğa, Mehmet Kadri; Açıkgöz, Eser; Yayla, Çağrı; Şensoy, Barış; Aydoğdu, Sinan

    2016-08-01

    Objective Since non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients with totally occluded infarct-related artery (TO-IRA) have worse prognosis, it is important to recognize TO-IRA in NSTEMI. Red cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) are novel markers of inflammation and oxidative stress and were associated with poor clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndrome. In the present study, association of RDW and MPV with the presence of TO-IRA in NSTEMI was investigated. Methods Data of 201 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography with a diagnosis of NSTEMI were analyzed. Independent predictors of TO-IRA were investigated with logistic regression analysis. Results Sixty-six (32.8%) of the patients had TO-IRA. In patients with TO-IRA, RDW and troponin-T were significantly higher and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was lower. MPV did not differ between groups. Circumflex (CX) IRA was more common in TO-IRA group. The ROC curve analysis showed that the RDW at a cut-point of 13.95% has 76% sensitivity and 66% specificity in detecting TO-IRA. RDW, troponin-T, LVEF and CX-IRA were independent predictors of TO-IRA in NSTEMI, but MPV was not. Conclusion RDW is a cheap and readily available marker that may have a role to predict TO-IRA in NSTEMI. PMID:26857117

  16. Ameliorating effects of two extracts of Nigella sativa in middle cerebral artery occluded rat

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Mohammad; Maikiyo, Aliyu Muhammad; Khanam, Razia; Mujeeb, Mohd; Aqil, Mohd; Najmi, Abul Kalam

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts of Nigella sativa (400 mg/kg, orally) for 7 days were administered and evaluated for their neuroprotective effects on middle cerebral artery occluded (MCAO) rats. Materials and Methods: Cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h followed by reperfusion for 22 h. After 24 h of ischemia, grip strength, locomotor activity tests were performed in the surgically operated animals. After behavioral tests, animals were immediately sacrificed. Infarct volumes followed by the estimation of markers of oxidative stress in the brains were measured. Results: Locomotor activity and grip strength of animals were improved in both aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts pretreated rats. Infarct volume was also reduced in both extracts pretreated rats as compared with MCAO rats. An elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and a reduction in glutathione and antioxidant enzymes, viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase levels were observed following MCAO. Pretreatment of Nigella sativa extracts showed the reduction in TBARS, elevation in glutathione, SOD and catalase levels as compared with MCAO rats. Conclusion: The present study observed the neuroprotective effects of both the extracts of Nigella sativa in cerebral ischemia. The neuroprotective effects could be due to its antioxidant, free radical scavenging, and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22368403

  17. A Study of Phytolith-occluded Carbon Stock in Monopodial Bamboo in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Jiasen; Jiang, Peikun; Xu, Qiufang; Zhao, Peiping; He, Shanqiong

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo plants have been proven to be rich in phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) and play an important role in reducing atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The object of this paper was to obtain more accurate methods for estimation of PhytOC stock in monopodial bamboo because previous studies may have underestimated it. Eight monopodial bamboo species, widely distributed across China, were selected and sampled for this study in their own typical distribution areas. There were differences (P < 0.05) both in phytolith content (Phytolith/dry biomass) across leaves, branches and culm, and in PhytOC content (PhytOC/dry biomass) across leaves and branches between species, with a trend of leaf > branch > culm. The average PhytOC stored in aboveground biomass and PhytOC production flux contributed by aboveground biomass varied substantially, and they were 3.28 and 1.57 times corresponding dates in leaves, with the highest in Phyllostachys glauca McClure and lowest in Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng f. It can be concluded that it could be more accurate to estimate PhytOC stock or PhytOC production flux by basing on whole aboveground biomass rather than on leaf or leaf litter only. The whole biomass should be collected for more estimation of bamboo PhytOC sequestration capacity in the future. PMID:26304801

  18. Simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration and partial splenic embolization for gastric fundal varices

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Akihiko; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Kuraoka, Naosuke; Ogawa, Kohei; Sato, Munehiro; Aiba, Tsuneo; Yoneyama, Osamu; Furukawa, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhito; Igarashi, Kentarou

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously reported the techniques and usefulness of simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and partial splenic embolization (PSE), based on the hypothesis that concomitant PSE can diminish the increase in portal venous pressure after B-RTO. Objective After experiencing more cases and performing longer-term follow-up, we re-evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE for gastric fundal varices (GVs). Methods We performed B-RTO in 36 consecutive patients treated for GVs from 2005 to 2013. Twenty-three patients underwent simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE (Group 1) and 13 underwent B-RTO monotherapy (Group 2). The outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups except that the splenic volumes were larger in Group 1 than 2. B-RTO was technically successful in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%) in Group 1 and in 12 of 13 patients (92.3%) in Group 2. In all patients with ruptured GVs (six in Group 1 and five in Group 2), complete hemostasis was obtained by B-RTO. Exacerbation of esophageal varices was significantly less frequent in Group 1 than 2 (p = 0.0017). Conclusion Concomitant PSE with B-RTO may contribute to prevention of the exacerbation of esophageal varices after B-RTO. PMID:26966524

  19. A Study of Phytolith-occluded Carbon Stock in Monopodial Bamboo in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Jiasen; Jiang, Peikun; Xu, Qiufang; Zhao, Peiping; He, Shanqiong

    2015-08-01

    Bamboo plants have been proven to be rich in phytolith-occluded carbon (PhytOC) and play an important role in reducing atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The object of this paper was to obtain more accurate methods for estimation of PhytOC stock in monopodial bamboo because previous studies may have underestimated it. Eight monopodial bamboo species, widely distributed across China, were selected and sampled for this study in their own typical distribution areas. There were differences (P < 0.05) both in phytolith content (Phytolith/dry biomass) across leaves, branches and culm, and in PhytOC content (PhytOC/dry biomass) across leaves and branches between species, with a trend of leaf > branch > culm. The average PhytOC stored in aboveground biomass and PhytOC production flux contributed by aboveground biomass varied substantially, and they were 3.28 and 1.57 times corresponding dates in leaves, with the highest in Phyllostachys glauca McClure and lowest in Indocalamus tessellatus (Munro) Keng f. It can be concluded that it could be more accurate to estimate PhytOC stock or PhytOC production flux by basing on whole aboveground biomass rather than on leaf or leaf litter only. The whole biomass should be collected for more estimation of bamboo PhytOC sequestration capacity in the future.

  20. Predictive Factor of Local Recurrence after Balloon-Occluded TACE with Miriplatin (MPT) in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Abe, Satoshi; Inoue, Ryousuke; Sugano, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Yuhsuke; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Nemoto, Takeo; Takeda, Keiko; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Miriplatin (MPT) is a novel platinum complex used in TACE that shows promise for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, rapid washout has been reported in some cases. Therefore, various methods of administration with MPT have been attempted to increase its therapeutic efficacy. One hopeful method is balloon-occluded TACE (B-TACE), but the therapeutic efficacy of B-TACE with MPT has not been evaluated. Aim To investigate the treatment outcomes and factors involved in local recurrence after B-TACE with MPT in HCC. Methods This study included 51 patients (55 nodules) with HCC lesions equal or less than 5 cm in diameter who underwent B-TACE with MPT between January 2012 and June 2013. Local recurrence after B-TACE with MPT and factors associated with local recurrence were evaluated. Results The overall local recurrence rate was 11.1% at 6 months and 26.2% at 12 months. The local recurrence rate did differ significantly depending on CT values immediately after B-TACE with MPT. Multivariate analysis also showed that the CT value after B-TACE with MPT was the only factor related to local recurrence after B-TACE. Conclusions B-TACE with MPT achieves relatively good local control of HCC. The plain CT value immediately after B-TACE with MPT is a predictive factor for local recurrence. In patients with unsatisfactory CT values, locoregional therapy or additional treatment is required. PMID:25047920

  1. Characterization of a non-occluded baculovirus-like agent pathogenic to penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Nadala, E C; Tapay, L M; Loh, P C

    1998-07-30

    A non-occluded baculovirus-like agent recently isolated by this laboratory from moribund Penaeus japonicus shrimps obtained from China and named Chinese baculovirus (CBV) was purified and some of its properties characterized. Under the electron microscope, negatively stained virus particles were rod-shaped, enveloped, and measured 322 to 378 nm in length and 130 to 159 nm in diameter. The nucleoprotein core exhibited a unique striated structure and measured 316 to 350 nm in length and 65 to 66 nm in diameter. The striations appear to be the result of the stacking of ring-like structures. These rings consisted of 2 rows of 12 to 14 globular subunits. Each globular subunit measured approximately 10 nm in diameter. SDS-PAGE gels of purified virus preparations showed, among several, 4 prominent protein bands with approximate molecular weights of 19, 23.5, 27.5 and 75 kDa. The structural viral proteins were identified by western blot analysis using polyclonal hyperimmune serum made against purified CBV. The 19, 27.5, and 75 kDa structural proteins were determined to be non-glycosylated components associated with the viral envelope. The 23.5 kDa protein, also non-glycosylated, was identified with the capsid structure. Viral genomic DNA digested with Hind III restriction endonuclease revealed at least 29 different fragments with a conservatively estimated total size of at least 183 kb.

  2. Controlling the hydration of the skin though the application of occluding barrier creams

    PubMed Central

    Sparr, Emma; Millecamps, Danielle; Isoir, Muriel; Burnier, Véronique; Larsson, Åsa; Cabane, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a barrier membrane that separates environments with profoundly different water contents. The barrier properties are assured by the outer layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which controls the transepidermal water loss. The SC acts as a responding membrane, since its hydration and permeability vary with the boundary condition, which is the activity of water at the outer surface of the skin. We show how this boundary condition can be changed by the application of a barrier cream that makes a film with a high resistance to the transport of water. We present a quantitative model that predicts hydration and water transport in SC that is covered by such a film. We also develop an experimental method for measuring the specific resistance to water transport of films made of occluding barrier creams. Finally, we combine the theoretical model with the measured properties of the barrier creams to predict how a film of cream changes the activity of water at the outer surface of the SC. Using the known variations of SC permeability and hydration with the water activity in its environment (i.e. the relative humidity), we can thus predict how a film of barrier cream changes SC hydration. PMID:23269846

  3. Lifting the Humic Veil: A Novel Approach to Quantitating Occluded Iron in Peat Porewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverica, T. J.; Kane, E. S.; Marcarelli, A. M.; Green, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions common in peatlands lead microbes to reduce alternative electron acceptors for respiration in the order of their energetic yield: nitrate, manganese, ferric iron (Fe[III]), sulfate, and CO2. Many studies of peatland respiration report high CO2 fluxes that cannot be completely explained by measured pathways of microbial metabolism: it appears that an unquantified pool of electron acceptors is driving respiration and the efflux of CO2. The notion that undetected iron reduction may be an important contributing factor to these fluxes has been proposed, but has yet to be addressed. Among the possible causes for this anomaly is the widespread use of colorimetric assays for iron quantitation and speciation. Peat porewater contains high concentrations of dissolved humic and fulvic acids that occlude Fe(III), blocking colorimetric complex formation, potentially leading to an underestimate of Fe(III) in these challenging analytical matrices. We evaluated a novel ionic liquid extraction method in a variety of temperate peatland porewater samples and compared these results to data acquired simultaneously using colorimetric methods. We found a >50% average improvement in accuracy for total iron quantitation using ionic liquid extraction. Moreover, ionic liquid extraction of peat porewater consistently recovered Fe(III) whereas colorimetric methods detected 50-100% less, suggesting that DOM bound Fe(III) is not reliably detected using colorimetric assays in these systems and may represent a previously unidentified pool of electron acceptors in peat porewater.

  4. Laser scoop desobliteration: a method for minimally invasive remote recanalization of chronically occluded superficial femoral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneweer, Carola; Siggelkow, Markus; Helle, Michael; Petzina, Rainer; Wulff, Asmus; Schaefer, Joost P.; Berndt, Rouven; Rusch, Rene; Wedel, Thilo; Klaws, Guenther; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Röcken, Christoph; Jansen, Olav; Lutter, Georg; Cremer, Joachim; Groß, Justus

    2015-02-01

    Stenosis and occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) are most common in arterial occlusive disease. There are numerous interventional, surgical, and combined approaches to reconstitute maximum blood supply to the lower limb; however, despite intense clinical research, the long-term success rates are still poor. We present the first results with a catheter prototype for laser-based minimal invasive endarterectomy, called laser scoop desobliteration (LSD). The tip of a glass fiber containing a catheter was modified with a spatula head design and connected to an ultraviolet laser. It was tested in cadavers fixed with the Thiel embalming technique preserving tissue consistency, flexibility, and plasticity. After longitudinal arteriotomy of the SFA, a circular dissection between media and adventitia was performed. Then the LSD catheter was inserted and propagated with a progress of 1 mm/s. Afterward, the atheroma core, which showed a plain surface without substantial attaching tissue debris, was removed. Histological examination of the vessel wall showed that the dissection was performed at the media/adventitia interface. In summary, the constructed LSD catheter allowed a rapid and easy way to perform an endarterectomy, thereby offering an innovative approach in the treatment of chronic occluded SFA.

  5. Effect of calcium chloride on the isobaric vapor-liquid equilibrium of 1-propanol + water

    SciTech Connect

    Iliuta, M.C.; Thyrion, F.C.; Landauer, O.M.

    1996-05-01

    The effect of calcium chloride at salt mole fractions from 0.02 to saturation on the vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of 1-propanol + water has been studied at 101.32 kPa using a modified Othmer equilibrium still. The salt exhibited a salting-out effect of the alcohol over the whole range of liquid composition, the azeotrope being eliminated at salt mole fractions greater than 0.080. A liquid phase splitting into two immiscible liquid phases on the whole range of salt concentration and over a liquid range of about 0.01--0.54 1-propanol mole fraction (salt-free basis) was observed. The results were compared with the values predicted from the extended UNIQUAC models of Sander et al. and Macedo et al. and the modified UNIFAC group-contribution model of Kikic et al.

  6. Reactor-chromatographic determination of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Berezkin, V.G.

    1986-08-01

    The authors carry out a chromatographic study of the volatile products that evolve when various grades of domestic polyvinyl chloride are heated, to determine the concentration of residual monomer. To find vinyl chloride in complex mixtures of air pollutants the authors used sorptive reaction concentration of impurities. This new combination of methods is based on preliminary separation at the sampling stage of impurities that interfere in the analysis, followed by concentration of the desired components in a trap with an adsorbent, and chromatographic determination of the concentrated trace materials. The method obtains low vinyl chloride concentrations (down to 10/sup -4/-10/sup -5/ wt. %) with +/-5 relative error.

  7. Long-term sodium and chloride surface water exports from the Dallas/Fort Worth region.

    PubMed

    Steele, M K; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J A

    2011-07-15

    Sodium and chloride in surface water are typically related to urbanization and population density and can have a significant impact on drinking water sources and the subsequent salinity of aquatic ecosystems. While the majority of research has focused on the impact of deicing salts on urban surface waters in colder climates, the effect of urbanization on sodium and chloride concentrations has been found to occur in warmer climates. This study investigated long-term exports of sodium and chloride from watersheds with increasing urbanization in the humid subtropical Dallas-Fort Worth region. We compared exports to characteristics of urbanization: urban land cover, impervious surface area, and calculated contributions from wastewater discharges. Long-term data (1980-2008) were obtained from five USGS gages located in and around the cities. Exports were calculated by regression analysis between concentrations and discharge and normalized for time and the watershed area. Grab samples were collected from June 2009 to May 2010 and sodium and chloride concentrations quantified. Our results show a strong positive relationship between the mean annual sodium and chloride exports from each watershed and the percent urban land cover and impervious surface area. Long-term increases in sodium and chloride fluxes were found for the three watersheds with the highest percentage of urban land cover. The single largest contributor was wastewater effluent that was estimated to contribute approximately half of the total loads in the three urbanized watersheds. Atmospheric deposition and deicing salts accounted for small amounts of the total export for urbanized watersheds. The source of the remaining salt load is still unknown and may be a combination of non-point sources. Estimates of urban salt exports were similar to estimates from northern watersheds affected by deicing salts.

  8. Non-occluded particles of nuclear polyhedrosis virus infecting Galleria mellonella L.: titration in vivo and in vitro. Brief report.

    PubMed

    Komissarenko, S V; Zherebtsova, E N; Sutugina, L P; Primatchenko, L V

    1979-01-01

    Infectivity of non-occluded particles of nuclear polyhedrosis virus infecting Galleria mellonella L. was determined with bioassay technique in vivo and with plaque assay method in vitro using SCLd 135 (Quiot) established cell culture. A plaque-forming virus unit corresponds to about 50 ID50 for Galleria larvae injected into hemocoel for non-cloned and 0.1-1.0 ID50 for a virus isolate cloned from an infective plaque.

  9. Transcatheter closure with use of the SHSMA occluder in 180 patients with congenital heart defects: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wan-Feng; Dong, Zhi-Feng; Gong, Kaizheng; Zhang, Guo-Pei; Cui, Ting; Xia, Yu-Dong; Dong, Jing; Shen, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter closure of congenital heart defects with the use of septal occluders has been widely accepted as a preferred treatment; however, the high cost of these devices limits their clinical application in some countries. Few clinical data are available regarding lower-cost products. Accordingly, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of the Chinese-made Shanghai Shape Memory Alloy (SHSMA) occluder in patients with congenital heart defects. From December 2001 through December 2008, a total of 180 patients with congenital heart defects (ages, 3-68 yr; mean age, 17.35 ± 13.22 yr) underwent transcatheter closure with use of the SHSMA occluder: 73 had atrial septal defects; 64, ventricular septal defects; 40, patent ductus arteriosus; and 3, complex congenital defects. The mean diameters of the defects were 20 ± 7.6 mm (atrial septal), 4.9 ± 2.1 mm (ventricular septal), and 5.6 ± 2.2 mm (patent ductus arteriosus). The procedural success rates were 98.6% for atrial defects, 98.4% for ventricular defects, and 100% for patent ductus arteriosus and for complex defects. The overall incidences of sequelae were 5.5%, 9.4%, 2.5%, and 0, respectively. Six months postprocedurally, complete occlusion was associated with a significant decrease in the right ventricular Tei index in atrial septal defect patients (P < 0.05) and with improvement of body mass index in 11 children. These results suggest that the SHSMA occluder is a safe, effective device for the transcatheter closure of congenital heart defects. For confirmation, a randomized controlled trial with more patients and a longer follow-up period is warranted. PMID:20978563

  10. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1991-12-31

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800{degrees}C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  11. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Ackerman, John P.; Battles, James E.; Johnson, Terry R.; Pierce, R. Dean

    1992-01-01

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  12. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-08-25

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

  13. Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic organic solvent-aqueous salt solution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Mokshina, N. Ya.; Zykov, A. V.

    2010-03-01

    Distribution coefficients of vitamin B2 in hydrophilic solvent ( n-butanol, isopropanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, and their mixtures)-aqueous salt (potassium chloride, sodium fluoride, and ammonium sulfate salting-out agents) solution systems were calculated. The synergic effect and optimum proportions of components in the solvent mixture for efficient extraction of vitamin B2 from aqueous solutions were established.

  14. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters Inserted Through Occluded or Collateral Veins Versus Conventional Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Steven; Chan, Tze Yuan; Bhat, Rammohan; Lam, Kimberly; Narlawar, Ranjeet S.; Cullen, Nicola; Littler, Peter

    2010-08-15

    Tunneled hemodialysis catheters become essential in dialysis access when there is no possibility of using a functioning arteriovenous fistula. Collateral or occluded veins visible on ultrasound are used for puncture and passage of catheters into the central venous system. Chronically occluded veins are crossed with guidewires to allow dilatation and subsequent passage of hemodialysis catheters. We performed a retrospective analysis of patient demographics, comorbidities, procedural complications, functional survival, performance, and history of previous vascular access. The study group was compared with two control groups in which dialysis catheters were inserted either by radiologists in the interventional suite or by clinicians on the wards. Nineteen patients from the study group were compared with same number of patients in both control groups. The mean age of the study group was higher compared with the control groups. There was no significant difference in mean functional survival, infection rates, dialysis pump speeds in the first 2 weeks, and procedural complications between the study group and the controls. The study group had a significantly higher number of previous vascular access interventions, longer dialysis careers, and more comorbidities. Tunneled dialysis catheter placement by way of collateral or occluded veins appears safe and effective. These techniques give the operator further options when faced with patients possessing challenging vascular access. Indeed, there may be a case for preferential use of these veins to keep patent central veins in reserve.

  15. [Initial division of the left renal vein before dissection of left renal vein occluded by intracaval tumor thrombus].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiro; Okita, Ryuji; Motoshima, Takanobu; Fujioka, Masashi; Abe, Hiromitsu; Morikawa, Hirofumi; Okaneya, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Hideki

    2011-09-01

    Between November 2008 and March 2010, we performed initial division of the left renal vein occluded by the tumor thrombus in six cases of left renal cancer at Toranomon Hospital. The left renal vein was completely occluded by the tumor thrombus in all cases. In order to ligate the left renal artery first behind the dilated left renal vein, we must dissect the left kidney with arterial blood flow. Massive bleeding from the numerous engorged collateral veins around the left kidney is inevitable. Furthermore, access to the left renal artery is difficult because of the large tumor. We therefore initially divided the left renal vein without arterial blood flow followed by division of the left renal artery. After nephrectomy by dissecting the tumor without blood flow we extirpated the intracaval tumor thrombus. The median time of the operation was 7 hours 35 minutes and the median amount of blood loss was 2,869 ml. The tumor stage was pT3b in four cases and pT3c in two cases. No complications were observed during and after surgery except for one case of lymphocele and another case of chylous ascites. The initial division of the left renal vein is considered to be a useful surgical approach in left renal cancer with occluded left renal vein, especially when the tumor is large.

  16. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  17. Brines formed by multi-salt deliquescence

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S; Rard, J; Alai, M; Staggs, K

    2005-11-04

    The FY05 Waste Package Environment testing program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory focused on determining the temperature, relative humidity, and solution compositions of brines formed due to the deliquescence of NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures. Understanding the physical and chemical behavior of these brines is important because they define conditions under which brines may react with waste canister surfaces. Boiling point experiments show that NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} salt mixtures form brines that transform to hydrous melts that do not truly 'dry out' until temperatures exceed 300 and 400 C, respectively. Thus a conducting solution is present for these salt assemblages over the thermal history of the repository. The corresponding brines form at lower relative humidity at higher temperatures. The NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has a mutual deliquescence relative humidity (MDRH) of 25.9% at 120 C and 10.8% at 180 C. Similarly, the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture has MDRH of 26.4% at 120 C and 20.0% at 150 C. The KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3} salt mixture salts also absorb some water (but do not appear to deliquesce) at 180 C and thus may also contribute to the transfer of electrons at interface between dust and the waste package surface. There is no experimental evidence to suggest that these brines will degas and form less deliquescent salt assemblages. Ammonium present in atmospheric and tunnel dust (as the chloride, nitrate, or sulfate) will readily decompose in the initial heating phase of the repository, and will affect subsequent behavior of the remaining salt mixture only through the removal of a stoichiometric equivalent of one or more anions. Although K-Na-NO{sub 3}-Cl brines form at high temperature and low relative humidity, these brines are dominated by nitrate, which is known to inhibit corrosion at lower temperature

  18. A new type of model-based Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis for solving the occluded marker problem.

    PubMed

    Kaptein, B L; Valstar, E R; Stoel, B C; Rozing, P M; Reiber, J H C

    2005-11-01

    Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) measures micromotion of an orthopaedic implant with respect to its surrounding bone. A problem in RSA is that the markers are sometimes overprojected by the implant itself. This study describes the so-called Marker Configuration Model-based RSA (MCM-based RSA) that is able to measure the pose of a rigid body in situations where less than three markers could be detected in both images of an RSA radiograph. MCM-based RSA is based on fitting a Marker Configuration model (MC-model) to the projection lines from the marker projection positions in the image to their corresponding Roentgen foci. An MC-model describes the positions of markers relative to each other and is obtained using conventional RSA. We used data from 15 double examinations of a clinical study of total knee prostheses and removed projections of the three tibial component markers, simulating occlusion of markers. The migration of the tibial component with respect to the bone, which should be zero, for the double examination is a measure of the accuracy of algorithm. With the new algorithm, it is possible to estimate the pose of a rigid body of which one or two markers are occluded in one of the images of the RSA radiograph with high accuracy as long as a proper MC-model of the markers in the rigid body is available. The new algorithm makes RSA more robust for occlusion of markers. This improves the results of clinical RSA studies because the number of lost RSA follow-up moments is reduced.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.; Edwards, T.

    2010-10-28

    The Savannah River Site has a mission to dissolve fissile materials and disposition them. The primary fissile material is plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}). To support dissolution of these materials, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and demonstrated a vacuum salt distillation (VSD) apparatus using both representative radioactive samples and non-radioactive simulant materials. Vacuum salt distillation, through the removal of chloride salts, increases the quantity of materials suitable for processing in the site's HB-Line Facility. Small-scale non-radioactive experiments at 900-950 C show that >99.8 wt % of the initial charge of chloride salt distilled from the sample boat with recovery of >99.8 wt % of the ceric oxide (CeO{sub 2}) - the surrogate for PuO{sub 2} - as a non-chloride bearing 'product'. Small-scale radioactive testing in a glovebox demonstrated the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from 13 PuO{sub 2} samples. Chloride concentrations were distilled from a starting concentration of 1.8-10.8 wt % to a final concentration <500 mg/kg chloride. Initial testing of a non-radioactive, full-scale production prototype is complete. A designed experiment evaluated the impact of distillation temperature, time at temperature, vacuum, product depth, and presence of a boat cover. Significant effort has been devoted to mechanical considerations to facilitate simplified operation in a glovebox.

  20. Studies Update Vinyl Chloride Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1980-01-01

    Extensive study affirms that vinyl chloride is a potent animal carcinogen. Epidemiological studies show elevated rates of human cancers in association with extended contact with the compound. (Author/RE)

  1. (Bioenergetics of salt tolerance): Progress report, 1980-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    We have developed novel and useful techniques based on ESR probes for measuring intracellular volumes and membrane permeability, as well as adapted more commonly used ones for various measurements in work on salt tolerance. Biological membrane systems, ranging from simpler (halobacteria and cyanobacteria) to more complex (sugar beet leaf segments) have been studied where specific problems related to salt tolerance and ionic transport were identified. The role of sodium and chloride transport in maintaining cellular volumes were studied with respect to the events which take place during adaptation to salt and their relationship to nitrate assimilation. 14 refs.

  2. Effects of Road Salt on Connecticut's Groundwater: A Statewide Centennial Perspective.

    PubMed

    Cassanelli, James P; Robbins, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which development and road salting has affected Connecticut's groundwater. We gathered water quality data from different time periods between 1894 and the present and analyzed the data using maps generated with ESRI ArcGIS. Historical reports illustrate a statewide baseline trend of decreasing chloride concentration northward across the State (average, 2 ppm). Since then, statewide chloride concentrations in ground water have increased by more than an order of magnitude on average. Analysis indicates spatial correlation between chloride impacts and major roadways. Furthermore, increases in statewide chloride concentration parallel increases in road salt application. Projected trends suggest that statewide baseline concentrations will increase by an amount equal to five times background levels between the present and the year 2030. The analytical process outlined herein can be readily applied to any region to investigate salt impacts on large spatial and temporal scales.

  3. Consumer acceptability of cucumber pickles produced by fermentation in calcium chloride brine for reduced environmental impact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation of cucumbers in calcium chloride brine has been proposed as an alternative process to reduce the environmental impact of traditional, high salt fermentations. The objective of this research was to determine whether consumer acceptability of pickle products would be impacted by fermentat...

  4. Effects of dietary sodium chloride on health parameters in mature cats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Laflamme, Dorothy P L; Long, Grace L

    2009-06-01

    High sodium diets have been shown to enhance water intake and urine output, a potential benefit in the management of lower urinary tract diseases. However, one study suggested that high salt (sodium chloride) diets might have adverse effects on the kidneys [Kirk CA, Jewell DE, Lowry SR. Effects of sodium chloride on selected parameters in cats. Vet Ther 2006; 7: 333-46]. Therefore, the objective of this controlled, prospective study was to evaluate the effects of diets with different salt content (1.11% sodium and 1.78% chloride versus 0.55% sodium and 1.02% chloride, dry matter (dm)) when fed to mature cats (mean age 7.0 years; 12 cats per group) over a 6-month period. Food intake, body weight, bone mineral content, total body hydration status, blood pressure, and markers of renal function were unaffected by salt intake, and no adverse effects were observed. When a subset of cats (n=9) with an initial serum creatinine > or =1.6mg/dl was evaluated separately, there remained no evidence of adverse effects associated with increased salt intake. These results are consistent with the majority of other studies evaluating sodium intake in cats, as well as with the National Research Council's assessment, all of which indicate that sodium at 1.5% of the diet dm is not harmful to healthy cats. PMID:19073369

  5. Effects of dietary sodium chloride on health parameters in mature cats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Laflamme, Dorothy P L; Long, Grace L

    2009-06-01

    High sodium diets have been shown to enhance water intake and urine output, a potential benefit in the management of lower urinary tract diseases. However, one study suggested that high salt (sodium chloride) diets might have adverse effects on the kidneys [Kirk CA, Jewell DE, Lowry SR. Effects of sodium chloride on selected parameters in cats. Vet Ther 2006; 7: 333-46]. Therefore, the objective of this controlled, prospective study was to evaluate the effects of diets with different salt content (1.11% sodium and 1.78% chloride versus 0.55% sodium and 1.02% chloride, dry matter (dm)) when fed to mature cats (mean age 7.0 years; 12 cats per group) over a 6-month period. Food intake, body weight, bone mineral content, total body hydration status, blood pressure, and markers of renal function were unaffected by salt intake, and no adverse effects were observed. When a subset of cats (n=9) with an initial serum creatinine > or =1.6mg/dl was evaluated separately, there remained no evidence of adverse effects associated with increased salt intake. These results are consistent with the majority of other studies evaluating sodium intake in cats, as well as with the National Research Council's assessment, all of which indicate that sodium at 1.5% of the diet dm is not harmful to healthy cats.

  6. Extraction of actinides from a chloride medium using pentaalkylpropanediamides

    SciTech Connect

    Cuillerdier, C.; Musikas, C.

    1993-01-01

    Pyrometallurgical processes for the purification of plutonium for defense create waste solutions containing actinides, mainly americium, in chloride medium. Studies have been undertaken to study the extraction of actinides in a chloride medium (hydrochloric acid mixed with concentrated salts such as LiCl, CaCl{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}, KCl) using pentaalkylpropanediamides as extractants. Plutonium(IV) is very easily extracted, but Am(III) needs a salting-out agent such as LiCl. Back extraction of trivalent cations is easy in HCl < 5 {und M}. Plutonium(IV) and (VI) can be stripped by reduction either with ascorbic acid or hydroxylammonium salts in a weak-acid medium. Several diluents can be used (aromatic, chlorinated, or even aliphatic) with addition of decanol to prevent third-phase formation. In conclusion, diamides can be used for declassification of various wastes, they are potentially completely incinerable, and, as the synthesis has been optimized, they appear to be promising extractants.

  7. On the Effect of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate on Cold Denaturation.

    PubMed

    Pica, Andrea; Graziano, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Both sodium chloride and sodium sulfate are able to stabilize yeast frataxin, causing an overall increase of its thermodynamic stability curve, with a decrease in the cold denaturation temperature and an increase in the hot denaturation one. The influence of low concentrations of these two salts on yeast frataxin stability can be assessed by the application of a theoretical model based on scaled particle theory. First developed to figure out the mechanism underlying cold denaturation in water, this model is able to predict the stabilization of globular proteins provided by these two salts. The densities of the salt solutions and their temperature dependence play a fundamental role.

  8. Cobrahead Deformity in the Right Atrial Disc of a New-Generation Occlutech Figulla Flex II Atrial Septal Defect Occluder Device

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ertan; Sahin, Tayfun

    2015-01-01

    Cobrahead deformity is a known (but uncommon) phenomenon associated with the left atrial disc of the Amplatzer or Occlutech Figulla septal occluder device during percutaneous transcatheter atrial septal defect closure. It has also been postulated that the right atrial disc of the Amplatzer septal occluder device might upon occasion exhibit the cobrahead malformation. To date, only one case report concerning the cobrahead deformity in the right atrial disc of an Amplatzer septal occluder has been published, if we discount a report published as a letter to the manufacturer. Here we present the first report (known to us) of a cobrahead deformity in the right atrial disc of an Occlutech Figulla Flex II atrial septal defect occluder device during transcatheter closure of a complex atrial septal defect. PMID:26504440

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy Secondary to Intrahepatic Portosystemic Venous Shunt: Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Kato, Takeharu; Tanaka, Osamu; Matsushima, Shigenori; Ito, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Chio; Ushijima, Yo; Shiga, Kensuke; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2002-06-15

    We report a 70-year-old woman with hepatic encephalopathy due to an intrahepatic portosystemic venous shunt that was successfully occluded by percutaneous transcatheter embolization with n-butyl cyanoacrylate and microcoils.

  10. Calcium phosphate stabilization of fly ash with chloride extraction.

    PubMed

    Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Municipal solid waste incinerator by products include fly ash and air pollution control residues. In order to transform these incinerator wastes into reusable mineral species, soluble alkali chlorides must be separated and toxic trace elements must be stabilized in insoluble form. We show that alkali chlorides can be extracted efficiently in an aqueous extraction step combining a calcium phosphate gel precipitation. In such a process, sodium and potassium chlorides are obtained free from calcium salts, and the trace metal ions are immobilized in the calcium phosphate matrix. Moderate calcination of the chemically treated fly ash leads to the formation of cristalline hydroxylapatite. Fly ash spiked with copper ions and treated by this process shows improved stability of metal ions. Leaching tests with water or EDTA reveal a significant drop in metal ion dissolution. Hydroxylapatite may trap toxic metals and also prevent their evaporation during thermal treatments. Incinerator fly ash together with air pollution control residues, treated by the combined chloride extraction and hydroxylapatite formation process may be considered safe to use as a mineral filler in value added products such as road base or cement blocks.

  11. Physico-chemical and sensory properties of reduced-fat mortadella prepared with blends of calcium, magnesium and potassium chloride as partial substitutes for sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Horita, C N; Morgano, M A; Celeghini, R M S; Pollonio, M A R

    2011-12-01

    Blends of calcium, magnesium and potassium chloride were used to partially replace sodium chloride (50-75%) in reduced-fat mortadella formulations. The presence of calcium chloride reduced the emulsion stability, cooking yield, elasticity and cohesiveness and increased hardness; however, it yielded the best sensory acceptance when 50% NaCl was replaced by 25% CaCl(2) and 25% KCl. There was no effect of the salt substitutes on mortadella color, appearance and aroma. All salt combinations studied showed stable lipid oxidation during its shelf life. The use of a blend with 1% NaCl, 0.5% KCl and 0.5% MgCl(2) resulted in the best emulsion stability, but the worst scores for flavor. This study suggests that it is possible to reduce the sodium chloride concentration by 50% in reduced-fat mortadella using the studied salt combinations with necessary adjustments to optimize the sensory properties (MgCl(2) 25%; KCl 25%) or emulsion stability (CaCl(2) 25%; KCl 25%).

  12. The development of a new generation of methyl chloride synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    McInroy, Alastair R; Winfield, John M; Dudman, Chris C; Jones, Peter; Lennon, David

    2016-07-01

    In previous work by the authors, aspects of the surface chemistry connected with methyl chloride synthesis over an η-alumina catalyst have been examined. This communication considers a role for Group 1 metal salts to modify the catalytic performance of the well characterised η-alumina catalyst. Firstly, based on a previously postulated mechanism for the reaction of methanol on η-alumina, a mechanism for methyl chloride synthesis over the η-alumina catalyst is proposed. Secondly, the validity of the new mechanism is tested by observing how the (i) type and (ii) loading of the Group 1 metal salt may perturb methyl chloride selectivity. The outcomes of these measurements are rationalised with reference to the postulated mechanism. Overall, this study represents an example of how a proposed reaction mechanism has been used to inform and guide a catalyst development strategy for a large-scale industrial process. PMID:27095544

  13. Effect of sodium chloride on growth and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471.

    PubMed

    Neysens, Patricia; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-11-15

    A kinetic investigation of the effect of sodium chloride on cell growth of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 and amylovorin L471 production was carried out through in vitro experiments using a temperature and pH prevailing during sourdough fermentations. Sodium chloride interfered both with cell growth and bacteriocin production. Biomass formation and amylovorin L471 production decreased in the presence of increasing salt concentrations. Maximum bacteriocin activities were observed after the addition of 10 g l(-1) of NaCl, while the maximum specific growth rate reached an optimum at 5 g l(-1) of NaCl. High salt concentrations (20-40 g l(-1)) resulted in biphasic fermentation profiles. Based on these results, incorporation of 5-10 g l(-1) of sodium chloride in the water phase of type II sourdough preparations might be beneficial to enhance bacterial growth and amylovorin L471 production, and so contribute to the competitiveness of the strain in a sourdough environment.

  14. Mechanism of chemical activation of sodium chloride in the presence of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Anja K K; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2015-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been shown to promote chlorination of glycerol during thermal processing. However, the detailed mechanism of this reaction is not well understood. Preliminary experiments have indicated that the reaction mixture should contain an amino acid and it should be dissolved thoroughly in water in order to induce chlorination. These observations are consistent with the process of dissociation of sodium chloride and its re-association with amino acid and eventual formation of the chlorinating agent in the form of the hydrochloride salt. Release of HCl from this salt can be manifested in chlorination and hydrolytic reactions occurring during thermal processing. The generation of HCl at room temperature from a mixture of sodium chloride and glycine was confirmed through spectrophotometric monitoring of the pH. Hydrolytic and chlorination reactions were demonstrated through monitoring of formation of HMF and chlorinated products under pyrolytic conditions using glucose or sucrose and amino acid mixtures.

  15. An XAFS study of nickel chloride in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride/ aluminum chloride

    SciTech Connect

    D Roeper; G Cheek; K Pandya; W OGrady

    2011-12-31

    Nickel chloride was studied with cyclic voltammetry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy in acidic and basic aluminum chloride/1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquids. Acidic melts display metal stripping peaks which are not observed in the basic melt. EXAFS analysis shows that the nickel is tetrahedrally coordinated with chloride ions in the basic solution. In the acidic solution the nickel is coordinated by six chloride ions that are also associated with aluminum ions.

  16. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  17. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  18. Device closure of secundum atrial septal defect in a 4.5 kilogram infant: Novel use of the Amplatzer DuctOccluder II device.

    PubMed

    McCrossan, B A; Walsh, K P

    2016-02-01

    Modest secundum atrial septal defects (2°ASD) may cause significant pulmonary over perfusion during infancy, particularly in conjunction with left heart obstructive lesions. Amplatzer Septal Occluders are not ideal in this setting especially given recent concerns regarding device erosion. We report the first use of the Amplatzer Duct Occluder II device (ADO2) to close a 2°ASD in a 4.5 kg infant.

  19. Formation of Recurrent Slope Lineae on Mars by Rewetting of Salt Deposits Formed in an Earlier Wetter Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, J.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2016-09-01

    The typical darkening of RSL can be reproduced by the deliquescent wetting of a perchlorate- or chloride-containing martian simulant soil if exposed to a relative humidity higher than the deliquescence relative humidity of the salt-soil mixture.

  20. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg. No. 7447-40-7) is a white... manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g)...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... from the filtrate on cooling. Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Alternatively, hydrogen chloride formed by the burning of hydrogen in chlorine is dissolved in water and then... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is...

  9. Regeneration of zinc chloride hydrocracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Zielke, Clyde W.

    1979-01-01

    Improved rate of recovery of zinc values from the solids which are carried over by the effluent vapors from the oxidative vapor phase regeneration of spent zinc chloride catalyst is achieved by treatment of the solids with both hydrogen chloride and calcium chloride to selectively and rapidly recover the zinc values as zinc chloride.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1622 - Potassium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium chloride. 184.1622 Section 184.1622 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1622 Potassium chloride. (a) Potassium chloride (KCl, CAS Reg... levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Potassium chloride may be used in...

  11. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  12. Transformation of zinc hydroxide chloride monohydrate to crystalline zinc oxide.

    PubMed

    Moezzi, Amir; Cortie, Michael; McDonagh, Andrew

    2016-04-25

    Thermal decomposition of layered zinc hydroxide double salts provides an interesting alternative synthesis for particles of zinc oxide. Here, we examine the sequence of changes occurring as zinc hydroxide chloride monohydrate (Zn5(OH)8Cl2·H2O) is converted to crystalline ZnO by thermal decomposition. The specific surface area of the resultant ZnO measured by BET was 1.3 m(2) g(-1). A complicating and important factor in this process is that the thermal decomposition of zinc hydroxide chloride is also accompanied by the formation of volatile zinc-containing species under certain conditions. We show that this volatile compound is anhydrous ZnCl2 and its formation is moisture dependent. Therefore, control of atmospheric moisture is an important consideration that affects the overall efficiency of ZnO production by this process. PMID:27030646

  13. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  14. Aluminium salt slag characterization and utilization--a review.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, P E

    2012-05-30

    Aluminium salt slag (also known as aluminium salt cake), which is produced by the secondary aluminium industry, is formed during aluminium scrap/dross melting and contains 15-30% aluminium oxide, 30-55% sodium chloride, 15-30% potassium chloride, 5-7% metallic aluminium and impurities (carbides, nitrides, sulphides and phosphides). Depending on the raw mix the amount of salt slag produced per tonne of secondary aluminium ranges from 200 to 500 kg. As salt slag has been classified as toxic and hazardous waste, it should be managed in compliance with the current legislation. Its landfill disposal is forbidden in most of the European countries and it should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This paper presents a review of the aluminium salt slag chemical and mineralogical characteristics, as well as various processes for metal recovery, recycling of sodium and potassium chlorides content back to the smelting process and preparation of value added products from the final non metallic residue.

  15. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  16. CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

    2007-11-30

    Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

  17. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L. . Kroll Inst. for Extractive Metallurgy); Averill, W.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon.

  18. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-05-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon.

  19. Transient streaming potentials associated with brine flow in rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental data collected in falling-head permeameter tests using brine flow through crushed rock salt are presented. The brine was obtained by recirculating what was initially deionized water through a column of crushed rock salt until saturation (specific gravity = 1.205) was attained. The column was then repacked with fresh crushed salt. Brine flow through the salt was then monitored with a pressure transducer and silver-silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrodes, measuring the pressure and voltage drops, respectively, across the length of the salt column. The measurements are reported. Preliminary analysis of the data is performed with a recently developed model for transient streaming potentials in falling-head permeameters.

  20. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.