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Sample records for chlorine dioxide gas

  1. Chlorine Dioxide (Gas)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a sterilant for use in manufacturing, laboratory equipment, medical devices, environmental surfaces, tools and clean rooms. Aqueous ClO2 is registered by the EPA as a surface disinfectant and sanitizer fo...

  2. Selective determination of chlorine dioxide using gas diffusion flow injection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, D.A.; Pacey, G.E.; Gordon, G.

    1985-12-01

    An automated absorbance technique for the determination of aqueous chlorine dioxide has been developed by utilizing gas diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas diffusion membrane is used to separate the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream. The absorbance of chlorine dioxide is monitored at 359 nm. The first method uses distilled water as the acceptor stream and gives a detection limit of 0.25 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This system is over 550 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. To further minimize chlorine interference, oxalic acid is used in the acceptor stream. The detection limit for this system is 0.45 mg/L chlorine dioxide. This second system is over 5400 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than chlorine. Both methods show excellent selectivity for chlorine dioxide over iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite and perchlorate ions. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry. PMID:27499670

  4. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyobi; Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak; Myeong, Donghoon; Chang, Byungjoon; Choe, Nong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry.

  5. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas residues on selected food produce.

    PubMed

    Trinetta, Valentina; Vaidya, Nirupama; Linton, Richard; Morgan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables has greatly increased, and so has its association with contamination of several foodborne pathogens (Listeria, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli). Hence, there is a need to investigate effective sanitizer systems for produce decontamination. Chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)), a strong oxidizing gas with broad spectrum and sanitizing properties, has previously been studied for use on selected fruits and vegetables. ClO(2) gas treatments show great potential for surface pathogen reduction; however its use from a residue safety standpoint has yet to be assessed. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate residues of ClO(2), chlorite, chlorate, and chloride on selected fresh produce surfaces after treatment with ClO(2) gas. A rinse procedure was used and water samples were analyzed by N, N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine and ion chromatography method (300.0). Seven different foods--tomatoes, oranges, apples, strawberries, lettuce, alfalfa sprouts, and cantaloupe--were analyzed after ClO(2) treatment for surface residues. Very low residues were detectable for all the food products except lettuce and alfalfa sprouts, where the measured concentrations were significantly higher. Chlorine dioxide technology leaves minimal to no detectable chemical residues in several food products, thus result in no significant risks to consumers. Practical Application: Potential for chlorine dioxide gas treatments as an effective pathogen inactivation technology to produce with minimal risk for consumers.

  6. Chloroxyanion residue quantification in cantaloupes treated with chlorine dioxide gas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes, results in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monoc...

  7. Potential biodefense model applications for portable chlorine dioxide gas production.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Jeannie M; Newsome, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Development of decontamination methods and strategies to address potential infectious disease outbreaks and bioterrorism events are pertinent to this nation's biodefense strategies and general biosecurity. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas has a history of use as a decontamination agent in response to an act of bioterrorism. However, the more widespread use of ClO2 gas to meet current and unforeseen decontamination needs has been hampered because the gas is too unstable for shipment and must be prepared at the application site. Newer technology allows for easy, onsite gas generation without the need for dedicated equipment, electricity, water, or personnel with advanced training. In a laboratory model system, 2 unique applications (personal protective equipment [PPE] and animal skin) were investigated in the context of potential development of decontamination protocols. Such protocols could serve to reduce human exposure to bacteria in a decontamination response effort. Chlorine dioxide gas was capable of reducing (2-7 logs of vegetative and spore-forming bacteria), and in some instances eliminating, culturable bacteria from difficult to clean areas on PPE facepieces. The gas was effective in eliminating naturally occurring bacteria on animal skin and also on skin inoculated with Bacillus spores. The culturable bacteria, including Bacillus spores, were eliminated in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Results of these studies suggested portable, easily used ClO2 gas generation systems have excellent potential for protocol development to contribute to biodefense strategies and decontamination responses to infectious disease outbreaks or other biothreat events.

  8. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 00 / 007 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ( CAS Nos . 10049 - 04 - 4 and 7758 - 19 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the ( IRIS ) Integrated Risk Information System September 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  9. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  10. Adsorption of chlorine dioxide gas on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Ryan, Shawn P; Snyder, Emily Gibb; Serre, Shannon D; Touati, Abderrahmane; Clayton, Matthew J

    2010-08-01

    Research and field experience with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas to decontaminate structures contaminated with Bacillus anthracis spores and other microorganisms have demonstrated the effectiveness of this sterilant technology. However, because of its hazardous properties, the unreacted ClO2, gas must be contained and captured during fumigation events. Although activated carbon has been used during some decontamination events to capture the ClO2 gas, no data are available to quantify the performance of the activated carbon in terms of adsorption capacity and other sorbent property operational features. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine and compare the ClO2 adsorption capacities of five different types of activated carbon as a function of the challenge ClO2 concentration. Tests were also conducted to investigate other sorbent properties, including screening tests to determine gaseous species desorbed from the saturated sorbent upon warming (to provide an indication of how immobile the ClO2 gas and related compounds are once captured on the sorbent). In the adsorption tests, ClO2 gas was measured continuously using a photometric-based instrument, and these measurements were verified with a noncontinuous method utilizing wet chemistry analysis. The results show that the simple activated carbons (not impregnated or containing other activated sorbent materials) were the most effective, with maximum adsorption capacities of approximately 110 mg/g. In the desorption tests, there was minimal release of ClO(2) from all sorbents tested, but desorption levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas (detected as chloride) varied, with a maximum release of nearly 15% of the mass of ClO2 adsorbed.

  11. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6- and 4.3-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, respectively. However, this treatment could result in the presence of chloroxyanion residues, such as chloride (Cl(-)), chlorite (ClO2(-)), chlorate (ClO3(-)), and perchlorate (ClO4(-)), which, apart from chloride, are a toxicity concern. Radiolabeled chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This

  12. Etching Rate of Silicon Dioxide Using Chlorine Trifluoride Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yutaka; Kasahara, Yu; Habuka, Hitoshi; Takechi, Naoto; Fukae, Katsuya

    2009-02-01

    The etching rate behavior of silicon dioxide (SiO2, fused silica) using chlorine trifluoride (ClF3) gas is studied at substrate temperatures between 573 and 1273 K at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal cold-wall reactor. The etching rate increases with the ClF3 gas concentration, and the overall reaction is recognized to be of the first order. The change of the etching rate with increasing substrate temperature is nonlinear, and the etching rate tends to approach a constant value at temperatures exceeding 1173 K. The overall rate constant is estimated by numerical calculation, taking into account the transport phenomena in the reactor, including the chemical reaction at the substrate surface. The activation energy obtained in this study is 45.8 kJ mol-1, and the rate constant is consistent with the measured etching rate behavior. A reactor system in which there is minimum etching of the fused silica chamber by ClF3 gas can be achieved using an IR lamp heating unit and a chamber cooling unit to maintain a sufficiently low temperature of the chamber wall.

  13. Chloroxyanion residues in cantaloupe and tomatoes after chlorine dioxide gas sanitation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but few data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tom...

  14. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization under Square-Wave Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, David K.; Woodworth, Archie G.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study chlorine dioxide (CD) gas sterilization under square-wave conditions. By using controlled humidity, gas concentration, and temperature at atmospheric pressure, standard biological indicators (BIs) and spore disks of environmental isolates were exposed to CD gas. The sporicidal activity of CD gas was found to be concentration dependent. Prehumidification enhanced the CD activity. The D values (time required for 90% inactivation) of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger ATCC 9372 BIs were estimated to be 1.5, 2.5, and 4.2 min when exposed to CD concentrations of 30, 15, and 7 mg/liter, respectively, at 23°C and ambient (20 to 40%) relative humidity (RH). Survivor tailings were observed. Prehumidification of BIs to 70 to 75% RH in an environmental chamber for 30 min resulted in a D value of 1.6 min after exposure to a concentration of 6 to 7 mg of CD per liter at 23°C and eliminated survivor tailing. Prolonging prehumidification at 70 to 75% RH for up to 16 h did not further improve the inactivation rate. Prehumidification by ultrasonic nebulization was found to be more effective than prehumidification in the environmental chamber, improving the D value to 0.55 min at a CD concentration of 6 to 7 mg/liter. Based on the current observations, CD gas is estimated, on a molar concentration basis, to be 1,075 times more potent than ethylene oxide as a sterilant at 30°C. A comparative study showed B. subtilis var. niger BIs were more resistant than other types of BIs and most of the tested bacterial spores of environmental isolates. PMID:16348127

  15. Exposure to Chlorine Dioxide Gas for 4 Hours Renders Syphacia Ova Nonviable

    PubMed Central

    Czarra, Jane A; Adams, Joleen K; Carter, Christopher L; Hill, William A; Coan, Patricia N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas for environmental decontamination of Syphacia spp. ova. We collected Syphacia ova by perianal cellophane tape impression of pinworm-infected mice. Tapes with attached ova were exposed to chlorine dioxide gas for 1, 2, 3, or 4 h. After gas exposure, ova were incubated in hatching medium for 6 h to promote hatching. For controls, tapes with attached ova were maintained at room temperature for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h without exposure to chlorine dioxide gas and similarly incubated in hatch medium for 6 h. Ova viability after incubation was assessed by microscopic examination. Exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for 4 h rendered 100% of Syphacia spp. ova nonviable. Conversely, only 17% of ova on the 4-h control slide were nonviable. Other times of exposure to chlorine dioxide gas resulted in variable effectiveness. These data suggest that exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for at least 4 h is effective for surface decontamination of Syphacia spp. ova. PMID:25199091

  16. Exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for 4 hours renders Syphacia ova nonviable.

    PubMed

    Czarra, Jane A; Adams, Joleen K; Carter, Christopher L; Hill, William A; Coan, Patricia N

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas for environmental decontamination of Syphacia spp. ova. We collected Syphacia ova by perianal cellophane tape impression of pinworm-infected mice. Tapes with attached ova were exposed to chlorine dioxide gas for 1, 2, 3, or 4 h. After gas exposure, ova were incubated in hatching medium for 6 h to promote hatching. For controls, tapes with attached ova were maintained at room temperature for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h without exposure to chlorine dioxide gas and similarly incubated in hatch medium for 6 h. Ova viability after incubation was assessed by microscopic examination. Exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for 4 h rendered 100% of Syphacia spp. ova nonviable. Conversely, only 17% of ova on the 4-h control slide were nonviable. Other times of exposure to chlorine dioxide gas resulted in variable effectiveness. These data suggest that exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for at least 4 h is effective for surface decontamination of Syphacia spp. ova.

  17. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Prodduk, Vara; Annous, Bassam A; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2014-11-01

    Although freshly sprouted beans and grains are considered to be a source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide good matrices for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to reduce Salmonella on artificially inoculated mungbean sprouts. The effectiveness of gaseous chlorine dioxide (0.5 mg/liter of air) with or without tumbling (mechanical mixing) was compared with an aqueous chlorine (200 ppm) wash treatment. Tumbling the inoculated sprouts during the chlorine dioxide gas application for 15, 30, and 60 min reduced Salmonella populations by 3.0, 4.0, and 5.5 log CFU/g, respectively, as compared with 3.0, 3.0, and 4.0 log CFU/g reductions obtained without tumbling, respectively. A 2.0 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella was achieved with an aqueous chlorine wash. The difference in microbial reduction between chlorine dioxide gas versus aqueous chlorine wash points to the important role of surface topography, pore structure, bacterial attachment, and/or biofilm formation on sprouts. These data suggested that chlorine dioxide gas was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells that are attached to inaccessible sites and/or are within biofilms on the sprout surface as compared with an aqueous chlorine wash. Consequently, scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that chlorine dioxide gas treatment was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells attached to inaccessible sites and within biofilms on the sprout surfaces.

  18. Chloroxyanion Residues in Cantaloupe and Tomatoes after Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sanitation.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Ernst, W; Herges, G R

    2015-11-04

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but little data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tomato and cantaloupe treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Treatments delivered 50 mg of chlorine dioxide gas per kg of tomato (2-h treatment) and 100 mg of gas per kg of cantaloupe (6-h treatment) in sealed, darkened containers. Chlorate residues in tomato and cantaloupe edible flesh homogenates were less than the LC-MS/MS limit of quantitation (60 and 30 ng/g respectively), but were 1319 ± 247 ng/g in rind + edible flesh of cantaloupe. Perchlorate residues in all fractions of chlorine dioxide-treated tomatoes and cantaloupe were not different (P > 0.05) than perchlorate residues in similar fractions of untreated tomatoes and cantaloupe. Data from this study suggest that chlorine dioxide sanitation of edible vegetables and melons can be conducted without the formation of unwanted residues in edible fractions.

  19. Selective chlorine dioxide determination using gas-diffusion flow injection analysis with chemiluminescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, D.A.; Gord, J.R.; Gordon, G.; Pacey, G.E.

    1986-06-01

    An automated chemiluminescent technique has been developed utilizing the advantages of gas-diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas-diffusion membrane separates the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream and removes ionic interferences. A novel chemiluminescence flow-through detector cell is used to measure the concentration of chlorine dioxide as a function of the intensity of the chemiluminescence produced from its reaction with luminol. The chemiluminescent reagent merges with the analyte directly in front of the photomultiplier tube in order to maximize the sensitivity of the system. The detection limit for chlorine dioxide is approximately 5 ppb. The method is over 1500 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than for chlorine on a mole basis. This method eliminates interference from iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite ion and chlorate ion.

  20. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  1. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  2. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  3. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food... the following methods: (i) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorite with either chlorine gas...

  4. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Fungi and Mycotoxins Associated with Sick Building Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S. C.; Wu, C.; Andriychuk, L. A.; Martin, J. M.; Brasel, T. L.; Jumper, C. A.; Straus, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    The growth of indoor molds and their resulting products (e.g., spores and mycotoxins) can present health hazards for human beings. The efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigation treatment for inactivating sick building syndrome-related fungi and their mycotoxins was evaluated. Filter papers (15 per organism) featuring growth of Stachybotrys chartarum, Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Cladosporium cladosporioides were placed in gas chambers containing chlorine dioxide gas at either 500 or 1,000 ppm for 24 h. C. globosum was exposed to the gas both as colonies and as ascospores without asci and perithecia. After treatment, all organisms were tested for colony growth using an agar plating technique. Colonies of S. chartarum were also tested for toxicity using a yeast toxicity assay with a high specificity for trichothecene mycotoxins. Results showed that chlorine dioxide gas at both concentrations completely inactivated all organisms except for C. globosum colonies which were inactivated an average of 89%. More than 99% of ascospores of C. globosum were nonculturable. For all ascospore counts, mean test readings were lower than the controls (P < 0.001), indicating that some ascospores may also have been destroyed. Colonies of S. chartarum were still toxic after treatment. These data show that chlorine dioxide gas can be effective to a degree as a fumigant for the inactivation of certain fungal colonies, that the perithecia of C. globosum can play a slightly protective role for the ascospores and that S. chartarum, while affected by the fumigation treatment, still remains toxic. PMID:16151130

  5. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 water direct contact killed food pathogen bacterium, Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies...

  6. Concentration-dependence of the explosion characteristics of chlorine dioxide gas.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ri-ya; Hu, Shuang-qi; Zhang, Yin-ghao; Bo, Tao

    2009-07-30

    The explosion characteristics of chlorine dioxide gas have been studied for the first time in a cylindrical exploder with a shell capacity of 20 L. The experimental results have indicated that the lower concentration limit for the explosive decomposition of chlorine dioxide gas is 9.5% ([ClO(2)]/[air]), whereas there is no corresponding upper concentration limit. Under the experimental conditions, and within the explosion limits, the pressure of explosion increases with increasing concentration of chlorine dioxide gas; the maximum pressure of explosion relative to the initial pressure was measured as 0.024 MPa at 10% ClO(2) and 0.641 MPa at 90% ClO(2). The induction time (the time from the moment of sparking to explosion) has also been found to depend on the concentration of chlorine dioxide gas; thus, at 10% ClO(2) the induction time was 2195 ms, but at 90% ClO(2) the induction time was just 8 ms. The explosion reaction mechanism of ClO(2) is of a degenerate chain-branching type involving the formation of a stable intermediate (Cl(2)O(3)), from which the chain-branching occurs. Chain initiation takes place at the point of ignition and termination takes place at the inner walls of the exploder.

  7. Plant physiological response of strawberry fruit to chlorine dioxide gas treatment during postharvest storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide, a strong oxidizing and sanitizing agent, is used as a postharvest sanitizer for fruits and vegetables and generally applied on a packing line using a chlorine dioxide generator. The objective of this research was to study the physiological responses of strawberries to ClO2 when app...

  8. Distribution, identification, and quantification of residues after treatment of ready-to-eat salami with 36Cl-labeled or nonlabeled chlorine dioxide gas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide gas actively eliminates a variety of food-borne pathogens and rot organisms, including Listeria monocytogenes on food and food preparation surfaces. However the disposition and fate of chlorine dioxide gas on ready-to-eat meat products has not been previously described. When ready-t...

  9. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P. . Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  11. A study of the properties of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigant

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Matsuura, Ayumi; Uekusa, Masashi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a strong oxidant that possesses an antimicrobial activity. We demonstrated here that ClO2 gas is easily generated by mixing 3.35% sodium chlorite solution (Purogene) and 85% phosphoric acid at a 10:1 volume ratio without using an expensive machine. In a test room (87 m3), experiments were carried out using various amounts of sodium chlorite solution (0.25 ml/m3 to 20.0 ml/m3). The gas concentration increased in a sodium chlorite volume-dependent manner and reached peak values of from 0.8 ppm to 40.8 ppm at 2 h–3 h, and then gradually decreased. No differences in gas concentrations were observed between 0.1 and 2.5 m above the floor, indicating that the gas was evenly distributed. Under high-humidity (approximately 80% relative humidity), colony formation of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was completely inhibited by ClO2 gas exposure at 1.0 ml/m3 sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 3.0 ppm). Exposure at 4.0 ml/m3 sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 10.6 ppm) achieved complete inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores. In contrast, without humidification, the efficacy of ClO2 gas was apparently attenuated, suggesting that the atmospheric moisture is indispensable. Delicate electronic devices (computer, camera, etc.) operated normally, even after being subjected to more than 20 times of fumigation. Considering that our method for gas generation is simple, reproducible, and highly effective at decontaminating microbes, our approach is expected to serve as an inexpensive alternative method for cleaning and disinfecting animal facilities. PMID:27041456

  12. A pilot study on using chlorine dioxide gas for disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes* #

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ying; Hao, Li-mei; Ma, Shu-ren; Wu, Jin-hui; Wang, Tao; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zong-xing; Qi, Jian-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study of employing chlorine dioxide (CD) gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes was conducted to meet the expectations of many endoscopy units in China for a high-efficiency and low-cost disinfectant. Methods: An experimental prototype with an active circulation mode was designed to use CD gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes. One type of testing device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes (2 m long, inner diameter 1 mm) and bacterial carrier containers was used to simulate the channel of the endoscope. PTFE bacterial carriers inoculated with Bacillus atrophaeus with or without organic burden were used to evaluate the sporicidal activity of CD gas. Factors including exposure dosage, relative humidity (RH), and flow rate (FR) influencing the disinfection effect of CD gas were investigated. Moreover, an autoptic disinfecting test on eight real gastrointestinal endoscopes after clinical use was performed using the experimental prototype. Results: RH, exposure dosage, organic burden, and the FR through the channel significantly (P<0.05) affected the disinfection efficacy of CD gas for a long and narrow lumen. The log reduction increased as FR decreased. Treatment with 4 mg/L CD gas for 30 min at 0.8 L/min FR and 75% RH, resulted in complete inactivation of spores. Furthermore, all eight endoscopes with a maximum colony-forming unit of 915 were completely disinfected. The cost was only 3 CNY (0.46 USD) for each endoscope. Conclusions: The methods and results reported in this study could provide a basis for further studies on using CD gas for the disinfection of endoscopes. PMID:27381729

  13. A pilot study on using chlorine dioxide gas for disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ying; Hao, Li-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ren; Wu, Jin-Hui; Wang, Tao; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zong-Xing; Qi, Jian-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    This pilot study of employing chlorine dioxide (CD) gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes was conducted to meet the expectations of many endoscopy units in China for a high-efficiency and low-cost disinfectant. An experimental prototype with an active circulation mode was designed to use CD gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes. One type of testing device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes (2 m long, inner diameter 1 mm) and bacterial carrier containers was used to simulate the channel of the endoscope. PTFE bacterial carriers inoculated with Bacillus atrophaeus with or without organic burden were used to evaluate the sporicidal activity of CD gas. Factors including exposure dosage, relative humidity (RH), and flow rate (FR) influencing the disinfection effect of CD gas were investigated. Moreover, an autoptic disinfecting test on eight real gastrointestinal endoscopes after clinical use was performed using the experimental prototype. RH, exposure dosage, organic burden, and the FR through the channel significantly (P<0.05) affected the disinfection efficacy of CD gas for a long and narrow lumen. The log reduction increased as FR decreased. Treatment with 4 mg/L CD gas for 30 min at 0.8 L/min FR and 75% RH, resulted in complete inactivation of spores. Furthermore, all eight endoscopes with a maximum colony-forming unit of 915 were completely disinfected. The cost was only 3 CNY (0.46 USD) for each endoscope. The methods and results reported in this study could provide a basis for further studies on using CD gas for the disinfection of endoscopes.

  14. A study of the properties of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigant.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Matsuura, Ayumi; Uekusa, Masashi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2016-07-29

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a strong oxidant that possesses an antimicrobial activity. We demonstrated here that ClO2 gas is easily generated by mixing 3.35% sodium chlorite solution (Purogene) and 85% phosphoric acid at a 10:1 volume ratio without using an expensive machine. In a test room (87 m(3)), experiments were carried out using various amounts of sodium chlorite solution (0.25 ml/m(3) to 20.0 ml/m(3)). The gas concentration increased in a sodium chlorite volume-dependent manner and reached peak values of from 0.8 ppm to 40.8 ppm at 2 h-3 h, and then gradually decreased. No differences in gas concentrations were observed between 0.1 and 2.5 m above the floor, indicating that the gas was evenly distributed. Under high-humidity (approximately 80% relative humidity), colony formation of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was completely inhibited by ClO2 gas exposure at 1.0 ml/m(3) sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 3.0 ppm). Exposure at 4.0 ml/m(3) sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 10.6 ppm) achieved complete inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores. In contrast, without humidification, the efficacy of ClO2 gas was apparently attenuated, suggesting that the atmospheric moisture is indispensable. Delicate electronic devices (computer, camera, etc.) operated normally, even after being subjected to more than 20 times of fumigation. Considering that our method for gas generation is simple, reproducible, and highly effective at decontaminating microbes, our approach is expected to serve as an inexpensive alternative method for cleaning and disinfecting animal facilities.

  15. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on hydroponic tomatoes using chlorine dioxide gas.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Arpan; Mahmoud, Barakat S M; Linton, Richard H

    2010-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine survivability of a cocktail of three strains of Salmonella enterica (Montevideo, Javiana, and Baildon) and two strains of Listeria monocytogenes (LCDC 81-861 and F4244) on hydroponic tomatoes after treatment with chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas. An initial concentration of 8-9 log cfu/mL of Salmonella and Listeria cocktails was inoculated individually, in separate experiments, on tomato skin to obtain a population of 7-8 log cfu/cm(2) after drying of the inoculums on the tomato skin. The aim was to achieve a 5 log reduction consistent with the recommendations of the National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods. The tomato skins were treated with 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mg/L ClO(2) gas for 12 min at 22 degrees C and at the relative humidity of 90%. Untreated skin samples were processed under the same conditions. ClO(2)-gas-treated and untreated samples were recovered by an overlay method. The bottom layer contains tryptic soy agar, and the top layer consists of xylose-lysine-desoxycholate agar or modified Oxford antimicrobial supplement agar for Salmonella and Listeria, respectively. More than a 5 log reduction in Salmonella and Listeria was observed on the tomato skin surfaces after treatment with 0.5 mg/L ClO(2) gas for 12 min. Treatment with 0.5 mg/L ClO(2) gas for 12 min also delayed the growth of natural microflora on tomato surfaces and extended the shelf life of tomatoes by 7 days during storage at 22 degrees C, compared with the untreated control. These results revealed that ClO(2) gas is a promising antimicrobial technology for fresh tomato skin surfaces.

  16. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas as a sanitizer of lettuce leaves.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young; Costello, Michael; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2004-07-01

    Aqueous solutions of sodium hypochlorite or hypochlorous acid are typically used to sanitize fresh fruits and vegetables. However, pathogenic organisms occasionally survive aqueous sanitization in sufficient numbers to cause disease outbreaks. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas generated by a dry chemical sachet was tested against foodborne pathogens on lettuce leaves. Lettuce leaves were inoculated with cocktail of three strains each of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium and treated with CLO2 gas for 30 min, 1 h, and 3 h in a model gas cabinet at room temperature (22 +/- 2 degrees C). After treatment, surviving cells, including injured cells, were enumerated on appropriate selective agar or using the overlay agar method, respectively. Total ClO2, generated by the gas packs was 4.3, 6.7, and 8.7 mg after 30 min, 1 h, and 3 h of treatment, respectively. Inoculated lettuce leaves exposed to ClO2 gas for 30 min experienced a 3.4-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.3-log reduction in Salmonella Typhimurium, and a 5.0-log reduction in L. monocytogenes when compared with the control. After 1 h. the three pathogens were reduced in number of CFU by 4.4. 5.3, and 5.2 log, respectively. After 3 h, the reductions were 6.9, 5.4, and 5.4 log, respectively. A similar pattern emerged when injured cells were enumerated. The ClO2, gas sachet was effective at killing pathogens on lettuce without deteriorating visual quality. Therefore, this product can be used during storage and transport of lettuce to improve its microbial safety.

  17. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  18. Distribution and chemical fate of chlorine dioxide gas during sanitation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A series of studies was conducted to establish the 1) distribution and chemical fate of 36-ClO2 on tomatoes and cantaloupe; and 2) the magnitude of residues in kilogram quantities of tomatoes and cantaloupe sanitized with a slow-release chlorine dioxide formulation. Tomatoes and cantaloupe were resp...

  19. Inactivation of Airborne Bacteria and Viruses Using Extremely Low Concentrations of Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio; Sakasegawa, Miyusse; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Takigawa, Yasuhiro; Taura, Kouichi; Taguchi, Kazuhiko; Matsubara, Kazuki; Nakahara, Kouichi; Kato, Daisuke; Sogawa, Koushirou; Oka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Infectious airborne microbes, including many pathological microbes that cause respiratory infections, are commonly found in medical facilities and constitute a serious threat to human health. Thus, an effective method for reducing the number of microbes floating in the air will aid in the minimization of the incidence of respiratory infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate that chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at extremely low concentrations, which has no detrimental effects on human health, elicits a strong effect to inactivate bacteria and viruses and significantly reduces the number of viable airborne microbes in a hospital operating room. In one set of experiments, a suspension of Staphylococcus aureus, bacteriophage MS2, and bacteriophage ΦX174 were released into an exposure chamber. When ClO2 gas at 0.01 or 0.02 parts per million (ppm, volume/volume) was present in the chamber, the numbers of surviving microbes in the air were markedly reduced after 120 min. The reductions were markedly greater than the natural reductions of the microbes in the chamber. In another experiment, the numbers of viable airborne bacteria in the operating room of a hospital collected over a 24-hour period in the presence or absence of 0.03 ppm ClO2 gas were found to be 10.9 ± 6.7 and 66.8 ± 31.2 colony-forming units/m3 (n = 9, p < 0.001), respectively. Taken together, we conclude that ClO2 gas at extremely low concentrations (≤0.03 ppm) can reduce the number of viable microbes floating in the air in a room. These results strongly support the potential use of ClO2 gas at a non-toxic level to reduce infections caused by the inhalation of pathogenic microbes in nursing homes and medical facilities.

  20. Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores on selected surfaces by chlorine dioxide gas*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-ju; Zhu, Neng; Jia, Hai-quan; Wu, Jin-hui; Yi, Ying; Qi, Jian-cheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chlorine dioxide (CD) gas has been used as a fumigant in the disinfection of biosafety laboratories. In this study, some experiments were conducted to assess the inactivation of spores inoculated on six materials [stainless steel (SS), painted steel (PS), polyvinyl chlorid (PVC), polyurethane (PU), glass (GS), and cotton cloth (CC)] by CD gas. The main aims of the study were to determine the sporicidal efficacy of CD gas and the effect of prehumidification before decontamination on sporicidal efficacy. Methods: Material coupons (1.2 cm diameter of SS, PS, and PU; 1.0 cm×1.0 cm for PVC, GS, and CC) were contaminated with 10 μl of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (ATCC 9372) spore suspension in mixed organic burden and then dried in a biosafety cabinet for 12 h. The spores were recovered by soaking the coupons in 5 ml of extraction liquid for 1 h and then vortexing the liquid for 1 min. Results: The log reductions in spore numbers on inoculated test materials exposed to CD gas [0.080% (volume ratio, v/v) for 3 h] were in the range of from 1.80 to 6.64. Statistically significant differences were found in decontamination efficacies on test material coupons of SS, PS, PU, and CC between with and without a 1-h prehumidification treatment. With the extraction method, there were no statistically significant differences in the recovery ratios between the porous and non-porous materials. Conclusions: The results reported from this study could provide information for developing decontamination technology based on CD gas for targeting surface microbial contamination. PMID:22467366

  1. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits.

  2. Decontamination of strawberries using batch and continuous chlorine dioxide gas treatments.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Selby, T L; Schultze, K K; Nelson, P E; Linton, R H

    2004-11-01

    Efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes on strawberries was determined using batch and continuous flow ClO2 gas treatment systems. Effects of continuous ClO2 gas treatment on total aerobic plate count, color, and residual ClO2 and chlorite on strawberries were also evaluated. Strawberries were spot inoculated with 7 to 8 log CFU per strawberry of each pathogen (E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes), stored for 1 day at 4 degrees C, and treated at 22 degrees C and 90 to 95% relative humidity with 0.2 to 4.0 mg/liter ClO2 gas for 15 or 30 min using a batch treatment system or with 0.6, 1.8, and 3.0 mg/liter for 10 min using a continuous treatment system. Surviving microbial populations were determined using a membrane-transfer plating recovery method. Increased ClO2 gas concentrations resulted in increased log reductions of each pathogen for both the batch and continuous systems. A batch treatment of strawberries with 4 mg/liter ClO2 for 30 min and continuous treatment with 3 mg/liter ClO2 for 10 min achieved greater than a 5-log reduction for both E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes. After continuous exposure to 3.0 mg/liter ClO2 gas for 10 min followed by 1 week of storage at 4 degrees C, no aerobic microorganisms were detected and the color of the strawberry surface did not change significantly (P > 0.05). Residues of ClO2 and chlorite on strawberries after the treatment were 0.19 +/- 0.33 mg ClO2 per kg and 1.17 +/- 2.02 mg Cl2 per kg, respectively, whereas after 1 week of storage no ClO2 residues were detected and residual chlorite levels were down to 0.07 +/- 0.12 mg Cl2 per kg. These results suggest that ClO2 gas treatment is an effective decontamination technique for improving the safety of strawberries while extending shelf life.

  3. Inactivation of feline calicivirus, a norovirus surrogate, by chlorine dioxide gas.

    PubMed

    Morino, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Lee, Cheolsung; Shibata, Takashi; Sanekata, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    The efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) against feline calicivirus (FCV), a norovirus surrogate, in the dry and the wet states on a hard surface was evaluated. We demonstrated that low-concentration ClO2 gas (mean 0.08 ppm, 0.22 microg/I) could inactivate FCV in the wet state with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS) within 6 h in 45 to 55% relative humidity (RH) (> 3 log10 reductions) and FCV in the dry state with 2% FBS (percentage of FBS in the viral suspension) within 10 h in 75 to 85% RH (> 3 log10 reductions) at 20 degrees C, respectively. Furthermore, a < 0.3 ppm concentration of ClO2 gas (mean 0.26 ppm, 0.73 microg/l) could inactivate (below the detection limit) FCV in the dry state with 5% FBS within 24 h in 75 to 85% RH at 20 degrees C. In contrast, in 45 to 55% RH at 20 degrees C, ClO2 gas had little effect even when the FCV in the dry state was exposed to high-concentration ClO2 (mean 8 ppm, 22.4 microg/l) for 24 h. These results suggest that humidity plays an important role in the inactivation by ClO2 gas of FCV in the dry state. According to the International Chemical Safety Card, threshold limit values for ClO2 gas are 0.1 ppm as an 8-h time-weighted average and 0.3 ppm as a 15 min short-term exposure limit. From these data, we propose that the treatment of wet areas of human activity such as kitchens, toilets, etc., with low-concentration ClO2 gas would be useful for reducing the risk of infection by noroviruses (NV) without adverse effects. In addition, we believe that the application of a combination of a < 0.3 ppm concentration of ClO2 gas and a humidifier in places without human activity may make it possible to inactivate NV in the dry state on any surface within a contaminated room without serious adverse effects.

  4. Method and apparatus for producing chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Santillie, P.W.; Ramras, D.M.

    1984-05-29

    A continuous method and apparatus are described for the efficient production of gaseous chlorine dioxide by the reaction between gaseous sulfur dioxide and an aqueous solution of a metallic chlorate. The chlorate solution and a highly concentrated sulfur dioxide gas are introduced into a packed columnar chamber at closely adjacent locations at the bottom of the chamber so as to flood the chamber and maximize both the contact area and contact time of the two reactants. Throughout the reaction the chamber is subjected to high vacuum imposed by an eductor which exhausts the chlorine dioxide gas and spent reactants. For use of the chlorine dioxide to produce potable water or treat foodstuffs, the chlorine dioxide and spent reactants are exhausted from the chamber separately by respective eductors substantially balanced with respect to each other to impose comparable vacuums upon the chamber. Because of the high efficency of the reaction, substantial heat is generated therefrom which is absorbed by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. The flow rate of the coolant and flow rate of the reactants into the chamber are porportional due to the dependency of the reactant flow rate on the coolant flow rate.

  5. Chlorine Gas Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    White, Carl W.; Martin, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Humans can come into contact with chlorine gas during short-term, high-level exposures due to traffic or rail accidents, spills, or other disasters. By contrast, workplace and public (swimming pools, etc.) exposures are more frequently long-term, low-level exposures, occasionally punctuated by unintentional transient increases. Acute exposures can result in symptoms of acute airway obstruction including wheezing, cough, chest tightness, and/or dyspnea. These findings are fairly nonspecific, and might be present after exposures to a number of inhaled chemical irritants. Clinical signs, including hypoxemia, wheezes, rales, and/or abnormal chest radiographs may be present. More severely affected individuals may suffer acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Up to 1% of exposed individuals die. Humidified oxygen and inhaled β-adrenergic agents are appropriate therapies for victims with respiratory symptoms while assessments are underway. Inhaled bicarbonate and systemic or inhaled glucocorticoids also have been reported anecdotally to be beneficial. Chronic sequelae may include increased airways reactivity, which tends to diminish over time. Airways hyperreactivity may be more of a problem among those survivors that are older, have smoked, and/or have pre-existing chronic lung disease. Individuals suffering from irritant-induced asthma (IIA) due to workplace exposures to chlorine also tend to have similar characteristics, such as airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, and to be older and to have smoked. Other workplace studies, however, have indicated that workers exposed to chlorine dioxide/sulfur dioxide have tended to have increased risk for chronic bronchitis and/or recurrent wheezing attacks (one or more episodes) but not asthma, while those exposed to ozone have a greater incidence of asthma. Specific biomarkers for acute and chronic exposures to chlorine gas are currently lacking. Animal models for chlorine gas

  6. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlorine dioxide. 173.300 Section 173.300 Food and... FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.300 Chlorine dioxide. Chlorine dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 10049-04-4) may be safely used in food in accordance with...

  7. Effect of low-concentration chlorine dioxide gas against bacteria and viruses on a glass surface in wet environments.

    PubMed

    Morino, H; Fukuda, T; Miura, T; Shibata, T

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of low-concentration chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas against model microbes in the wet state on a glass surface. We set up a test room (39 m(3)) and the ClO(2) gas was produced by a ClO(2) gas generator that continuously releases a constant low-concentration ClO(2) gas. Influenza A virus (Flu-A), feline calicivirus (FCV), Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were chosen as the model microbes. The low-concentration ClO(2) gas (mean 0.05 ppmv, 0.14 mg m(-3)) inactivated Flu-A and E. coli (>5 log(10) reductions) and FCV and S. aureus (>2 log(10) reductions) in the wet state on glass dishes within 5 h. The treatment of wet environments in the presence of human activity such as kitchens and bathrooms with the low-concentration ClO(2) gas would be useful for reducing the risk of infection by bacteria and viruses residing on the environmental hard surfaces without adverse effects. This study demonstrates that the low-concentration ClO(2) gas (mean 0.05 ppmv) inactivates various kinds of microbes such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, enveloped and nonenveloped viruses in the wet state. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Inhalation of chlorine gas.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical features of acute chlorine gas inhalation, and its management are reviewed. Current medical views on the chronic effects of an acute overwhelming exposure on lung function (reactive airways dysfunction syndrome), and the more controversial field of lung disease secondary to repeated inhalations of lower concentrations of chlorine gas are discussed. Images Figure PMID:9519180

  9. Six-month low level chlorine dioxide gas inhalation toxicity study with two-week recovery period in rats.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Akinori; Lee, Cheolsung; Morino, Hirofumi; Miura, Takanori; Ogata, Norio; Shibata, Takashi

    2012-02-21

    Chlorine dioxide (CD) gas has a potent antimicrobial activity at extremely low concentration and may serve as a new tool for infection control occupationally as well as publicly. However, it remains unknown whether the chronic exposure of CD gas concentration effective against microbes is safe. Therefore, long-term, low concentration CD gas inhalation toxicity was studied in rats as a six-month continuous whole-body exposure followed by a two-week recovery period, so as to prove that the CD gas exposed up to 0.1 ppm (volume ratio) is judged as safe on the basis of a battery of toxicological examinations. CD gas at 0.05 ppm or 0.1 ppm for 24 hours/day and 7 days/week was exposed to rats for 6 months under an unrestrained condition with free access to chow and water in a chamber so as to simulate the ordinary lifestyle in human. The control animals were exposed to air only. During the study period, the body weight as well as the food and water consumptions were recorded. After the 6-month exposure and the 2-week recovery period, animals were sacrificed and a battery of toxicological examinations, including biochemistry, hematology, necropsy, organ weights and histopathology, were performed. Well regulated levels of CD gas were exposed throughout the chamber over the entire study period. No CD gas-related toxicity sign was observed during the whole study period. No significant difference was observed in body weight gain, food and water consumptions, and relative organ weight. In biochemistry and hematology examinations, changes did not appear to be related to CD gas toxicity. In necropsy and histopathology, no CD gas-related toxicity was observed even in expected target respiratory organs. CD gas up to 0.1 ppm, exceeding the level effective against microbes, exposed to whole body in rats continuously for six months was not toxic, under a condition simulating the conventional lifestyle in human.

  10. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  11. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  12. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  13. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  14. Combination treatment of chlorine dioxide gas and aerosolized sanitizer for inactivating foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas and aerosolized sanitizer, when applied alone or in combination, on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto spinach leaves and tomato surfaces. Spinach leaves and tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of the three foodborne pathogens. ClO2 gas (5 or 10 ppmv) and aerosolized peracetic acid (PAA) (80 ppm) were applied alone or in combination for 20 min. Exposure to 10 ppmv of ClO2 gas for 20 min resulted in 3.4, 3.3, and 3.4 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on spinach leaves, respectively. Treatment with 80 ppm of aerosolized PAA for 20 min caused 2.3, 1.9, and 0.8 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) for 20 min caused 5.4, 5.1, and 4.1 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on tomatoes experienced similar reduction patterns to those on spinach leaves. As treatment time increased, most combinations of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA showed additive effects in the inactivation of the three pathogens. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA produced injured cells of three pathogens on spinach leaves while generally did not produce injured cells of these pathogens on tomatoes. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the color and texture of samples during 7 days of storage.

  15. Inactivation Kinetics and Mechanism of a Human Norovirus Surrogate on Stainless Steel Coupons via Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Jia Wei; Kaur, Simran; Lou, Fangfei; DiCaprio, Erin; Morgan, Mark; Linton, Richard; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-16

    Acute gastroenteritis caused by human norovirus is a significant public health issue. Fresh produce and seafood are examples of high-risk foods associated with norovirus outbreaks. Food contact surfaces also have the potential to harbor noroviruses if exposed to fecal contamination, aerosolized vomitus, or infected food handlers. Currently, there is no effective measure to decontaminate norovirus on food contact surfaces. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a strong oxidizer and is used as a decontaminating agent in food processing plants. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and mechanism of ClO2 gas inactivation of a norovirus surrogate, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), on stainless steel (SS) coupons. MNV-1 was inoculated on SS coupons at the concentration of 10(7) PFU/coupon. The samples were treated with ClO2 gas at 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 4 mg/liter for up to 5 min at 25°C and a relative humidity of 85%, and virus survival was determined by plaque assay. Treatment of the SS coupons with ClO2 gas at 2 mg/liter for 5 min and 2.5 mg/liter for 2 min resulted in at least a 3-log reduction in MNV-1, while no infectious virus was recovered at a concentration of 4 mg/liter even within 1 min of treatment. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanism of ClO2 gas inactivation included degradation of viral protein, disruption of viral structure, and degradation of viral genomic RNA. In conclusion, treatment with ClO2 gas can serve as an effective method to inactivate a human norovirus surrogate on SS contact surfaces.

  16. Inactivation Kinetics and Mechanism of a Human Norovirus Surrogate on Stainless Steel Coupons via Chlorine Dioxide Gas

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Jia Wei; Kaur, Simran; Lou, Fangfei; DiCaprio, Erin; Morgan, Mark; Linton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis caused by human norovirus is a significant public health issue. Fresh produce and seafood are examples of high-risk foods associated with norovirus outbreaks. Food contact surfaces also have the potential to harbor noroviruses if exposed to fecal contamination, aerosolized vomitus, or infected food handlers. Currently, there is no effective measure to decontaminate norovirus on food contact surfaces. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a strong oxidizer and is used as a decontaminating agent in food processing plants. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and mechanism of ClO2 gas inactivation of a norovirus surrogate, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), on stainless steel (SS) coupons. MNV-1 was inoculated on SS coupons at the concentration of 107 PFU/coupon. The samples were treated with ClO2 gas at 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 4 mg/liter for up to 5 min at 25°C and a relative humidity of 85%, and virus survival was determined by plaque assay. Treatment of the SS coupons with ClO2 gas at 2 mg/liter for 5 min and 2.5 mg/liter for 2 min resulted in at least a 3-log reduction in MNV-1, while no infectious virus was recovered at a concentration of 4 mg/liter even within 1 min of treatment. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanism of ClO2 gas inactivation included degradation of viral protein, disruption of viral structure, and degradation of viral genomic RNA. In conclusion, treatment with ClO2 gas can serve as an effective method to inactivate a human norovirus surrogate on SS contact surfaces. PMID:26475110

  17. Effect of chlorine dioxide gas on physical, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of p[olymeric packaging materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the first part of our study we determined permeability, diffusion, and solubility coefficients of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) through the following packaging material: biaxial-oriented polypropylene (BOPP); polyethylene terephthalate (PET); poly lactic acid (PLA); multilayer structure of ethy...

  18. Six-month low level chlorine dioxide gas inhalation toxicity study with two-week recovery period in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chlorine dioxide (CD) gas has a potent antimicrobial activity at extremely low concentration and may serve as a new tool for infection control occupationally as well as publicly. However, it remains unknown whether the chronic exposure of CD gas concentration effective against microbes is safe. Therefore, long-term, low concentration CD gas inhalation toxicity was studied in rats as a six-month continuous whole-body exposure followed by a two-week recovery period, so as to prove that the CD gas exposed up to 0.1 ppm (volume ratio) is judged as safe on the basis of a battery of toxicological examinations. Methods CD gas at 0.05 ppm or 0.1 ppm for 24 hours/day and 7 days/week was exposed to rats for 6 months under an unrestrained condition with free access to chow and water in a chamber so as to simulate the ordinary lifestyle in human. The control animals were exposed to air only. During the study period, the body weight as well as the food and water consumptions were recorded. After the 6-month exposure and the 2-week recovery period, animals were sacrificed and a battery of toxicological examinations, including biochemistry, hematology, necropsy, organ weights and histopathology, were performed. Results Well regulated levels of CD gas were exposed throughout the chamber over the entire study period. No CD gas-related toxicity sign was observed during the whole study period. No significant difference was observed in body weight gain, food and water consumptions, and relative organ weight. In biochemistry and hematology examinations, changes did not appear to be related to CD gas toxicity. In necropsy and histopathology, no CD gas-related toxicity was observed even in expected target respiratory organs. Conclusions CD gas up to 0.1 ppm, exceeding the level effective against microbes, exposed to whole body in rats continuously for six months was not toxic, under a condition simulating the conventional lifestyle in human. PMID:22348507

  19. [Comparison of the quality and toxicity of wastewater after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-sha; Zhang, Tong; Hu, Hong-ying

    2005-11-01

    The effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections on quality and toxicity of wastewater were compared. The experiment results showed that chlorine disinfection had no obvious effect on wastewater color, while chlorine dioxide disinfection decreased wastewater color observably. The DOC of wastewater did not change much after chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections. Chlorine disinfection significantly increased UV230 of wastewater and chlorine dioxide disinfection slightly decreased UV230 of wastewater. When the disinfectants dosage was 30 mg/L, UV230 increased about 0.7 cm(-1) after chlorine disinfection and decreased about 0.05 cm(-1) after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The acute toxicity of wastewater increased with increasing disinfectants dosage for both chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections and the acute toxicity after chlorine disinfection is much stronger than that after chlorine dioxide disinfection. The genotoxicity of wastewater increased slightly after chlorine disinfection and decreased slightly after chlorine dioxide disinfection.

  20. Impact of Chlorine dioxide Gas on the Barrier Properties of Polymeric Packaging Materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One important criterion of polymeric material selection and packaging design for fresh produce is choosing the material with suitable ratio of carbon dioxide and oxygen permabilities (PCO2/P O2), to the respiratory proportion of the targeted produce. The ratio of [O2] and [CO2] in the head space var...

  1. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO2. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO2 with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. In one model system, 99% of Cl2(g) either reacted with components of flour or was consumed by oxidation/chlorination reactions. The lipids extracted from the chlorinated flour contained significant amounts of chlorine. Exposure of shrimp to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution resulted in significant incorporation of chlorine into the edible portion. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully. PMID:3545804

  2. Use of chlorine dioxide gas for the postharvest control of Alternaria alternata and Stemphylium vesicarium on Roma tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Trinetta, Valentina; Linton, Richard H; Morgan, Mark T

    2013-10-01

    Tomatoes and potatoes are the top produce affected in terms of value lost in the USA. Postharvest losses can occur anywhere from the time of harvest to the consumers' decision to eat or discard the food. These data support the importance of finding sustainable strategies to minimise food waste and preserve resources. This study evaluated the potential application of chlorine dioxide gas (ClO2 ) technology to control the postharvest spoilage of Roma tomatoes by Alternaria alternata and Stemphylium vesicarium. Data analysis showed that exposure time was a significant factor for fungal disease control (P < 0.05). After 3 min of treatment, mycelial growth was completely inhibited for A. alternata and S. vesicarium. Similar results were observed for conidial germination. The efficacy of ClO2 treatments was also studied under in vivo conditions. While untreated Roma tomatoes developed white moulds and black spots after 5 days of storage, produce decay was significantly (P < 0.05) delayed after 5 and 7 min treatments for S. vesicarium and A. alternata respectively. The use of ClO2 in the food industry is regulated by both the FDA and the EPA. Currently, only acidified sodium chlorite solutions are approved for the control of micro-organisms in water used to wash fruits and vegetables. No direct applications of ClO2 gas on fresh fruits and vegetables can be found in the regulations. More data are required by the two agencies to demonstrate that residues of ClO2 on produce surfaces are acceptable for human consumption. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Surrogate testing suggests that chlorine dioxide gas exposure would not inactivate Ebola virus contained in environmental blood contamination.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John J; Hewlett, Angela L; Iwen, Peter C; Smith, Philip W; Gibbs, Shawn G

    2015-05-08

    The ability to decontaminate a room potentially containing the Ebola virus is important to healthcare facilities in the United States. Ebola virus remains viable in body fluids, a room that has housed a patient with Ebola virus disease must have all surfaces manually wiped with an approved disinfectant, which increases occupational exposure risk. This study evaluated the efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide inactivation of bacterial organisms in blood as Ebola virus surrogates and as the organisms used by the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit to provide the margin of safety for decontamination. Bacillus anthracis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Mycobacterium smegmatis blood suspensions that were exposed to ClO2 gas concentrations and exposure limits. The log reduction in Colony Forming Units (CFU) was determined for each bacterial blood suspension. Exposure parameters approximating industry practices for ClO2 environmental decontamination (360ppm concentration to 780 ppm-hrs exposure, 65% relative humidity) as well as parameters exceeding current practice (1116 ppm concentration to 1400 ppm-hrs exposure; 1342ppm concentration to 1487 ppm-hrs exposure) were evaluated. Complete inactivation was not achieved for any of the bacterial blood suspensions tested. Reductions were observed in concentrations of B. anthracis spores (1.3 -3.76 log) and E. faecalis vegetative cells (1.3 log) whereas significant reductions in vegetative cell concentrations for E. coli and M. smegmatis blood suspensions were not achieved. Our results showed that bacteria in the presence of blood were not inactivated using gaseous ClO2 decontamination. ClO2 decontamination alone should not be used for Ebola virus, but decontamination processes should first include manual wiping of potentially contaminated blood; especially for microorganisms as infectious as the Ebola virus.

  4. Impact of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization on Nosocomial Organism Viability in a Hospital Room

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, John J.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Iwen, Peter C.; Smith, Philip W.; Hewlett, Angela L.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of ClO2 to decontaminate pathogens known to cause healthcare-associated infections in a hospital room strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Staphylococcus aureus were spot placed in duplicate pairs at 10 sites throughout a hospital room and then exposed to ClO2 gas. Organisms were collected and evaluated for reduction in colony forming units following gas exposure. Six sterilization cycles with varied gas concentrations, exposure limits, and relative humidity levels were conducted. Reductions in viable organisms achieved ranged from 7 to 10-log reductions. Two sterilization cycles failed to produce complete inactivation of organisms placed in a bathroom with the door closed. Reductions of organisms in the bathroom ranged from 6-log to 10-log reductions. Gas leakage between hospital floors did not occur; however, some minor gas leakage from the door of hospital room was measured which was subsequently sealed to prevent further leakage. Novel technologies for disinfection of hospital rooms require validation and safety testing in clinical environments. Gaseous ClO2 is effective for sterilizing environmental contamination in a hospital room. Concentrations of ClO2 up to 385 ppm were safely maintained in a hospital room with enhanced environmental controls. PMID:23792697

  5. Impact of chlorine dioxide gas sterilization on nosocomial organism viability in a hospital room.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G; Iwen, Peter C; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L

    2013-06-21

    To evaluate the ability of ClO2 to decontaminate pathogens known to cause healthcare-associated infections in a hospital room strains of Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Staphylococcus aureus were spot placed in duplicate pairs at 10 sites throughout a hospital room and then exposed to ClO2 gas. Organisms were collected and evaluated for reduction in colony forming units following gas exposure. Six sterilization cycles with varied gas concentrations, exposure limits, and relative humidity levels were conducted. Reductions in viable organisms achieved ranged from 7 to 10-log reductions. Two sterilization cycles failed to produce complete inactivation of organisms placed in a bathroom with the door closed. Reductions of organisms in the bathroom ranged from 6-log to 10-log reductions. Gas leakage between hospital floors did not occur; however, some minor gas leakage from the door of hospital room was measured which was subsequently sealed to prevent further leakage. Novel technologies for disinfection of hospital rooms require validation and safety testing in clinical environments. Gaseous ClO2 is effective for sterilizing environmental contamination in a hospital room. Concentrations of ClO2 up to 385 ppm were safely maintained in a hospital room with enhanced environmental controls.

  6. Identification of a non-pathogenic surrogate organism for chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Mok; Linton, Richard H

    2008-06-01

    The identification of non-pathogenic surrogate microorganisms is beneficial for determining and validating the efficacy of antimicrobial treatments in food manufacturing environments. A surrogate organism was identified to aid in the decontamination process of fresh produce when treated with chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas. Thirty-two known strains of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms and seven unknown microbial isolates from mushroom, tomatoes, and strawberries were evaluated. The primary goal was to find alternative non-pathogenic organisms that had an equal or higher resistance compared to Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Among the strains tested, MR1 (mushroom isolate), E. coli O157:H7 C7927, E. coli O157:H7 204P, STB2 (strawberry isolate), and vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus 232 in wet inoculum were found to be the most resistant to gaseous ClO(2) treatment at 0.3 mg/l for 1 min and D-values at 0.3 mg/l ClO(2) were 3.53, 1.95, 1.72, 1.68, and 1.57 min, respectively. For identification, the MR1 and STB2 strains were identified using a Ribotyper with the EcoRI restriction enzyme of 16S rDNA sequence. MR1 was identified as Hafnia alvei with a similarity value of 94% using the ribotype pattern and with a 93.6% similarity using an API 20E strip, and with a 99% similarity using 16S rDNA analysis. The Ped-2E9-based cytotoxicity assay was conducted for the MRI strain extracellular toxin and whole cell toxicity and did not show cytotoxicity. Analysis, using multiplex PCR, was performed to verify absence of the eaeA gene. H. alvei is a suitable non-pathogenic surrogate, with higher resistance to ClO(2) gas compared to pathogens studied, that may be useful to establish optimum conditions of ClO(2) gas decontamination systems.

  7. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide mouthwash against halitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestari, M. D.; Sunarto, H.; Kemal, Y.

    2017-08-01

    To ascertain the effectiveness of using chlorine dioxide mouthwash in addressing halitosis. Forty people were divided equally into the test group (required to gargle with mouthwash containing chlorine dioxide) and the control group (required to gargle with aquadest). The volatile sulfur compound (VSC) and organoleptic scores were measured before gargling and 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h after. The Wilcoxon test analysis showed a significant difference (p<0.05) in the mean value of VSC scores between the test group and the control group in four testing periods after gargling. Chlorine dioxide mouthwash is effective in addressing halitosis.

  8. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  9. Disinfection kinetics of murine norovirus using chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Young; Kim, Ju-Mi; Ko, Gwangpyo

    2010-05-01

    We determined the disinfection efficiency of chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) using murine norovirus (MNV) and coliphage MS2 as surrogates for human norovirus. Experiments were performed in oxidant demand-free buffer (pH 7.2) at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C. The extent of virus inactivation by a disinfectant was quantified using three different analytical methods: plaque, short template real-time TaqMan reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and long template RT-PCR assays. Rapid inactivation of MNV by both chlorine and chlorine dioxide was observed by the plaque assay. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct values of 0.314mg/Lmin and 0.247mg/Lmin were required for a 4-log reduction of MNV at 5 degrees C by chlorine and chlorine dioxide, respectively. Lower Ct values were required at 20 degrees C. Both long template and short template RT-PCR assays significantly underestimated the virus inactivation compared to the plaque assay. Our study demonstrates that adequate treatment of water with either chlorine or ClO(2) is likely to effectively control the waterborne transmission of human norovirus.

  10. Generation and Measurement of Chlorine Dioxide Gas at Extremely Low Concentrations in a Living Room: Implications for Preventing Airborne Microbial Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio; Sogawa, Koushirou; Takigawa, Yasuhiro; Shibata, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Preventing respiratory diseases caused by airborne microbes in enclosed spaces is still not satisfactorily controlled. At extremely low concentrations (about 30 parts per billion), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas can inactivate airborne microbes and prevent respiratory disease. It has no toxic effect on animals at this level. However, controversies still remain regarding how to measure concentrations of ClO2 gas at such low levels. It is therefore necessary to prove that measured gas concentrations are accurate and reproducible. ClO2 gas was released from a gas generator and its concentration was measured by a novel highly sensitive gas analyzer. We compared its data with those from ion chromatography. We demonstrate that the gas concentrations measured in a room using the gas analyzer are accurate and reproducible after comparing the results with those from ion chromatography. However, the temperature dependence of the gas analyzer was found. Therefore, data correction is required for each temperature at which gas concentration is measured. A theoretical analysis of the gas concentrations predicted by the rate of ClO2 gas released from the ClO2 generator was also performed. Our results advance progress toward using low concentration ClO2 gas to prevent airborne infectious diseases such as influenza. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The effect of photochemical dissociation on downwind chlorine dioxide plume concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowicz, R.; Alp, E.

    1997-12-31

    The pulp and paper industry handles toxic gases which may present an inherent hazard to the safety of the general public in the surrounding area. One such toxic gas that may pose a hazard is chlorine dioxide. Spills of chlorine dioxide solution result in the gassing off of toxic clouds of chlorine dioxide. Under daytime dry conditions, chlorine dioxide decomposes photolytically to form chlorine and oxygen and intermediates, chlorine trioxide and chlorine hexoxide. Air dispersion modeling of chlorine dioxide releases which does not properly account for its photochemical decomposition will lead to overly conservative hazard zone estimates. Under these conditions, risk control measures and emergency response evacuation zones based on such estimates will be unnecessarily expensive, perhaps prohibitive. This paper investigates the photolytic rate of dissociation of chlorine dioxide under various atmospheric conditions. It was found that modeling based on the decomposition of chlorine dioxide gas, resulted in downwind distances to TLV-Short Term Exposure Limits which are considerably shorter than modeling based on chlorine dioxide dispersion with no decomposition.

  12. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  13. Kinetics of Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger Spores and Staphylococcus albus on Paper by Chlorine Dioxide Gas in an Enclosed Space

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Jinhui; Hao, Limei; Yi, Ying; Zhang, Zongxing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spore and Staphylococcus albus are typical biological indicators for the inactivation of airborne pathogens. The present study characterized and compared the behaviors of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus in regard to inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas under different gas concentrations and relative humidity (RH) conditions. The inactivation kinetics under different ClO2 gas concentrations (1 to 5 mg/liter) were determined by first-order and Weibull models. A new model (the Weibull-H model) was established to reveal the inactivation tendency and kinetics for ClO2 gas under different RH conditions (30 to 90%). The results showed that both the gas concentration and RH were significantly (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with the inactivation of the two chosen indicators. There was a rapid improvement in the inactivation efficiency under high RH (>70%). Compared with the first-order model, the Weibull and Weibull-H models demonstrated a better fit for the experimental data, indicating nonlinear inactivation behaviors of the vegetative bacteria and spores following exposure to ClO2 gas. The times to achieve a six-log reduction of B. subtilis subsp. niger spore and S. albus were calculated based on the established models. Clarifying the kinetics of inactivation of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus by ClO2 gas will allow the development of ClO2 gas treatments that provide an effective disinfection method. IMPORTANCE Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a novel and effective fumigation agent with strong oxidization ability and a broad biocidal spectrum. The antimicrobial efficacy of ClO2 gas has been evaluated in many previous studies. However, there are presently no published models that can be used to describe the kinetics of inactivation of airborne pathogens by ClO2 gas under different gas concentrations and RH conditions. The first-order and Weibull (Weibull-H) models established in this study can

  14. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Rosenblatt, A.

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  15. Chlorine dioxide treatment for zebra mussel control

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarik, D.; Byron, J.; Germer, M.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine is recognized and commonly used biocide for power plant cooling water and service water treatment programs, including the control of zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide has recently become a popular method of zebra mussel control because of its economy, safety, environmental acceptability, and effectiveness when compared to other mussel control methods. This control technique was recently demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Alma Generating Station on the east bank of the upper Mississippi River in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was assisted with EPRI Tailored Collaboration Program funds. The Dairyland Power Alam Generating Station consists of five generating units that utilize raw, untreated Mississippi River water for condenser, circulating, and service water supplies. The first units were built in 1947, with the final and largest unit being completed in 1960. Total station generating capacity is 200 MW. Because of recent increases in the zebra mussel density at the station intake, Dairyland Power selected the team of Nalco and Rio Linda to perform a chlorine dioxide treatment of the station`s new water systems to eradicate and control the mussels before their presence created operational difficulties. This paper will present the results of the treatment including treatment theory, design and construction of the treatment system, the method of chlorine dioxide generation, treatment concentration, analytical methods o monitoring chlorine dioxide generation, residuals and trihalomethane (THM) concentrations, protocol for monitoring treatment mortality, and the effects of chlorine dioxide and detoxification on other water chemistry parameters and equipment materials. The goal of this paper is to inform and assist users with establishing consistent and uniform practices for safely utilizing and monitoring chlorine dioxide in the eradication and control of zebra mussels.

  16. Basic Gas Chlorination Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to introduce treatment plant operators to the safe operation and maintenance of gas chlorination systems employing the variable vacuum gas chlorinator. Each of the lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing…

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  19. A comparison of chlorinated organic material produced by chlorine and chlorine dioxide bleaching

    SciTech Connect

    McKaque, A.B.; Reeve, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide react differently with pulp during bleaching and produce different types of organic by-products. The main differences are the large reduction in the amount of AOX (adsorbable organic halogen) in the effluent and EOX (extractable organic halogen) in the pulp. This talk reviews the differences in the amounts and types of chlorinated organic by-products produced by the two different bleaching agents.

  20. Development of Combined Dry Heat and Chlorine Dioxide Gas Treatment with Mechanical Mixing for Inactivation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Montevideo on Mung Bean Seeds.

    PubMed

    Annous, Bassam A; Burke, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh sprouted beans. The sprouting conditions of mung bean seeds provide optimal conditions of temperature and relative humidity for any potential pathogenic contaminant on the seeds to grow. The lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. Thus, the use of a kill step on the seeds prior to a sprouting step would enhance the safety of fresh sprouts. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combined thermal and chlorine dioxide gas (3.5 mg/liter of air) treatment with mechanical mixing (tumbling) to eliminate Salmonella on artificially inoculated mung bean seeds. Although no viable Salmonella was recovered from seeds treated in hot water at 60°C for 2 h, these treated seeds failed to germinate. Dry heat treatments (55, 60, or 70°C) for up to 8 h reduced Salmonella populations in excess of 3 log CFU/g. The use of tumbling, while treating the seeds, resulted in up to 1.6 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella populations compared with no tumbling. Dry heat treatment at 65°C for 18 h with tumbling resulted in a complete inactivation of Salmonella populations on inoculated seeds with low inoculum levels (2.83 log CFU/g) as compared with high inoculum levels (4.75 log CFU/g). The increased reductions in pathogenic populations on the seeds with the use of tumbling could be attributed to increased uniformity of heat transfer and exposure to chlorine dioxide gas. All treated seeds were capable of germinating, as well as the nontreated controls. These results suggest that this combined treatment would be a viable process for enhancing the safety of fresh sprouts.

  1. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  2. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  3. Disinfectants: Chlorine and chlorine dioxide. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the antimicrobial properties of chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The use of chlorine for the inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and fungi in wastewater treatment plants is discussed, including the mode of action and factors influencing inactivation. The use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine disinfection in swimming pools and water supplies, and possible adverse effects are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 157 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain).

    PubMed

    Chatuev, B M; Peterson, J W

    2010-02-01

    Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log(10) reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions at room temperature in sealed tubes, as well as spraying onto plastic and stainless steel surfaces in a biological safety cabinet. Serial 10-fold dilutions of the treated spores were then plated on 5% sheep blood agar plates, and the survivor colonies were enumerated. Disinfection of spore suspensions with aqueous chlorine dioxide solution in sealed microfuge tubes was highly effective, reducing the viable spore counts by 8log(10) in only 3min. By contrast, the process of spraying or spreading the disinfectant onto surfaces resulted in only a 1log(10) kill because the chlorine dioxide gas was rapidly vaporised from the solutions. Full potency of the sprayed aqueous chlorine dioxide solution was restored by preparing the chlorine dioxide solution in 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite). The volatility of chlorine dioxide can cause treatment failures that constitute a serious hazard for unsuspecting users. Supplementation of the chlorine dioxide solution with 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite) restored full potency and increased stability for one week.

  5. Analysis of the sporicidal activity of chlorine dioxide disinfectant against Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain)

    PubMed Central

    Chatuev, B.A.; Peterson, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Routine surface decontamination is an essential hospital and laboratory procedure, but the list of effective, noncorrosive disinfectants that kill spores is limited. We investigated the sporicidal potential of an aqueous chlorine dioxide solution and encountered some unanticipated problems. Quantitative bacteriological culture methods were used to determine the log10 reduction of Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) spores following 3 min exposure to various concentrations of aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions at room temperature in sealed tubes, as well as spraying onto plastic and stainless steel surfaces in a biological safety cabinet. Serial 10-fold dilutions of the treated spores were then plated on 5% sheep blood agar plates, and the survivor colonies were enumerated. Disinfection of spore suspensions with aqueous chlorine dioxide solution in sealed microfuge tubes was highly effective, reducing the viable spore counts by 8 log10 in only 3 min. By contrast, the process of spraying or spreading the disinfectant onto surfaces resulted in only a 1 log10 kill because the chlorine dioxide gas was rapidly vaporised from the solutions. Full potency of the sprayed aqueous chlorine dioxide solution was restored by preparing the chlorine dioxide solution in 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite). The volatility of chlorine dioxide can cause treatment failures that constitute a serious hazard for unsuspecting users. Supplementation of the chlorine dioxide solution with 5% bleach (0.3% sodium hypochlorite) restored full potency and increased stability for one week. PMID:20061062

  6. Efficiency of Chlorine Dioxide as a Bactericide1

    PubMed Central

    Benarde, Melvin A.; Israel, Bernard M.; Olivieri, Vincent P.; Granstrom, Marvin L.

    1965-01-01

    We found chlorine dioxide to be a more effective disinfectant than chlorine in sewage effluent at pH 8.5. Chlorine dioxide was also found to be a more stable bactericide in relation to pH in the range studied. Images Fig. 1 PMID:5325940

  7. Chlorine dioxide gas from an aqueous solution: reduction of Salmonella in wounds on tomato fruit and movement to sinks in a treatment chamber.

    PubMed

    Mahovic, Michael; Bartz, Jerry A; Schneider, Keith R; Tenney, Joel D

    2009-05-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) off-gassed from an aqueous solution and reacted incrementally with potassium iodide solutions (sinks). After 30 min, 45% of the initial dose was detected as chlorite ion in the sink, whereas 35% of the initial dose was still in the source. Aqueous solutions of ClO2 can be used as a source of ClO2 gas in various laboratory experiments involving treatment of fruits or vegetables. Movement from source to sink is continuous, which precludes the development of large headspace concentrations and the need for a tight chamber seal. When the source solution has dissipated, the chamber can be opened safely as there is little free ClO2 remaining in the headspace. In tests with whole, wound-inoculated tomato fruit, at both green and pink stages of ripeness, the control of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in wounds varied with the weight of gas used. The number of viable cells of Typhimurium recovered was reduced by > 5 log units when > or = 0.5 mg of ClO2 was applied to three pieces of fruit during a 2-h treatment.

  8. Study on encapsulation of chlorine dioxide in gelatin microsphere for reducing release rate

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Ying; Wang, Lin; Guo, Yanchuan; Sun, Ruixue; Wang, Xijie; Li, Jinyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the effects of encapsulation of chlorine dioxide in a hydrophilic biodegradable polymer gelatin to reduce its release rate. Methods: An emulsification-coacervation method was adopted. The characterizations of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres were described. Using UV-vis spectrophotometer the λmax of chlorine dioxide was observed at 358 nm. The particle size and distribution of chlorine oxide-gelatin microspheres was measured by a dynamic light scattering (DLS) method, the diameter was (1400~1900) nm. The entrapment of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres was confirmed by IR. The surface morphology, size, and shape of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: It showed that the encapsulated microspheres size was around 2000 nm with uniform distribution. The percentage entrapment of chlorine dioxide in the encapsulated samples was about 80~85%. A slow release study of chlorine dioxide from the encapsulated biopolymer (gelatin) in air was also carried out, which showed continuous release up to ten days. Conclusions: It can be concluded that it is possible to make a slow release formulation of ClO2 by entrapped in a hydrophilic biodegradable polymer gelatin. ClO2-gelatin microspheres can stable release low concentration ClO2 gas over an extended period. PMID:26550151

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  11. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  12. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  13. Reactions of tetracycline antibiotics with chlorine dioxide and free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2011-02-01

    Tetracyclines (TCs) are a group of widely used antibiotics that have been frequently found in the aquatic environment. The potential reactions of TCs with common water disinfection oxidants such as chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) and free available chlorine (FAC) have not been studied in depth and are the focus of this study. The oxidation kinetics of tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlorotetracycline and iso-chlorotetracycline by ClO(2) and FAC are very rapid (with large apparent second-order rate constants k(app) = 2.24 × 10(5)-1.26 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) with ClO(2) and k(app) = 1.12 × 10(4)-1.78 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) with FAC at pH 7.0) and highly dependent on pH. Species-specific rate constants are obtained by kinetic modeling that incorporates pH-speciation of TCs and the oxidants (for FAC), and reveal that TCs primarily react with ClO(2) and FAC by their unprotonated dimethylamino group and deprotonated phenolic-diketone group. The modest difference in reactivity among the four TCs toward the oxidants is consistent with expectation and can be explained by structural influences on the two reactive moieties. Product evaluation shows that oxidation of TCs by ClO(2) leads to (hydr)oxylation and breakage of TC molecules, while oxidation of TCs by FAC leads to chlorinated and (hydr)oxylated products without any substantial ring breakage. Results of this study indicate that rapid transformation of TCs by oxidants such as ClO(2) and FAC under water and wastewater treatment conditions can be expected.

  14. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  15. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  16. Decontamination of a hospital room using gaseous chlorine dioxide: Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G; Iwen, Peter C; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide for inactivation of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis in a hospital patient care suite. Spore and vegetative cells of Bacillus anthracis Sterne 34F2, spores of Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 and vegetative cells of both Francisella tularensis ATCC 6223 and Yersinia pestis A1122 were exposed to gaseous chlorine dioxide in a patient care suite. Organism inactivation was then assessed by log reduction in viable organisms postexposure to chlorine dioxide gas compared to non-exposed control organism. Hospital room decontamination protocols utilizing chlorine dioxide gas concentrations of 377 to 385 ppm maintained to exposures of 767 ppm-hours with 65% relative humidity consistently achieved complete inactivation of B. anthracis and B. atrophaeus spores, as well as vegetative cells of B. anthracis, F. tularensis, and Y. pestis. Decrease in exposure (ppm-hours) and relative humidity (<65%) or restricting airflow reduced inactivation but achieved >8 log reductions in organisms. Up to 10-log reductions were achieved in a hospital room with limited impact on adjacent areas, indicating chlorine dioxide concentrations needed for decontamination of highly concentrated (>6 logs) organisms can be achieved throughout a hospital room. This study translates laboratory chlorine dioxide fumigation studies applied in a complex clinical environment.

  17. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  18. Mechanism of chloroform formation by chlorine and its inhibition by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Suh, D H; Abdel-Rahman, M S

    1985-04-01

    Chlorination of drinking waters leads to the formation of trihalomethanes arising from the reaction of chlorine and organic substances. Therefore, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) which does not produce trihalomethanes is being considered as an alternative disinfectant. It has been reported that rat blood chloroform levels were significantly decreased after treatment with ClO2. Studies were conducted to investigate the mechanisms of chloroform formation by chlorine (HOCl) and its inhibition by ClO2 (5 mg/liter) in the presence of HOCl (5, 10, 20 mg/liter) using sodium citrate (1 mM) as an organic substance. When citrate was reacted with HOCl, beta-ketoglutaric acid, monochloroacetone, dichloroacetone, and trichloroacetone were produced as reaction intermediates and chloroform as a final product. There was a linear relationship between the concentrations of HOCl and the formation of chloroform. When ClO2 was substituted for HOCl, neither chloroform was formed nor citrate concentration was changed. Further, chloroform formation was inhibited by ClO2 in the presence of HOCl and citrate and the degree of inhibition depends on the ratio of ClO2/HOCl. Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer analysis indicates that this inhibition is related to the reaction of ClO2 with beta-ketoglutaric acid to form malonic acid. Chlorine dioxide also oxidizes other intermediates such as monochloroacetone and dichloroacetone to acetic acid. These studies indicate that ClO2 inhibits chloroform formation from citrate and HOCl by the oxidation of the intermediates which were involved in the reaction of chloroform formation.

  19. [Inactivation and removal of chlorine dioxide on cyclops of zooplankton].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Cui, Fu-Yi; Lin, Tao; Liu, Guo-Ping

    2007-08-01

    Comparative experiments on the inactivation of cyclops by chlorine dioxide and chlorine were conducted. Batch experiments were performed in order to analyze the influence of pH value, organic precursor concentration on the rate of inactivation of cyclops with chlorine dioxide. In addition, the synergistic effect of different pre-oxidation followed by coagulation process on removal of cyclops in raw water was evaluated. It was found that chlorine dioxide possessed better inactivation effect than chlorine. Cyclops can be completely inactivated after 30 min of contact time by low dosage of chlorine dioxide (1.0 mg/L). The rate of inactivation was essentially the same at pH 5.7 and 8.0, and pH 9.8 resulted in the 10% of decrease in inactivation rate of cyclops than pH 5.7 - 8.0 in same contact time. The organic precursor concentration had negative effects on inactivation, and the higher the organic precursor concentration was, the lower inactivation rate of cyclops was achieved. The coagulation jar test showed that cyclops in the raw water could be completely removed by synergistic effect of chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation followed by coagulation process at chlorine dioxide dosage of 0.9 mg/L.

  20. Distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as was major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated 36Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2-hour exposure t...

  1. Removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti and mutagenicity with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Jin-long; Cui, Fu-yi; Qu, Bo; Zhu, Gui-bing

    2006-01-01

    Mesocyclops leukurti of zooplankton propagates excessively in eutrophic water body and it cannot be effectively inactivated by the conventional drinking water treatment process. In order to tackle this problem, a study of removal effect on Mesocyclops leukarti with chlorine dioxide in a waterworks was performed. The results showed that Mesocyclops leukarti could be effectively removed from water by 1.0 mg/L chlorine dioxide preoxidation combined with the conventional drinking water treatment process. Higher oxidizability and molecular state of chlorine dioxide in water is the key to the inactivation of Mesocyclops leukarti. The chlorite, disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide, was stable at 0.45 mg/L, which is lower than that critical value of the USEPA. GC-MS examination showed that the quantity of organic substance in the water treated by chlorine dioxide obviously decreased. Ames test further revealed that the mutagenicity was reduced by chlorine dioxide with respect to prechlorine. The propagation of Mesocyclops leukarti can be inactivated effectively and safely by chlorine dioxide pre-oxidation.

  2. Mechanisms of inactivation of poliovirus by chlorine dioxide and iodine.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, M E; O'Brien, R T

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide and iodine inactivated poliovirus more efficiently at pH 10.0 than at pH 6.0. Sedimentation analyses of viruses inactivated by chlorine dioxide and iodine at pH 10.9 showed that viral RNA separated from the capsids, resulting in the conversion of virions from 156S structures to 80S particles. The RNAs release from both chlorine dioxide- and iodine-inactivated viruses cosedimented with intact 35S viral RNA. Both chlorine dioxide and iodine reacted with the capsid proteins of poliovirus and changed the pI from pH 7.0 to pH 5.8. However, the mechanisms of inactivation of poliovirus by chlorine dioxide and iodine were found to differ. Iodine inactivated viruses by impairing their ability to adsorb to HeLa cells, whereas chlorine dioxide-inactivated viruses showed a reduced incorporation of [14C]uridine into new viral RNA. We concluded, then, that chlorine dioxide inactivated poliovirus by reacting with the viral RNA and impairing the ability of the viral genome to act as a template for RNA synthesis. PMID:6295277

  3. Inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, D; Hoff, J C

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of inactivation of simian rotavirus SA11 by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine were studied at 5 degrees C with a purified preparation of single virions and a preparation of cell-associated virions. Inactivation of the virus preparations with chlorine and chlorine dioxide was studied at pH 6 and 10. The monochloramine studies were done at pH 8. With 0.5 mg of chlorine per liter at pH 6, more than 4 logs (99.99%) of the single virions were inactivated in less than 15 s. Both virus preparations were inactivated more rapidly at pH 6 than at pH 10. With chlorine dioxide, however, the opposite was true. Both virus preparations were inactivated more rapidly at pH 10 than at pH 6. With 0.5 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter at pH 10, more than 4 logs of the single-virus preparation were inactivated in less than 15 s. The cell-associated virus was more resistant to inactivation by the three disinfectants than was the preparation of single virions. Chlorine and chlorine dioxide, each at a concentration of 0.5 mg/liter and at pH 6 and 10, respectively, inactivated 99% of both virus preparations within 4 min. Monochloramine at a concentration of 10 mg/liter and at pH 8 required more than 6 h for the same amount of inactivation. Images PMID:6091546

  4. Distribution and chemical fate of ³⁶Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Ernst, W; Giddings, J M

    2014-12-03

    The distribution and chemical fate of (36)Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as were major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated (36)Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2 h exposure to approximately 5 mg of (36)Cl-ClO2. A water rinse removed 14% of the radiochlorine while tomato homogenate contained ∼63% of the tomato radioactivity; 24% of the radiochlorine was present in the tomato stem scar area. Radioactivity in tomato homogenate consisted of (36)Cl-chloride (≥80%), (36)Cl-chlorate (5 to 19%), and perchlorate (0.5 to 1.4%). In cantaloupe, 55% of the generated (36)Cl-ClO2 was present on melons fumigated with 100 mg of (36)Cl-ClO2 for a 2 h period. Edible cantaloupe flesh contained no detectable radioactive residue (LOQ = 0.3 to 0.4 μg/g); >99.9% of radioactivity associated with cantaloupe was on the inedible rind, with <0.1% associated with the seed bed. Rind radioactivity was present as (36)Cl-chloride (∼86%), chlorate (∼13%), and perchlorate (∼0.6%). Absent from tomatoes and cantaloupe were (36)Cl-chlorite residues. Follow-up studies have shown that chlorate and perchlorate formation can be completely eliminated by protecting fumigation chambers from light sources.

  5. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.; Coyle, J.; Crone, D.

    1996-08-01

    This paper summarizes the EPRI report (TR-105202) on the same topic as well as presents changes in current thinking on the suitability (applicability) of chlorine dioxide for fouling control. Chlorine dioxide was tested as a zebra mussel biocide at two steam electric generating stations in Illinois and one in Indiana. The purpose of these studies was to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in killing zebra mussels and to develop site specific treatment programs for the three utilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Consortium sponsored the testing of this recent use of chlorine dioxide. The raw water system at Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station, on the Illinois River, received applications of chlorine dioxide in April, July, and September 1994. The raw water system at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station, on the Mississippi River, received applications in July 1993, January, April, May, July, and September 1994. The Gallagher Station, on the Ohio River, was treated in July and October 1994. Chlorine dioxide was generated on-site and injected into the water intake structure. Both cooling and service water systems were treated at the facilities. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine dioxide-trithionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Cseko, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2012-03-22

    The trithionate-chlorine dioxide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in a slightly acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in acetate/acetic acid buffer monitoring the decay of chlorine dioxide at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M) adjusted by sodium perchlorate. We found that under our experimental conditions two limiting stoichiometries exist and the pH, the concentration of the reactants, and even the concentration of chloride ion affects the actual stoichiometry of the reaction that can be augmented by an appropriate linear combination of these limiting processes. It is also shown that although the formal kinetic order of trithionate is strictly one that of chlorine dioxide varies between 1 and 2, depending on the actual chlorine dioxide excess and the pH. Moreover, the otherwise sluggish chloride ion, which is also a product of the reaction, slightly accelerates the initial rate of chlorine dioxide consumption and may therefore act as an autocatalyst. In addition to that, overshoot-undershoot behavior is also observed in the [(·)ClO(2)]-time curves in the presence of chloride ion at chlorine dioxide excess. On the basis of the experiments, a 13-step kinetic model with 6 fitted kinetic parameter is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation.

  7. Advantages and disadvantages of chemical oxidation and disinfection by ozone and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, F; Richard, Y; Montiel, A; Musquere, P

    1981-04-01

    Ozone and chlorine dioxide present definite advantages and disadvantages over chlorination. Chlorination, particularly for the removal of ammonia and the maintenance of a disinfectant residual in the distribution system has decisive advantages and will be difficult to replace. Ozone and chlorine dioxide seem to produce fewer carcinogenic by-products but the risk for acute toxicity, especially from the chlorites which follow chlorine dioxide, is higher than with chlorine. Chlorine dioxide and more particularly ozone should be considered as useful complements to chlorination, but no strong oxidative treatment should be applied before most of the organic matter has been removed.

  8. Influences of packaging design on antimicrobial effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is an effective surface disinfectant, for it has the ability to reach and inactivate bacterial cells in biofilms which are attached to inaccessible sites on produce surfaces. One of the most promising applications of gaseous ClO2 is to be included in the headspace of foo...

  9. Controlling Mold on Library Materials with Chlorine Dioxide: An Eight-Year Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Meyers, Pat L.; Kowaleski, Barbara; Stolt, Wilbur A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with mold growth at the University of Oklahoma libraries and describes the results of using chlorine dioxide in aqueous and gaseous forms. Highlights include toxicity compared to other preservation treatments; environmental controls; and explanations of a preference for the use of a self-activating gas packet.…

  10. Controlling Mold on Library Materials with Chlorine Dioxide: An Eight-Year Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Meyers, Pat L.; Kowaleski, Barbara; Stolt, Wilbur A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with mold growth at the University of Oklahoma libraries and describes the results of using chlorine dioxide in aqueous and gaseous forms. Highlights include toxicity compared to other preservation treatments; environmental controls; and explanations of a preference for the use of a self-activating gas packet.…

  11. Reactivity of natural organic matter fractions with chlorine dioxide and ozone.

    PubMed

    Swietlik, J; Dabrowska, A; Raczyk-Stanisławiak, U; Nawrocki, J

    2004-02-01

    The effects of ozone and chlorine dioxide on the aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) were studied. The natural as well as oxidised organic matter in aerated and sand filtered water were fractionated using XAD, anion-exchange, and cation-exchange resins procedure into humic acid, hydrophobic acids and neutrals, and hydrophilic acids, bases and neutrals. The main NOM components were hydrophobic, while oxidation with both ozone and chlorine dioxide increased the proportion of hydrophilic fractions. High-pressure size exclusion chromatography with UV-254 nm and UV-220 nm detection was used to determine the differences between molecular weight distribution of natural and oxidised organic matter fractions. The main purpose of this paper was to compare the reactivity of individual NOM fractions with oxidants in order to compare the productivity of biodegradable by-products after oxidation with chlorine dioxide and ozone. The quantity as well as the quality of by-products were analysed by means of ion and gas chromatography.

  12. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

    1995-11-01

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

  13. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fukayama, M.Y.; Tan, H.; Wheeler, W.B.; Wei, C.

    1986-11-01

    This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (CL/sub 2/(g)), aqueous chlorine, and ClO/sub 2/ with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO/sub 2/. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO/sub 2/ with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully.

  14. Impacts of water quality on chlorine and chlorine dioxide efficacy in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Benoit; Desjardins, Raymond; Mysore, Chandra; Prévost, Michele

    2005-05-01

    The impact of disinfection efficacy in natural waters was evaluated by performing disinfection assays using four untreated surface waters of various qualities and ultra-pure buffered waters as a baseline condition for comparison. Bacillus subtilis spores were spiked in these waters and disinfection assays were conducted at 22 degrees C using either free chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Assays using indigenous aerobic spores were also completed. The inactivation kinetics in natural and ultra-pure buffered waters were not statistically different (at p = 0.05) while using free chlorine, as long as disinfectant decay was taken into account. Filtering natural waters through a 0.45 microm did not improve the sporicidal efficacy of chlorine. For three out of the four waters tested, the efficacy of chlorine dioxide was greater in natural waters compared to that observed in ultra-pure buffered waters. Such results are consistent with previous observations using ultra-pure waters supplemented with NOM-extract from the Suwannee River. Similar to free chlorine results, the impact of filtration (0.45 microm) on the efficacy of chlorine dioxide was not statistically significant.

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  19. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  20. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  1. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bacterial Disinfection by Chlorine Dioxide1

    PubMed Central

    Benarde, Melvin A.; Snow, W. Brewster; Olivieri, Vincent P.; Davidson, Burton

    1967-01-01

    Survival data are presented for a fecal strain of Escherichia coli exposed to three concentrations of chlorine dioxide at four temperatures. Chick's first-order reaction equation is generalized to a pseudo nth-order model. Nonlinear least squares curve-fitting of the survival data to the nth order model was performed on an analogue computer. The data were observed to follow fractional order kinetics with respect to survival concentration, with an apparent activation energy of 12,000 cal/mole. Initial experiments support the thesis that the mechanism of chlorine dioxide kill occurs via disruption of protein synthesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:5339839

  2. An unusual case of reversible acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bathina, Gangadhar; Yadla, Manjusha; Burri, Srikanth; Enganti, Rama; Prasad Ch, Rajendra; Deshpande, Pradeep; Ch, Ramesh; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a commonly used water disinfectant. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites is rare. In experimental studies, it was shown that acute and chronic toxicity were associated with insignificant hematological changes. Acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide was not reported. Two cases of renal toxicity due to its metabolites, chlorate and chlorite were reported. Herein, we report a case of chlorine dioxide poisoning presenting with acute kidney injury.

  3. Distribution, Identification, and Quantification of Residues after Treatment of Ready-To-Eat Salami with (36)Cl-Labeled or Nonlabeled Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Giddings, J Michael; Herges, Grant R; Ernst, William

    2016-11-09

    When ready-to-eat salami was treated in a closed system with (36)Cl-labeled ClO2 (5.5 mg/100 g of salami), essentially all radioactivity was deposited onto the salami. Administered (36)ClO2 was converted to (36)Cl-chloride ion (>97%), trace levels of chlorate (<2%), and detectable levels of chlorite. In residue studies conducted with nonlabeled ClO2, sodium perchlorate residues (LOQ, 4 ng/g) were not formed when reactions were protected from light. Sodium chlorate residues were present in control (39.2 ± 4.8 ng/g) and chlorine dioxide treated (128 ± 31.2 ng/g) salami. If sanitation occurred under conditions of illumination, detectable levels (3.7 ± 1.5 ng/g) of perchlorate were formed along with greater quantities of sodium chlorate (183.6 ± 75.4 ng/g). Collectively, these data suggest that ClO2 is chemically reduced by salami and that slow-release formulations might be appropriate for applications involving the sanitation of ready-to-eat meat products.

  4. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  5. [Characterization of the change in DOM during wastewater chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections by 3DEEM].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-sha; Hu, Hong-ying; Koichi, Fujie

    2007-07-01

    The change of DOM (dissolve organic matter) during wastewater chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections was characterized by 3DEEM (three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy) method. The results showed that the DOM in wastewater tested was quite different from drinking water and surface waters. It contained more aromatic proteins and soluble microbial products, and the humus were predominately microbially derived and had less aromatic moieties. After chlorine and chlorine dioxide disinfections, the excitation or emission wavelength of EEM (excitation emission matrix) peaks for aromatic proteins and soluble microbial products shifted to longer wavelength by several nanometers, which was probably caused by the decomposition of aromatic structure; while the excitation or emission wavelength of EEM peaks for humus shifted to shorter wavelength by several to more than twenty nanometers, which was different from surface waters, and this phenomenon was considered to be caused by their different resources. Similar to the change in genotoxicity, ammonia nitrogen significantly influenced the change in EEM during chlorine disinfection, but not during chlorine dioxide disinfection.

  6. A comparison of the virucidal properties of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G. R.; Butler, M.

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine were compared with chlorine as virucidal agents. Under optimal conditions all disinfectants were effective at low concentrations, but each disinfectant responded differently to acidity and alkalinity. Disinfection by chlorine was impaired by the presence of ammonia, but the other disinfectants retained much of their potency. Disinfection of poliovirus by iodine resulted in structural changes in the virions as seen by electron micrroscopy, but the other disinfectants were able to inactivate poliovirus without causing any apparent structural changes. Images Plate 1 PMID:6290566

  7. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mussalli, Y.G.; Martin, P.D.

    1995-11-01

    Chlorine dioxide was injected into the water intakes at two power plants in Illinois and one in Indiana in an effort to eradicate the existing population of zebra mussels and mitigate further settlement in station river water cooling systems. Results of the treatments at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station on the Mississippi River, Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station on the Illinois River, and SI Energy`s Gallagher Station on the Ohio River are reported. Treatments were performed on a turnkey basis, with three treatments performed at Meredosia Station in 1994, six treatments performed at Wood River Station between July 1993 and September 1994, and 2 treatments performed at Gallagher Station in 1994. For each treatment, a contractor installed and operated a portable chlorine dioxide generator, monitored water quality and oxidant levels, and provided and monitored bioboxes containing test mussels. Results of the treatments were very favorable, indicating a good potential for periodic treatments with chlorine dioxide to control zebra mussel infestations in the raw water systems of power plants and other industrial facilities. Some difficulties with the chlorine dioxide generation system and cold temperature effects reduced the treatment effectiveness, particularly the second treatment at Gallagher Station. Average induced mortalities ranged from 70 to 100% at Wood River, 87 to 92% at Meredosia, and 30 to 100% at Gallagher for native mussels. Dechlorination successfully kept total oxidant residual levels at or below 0.05 ppM during all treatments at all stations.

  8. The effect of chlorine dioxide on polymeric packaging materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), with its high oxidizing capacity and broad disinfecting property, is used frequently as a disinfectant in many applications. As a biocide in food applications, it showed a microbial inactivating capacity against many important pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, located ...

  9. Disinfection of football protective equipment using chlorine dioxide produced by the ICA TriNova system

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Anthony L; DuBois, John D; Tenney, Joel D

    2009-01-01

    Backround Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks have occurred in individuals engaged in athletic activities such as wrestling and football. Potential disease reduction interventions include the reduction or elimination of bacteria on common use items such as equipment. Chlorine dioxide has a long history of use as a disinfectant. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of novel portable chlorine dioxide generation devices to eliminate bacteria contamination of helmets and pads used by individuals engaged in football. Methods In field studies, the number of bacteria associated with heavily used football helmets and shoulder pads was determined before and after overnight treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Bacteria were recovered using cotton swabs and plated onto trypticase soy agar plates. In laboratory studies, Staphylococcus aureus was applied directly to pads. The penetration of bacteria into the pads was determined by inoculating agar plates with portions of the pads taken from the different layers of padding. The ability to eliminate bacteria on the pad surface and underlying foam layers after treatment with chlorine dioxide was also determined. Results Rates of recovery of bacteria after treatment clearly demonstrated that chlorine dioxide significantly (p < 0.001) reduce and eliminated bacteria found on the surface of pads. For example, the soft surface of shoulder pads from a university averaged 2.7 × 103 recoverable bacteria colonies before chlorine dioxide treatment and 1.3 × 102 recoverable colonies after treatment. In addition, the gas was capable of penetrating the mesh surface layer and killing bacteria in the underlying foam pad layers. Here, 7 × 103 to 4.5 × 103 laboratory applied S. aureus colonies were recovered from underlying layers before treatment and 0 colonies were present after treatment. Both naturally occurring bacteria and S. aureus were susceptible to the treatment process

  10. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection.

  11. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide tablets on inactivation of cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Haas, Charles N; Arrowood, Michael J; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-05-20

    The ability of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to achieve 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in drinking water has been documented. No studies have specifically addressed the effects of ClO2 on C. parvum oocyst infectivity in chlorinated recreational water venues (e.g., pools). The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of ClO2 as an alternative to existing hyperchlorination protocols that are used to achieve a 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in such venues. To obtain a 3-log inactivation of C. parvum Iowa oocysts, contact times of 105 and 128 min for a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 2.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. Contact times of 294 and 857 min for a solution containing 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 3.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. The hyperchlorination control (21 mg/L free chlorine only) required 455 min for a 3-log inactivation. Use of a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 and solutions containing 5 or 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with the addition of free chlorine appears to be a promising alternative to hyperchlorination for inactivating Cryptosporidium in chlorinated recreational water venues, but further studies are required to evaluate safety constraints on use.

  12. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y S; Vaughn, J M

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4 degrees C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10(5)-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate at neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants. PMID:2160222

  13. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw ); Vaughn, J.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  14. Oxidative elimination of cyanotoxins: comparison of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Eva; Onstad, Gretchen D; Kull, Tomas P J; Metcalf, James S; Acero, Juan L; von Gunten, Urs

    2007-08-01

    As the World Health Organization (WHO) progresses with provisional Drinking Water Guidelines of 1 microg/L for microcystin-LR and a proposed Guideline of 1 microg/L for cylindrospermopsin, efficient treatment strategies are needed to prevent cyanotoxins such as these from reaching consumers. A kinetic database has been compiled for the oxidative treatment of three cyanotoxins: microcystin-LR (MC-LR), cylindrospermopsin (CYN), and anatoxin-a (ANTX) with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate. This kinetic database contains rate constants not previously reported and determined in the present work (e.g. for permanganate oxidation of ANTX and chlorine dioxide oxidation of CYN and ANTX), together with previously published rate constants for the remaining oxidation processes. Second-order rate constants measured in pure aqueous solutions of these toxins could be used in a kinetic model to predict the toxin oxidation efficiency of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate when applied to natural waters. Oxidants were applied to water from a eutrophic Swiss lake (Lake Greifensee) in static-dose testing and dynamic time-resolved experiments to confirm predictions from the kinetic database, and to investigate the effects of a natural matrix on toxin oxidation and by-product formation. Overall, permanganate can effectively oxidize ANTX and MC-LR, while chlorine will oxidize CYN and MC-LR and ozone is capable of oxidizing all three toxins with the highest rate. The formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the treated water may be a restriction to the application of sufficiently high-chlorine doses.

  15. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J; Duerr, Mark A; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Chlorine dioxide remediation of a virus-contaminated manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Lutgen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    CONFERENCE PROCEEDING Proceedings of the PDA/FDA Adventitious Viruses in Biologics: Detection and Mitigation Strategies Workshop in Bethesda, MD, USA; December 1-3, 2010 Guest Editors: Arifa Khan (Bethesda, MD), Patricia Hughes (Bethesda, MD) and Michael Wiebe (San Francisco, CA) Chlorine dioxide fumigation was successfully used to decontaminate a virally contaminated biotech manufacturing facility. Addressing safety, product quality, and corrosion risks were important factors in planning the building fumigation. Studies were performed to define the conditions in which minute mouse virus (MMV) is inactivated by chlorine dioxide and to understand equipment and facility risks. Written plans and procedures documented activities necessary to safely fumigate the building and requalify it to manufacture commercial product.

  17. Chlorine dioxide against bacteria and yeasts from the alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Meneghin, Silvana Perissatto; Reis, Fabricia Cristina; de Almeida, Paulo Garcia; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2008-01-01

    The ethanol production in Brazil is carried out by fed-batch or continuous process with cell recycle, in such way that bacterial contaminants are also recycled and may be troublesome due to the substrate competition. Addition of sulphuric acid when inoculum cells are washed can control the bacterial growth or alternatively biocides are used. This work aimed to verify the effect of chlorine dioxide, a well-known biocide for bacterial decontamination of water and equipments, against contaminant bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides) from alcoholic fermentation, through the method of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), as well as its effect on the industrial yeast inoculum. Lower MIC was found for B. subtilis (10 ppm) and Leuconostoc mesenteroides (50 ppm) than for Lactobacillus fermentum (75 ppm) and Lactobacillus plantarum (125 ppm). Additionally, these concentrations of chlorine dioxide had similar effects on bacteria as 3 ppm of Kamoran® (recommended dosage for fermentation tanks), exception for B. subtilis, which could not be controlled at this Kamoran® dosage. The growth of industrial yeasts was affected when the concentration of chlorine dioxide was higher than 50 ppm, but the effect was slightly dependent on the type of yeast strain. Smooth yeast colonies (dispersed cells) seemed to be more sensitive than wrinkled yeast colonies (clustered cells/pseudohyphal growth), both isolated from an alcohol-producing unit during the 2006/2007 sugar cane harvest. The main advantage in the usage of chlorine dioxide that it can replace antibiotics, avoiding the selection of resistant populations of microorganisms. PMID:24031227

  18. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of a Chlorine Dioxide Solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jui-Wen; Huang, Bin-Syuan; Hsu, Chu-Wei; Peng, Chun-Wei; Cheng, Ming-Long; Kao, Jung-Yie; Way, Tzong-Der; Yin, Hao-Chang; Wang, Shan-Shue

    2017-03-22

    In this study, a chlorine dioxide solution (UC-1) composed of chlorine dioxide was produced using an electrolytic method and subsequently purified using a membrane. UC-1 was determined to contain 2000 ppm of gaseous chlorine dioxide in water. The efficacy and safety of UC-1 were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was more than 98.2% reduction when UC-1 concentrations were 5 and 20 ppm for bacteria and fungi, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of H1N1, influenza virus B/TW/71718/04, and EV71 were 84.65 ± 0.64, 95.91 ± 11.61, and 46.39 ± 1.97 ppm, respectively. A 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test revealed that the cell viability of mouse lung fibroblast L929 cells was 93.7% at a 200 ppm UC-1 concentration that is over that anticipated in routine use. Moreover, 50 ppm UC-1 showed no significant symptoms in a rabbit ocular irritation test. In an inhalation toxicity test, treatment with 20 ppm UC-1 for 24 h showed no abnormality and no mortality in clinical symptoms and normal functioning of the lung and other organs. A ClO₂ concentration of up to 40 ppm in drinking water did not show any toxicity in a subchronic oral toxicity test. Herein, UC-1 showed favorable disinfection activity and a higher safety profile tendency than in previous reports.

  19. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide to early life stages of marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hose, J.E.; Di Fiore, D.; Parker, H.S.; Sciarrotta, T.

    1989-03-01

    With increasing interest in minimizing exposure to chlorine, many electric generating and water treatment plants are exploring the use of alternative biocides such as chlorine dioxide. Unlike chlorine, chlorine dioxide does not react with ambient organic compounds to form potentially carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform. However, the toxicity of chlorine dioxide to aquatic organisms has received little study. No information exists on chlorine toxicity to marine organisms. Furthermore, West Coast electric power stations usually discharge chlorine intermittently once or twice daily and substantial mixing of receiving water occurs between treatments. Therefore, this study sought to obtain information on chlorine dioxide toxicity using an exposure schedule typical of generating stations which discharge into the marine environment. Early life history stages of a plant, invertebrate and fish were tested since these stages are generally acknowledged to be most sensitive to toxicants and are the stages that are most likely to be exposed to the effluent.

  20. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii. PMID:21602398

  1. Cellular response of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treatments.

    PubMed

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-07-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested on A. castellanii trophozoites. Doses of disinfectants leading to up to a 3-log reduction were compared by flow cytometry and electron microscopy. Chlorine treatment led to size reduction, permeabilization, and retraction of pseudopods. In addition, treatment with chlorine dioxide led to a vacuolization of the cytoplasm. Monochloramine had a dose-dependent effect. At the highest doses monochloramine treatment resulted in almost no changes in cell size and permeability, as shown by flow cytometry, but the cell surface became smooth and dense, as seen by electron microscopy. We show that these disinfectants globally induced size reduction, membrane permeabilization, and morphological modifications but that they have a different mode of action on A. castellanii.

  2. Non-heme manganese catalysts for on-demand production of chlorine dioxide in water and under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Scott D; Kim, Doyeon; Xiong, Silei; Medvedev, Grigori A; Caruthers, James; Hong, Seungwoo; Nam, Wonwoo; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2014-03-05

    Two non-heme manganese complexes are used in the catalytic formation of chlorine dioxide from chlorite under ambient temperature at pH 5.00. The catalysts afford up to 1000 turnovers per hour and remain highly active in subsequent additions of chlorite. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies revealed a Mn(III)(OH) species as the dominant form under catalytic conditions. A Mn(III)(μ-O)Mn(IV) dinuclear species was observed by EPR spectroscopy, supporting the involvement of a putative Mn(IV)(O) species. First-order kinetic dependence on the manganese catalyst precludes the dinuclear species as the active form of the catalyst. Quantitative kinetic modeling enabled the deduction of a mechanism that accounts for all experimental observations. The chlorine dioxide producing cycle involves formation of a putative Mn(IV)(O), which undergoes PCET (proton coupled electron-transfer) reaction with chlorite to afford chlorine dioxide. The ClO2 product can be efficiently removed from the aqueous reaction mixture via purging with an inert gas, allowing for the preparation of pure chlorine dioxide for on-site use and further production of chlorine dioxide.

  3. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide.

  4. A membrane process to recover chlorine from chloralkali plant tail gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhandwala, K.A.; Segelke, S.; Nguyen, P.; Baker, R.W.; Su, T.T.; Pinnau, I.

    1999-10-01

    Chlorine is manufactured by the electrolysis of brine. The chlorine product is a gas, which is collected, dried, compressed, and cooled to produce a liquid. This paper describes the development and field demonstration of a membrane process to recover chlorine from the liquefaction tail gas of chloralkali plants. The tail gas consists of about 20% chlorine and 50--70% air, with the balance being hydrogen and carbon dioxide. A number of membrane materials can achieve a selectivity of 20 or more for chlorine from nitrogen, but degradation of the membrane materials in the presence of high concentrations of chlorine gas often occurs. However, modified silicone rubber membranes are stable to chlorine gas streams. Silicone rubber composite membranes were prepared and formed into modules of 1--2 m{sup 2} membrane area. The modules were tested in the laboratory and in a field test on a slip stream from a chlorine liquefaction unit. In the laboratory, chlorine/nitrogen membrane selectivities of more than 40 were obtained, but selectivities of 6--10 were measured in the field test. This decrease in selectivity was caused by low gas flow rates through the modules, which resulted in concentration polarization effects. However, the membrane maintained essentially constant fluxes and selectivities in field tests lasting more than 1 month. Calculated plant designs based on a selectivity of 8 are able to recover more than 95% of the chlorine in the tail gas. Typical project payback times based on the value of the recovered chlorine and avoided caustic scrubber chemical use are expected to be 1--2 years.

  5. Benefits of carbon dioxide as pH reducer in chlorinated indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Gomà, Anton; Guisasola, Albert; Tayà, Carlota; Baeza, Juan A; Baeza, Mireia; Bartrolí, Albert; Lafuente, Javier; Bartrolí, Jordi

    2010-06-01

    Carbon dioxide is seldom used as pH reducer in swimming pools. Nevertheless it offers two interesting advantages. First, its use instead of the usual hydrochloric acid avoids the characteristic and serious accident of mixing the disinfectant with that strong acid, which forms a dangerous chlorine gas cloud and, second, it allows the facility to become slightly a depository of that greenhouse gas. This work introduces the experience of using CO(2) as pH reducer in real working swimming pools, showing three more advantages: lower chlorine consumption, lower presence of oxidants in the air above the swimming pool and a diminished formation of trihalomethanes in the swimming pool water. Experiments lasted 4years and they were run in three swimming pools in the Barcelona area, where the conventional system based upon HCl and a system based upon CO(2) were consecutively exchanged.

  6. Low-Temperature Decontamination with Hydrogen Peroxide or Chlorine Dioxide for Space Applications

    PubMed Central

    Macken, S.; Giri, K.; Walker, J. T.; Bennett, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m3 exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry. PMID:22492450

  7. Low-temperature decontamination with hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide for space applications.

    PubMed

    Pottage, T; Macken, S; Giri, K; Walker, J T; Bennett, A M

    2012-06-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m(3) exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry.

  8. Efficacy and Safety Evaluation of a Chlorine Dioxide Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jui-Wen; Huang, Bin-Syuan; Hsu, Chu-Wei; Peng, Chun-Wei; Cheng, Ming-Long; Kao, Jung-Yie; Way, Tzong-Der; Yin, Hao-Chang; Wang, Shan-Shue

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a chlorine dioxide solution (UC-1) composed of chlorine dioxide was produced using an electrolytic method and subsequently purified using a membrane. UC-1 was determined to contain 2000 ppm of gaseous chlorine dioxide in water. The efficacy and safety of UC-1 were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was more than 98.2% reduction when UC-1 concentrations were 5 and 20 ppm for bacteria and fungi, respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of H1N1, influenza virus B/TW/71718/04, and EV71 were 84.65 ± 0.64, 95.91 ± 11.61, and 46.39 ± 1.97 ppm, respectively. A 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test revealed that the cell viability of mouse lung fibroblast L929 cells was 93.7% at a 200 ppm UC-1 concentration that is over that anticipated in routine use. Moreover, 50 ppm UC-1 showed no significant symptoms in a rabbit ocular irritation test. In an inhalation toxicity test, treatment with 20 ppm UC-1 for 24 h showed no abnormality and no mortality in clinical symptoms and normal functioning of the lung and other organs. A ClO2 concentration of up to 40 ppm in drinking water did not show any toxicity in a subchronic oral toxicity test. Herein, UC-1 showed favorable disinfection activity and a higher safety profile tendency than in previous reports. PMID:28327506

  9. Effects of chlorine or chlorine dioxide during immersion chilling on recovery of bacteria from broiler carcasses and chiller water

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine the microbiological impact of immersion chilling broiler carcasses with chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Eviscerated, pre-chill commercial broiler carcasses were cut into left and right halves along the keel bone, and each half was rinsed (HCR) in 100 mL of 0.1% pept...

  10. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  11. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  12. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  13. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  14. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  15. Application of Chlorine Dioxide to Lessen Bacterial Contamination during Broiler Defeathering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to escape of contaminated gut contents, the number of Campylobacter spp. recovered from broiler carcasses increases during feather removal. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is approved for use as an antimicrobial treatment during poultry processing. A chlorine dioxide generator was placed in a commerci...

  16. Potential Use of Chlorine Dioxide to Control Diseases in Ornamental Plant Production Systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research is being done to evaluate uses of chlorine dioxide in ornamental plant production systems. Chlorine dioxide has been shown to control spread of Fusarium oxysporum during the hot water treatment of daffodils and should provide replacement of formaldehyde which was used in the past. By dipp...

  17. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%.

  18. Immobilization of chlorine dioxide modified cells for uranium absorption.

    PubMed

    He, Shengbin; Ruan, Binbiao; Zheng, Yueping; Zhou, Xiaobin; Xu, Xiaoping

    2014-11-01

    There has been a trend towards the use of microorganisms to recover metals from industrial wastewater, for which various methods have been reported to be used to improve microorganism adsorption characteristics such as absorption capacity, tolerance and reusability. In present study, chlorine dioxide(ClO2), a high-efficiency, low toxicity and environment-benign disinfectant, was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. FTIR analysis indicated that several cell surface groups are involved in the uranium adsorption and cell surface modification. The modified cells were further immobilized on a carboxymethylcellulose(CMC) matrix to improve their reusability. The cell-immobilized adsorbent could be employed either in a high concentration system to move vast UO2(2+) ions or in a low concentration system to purify UO2(2+) contaminated water thoroughly, and could be repeatedly used in multiple adsorption-desorption cycles with about 90% adsorption capacity maintained after seven cycles.

  19. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  20. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  1. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  2. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  3. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  4. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  5. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  6. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  7. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  8. Formation of assimilable organic carbon during oxidation of natural waters with ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, permanganate, and ferrate.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, Maaike K; Peter, Andreas; Traber, Jacqueline; von Gunten, Urs

    2011-02-01

    Five oxidants, ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, permanganate, and ferrate were studied with regard to the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and oxalate in absence and presence of cyanobacteria in lake water matrices. Ozone and ferrate formed significant amounts of AOC, i.e. more than 100 μg/L AOC were formed with 4.6 mg/L ozone and ferrate in water with 3.8 mg/L dissolved organic carbon. In the same water samples chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and permanganate produced no or only limited AOC. When cyanobacterial cells (Aphanizomenon gracile) were added to the water, an AOC increase was detected with ozone, permanganate, and ferrate, probably due to cell lysis. This was confirmed by the increase of extracellular geosmin, a substance found in the selected cyanobacterial cells. AOC formation by chlorine and chlorine dioxide was not affected by the presence of the cells. The formation of oxalate upon oxidation was found to be a linear function of the oxidant consumption for all five oxidants. The following molar yields were measured in three different water matrices based on oxidant consumed: 2.4-4.4% for ozone, 1.0-2.8% for chlorine dioxide and chlorine, 1.1-1.2% for ferrate, and 11-16% for permanganate. Furthermore, oxalate was formed in similar concentrations as trihalomethanes during chlorination (yield ∼ 1% based on chlorine consumed). Oxalate formation kinetics and stoichiometry did not correspond to the AOC formation. Therefore, oxalate cannot be used as a surrogate for AOC formation during oxidative water treatment.

  9. [Study on pipe material's influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection].

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Yue, Yinling; Ling, Bo; Zhang, Lan

    2010-09-01

    To study the pipe material's influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection. 0.8 mg/L chlorine dioxide solution was injected into 5 kinds of pipes respectively, PPR, PVC-U, Steel with Zinc coating, copper and PE pipes. Dipped free from light for 48 hours and the concentrations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate were tested from samples taken from each kind of pipe at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours respectively. Chlorine dioxides decay rates in the water dipping the pipes increase as the dipping time increases and the decay of chlorine dioxide mainly occurs within 6 hours after the dipping. But for different pipe, the influence of decay differs. The consumption of chlorine dioxide of the metal pipes is more than that of the plastic pipes. And with 2 hours after the dipping experiment begins, the concentrations of the chlorite of the copper pipe and of the steel with zinc coating pipe increase quickly and reach the maximum concentration. But then the chlorite concentration decreases greatly. After dipped 24 hours, the chlorite in the water in the pipe can not be detected. For other plastic piples, all the chlorite concentrations in the dipping water increase as the dipping time increase. Compared with the start of the dipping experiment, the chlorate concentration in the dipping water of each pipe has no obvious change. The material of the water transportation pipe does have influence on chlorine dioxide drinking water disinfection.

  10. Clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide for disinfection of dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to clinically evaluate the disinfection efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for used dental instruments. An imprint culture technique demonstrated that ultrasonic cleaning of intraorally applied dental mirrors in 0.02% ClO2 for 10 minutes resulted in compete removal of microorganisms for 10 subjects. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction on periodontal curettes after subgingival scaling in four HCV-infected patients and was completely removed by the same treatment procedure. Therefore, the combination of ultrasonic cleaning with ClO2 may provide an alternative to toxic disinfectants, such as glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochlorite, for disinfecting dental instruments.

  11. Efficacy of Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Poliovirus in Water Disinfected by Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, Ozone, and UV Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Norman J.; Margolin, Aaron B.

    1994-01-01

    MilliQ water was inoculated with poliovirus type 1 strain LSc-1 and was treated with disinfectants, including chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and UV light. No relationship between probes and plaque assays were seen, demonstrating that viral nucleic acids were not destroyed. These findings suggest that nucleic acid probes cannot distinguish between infectious and noninfectious viruses and cannot be used in the evaluation of treated waters. PMID:16349448

  12. Hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole coupling in chlorine and fluorine dioxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Berta; Christiansen, Ove; Jørgensen, Poul; Byberg, Jørgen; Gauss, Jürgen; Ruud, Kenneth

    1997-02-01

    The hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors have been calculated for the two chlorine dioxide isomers OClO and ClOO and for fluorine dioxide FOO. The coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) approach with a perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] has been used and basis saturation has been investigated. For the symmetric isomer OClO close agreement is obtained with the accurate and detailed experimental data. For FOO a geometry optimization as well as a comparison of calculated and experimental hyperfine coupling tensors suggest a shorter F-O bond length than that obtained experimentally. For the isomer ClOO, calculations have been carried out at the theoretical equilibrium geometry determined by Peterson and Werner and at the geometry proposed by Byberg for the matrix isolated molecule. The hyperfine coupling tensors obtained at these two geometries are substantially different, but the estimated accuracy of the calculations is not high enough to allow a determination of the geometry of ClOO from the hyperfine data.

  13. Core-level excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, R.; Plenge, J.; Rühl, E.

    2006-03-01

    Inner-shell excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-excitation regime is reported. The electronic structure of the element-selectively excited radical is studied by X-ray absorption and total cation yields. A comparison of both approaches allows us to estimate the absolute photoionization cross-section and the ionization yield near the Cl 2p- and O 1s-absorption edges. The latter quantity is characteristically enhanced in core-ionization continua. We observe below both core-absorption edges intense core-to-valence-transitions. These are assigned in comparison with related work on core-excited sulfur dioxide. These results give clear evidence that the highest molecular orbital of OClO is half-filled. High-resolution spectra recorded in the Cl 2p-regime show evidence for Rydberg transitions. The extrapolation of the term values of the low-lying Rydberg states allows us to derive the Cl 2p-ionization energy of OClO. Fragmentation of core-excited OClO is reported. Photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (PEPICO) spectra are recorded, indicating that singly and doubly charged fragments are formed. Fission of the doubly and multiply charged OClO leads to singly charged fragments. These are measured by photoion-photoion-coincidence (PIPICO) spectra, where characteristic changes in intensity of the fission channels in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-continuum are observed.

  14. Field Experience with Chlorine Dioxide Fumigation of a Hospital: Timeline and Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide (Cl02) fumigation technology was developed and successfully used to remediate four large buildings contaminated with anthrax spores from 2001 through 2004. As a first application of the technology, those remediations were complex, costly and time consuming. There...

  15. Sterilization of hydrogen peroxide resistant bacterial spores with stabilized chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony; Zachariah, Malcolm; Middaugh, Amy; Heiser, Matt; Khanna, Neeraj; Vaishampayan, Parag; Rice, Charles V

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores isolated from a clean room environment are known to exhibit enhanced resistance to peroxide, desiccation, UV radiation and chemical disinfection than other spore-forming bacteria. The survival of B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard clean room sterilization practices requires development of more stringent disinfection agents. Here, we report the effects of a stabilized chlorine dioxide-based biocidal agent against spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. Viability was determined via CFU measurement after exposure. Chlorine dioxide demonstrated efficacy towards sterilization of spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 equivalent or better than exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate efficacy of chlorine dioxide delivered through a stabilized chlorine dioxide product as a means of sterilization of peroxide- and UV-resistant spores.

  16. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  17. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1:13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2:17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  18. Field Experience with Chlorine Dioxide Fumigation of a Hospital: Timeline and Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide (Cl02) fumigation technology was developed and successfully used to remediate four large buildings contaminated with anthrax spores from 2001 through 2004. As a first application of the technology, those remediations were complex, costly and time consuming. There...

  19. Evaluation of the use of chlorine dioxide to control zebra mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.; Coyle, J.; Pallo, S.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide was tested as a zebra mussel biocide at two steam electric generating stations in Illinois. The purpose of these studies was to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in killing zebra mussels and to develop site specific treatment programs for the two utilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Consortium sponsored the testing of this recent use of chlorine dioxide. The raw water system at Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station, on the Illinois River, received two to four day applications of chlorine dioxide in April, July, and September 1994. The raw water system at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station, on the Mississippi River, received two to four day applications in July 1993, January, April, May, July, and September 1994. Chlorine dioxide was generated on-site and injected into the water intake structure, in front of or just behind the traveling screens, at both power stations. Both cooling and service water systems were treated at the facilities. Various water quality parameters, including residual chlorine in the discharge effluent, were measured during the studies. Residual chlorine was neutralized with sodium bisulfite prior to discharge at both plants. Bioboxes, containing healthy zebra mussels, were placed at various strategic locations throughout the power stations. Control bioboxes were also placed in the rivers, upstream of the chlorine dioxide injection locations. Results of the chlorine dioxide applications varied from 35 percent to 100 percent. These varied results appear to be related to seasonal water temperature differences, water quality, and/or plant design. Mortality differences were also noted in bioboxes which contained zebra mussels imported from Lake Erie and those which contained local mussels. These and other data are presented.

  20. Oxidation of pharmaceuticals during water treatment with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Huber, Marc M; Korhonen, Susanna; Ternes, Thomas A; von Gunten, Urs

    2005-09-01

    The potential of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for the oxidation of pharmaceuticals during water treatment was assessed by determining second-order rate constants for the reaction with selected environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals. Out of 9 pharmaceuticals only the 4 following compounds showed an appreciable reactivity with ClO2 (in brackets apparent second-order rate constants at pH 7 and T = 20 degrees C): the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfamethoxazole (6.7 x 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)), the macrolide antibiotic roxithromycin (2.2 x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), the estrogen 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (approximately 2 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), and the antiphlogistic diclofenac (1.05 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). Experiments performed using natural water showed that ClO2 also reacted fast with other sulfonamides and macrolides, the natural hormones estrone and 17beta-estradiol as well as 3 pyrazolone derivatives (phenazone, propylphenazone, and dimethylaminophenazone). However, many compounds in the study were ClO2 refractive. Experiments with lake water and groundwater that were partly performed at microgram/L to nanogram/L levels proved that the rate constants determined in pure water could be applied to predict the oxidation of pharmaceuticals in natural waters. Compared to ozone, ClO2 reacted more slowly and with fewer compounds. However, it reacted faster with the investigated compounds than chlorine. Overall, the results indicate that ClO2 will only be effective to oxidize certain compound classes such as the investigated classes of sulfonamide and macrolide antibiotics, and estrogens.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT QUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that is highly resistant to chlorine, has been implicated in a number of waterborne disease outbreaks. This organism appears, however, to be efectively controlled by other oxidants such as chlorine dioxide or ozone. A major element of ...

  2. Full-scale study of removal effect on Cyclops of zooplankton with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Cui, Fu-Yi; Liu, Dong-Mei; An, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Cyclops of zooplankton propagated excessively in eutrophic water body and could not be effectively inactivated by the conventional disinfections process like chlorination due to its stronger resistance to oxidation. In this paper, a full-scale study of chlorine dioxide preoxidation cooperating with routine clarification process for Cyclops removal was conducted in a waterworks. The experimental results were compared with that of the existing prechlorination process in several aspects: including the Cyclops removal efficiencies of water samples taken from the outlets of sedimentation tank and sand filter and the security of drinking water and so on. The results showed that chlorine dioxide might be more effective to inactivate Cyclops than chlorine and Cyclops could be thoroughly removed from water by pre-dosing chlorine dioxide process. The GC-MS examination and Ames test further showed that the sort and amount of organic substance in the treated water by chlorine dioxide preoxidation were evidently less than that of prechlorination and the mutagenicity of drinking water treated by pre-dosing chlorine dioxide was substantially reduced compared with prechlorination.

  3. Efficacy of chlorine, acidic electrolyzed water and aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions to decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from lettuce leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study compared the efficacy of chlorine (20 – 200 ppm), acidic electrolyzed water (50 ppm chlorine, pH 2.6), acidified sodium chlorite (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, Sanova), and aqueous chlorine dioxide (20 – 200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, TriNova) washes in reducing population...

  4. The synergistic effect of Escherichia coli inactivation by sequential disinfection with low level chlorine dioxide followed by free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Yang, Dong; Zhu, Sui-Yi; Chen, Bo-Yan; Huo, Ming-Xin; Li, Jun-Wen

    2012-12-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there was little information available on pathogen removal using low level disinfectant followed by free chlorine in sequential disinfection (SD). This study investigated Escherichia coli inactivation by four types of disinfection: single step disinfection (SSD), SD, traditional sequential disinfection (TSD) and mixed disinfectant disinfection (MDD). Results indicated that SD had higher ability to inactivate E. coli than the others, indicating there was a positive synergistic effect on chlorine disinfection by prior dosing with a low level of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). The ONPG assay suggested that the permeability of cell wall rather than the viability of E. coli were changed under 0.02 mg/l ClO(2) treatment. The coexistence of residual ClO(2) and free chlorine also plays an active synergistic effect. Additionally, temperature had a positive effect on E. coli inactivation in SD, while inactivation was reduced in alkaline compared to neutral and acidic conditions.

  5. Very Low Energy Electron Scattering from Ozone and Chlorine Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulley, R. J.; Field, T. A.; Steer, W. A.; Mason, N. J.; Ziesel, J. P.; Lunt, S. L.; Field, D.

    1998-10-01

    Total cross-sections are reported for the scattering of electrons from ozone (O_3) and chlorine dioxide (OClO) for energies in the range of 9 meV to 10 eV. The measurements were made in transmission experiments using a synchrotron photoionization apparatus with an energy resolution in the incident electron beam of ~ 3.5 meV (FWHM). The cross section for O3 shows strong rotational scattering at low energy, through the presence of the permanent dipole moment of O_3. Superposed on this strong scattering signal, there is evidence of a weak structure around 50 meV associated with dissociative attachment. A shape resonance, known from earlier work at ~ 4 meV, is also observed. Electron scattering from OClO is dominated by rotationally inelastic scattering decreasing from a peak at essentially zero eV to an energy of 40 meV, where p-wave attachment becomes more important, peaking at 50--60 meV and extending to several hundred meV.

  6. Chlorine dioxide-facilitated oxidation of the azo dye amaranth.

    PubMed

    Nadupalli, S; Koorbanally, N; Jonnalagadda, S B

    2011-10-27

    The oxidation reaction of amaranth (trisodium 2-hydroxy-1-(4-sulfonato-1-naphthylazo)naphthalene-3,6-disulfonate or AM(-)) by chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in aqueous conditions was investigated in detail. The major reaction products immediately after decolorization of AM(-) were 1,2-naphthoquinone disulfonate sodium salt and 1,4-napthalenedione. The reaction had first-order dependence on both AM(-) and ClO(2). The rate-limiting step involved the reaction between AM(-) and OH(-) ions. The role of hydroxide ion as a catalyst was established. The second-order rate constant increased with pH, from (19.8 ± 0.9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.0, (97.1 ± 2.3) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 8.0 to (132.5 ± 2.8) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.0. In the pH range of 6.0-7.5, the catalytic constant for OH(-) ion was 4.0 × 10(9) M(-2) s(-1). The energy and entropy of activation values for the reaction were 50.0 kJ mol(-1) and -658.7 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. A probable reaction mechanism was elucidated and was validated by simulations.

  7. Impact of combining chlorine dioxide and chlorine on DBP formation in simulated indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Kaplan Bekaroglu, Sehnaz Sule; Selbes, Meric; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the combined use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and chlorine (Cl2) on the speciation and kinetics of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in swimming pools using synthetic pool waters prepared with a body fluid analog (BFA) and/or fresh natural water. At 1:25 (mass ratio) of ClO2 to Cl2, there was no significant reduction in the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) for both BFA solution and natural water compared to the application of Cl2 alone. When the mass ratio of ClO2 to Cl2 increased to 1:1, substantial decreases in both THMs and HAAs were observed in the natural water, while there was almost no change of DBP formations in the BFA solution. Haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes levels in both water matrices remained similar. In the presence of bromide, the overall DBP formation increased in both BFA solution and natural water. For the DBP formation kinetics, after 72hr of contact time, very low formation of THMs and HAAs was observed for the use of ClO2 only. Compared to Cl2 control, however, applying the 1:1 mixture of ClO2/Cl2 reduced THMs by >60% and HAAs by >50%. Chlorite was maintained below 1.0mg/L, while the formation of chlorate significantly increased over the reaction time. Finally, in a bench-scale indoor pool experiment, applying ClO2 and Cl2 simultaneously produced less THMs compared to Cl2 control and kept chlorite at <0.4mg/L, while HAAs and chlorate accumulated over 4-week operation period. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Chlorine gas exposure and the lung: a review.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Blanc, P D

    1993-01-01

    We conducted a review of the literature detailing the respiratory effects of chlorine, an extremely important but toxic halogen. Historically, the heaviest mass inhalational exposures to chlorine resulted from World War I gassing. Currently potential human exposure to chlorine inhalation occurs in a variety of settings in the workplace, as a result of inadvertent environmental releases, and even in the home due to household cleaning mishaps. Chlorine species are highly reactive; tissue injury results from exposure to chlorine, hydrochloric acid, hypochlorous acid, or chloramines. Acute, high level exposure to chlorine gas in occupational or environmental settings results in a variety of dose-related lung effects ranging from respiratory mucus membrane irritation to pulmonary edema. Pulmonary function testing can reveal either obstructive or restrictive deficits immediately following exposure, with resolution over time in the majority of cases. However, some of those exposed may demonstrate long-term persistent obstructive or restrictive pulmonary deficits or increased nonspecific airway reactivity after high level exposure to chlorine gas. Symptoms and signs following inhalation of mixtures of chlorine-containing cleaners in the home are similar to those after occupational exposures and environmental releases. Although generally less severe, these events may be extremely common. Controlled human exposure data suggest that some subjects may be more responsive to the effects of chlorine gas; epidemiologic data also indicate that certain subpopulations (e.g., smokers) may be at greater risk of adverse outcome after chlorine inhalation. Although these findings are intriguing, additional study is needed to better delineate the risk factors that predispose toward the development of long-term pulmonary sequelae following chlorine gas exposure.

  9. Removal of hexenuronic acid by xylanase to reduce adsorbable organic halides formation in chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuangxi; Wang, Shuangfei; Qin, Chengrong; Yao, Shuangquan; Ebonka, Johnbull Friday; Song, Xueping; Li, Kecheng

    2015-11-01

    Xylanase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp was investigated. The pulp was pretreated with xylanase and followed a chlorine dioxide bleaching stage. The ATR-FTIR and XPS were employed to determine the surface chemistry of the control pulp, xylanase treated and chlorine dioxide treated pulps. The hexenuronic acid (HexA) could obviously be reduced after xylanase pretreatment, and the adsorbable organic halides (AOX) were reduced after chlorine dioxide bleaching. Compared to the control pulp, AOX could be reduced by 21.4-26.6% with xylanase treatment. Chlorine dioxide demand could be reduced by 12.5-22% to achieve the same brightness. The ATR-FTIR and XPS results showed that lignin and hemicellulose (mainly HexA) were the main source for AOX formation. Xylanase pretreatment could remove HexA and expose more lignin, which decreased the chlorine dioxide demand and thus reduced formation of AOX.

  10. A field study evaluation for mitigating biofouling with chlorine dioxide or chlorine integrated with UV disinfection.

    PubMed

    Rand, J L; Hofmann, R; Alam, M Z B; Chauret, C; Cantwell, R; Andrews, R C; Gagnon, G A

    2007-05-01

    The drinking water industry is continually seeking innovative disinfection strategies to control biofouling in transmission systems. This research, conducted in collaboration with the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) in California, compared the efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to free chlorine (Cl2) with and without pre-treatment with low-pressure ultraviolet (UV) light for biofilm control. An additional goal was to determine disinfection by-product (DBP) formation with each disinfection strategy. Annular reactors (ARs) containing polycarbonate coupons were used to simulate EBMUD's 90-mile aqueduct that transports surface water from a source reservoir to treatment facilities. ARs were dosed with chemical disinfectants to achieve a residual of 0.2 mg/L, which is a typical value mid-way in the aqueduct. The experiment matrix included four strategies of disinfection including UV/ClO2, ClO2, UV/Cl2 and Cl2. Two ARs acted as controls and received raw water (RW) or UV-treated water. The data presented show that the UV/ClO2 combination was most effective against suspended and attached heterotrophic (heterotrophic plate count, HPC) bacteria with 3.93 log and 2.05 log reductions, respectively. ClO2 was more effective than Cl2 at removing suspended HPC bacteria and similarly effective in biofilm bacterial removal. UV light alone was not effective in controlling suspended or biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with ClO2 or Cl2. Pre-treatment with UV was more effective overall for removal of HPC bacteria than treating with corresponding chemical disinfectants only; however, it did not lower required chemical dosages. Therefore, no significant differences were observed in DBP concentrations between ARs pre-treated with UV light and ARs not pre-treated. Disinfection with ClO2 produced fewer total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) than chlorination but did produce low levels of chlorite. These data indicate that replacing Cl2 with ClO2 would

  11. TOXICITY RESPONSES OF HERBACEOUS AND WOODY ORNAMENTAL PLANTS TO CHLORINE AND HYDROGEN DIOXIDES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine potential toxicity problems associated with foliar applications, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), at 2, 5, 20, 50, 100, 200, 1000, and 2000 and hydrogen dioxide (H2O2), at 900, 2700, 5400, and 10200 ppm, were sprayed five times at 3 day intervals on eight bedding plants and nine shrub species. ...

  12. [Comparison of the effects of chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and their combination on simulative water disinfection].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Na; Lu, Yi; Wang, Yazhou

    2008-05-01

    To compare the effects of disinfection of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), sodium hypochlorite(NaClO) and their combination (ClO + NaClO) on simulative water samples. The simulative water samples containing 5.0 x 10(4) - 5.0 x 10(5) cfu/100ml Escherichia coli were prepared in laboratory and disinfected by different doses of chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and their combination for 60, 60, 30 + 60 min respectively. The kill ratio for Escherichia coli, and the residual chlorine dioxide, and the product of chlorite ion (ClO2-) and total residual chlorine were detected and compared by the membrane filter(MF) technique and electrometric titration. The minimum effective dosage (MED) for disinfect of simulative water samples were 0.4 mg/L of chlorine dioxide, 0.5 mg/L of sodium hypochlorite, and the 0.1 mg/L + 0.3 mg/L or 0.2 mg/L + 0.2 mg/L of their combination. By comparision with disinfection of ClO2 and NaClO alone, the residual chlorine dioxide increased 13.43% - 166.67% in simulative water sample under disinfection by the combination of ClO2 + NaClO, While chlorite ion decreased 13.11% - 19.97% and total residual chlorine increased 9.34% - 40.15%. The combination of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite for disinfection of drinking water could achieve better effect of disinfection and decrease disinfection by-products as well.

  13. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol.

    PubMed

    Parga, J R; Shukla, S S; Carrillo-Pedroza, F R

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O(3)) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  14. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol

    SciTech Connect

    Parga, J.R.; Shukla, S.S.; Carrillo-Pedroza, F.R

    2003-07-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O{sub 3}) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  15. Transcriptional and Phenotypic Responses of Listeria monocytogenes to Chlorine Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Pleitner, Aaron M.; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T.; Linton, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σB and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer. PMID:24610841

  16. Transcriptional and phenotypic responses of Listeria monocytogenes to chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Pleitner, Aaron M; Trinetta, Valentina; Morgan, Mark T; Linton, Richard L; Oliver, Haley F

    2014-05-01

    Significant food-borne disease outbreaks have occurred from consumption of ready-to-eat foods, including produce, contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Challenging food matrices (e.g., cantaloupe, sprouts) with limited processing steps postharvest to reduce pathogen loads have underscored a need for new mitigation strategies. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is increasingly being used in produce and other food systems to reduce food-borne pathogen levels. The goal of this study was to characterize the transcriptional response and survival of L. monocytogenes 10403S exposed to ClO2. The transcriptional profile of log-phase cells exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 for 15 min was defined by whole-genome microarray. A total of 340 genes were significantly differentially expressed. Among the differentially expressed genes, 223 were upregulated (fold change ≥ 1.5; adjusted P value < 0.05) in role categories responsible for protein fate, cellular processes, and energy metabolism. There were 113 and 16 genes differentially expressed belonging to regulatory networks of σ(B) and CtsR, respectively. We assessed L. monocytogenes 10403S survival after exposure to 100, 300, and 500 mg/liter aqueous ClO2 in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth; there was a significant difference between cells exposed to 500 mg/liter ClO2 and those exposed to all other conditions over time (P value < 0.05). Isogenic ΔsigB and ΔctsR mutants exposed to 300 mg/liter ClO2 were more sensitive to ClO2 than the wild type under the same conditions. These results provide an initial insight into the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes employs to survive sublethal ClO2 and further our understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of this increasingly used sanitizer.

  17. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide based product as a hatchery sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, P; Cox, S; Gadde, U; Clark, F D; Bramwell, K; Watkins, S E

    2016-12-05

    Formaldehyde is commonly used to overcome contaminants introduced by hatching eggs or water supply in the hatcher cabinets. However, health risks associated with its use make economical alternatives important. This project evaluated a chlorine dioxide based product (CDBP) (0.3% concentrate) as a hatchery sanitizer in decontaminating microbial populations on the shell surface of hatching eggs (>18 d old), as well as its impact on hatchability and chick performance. Hatchers (0.20 m(2)) designed to hold approximately 50 eggs and equipped with circulation fans, heaters, and thermostats were used for the evaluation. For each of the 2 trials conducted, 450 hatching eggs were obtained and incubated in a common setter. Eggs used in trial 1 were floor eggs whereas in trial 2 nest eggs were used. On d 18 of incubation, eggs were removed from the setter, and viable eggs were randomly allocated to 9 hatchers. Pre-treatment egg rinse samples (10 eggs per hatcher) were collected for initial microbial analysis. Three hatchers were treated with CDBP and 3 hatchers with a formaldehyde based product (FBP). Three untreated hatchers served as control (C). Prior to hatch, 10 eggs/incubator, not previously rinsed, were used for post treatment microbial counts. The hatched chicks were reared until d 21 in floor pens with a common starter diet. For the CDBP treated eggs, hatchability and chick performance (weight gains, mortality, and FCR on d 7 and d 21) were similar to the other treatments. The application rate of CDBP evaluated in this study was not an effective antimicrobial alternative to formaldehyde for sanitizing hatching eggs in hatcher cabinets prior to hatch.

  18. [Change in genotoxicity of wastewater during chlorine dioxide and ahlorine disinfections and the influence of ammonia nitrogen].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Sha; Hu, Hong-Ying; Ta, Chun-Hong; Tian, Jie; Wang, Chao; Koichi, Fujie

    2007-03-01

    The effects of chlorine dioxide and chlorine disinfections on genotoxicity of different biologically treated sewage wastewater samples were studied by umu-test. The experiment results showed that when chlorine dioxide dosage increased from 0 mg/L to 30 mg/L, the genotoxicity of wastewater first decreased rapidly and then tended to be stable, while when the chlorine dosage increased from 0 mg/L to 30 mg/L, the genotoxicity of wastewater changed diversely for different samples. It was then found that ammonia nitrogen did not affect the change of genotoxicity during chlorine dioxide disinfection of wastewater, while it greatly affected the change of genotoxicity during chlorine disinfection of wastewater. When the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was low (< 10 - 20 mg/L), the genotoxicity of wastewater decreased after chlorine disinfection, and when the concentration of ammonia nitrogen was high (> 10 - 20 mg/L), the genotoxicity of wastewater increased after chlorine disinfection.

  19. Development of chlorine dioxide-related by-product models for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Korn, Caroline; Andrew, Robert C; Escobar, Michael D

    2002-01-01

    Factorial experiments were conducted using source waters from seven drinking water treatment plants in Ontario, Canada to develop statistically based model equations capable of predicting chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite and chlorate formation upon chlorine dioxide application. The equations address raw water quality and operational parameters including pH, temperature, chlorine dioxide concentration, reaction time and water organic content (as described by non-purgeable organic carbon x ultraviolet absorbance measured at 254 nm, NPOC x UV254). Terms describing two-factor interaction effects were also included, improving the accuracy of the predictive equations in fitting measured response concentrations as evaluated through internal and external validations. Nearly 80% of the predictions for chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite formation were observed to be within 20% of the measured levels. Over 90% of the predicted chlorate levels were within +/- 0.1 mg/L of the measured levels. Chlorine dioxide concentration and NPOC x UV254 were key parameters when developing the predictive models.

  20. Lethality of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a commercial produce sanitizer to Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas in a liquid detergent, on stainless steel, and in biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kreske, Audrey C; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Pettigrew, Charles A; Beuchat, Larry R

    2006-11-01

    Many factors that are not fully understood may influence the effectiveness of sanitizer treatments for eliminating pathogens and spoilage microorganisms in food or detergent residues or in biofilms on food contact surfaces. This study was done to determine the sensitivities of Pseudomonas cells and Bacillus cereus cells and spores suspended in a liquid dishwashing detergent and inoculated onto the surface of stainless steel to treatment with chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a commercial produce sanitizer (Fit). Cells and spores were incubated in a liquid dishwashing detergent for 16 to 18 h before treatment with sanitizers. At 50 microg/ml, chlorine dioxide killed a significantly higher number of Pseudomonas cells (3.82 log CFU/ml) than did chlorine (a reduction of 1.34 log CFU/ml). Stainless steel coupons were spot inoculated with Pseudomonas cells and B. cereus cells and spores, with water and 5% horse serum as carriers. Chlorine was more effective than chlorine dioxide in killing cells and spores of B. cereus suspended in horse serum. B. cereus biofilm on stainless steel coupons that were treated with chlorine dioxide or chlorine at 200 microg/ml had total population reductions (vegetative cells plus spores) of > or = 4.42 log CFU per coupon; the number of spores was reduced by > or = 3.80 log CFU per coupon. Fit (0.5%) was ineffective for killing spot-inoculated B. cereus and B. cereus in biofilm, but treatment with mixtures of Fit and chlorine dioxide caused greater reductions than did treatment with chlorine dioxide alone. In contrast, when chlorine was combined with Fit, the lethality of chlorine was completely lost. This study provides information on the survival and sanitizer sensitivity of Pseudomonas and B. cereus in a liquid dishwashing detergent, on the surface of stainless steel, and in a biofilm. This information will be useful for developing more effective strategies for cleaning and sanitizing contact surfaces in food preparation and processing

  1. [A pilot study on trihalomethane formation in water treated by chlorine dioxide].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Yu, Z; Gao, M

    1996-01-01

    Trihalomethane (THM) formation was determined by gas chromatography in water disinfected with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) only or ClO2 combined with chlorine (Cl2), to lay a basis for water disinfected with ClO2. Results showed no THM was produced in water disinfected with ClO2 only if without existence of bromine (Br) ion in it; certain amount of bromoform could be formed with existence of bromine ion, and THM formation could be inhibited by ClO2 and Cl2, with a ratio of greater than 1 between them. Light irradiation could decrease the amount of THM produced whether in disinfection with ClO2 or combination with ClO2 and Cl2. No significant effect of pH value of water on THM formation was observed, but pH should be controlled under neutral or slightly acidic to ensure the concentration of ClO2 in water.

  2. Chlorine Dioxide Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts and Bacterial Spore Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Chauret, Christian P.; Radziminski, Chris Z.; Lepuil, Michael; Creason, Robin; Andrews, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, which is resistant to chlorine concentrations typically used in water treatment, is recognized as a significant waterborne pathogen. Recent studies have demonstrated that chlorine dioxide is a more efficient disinfectant than free chlorine against Cryptosporidium oocysts. It is not known, however, if oocysts from different suppliers are equally sensitive to chlorine dioxide. This study used both a most-probable-number–cell culture infectivity assay and in vitro excystation to evaluate chlorine dioxide inactivation kinetics in laboratory water at pH 8 and 21°C. The two viability methods produced significantly different results (P < 0.05). Products of disinfectant concentration and contact time (Ct values) of 1,000 mg · min/liter were needed to inactivate approximately 0.5 log10 and 2.0 log10 units (99% inactivation) of C. parvum as measured by in vitro excystation and cell infectivity, respectively, suggesting that excystation is not an adequate viability assay. Purified oocysts originating from three different suppliers were evaluated and showed marked differences with respect to their resistance to inactivation when using chlorine dioxide. Ct values of 75, 550, and 1,000 mg · min/liter were required to achieve approximately 2.0 log10 units of inactivation with oocysts from different sources. Finally, the study compared the relationship between easily measured indicators, including Bacillus subtilis (aerobic) spores and Clostridium sporogenes (anaerobic) spores, and C. parvum oocysts. The bacterial spores were found to be more sensitive to chlorine dioxide than C. parvum oocysts and therefore could not be used as direct indicators of C. parvum inactivation for this disinfectant. In conclusion, it is suggested that future studies address issues such as oocyst purification protocols and the genetic diversity of C. parvum, since these factors might affect oocyst disinfection sensitivity. PMID:11425712

  3. Chlorine diffusion in uranium dioxide under heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Peaucelle, C.; Toulhoat, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Raimbault, L.; Sainsot, P.; Carlot, G.

    2007-04-01

    The radiation enhanced diffusion of chlorine in UO2 during heavy ion irradiation is studied. In order to simulate the behaviour of 36Cl, present as an impurity in UO2, 37Cl has been implanted into the samples (projected range 200 nm). The samples were then irradiated with 63.5 MeV 127I at two fluxes and two temperatures and the chlorine distribution was analyzed by SIMS. The results show that, during irradiation, the diffusion of the implanted chlorine is enhanced and slightly athermal with respect to pure thermal diffusion. A chlorine gain of 10% accumulating near the surface has been observed at 510 K. This corresponds to the displacement of pristine chlorine from a region of maximum defect concentration. This behaviour and the mean value of the apparent diffusion coefficient found for the implanted chlorine, around 2.5 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, reflect the high mobility of chlorine in UO2 during irradiation with fission products.

  4. Inactivation of Enteric Adenovirus and Feline Calicivirus by Chlorine Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Thurston-Enriquez, Jeanette A.; Haas, Charles N.; Jacangelo, Joseph; Gerba, Charles P.

    2005-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) inactivation experiments were conducted with adenovirus type 40 (AD40) and feline calicivirus (FCV). Experiments were carried out in buffered, disinfectant demand-free water under high- and low-pH and -temperature conditions. Ct values (the concentration of ClO2 multiplied by contact time with the virus) were calculated directly from bench-scale experiments and from application of the efficiency factor Hom (EFH) model. AD40 Ct ranges for 4-log inactivation (Ct99.99%) at 5°C were >0.77 to <1.53 mg/liter × min and >0.80 to <1.59 mg/liter × min for pH 6 and 8, respectively. For 15°C AD40 experiments, >0.49 to <0.74 mg/liter × min and <0.12 mg/liter × min Ct99.99% ranges were observed for pH 6 and 8, respectively. FCV Ct99.99% ranges for 5°C experiments were >20.20 to <30.30 mg/liter × min and >0.68 mg/liter × min for pH 6 and 8, respectively. For 15°C FCV experiments, Ct99.99% ranges were >4.20 to <6.72 and <0.18 mg/liter × min for pH 6 and 8, respectively. Viral inactivation was higher at pH 8 than at pH 6 and at 15°C than at 5°C. Comparison of Ct values and inactivation curves demonstrated that the EFH model described bench-scale experiment data very well. Observed bench-scale Ct99.99% ranges and EFH model Ct99.99% values demonstrated that FCV is more resistant to ClO2 than AD40 for the conditions studied. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance manual Ct99.99% values are higher than Ct99.99% values calculated from bench-scale experiments and from EFH model application. PMID:15933007

  5. Biofilm reactors for treatment of gas streams containing chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Speitel, G.E. Jr. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); McLay, D.S. )

    1993-08-01

    Air streams contaminated with chlorinated solvents are increasingly common as by-products of air-stripping and soil-vapor-extraction operations. This research investigated treatment of such gas streams with a bioreactor that supported the growth of methanotrophic bacteria. These bacteria cometabolize many chlorinated solvents. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) were selected as model contaminants. Removals ranged from 20% to 80% at influent concentrations of 300-1,000 [mu]g/L of air and packed-bed gas-resident times of 5-12 min. Biofilm models were able to describe bioreactor performance well. Pseudo-first-order rate constants from reactor modeling were considerably smaller than those measured in batch systems, suggesting that much of the biofilm was inactive, which also was supported by methane-removal data. Enzyme competition between methane and chlorinated solvents and toxicity from chlorinated solvent metabolites both appeared significant.

  6. Mitigation of Alicyclobacillus spp. spores on food contact surfaces with aqueous chlorine dioxide and hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Loretta M; Goodrich-Schneider, Renee; Parish, Mickey E; Danyluk, Michelle D

    2009-12-01

    The prevalence of Alicyclobacillus spp. and other spore-forming spoilage organisms in food handling and processing environments presents a sanitation challenge to manufacturers of products such as juices and beverages. The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in killing Alicyclobacillus spores in situ and to evaluate the efficacy of various chlorine dioxide and hypochlorite sanitizing regimes on Alicyclobacillus spp. spores on stainless steel, wood, and rubber conveyor material. Five or two log CFU/ml spore concentrations were left in aqueous solution or inoculated onto stainless steel, rubber, or wood coupons and challenged with sanitizer for varied time intervals. After treatment, the coupons were placed in sterile sample bags, massaged with neutralizing buffer, and enumerated on Ali agar. Surfaces were also examined before and after treatment by scanning electron microscopy to confirm destruction or removal of the spores. For both five and two log CFU/ml spore concentrations, treatments of 50 and 100 ppm of chlorine dioxide and 1000 and 2000 ppm of hypochlorite, respectively, were the most effective. Of the range of chlorine dioxide concentrations and contact time regimes evaluated for all surfaces, the most effective concentration/time regime applied was 100 ppm for 10 min. Reductions ranged from 0 to 4.5 log CFU/coupon. Chlorine dioxide was least effective when applied to wood. Hypochlorite was not efficient at eliminating Alicyclobacillus spores from any of the food contact surfaces at any time and concentration combinations tested. Chlorine dioxide is an alternative treatment to kill spores of Alicyclobacillus spp. in the processing environment.

  7. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Disinfection Profile § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If...

  8. Antipollution system to remove nitrogen dioxide gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, A. J.; Slough, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Gas phase reaction system using anhydrous ammonia removes nitrogen dioxide. System consists of ammonia injection and mixing section, reaction section /reactor/, and scrubber section. All sections are contained in system ducting.

  9. Chlorine Dioxide Disinfection in the Use of Individual Water Purification Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    successfully meet the EPA Guide’s minimum performance standards. General Chlorine dioxide ( ClO2 ) was discovered in 1811 (reference 2). It’s widely...reference 3). However, chlorine dioxide is an oxidant and reactions with organic matter form inorganic DBPs including primarily chlorite ion ( ClO2 ...8 containing organic matter is suggested to be (reference 6): ClO2 + e- → ClO2 - ClO2 - + H+ ↔ HClO2 (chlorous acid) 4HClO2 → 2ClO2 + H+ + Cl

  10. Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite in Water Supply Systems by Verified Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáčová, Jana; Božíková, Jarmila

    2014-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the development and optimization of appropriate analytical methods for the determination of chlorine dioxide and chlorite in drinking water in order to obtain accurate and correct results in the quality control of drinking water. The work deals with the development and optimization of a method for the determination of chlorine dioxide using chlorophenol red. Furthermore, a new spectrophotometric method for the determination of chlorite via bromometry using methyl orange was developed, optimized and validated. An electrochemical method for the determination of chlorite by flow coulometry was also developed, optimized and validated.

  11. [Chlorine dioxide as an agent for optimization of drinking water preparation].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Petrenko, N F; Mokienko, A V; Gozhenko, A I

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with the important urgent problem in the provision of epidemiological drinking water. It considers the chemical, biological, toxicological, technological, environmental, and economic aspects of the use of chlorine dioxide as a highly effective disinfecting and oxidizing agent in water purification and decontamination processes. The authors present the results of their own studies. They conclude that chlorine dioxide is an epidemiologically, ecologically, and toxicologically safe and technologically adequate and economically acceptable agent for water treatment in the domestic water supply systems of localities.

  12. Effect of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on the dissolution of human pulp tissue – An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Ramen; Kar, S.K.; Ather, Amber; Limaye, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Organic tissue dissolution is an important property of an irrigant which aids in the success of root canal treatment. Recent studies have advocated the use of Chlorine dioxide as an endodontic irrigant. The aim of this study is to compare the dissolution efficacy of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite on human pulp tissue. Methods In this study, 2% Sodium hypochlorite, 5% Chlorine dioxide and isotonic saline solution (control) were used. Thirty human pulp tissue specimens were exposed to three test solutions (n = 10) for 30 min following which the loss of weight was compared from the original weight by using a digital analytical balance. Results Sodium hypochlorite was more efficient in dissolving human pulp tissue when compared to Chlorine dioxide. Isotonic saline solution failed to dissolve any of the specimens. Conclusion 5% Chlorine dioxide is capable of dissolving human pulp tissue but sodium hypochlorite was more effective. PMID:24532904

  13. Molecular size distribution of dissolved organic matter in water of the Pearl River and trihalomethane formation characteristics with chlorine and chlorine dioxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen-Ye; Gu, Ji-Dong; Fan, Xiao-Jun; Li, Hai-Bo

    2006-06-30

    River water sample was collected from Guangzhou section of the Pearl River to investigate soluble organic fractions and formation of trihalomethane (THMs) after chlorine and chlorine dioxide treatments. The water sample was passed through Amicon YC-05, YM-1, YM-3, YM-10, YM-30, YM-100 and ZM-500 series membranes after a pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and the specific ultra-violet absorbance (SUVA(254)) of each fraction obtained from membrane were analyzed, and these fractions were further disinfected with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The results showed that reverse osmosis (RO) fraction contained mainly dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the water sample, suggesting that the water has been highly contaminated by anthropogenic activities. Meanwhile, the THMs concentration and SUVA(254) increased gradually as the molecular weight of the obtained fractions reduced, indicating that the low molecular weight DOM was the major THMs precursor in the disinfection process with chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The results suggest that THMs in source water of Pearl River could be effectively reduced when pollution of human activity is greatly controlled. Between the two disinfection processes tested, chlorine dioxide produced less THMs than chlorine in this study.

  14. Highly enantioselective alpha-chlorination of cyclic beta-ketoesters catalyzed by N,N'-dioxide using NCS as the chlorine source.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunfei; Wang, Wentao; Shen, Ke; Wang, Jun; Hu, Xiaolei; Lin, Lili; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2010-02-28

    A simple and highly efficient N,N'-dioxide organocatalyst system was developed for the asymmetric alpha-chlorination of cyclic beta-ketoesters using easily available NCS as the chlorine source to provide a series of optically active alpha-chloro-beta-ketoesters in excellent yields with 90-98% ee.

  15. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes. PMID:7151762

  16. USING REDUCING AGENTS TO ELIMINATE CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ION RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to determine the viability of various disinfection alternatives, the Evansville, Ind. Water and Sewer Utility is engaged in a pilot-plant investigation to compare chlorine dioxide and ozone pretreatment. As a result of increased speculation that the total residual c...

  17. USING REDUCING AGENTS TO ELIMINATE CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ION RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to determine the viability of various disinfection alternatives, the Evansville, Ind. Water and Sewer Utility is engaged in a pilot-plant investigation to compare chlorine dioxide and ozone pretreatment. As a result of increased speculation that the total residual c...

  18. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    PubMed

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  19. Application of chlorine dioxide to lessen bacterial contamination during broiler defeathering

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to escape of contaminated gut contents, the number of Campylobacter spp. recovered from broiler carcasses increases during feather removal. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is approved for use as an antimicrobial treatment during poultry processing. A study was designed to test if application of 50 ppm...

  20. New packaging design for fresh produce with effective distribution of antimicrobial gaseous chlorine dioxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the last decade, the potential use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as an antimicrobial agent for vapor-phase decontamination to extend the shelf-life of fresh produce has been widely studied. Most of the works focused on the dose of gaseous ClO2 for particular food product and/or specific microorganis...

  1. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW USING CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a state-of-the-art review of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) used for high-rate disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO). The review includes bench-, pilot-, and fullscale studies on the use of ClO2 as a disinfecting agent for a variety of wastewaters. Specific ...

  2. A quantitative study on the absorption of gaseous chlorine dioxide onto lettuce leaf

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an effective surface disinfectant and it is gaining interest in the food and pharmaceutical industries, due to its bacteriocide effects. One of the most promising applications of gaseous ClO2 is to be included in the headspace of food packaging systems for vapor-phase deco...

  3. Introducing Students to a Synthetic and Spectroscopic Study of the Free Radical Chlorine Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Sarah C.; Cleland, Walter E.; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2017-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate chemistry laboratory exercise takes advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of the free radical chlorine dioxide to allow for a direct comparison of its symmetric stretch in both the ground and excited states. It incorporates several subject areas covered in an undergraduate chemistry degree (synthesis,…

  4. Development of chlorine dioxide releasing film and its application in decontaminating fresh produce

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A feasibility study was conducted to develop chlorine dioxide releasing packaging films for decontaminating fresh produce. Sodium chlorite and citric acid powder were incorporated into polylactic acid (PLA) polymer. Films made with different amount of PLA (100 & 300 mg), percentage of reactant (5-60...

  5. The organic precursors affecting the formation of disinfection by-products with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chang, C Y; Hsieh, Y H; Lin, Y M; Hu, P Y; Liu, C C; Wang, K H

    2001-08-01

    The object of this research was to study the formation of disinfection by-products by using chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as a disinfectant reacting with different properties of organic substance in natural aquatic environment. The adsorbent resin (XAD-4, XAD-7) was used to divide the organic matters in raw water into three groups. The influence of the function groups on structure, reaction tendency, and formation of disinfection by-products generated by the reaction of these organic substances with chlorine dioxide was explored. The experimental results show that the three different organic groups formed using adsorbent resin were hydrophobic substance, hydrophilic acid, and non-acid hydrophilics in proportions of 43%, 41%, and 16%, respectively. Within the raw water in our study, the hydrophilic substance had a higher distribution proportion than that described in general articles and journals, which indicates that this water was contaminated with pollution from human beings. The exploration of the reactivity of the three different organic substances with chlorine dioxide shows that the unit consumption of disinfection agent per unit organic matters (represented by ClO2/DOC) is in the following sequence hydrophobic substance > hydrophilic substance > non-acid hydrophilics. It indicated that larger molecular organic precursors had larger consumption of disinfectant. We also discovered that after the reaction of the three different organic substances with chlorine dioxide, the largest amount of disinfection by-products were generated by the non-acid hydrophilics.

  6. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW USING CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a state-of-the-art review of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) used for high-rate disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO). The review includes bench-, pilot-, and fullscale studies on the use of ClO2 as a disinfecting agent for a variety of wastewaters. Specific ...

  7. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management.

  8. Effectiveness of a high purity chlorine dioxide solution in eliminating intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Herczegh, Anna; Ghidan, Agoston; Friedreich, Dóra; Gyurkovics, Milán; Bendő, Zsolt; Lohinai, Zsolt

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) solution in comparison to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) in the elimination of intracanal Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. Extracted human teeth were inoculated with E. faecalis. After preparation the canals were irrigated with ClO2, NaOCl, CHX or physiologic saline for control. Two and five days later bacterial samples were collected and streaked onto Columbia agar. CFU/mL were counted. The canal walls were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gas phase was investigated in an upside down Petri dish where E. faecalis was inoculated onto blood agar. The irrigants were placed on absorbent paper into the cover. Bacteria were detectable in the control group, but not in any of the irrigants groups. There was a massive reinfection 2 or 5 days after irrigation in the control group. The lowest reinfection was found after the ClO2 treatment. These findings were confirmed by SEM images. We observed an antibacterial effect of ClO2 and NaOCl gas phases on E. faecalis growth, but not of CHX. ClO2 eliminates intracanal biofilm and keeps canal nearly free from bacteria. We suggest the use of high purity ClO2 as a root canal irrigant in clinical practice.

  9. Direct effect of chlorine dioxide, zinc chloride and chlorhexidine solution on the gaseous volatile sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Sik; Park, Ji-Woon; Kim, Dae-Jung; Kim, Young-Ku; Lee, Jeong-Yun

    2014-11-01

    This study focused on the ability of aqueous anti-volatile-sulfur-compound (VSC) solutions to eliminate gaseous VSCs by direct contact in a sealed space to describe possible mode of action of anti-VSC agents. Twenty milliliters of each experimental solution, 0.16% sodium chlorite, 0.25% zinc chloride, 0.1% chlorhexidine and distilled water, was injected into a Teflon bag containing mixed VSCs, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide and mixed vigorously for 30 s. The VSC concentration was measured by gas chromatography before, immediately after, 30 min and 60 min after mixing. The sodium chlorite solution reduced the VSC concentration remarkably. After mixing, nearly all VSCs were eliminated immediately and no VSCs were detected at 30 and 60 min post-mixing. However, in the other solutions, the VSC concentration decreased by ∼30% immediately after mixing and there was no further decrease. The results suggest that sodium chlorite solution has the effect of eliminating gaseous VSCs directly. This must be because it can release chlorine dioxide gas which can react directly with gaseous VSCs. In the case of other solutions that have been proved to be effective to reduce halitosis clinically, it can be proposed that their anti-VSC effect is less likely due to the direct chemical elimination of gaseous VSCs in the mouth.

  10. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon dioxide...

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of styrene epoxidation by chlorite: role of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Jessica K; Rajput, Jonathan; Richardson, David E

    2014-07-07

    An investigation of the kinetics and mechanism for epoxidation of styrene and para-substituted styrenes by chlorite at 25 °C in the pH range of 5-6 is described. The proposed mechanism in water and water/acetonitrile includes seven oxidation states of chlorine (-I, 0, I, II, III, IV, and V) to account for the observed kinetics and product distributions. The model provides an unusually detailed quantitative mechanism for the complex reactions that occur in mixtures of chlorine species and organic substrates, particularly when the strong oxidant chlorite is employed. Kinetic control of the reaction is achieved by the addition of chlorine dioxide to the reaction mixture, thereby eliminating a substantial induction period observed when chlorite is used alone. The epoxidation agent is identified as chlorine dioxide, which is continually formed by the reaction of chlorite with hypochlorous acid that results from ClO produced by the epoxidation reaction. The overall stoichiometry is the result of two competing chain reactions in which the reactive intermediate ClO reacts with either chlorine dioxide or chlorite ion to produce hypochlorous acid and chlorate or chloride, respectively. At high chlorite ion concentrations, HOCl is rapidly eliminated by reaction with chlorite, minimizing side reactions between HOCl and Cl2 with the starting material. Epoxide selectivity (>90% under optimal conditions) is accurately predicted by the kinetic model. The model rate constant for direct reaction of styrene with ClO2(aq) to produce epoxide is (1.16 ± 0.07) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) for 60:40 water/acetonitrile with 0.20 M acetate buffer. Rate constants for para substituted styrenes (R = -SO3(-), -OMe, -Me, -Cl, -H, and -NO2) with ClO2 were determined. The results support the radical addition/elimination mechanism originally proposed by Kolar and Lindgren to account for the formation of styrene oxide in the reaction of styrene with chlorine dioxide.

  16. Examination of the potential of chlorine dioxide for use in zebra mussel veliger control

    SciTech Connect

    Rusznak, L.; Smolik, N.; Hale, L.; Freymark, S.

    1995-06-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel) veligers were treated with various concentrations of chlorine dioxide and exposed at several time intervals to determine the effectiveness of this oxidant as a veliger control agent. The direction of this testing was based on previous studies which determined the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide as a molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control. Zebra mussel veligers were collected from the Niagara River shoreline at an untreated site and tested using filtered river water from the same source. All testing was conducted on site at an industrial plant in order to insure the integrity of veligers collected for this study. The plankton wheel method was used to examine the effects of chlorine dioxide. This methodology involves intense microscopic examination of the test organism prior to and after chemical exposure todeterminen molluscicidal efficacy. Veliger mortality was determined based on observations of veliger movement. Typical criteria for the determination of mortality was expanded to include four categories; veliger actively swimming, internal musculature movement, no internal musculature movement observed, however not necessarily indicating a mortality and obviously a mortality. The treatment levels ranged from 0.75 ppm - 2.0 ppm which are considered to simulate treatment levels in actual applications. Mortality levels ranged on average from 16%-42% based on 30 minute or 60 minute exposure times. The determination exposure time was based on water flow time intervals in actural applications. Sodium hypochlorite was also evaluated in order to compare the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide against this known veliger control agent. Testing resulted in chlorine dioxide providing significantly better veliger control than sodium hypochlorite under similar conditions.

  17. Formation of disinfection byproducts upon chlorine dioxide preoxidation followed by chlorination or chloramination of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Lee, Wontae

    2013-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is often used as an oxidant to remove taste, odor and color during water treatment. Due to the concerns of the chlorite formation, chlorination or chloramination is often applied after ClO2 preoxidation. We investigated the formation of regulated and emerging disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in sequential ClO2-chlorination and ClO2-chloramination processes. To clarify the relationship between the formation of DBPs and the characteristics of natural organic matter (NOM), changes in the properties of NOM before and after ClO2 oxidation were characterized by fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and size and resin fractionation techniques. ClO2 preoxidation destroyed the aromatic and conjugated structures of NOM and transformed large aromatic and long aliphatic chain organics to small and hydrophilic organics. Treatment with ClO2 alone did not produce significant amount of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), but produced chlorite. ClO2 preoxidation reduced THMs, HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs) and chloral hydrate (CH) during subsequent chlorination, but no reduction of THMs was observed during chloramination. Increasing ClO2 doses enhanced the reduction of most DBPs except halonitromethanes (HNMs) and haloketones (HKs). The presence of bromide increased the formation of total amount of DBPs and also shifted DBPs to more brominated ones. Bromine incorporation was higher in ClO2 treated samples. The results indicated that ClO2 preoxidation prior to chlorination is applicable for control of THM, HAA and HAN in both pristine and polluted waters, but chlorite formation is a concern and HNMs and HKs are not effectively controlled by ClO2 preoxidation.

  18. Chlorine dioxide disinfection of single and dual species biofilms, detached biofilm and planktonic cells.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Sabrina; Camper, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection efficacy testing is usually done with planktonic cells or more recently, biofilms. While disinfectants are much less effective against biofilms compared to planktonic cells, questions regarding the disinfection tolerance of detached biofilm clusters remain largely unanswered. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in chemostats and biofilm tubing reactors, with the tubing reactor serving as a source of detached biofilm clusters. Chlorine dioxide susceptibility was assessed for B. cepacia and P. aeruginosa in these three sample types as monocultures and binary cultures. Similar doses of chlorine dioxide inactivated samples of chemostat and tubing reactor effluent and no statistically significant difference between the log(10) reductions was found. This contrasts with chlorine, shown previously to be generally less effective against detached biofilm particles. Biofilms were more tolerant and required chlorine dioxide doses ten times higher than chemostat and tubing reactor effluent samples. A second species was advantageous in all sample types and resulted in lower log(10) reductions when compared to the single species cultures, suggesting a beneficial interaction of the species.

  19. Photoelectrocatalytic production of active chlorine on nanocrystalline titanium dioxide thin-film electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice B; Sene, Jeosadaque J; Selcuk, Huseyin; Anderson, Marc A

    2004-06-01

    The production of chlorine and hypochlorite is of great economical and technological interest due to their large-scale use in many kinds of commercial applications. Yet, the current processes are not without problems such as inevitable side reactions and the high cost of production. This work reports the photoelectrocatalytic oxidation of chloride ions to free chlorine as it has been investigated by using titanium dioxide (TiO2) and several metal-doped titanium dioxide (M-TiO2) material electrodes. An average concentration of 800 mg L(-1) of free chlorine was obtained in an open-air reactor using a TiO2 thin-film electrode biased at +1.0 V (SCE) and illuminated by UV light. The M-doped electrodes have performed poorly compared with the pure TiO2 counterpart. Test solutions containing 0.05 mol L(-1) NaCl pH 2.0-4.0 were found to be the best conditions for fast production of free chlorine. A complete investigation of all parameters that influence the global process of chlorine production by the photo electrocatalytic method such as applied potential, concentration of NaCl, pH solution, and time is presented in detail. In addition, photocurrent vs potential curves and the reaction order are also discussed.

  20. [Adsorption of carbon dioxide gas].

    PubMed

    Juniot, A; Seltzer, S; Louvier, N; Milesi-Defrance, N; Cros-Terraux, N

    1999-03-01

    To analyse the various methods for carbon dioxide absorption in anaesthesia, the available absorbents and their modes of use. We searched the Medline and Internet databases for papers using the key words: carbon dioxide absorption, soda-lime, zeolite. We also had correspondence and contacts with soda lime manufacturers. All types of articles containing data on CO2 absorption. The articles were analysed for the benefits and adverse effects of the various absorbents. Carbon dioxide absorption enables the use of low flow anaesthesia, and a decreased consumption of medical gases and halogenated anaesthetics, as well as reduced pollution. Chemical absorbents (soda-lime and barium hydroxide lime (Baralyme) may produce toxic compounds: carbon monoxide with all halogenated anaesthetics and compound A with sevoflurane. Simple measures against desiccation of the lime prevent carbon monoxide production. The toxicity of compound A, shown in the rat, has not been proven in clinical anaesthesia. Recent improvements in manufacture processes have decreased the powdering of lime. Moreover, filters inserted between the anaesthesia circuit and the patient abolish the risk for powder inhalation.

  1. Effect of hot acid hydrolysis and hot chlorine dioxide stage on bleaching effluent biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Gomes, C M; Colodette, J L; Delantonio, N R N; Mounteer, A H; Silva, C M

    2007-01-01

    The hot acid hydrolysis followed by chlorine dioxide (A/D*) and hot chlorine dioxide (D*) technologies have proven very useful for bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulp. Although the characteristics and biodegradability of effluents from conventional chlorine dioxide bleaching are well known, such information is not yet available for effluents derived from hot acid hydrolysis and hot chorine dioxide bleaching. This study discusses the characteristics and biodegradability of such effluents. Combined whole effluents from the complete sequences DEpD, D*EpD, A/D*EpD and ADEpD, and from the pre-bleaching sequences DEp, D*Ep, A/D*Ep and ADEp were characterized by quantifying their colour, AOX and organic load (BOD, COD, TOC). These effluents were also evaluated for their treatability by simulation of an activated sludge system. It was concluded that treatment in the laboratory sequencing batch reactor was efficient for removal of COD, BOD and TOC of all effluents. However, colour increased after biological treatment, with the greatest increase found for the effluent produced using the AD technology. Biological treatment was less efficient at removing AOX of effluents from the sequences with D*, A/D* and AD as the first stages, when compared to the reference D stage; there was evidence of the lower treatability of these organochlorine compounds from these sequences.

  2. Role of Chlorine Dioxide in N-Nitrosodimethylamine Formation from Oxidation of Model Amines.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wenhui; Bond, Tom; Yang, Xin; Westerhoff, Paul

    2015-10-06

    N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging disinfection byproduct, and we show that use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has the potential to increase NDMA formation in waters containing precursors with hydrazine moieties. NDMA formation was measured after oxidation of 13 amines by monochloramine and ClO2 and pretreatment with ClO2 followed by postmonochloramination. Daminozide, a plant growth regulator, was found to yield 5.01 ± 0.96% NDMA upon reaction with ClO2, although no NDMA was recorded during chloramination. The reaction rate was estimated to be ∼0.0085 s(-1), and on the basis of our identification by mass spectrometry of the intermediates, the reaction likely proceeds via the hydrolytic release of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), with the hydrazine structure a key intermediate in NDMA formation. The presence of UDMH was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. For 10 of the 13 compounds, ClO2 preoxidation reduced NDMA yields compared with monochloramination alone, which is explained by our measured release of dimethylamine. This work shows potential preoxidation strategies to control NDMA formation may not impact all organic precursors uniformly, so differences might be source specific depending upon the occurrence of different precursors in source waters. For example, daminozide is a plant regulator, so drinking water that is heavily influenced by upstream agricultural runoff could be at risk.

  3. Investigating the phase-dependent photochemical reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Sophia C.; Wallace, Paul M.; Bolinger, Josh C.; Reid, Philip J.

    Recent progress in understanding the phase-dependent reactivity demonstrated by halooxides is outlined. Specifically, resonance Raman intensity analysis (RRIA) and time-resolved resonance Raman (TRRR) studies of chlorine dioxide (OClO) photochemistry in solution are presented. Using RRIA, it has been determined that the excited-state structural evolution that occurs along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate in the gas phase is restricted in solution. The absence of evolution along this coordinate results in the preservation of groundstate symmetry in the excited state. The role of symmetry in defining the reaction coordinate and the solvent-solute interactions responsible for modification of the excited-state potential energy surface are discussed. TRRR studies are presented which demonstrate that geminate recombination of the primary photoproducts resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is a central feature of OClO photochemistry in solution. These studies also demonstrate that a fraction of photoexcited OClO undergoes photoisomerization to form ClOO, with the ground-state thermal decomposition of this species resulting in Cl production on the subnanosecond timescale. Finally, time-resolved anti-Stokes experiments are presented which demonstrate that the OClO vibrational-relaxation dynamics are solvent dependent. The current picture of OClO photochemistry derived from these studies is discussed, and future directions for study are outlined.

  4. Dissection of the mechanism of manganese porphyrin-catalyzed chlorine dioxide generation.

    PubMed

    Umile, Thomas P; Wang, Dong; Groves, John T

    2011-10-17

    Chlorine dioxide, an industrially important biocide and bleach, is produced rapidly and efficiently from chlorite ion in the presence of water-soluble, manganese porphyrins and porphyrazines at neutral pH under mild conditions. The electron-deficient manganese(III) tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)imidazolium porphyrin (MnTDMImP), tetra-(N,N-dimethyl)benzimidazolium (MnTDMBImP) porphyrin, and manganese(III) tetra-N-methyl-2,3-pyridinoporphyrazine (MnTM23PyPz) were found to be the most efficient catalysts for this process. The more typical manganese tetra-4-N-methylpyridiumporphyrin (Mn-4-TMPyP) was much less effective. Rates for the best catalysts were in the range of 0.24-32 TO/s with MnTM23PyPz being the fastest. The kinetics of reactions of the various ClO(x) species (e.g., chlorite ion, hypochlorous acid, and chlorine dioxide) with authentic oxomanganese(IV) and dioxomanganese(V)MnTDMImP intermediates were studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. Rate-limiting oxidation of the manganese(III) catalyst by chlorite ion via oxygen atom transfer is proposed to afford a trans-dioxomanganese(V) intermediate. Both trans-dioxomanganese(V)TDMImP and oxoaqua-manganese(IV)TDMImP oxidize chlorite ion by 1-electron, generating the product chlorine dioxide with bimolecular rate constants of 6.30 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) and 3.13 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, at pH 6.8. Chlorine dioxide was able to oxidize manganese(III)TDMImP to oxomanganese(IV) at a similar rate, establishing a redox steady-state equilibrium under turnover conditions. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced during turnover was found to rapidly and reversibly react with manganese(III)TDMImP to give dioxoMn(V)TDMImP and chloride ion. The measured equilibrium constant for this reaction (K(eq) = 2.2 at pH 5.1) afforded a value for the oxoMn(V)/Mn(III) redox couple under catalytic conditions (E' = 1.35 V vs NHE). In subsequent processes, chlorine dioxide reacts with both oxomanganese(V) and oxomanganese(IV)TDMImP to afford chlorate

  5. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  6. 367-nm photochemistry of chlorine dioxide in and on amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. D.; Roberts, Jeffrey T.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    1998-04-01

    The 367 nm photochemistry of chlorine dioxide, OClO, in and on thin films of amorphous ice at T equals 100 K has been investigated. Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the photoproducts formed in and on amorphous ice films upon 367 nm irradiation. Under dilute conditions, 367 nm irradiation of OClO in amorphous ice results in the formation of the isomer, chlorine superoxide, ClOO. Under more concentrated conditions, in which OClO clusters are presented, 367 nm irradiation OClO results in an additional photoproduct chloryl chloride, Cl-ClO2. Irradiation of OClO adsorbed on ice results in the formation of a single chlorine-containing photoproduct identified as Cl-ClO2. Similarities in the photoreactivity of concentrated amorphous ice films containing OClO clusters and OClO adsorbed on ice suggest that OClO clusters may play a role in ice surface photochemistry.

  7. Detection of chlorinated methanes by tin oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Son, Y C; Shaw, B R; Creasy, K E; Suib, S L

    2001-08-01

    Tin oxide thin films prepared by thermal oxidation of Sn films were used for the detection of chlorinated methanes (CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CCl4). This resulted in better chemical selectivity, sensitivity, response speed and detection limit than seen with previous detectors. The temperature dependence of the sensing of 1% CCl4 gas was studied and the best sensing behavior was observed at 300 degrees C. The films showed different chemical selectivity in both speed and direction of sensing response to each gas and were stable for more than 3 weeks under operating conditions. The films showed rapid gas sensing (<40 s to reach 90% of full response) and low detection limits (< 4 ppm CCl4). The role of oxygen in the detection of chlorinated methanes and in resistance changes without chlorinated methanes was also studied. The changes at the surface of the film after gas sensing were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry.

  8. The use of chlorine dioxide for zebra mussel control - A perspective of treatment histories

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, N.; Rusznak, L.; Anderson, J.; Hale, L.

    1995-06-01

    It is of utmost importance to provide updated performance results of various chemical treatments presently being utilized for zebra mussel control. Zebra mussels have a distinctive ability to endure environmental changes by reproducing effectively and attaching to various hard surfaces. These traits are cause for concern and have resulted in some operating difficulties for industries bordering infested waterways. Various methods are being employed by industries to deal with the problems associated with these species. One of the options is control via chemical treatment. Prior field test studies showed that chlorine dioxide was determined to be an effective molluscicidal agent for adult zebra mussel eradication. Continuous feed of chlorine dioxide at treatment levels ranging from 0.25 - 5.0 ppm above the oxidant demand provided 100% adult zebra mussel mortality which required between 2.9 - 8.8 days of treatment. Previous studies also showed that water temperature was an essential parameter in determining the time required to achieve 100% mortality of adult zebra mussels. Further field applications were undertaken at three electric utility sites located in the midwest. These facilities were concerned with the potential for zebra mussels to reduce efficiency and availability by blocking water flow or plugging equipment. Treatment applications at these facilities consisted of a continuous feed of chlorine dioxide ranging from 0.15 - 0.5 ppm above the oxidant demand. Significant mortality was achieved in monitored mussels tested at each utility in a period ranging from two to four days. This time period was directly related to a number of parameters, with the predominant one being water temperature. Data from these field applications is presented in this paper and confirms that chlorine dioxide is an effective molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control.

  9. Temperature dependence and mechanism of the reaction between O(3P) and chlorine dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Sander, S. P.; Fiedl, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order rate constants for the decay of O(3P) in excess chlorine dioxide, k(II), were measured as a function of total pressure (20-600 Torr argon) and temperature (248-312 K), using flash photolysis-atomic resonance fluorescence. Results indicate that k(II) is pressure dependent with a value, K(b), that is nonzero at zero pressure, and both the third-order rate constant and k(b) have negative temperature dependences.

  10. Experimental Evidence of Localized Oscillations in the Photosensitive Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Míguez, David G.; Alonso, Sergio; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Sagués, Francesc

    2006-10-01

    The interaction between Hopf and Turing modes has been the subject of active research in recent years. We present here experimental evidence of the existence of mixed Turing-Hopf modes in a two-dimensional system. Using the photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction (CDIMA) and external constant background illumination as a control parameter, standing spots oscillating in amplitude and with hexagonal ordering were observed. Numerical simulations in the Lengyel-Epstein model for the CDIMA reaction confirmed the results.

  11. Toxicological effects of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate.

    PubMed Central

    Couri, D; Abdel-Rahman, M S; Bull, R J

    1982-01-01

    Review of the available literature obtained from both acute and chronic experiments utilizing rats, mice and chickens treated with ClO2, ClO2- and ClO3-in drinking water has demonstrated alterations in hematologic parameters in all species tested. The effects were usually dose related and marked changes occurred only at the higher dosages (up to 1000 mg/l.). In chronic studies, rats have been given ClO2 at doses of up to 1000 mg/l., and NaClO2 or NaClO3 at up to 100 mg/l., in their drinking water for one year. Treatment groups receiving ClO2, ClO2- or ClO3- showed alterations in erythrocyte morphology and osmotic fragility; at higher dosages mild hemolytic anemia occurred. An examination of blood glutathione content and RBC enzymes involving glutathione formation showed a dose-related diminution of glutathione in chlorine compound treated groups. The higher oxidative capacity of the chlorine compounds resulting in the decreased erythrocytic glutathione might well be the principal biochemical event leading to the other hematological alterations. More recent data show that ClO2, ClO2- and ClO3- alter the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into the nuclei of various organs of the rat. These data suggest the possibility of increased turnover cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa and inhibited DNA synthesis in several organs. In the latter category, most concern revolves around whether or not the apparent depression of DNA synthesis in the testes is associated with depressed spermatogenesis and reproductive toxicity in the male rat. PMID:6759107

  12. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  13. Chlorine Dioxide for Reduction of Postharvest Pathogen Inoculum during Handling of Tree Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rodney G.; Reymond, Stephen T.

    1994-01-01

    Alternatives to hypochlorous acid and fungicides are needed for treatment of fruit and fruit-handling facilities. Chlorine dioxide was evaluated and found effective against common postharvest decay fungi and against filamentous fungi occurring on fruit packinghouse surfaces. In vitro tests with conidial or sporangiospore suspensions of Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum, Mucor piriformis, and Cryptosporiopsis perennans demonstrated >99% spore mortality within 1 min when the fungi were exposed to aqueous chlorine dioxide at 3 or 5 μg · ml-1. Longer exposure times were necessary to achieve similar spore mortalities with 1 μg · ml-1. Of the fungi tested, B. cinerea and P. expansum were the least sensitive to ClO2. In comparison with the number recovered from untreated control areas, the number of filamentous fungi recovered was significantly lower in swipe tests from hard surfaces such as belts and pads in a commercial apple and pear packinghouse after treatment of surfaces with a 14.0- to 18.0-μg · ml-1 ClO2 foam formulation. Chlorine dioxide has desirable properties as a sanitizing agent for postharvest decay management when residues of postharvest fungicides are not desired or allowed. PMID:16349354

  14. Kinetics of membrane damage to high (HNA) and low (LNA) nucleic acid bacterial clusters in drinking water by ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ferrate(VI), and permanganate.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, Maaike K; von Gunten, Urs; Freihofer, Pietro; Hammes, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Drinking water was treated with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, ferrate(VI), and permanganate to investigate the kinetics of membrane damage of native drinking water bacterial cells. Membrane damage was measured by flow cytometry using a combination of SYBR Green I and propidium iodide (SGI+PI) staining as indicator for cells with permeabilized membranes and SGI alone to measure total cell concentration. SGI+PI staining revealed that the cells were permeabilized upon relatively low oxidant exposures of all tested oxidants without a detectable lag phase. However, only ozonation resulted in a decrease of the total cell concentrations for the investigated reaction times. Rate constants for the membrane damage reaction varied over seven orders of magnitude in the following order: ozone > chlorine > chlorine dioxide ≈ ferrate > permanganate > chloramine. The rate constants were compared to literature data and were in general smaller than previously measured rate constants. This confirmed that membrane integrity is a conservative and therefore safe parameter for disinfection control. Interestingly, the cell membranes of high nucleic acid (HNA) content bacteria were damaged much faster than those of low nucleic acid (LNA) content bacteria during treatment with chlorine dioxide and permanganate. However, only small differences were observed during treatment with chlorine and chloramine, and no difference was observed for ferrate treatment. Based on the different reactivity of these oxidants it was suggested that HNA and LNA bacterial cell membranes have a different chemical constitution.

  15. Effectiveness of the sulfur(IV) compound, sodium bisulfite, in reducing chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chlorite toxicity to Daphnia magna in well water and pond water.

    PubMed

    Yonkos, L T; Fisher, D J; Burton, D T; Whitekettle, W K; Peterille, J C

    2001-03-01

    Flow-through toxicity tests were conducted with Daphnia magna to determine the residual toxicity of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chlorite after treatment with the sulfur(IV) compound sodium bisulfite. Daphnids were exposed separately to 0.5-mg/L concentrations of each of the three compounds without the addition of sodium bisulfite, with a low stoichiometric dose of sodium bisulfite, and with a high stoichiometric dose of sodium bisulfite. Tests were performed in well water with a low total organic carbon (TOC) content and pond water with a high TOC content. Analysis of results indicated that sodium bisulfite did not eliminate the toxicity of chlorine dioxide or chlorite to D. magna. Total residual oxidant (TRO) concentrations were reduced and survival times were extended, but acute toxicity persisted even with a S(IV) concentration 10.0 times the stoichiometric ratio of oxidant. Mortality occurred in chlorine dioxide treatments in which no TRO was detected, indicating that standard analytical (amperometric) techniques may be inadequate to detect toxicity. Sodium bisulfite did succeed in eliminating chlorine toxicity except in pond water receiving a low (3.0x) sodium bisulfite dose. Oxidant reactions with organic substrates may have produced chlorinated residuals that were resistant to S(IV) dechlorination.

  16. Chemical oxidation of dissolved organic matter by chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and ozone: effects on its optical and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jannis; Aeschbacher, Michael; Salhi, Elisabeth; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs; Sander, Michael

    2013-10-01

    In water treatment dissolved organic matter (DOM) is typically the major sink for chemical oxidants. The resulting changes in DOM, such as its optical properties have been measured to follow the oxidation processes. However, such measurements contain only limited information on the changes in the oxidation states of and the reactive moieties in the DOM. In this study, we used mediated electrochemical oxidation to quantify changes in the electron donating capacities (EDCs), and hence the redox states, of three different types of DOM during oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO2), chlorine (as HOCl/OCl(-)), and ozone (O3). Treatment with ClO2 and HOCl resulted in comparable and prominent decreases in EDCs, while the UV light absorbances of the DOM decreased only slightly. Conversely, ozonation resulted in only small decreases of the EDCs but pronounced absorbance losses of the DOM. These results suggest that ClO2 and HOCl primarily reacted as oxidants by accepting electrons from electron-rich phenolic and hydroquinone moieties in the DOM, while O3 reacted via electrophilic addition to aromatic moieties, followed by ring cleavage. This study highlights the potential of combined EDC-UV measurements to monitor chemical oxidation of DOM, to assess the nature of the reactive moieties and to study the underlying reaction pathways.

  17. Chlorine gas sensors using one-dimensional tellurium nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shashwati; Sharma, Madhvi; Kumar, Vivek; Muthe, K P; Satyam, P V; Bhatta, Umananda M; Roy, M; Gaur, N K; Gupta, S K; Yakhmi, J V

    2009-03-15

    Tellurium nanotubes have been grown by physical vapor deposition under inert environment at atmospheric pressure as well as under vacuum conditions. Different techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical absorption have been utilized for characterization of grown structures. Films prepared using both types of tellurium nanotubes were characterized for sensitivity to oxidizing and reducing gases and it was found that the relative response to gases depends on the microstructure. Nanotubes prepared at atmospheric pressure (of argon) showed high sensitivity and better selectivity to chlorine gas. Impedance spectroscopy studies showed that the response to chlorine is mainly contributed by grain boundaries and is therefore enhanced for nanotubes prepared under argon atmosphere.

  18. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to report the course of an accidental release of chlorine gas that occurred in a factory in Gumi-si, South Korea, on March 5, 2013. We describe the analysis results of 2 patients hospitalized because of chlorine-induced acute health problems, as well as the clinical features of 209 non-hospitalized patients. Methods We analyzed the medical records of the 2 hospitalized patients admitted to the hospital, as well as the medical records and self-report questionnaires of 209 non-hospitalized patients completed during outpatient treatment. Results Immediately after the exposure, the 2 hospitalized patients developed acute asthma-like symptoms such as cough and dyspnea, and showed restrictive and combined pattern ventilatory defects on the pulmonary function test. The case 1 showed asthma-like symptoms over six months and diurnal variability in peak expiratory flow rate was 56.7%. In case 2, his FEV1 after treatment (93%) increased by 25% compared to initial FEV1 (68%). Both cases were diagnosed as chlorine-induced reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) on the basis of these clinical features. The most frequent chief complaints of the 209 non-hospitalized patients were headache (22.7%), followed by eye irritation (18.2%), nausea (11.2%), and sore throat (10.8%), with asymptomatic patients accounting for 36.5%. The multiple-response analysis of individual symptom revealed headache (42.4%) to be the most frequent symptom, followed by eye irritation (30.5%), sore throat (30.0%), cough (29.6%), nausea (27.6%), and dizziness (27.3%). Conclusions The 2 patients hospitalized after exposure to chlorine gas at the leakage site showed a clinical course corresponding to RADS. All of the 209 non-hospitalized patients only complained of symptoms of the upper airways and mucous membrane irritation. PMID:25852940

  19. Nitrite therapy improves survival postexposure to chlorine gas

    PubMed Central

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Steele, Chad; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to relatively high levels of chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur in mass-casualty scenarios associated with accidental or intentional release. Recent studies have shown a significant postexposure injury phase to the airways, pulmonary, and systemic vasculatures mediated in part by oxidative stress, inflammation, and dysfunction in endogenous nitric oxide homeostasis pathways. However, there is a need for therapeutics that are amenable to rapid and easy administration in the field and that display efficacy toward toxicity after chlorine exposure. In this study, we tested whether nitric oxide repletion using nitrite, by intramuscular injection after Cl2 exposure, could prevent Cl2 gas toxicity. C57bl/6 male mice were exposed to 600 parts per million Cl2 gas for 45 min, and 24-h survival was determined with or without postexposure intramuscular nitrite injection. A single injection of nitrite (10 mg/kg) administered either 30 or 60 min postexposure significantly improved 24-h survival (from ∼20% to 50%). Survival was associated with decreased neutrophil accumulation in the airways. Rendering mice neutropenic before Cl2 exposure improved survival and resulted in loss of nitrite-dependent survival protection. Interestingly, female mice were more sensitive to Cl2-induced toxicity compared with males and were also less responsive to postexposure nitrite therapy. These data provide evidence for efficacy and define therapeutic parameters for a single intramuscular injection of nitrite as a therapeutic after Cl2 gas exposure that is amenable to administration in mass-casualty scenarios. PMID:25326579

  20. Determination of chlorate and chlorite and mutagenicity of seafood treated with aqueous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Marshall, M R; Du, W X; Otwell, W S; Wei, C I

    1999-09-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) as a potential substitute for aqueous chlorine to improve the quality of seafood products has not been approved by regulatory agencies due to health concerns related to the production of chlorite (ClO(2)(-)) and chlorate (ClO(3)(-)) as well as possible mutagenic/carcinogenic reaction products. Cubes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and red grouper (Epinephelus morio) were treated with 20 or 200 ppm aqueous chlorine or ClO(2) solutions for 5 min, and extracts of the treated fish cubes and test solutions were checked for mutagenicity using the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. No mutagenic activity was detected in the treated fish samples or test solutions with ClO(2). Only the sample treated with 200 ppm chlorine showed weak mutagenic activity toward S. typhimurium TA 100. No chlorite residue was detected in sea scallops, mahi-mahi, or shrimp treated with ClO(2) at 3.9-34.9 ppm. However, low levels of chlorate residues were detected in some of the treated samples. In most cases, the increase in chlorate in treated seafood was time- and dose-related.

  1. Effects of Chlorine Dioxide on Spore Structural and Fuctional Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    a screw-top flask. A control sample was also prepared consisting of spores exposed to sterile distilled water for 1 hour. Finally, ClO2 ...gas-phase ClO2 concentrations for the duration of the 2 hour exposure time. Spores were then recovered from each sample. Recovery from spore...fluorescence, indicating DNA staining with Syto but not with propidium. Spores treated with NaOCl (Fig. 4), ClO2 (Fig.5), and autoclaving (Fig. 6) all

  2. Thermal electron attachment to chlorinated alkenes in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnorowski, K.; Wnorowska, J.; Michalczuk, B.; Jówko, A.; Barszczewska, W.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of the rate coefficients and the activation energies of the electron capture processes with various chlorinated alkenes. The electron attachment processes in the mixtures of chlorinated alkenes with carbon dioxide have been investigated using a Pulsed Townsend technique. This study has been performed in the temperature range (298-378) K. The obtained rate coefficients more or less depended on temperature in accordance to Arrhenius equation. The activation energies (Ea's) were determined from the fit to the experimental data points with function ln(k) = ln(A) - Ea/kBT. The rate coefficients at 298 K were equal to 1.0 × 10-10 cm3 s-1, 2.2 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, 1.6 × 10-9 cm3 s-1, 4.4 × 10-8 cm3 s-1, 2.9 × 10-12 cm3 s-1 and 7.3 × 10-12 cm3 s-1 and activation energies were: 0.27 eV, 0.26 eV, 0.25 eV, 0.21 eV, 0.55 eV and 0.42 eV, for trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, 2-chloropropene, 3-chloropropene respectively.

  3. Enriching blast furnace gas by removing carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Sun, Zhimin; Chen, Shuwen; Wang, Baohai

    2013-12-01

    Blast furnace gas (BF gas) produced in the iron making process is an essential energy resource for a steel making work. As compared with coke oven gas, the caloric value of BF gas is too low to be used alone as fuel in hot stove because of its high concentrations of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. If the carbon dioxide in BF gas could be captured efficiently, it would meet the increasing need of high caloric BF gas, and develop methods to reusing and/or recycling the separated carbon dioxide further. Focused on this, investigations were done with simple evaluation on possible methods of removing carbon dioxide from BF gas and basic experiments on carbon dioxide capture by chemical absorption. The experimental results showed that in 100 minutes, the maximum absorbed doses of carbon dioxide reached 20 g/100 g with ionic liquid as absorbent.

  4. Controlled clinical evaluations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, J R; Chauan, S; Bianchine, J R

    1982-01-01

    To assess the relative safety of chronically administered chlorine water disinfectants in man, a controlled study was undertaken. The clinical evaluation was conducted in the three phases common to investigational drug studies. Phase I, a rising dose tolerance investigation, examined the acute effects of progressively increasing single doses of chlorine disinfectants to normal healthy adult male volunteers. Phase II considered the impact on normal subjects of daily ingestion of the disinfectants at a concentration of 5 mg/l. for twelve consecutive weeks. Persons with a low level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may be expected to be especially susceptible to oxidative stress; therefore, in Phase III, chlorite at a concentration of 5 mg/l. was administered daily for twelve consecutive weeks to a small group of potentially at-risk glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects. Physiological impact was assessed by evaluation of a battery of qualitative and quantitative tests. The three phases of this controlled double-blind clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide and its potential metabolites in human male volunteer subjects were completed uneventfully. There were no obvious undesirable clinical sequellae noted by any of the participating subjects or by the observing medical team. In several cases, statistically significant trends in certain biochemical or physiological parameters were associated with treatment; however, none of these trends was judged to have physiological consequence. One cannot rule out the possibility that, over a longer treatment period, these trends might indeed achieve proportions of clinical importance. However, by the absence of detrimental physiological responses within the limits of the study, the relative safety of oral ingestion of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite and chlorate, was demonstrated. PMID:6961033

  5. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  6. Breathing spiral waves in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Yang, Lingfa; Dolnik, Milos; Zhabotinsky, Anatol M.; Epstein, Irving R.

    2008-08-01

    Breathing spiral waves are observed in the oscillatory chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system. The breathing develops within established patterns of multiple spiral waves after the concentration of polyvinyl alcohol in the feeding chamber of a continuously fed, unstirred reactor is increased. The breathing period is determined by the period of bulk oscillations in the feeding chamber. Similar behavior is obtained in the Lengyel-Epstein model of this system, where small amplitude parametric forcing of spiral waves near the spiral wave frequency leads to the formation of breathing spiral waves in which the period of breathing is equal to the period of forcing.

  7. Shelf-life extension of minimally processed carrots by gaseous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, V M; Devlieghere, F; Ragaert, P; Debevere, J

    2007-05-10

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas is a strong oxidizing and sanitizing agent that has a broad and high biocidal effectiveness and big penetration ability; its efficacy to prolong the shelf-life of a minimally processed (MP) vegetable, grated carrots (Daucus carota L.), was tested in this study. Carrots were sorted, their ends removed, hand peeled, cut, washed, spin dried and separated in 2 portions, one to be treated with ClO(2) gas and the other to remain untreated for comparisons. MP carrots were decontaminated in a cabinet at 91% relative humidity and 28 degrees C for up to 6 min, including 30 s of ClO(2) injection to the cabinet, then stored under equilibrium modified atmosphere (4.5% O(2), 8.9% CO(2), 86.6% N(2)) at 7 degrees C for shelf-life studies. ClO(2) concentration in the cabinet rose to 1.33 mg/l after 30 s of treatment, and then fell to nil before 6 min. The shelf-life study included: O(2) and CO(2) headspace concentrations, microbiological quality (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts), sensory quality (odour, flavour, texture, overall visual quality, and white blushing), and pH. ClO(2) did not affect respiration rate of MP carrots significantly (alpha< or =0.05), and lowered the pH significantly (alpha< or =0.05). The applied packaging configuration kept O(2) headspace concentrations in treated samples in equilibrium and prevented CO(2) accumulation. After ClO(2) treatment, the decontamination levels (log CFU/g) achieved were 1.88, 1.71, 2.60, and 0.66 for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, and yeasts respectively. The initial sensory quality of MP carrots was not impaired significantly (alpha< or =0.05). A lag phase of at least 2 days was observed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, and lactic acid bacteria in treated samples, while mesophilic aerobic bacteria and psychrotrophs increased parallelly. Odour was the only important attribute in sensory deterioration, but it reached an

  8. Comparative antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solutions evaluated using a novel standardized assay.

    PubMed

    Thorn, R M S; Robinson, G M; Reynolds, D M

    2013-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces.

  9. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  10. Microscale Chemistry in a Plastic Petri Dish: Preparation and Chemical Properties of Chlorine Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Martin M. F.

    2002-08-01

    This experiment demonstrates some of the chemistry of chlorine on a microscale, about the size of a water droplet. Chlorine gas was prepared from an acidified bleach solution in a plastic petri dish. The chlorine gas generated in situ reacted with other chemical reagents in the dish by diffusion. Some of the oxidizing properties and bleaching power of chlorine gas were shown visually and could be observed within 10 minutes. These experiments provide suitable hands-on experience for students at secondary-school level.

  11. [Study on the corn stover lignin oxidized by chlorine dioxide and modified by furfuryl alcohol].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Jin-ping; Yang, Gang; Li, Zuo-hu

    2007-10-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Visible), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) and TG analysis were used to study the oxidation of corn stover lignin by chloride dioxide and subsequently modified by furfuryl alcohol. The results were as following: The selective oxidation of lignin by chlorine dioxide was obtained by spectroscopy study. FTIR showed that the characteristic absorbance peaks of aromatic units were decreased after chloride dioxide oxidation. The increased absorbance for the band around 1720 cm(-1) corresponding to carbonyl stretching was achieved in the oxidized lignin and the lignin modified with furfuryl alcohol. The ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showed that the absorbance around 280 nm was largely reduced after the lignin was oxidized. The 1H NMR spectroscopy also showed the decrease of aromatic units and methoxyl group in the oxidized lignin. All these indicated the formation of muconic acid and ester, or quinone derivatives when the lignin was selectively oxidized by chloride dioxide. The modification by furfuryl alcohol made the oxidized lignin more thermally stable.

  12. Formation of disinfection by-products after pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide or ferrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Feng; Ye, Tingjin; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The effect of pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or ferrate (Fe(VI)) on the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination or chloramination was tested with natural waters from 12 sources (9 surface waters, 1 groundwater, and 2 wastewater effluents). DBPs investigated included trihalomethanes (THM), chloral hydrate (CH), haloketones (HK), haloacetonitriles (HAN) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM), chlorite and chlorate. Chlorite and chlorate were found in the ClO2-treated waters. Application of 1 mg/L ClO2 ahead of chlorination reduced the formation potential for THM by up to 45% and the formation of HK, HAN and TCNM in most of the samples. The CH formation results were mixed. The formation of CH and HK was enhanced with low doses of Fe(VI) (1 mg/L as Fe), but was greatly reduced at higher doses (20 mg/L Fe). Fe(VI) reduced the formation of THM, HAN and TCNM in most of the samples. Reduced potential for the formation of NDMA was observed in most of the samples after both ClO2 and Fe(VI) pre-oxidation.

  13. Susceptibility of chemostat-grown Yersinia enterocolitica and Klebsiella pneumoniae to chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Harakeh, M S; Berg, J D; Hoff, J C; Matin, A

    1985-01-01

    The resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial agents could be influenced by growth environment. The susceptibility of two enteric bacteria, Yersinia enterocolitica and Klebsiella pneumoniae, to chlorine dioxide was investigated. These organisms were grown in a defined medium in a chemostat and the influence of growth rate, temperature, and cell density on the susceptibility was studied. All inactivation experiments were conducted with a dose of 0.25 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter in phosphate-buffered saline at pH 7.0 and 23 degrees C. The results indicated that populations grown under conditions that more closely approximate natural aquatic environments, e.g., low temperatures and growth at submaximal rates caused by nutrient limitation, were most resistant. The conclusion from this study is that antecedent growth conditions have a profound effect on the susceptibility of bacteria to disinfectants, and it is more appropriate to use the chemostat-grown bacteria as test organisms to evaluate the efficacy of a certain disinfectant. PMID:3883899

  14. Characterization of pharmaceuticals and personal care products as N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors during disinfection processes using free chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Li, Yongmei; Song, Yun; Lv, Juan; Yang, Juan

    2014-07-15

    The worldwide detection of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in aquatic environment and drinking water has caused wide concern in recent years. The possibility for concurrent formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during disinfection has become another significant concern for water quality. This study demonstrates that a group of PPCPs containing amine groups can serve as NDMA precursors during free chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2) chlorination processes. Selected PPCPs after screening by NDMA yield were further investigated for NDMA formation conditions. High disinfectant dose and initial PPCP concentration resulted in relatively high NDMA formation potential. Linear kinetic models were developed for NDMA formation during chlorination of selected PPCPs. Although the PPCP precursors were removed significantly during chlorination, they were not completely mineralized based on the total organic carbon (TOC) loss. The existence of another possible pathway for direct formation of NDMA from tertiary amine during chlorination was indicated, in which dimethylamine (DMA) was not involved. It is recommended to control the initial PPCP concentrations prior to disinfection and to shorten the contact time to reduce the NDMA formation. ClO2 is suggested to be a proper disinfectant in order to reduce the NDMA formation.

  15. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  16. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  20. Raman Spectra and Cross Sections of Ammonia, Chlorine, Hydrogen Sulfide, Phosgene, and Sulfur Dioxide Toxic Gases in the Fingerprint Region 400-1400 cm-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    carbon dioxide (CO2) as the reference.7 II. EXPERIMENTAL Figure 1 shows a...nitrogen) was purchased from Cross Company. Carbon dioxide (103 L of 4.97 ppm balance air), chlorine (103 L of 4.60 ppm balance air), phosgene (103 L of...1 Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region

  1. Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400 1400 cm 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-24

    carbon dioxide (CO2) as the reference.7 II. EXPERIMENTAL Figure 1 shows a...nitrogen) was purchased from Cross Company. Carbon dioxide (103 L of 4.97 ppm balance air), chlorine (103 L 3 of 4.60 ppm balance air), phosgene (103...1 Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region

  2. Comparing the efficacy of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum in water from Parana State, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Juliana Tracz; Costa, Adriana Oliveira; de Oliveira Silva, Márcia Benedita; Schuchard, Wagner; Osaki, Silvia Cristina; de Castro, Edilene Alcântara; Paulino, Rosangela Clara; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz

    2008-12-01

    In the present work, assays were performed to compare the efficacy of hypochlorous acid, chlorine dioxide, and ozone in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocyst in public water supply from Brazilian South conditions. Experiments were carried out in samples containing 2 x 10(4) oocysts/ml of C. parvum purified from feces of experimentally contaminated calves. An in vitro excystation method was used to evaluate oocysts' viability and to determine the inactivation rates of hypochlorous acid at 2 ppm, chlorine dioxide at 1, 2, and 5 ppm, and ozone at the doses of 0.18, 0.24, 0.36, 0.48, and 1.44 mg/l. By using hypochlorous acid, the maximum inactivation rate obtained was 49.04% after 120 min. Chlorine dioxide at 5 ppm inactivated 90.56% of oocysts after 90 min of contact. Ozone was the most effective product, rendering an inactivation of 100% with the concentration of 24 mg/l. Resistance of Cryptosporidium to the usual disinfectants and the need for more effective water treatments to prevent waterborne diseases in Brazil are discussed in this manuscript.

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children.

  4. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  5. Survival of Salmonella enterica on soybean sprouts following treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide and biocontrol Pseudomonas bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control of Salmonella enterica on sprouts and minimally processed, ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables is important for food and consumer safety. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide(ClO2)and biocontrol microorganisms (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. fluoresc...

  6. Survival of Salmonella Typhimurium on soybean sprouts after treatment with gaseous chlorine dioxide and biocontrol Pseudomonas bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Control of Salmonella Typhimurium on sprouts and minimally processed produce is crucial for food and consumer safety. The aim of this research was to assess natural microflora populations on soybean and evaluate the effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and biocontrol Pseudomonas on the surviva...

  7. The effect of chlorine dioxide and chitosan/essential oil coatings on the safety and quality of fresh blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blueberries are high-value fruit with strong antioxidant capacity and other health-promoting benefits. Controlled release chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or chitosan coating plus different essential oils were applied to fresh blueberries to preserve their quality and safety during postharvest storage. In vi...

  8. Novel pod for chlorine dioxide generation and delivery to control aerobic bacteria on the inner surface of floor drains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Floor drains in poultry processing and further processing plants are a harborage site for bacteria both free swimming and in biofilms. This population can include Listeria monocytogenes which has been shown to have potential for airborne spreading from mishandled open drains. Chlorine dioxide (ClO...

  9. Chlorine dioxide-induced and Congo red-inhibited Marangoni effect on the chlorite-trithionate reaction front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ren, Xingfeng; Pan, Changwei; Zheng, Ting; Yuan, Ling; Zheng, Juhua; Gao, Qingyu

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic flows can exert multiple effects on an exothermal autocatalytic reaction, such as buoyancy and the Marangoni convection, which can change the structure and velocity of chemical waves. Here we report that in the chlorite-trithionate reaction, the production and consumption of chlorine dioxide can induce and inhibit Marangoni flow, respectively, leading to different chemo-hydrodynamic patterns. The horizontal propagation of a reaction-diffusion-convection front was investigated with the upper surface open to the air. The Marangoni convection, induced by gaseous chlorine dioxide on the surface, produced from chlorite disproportionation after the proton autocatalysis, has the same effect as the heat convection. When the Marangoni effect is removed by the reaction of chlorine dioxide with the Congo red (CR) indicator, an oscillatory propagation of the front tip is observed under suitable conditions. Replacing CR with bromophenol blue (BPB) distinctly enhanced the floating, resulting in multiple vortexes, owing to the coexistence between BPB and chlorine dioxide. Using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with reaction-diffusion and heat conduction equations, we numerically obtain various experimental scenarios of front instability for the exothermic autocatalytic reaction coupled with buoyancy-driven convection and Marangoni convection.

  10. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  11. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeturu, Sravan Kumar; Acharya, Shashidhar; Urala, Arun Sreenivas; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis in orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A randomized single-center, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial was conducted among 90 subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. The subjects were randomly divided into one of the three study groups (Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, chlorine dioxide). Plaque and gingivitis were assessed using modified Silness and Loe Plaque Index and Gingival Index at baseline and at follow-up after 15 days. Paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc Dunnett test were used. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 85 participants completed the study; among them, 40 were male and 45 were female. There was significant reduction in mean plaque and gingival scores in all the 3 groups at follow-up when compared to baseline. A significantly higher reduction (plaque and gingival scores) was found in chlorhexidine when compared with the Aloe vera group. However, no significant difference was seen between chlorhexidine and chlorine dioxide with respect to mean reduction in plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion Chlorine dioxide can be a suitable and economical alternative for chlorhexidine. Further long-term studies are recommended for evaluating their effectiveness. PMID:26937371

  12. Systematic Evaluation of the Efficacy of Chlorine Dioxide in Decontamination of Building Interior Surfaces Contaminated with Anthrax Spores▿

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vipin K.; Ryan, Shawn P.; Wallace, Lalena; Smith, Lisa S.; Shah, Saumil S.; Martin, G. Blair

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of chlorine dioxide (CD) gas generated by two distinct generation systems, Sabre (wet system with gas generated in water) and ClorDiSys (dry system with gas generated in air), was evaluated for inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on six building interior surfaces. The six building materials included carpet, acoustic ceiling tile, unpainted cinder block, painted I-beam steel, painted wallboard, and unpainted pinewood. There was no statistically significant difference in the data due to the CD generation technology at a 95% confidence level. Note that a common method of CD gas measurement was used for both wet and dry CD generation types. Doses generated by combinations of different concentrations of CD gas (500, 1,000, 1,500, or 3,000 parts per million of volume [ppmv]) and exposure times (ranging between 0.5 and 12 h) were used to evaluate the relative role of fumigant exposure period and total dose in the decontamination of building surfaces. The results showed that the time required to achieve at least a 6-log reduction in viable spores is clearly a function of the material type on which the spores are inoculated. The wood and cinder block coupons required a longer exposure time to achieve a 6-log reduction. The only material showing a clear statistical difference in rate of decay of viable spores as a function of concentration was cinder block. For all other materials, the profile of spore kill (i.e., change in number of viable spores with exposure time) was not dependent upon fumigant concentration (500 to 3,000 ppmv). The CD dose required for complete spore kill on biological indicators (typically, 1E6 spores of Bacillus atrophaeus on stainless steel) was significantly less than that required for decontamination of most of the building materials tested. PMID:20305025

  13. In-Line Salt Fluxing Process: The Solution to Chlorine Gas Utilization in Casthouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, Sébastien; Dupuis, Claude; Maltais, Bruno; Thibault, Marc-André; Smarason, Einar

    Over the past decades, the aluminium industry has been very active in developing and implementing metal treatment technologies such as the TAC and RFI to reduce the negative environmental, health and safety (EHS) impacts of gaseous chlorine. However, most casthouses are still relying on the utilization of chlorine gas for in-line metal treatment. This requires maintaining an active chlorine network at considerable costs and EHS considerations.

  14. Target Turing patterns and growth dynamics in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction.

    PubMed

    Preska Steinberg, Asher; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2014-04-03

    We study the growth dynamics of Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system in response to perturbations with visible light. We describe several mechanisms by which Turing patterns reappear after they are suppressed by illumination with a disc-shaped geometry. We observe that under specific conditions the patterns reorganize from a random configuration of spots and stripes to a set of ordered, concentric rings, which we refer to as target Turing patterns. These patterns closely resemble the unit cells of the Turing hexagonal superlattices known as black eye patterns. However, these target Turing patterns are not part of a larger superlattice structure, and they usually have a larger number of concentric rings. Numerical simulations support the experimental findings.

  15. Application of highly purified electrolyzed chlorine dioxide for tilapia fillet disinfection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chen-Hsing; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Chao-Chin; Huang, Hao-Hsun; Chen, Ho-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to develop an electrolysis method to generate high-concentration chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for tilapia fillet disinfection. The designed generator produced up to 3500 ppm of ClO2 at up to 99% purity. Tilapia fillets were soaked in a 400 ppm ClO2 solution for 5, 10, and 25 min. Results show that total plate counts of tilapia, respectively, decreased by 5.72 to 3.23, 2.10, and 1.09 log CFU/g. In addition, a 200 ppm ClO2 solution eliminated coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli in 5 min with shaking treatment. Furthermore, ClO2 and trihalomethanes (THMs) residuals on tilapia fillets were analyzed by GC/MS and were nondetectable (GC-MS detection limit was 0.12 ppb). The results conform to Taiwan's environmental protection regulations and act governing food sanitation.

  16. A coupled chemical burster: The chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction in two flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction has been studied in a system consisting of two continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The reactors are coupled by computer monitoring of the electrochemical potential in each reactor, which is then used to control the input into the other reactor. Two forms of coupling are employed: reciprocally triggered, exponentially decreasing stimulation, and alternating mass exchange. The reaction, which exhibits oscillatory and excitable behavior in a single CSTR, displays neuronlike bursting behavior with both forms of coupling. Reciprocal stimulation yields bursting in both reactors, while with alternating mass exchange, bursting is observed in one reactor and complex oscillation in the other. A simple model of the reaction gives good agreement between the experimental observations and numerical simulations.

  17. Monitoring of Legionella pneumophila viability after chlorine dioxide treatment using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Pascale; Epalle, Thibaut; Allegra, Séverine; Girardot, Françoise; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-04-01

    The viability of three Legionella pneumophila strains was monitored after chlorine dioxide (ClO2) treatment using a flow cytometric assay. Suspensions of L. pneumophila cells were submitted to increasing concentrations of ClO2. Culturable cells were still detected when using 4 mg/L, but could no longer be detected after exposure to 6 mg/L of ClO2, although viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells were found after exposure to 4-5 mg/L of ClO2. When testing whether these VBNC were infective, two of the strains were resuscitated after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but neither of them could infect macrophage-like cells.

  18. The formation of disinfection by-products in water treated with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chang, C Y; Hsieh, Y H; Hsu, S S; Hu, P Y; Wang, K H

    2000-12-01

    In this study, chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) was used as an alternative disinfection agent with humic acid as the organic precursor in a natural aquatic environment. The major topics in this investigation consisted of the disinfection efficiency of ClO(2), the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), and the operating conditions. The results indicated that the pH value (pH 5-9) did not affect the efficiency of disinfection while the concentration of organic precursors did. The primary DBPs formed were trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). The distribution of the individual species was a function of the bromide content. The higher the ClO(2) dosage, the lower the amount of DBPs produced. The amount of DBPs increased with reaction time, with chlorite ions as the primary inorganic by-product.

  19. Comparison of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in acetonitrile and water using subpicosecond pump probe spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew J.; Charalambous, Sophia; Reid, Philip J.

    1997-12-01

    The photochemical reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in water and acetonitrile are investigated using subpicosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The spectral dynamics observed at 267 and 400 nm demonstrate that the quantum yield for geminate recombination of ClO and O to form OClO is reduced in acetonitrile relative to water. However, the dynamics at 800 nm are similar for both solvents consistent with ClOO rather than OClO being responsible for the evolution at this wavelength. The kinetics for ground-state ClOO production and decomposition are significantly slower in acetonitrile relative to water suggesting that solvent-solute hydrogen bonding is important in defining the ground state reactivity of this photoproduct.

  20. Theoretical and experimental studies of spatial bistability in the chlorine-dioxide-iodide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchedeau, P.; Boissonade, J.; De Kepper, P.

    2000-12-01

    The phenomenon of spatial bistability has recently been proposed to understand a number of paradoxical results obtained in experiments on nonequilibrium chemical patterns performed in open reactors made of a thin film of gel fed from one side. On the basis of a realistic kinetic model, we predict that the chlorine-dioxide-iodide reaction, taken as a prototypic example of a large class of reactions, should exhibit spatial bistability. The theoretical and numerical results are supported by experiments performed in specially designed reactors. This spatial bistability introduces an additional geometric dimension in the system which is generally overlooked. We elaborate on the role that this additional complexity can play in the observation of patterns associated to fronts in such reactors.

  1. Chlorine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine ; CASRN 7782 - 50 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  2. Chlorine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical chlorine, produced in small quantities in the laboratory, is presented. The profile summarizes physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  3. Chlorine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical chlorine, produced in small quantities in the laboratory, is presented. The profile summarizes physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  4. A review of the contrasting behavior of two magmatic volatiles: Chlorine and carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are common magmatic volatiles with contrasting behaviors. CO2 solubility increases with pressure whereas Cl solubility shows relatively little pressure or temperature effect. CO2 speciation changes with silicate melt composition, dissolving as carbonate in basaltic magmas and molecular CO2 in more silicic compositions. In H2O-bearing systems, the strongly non-ideal behavior of alkali chlorides causes unmixing of the volatile phase to form a H2O-rich vapor and a hydrosaline phase with important implications for the maximum concentration of Cl in magmas. Addition of CO2 to magma hastens immiscibility at crustal pressures (<500 MPa), inducing the formation of CO2-rich vapors and Cl-rich hydrosaline melts. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.Chlorine (Cl) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are common magmatic volatiles with contrasting behaviors. CO2 solubility increases with pressure whereas Cl solubility shows relatively little pressure or temperature effect. CO2 speciation changes with silicate melt composition, dissolving as carbonate in basaltic magmas and molecular CO2 in more silicic compositions. In H2O-bearing systems, the strongly non-ideal behavior of alkali chlorides causes unmixing of the volatile phase to form a H2O-rich vapor and a hydrosaline phase with important implications for the maximum concentration of Cl in magmas. Addition of CO2 to magma hastens immiscibility at crustal pressures (<500 MPa), inducing the formation of CO2-rich vapors and Cl-rich hydrosaline melts.

  5. Conventional oxidation treatments for the removal of arsenic with chlorine dioxide, hypochlorite, potassium permanganate and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca

    2010-11-01

    Arsenic is widespread in soils, water and air. In natural water the main forms are arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)). The consumption of water containing high concentration of arsenic produces serious effects on human health, like skin and lung cancer. In Italy, Legislative Decree 2001/31 reduced the limit of arsenic from 50 to 10 μg/L, in agreement with the European Directive 98/83/EC. As consequence, many drinking water treatment plant companies needed to upgrade the existing plants where arsenic was previously removed or to build up new plants for arsenic removal when this contaminant was not previously a critical parameter. Arsenic removal from water may occur through the precipitation with iron or aluminum salts, adsorption on iron hydroxide or granular activated alumina (AA), reverse osmosis and ion exchange (IE). Some of the above techniques, especially precipitation, adsorption with AA and IE, can reach good arsenic removal yields only if arsenic is oxidized. The aim of the present work is to investigate the efficiency of the oxidation of As(III) by means of four conventional oxidants (chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite, potassium permanganate and monochloramine) with different test conditions: different type of water (demineralised and real water), different pH values (5.7-6-7 and 8) and different doses of chemicals. The arsenic oxidation yields were excellent with potassium permanganate, very good with hypochlorite and low with monochloramine. These results were observed both on demineralised and real water for all the tested reagents with the exception of chlorine dioxide that showed a better arsenic oxidation on real groundwater than demineralised water.

  6. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bercz, J.P.; Jones, L.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Bawa, R.; Condie, L.

    1986-11-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO/sub 2/ ingestion, it seems that ClO/sub 2/ does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrient, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen.

  7. Femtosecond pump-probe studies of actinic-wavelength dependence in aqueous chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Bixby, Teresa J.; Bolinger, Joshua C.; Patterson, Joshua D.; Reid, Philip J.

    2009-04-21

    The actinic or photolysis-wavelength dependence of aqueous chlorine dioxide (OClO) photochemistry is investigated using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Following photoexcitation at 310, 335, and 410 nm the photoinduced evolution in optical density is measured from the UV to the near IR. Analysis of the optical-density evolution illustrates that the quantum yield for atomic chlorine production ({Phi}{sub Cl}) increases with actinic energy, with {Phi}{sub Cl}=0.16{+-}0.02 for 410 nm excitation and increasing to 0.25{+-}0.01 and 0.54{+-}0.10 for 335 and 310 nm excitations, respectively. Consistent with previous studies, the production of Cl occurs through two channels, with one channel corresponding to prompt (<5 ps) Cl formation and the other corresponding to the thermal decomposition of ClOO formed by OClO photoisomerization. The partitioning between Cl production channels is dependent on actinic energy, with prompt Cl production enhanced with an increase in actinic energy. Limited evidence is found for enhanced ClO production with an increase in actinic energy. Stimulated emission and excited-state absorption features associated with OClO populating the optically prepared {sup 2}A{sub 2} surface decrease with an increase in actinic energy suggesting that the excited-state decay dynamics are also actinic energy dependent. The studies presented here provide detailed information on the actinic-wavelength dependence of OClO photochemistry in aqueous solution.

  8. Femtosecond pump-probe studies of actinic-wavelength dependence in aqueous chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixby, Teresa J.; Bolinger, Joshua C.; Patterson, Joshua D.; Reid, Philip J.

    2009-04-01

    The actinic or photolysis-wavelength dependence of aqueous chlorine dioxide (OClO) photochemistry is investigated using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Following photoexcitation at 310, 335, and 410 nm the photoinduced evolution in optical density is measured from the UV to the near IR. Analysis of the optical-density evolution illustrates that the quantum yield for atomic chlorine production (ΦCl) increases with actinic energy, with ΦCl=0.16±0.02 for 410 nm excitation and increasing to 0.25±0.01 and 0.54±0.10 for 335 and 310 nm excitations, respectively. Consistent with previous studies, the production of Cl occurs through two channels, with one channel corresponding to prompt (<5 ps) Cl formation and the other corresponding to the thermal decomposition of ClOO formed by OClO photoisomerization. The partitioning between Cl production channels is dependent on actinic energy, with prompt Cl production enhanced with an increase in actinic energy. Limited evidence is found for enhanced ClO production with an increase in actinic energy. Stimulated emission and excited-state absorption features associated with OClO populating the optically prepared A22 surface decrease with an increase in actinic energy suggesting that the excited-state decay dynamics are also actinic energy dependent. The studies presented here provide detailed information on the actinic-wavelength dependence of OClO photochemistry in aqueous solution.

  9. Development and field testing of a mobile chlorine dioxide generation system for the decontamination of buildings contaminated with Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joseph P; Blair Martin, G

    2009-05-30

    The numerous buildings that became contaminated with Bacillus anthracis (the bacterium causing the disease anthrax) in 2001, and more recent B. anthracis - related events, point to the need to have effective decontamination technologies for buildings contaminated with biological threat agents. The U.S. Government developed a portable chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) generation system to decontaminate buildings contaminated with B. anthracis spores, and this so-called mobile decontamination trailer (MDT) prototype was tested through a series of three field trials. The first test of the MDT was conducted at Fort McClellan in Anniston, AL. during October 2004. Four test attempts occurred over two weekends; however, a number of system problems resulted in termination of the activity prior to any ClO(2) introduction into the test building. After making several design enhancements and equipment changes, the MDT was subjected to a second test. During this test, extensive leak checks were made using argon and nitrogen in lieu of chlorine gas; each subsystem was checked for functionality, and the MDT was operated for 24h. This second test demonstrated the MDT flow and control systems functioned satisfactorily, and thus it was decided to proceed to a third, more challenging field trial. In the last field test, ClO(2) was generated and routed directly to the scrubber in a 12-h continuous run. Measurement of ClO(2) levels at the generator outlet showed that the desired production rate was not achieved. Additionally, only one of the two scrubbers performed adequately with regard to maintaining ClO(2) emissions below the limit. Numerous lessons were learned in the field trials of this ClO(2) decontamination technology.

  10. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  11. Microscale Chemistry in a Plastic Petri Dish: Preparation and Chemical Properties of Chlorine Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Martin M. F.

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates some of the chemistry of chlorine on a microscale about the size of a water droplet. Chlorine gas was prepared from an acidified bleach solution in a plastic petri dish. Provides suitable hands-on experience for students at the secondary-school level. (MM)

  12. Microscale Chemistry in a Plastic Petri Dish: Preparation and Chemical Properties of Chlorine Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Martin M. F.

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates some of the chemistry of chlorine on a microscale about the size of a water droplet. Chlorine gas was prepared from an acidified bleach solution in a plastic petri dish. Provides suitable hands-on experience for students at the secondary-school level. (MM)

  13. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  14. Pneumomediastinum from acute inhalation of chlorine gas in 2 young patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiqiang; Jia, Ling; Shao, Danbing; Liu, Hongmei; Nie, Shinan; Tang, Wenjie; Xu, Baohua; Hu, Zongfeng; Sun, Haichen

    2011-03-01

    Trichloroisocyanuric acid is a high-efficiency and-low toxicity fungicide and bleach. It is commonly used as disinfectant for industrial circulating water, swimming pools, restaurants, and other public places in China. When trichloroisocyanuric acid is put into water, chlorine gas is produced. Chlorine gas is a potent pulmonary irritant that causes acute damage in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts (J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1998;36(1-2):87-93). Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication in patients with acute chlorine gas poisoning. A small amount of gas can be asymptomatic, but a large amount of gas entering the mediastinum suddenly will lead to respiratory and circulatory disorder, mediastinal swing, or even cardiopulmonary arrest. Severe chlorine gas poisoning patients usually need mechanical ventilation; if the pneumomediastinum is not found on time, threat to life would be greatly increased. It requires a high index of suspicion for diagnosis and rapid treatment. The proper use of ventilator, timely and effective treatment of original disease, and multiple system organ support had significant impact on the prognosis. The pneumomediastinum case secondary to inhalation of chlorine gas that we report here should remind all emergency department physicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease and seek immediate and proper intervention when treating patients with acute chlorine gas poisoning, once diagnosed, especially in younger patients.

  15. Chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  18. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Morino, Hirofumi; Lee, Cheolsung; Maeda, Ken; Araki, Kazuko; Otake, Toru; Kawahata, Takuya; Shibata, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the antiviral activity of a chlorine dioxide gas solution (CD) and sodium hypochlorite (SH) against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus. CD at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppm produced potent antiviral activity, inactivating >or= 99.9% of the viruses with a 15 sec treatment for sensitization. The antiviral activity of CD was approximately 10 times higher than that of SH.

  19. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  20. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  1. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  2. Denaturation of protein by chlorine dioxide: oxidative modification of tryptophan and tyrosine residues.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2007-04-24

    Oxychlorine compounds, such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), have potent antimicrobial activity. Although the biochemical mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of HOCl has been extensively investigated, little is known about that of ClO2. Using bovine serum albumin and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model proteins, here I demonstrate that the antimicrobial activity of ClO2 is attributable primarily to its protein-denaturing activity. By solubility analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and measurement of enzymatic activity, I demonstrate that protein is rapidly denatured by ClO2 with a concomitant decrease in the concentration of ClO2 in the reaction mixture. Circular dichroism spectra of the ClO2-treated proteins show a change in ellipticity at 220 nm, indicating a decrease in alpha-helical content. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that transition temperature and endothermic transition enthalpy of heat-induced unfolding decrease in the ClO2-treated protein. The enzymatic activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase decreases to 10% within 15 s of treatment with 10 microM ClO2. Elemental analyses show that oxygen, but not chlorine, atoms are incorporated in the ClO2-treated protein, providing direct evidence that protein is oxidized by ClO2. Furthermore, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show that tryptophan residues become N-formylkynurenine and tyrosine residues become 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or 2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine (TOPA) in the ClO2-treated proteins. Taking these results together, I conclude that microbes are inactivated by ClO2 owing to denaturation of constituent proteins critical to their integrity and/or function, and that this denaturation is caused primarily by covalent oxidative modification of their tryptophan and tyrosine residues.

  3. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Bercz, J P; Jones, L L; Harrington, R M; Bawa, R; Condie, L

    1986-01-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO2 ingestion, it seems that ClO2 does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decrease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrients, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen. Images FIGURE 1. a FIGURE 1. b FIGURE 1. c PMID:3816729

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of pentathionate ion by chlorine dioxide in a slightly acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Csekő, György; Petz, Andrea; Horváth, Attila K

    2014-02-27

    The chlorine dioxide-pentathionate reaction has been studied at a slightly acidic medium by conventional UV-vis spectroscopy monitoring the absorbance at 430 nm. We have shown that pentathionate was oxidized to sulfate, but chlorate is also a marginal product of the reaction besides the chloride ion. The stoichiometry of the reaction can be established as a linear combination of two limiting stoichiometries under our experimental conditions. Kinetics of the reaction was found to be also complex because initial rate studies revealed that formal kinetic orders of both the hydrogen ion and chlorine dioxide is far from unity. Moreover, log-log plot of the initial rate against pentathionate concentration indicated a nonconstant formal kinetic order. We also observed a significant catalytic effect of chloride ion. Based on our observations and simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, an 11-step kinetic model is obtained with 6 fitted rate coefficients. A relatively simple rate equation has also been derived and discussed.

  5. Efficacy of chlorine, acidic electrolyzed water and aqueous chlorine dioxide solutions to decontaminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 from lettuce leaves.

    PubMed

    Keskinen, Lindsey A; Burke, Angela; Annous, Bassam A

    2009-06-30

    This study compared the efficacy of chlorine (20-200 ppm), acidic electrolyzed water (50 ppm chlorine, pH 2.6), acidified sodium chlorite (20-200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, Sanova), and aqueous chlorine dioxide (20-200 ppm chlorite ion concentration, TriNova) washes in reducing populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on artificially inoculated lettuce. Fresh-cut leaves of Romaine or Iceberg lettuce were inoculated by immersion in water containing E. coli O157:H7 (8 log CFU/ml) for 5 min and dried in a salad spinner. Leaves (25 g) were then washed for 2 min, immediately or following 24 h of storage at 4 degrees C. The washing treatments containing chlorite ion concentrations of 100 and 200 ppm were the most effective against E. coli O157:H7 populations on Iceberg lettuce, with log reductions as high as 1.25 log CFU/g and 1.05 log CFU/g for TriNova and Sanova wash treatments, respectively. All other wash treatments resulted in population reductions of less than 1 log CFU/g. Chlorine (200 ppm), TriNova, Sanova, and acidic electrolyzed water were all equally effective against E. coli O157:H7 on Romaine, with log reductions of approximately 1 log CFU/g. The 20 ppm chlorine wash was as effective as the deionized water wash in reducing populations of E. coli O157:H7 on Romaine and Iceberg lettuce. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that E. coli O157:H7 that was incorporated into biofilms or located in damage lettuce tissue remained on the lettuce leaf, while individual cells on undamaged leaf surfaces were more likely to be washed away.

  6. The Effects of Oxy-firing Conditions on Gas-phase Mercury Oxidation by Chlorine and Bromine

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula; Silcox, Geoffrey

    2010-06-30

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a quartz-lined, natural gas-fired reactor with the combustion air replaced with a blend of 27 mole percent oxygen, with the balance carbon dioxide. Quench rates of 210 and 440 K/s were tested. In the absence of sulfur dioxide, the oxy-firing environment caused a remarkable increase in oxidation of mercury by chlorine. At 400 ppm chlorine (as HCl equivalent), air-firing results in roughly 5 percent oxidation. At the same conditions with oxy-firing, oxidation levels are roughly 80 percent. Oxidation levels with bromine at 25 and 50 ppm (as HBr equivalent) ranged from 80 to 95 percent and were roughly the same for oxy- and air-firing conditions. Kinetic calculations of levels of oxidation at air- and oxy-conditions captured the essential features of the experimental results but have not revealed a mechanistic basis for the oxidative benefits of oxy-firing conditions. Mixtures of 25 ppm bromine and 100 and 400 ppm chlorine gave more than 90 percent oxidation. At all conditions, the effects of quench rate were not significant. The presence of 500 ppm SO2 caused a dramatic decline in the levels of oxidation at all oxy-fired conditions examined. This effect suggests that SO2 may be preventing oxidation in the gas phase or preventing oxidation in the wetconditioning system that was used in quantifying oxidized and elemental mercury concentrations. Similar effects of SO2 have been noted with air-firing. The addition of sodium thiosulfate to the hydroxide impingers that are part of wet conditioning systems may prevent liquid-phase oxidation from occurring.

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of chlorine dioxide and chlorite oxidations of cysteine and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Ison, Ana; Odeh, Ihab N; Margerum, Dale W

    2006-10-16

    Chlorine dioxide oxidation of cysteine (CSH) is investigated under pseudo-first-order conditions (with excess CSH) in buffered aqueous solutions, p[H+] 2.7-9.5 at 25.0 degrees C. The rates of chlorine dioxide decay are first order in both ClO2 and CSH concentrations and increase rapidly as the pH increases. The proposed mechanism is an electron transfer from CS- to ClO2 (1.03 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) with a subsequent rapid reaction of the CS* radical and a second ClO2 to form a cysteinyl-ClO2 adduct (CSOClO). This highly reactive adduct decays via two pathways. In acidic solutions, it hydrolyzes to give CSO(2)H (sulfinic acid) and HOCl, which in turn rapidly react to form CSO3H (cysteic acid) and Cl-. As the pH increases, the (CSOClO) adduct reacts with CS- by a second pathway to form cystine (CSSC) and chlorite ion (ClO2-). The reaction stoichiometry changes from 6 ClO2:5 CSH at low pH to 2 ClO2:10 CSH at high pH. The ClO2 oxidation of glutathione anion (GS-) is also rapid with a second-order rate constant of 1.40 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1). The reaction of ClO2 with CSSC is 7 orders of magnitude slower than the corresponding reaction with cysteinyl anion (CS-) at pH 6.7. Chlorite ion reacts with CSH; however, at p[H+] 6.7, the observed rate of this reaction is slower than the ClO2/CSH reaction by 6 orders of magnitude. Chlorite ion oxidizes CSH while being reduced to HOCl, which in turn reacts rapidly with CSH to form Cl-. The reaction products are CSSC and CSO3H with a pH-dependent distribution similar to the ClO2/CSH system.

  8. Chlorine sensing properties of zinc oxide resistive gas sensor doped with platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedot, M.; Suchorska-Woźniak, P.; Rac, O.; Nawrot, W.; Teterycz, H.

    2016-11-01

    In presented studies resistive chlorine gas sensor with gas sensitive layer in the form of zinc oxide microrods doped with platinum was developed. The growth of active layer was carried out in water solution containing zinc nitrate (V), hexamethylenetetramine and chloroplatinic acid using the chemical bath deposition method. The structure and morphology of obtained sensors was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). To determine the chlorine gas sensing properties Temperature-Stimulated Conductance method (TSC) was used. During the measurements sensor was tested in a reference atmosphere and an atmosphere with 2, 5 or 8 ppm of chlorine. Obtained results have shown that zinc oxide microrods doped with platinum were obtained. TSC measurements showed that developed sensor allows to detect chlorine with very good sensitivity.

  9. Evaluation of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizer for effectiveness in killing Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis spores in suspensions, on the surface of stainless steel, and on apples.

    PubMed

    Kreske, Audrey C; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Beuchat, Larry R

    2006-08-01

    Chlorine (10 to 200 microg/ml), chlorine dioxide (10 to 200 microg/ml), and a peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizer (40 and 80 microg/ ml) were evaluated for effectiveness in killing spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis in suspensions and on the surface of stainless steel and apples. Water and 5% horse serum were used as carriers for spore inoculum applied to the surface of stainless steel coupons, and 5% horse serum was used as a carrier for inoculum applied to apples. Inocula were dried on stainless steel for 5 h and on apples for 22 to 24 h before treating with sanitizers. At the concentrations of sanitizers tested, sensitivities of planktonic B. cereus and B. thuringiensis spores were similar. A portion of the spores surviving treatment with chlorine and, more markedly, chlorine dioxide had decreased tolerance to heat. Planktonic spores of both species were more sensitive to sanitizers than were spores on the surface of stainless steel or apples. At the same concentrations, chlorine was more effective than chlorine dioxide in killing spores in suspension and on stainless steel. The lethality of chlorine dioxide was markedly reduced when inoculum on stainless steel coupons was suspended in 5% horse serum as a carrier rather than water. Chlorine and chlorine dioxide at concentrations of 10 to 100 microg/ml were equally effective in killing spores on apples. Significant reductions of > or = 3.8 to 4.5 log CFU per apple were achieved by treatment with 100 microg/ml of either of the two sanitizers. The peroxyacetic acid sanitizer (40 and 80 microg/ml) was ineffective in killing Bacillus spores in the test systems investigated. Results provide information on the effectiveness of sanitizers commonly used in the food processing industry in killing Bacillus spores in suspension, on a food-contact surface, and on a ready-to-eat food.

  10. Monochloramine and chlorine dioxide for controlling Legionella pneumophila contamination: biocide levels and disinfection by-product formation in hospital water networks.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Isabella; Ferranti, Greta; Bargellini, Annalisa; Marchegiano, Patrizia; Predieri, Guerrino; Stout, Janet E; Borella, Paola

    2013-12-01

    Legionella colonization in hospital hot water distribution networks was evaluated following 36 months of continuous treatment with monochloramine and compared with chlorine dioxide. Nitrite, nitrate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids as well as the biocide concentration at sampled points were measured. Only 8/84 samples treated with monochloramine were found contaminated and after the first 8 months of treatment no Legionella was isolated. Chlorine dioxide was associated with a strong reduction in Legionella contamination compared to pre-treatment, but differences according to the device were observed. Monochloramine between 2 and 3 mg l(-1) and chlorine dioxide between 0.50 and 0.70 mg l(-1) were needed to control Legionella colonization. Comparing no- and post-flush samples, a higher frequency of no-flush positive samples was noted using chlorine dioxide, suggesting an increased risk for patients when they open the tap. No increase in chlorite levels and no water nitrification occurred by using monochloramine. Chlorite at levels exceeding the limit requested for drinking water was measured when chlorine dioxide was applied. In conclusion, we highlight that continuous injection of monochloramine should be considered as an effective alternative to chlorine dioxide in controlling legionellae contamination inside hospital water distribution systems.

  11. Numerical bifurcation diagram for the two-dimensional boundary-fed chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic-acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, S.; Cross, M. C.

    1999-04-01

    We present a numerical solution of the chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic-acid reaction-diffusion system in two dimensions in a boundary-fed system using a realistic model. The bifurcation diagram for the transition from nonsymmetry-breaking structures along boundary feed gradients to transverse symmetry-breaking patterns in a single layer is numerically determined. We find this transition to be discontinuous. We make a connection with earlier results and discuss prospects for future work.

  12. Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  13. Use of chlorine dioxide in a secondary recovery process to inhibit bacterial fouling and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Knickrehm, M.; Caballero, E.; Romualdo, P.; Sandidge, J.

    1987-01-01

    A major oil company operates a secondary recovery waterflood in Inglewood, California. The waterflood currently processes 250,000 bbls. per day of produced fluid. The major economic and operational problems associated with a secondary recovery waterflood are: 1) corrosion due to oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and bacteria (sulfate reducers and slime biomass), 2) plugging from deposits due to salts, sulfides, and biofilms. These problems lead to deterioration of water handling equipment, injection lines (surface and subsurface), and decreased water quality resulting in the plugging of injection wells. During the last 8 years the operator has used varying mechanical and chemical technology to solve these problems. From 1978 to 1982 traditional chemical programs were in effect. Over this time period there was a continuing decline in water quality, and a substantial increase in chemical and operational costs. It was determined at that time that the major reason for this was due to microbiological activity. With this in mind, the operator proceeded to test the effects of using Aqueous Chlorine Dioxide in one portion of their water handling facilities. Due to the success of the program it was applied field wide. Presently, the primary problems associated with bacteria have been arrested. Solving one corrosion problem can lead to the onset of another. The operator is now in the process of making a concentrated effort to eliminate the other synergistically related corrosive and plugging agents (O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S). A field history of the problems, findings, and solutions, are discussed along with an overview of our present direction.

  14. Chlorine gas exposure increases susceptibility to invasive lung fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Melissa A.; Doran, Stephen F.; Yu, Zhihong; Dunaway, Chad W.; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is a highly irritating and reactive gas with potential occupational and environmental hazards. Acute exposure to Cl2 induces severe epithelial damage, airway hyperreactivity, impaired alveolar fluid clearance, and pulmonary edema in the presence of heightened inflammation and significant neutrophil accumulation in the lungs. Herein, we investigated whether Cl2 exposure affected the lung antimicrobial immune response leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Mice exposed to Cl2 and challenged intratracheally 24 h thereafter with the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus demonstrated an >500-fold increase in A. fumigatus lung burden 72 h postchallenge compared with A. fumigatus mice exposed to room air. Cl2-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice also demonstrated significantly higher lung resistance following methacholine challenge and increased levels of plasma proteins (albumin and IgG) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Despite enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells to the lungs of Cl2-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice, these cells (>60% of which were neutrophils) demonstrated a profound impairment in generating superoxide. Significantly higher A. fumigatus burden in the lungs of Cl2 exposed mice correlated with enhanced production of IL-6, TNF-α, CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL3. Surprisingly, however, Cl2-exposed A. fumigatus challenged mice had a specific impairment in the production of IL-17A and IL-22 in the lungs compared with mice exposed to room air and challenged with A. fumigatus. In summary, our results indicate that Cl2 exposure markedly impairs the antimicrobial activity and inflammatory reactivity of myeloid cells in the lung leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens. PMID:23564508

  15. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  16. Lifetime Prediction of Polyethylene Pipes Transporting Drinking Water in the Presence of Chlorine Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, X.; Audouin, L.; Verdu, J.

    2008-08-01

    A kinetic model for lifetime prediction of polyethylene pipes transporting pressurized water disinfected by chlorine dioxide (DOC) has been elaborated. This model is composed of three sub-models: —A system of differential equations, derived from a realistic mechanistic scheme for radical chain oxidation in the presence of DOC of stabilized polyethylene (PE), giving access to the spatial distribution of structural changes in the pipe wall and its evolution against time of exposure; —The classical Saito's equation to predict the profiles of average molar masses from the spatial distribution of chain scissions and crosslinking events; —An empirical creep equation and an empirical fracture criterion derived from regression curves obtained in pure water. It is assumed that chemical degradation modifies only the time to transition tc between ductile and brittle regimes of failure, and that tc is linked to the weight average molar mass by a power law. By combining these three sub-models, it is possible to predict the time to failure tF under the coupled effects of pressure and chemical degradation. In current use conditions (under 3-12 bars water pressure, at 15 °C, in the presence of 0.15 mg of DOC per liter of water), the model predicts a tF of the order of 15 years against more than 50 years expected lifetime, that agrees well with experimental results.

  17. Factors affecting the formation of iodo-trihalomethanes during oxidation with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wanhong; Shan, Yingchun; Yang, Xin

    2014-01-15

    Effects of water characteristics, reaction time, temperature, bromide and iodide ion concentrations, oxidant doses, and pH on formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THM) during oxidation of iodide-containing water with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) were investigated. Among the water samples collected from ten water sources, iodoform (CHI3) was the predominant I-THM and trace amount of chlorodiiodomethane (CHClI2) was occasionally found. CHI3 yields correlated moderately with specific UV absorbance (SUVA) (R(2)=0.79), indicating that hydrophobic aromatic content were important precursors. Longer reaction time led to continued formation of CHI3. I-THM containing bromide was also found in waters containing both bromide and iodide, but CHI3 was dominant. The formation of CHI3 was higher at 25°C than 5°C and 35°C. CHI3 formation showed an increase followed by a decrease trend with increasing ClO2 doses and iodide concentrations and the highest yields occurred at iodide to ClO2 molar ratios of 1-2. pH 8 resulted in the highest CHI3 formation. It should be noted that a high iodide concentration was spiked to waters before adding ClO2 and the results may not reflect the formation yields of iodinated THMs in real conditions, but they provide information about formation trend of I-THM during oxidation of ClO2.

  18. Effect of chlorine dioxide on cyanobacterial cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Li, Lei; Deng, Jing; Zhu, Mingqiu; Zhu, Shumin

    2014-06-01

    Bench scale tests were conducted to study the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) oxidation on cell integrity, toxin degradation and disinfection by-product formation of Microcystis aeruginosa. The simulated cyanobacterial suspension was prepared at a concentration of 1.0×10(6)cells/mL and the cell integrity was measured with flow cytometry. Results indicated that ClO2 can inhibit the photosynthetic capacity of M. aeruginosa cells and almost no integral cells were left after oxidation at a ClO2 dose of 1.0mg/L. The total toxin was degraded more rapidly with the ClO2 dosage increasing from 0.1mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Moreover, the damage on cell structure after oxidation resulted in released intracellular organic matter, which contributed to the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) as disinfection by-products. Therefore, the use of ClO2 as an oxidant for treating algal-rich water should be carefully considered.

  19. Application of Highly Purified Electrolyzed Chlorine Dioxide for Tilapia Fillet Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen-Hsing; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Chao-Chin; Huang, Hao-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to develop an electrolysis method to generate high-concentration chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for tilapia fillet disinfection. The designed generator produced up to 3500 ppm of ClO2 at up to 99% purity. Tilapia fillets were soaked in a 400 ppm ClO2 solution for 5, 10, and 25 min. Results show that total plate counts of tilapia, respectively, decreased by 5.72 to 3.23, 2.10, and 1.09 log CFU/g. In addition, a 200 ppm ClO2 solution eliminated coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli in 5 min with shaking treatment. Furthermore, ClO2 and trihalomethanes (THMs) residuals on tilapia fillets were analyzed by GC/MS and were nondetectable (GC-MS detection limit was 0.12 ppb). The results conform to Taiwan's environmental protection regulations and act governing food sanitation. PMID:24696651

  20. Disinfection of bore well water with chlorine dioxide/sodium hypochlorite and hydrodynamic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Jia, Aiyin; Wu, Yue; Wu, Chunde; Chen, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) on potable water disinfection of chemicals was investigated. The bore well water was introduced into HC set-up to examine the effect of HC alone and combination of HC and chemicals such as chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite. The effect of inlet pressure and geometrical parameters on disinfection was studied using HC alone and the results showed that increasing inlet pressure and using more and bigger holes of orifice plates can result in a higher disinfection rates. When HC was combined with chemicals, HC can reduce the doses of the chemicals and shorten the time of disinfection. It was also found that the decrease in bacteria concentration followed a first-order kinetic model. As for the experiment of combination of HC and sodium hypochlorite for disinfection, HC not only improves the disinfection rate but also degrades natural organic matter and chloroform. Compared with only sodium hypochlorite disinfection, combined processes get higher disinfection rate and lower production of chloroform, particularly the pretreatment with HC enhances the disinfection rate by 32% and there is a simultaneous reduction in production of chloroform by 39%.

  1. In Situ Generation of Chlorine Dioxide for Surface Decontamination of Produce.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Cheng-An; Huang, Lihan; Wu, Vivian Chi-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are frequently contaminated with bacterial pathogens and implicated in foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to develop a unique surface decontamination method for produce using sodium chlorite and an acid in a sequential treatment. The surfaces of cantaloupe rinds, peels of cucumbers, stem scars of grape tomatoes, and leaves of baby spinach were inoculated with Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes at 5 to 6 log CFU/g, submerged in 1.6 to 4% sodium chlorite solutions for 10 or 30 min, dried for 20 min, and then soaked in 6 mM hydrogen chloride (HCl) for 10 or 30 min and dried for 20 min. Control samples were treated with deionized water, sodium chlorite, HCl, or a premixed solution of sodium chlorite and HCl for comparison. The control treatments reduced the levels of both pathogens on the samples by only 0.3 to 2.9 log CFU/g, whereas the sequential treatment caused significantly higher reductions (P < 0.05) of 5.1 to 5.6 log CFU/g, effectively eliminating the inoculated pathogens. The more effective decontamination resulting from the sequential treatment was attributed to the in situ formation of chlorine dioxide within the plant tissues under the surface by the reaction between sodium chlorite absorbed by the produce and HCl. These results suggest that the sequential use of sodium chlorite and acid is a potentially effective treatment for elimination of foodborne pathogens on produce.

  2. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide as a supplementary pretreatment reagent for lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Acharjee, Tapas C; Jiang, Zhihua; Haynes, Robert Daniel; Lee, Yoon Y

    2017-08-10

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a bleaching reagent used in paper industry. Two different types of pretreatment methods were investigated incorporating ClO2 as a secondary reagent: (a) alkaline followed by ClO2 treatment; (b) dilute-sulfuric acid followed ClO2 treatment. In these methods, ClO2 treatment has shown little effect on delignification. Scheme-a has shown a significant improvement in enzymatic digestibility of glucan far above that treated by ammonia alone. On the contrary, dilute-acid followed by ClO2 treatment has shown negative effect on the enzymatic hydrolysis. The main factors affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis are the changes of the chemical structure of lignin and its distribution on the biomass surface. ClO2 treatment significantly increases the carboxylic acid content and reduces phenolic groups of lignin, affecting hydrophobicity of lignin and the H-bond induced association between the enzyme and lignin. This collectively led to reduction of unproductive binding of enzyme with lignin, consequently increasing the digestibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of chlorine dioxide for the inactivation of copepod zooplankton in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei; Cai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The presence of zooplankton in drinking water treatment system may cause a negative effect on the aesthetic value of drinking water and may also increase the threat to human health due to they being the carriers of bacteria. Very little research has been done on the effects of copepod inactivation and the mechanisms involved in this process. In a series of bench-scale experiments we used a response surface method to assess the sensitivity of copepod to inactivation when chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) was used as a disinfectant. We also assessed the effects of the ClO₂dosage, exposure time, organic matter concentration and temperature. Results indicated that the inactivation rate improved with increasing dosage, exposure time and temperature, whereas it decreased with increasing organic matter concentration. Copepod inactivation was more sensitive to the ClO₂dose than that to the exposure time, while being maintained at the same Ct-value conditions. The activation energy at different temperatures revealed that the inactivation of copepods with ClO₂was temperature-dependent. The presence of organic matter resulted in a lower available dose as well as a shorter available exposure time, which resulted in a decrease in inactivation efficiency.

  4. Reactions of aquacobalamin and cob(II)alamin with chlorite and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dereven'kov, Ilia A; Shpagilev, Nikita I; Valkai, László; Salnikov, Denis S; Horváth, Attila K; Makarov, Sergei V

    2017-06-01

    Reactions of aquacobalamin (H2O-Cbl(III)) and its one-electron reduced form (cob(II)alamin, Cbl(II)) with chlorite (ClO2(-)) and chlorine dioxide (ClO 2(•) ) were studied by conventional and stopped-flow UV-Vis spectroscopies and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). ClO2(-) does not react with H2O-Cbl(III), but oxidizes Cbl(II) to H2O-Cbl(III) as a major product and corrin-modified species as minor products. The proposed mechanism of chlorite reduction involves formation of OCl(-) that modifies the corrin ring during the course of reaction with Cbl(II). H2O-Cbl(III) undergoes relatively slow destruction by ClO 2(•) via transient formation of oxygenated species, whereas reaction between Cbl(II) and ClO 2(•) proceeds extremely rapidly and leads to the oxidation of the Co(II)-center.

  5. On the cause of the tailing phenomenon during virus disinfection by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sigstam, Thérèse; Rohatschek, Andreas; Zhong, Qingxia; Brennecke, Moritz; Kohn, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms underlying the deviation from Chick-Watson kinetics, namely a tailing curve, during the disinfection of viruses by chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Tailing has been previously reported, but is typically attributed to the decay in disinfectant concentration. Herein, it is shown that tailing occurs even at constant ClO2 concentrations. Four working hypothesis to explain the cause of tailing were tested, specifically changes in the solution's disinfecting capacity, aggregation of viruses, resistant virus subpopulations, and changes in the virus properties during disinfection. In experiments using MS2 as a model virus, it was possible to rule out the solution's disinfecting capacity, virus aggregation and the resistant subpopulation as reasons for tailing. Instead, the cause for tailing is the deposition of an adduct onto the virus capsid over the course of the experiment, which protects the viruses. This adduct could easily be removed by washing, which restored the susceptibility of the viruses to ClO2. This finding highlights an important shortcoming of ClO2, namely its self-limiting effect on virus disinfection. It is important to take this effect into account in treatment applications to ensure that the water is sufficiently disinfected before human consumption.

  6. Chlorine dioxide as a treatment for ballast water to control invasive species: shipboard testing.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Lucie; Cox, Annie M; Campbell, Robert G; Smith, David C

    2013-10-15

    The efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in eliminating organisms present in estuarine ballast water of a containership was determined under actual operating conditions by comparing the survival of planktonic communities present in waters of treated and control ballast tanks. Sampling was via ballast-tank hatches. The treatment (5 mg L(-1)ClO2 without pre-filtration) delivered by a prototype ClO2-generating system was generally effective against planktonic assemblages, although bacterial communities rebounded after a few days. Regardless of temperature, ClO2 was very effective against phytoplankton; the effect was immediate, without resurgence. Some zooplankters in the ≥ 50-μm fraction may survive the biocide, especially those able to find refuge within a protective coating (e.g., cysts, resting eggs, and shells) or in sediment. In order to boost efficacy, a pre-filtration step is recommended (now installed as standard equipment) to lower the intake of the ≥ 50-μm fraction and lessen the challenge posed by this size class.

  7. [Evaluation of genotoxicity of sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide and peracetic acid using plant tests].

    PubMed

    Feretti, D; Zani, C; Alberti, A; Copetta, L; Nardi, G; Monarca, S

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the potential genotoxic effects of three drinking water disinfectants by means of in vivo short-term mutagenicity tests using plants. The study was carried out in laboratory using distilled water disinfected with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and peracetic acid (PAA) at different concentrations both in neutral and acid conditions. Untreated distilled water was used as a negative control. Micronuclei test in Tradescantia pollen cells and chromosomal aberration test in root cells of Allium cepa were the bioassays performed by exposing directly plant bioindicators to treated and untreated distilled water. The Tradescantia/micronuclei test gave positive results in most of the ClO2-treated water samples but only at acid pH. The Allium cepa test showed genotoxicity in NaClO-treated samples at acid pH and in a ClO2-treated sample at pH 7. PAA-treated samples were always nongenotoxic. Since the concentrations tested of free disinfectants are usually present in drinking water for biocidal purposes, genotoxicity of these compounds could be a public health problem.

  8. Multistate vibronic interactions and nonadiabatic wave packet dynamics in the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Susanta; Ritschel, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    We report theoretical investigations on the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide molecule by ab initio quantum dynamical methods. This band exhibits a highly complex structure and represents a composite portrait of five excited energetically close-lying electronic states of ClO 2+. Much of this complexity is likely to be arising due to strong vibronic interactions among these electronic states - which we address and examine herein. The near equilibrium MRCI potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these five cationic states reported by Peterson and Werner [J. Chem. Phys. 99 (1993) 302] for the C2v configuration, are extended for the Cs geometry assuming a harmonic vibration along the asymmetric stretching mode. The strength of the vibronic coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian are calculated by ab initio CASSCF-MRCI method and conical intersections of the PESs are established. The diabatic Hamiltonian matrix is constructed within a linear vibronic coupling scheme and the resulting PESs are employed in the nuclear dynamical simulations, carried out with the aid of a time-dependent wave packet approach. Companion calculations are performed for transitions to the uncoupled electronic states in order to reveal explicitly the impact of the nonadiabatic coupling on the photoelectron dynamics. The theoretical findings are in good accord with the experimental observations. The femtosecond nonradiative decay dynamics of ClO 2+ excited electronic states mediated by conical intersections is also examined and discussed.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of the weakly solvent dependent relaxation dynamics following chlorine dioxide photoexcitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooksby, Craig; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Reid, Philip J.

    2003-11-01

    The solvation dynamics following photoexcitation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in different solvents are investigated by classical molecular dynamics. Following previous work on the aqueous response to OClO photoexcitation [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 4563 (2003)], the present study considers the response of chloroform and cyclohexane; these three liquids present unique solvent environments that differ significantly in both polarity and structure. The study is designed to ascertain the origin of the solvent-invariant homogeneous linewidth associated with OClO photoexcitation and to confirm, at the molecular level, whether the relaxation dynamics are similar across dissimilar solvents due to chance or a common relaxation origin. The results obtained here are used to predict the time scale of solvent-induced optical dephasing, and excellent agreement with experiment is observed for all solvents. Analysis demonstrates that the solvation dynamics of OClO are dominated by short-ranged mechanical solute-solvent interactions regardless of the identity and electrostatic properties of the solvent. Low-frequency translational motions dominate the coupling spectrum, and virtually no contribution to energy gap relaxation is achieved through intramolecular solvent motions. The invariant homogeneous linewidth is attributed to the similarity in the primary response of all solvents to OClO photoexcitation.

  10. Turing pattern formation in the chlorine dioxide-iodine- malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setayeshgar, Sima

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry- breaking perturbations (the Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experimental results. We also verify that the two-variable reduction of the chemical model employed in the linear stability analysis is justified. Finally, we present numerical solution of the CDIMA system in two dimensions which is in qualitative agreement with experiments. This result also confirms our linear stability analysis, while demonstrating the feasibility of numerical exploration of realistic chemical models.

  11. Effect of antecedent growth conditions on sensitivity of Escherichia coli to chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, J D; Matin, A; Roberts, P V

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to inactivation by antibacterial agents that is induced by the growth environment was studied. Escherichia coli was grown in batch culture and in a chemostat, and the following parameters were varied: type of substrate, growth rate, temperature, and cell density during growth. Low doses (0.75 mg/liter) of chlorine dioxide were used to inactivate the cultures. The results demonstrated that populations grown under conditions that more closely approximated natural aquatic environments were more resistant than those grown under commonly employed batch culture conditions. In particular, bacteria grown at submaximal rates were more resistant than their counterparts grown at mumax. The most resistant populations encountered in this study were those grown at D values of 0.02 h-1 and 0.06 h-1 at 25 degrees C. Growth at 15 degrees C led to greater resistance than did growth at 37 degrees C. The conditions that produced relatively resistant phenotypes were much closer to those found in most natural environments than are the typical conditions of batch culture methods. The importance of major physiological changes that can be induced by the antecedent growth environment is discussed in light of the possible modes of action of several disinfectants. PMID:6756305

  12. Femtosecond pump probe studies of chlorine dioxide photochemistry in water and acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew J.; Hayes, Sophia C.; Reid, Philip J.

    1998-09-01

    The reaction dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in water and acetonitrile are investigated using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The change in optical density following photoexcitation of OClO at 400 nm is monitored at 12 wavelengths ranging from 267 to 900 nm. The dynamics observed at 267 and 400 nm demonstrate that the geminate recombination quantum yield of the primary ClO and O photofragments to reform ground-state OClO is reduced by a factor of six in acetonitrile relative to water. Calculations are presented that model the contribution of vibrationally excited OClO formed by geminate recombination to the pump-probe dynamics. Comparison of the experimental and computational results demonstrates that a portion of the dynamics can be attributed to vibrationally excited OClO. However, the optical-density changes observed between 700 and 900 nm are similar in magnitude for both solvents, suggesting that another species not produced by geminate recombination is responsible for these dynamics. The appearance and relaxation kinetics in acetonitrile are significantly slower than in water demonstrating the solvent dependence of photoproduct formation and ground-state vibrational relaxation. Reasons for this dependence including Coulombic solvent-solute interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonding are discussed.

  13. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding in chlorine dioxide photochemistry: A time-resolved resonance Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philpott, Matthew P.; Hayes, Sophia C.; Thomsen, Carsten L.; Reid, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    The geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in ethanol and 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) are investigated using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. Stokes spectra are measured as a function of time following photoexcitation using degenerate pump and probe wavelengths of 398 nm. For OClO dissolved in ethanol, subpicosecond geminate recombination occurs resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO with a quantum yield of 0.5±0.1. Following recombination, intermolecular-vibrational relaxation of OClO occurs with a time constant of 31±10 ps. For OClO dissolved in TFE, recombination occurs with a time constant of 1.8±0.8 ps and a quantum yield of only 0.3±0.1. The intermolecular-vibrational-relaxation time constant of OClO in TFE is 79±27 ps. The reduced geminate-recombination quantum yield, delayed recombination, and slower vibrational relaxation for OClO in TFE is interpreted in terms of greater self-association of the solvent. Degenerate pump-probe experiments are also presented that demonstrate decay of the Cl-solvent charge-transfer complex on the ˜1-ns time scale in ethanol and TFE. This time is significantly longer than the abstraction times observed for other systems demonstrating that Cl hydrogen abstraction from alcohols occurs in the presence of a significant energy barrier.

  14. Removal of pharmaceuticals in biologically treated wastewater by chlorine dioxide or peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Hey, G; Ledin, A; Jansen, J la Cour; Andersen, H R

    2012-01-01

    Removal of six active pharmaceutical ingredients in wastewater was investigated using chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or peracetic acid (PAA) as chemical oxidants. Four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and mefenamic acid) and two lipid-regulating agents (gemfibrozil and clofibric acid, a metabolite of clofibrate) were used as target substances at 40 microg/L initial concentration. Three different wastewaters types originating from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were used. One wastewater was collected after extended nitrogen removal in activated sludge, one after treatment with high-loaded activated sludge without nitrification, and one from the final effluent from the same plant where nitrogen removal was made in trickling filters for nitrification and moving-bed biofilm reactors for denitrification following the high-loaded plant. Of the six investigated compounds, only clofibric acid and ibuprofen were not removed when treated with ClO2 up to 20 mg/L. With increasing PAA dose up to 50 mg/L, significant removal of most of the pharmaceuticals was observed except for the wastewater with the highest chemical oxygen demand (COD). This indicates that chemical oxidation with ClO2 could be used for tertiary treatment at WWTPs for active pharmaceutical ingredients, whereas PAA was not sufficiently efficient.

  15. Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2014-01-13

    A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency.

  16. Chemical looping integration with a carbon dioxide gas purification unit

    DOEpatents

    Andrus, Jr., Herbert E.; Jukkola, Glen D.; Thibeault, Paul R.; Liljedahl, Gregory N.

    2017-01-24

    A chemical looping system that contains an oxidizer and a reducer is in fluid communication with a gas purification unit. The gas purification unit has at least one compressor, at least one dryer; and at least one distillation purification system; where the gas purification unit is operative to separate carbon dioxide from other contaminants present in the flue gas stream; and where the gas purification unit is operative to recycle the contaminants to the chemical looping system in the form of a vent gas that provides lift for reactants in the reducer.

  17. Methane Gas Hydrate Decomposition in a Porous Medium Upon Injection of a Warm Carbon Dioxide Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanov, M. K.; Shagapov, V. Sh.

    2016-09-01

    The characteristic features of methane gas hydrate decomposition upon injection of a warm carbon dioxide gas into a porous medium saturated with methane and its hydrate are investigated. A mathematical model is presented for heat and mass transfer in a porous medium accompanied by substitution of methane for carbon dioxide gas in the original gas hydrate. Self-similar solutions of a one-dimensional problem that describe the distribution of basic parameters in a stratum have been constructed. It is shown that there are solutions according to which methane gas hydrate may decompose either with the formation of carbon dioxide gas hydrate alone, or with the formation of both carbon dioxide gas hydrate and a mixture of methane with water. Critical diagrams of the existence of each type of solutions have been drawn.

  18. Electricity, methane and liquid carbon dioxide production from landfill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, V.A.; Lerner, S.L.; Maclean, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Landfill gas, which has a typical composition of 40-60% methane, 40-50% carbon dioxide, and a wide range of impurities, has historically been recovered solely for its heating value. After only minor impurity removal, landfill gas has been used as medium Btu industrial fuel or to generate electricity. This paper presents two processes which make use of an oxygen fed combustion step to reduce both the quantity and variety of impurities which must be removed to meet carbon dioxide product specifications. The two processes produce carbon dioxide and electricity or carbon dioxide and pipeline quality methane, respectively. In both oxygen based coproduction processes, the combustion step is integrated into the overall process so as to maximize energy efficiency. The two processes are described and anticipated project financial returns are presented.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-04-01

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2005 and March 31, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Engineered sorbents composed of sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were tested in a laboratory fluidized bed reactor system and found to be capable of essentially complete removal of carbon dioxide at 60 C in a short residence time. Upon breakthrough the sorbents can be thermally regenerated to recover essentially all of the absorbed carbon dioxide. An optimized supported sorbent tested in a pilot-scale entrained bed absorber retained its reactivity in multicycle tests and experienced no attrition. Removal of >90% of carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas was achieved in an entrained bed reactor.

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

  1. Raman Spectra and Cross Sections of Ammonia, Chlorine, Hydrogen Sulfide, Phosgene, and Sulfur Dioxide Toxic Gases in the Fingerprint Region 400-1400 cm-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-11

    region 400-1400 cm−1 using the Raman cross section of the 1285 cm−1 mode of carbon dioxide (CO2) as the reference.9 Raman cross sections of NH3, Cl2...Safety. Hydrogen sulfide (34 L of 50 ppm balance nitrogen) was purchased from Cross Company. Carbon dioxide (103 L of 4.97 ppm balance air), chlorine...AIP ADVANCES 6, 025310 (2016) Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in

  2. Oxidative stress induced by chlorine dioxide as an insecticidal factor to the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Park, Jiyeong; Kim, Eunseong; Na, Jahyun; Chun, Yong Shik; Kwon, Hyeok; Kim, Wook; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-10-01

    A novel fumigant, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a commercial bleaching and disinfection agent. Recent study indicates its insecticidal activity. However, its mode of action to kill insects is yet to be understood. This study set up a hypothesis that an oxidative stress induced by ClO2 is a main factor to kill insects. The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, is a lepidopteran insect pest infesting various stored grains. Larvae of P. interpunctella were highly susceptible to ClO2 gas, which exhibited an acute toxicity. Physiological damages by ClO2 were observed in hemocytes. At high doses, the larvae of P. interpunctella suffered significant reduction of total hemocytes. At low doses, ClO2 impaired hemocyte behaviors. The cytotoxicity of ClO2 was further analyzed using two insect cell lines, where Sf9 cells were more susceptible to ClO2 than High Five cells. The cells treated with ClO2 produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). The produced ROS amounts increased with an increase of the treated ClO2 amount. However, the addition of an antioxidant, vitamin E, significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity of ClO2 in a dose-dependent manner. To support the oxidative stress induced by ClO2, two antioxidant genes (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thioredoxin-peroxidase (Tpx)) were identified from P. interpunctella EST library using ortholog sequences of Bombyx mori. Both SOD and Tpx were expressed in larvae of P. interpunctella especially under oxidative stress induced by bacterial challenge. Exposure to ClO2 gas significantly induced the gene expression of both SOD and Tpx. RNA interference of SOD or Tpx using specific double stranded RNAs significantly enhanced the lethality of P. interpunctella to ClO2 gas treatment as well as to the bacterial challenge. These results suggest that ClO2 induces the production of insecticidal ROS, which results in a fatal oxidative stress in P. interpunctella.

  3. Quality of fresh chicken breasts using a combination of modified atmosphere packaging and chlorine dioxide sachets.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M; Cooksey, K; Dawson, P; Han, I; Vergano, P

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this research was to observe the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) combined with modified atmosphere packaging on the quality of fresh chicken breasts under refrigerated storage for 15 days. Each chicken breast was inoculated with a 4-log CFU/ml culture of Salmonella Typhimurium (nalidixic acid-resistant strain) and placed into a barrier foam tray. Fast- or slow-release ClO2 sachets were placed next to the chicken in each package. A control set of packages that did not contain a ClO2 sachet was also included in the study. Packages were flushed with either 100% N2 or 75% N2-25% CO2 and stored at 3 degrees C. Microbial analysis, CIE L.a.b. color, and sensory (appearance and aroma) were performed every 3 days for 15 days. Total plate counts for chicken increased steadily after 6 to 9 days of storage regardless of package atmosphere or ClO2 treatment. However, those treated with ClO2 sachets had 1 to 1.5 log CFU per chicken breast lower total plate counts compared with those without ClO2 sachets. After 15 days, samples treated with ClO2 (fast- and slow-release sachets) had significantly lower Salmonella Typhimurium (nalidixic acid-resistant strain) populations (approximately 1 log) compared with chicken that did not contain ClO2 sachets. The ClO2 adversely affected the color of the chicken in areas close to the sachet. No off-odor was detected by the sensory panelists.

  4. Disinfection of indoor air microorganisms in stack room of university library using gaseous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Lu, Ming-Chun; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    As with all indoor public spaces in Taiwan, the stack rooms in public libraries should meet the air quality guidelines laid down by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Accordingly, utilizing a university library in Taiwan for experimental purposes, this study investigates the efficiency of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as a disinfection agent when applied using three different treatment modes, namely a single-daily disinfection mode (SIM), a twice-daily disinfection mode (TWM), and a triple-daily disinfection mode (TRM). For each treatment mode, the ClO2 is applied using an ultrasonic aerosol device and is performed both under natural lighting conditions and under artificial lighting conditions. The indoor air quality is evaluated before and after each treatment session by measuring the bioaerosol levels of bacteria and fungi. The results show that for all three disinfection modes, the application of ClO2 reduces the indoor bacteria and fungi concentrations to levels lower than those specified by the Taiwan EPA (i.e., bacteria <1500 CFU/m(3), fungi <1000 CFU/m(3)), irrespective of the lighting conditions under which the disinfection process is performed. For each disinfection mode, a better disinfection efficiency is obtained under natural lighting conditions since ClO2 readily decomposes under strong luminance levels. Among the three treatment modes, the disinfection efficiencies of the TWM and TRM modes are very similar under natural lighting conditions and are significantly better than that of the SIM mode. Thus, overall, the results suggest that the TWM treatment protocol represents the most cost-effective and efficient method for meeting the indoor air quality requirements of the Taiwan EPA.

  5. Chlorine dioxide oxidation of Escherichia coli in water - A study of the disinfection kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Isaac; Maddila, Suresh; Lin, Johnson; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2017-03-16

    This study investigated the kinetics and mechanism of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) inactivation of a Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (ATCC 35218) in oxidant demand free (ODF) water in detail as a function of disinfectant concentration (0.5-5.0 mg/L), water pH (6.5-8.5), temperature variations (4-37°C) and bacterial density (10(5)-10(7) cfu/mL). The effects of ClO2 on bacterial cell morphology, outer membrane permeability, cytoplasmic membrane disruption and intracellular enzymatic activity were also studied to elucidate the mechanism of action on the cells. Increasing temperature and disinfectant concentration were proportional to the rate of cell killing, but efficacy was found to be significantly subdued at 0.5 mg/L and less dependent on the bacterial density. The bactericidal efficiency was higher at alkaline pH of 8 or above as compared to neutral and slightly acidic pH of 7 and 6.5 respectively. The disinfection kinetic curves followed a biphasic pattern of rapid inactivation within the initial 2 min which were followed by a tailing even in the presence of residual biocide. The curves were adequately described by the Cavg Hom model. Transmission Electron Microscopy images of the bacteria cells exposed to lethal concentrations of ClO2 indicated very little observable morphological damage to the outer membranes of the cells. ClO2 however was found to increase the permeability of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes leading to the leakage of membrane components such as 260 nm absorbing materials and inhibiting the activity of the intracellular enzyme β-D-galactosidase. It is suggested that the disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane and subsequent efflux of intracellular components result in the inactivation of the Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments.

  7. Resonance Raman intensity analysis of chlorine dioxide dissolved in chloroform: The role of nonpolar solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Catherine E.; Barham, Bethany P.; Reid, Philip J.

    2001-05-01

    Absolute resonance Raman cross sections for chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in chloroform are obtained at several excitation wavelengths spanning the photochemically relevant 2B1-2A2 optical transition. The absolute scattering cross sections of OClO are determined by reference to the 666 cm-1 transition of chloroform whose absolute scattering cross sections are reported here. The time-dependent theory for Raman and absorption are used to develop a mode-specific description of the 2A2 excited state surface. This description demonstrates that photoexcitation of OClO leads to significant structural evolution along the symmetric stretch and bend coordinates, with only limited evolution occurring along the asymmetric stretch. This description is similar to that determined for OClO dissolved in cyclohexane and water demonstrating that the excited-state structural evolution of OClO is similar in these solvents. Analysis of the OClO absolute scattering cross sections establishes that the homogeneous linewidth is 95±15 cm-1 in chloroform, essentially identical to the linewidths in cyclohexane and water. To establish the origin of this linewidth, the fluorescence cross section for OClO dissolved in cyclohexane is measured and found to be consistent with an excited-state lifetime of ˜200 fs. Comparison of this lifetime to the homogeneous linewidth establishes that the homogeneous broadening is dominated by solvent-induced pure dephasing. It is proposed that the apparent solvent independence of the homogeneous linewidth reflects the mechanical response of the solvent to the photoinitiated change in solute geometry. In support of this hypothesis, the homogeneous linewidth is reproduced using the viscoelastic continuum model of nonpolar solvation. Finally, it is argued that the restricted evolution along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate is due to dielectric solvent-solute interactions consistent with the increase in inhomogeneous linewidth with an increase in solvent

  8. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools.

  9. Comparison of organic tissue dissolution capacities of sodium hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cobankara, Funda Kont; Ozkan, Hatice Buyukozer; Terlemez, Arslan

    2010-02-01

    The organic tissue dissolution properties of irrigating solutions are important for the success of endodontic treatment. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been recently proposed as an irrigation solution in endodontics. The organic tissue dissolution property of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is well-known and extensively investigated, but apparently no data have been published on tissue-dissolving properties of ClO2. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare organic tissue dissolution capacity of NaOCl and ClO2. In this study, 5.25% NaOCl, 13.8% ClO2, and, as a control, isotonic saline solutions (0.9% NaCl) were used. Thirty bovine pulp specimens were previously weighed and immersed for 20 minutes in each test solution (changing the solution every 2 minutes). The pulp specimens were then blotted dry and weighed again. The percentage of weight loss was calculated and statistically analyzed by using one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey honestly significant difference tests. Saline solution did not dissolve the organic tissue. Both 5.25% NaOCl and 13.8% ClO2 dissolved the tissue pieces more effectively than saline control (P < .05). No statistically significant difference was found between the tissue-dissolving properties of 5.25% NaOCl and those of 13.8% ClO2 (P > .05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that ClO2 and NaOCl are equally efficient for dissolving organic tissue. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fast detection of lead dioxide (PbO2) in chlorinated drinking water by a two-stage iodometric method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2010-02-15

    Lead dioxide (PbO(2)) is an important corrosion product associated with lead contamination in drinking water. Quantification of PbO(2) in water samples has been proven challenging due to the incomplete dissolution of PbO(2) in sample preservation and digestion. In this study, we present a simple iodometric method for fast detection of PbO(2) in chlorinated drinking water. PbO(2) can oxidize iodide to form triiodide (I(3)(-)), a yellow-colored anion that can be detected by the UV-vis spectrometry. Complete reduction of up to 20 mg/L PbO(2) can be achieved within 10 min at pH 2.0 and KI = 4 g/L. Free chlorine can oxidize iodide and cause interference. However, this interference can be accounted by a two-stage pH adjustment, allowing free chlorine to completely react with iodide at ambient pH followed by sample acidification to pH 2.0 to accelerate the iodide oxidation by PbO(2). This method showed good recoveries of PbO(2) (90-111%) in chlorinated water samples with a concentration ranging from 0.01 to 20 mg/L. In chloraminated water, this method is limited due to incomplete quenching of monochloramine by iodide in neutral to slightly alkaline pH values. The interference of other particles that may be present in the distribution system was also investigated.

  11. Management of chlorine gas-related injuries from the Graniteville, South Carolina, train derailment.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Emily; Svendsen, Erik; Grant, Stephen; Michels, Jill E; Richardson, William H

    2014-10-01

    A widely produced chemical, chlorine is used in various industries including automotive, electronics, disinfectants, metal production, and many others. Chlorine is usually produced and transported as a pressurized liquid; however, as a gas it is a significant pulmonary irritant. Thousands of people are exposed to chlorine gas every year, and while large-scale exposures are uncommon, they are not rare. Symptoms are usually related to the concentration and length of exposure, and although treatment is largely supportive, certain specific therapies have yet to be validated with randomized controlled trials. The majority of those exposed completely recover with supportive care; however, studies have shown the potential for persistent inflammation and chronic hyperreactivity. This case report describes an incident that occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina, when a train derailment exposed hundreds of people to chlorine gas. This report reviews the events of January 6, 2005, and the current treatment options for chlorine gas exposure.(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-6).

  12. Comparative toxicities of oxygen, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chlorine bleaching filtrates - microtox toxicities of raw and processed filtrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ard, T.A.; McDonough, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    It has claimed that effluents from the bleaching of kraft pulp with chlorine and its compounds have deleterious effects on the aquatic environment. It has been further suggested that bleaching without the use of chlorine or its compounds will produce innocuous effluents. To obtain information on the validity of these claims, we have conducted a laboratory study of the toxicity of filtrates from chlorine-based and nonchlorine bleaching processes. We have also examined two related issues. The first is whether any toxicants generated during bleaching are rendered harmless (by neutralization, storage, and biological treatment) before being discharged to the environment. The second related issue is whether any toxicity observed in mill effluents actually originates in the bleaching process, as opposed to being due to raw material components or compounds formed during the pulping step that precedes bleaching. Several conclusions were drawn from this study. (1) There is a background level of toxicity which originates in the oxygen stage, process steps prior to bleaching, or in the wood raw material. It is decreased by neutralization and storage, but residual toxicity may still be detected after two weeks. (2) If the sum of the first and second stage toxicities is taken as an indicator of overall toxicity, the untreated filtrates may be ranked as follows: Control (Background) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > C(EO). However, these toxicities are of no importance in regard to environmental effects because of their ephemeral nature and the likelihood of their being reduced or eliminated prior to effluent discharge. Evidence for this statement is the ease with which all except the C(EO) were detoxified by neutralization and storage. (3) After neutralization and storage for two weeks at room temperature the ranking of toxicities becomes: C(EO) > D(EO) > Z(EO) > Background. The last three are similar in magnitude.

  13. An evaluation of the use of chlorine dioxide (Tristel One-Shot) in an automated washer/disinfector (Medivator) fitted with a chlorine dioxide generator for decontamination of flexible endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Coates, D

    2001-05-01

    Microbiological tests were carried out to evaluate a new chlorine dioxide sterilant: Tristel OneShot. Preliminary in vitro suspension tests showed that solutions containing around 140 ppm chlorine dioxide achieved a reduction factor exceeding 10(6) of Staphylococcus aureus in 1min and of Bacillus subtilis spores in 2.5 min in the presence of 3g/L bovine albumin. Subsequent tests evaluated the effectiveness of Tristel One-Shot in a Medivator washer/disinfector fitted with a Tristel Generator for processing flexible endoscopes. Each test run involved three stages. In the first, the instrument and air-water channels of a gastroscope were inoculated with a suspension of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10(8)cfu/ml) in 10% sodium glutamate and serum (0, 5 or 10%) and then drained, partially dried, and saline flushed through for total viable counts (TVCs). In the second stage, the channels were re-inoculated with test organisms; detergent was flushed through the channels which were then brushed; and saline was flushed through for TVCs. In the third stage, the channels were re-inoculated; detergent was flushed through the channels which were then brushed; the endoscope was processed in the Medivator; and saline was flushed through for TVCs. Carrying out all three stages enabled determination of (1) the contribution played by manual cleaning of channels prior to processing in the Medivator, and (2) the combined effect of manual cleaning followed by processing. Two series of test runs were done. In the first, the Tristel Generator was set to generate 230ppm chlorine dioxide, and in the second 150ppm. In the first, cleaning followed by processing in the Medivator consistently achieved a >/= 10(6)-fold reduction of test organisms, and in the second a >/= 10(5)-fold reduction. Pre-cleaning of channels was very important-when done the initial concentration of serum in the inoculum (0-10%) had no affect on the results obtained after processing.

  14. Ag-doped titanium dioxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei Sheini, Navid; Rohani, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been utilized for the fabrication of oxygen sensitive ceramic bodies. In this work, disk-shaped TiO2 pellets are fabricated by the sintering of the press- formed anatase powder at 1000°C. Two silver contacts are printed on one of the top base of each sample. Silver wire segments are connected to the printed electrodes. It is shown that the gradual diffusion of silver into titanium dioxide from the electrodes profoundly affects the resistive properties of the ceramic samples. SEM, XRD and EDAX analyses are carried out to determine the position of the silver diffused in the structure. At 35°C, before silver diffusion, the electrical resistance of the device decreases ten times in response to the presence of 3000 ppm ethanol contamination. Sensitivity (Rair/Rgas) to reducing gases is severely affected by the silver doping level in the titanium dioxide. The progress of silver diffusion continuously decreases the sensitivity till it become less than one. Further progress in silver diffusion brings the devices to the condition at which the resistance increases at the presents of reducing gases. In this condition, inverse sensitivities (Rgas/Rair) as large as 103 are demonstrated.

  15. Chlorine gas exposure at a metal recycling facility--California, 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-07-22

    On June 8, 2010, chlorine gas was released from a ruptured, 1-ton, low-pressure tank being recycled at a California metal recycling facility. A total of 23 persons, including employees, customers, and workers at nearby businesses, were treated for the effects of the fumes at seven area hospitals. Chlorine is a corrosive, greenish-yellow gas that is heavier than air and can cause severe respiratory damage; it is used widely in water purification, sewage treatment, and disinfectant washes for foods. Following the incident, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) and CDC collaborated with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) on an Assessment of Chemical Exposures (ACE) to determine 1) the circumstances surrounding those exposed during the chlorine gas release, 2) health effects associated with exposures, and 3) recommendations for preventing recurrences. This report describes the chlorine gas release in California and summarizes the results of the ACE investigation. Of 29 persons potentially exposed to chlorine gas, 27 were interviewed to collect information regarding their exposures. In addition, information regarding acute health effects and symptoms was abstracted from medical records. At the time of the chlorine gas release, 15 persons were outdoors, and 13 were exposed for >30 minutes before they were decontaminated. Twenty-three persons reported experiencing one or more upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms within 24 hours of exposure; six persons were hospitalized for 1-11 days. Based on these findings, CDPH issued a statewide alert to all recycling facilities on how to handle containers with potential hazardous waste.

  16. A comparison of six different ballast water treatment systems based on UV radiation, electrochlorination and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Stehouwer, Peter Paul; Buma, Anita; Peperzak, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The spread of aquatic invasive species through ballast water is a major ecological and economical threat. Because of this, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) set limits to the concentrations of organisms allowed in ballast water. To meet these limits, ballast water treatment systems (BWTSs) were developed. The main techniques used for ballast water treatment are ultraviolet (UV) radiation and electrochlorination (EC). In this study, phytoplankton regrowth after treatment was followed for six BWTSs. Natural plankton communities were treated and incubated for 20 days. Growth, photosystem II efficiency and species composition were followed. The three UV systems all showed similar patterns of decrease in phytoplankton concentrations followed by regrowth. The two EC and the chlorine dioxide systems showed comparable results. However, UV- and chlorine-based treatment systems showed significantly different responses. Overall, all BWTSs reduced phytoplankton concentrations to below the IMO limits, which represents a reduced risk of aquatic invasions through ballast water.

  17. Comparative evaluation of 15% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid plus cetavlon and 5% chlorine dioxide in removal of smear layer: A scanning electron microscope study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sandeep; Arora, Vimal; Majithia, Inderpal; Dhiman, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh; Ather, Amber

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of smear layer removal by 5% chlorine dioxide and 15% Ethylenediamine Tetra-Acetic Acid plus Cetavlon (EDTAC) from the human root canal dentin. Materials and Methods Fifty single rooted human mandibular anterior teeth were divided into two groups of 20 teeth each and control group of 10 teeth. The root canals were prepared till F3 protaper and initially irrigated with 2% Sodium hypochlorite followed by 1 min irrigation with 15% EDTAC or 5% Chlorine dioxide respectively. The control group was irrigated with saline. The teeth were longitudinally split and observed under Scanning electron microscope SEM (×2000). Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was done using General Linear Mixed Model. Results: At the coronal thirds, no statistically significant difference was found between 15% EDTAC and 5% Chlorine dioxide in removing smear layer. In the middle and apical third region 15% EDTAC showed better smear layer removal ability than 5% Chlorine dioxide. Conclusion: Final irrigation with 15% EDTAC is superior to 5% chlorine dioxide in removing smear layer in the middle and apical third of radicular dentin. PMID:23853455

  18. Sevoflurane as a therapy for acute chlorine gas exposure in an austere healthcare environment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellenger, Sarah R; Frizzi, James D

    2014-06-01

    Chlorine is a common agent found worldwide in industrial and household applications. This element is found everywhere and anywhere around the globe. Because of its ubiquitous nature in the world, chlorine-injured patients may be expected at all medical facilities, from large-urban to small-community to austere-tent facilities. Chlorine has been used as a chemical weapon since 1915 and has been accidentally released in transport, storage, and use, causing industrial accidents worldwide. A patient with a history of severe chlorine inhalational injury sustained 2 chlorine gas exposures within 48 hours. The patient was treated with intubation, mechanical ventilation, and directed therapies for severe injury by chlorine gas inhalation. Sevoflurane has a role in treating chlorine inhalation injury. Additional therapies are possible, some of which are not available in remote locations.

  19. Hg reactions in the presence of chlorine species: homogeneous gas phase and heterogeneous gas-solid phase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hedrick, Elizabeth; Biswas, Pratim

    2002-11-01

    The kinetics of Hg chlorination (with HCl) was studied using a flow reactor system with an online Hg analyzer, and speciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (alpha), overall rate constant (k'), and activation energy (Ea), were estimated based on the simple overall reaction pathway. The reaction order with respect to C(Hg), k', and Ea were found to be 1.55, 5.07 x 10(-2) exp(-1939.68/T) [(microg/m3)(-055)(s)(-1)]. and 16.13 [kJ/ mol], respectively. The effect of chlorine species (HCl, CH2Cl2) on the in situ Hg capture method previously developed (28) was also investigated. The efficiency of capture of Hg by this in situ method was higher than 98% in the presence of chlorine species. Furthermore, under certain conditions, the presence of chlorine enhanced the removal of elemental Hg by additional gas-phase oxidation.

  20. Chlorine gas toxicity from mixture of bleach with other cleaning products--California.

    PubMed

    1991-09-13

    From October 1987 through November 1989, five episodes of chlorine gas exposure with toxicity to at least 14 persons occurred at two state hospitals in California. Each hospital provides inpatient treatment to approximately 1000 forensic psychiatric patients. As part of their rehabilitation programs, selected patients perform cleaning duties under the supervision of janitors or nursing staff. Each incident occurred during the performance of these duties and involved the mixture of bleach (sodium hypochlorite) and a phosphoric acid cleaner by inpatients. This mixture produced chlorine gas and other chemical byproducts (Figure 1a and 1b) and resulted in temporary illness in exposed persons.

  1. Determination of degradation products and pathways of mancozeb and ethylenethiourea (ETU) in solutions due to ozone and chlorine dioxide treatments.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Sun; Cash, Jerry N; Zabik, Matthew J

    2003-02-26

    The objective of the present study was to determine the degradation products of mancozeb and ethylenethiourea (ETU) and elucidate the possible degradation pathways in solution as a result of chemical oxidation using ozone and chlorine dioxide. This study was developed in a solution at 100 ppm of mancozeb and ETU concentration over the course of 60 min. Two different oxidizing agents used in this study were (1) ozone at 3 ppm and (2) chlorine dioxide at 20 ppm. Ozone was continuously provided throughout the course of the reaction. Degradation products were detected with high-resolution GC-MS. The total analysis time was 4 min per sample combined with rapid GC separation and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Hydrolysis of mancozeb led to m/z 144 ion fragmentation, which is 5-imidazoledithiocarboxylic acid, as a major degradation product. ETU showed M(+) 102, which corresponds to its mass, indicating this compound was stable in distilled water and did not undergo hydrolysis during 60 min. The average retention times of mancozeb and ETU were approximately 181-189 and 210-230 s, respectively. Ozonation of mancozeb produced ETU as a major product. Treatment of ETU with ozone produced several degradation compounds. From prolonged ozonation, the CS(2) or CS group was removed. Overall, several byproducts identified were M(+) 60, M(+) 84, M(+) 163, M(+) 117, and M(+) 267 by ozone and M(+) 117, M(+) 86, and M(+) 163 by chlorine dioxide treatment. Several of these have been reported, but others have never been reported previously.

  2. Oxidative transformation of micropollutants during municipal wastewater treatment: comparison of kinetic aspects of selective (chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ferrate VI, and ozone) and non-selective oxidants (hydroxyl radical).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunho; von Gunten, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Chemical oxidation processes have been widely applied to water treatment and may serve as a tool to minimize the release of micropollutants (e.g. pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors) from municipal wastewater effluents into the aquatic environment. The potential of several oxidants for the transformation of selected micropollutants such as atenolol, carbamazepine, 17 alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), ibuprofen, and sulfamethoxazole was assessed and compared. The oxidants include chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ferrate(VI), and ozone as selective oxidants versus hydroxyl radicals as non-selective oxidant. Second-order rate constants (k) for the reaction of each oxidant show that the selective oxidants react only with some electron-rich organic moieties (ERMs), such as phenols, anilines, olefins, and deprotonated-amines. In contrast, hydroxyl radicals show a nearly diffusion-controlled reactivity with almost all organic moieties (k>or=10(9)M(-1) s(-1)). Due to a competition for oxidants between a target micropollutant and wastewater matrix (i.e. effluent organic matter, EfOM), a higher reaction rate with a target micropollutant does not necessarily translate into more efficient transformation. For example, transformation efficiencies of EE2, a phenolic micropollutant, in a selected wastewater effluent at pH 8 varied only within a factor of 7 among the selective oxidants, even though the corresponding k for the reaction of each selective oxidant with EE2 varied over four orders of magnitude. In addition, for the selective oxidants, the competition disappears rapidly after the ERMs present in EfOM are consumed. In contrast, for hydroxyl radicals, the competition remains practically the same during the entire oxidation. Therefore, for a given oxidant dose, the selective oxidants were more efficient than hydroxyl radicals for transforming ERMs-containing micropollutants, while hydroxyl radicals are capable of transforming micropollutants even without ERMs. Besides Ef

  3. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-09-30

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

  4. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskins, Delora K.; Pruc, Emily E.; Epstein, Irving R.; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-01

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  5. Galerkin analysis of light-induced patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Sen, Shrabani; Riaz, Syed Shahed; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2009-05-01

    The photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system has been an experimental paradigm for the study of Turing pattern over the last several years. When subjected to illumination of varied intensity by visible light the patterns undergo changes from spots to stripes, vice versa, and their mixture. We carry out a nonlinear analysis of the underlying model in terms of a Galerkin scheme with finite number of modes to explore the nature of the stability and existence of various modes responsible for the type and crossover of the light-induced patterns.

  6. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Delora K; Pruc, Emily E; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-29

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  7. Removal of ethylene and bioaerosol by chlorine dioxide using a chemical scrubbing system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsu-Hua; Wu, Li-Chun; You, Ya-Ting; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2009-02-15

    Ethylene (C2H4) and bioaerosol are commonly present in the inside atmosphere of postharvest fruit and vegetable storage facilities, which may affect the aging of postharvest fruit and human health. We have assessed the feasibility of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as the scrubbing solution in a chemical scrubbing tower for simultaneously removing C2H4 and bioaerosol emissions from a gas stream. Parameters such as the ClO2concentration, contact time, and liquid-to-gas (L/G) ratio were examined with the aim of determining the optimal operating conditions. Using the system reported here, the optimal C2H4 removal efficiency was 99.5% when 500 ppm ClO2 was used at a reaction time of 30-60 s under a continuous non-recycle ClO2 flow mode. In terms of C2H4 removal, a greater L/G resulted in a higher C2H4 removal efficiency up to the optimal ratio of 12.5. In terms of the simultaneous removal of C2H4 and bioaerosol, the removal efficiency of C2H4 was 99.2% and those for the bioaersols of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were 99.92 and 99.10%, respectively, under a continuous non-recycle flow mode. Our results also indicate that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) can be a valuable indicator for the timing of the replacement of the scrubbing solution in the system under a continuous recycle flow mode. Additional confirmation of the feasibility of the ORP as an indicator of C2H4 and bioaerosol removal in situ was obtained in a 3-month test of our system in continuous recycle flow mode with the periodical replacement of scrubbing solution, ClO2. The removal efficiencies for C2H4, bacterial and fungus aerosol, and total hydrocarbon compounds (THC) were 83.4, 96.8, 96.1, and 76.5%, respectively. Our results prove that ClO2 is an excellent scrubbing solution in the chemical scrubbing tower for the removal of C2H4 emissions and bioaerosol. We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility.

  8. Continuous analysis of nitrogen dioxide in gas streams of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, W. T.; Kispert, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Analyzer and sampling system continuously monitors nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the feed and tail gas streams of a facility recovering nitric acid. The system, using a direct calorimetric approach, makes use of readily available equipment and is flexible and reliable in operation.

  9. Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Using Ion Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W L; Johnson, M R

    2006-04-21

    We are developing a new way of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas based on ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, which can be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a nearly pure gas. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas. The slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is impervious to trace acid gases that destroy existing solvents, and no pre-separation is necessary. The simple, robust nature of the process lends itself to small separation plants. Although the energy cost of the ion pump is significant, we anticipate that it will be compete favorably with the current 35% energy penalty of chemical stripping systems in use at power plants. There is the distinct possibility that this simple method could be significantly more efficient than existing processes.

  10. Chlorine dioxide inactivation of enterovirus 71 in water and its impact on genomic targets.

    PubMed

    Jin, Min; Shan, Jinyang; Chen, Zhaoli; Guo, Xuan; Shen, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Zhigang; Xue, Bin; Wang, Yongguang; Zhu, Dunwan; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Junwen

    2013-05-07

    To control the waterborne transmission of enterovirus 71(EV71), which is associated with hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD), it is essential to know the inactivation effectiveness of disinfectants on EV71 in water. In this article, we present a comparative analysis of the effects on EV71 following exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) under different doses, pH, and temperature conditions. We show that the EV71 exhibited strong resistance to ClO2 (more than the MS2 standard) and that Ct value ranges required for a 4-log reduction of EV71 in buffered, disinfectant demand-free water at pH 7.2 and 20 °C by ClO2 were 4.24-6.62 mg/L·min according to the efficiency factor Hom model. ClO2 inactivation of the virus was temperature- and pH-dependent. The virucidal efficiency was higher at pH 8.2 than at pH 5.6 and pH 7.2 and higher at 36 °C than at 4 and 20 °C. In addition, we also observed the impact of ClO2 on the entire viral genome using RT-PCR, which indicated that the 5' noncoding region (5'-NCR) within the EV71 genome, specifically the 1-118 nt region, was the most easily damaged by ClO2 and correlated with viral infectivity. Our study has not only provided guidelines for EV71 disinfection strategies of waste and drinking water, but also confirmed the importance of the 5'-NCR for EV71 infectivity and may demonstrate a general inactivation by ClO2 of enteric virus by damaging the 5'-NCR. Furthermore, 5'-NCR can be used as a target region for PCR to investigate infectious virus contamination in environmental water and evaluate the inactivation effects of ClO2.

  11. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: relevance to drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-06

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10(6) M(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 0.1 g L(-1) CuO at 21 ± 1 °C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH(-) is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes.

  12. Sanitizing radish seeds by simultaneous treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide, high relative humidity, and mild heat.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jihyun; Choi, Moonhak; Son, Hyeri; Beuchat, Larry R; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Hoikyung; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2016-11-21

    Sanitizing radish seeds intended for edible sprout production was achieved by applying simultaneous treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), high relative humidity (RH, 100%), and mild heat (55°C). Gaseous ClO2 was produced from aqueous ClO2 (0.66ml) by mixing sulfuric acid (5% w/v) with sodium chlorite (10 mg/mL) in a sealed container (1.8L). Greater amounts of gaseous ClO2 were measured at 23% RH (144ppm after 6h) than at 100% RH (66ppm after 6h); however, the lethal activity of gaseous ClO2 against naturally occurring mesophilic aerobic bacteria (MAB) on radish seeds was significantly enhanced at 100% RH. For example, when exposed to gaseous ClO2 at 23% RH, the number of MAB on radish seeds decreased from 3.7logCFU/g to 2.6logCFU/g after 6h. However, when exposed to gaseous ClO2 at 100% RH for 6h, the MAB population decreased to 0.7logCFU/g after 6h. Gaseous ClO2 was produced in higher amounts at 55°C than at 25°C, but decreased more rapidly over time at 55°C than at 25°C. The lethal activity of gaseous ClO2 against MAB on radish seeds was greater at 55°C than at 25°C. When radish seeds were treated with gaseous ClO2 (peak concentration: 195ppm) at 100% RH and 55°C, MAB were reduced to populations below the detectable level (<-0.7logCFU/g) within 2h without decreasing the seed germination rate (97.7%). The lethality of combined treatments against artificially inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 was also evaluated. When exposed to gaseous ClO2 at 100% RH and 55°C for 6h, the initial number of E. coli O157:H7 (3.5logCFU/g) on radish seeds decreased to below the detection limit (0.7logCFU/g) by direct plating but it was not eliminated from seeds. The germination rate of radish seeds was not significantly (P>0.05) decreased after treatment for 6h. The information reported here will be useful when developing decontamination strategies for producing microbiologically safe radish seed sprouts.

  13. Effect of pipe corrosion scales on chlorine dioxide consumption in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L; Vidic, Radisav

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that temperature and total organic carbon in drinking water would cause chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) loss in a water distribution system and affect the efficiency of ClO(2) for Legionella control. However, among the various causes of ClO(2) loss in a drinking water distribution system, the loss of disinfectant due to the reaction with corrosion scales has not been studied in detail. In this study, the corrosion scales from a galvanized iron pipe and a copper pipe that have been in service for more than 10 years were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The impact of these corrosion scale materials on ClO(2) decay was investigated in de-ionized water at 25 and 45 degrees C in a batch reactor with floating glass cover. ClO(2) decay was also investigated in a specially designed reactor made from the iron and copper pipes to obtain more realistic reaction rate data. Goethite (alpha-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) were identified as the main components of iron corrosion scale. Cuprite (Cu(2)O) was identified as the major component of copper corrosion scale. The reaction rate of ClO(2) with both iron and copper oxides followed a first-order kinetics. First-order decay rate constants for ClO(2) reactions with iron corrosion scales obtained from the used service pipe and in the iron pipe reactor itself ranged from 0.025 to 0.083 min(-1). The decay rate constant for ClO(2) with Cu(2)O powder and in the copper pipe reactor was much smaller and it ranged from 0.0052 to 0.0062 min(-1). Based on these results, it can be concluded that the corrosion scale will cause much more significant ClO(2) loss in corroded iron pipes of the distribution system than the total organic carbon that may be present in finished water.

  14. Effects of food composition on the inactivation of foodborne microorganisms by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Vandekinderen, I; Devlieghere, F; Van Camp, J; Kerkaert, B; Cucu, T; Ragaert, P; De Bruyne, J; De Meulenaer, B

    2009-05-31

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a strong oxidizing agent that can be applied in solution as well as in the gaseous state. It has bactericidal, fungicidal and viricidal properties. Several food-related microorganisms, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts, mould spores and Bacillus cereus spores were tested for their susceptibility to 0.08 mg/L gaseous ClO2 during 1 min at a relative humidity of 90%. In this screening, the resistance of the different groups of microorganisms towards gaseous ClO2 generally increased in the order Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, yeasts and mould spores and Bacillus cereus spores. With this treatment, reductions of microbial numbers between 0.1 and 3.5 log cfu/cm2 could be achieved. The effects of the food components starch, fat, protein and NaCl on the antimicrobial activity of gaseous ClO2 were also evaluated. Soluble starch, corn oil, butter, whey protein isolate and NaCl were added in incremental concentrations to portions of an agar medium. Then, plates of the supplemented agars were inoculated with Leuconostoc mesenteroïdes at numbers of 4 log cfu/cm2 and subsequently treated with ClO2. Both soluble starch and NaCl did not have an effect on the antimicrobial efficiency of ClO2. However, butter, corn oil or whey protein in the agar almost eliminated the antimicrobial effect of ClO2. In corn oil-water emulsions treated with gaseous ClO2 the peroxide value increased significantly, indicating the formation of primary oxidation products. Similarly, a treatment with ClO2 increased the protein carbonyl content and induced the transformation of SH-groups to -S-S-groups in whey protein. The findings suggest that gaseous ClO2 will be a highly effective decontaminating agent for carbohydrate-rich foods, but that it would be less effective for the decontamination of high-protein and fatty foods.

  15. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment.

    PubMed

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L

    2009-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met PO2/FiO2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and PO2/FiO2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity.

  16. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment⋆

    PubMed Central

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J.; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met Po2/Fio2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and Po2/Fio2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity. PMID:19041527

  17. Soil gas screening for chlorinated solvents at three contaminated karst sites in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.; Williams, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    Soil gas was sampled using active sampling techniques and passive collectors at three sites in Tennessee to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques for locating chlorinated solvent sources and flowpaths in karst aquifers. Actively collected soil gas samples were analyzed in the field with a portable gas chromatograph, and the passive soil gas collectors were analyzed in the lab with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results of the sampling indicate that the effectiveness of both techniques is highly dependent on the distribution of the contaminants in the subsurface, the geomorphic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the site, and, in one case, on seasonal conditions. Both active and passive techniques identified areas of elevated subsurface chlorinated solvent concentrations at a landfill site where contamination remains concentrated in the regolith. Neither technique detected chlorinated solvents known to be moving in the bedrock at a manufacturing site characterized by thick regolith and an absence of surficial karst features. Passive soil gas sampling had varied success detecting flowpaths for chloroform in the bedrock at a train derailment site characterized by shallow regolith and abundant surficial karst features. At the train derailment site, delineation of the contaminant flowpath through passive soil gas sampling was stronger and more detailed under Winter conditions than summer.

  18. Cryotherapy gas--to use nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide?

    PubMed

    Maiti, H; Cheyne, M F; Hobbs, G; Jeraj, H A

    1999-02-01

    Cryotherapy is regularly used in our clinic for treating genital warts. Nitrous oxide was used as the cryogenic gas. Following a health and safety review it was decided to monitor the nitrous oxide levels in the treatment room under different conditions. The Occupational Exposure Standard for nitrous oxide is 100 parts per million (PPM) (8-h time weighted average) and an indicative short-term exposure limit of 300 PPM (15-min reference period). High levels of gas were detected, especially when the exhaust was not vented to the outside. Venting of the gas to the outside could also present a hazard to adjacent areas. The situation was considered to be unacceptable and carbon dioxide was proposed as an alternative. The Occupational Exposure Standard for carbon dioxide is 5000 PPM (8-h time weighted average) and a short-term limit of 15,000 PPM (15-min reference period). Carbon dioxide levels were found to be within the Occupational Exposure Standard. There is no noticeable difference in the cryogenic efficacy of the 2 gases. Carbon dioxide is, therefore, a safer alternative. It also offers significant savings when compared with nitrous oxide.

  19. Correlation of Conformational Changes and Protein Degradation with Loss of Lysozyme Activity Due to Chlorine Dioxide Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Beng Guat; Branning, Sharon Alyssa

    2017-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a potent oxidizing agent used for the treatment of drinking water and decontamination of facilities and equipment. The purpose of this research is to elucidate the manner in which ClO2 destroys proteins by studying the effects of ClO2 on lysozyme. The degree of enzyme activity lost can be correlated to the treatment time and levels of the ClO2 used. Lysozyme activity was drastically reduced to 45.3% of original enzyme activity when exposed to 4.3 mM ClO2 in the sample after 3 h. Almost all activities were lost in 3 h after exposure to higher ClO2 concentrations of up to 16.8 and 21.9 mM. Changes in protein conformation and amount as a result of ClO2 treatment were determined using the Raman spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis. Raman shifts and the alteration of spectral features observed in the ClO2-treated lysozyme samples are associated with loss of the α-helix secondary structure, tertiary structure, and disulfide bond. Progressive degradation of the denatured lysozyme by increasing levels of chlorine dioxide was also observed in gel electrophoresis. Hence, ClO2 can effectively cause protein denaturation and degradation resulting in loss of enzyme activity.

  20. A Comparison of Wound Healing Rate Following Treatment with Aftamed and Chlorine Dioxide Gels in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the wound healing activities of Aftamed and chlorine dioxide gels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Experimental Approach. Forty-eight Sprague Dawley rats were chosen for this study, divided into 4 groups. Diabetes was induced. Two-centimeter-diameter full-thickness skin excision wounds were created. Animals were topically treated twice daily. Groups 1, the diabetic control group, were treated with 0.2 mL of sterile distilled water. Group 2 served as a reference standard were treated with 0.2 mL of Intrasite gel. Groups 3 and 4 were treated with 0.2 mL of Aftamed and 0.2 mL of chlorine dioxide gels respectively. Granulation tissue was excised on the 10th day and processed for histological and biochemical analysis. The glutathione peroxidase ,superoxide dismutase activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined. Results. Aftamed-treated wounds exhibited significant increases in hydroxyproline, cellular proliferation, the number of blood vessels, and the level of collagen synthesis. Aftamed induced an increase in the free radical-scavenging enzyme activity and significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation levels in the wounds as measured by the reduction in the MDA level. Conclusions. This study showed that Aftamed gel is able to significantly accelerate the process of wound healing in diabetic rats. PMID:22666291

  1. Effect of disinfection of drinking water with ozone or chlorine dioxide on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Mazás, E A; Masschelein, W J; Villacorta Martiez de Maturana, I; Debacker, E

    1989-01-01

    Demineralized water was seeded with controlled numbers of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum purified from fresh calf feces and subjected to different treatments with ozone or chlorine dioxide. The disinfectants were neutralized by sodium thiosulfate, and neonatal mice were inoculated intragastrically and sacrificed 7 days later for enumeration of oocyst production. Preliminary trials indicated that a minimum infection level of 1,000 oocysts (0.1-ml inoculum) per mouse was necessary to induce 100% infection. Treatment of water containing 10(4) oocysts per ml with 1.11 mg of ozone per liter (concentration at time zero [C0]) for 6 min totally eliminated the infectivity of the oocysts for neonatal mice. A level of 2.27 mg of ozone per liter (C0) was necessary to inactivate water containing 5 x 10(5) oocysts per ml within 8 min. Also, 0.4 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter (C0) significantly reduced infectivity within 15 min of contact, although some oocysts remained viable. PMID:2764564

  2. Comparative study on the efficiency of peracetic acid and chlorine dioxide at low doses in the disinfection of urban wastewaters.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Giovanna; Sacchetti, Rossella; Zanetti, Franca; Leoni, Erica

    2008-01-01

    A comparison was made between the efficiency of low doses of peracetic acid (PAA: 1.5 mg/l) and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2): 1.5 and 2.0 mg/l) in the disinfection of secondary effluents of a wastewater treatment plant. Peracetic acid was seen to be more active than chlorine dioxide and less influenced by the organic content of the waste. Both PAA and ClO(2) (2.0 mg/l) lead to a higher reduction in total and faecal coliforms and E. coli than in phages (somatic coliphages and F-specific RNA bacteriophages) and enterococci. Detection of faecal coliforms and E. coli should therefore be accompanied by a search for these more resistant microorganisms when assessing the conformity of wastewater for irrigation use, or for discharge into surface waters. Coliphages are also considered suitable indicators of the presence of enteric viruses. Although the application of low doses of both disinfectants offers advantages in terms of costs and produces not significant quantities of byproducts, it is not sufficient to obtain wastewater suitable for irrigation according to the Italian norms (E. coli < 10/100 ml in 80 % of samples and <100/100 ml in the remaining samples). Around 65 % of the samples, however, presented concentrations of E. coli lower than the limit of 5,000/100 ml established by Italian norms for discharge into surface waters.

  3. Chlorine dioxide-iodide-methyl acetoacetate oscillation reaction investigated by UV-vis and online FTIR spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Shi, Laishun; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Na; Liu, Jie; Yan, Chunying

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the chemical oscillatory behavior and mechanism of a new chlorine dioxide-iodide ion-methyl acetoacetate reaction system, a series of experiments were done by using UV-Vis and online FTIR spectrophotometric method. The initial concentrations of methyl acetoacetate, chlorine dioxide, potassium iodide, and sulfuric acid and the pH value have great influence on the oscillation observed at wavelength of 289 nm. There is a preoscillatory or induction period, and the amplitude and the number of oscillations are associated with the initial concentration of reactants. The equations for the triiodide ion reaction rate changing with reaction time and the initial concentrations in the oscillation stage were obtained. Oscillation reaction can be accelerated by increasing temperature. The apparent activation energies in terms of the induction period and the oscillation period were 26.02 KJ/mol and 17.65 KJ/mol, respectively. The intermediates were detected by the online FTIR analysis. Based upon the experimental data in this work and in the literature, a plausible reaction mechanism was proposed for the oscillation reaction.

  4. Chlorine Dioxide-Iodide-Methyl Acetoacetate Oscillation Reaction Investigated by UV-Vis and Online FTIR Spectrophotometric Method

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Laishun; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Na; Liu, Jie; Yan, Chunying

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the chemical oscillatory behavior and mechanism of a new chlorine dioxide-iodide ion-methyl acetoacetate reaction system, a series of experiments were done by using UV-Vis and online FTIR spectrophotometric method. The initial concentrations of methyl acetoacetate, chlorine dioxide, potassium iodide, and sulfuric acid and the pH value have great influence on the oscillation observed at wavelength of 289 nm. There is a preoscillatory or induction period, and the amplitude and the number of oscillations are associated with the initial concentration of reactants. The equations for the triiodide ion reaction rate changing with reaction time and the initial concentrations in the oscillation stage were obtained. Oscillation reaction can be accelerated by increasing temperature. The apparent activation energies in terms of the induction period and the oscillation period were 26.02 KJ/mol and 17.65 KJ/mol, respectively. The intermediates were detected by the online FTIR analysis. Based upon the experimental data in this work and in the literature, a plausible reaction mechanism was proposed for the oscillation reaction. PMID:22454614

  5. Enhancing the efficacy of electrolytic chlorination for ballast water treatment by adding carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung-Gon; Seo, Min-Ho; Lee, Heon-Young; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Sup; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Choi, Keun-Hyung

    2015-06-15

    We examined the synergistic effects of CO2 injection on electro-chlorination in disinfection of plankton and bacteria in simulated ballast water. Chlorination was performed at dosages of 4 and 6ppm with and without CO2 injection on electro-chlorination. Testing was performed in both seawater and brackish water quality as defined by IMO G8 guidelines. CO2 injection notably decreased from the control the number of Artemia franciscana, a brine shrimp, surviving during a 5-day post-treatment incubation (1.8 and 2.3 log10 reduction in seawater and brackish water, respectively at 6ppm TRO+CO2) compared with water electro-chlorinated only (1.2 and 1.3 log10 reduction in seawater and brackish water, respectively at 6ppm TRO). The phytoplankton Tetraselmis suecica, was completely disinfected with no live cell found at >4ppm TRO with and without CO2 addition. The effects of CO2 addition on heterotrophic bacterial growth was not different from electro-chlorination only. Total residual oxidant concentration (TRO) more rapidly declined in electro-chlorination of both marine and brackish waters compared to chlorine+CO2 treated waters, with significantly higher amount of TRO being left in waters treated with the CO2 addition. Total concentration of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) measured at day 0 in brackish water test were found to be 2- to 3-fold higher in 6ppm TRO+CO2-treated water than in 6ppm TRO treated water. The addition of CO2 to electro-chlorination may improve the efficiency of this sterilizing treatment of ballast water, yet the increased production of some disinfection byproducts needs further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute respiratory symptoms and evacuation-related behavior after exposure to chlorine gas leakage.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Woo; Choi, Won-Jun; Yi, Min-Kee; Song, Seng-Ho; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed on the accidental chlorine gas leakage that occurred in a factory of printed circuit boards manufactured without chlorine. Health examination was performed for all 52 workers suspected of exposure to chlorine gas, and their evacuation-related behaviors were observed in addition to analyzing the factors that affected the duration of their acute respiratory symptoms. Behavioral characteristics during the incidence of the accidental chlorine gas leakage, the estimated time of exposure, and the duration of subjective acute respiratory symptoms were investigated. In addition, clinical examination, chest radiography, and dental erosion test were performed. As variables that affected the duration of respiratory symptoms, dose group, body weight, age, sex, smoking, work period, and wearing a protective gear were included and analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model. Of 47 workers exposed to chlorine gas, 36 (77 %) developed more than one subjective symptom. The duration of the subjective symptoms according to exposure level significantly differed, with a median of 1 day (range, 0-5 days) in the low-exposure group and 2 days (range, 0-25 days) in the high-exposure group. Among the variables that affected the duration of the acute respiratory symptoms, which were analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model, only exposure level was significant (hazard ratio 2.087, 95 % CI = 1.119, 3.890). Regarding the evacuation-related behaviors, 22 workers (47 %) voluntarily evacuated to a safety zone immediately after recognizing the accidental exposure, but 25 workers (43 %) delayed evacuation until the start of mandatory evacuation (min 5, max 25 min). The duration of the subjective acute respiratory symptoms significantly differed between the low- and high-exposure groups. Among the 27 workers in the high-exposure group, 17 misjudged the toxicity after being aware of the gas leakage, which is a relatively high number.

  7. Novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Lui, Junfang; Yuan, Mei

    2000-08-01

    The feasibility of sensing carbon dioxide with a IR single- beam optical structure is studied, and a novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on IR absorption is achieved. Applying the Lambert-Beer law and some key techniques such as current stabilization for IR source, using a high-quality IR detector, and data compensation for the influences of ambience temperature and atmosphere total pressure, the sensor can measure carbon dioxide with high precision and efficiency. The mathematical models for providing temperature and pressure compensation for the sensor are established. Moreover the solutions to the models are proposed. Both the models and the solutions to the models are verified via experiments. The sensor possesses the advantages of small volume, light weight, low power consumption, and high reliability. Therefore it can be used in many associated fields, such as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

  9. Dynamics of gas-phase trichloramine (NCl3) in chlorinated, indoor swimming pool facilities.

    PubMed

    Weng, S-C; Weaver, W A; Afifi, M Zare; Blatchley, T N; Cramer, J S; Chen, J; Blatchley, E R

    2011-10-01

    Trichloramine (NCl(3)) is recognized as an irritant of the human respiratory system and other tissues. Processes that lead to volatilization from the liquid phase allow for human exposure to gas-phase NCl(3) in swimming pool settings. The dynamics of these processes are not well defined. A N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine/potassium iodide (DPD/KI)-based wet-chemistry method for measuring gas-phase NCl(3) concentration was verified and applied in chlorinated, indoor swimming pool facilities. Other gas-phase oxidants in the air of indoor pools provided interference of 15% or less. The DPD/KI method was applied for the measurement of gas-phase NCl(3) in four chlorinated, indoor swimming pool facilities. All results showed a correlation between bather loading and gas-phase NCl(3) concentration. The nature of swimmer activities also influenced air quality, presumably because of the effects of these activities on mixing near the gas-liquid interface. The activities of swimmers promote transfer of volatile compounds from water to the surrounding air. For chlorinated, indoor pool facilities, this can lead to exposure to gas-phase chemicals that can cause irritation of the respiratory system and other tissues. The focus of this study was on NCl(3), a common disinfection by-product (DBP) in chlorinated pools. However, the conditions that promote NCl(3) transfer are likely to promote transfer of other volatile chemicals from water to air. As such, it is possible that other DBPs formed in pools may also contribute to diminished air quality. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Disinfection aboard cruise liners and naval units: formation of disinfection by-products using chlorine dioxide in different qualities of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ufermann, Petra; Petersen, Hauke; Exner, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The world-wide deployment of cruise liners and naval units has caused an increased need for the disinfection of drinking water. The main cause for this is the unknown quality of drinking water in foreign harbours--besides the formation of bio-films due to the climatically disadvantageous conditions in the operational area. Water conduits on board are currently disinfected with calcium hypochlorite in case of microbiological contamination. Chemical and physical analyses after disinfection with calcium hypochlorite have shown that organic by-products consisting of trihalomethanes develop in considerable amounts during disinfection. Furthermore, the method is susceptible to handling errors and thus often leads to insufficient disinfection results. Hitherto, the use of other disinfection methods allowed by government regulations, especially chlorine dioxide, is not widely spread. Unlike disinfection with calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide does not lead to the formation of trihalomethanes. Typical disinfection by-products (DBP) are the anions chlorite and chlorate, which are formed in oxidative processes. The formation conditions of these anions have not yet been elucidated. For this reason, the probability of the generation of inorganic by-products after disinfection with chlorine dioxide has been determined, and their occurrence in drinking water on board has been examined with respect to a possible correlation between water quality and the formation of chlorate and chlorite. Therefore, a chromatographic method was developed and validated in order to determine the periodical development of chlorate and chlorite from chorine dioxide in purified water at different pH-values as well as in actual drinking water samples from water conduits on board. The formation of the by-products chlorite and chlorate after disinfection with chlorine dioxide is influenced neither by pH-value nor by chemical properties of the disinfected water. Considering the examined conditions

  11. Acute inhalation injury with evidence of diffuse bronchiolitis following chlorine gas exposure at a swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Parimon, Tanyalak; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Pierson, David J

    2004-03-01

    A previously healthy 23-year-old man with nonproductive cough and sore throat presented to the hospital a few hours after chlorine gas exposure at a fitness center swimming pool. Initial physical examination and chest radiograph were normal. Thirty-six hours later he developed worsening dyspnea and cough, with development of blood-tinged sputum. Arterial blood gas analysis showed mild hypoxemia and a subsequent chest radiograph demonstrated diffuse tiny nodular opacities. Findings on a thin-section computed tomogram of the chest were consistent with diffuse bronchiolitis. Pulmonary function tests showed a mild obstructive abnormality and he demonstrated substantial bronchodilator response. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and an inhaled beta(2) agonist, to which he responded well, with full clinical recovery occurring over 5 months. This manifestation of chlorine gas exposure at a swimming pool is unusual.

  12. Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    New coal gasification processes are now being developed which can generate electricity with high thermal efficiency either in a combined gas-turbine, steam-turbine cycle or in a fuel cell. Both of these coal-to-electricity pathways require that the coal-derived fuel gas be at a high temperature and be free of potential pollutants, such as sulfur compounds. Unfortunately, some high-sulfur Illinois coals also contain significant chlorine which converts into hydrogen chloride (HC1) in the coal-gas. This project investigates the effect of HC1, in concentrations typical of a gasifier fed by high-chlorine Illinois coals, on zinc-titanate sorbents that are currently being developed for H{sub 2}S and COS removal from hot coal-gas. This study is designed to identify any deleterious changes in the sorbent caused by the HC1, both in adsorptive operation and in the regeneration cycle, and will pave the way to modify the sorbent formulation or the process operating procedure to remove HC1 along with the H{sub 2}S and COS from the coal-gas. This will negate any harmful consequences of utilizing high-chlorine Illinois in these processes. The bench- scale fluidized bed has been modified to prevent potential HC1 corrosion and startup experiments have proven the reactor system operable and capable of yielding reliable experimental results. The first of the planned experiments in the project are now being performed. 1 fig.

  13. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-03-31

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2006, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. An integrated system composed of a downflow co-current contact absorber and two hollow screw conveyors (regenerator and cooler) was assembled, instrumented, debugged, and calibrated. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 15% sodium carbonate was prepared and subjected to surface area and compact bulk density determination.

  14. Chlorine Diffusion in Uranium Dioxide: Thermal Effects versus Radiation Enhanced Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pipon, Yves; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Bererd, Nicolas; Jaffrezic, Henri; Raimbault, Louis; Scheidegger, Andre M.; Carlot, Gaelle

    2007-07-01

    Chlorine is present as an impurity in the UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel. {sup 35}Cl is activated into {sup 36}Cl by thermal neutron capture. In case of interim storage or deep geological disposal of the spent fuel, this isotope is known to be able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction because of its mobile behavior and its long half life (around 300000 years). It is therefore important to understand its migration behavior within the fuel rod. During reactor operation, chlorine diffusion can be due to thermally activated processes or can be favoured by irradiation defects induced by fission fragments or alpha decay. In order to decouple both phenomena, we performed two distinct experiments to study the effects of thermal annealing on the behaviour of chlorine on one hand and the effects of the irradiation with fission products on the other hand. During in reactor processes, part of the {sup 36}Cl may be displaced from its original position, due to recoil or to collisions with fission products. In order to study the behavior of the displaced chlorine, {sup 37}Cl has been implanted into sintered depleted UO{sub 2} pellets (mean grain size around 18 {mu}m). The spatial distribution of the implanted and pristine chlorine has been analyzed by SIMS before and after treatment. Thermal annealing of {sup 37}Cl implanted UO{sub 2} pellets (implantation fluence of 10{sup 13} ions.cm{sup -2}) show that it is mobile from temperatures as low as 1273 K (E{sub a}=4.3 eV). The irradiation with fission products (Iodine, E=63.5 MeV) performed at 300 and 510 K, shows that the diffusion of chlorine is enhanced and that a thermally activated contribution is preserved (E{sub a}=0.1 eV). The diffusion coefficients measured at 1473 K and under fission product irradiation at 510 K are similar (D = 3.10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). Considering in first approximation that the diffusion length L can be expressed as a function of the diffusion coefficient D and time t by : L

  15. Sequential disinfection of E. coli O157:H7 on shredded lettuce leaves by aqueous chlorine dioxide, ozonated water, and thyme essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nepal; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Stroshine, Richard L.; Simon, James E.

    2001-03-01

    There have been numerous studies on effectiveness of different sanitizers for microbial inactivation. However, results obtained from different studies indicate that microorganism cannot be easily removed from fresh cut vegetables because of puncture and cut surfaces with varying surface topographies. In this study, three step disinfection approach was evaluated for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on shredded lettuce leaves. Sequential application of thyme oil, ozonated water, and aqueous chlorine dioxide was evaluated in which thyme oil was applied first followed by ozonated water and aqueous chlorine dioxide. Shredded lettuce leaves inoculated with cocktail culture of E. coli O157:H7 (C7927, EDL 933 and 204 P), were washed with ozonated water (15 mg/l for 10min), aqueous chlorine dioxide (10 mg/l,for 10min) and thyme oil suspension (0.1%, v/v for 5min). Washing of lettuce leaves with ozonated water, chlorine dioxide and thyme oil suspension resulted in 0.44, 1.20, and 1.46 log reduction (log10 cfu/g), respectively. However, the sequential treatment achieved approximately 3.13 log reductions (log10 cfu/g). These results demonstrate the efficacy of sequential treatments in decontaminating shredded lettuce leaves containing E. coli O157:H7.

  16. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2008-07-02

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  17. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson [Castro Valley, CA

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  18. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2014-06-03

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  19. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J.; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B.; Tour, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  20. Forcing of Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction with strong visible light.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Raphael; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2013-09-26

    We investigate the sensitivity of Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction to illumination by strong white light. Intense illumination results in an increase of [I(-)], in contrast to previous studies, which found only decreased [I(-)] for weak and intermediate intensities of illumination. We propose an expanded mechanism to explain the experimental observations. Both experimental and numerical results suggest that [ClO2] is the key parameter that determines whether the high iodide state is obtained under strong illumination. When strong illumination is applied through a spatially periodic mask with black and white stripes, a dark state with high [I(-)] is produced in the illuminated domain and a light state with low [I(-)] forms in the nonilluminated domain. Depending on the black:white ratio of the mask and its wavelength, Turing patterns can coexist with either the light or the dark state in the nonilluminated domain.

  1. Composite Film of Vanadium Dioxide Nanoparticles and Ionic Liquid-Nickel-Chlorine Complexes with Excellent Visible Thermochromic Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingting; Huang, Aibin; Ma, Haibin; Ma, Yining; Tong, Kun; Ji, Shidong; Bao, Shanhu; Cao, Xun; Jin, Ping

    2016-11-02

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2), as a typical thermochromic material used in smart windows, is always limited by its weaker solar regulation efficiency (ΔTsol) and lower luminous transmittance (Tlum). Except for common approaches such as doping, coating, and special structure, compositing is another effective method. The macroscopic thermochromic (from colorless to blue) ionic liquid-nickel-chlorine (IL-Ni-Cl) complexes are selected in this paper to be combined with VO2 nanoparticles forming a composite film. This novel scheme demonstrates outstanding optical properties: ΔTsol = 26.45% and Tlum,l = 66.44%, Tlum,h = 43.93%. Besides, the addition of the IL-Ni-Cl complexes endows the film with an obvious color change from light brown to dark green as temperature rises. This splendid visible thermochromic performance makes the composite film superior in function exhibiting and application of smart windows.

  2. An improved colorimetric method for chlorine dioxide and chlorite ion in drinking water using lissamine green B and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Pepich, Barry V; Dattilio, Teri A; Fair, Patricia S; Munch, David J; Gordon, Gilbert; Körtvélyesi, Zsolt

    2007-07-16

    Lissamine Green B (LGB) was carefully selected as a potential candidate for the development of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method that is intended for use at water utilities to determine chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in drinking water. Chlorine dioxide reacts with LGB in aqueous solution to decrease the absorbance of LGB in direct proportion to the ClO2 concentration. LGB was confirmed to have adequate sensitivity, and to suffer less interference than other dyes reported in the literature. The stoichiometry for the reaction between LGB and ClO2 was found not to be 1:1 and is dependent on the LGB concentration. This required calibration of each LGB stock solution and prompted the investigation of alternate means of calibration, which utilized a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of chlorite ion (ClO2(-)) to ClO2. This approach allowed the simultaneous determination of ClO2(-) concentration, which is also required each day at water plants that use ClO2. Studies were conducted to characterize and carefully optimize the HRP-conversion of ClO2(-) to ClO2 in order to yield reaction conditions that could be accomplished in less than 30 min at modest cost, yet meet EPA's sensitivity and robustness requirements for routine monitoring. An assessment of method detection limit, linearity and slope (or sensitivity), precision, and accuracy in finished drinking water matrices indicated that this approach was suitable for publication as EPA Method 327.0.

  3. Chlorine dioxide as an alternative antifouling biocide for cooling water systems: Toxicity to larval barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus (Utinomi).

    PubMed

    Venkatnarayanan, Srinivas; Sriyutha Murthy, P; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam; Venugopalan, Vayalam P

    2017-01-19

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is seen as an effective alternative to chlorine, which is widely used as an antifouling biocide. However, data on its efficacy against marine macrofoulants is scanty. In this study, acute toxicity of ClO2 to larval forms of the fouling barnacle Amphibalanus reticulatus was investigated. ClO2 treatment at 0.1mg/L for 20min elicited 45-63% reduction in naupliar metamorphosis, 70% inhibition of cyprid settlement and 80% inhibition of metamorphosis to juveniles. Increase in concentration to 0.2mg/L did not result in any significant difference in the settlement inhibition or metamorphosis. Treatment with 0.2mg/L of ClO2 elicited substantial reduction in the settlement of barnacle larvae compared to control. The study indicates the possibility of using ClO2 as an alternative antifouling biocide in power plant cooling water systems. However, more work needs to be done on the environmental effects of such switchover, which we are currently undertaking.

  4. Study by XPS of the chlorination of proteins aggregated onto tin dioxide during electrochemical production of hypochlorous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine; Haskouri, Sanae; Cachet, Hubert

    2007-04-01

    In solution, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) reacts with organic matter and notably with protein side-chains. In this study, HOCl was produced by an electrochemical way, by oxidation of chloride ions at a transparent tin dioxide electrode in the presence of a protein, the bovine serum albumin (BSA). A thick irregular layer is formed at the electrode when HOCl is produced at the SnO 2 surface. Indeed, SEM analyses show that an important deposit is formed during the anodic polarization of SnO 2 in the presence of chloride ions and proteins. Actually, two phenomena take place on the one hand the chlorination of the proteins due to the reaction of HOCl with some protein side-chains and on the other hand the aggregation of proteins onto the SnO 2 surface. The present X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study points out the cross-linking of BSA molecules via formation of inter molecular sulfonamide groups. It also shows that the BSA chlorination is due on the one hand to the formation of sulfonyl chloride groups (-SO 2Cl) and on the other hand to formation of chloramine groups ( lbond2 N-Cl). The Cl2p and S2p photo-peak intensities allowed us to quantify the chloramines. It is found that, one BSA entity immobilized onto the SnO 2 surface contains about 50 chloramine groups.

  5. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-04-01

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2004 and March 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. RTI has produced laboratory scale batches (approximately 300 grams) of supported sorbents (composed of 20 to 40% sodium carbonate) with high surface area and acceptable activity. Initial rates of weight gain of the supported sorbents when exposed to a simulated flue gas exceeded that of 100% calcined sodium bicarbonate. One of these sorbents was tested through six cycles of carbonation/calcination by thermogravimetric analysis and found to have consistent carbonation activity. Kinetic modeling of the regeneration cycle on the basis of diffusion resistance at the particle surface is impractical, because the evolving gases have an identical composition to those assumed for the bulk fluidization gas. A kinetic model of the reaction has been developed on the basis of bulk motion of water and carbon dioxide at the particle surface (as opposed to control by gas diffusion). The model will be used to define the operating conditions in future laboratory- and pilot-scale testing.

  6. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  7. Method for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.I.; Herron, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The combustion of sulfur-containing fuels generates significant amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are also often generated in the course of the combustion of various fuels. Without appropriate treatment of the exhaust gases of combustion, large amounts of sulfur and nitrogen oxides would be injected into the atmosphere, causing a variety of ecological problems. A method is provided for removing SO/sub 2/ from gas streams by its gas-phase reaction with a stabilized Criegee intermediate under conditions where a very large excess of water vapor is avoided, resulting in efficient scavenging of SO2 by the Criegee intermediate to form an adduct. The adduct reacts with water vapor to convert it directly to sulfuric acid, which is then separated from the gas stream. The Criegee intermediate may be generated in a variety of ways.

  8. Development of Facts Procedures for Bromine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Iodine in Aqueous Solutions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Rainbow Trout ," Water Waste Treat. J. 7:150- 151 (1958). 21. Collins, H.F. and D.G. Deaner, "Sewage Chlorination Versus Toxicity -- A Dilema?," . Environ...DOCUMAENTATION PAGE BKV? CM"AM o 1. REPORT NUMBER AdI. GOV ACCESSIO W S. RE1CIPIEM1T’S CATALOG NUMB R TECHNICAL REPORT 8003 0 /71- ______________ 14. TITLE

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates following long-term chlorine dioxide treatment in a university hospital water system.

    PubMed

    Casini, B; Valentini, P; Baggiani, A; Torracca, F; Frateschi, S; Nelli, L Ceccherini; Privitera, G

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the results of a five-year monitoring programme applied to the water distribution system of the University Hospital of Pisa (Italy). The purpose of the programme was to evaluate the efficacy of an integrated water safety plan in controlling Legionella spp. colonisation of the potable water system. The impact of the safety plan on the ecology of legionella in the water network was evaluated by studying the genetic variability and the chlorine susceptibility of the strains isolated prior to, and throughout, the application of continuous chlorine dioxide treatment. After 45 months of water hyperchlorination, Legionella spp. were still present but the positive supply points were reduced by 79.4%. The samples exceeding 10(3)cfu/L were reduced by 83.8% and the mean counts showed a decrease of 94.6%. The majority of the isolates belonged to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (overall positivity rate: 161/423; 38%). Molecular typing was performed on 61 isolates (37.9% of the positive samples) selected on spatial and temporal criteria. This revealed the circulation and the persistence in the hospital environment of three prevalent types of L. pneumophila Wadsworth, demonstrating allelic and electrophoretic characteristic profiles and different chlorine susceptibility. Two of these, one predominant and pre-dating the sanitation regimen, and one other isolated after three years of water treatment, were chlorine tolerant. Despite the ineffectiveness of chlorine dioxide in eradicating L. pneumophila, the risk management plan adopted appeared to discourage further cases of nosocomial legionellosis.

  10. Acute accidental exposure to chlorine gas: clinical presentation, pulmonary functions and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Alladi; Kumar, S Naveen; Rao, M H; Bollineni, S; Manohar, I Chiranjeevi

    2010-01-01

    To study the clinical presentation, pulmonary functions and outcomes in subjects who were accidentally exposed to chlorine gas. Prospective observational study of 64 patients who sustained acute accidental exposure to chlorine gas during a leak in the chlorination system of the public bathing pool of a temple. The major presenting symptoms and signs included acute dyspnoea (100%), chest discomfort (100%), cough (97%), eye irritation (88%), giddiness (72%), vomiting (46%), and heaviness in the head (44%); tachycardia (100%), tachypnoea (96%) and polyphonic wheezing (28%). All patients were managed in the emergency room with humidified oxygen inhalation and beta-2 agonist nebulisation and 52 were discharged within six hours. Twelve patients were severely affected and required hospitalisation; three of them were admitted into the intensive care unit. Three patients developed pulmonary oedema six to eight hours following admission. Pulmonary function testing (n = 12) at presentation revealed obstructive defect in eight and mixed obstructive-cum-restrictive defect in four patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 5.1 +/- 2.1 days. None of the patients died. Reactive airway dysfunction syndrome (RADS) was observed in three of the 12 hospitalised patients, who complained of manifested persistent cough that lasted for three months period following discharge. Serial pulmonary functions recovered to normal range by the end of the six months in all patients and remained so at one-year follow-up. Acute exposure to chlorine gas is an uncommon, but important public health hazard and can cause RADS, acute lung injury and pulmonary function abnormalities, which are reversible on prompt and appropriate management.

  11. Determination of chlorine concentration using single temperature modulated semiconductor gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woźniak, Ł.; Kalinowski, P.; Jasiński, G.; Jasiński, P.

    2016-11-01

    A periodic temperature modulation using sinusoidal heater voltage was applied to a commercial SnO2 semiconductor gas sensor. Resulting resistance response of the sensor was analyzed using a feature extraction method based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT). The amplitudes of the higher harmonics of the FFT from the dynamic nonlinear responses of measured gas were further utilized as an input for Artificial Neuron Network (ANN). Determination of the concentration of chlorine was performed. Moreover, this work evaluates the sensor performance upon sinusoidal temperature modulation.

  12. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Andreas Weber; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A field test was conducted to examine the extent to which RTI's supported sorbent can be regenerated in a heated, hollow screw conveyor. This field test was conducted at the facilities of a screw conveyor manufacturer. The sorbent was essentially completely regenerated during this test, as confirmed by thermal desorption and mass spectroscopy analysis of the regenerated sorbent. Little or no sorbent attrition was observed during 24 passes through the heated screw conveyor system. Three downflow contactor absorption tests were conducted using calcined sodium bicarbonate as the absorbent. Maximum carbon dioxide removals of 57 and 91% from simulated flue gas were observed at near ambient temperatures with water-saturated gas. These tests demonstrated that calcined sodium carbonate is not as effective at removing CO{sub 2} as are supported sorbents containing 10 to 15% sodium carbonate. Delivery of the hollow screw conveyor for the laboratory-scale sorbent regeneration system was delayed; however, construction of other components of this system continued during the quarter.

  13. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of nano crystalline nickel zinc ferrite for chlorine gas sensor at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, C. S.; Gujar, M. P.; Mathe, V. L.

    2015-06-24

    Nano crystalline Nickel Zinc ferrite (Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) thin films were synthesized by Sol Gel method for gas response. The phase and microstructure of the obtained Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanostructured Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film shows single spinel phase. Magnetic study was obtained with the help of VSM. The effects of working temperature on the gas response were studied. The results reveal that the Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film gas sensor shows good selectivity to chlorine gas at room temperature. The sensor shows highest sensitivity (∼50%) at room temperature, indicating its application in detecting chlorine gas at room temperature in the future.

  15. Lung Function before and after a Large Chlorine Gas Release in Graniteville, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kathleen A; Karmaus, Wilfried J J; Mohr, Lawrence C; Cai, Bo; Balte, Pallavi; Gibson, James J; Ownby, Dennis; Lawson, Andrew B; Vena, John E; Svendsen, Erik R

    2016-03-01

    On January 6, 2005 a train derailment led to an estimated 54,915-kg release of chlorine at a local textile mill in Graniteville, South Carolina. We used the employee health spirometry records of the textile to identify enduring effects of chlorine gas exposure resulting from the incident on the lung function of workers employed at the textile mill. Spirometry records from 1,807 mill workers (7,332 observations) were used from 4 years before and 18 months after the disaster. Longitudinal analysis using marginal regression models produced annual population mean estimates for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio. Covariate adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, height, season tested, technician, obesity, season × year interactions, and smoker × year interactions. The increased prevalence of mill workers having accelerated FEV1 decline was also evaluated after the chlorine spill. In the year of the accident, we observed a significant reduction in mean FEV1 (-4.2% predicted; P = 0.019) when compared with the year before the incident. In the second year, partial recovery in the mean FVC % predicted level was seen, but the cohort's average FEV1/FVC ratio continued to decrease over time. Severe annual FEV1 decline was most prevalent in the year of the accident, and independent of mill worker smoking status. The Graniteville mill worker cohort revealed significant reductions in lung function immediately after the chlorine incident. Improvement was seen in the second year; but the proportion of mill workers experiencing accelerated FEV1 annual decline significantly increased in the 18 months after the chlorine incident.

  16. Lung Function before and after a Large Chlorine Gas Release in Graniteville, South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, Wilfried J. J.; Mohr, Lawrence C.; Cai, Bo; Balte, Pallavi; Gibson, James J.; Ownby, Dennis; Lawson, Andrew B.; Vena, John E.; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: On January 6, 2005 a train derailment led to an estimated 54,915-kg release of chlorine at a local textile mill in Graniteville, South Carolina. Objectives: We used the employee health spirometry records of the textile to identify enduring effects of chlorine gas exposure resulting from the incident on the lung function of workers employed at the textile mill. Methods: Spirometry records from 1,807 mill workers (7,332 observations) were used from 4 years before and 18 months after the disaster. Longitudinal analysis using marginal regression models produced annual population mean estimates for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio. Covariate adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, height, season tested, technician, obesity, season × year interactions, and smoker × year interactions. The increased prevalence of mill workers having accelerated FEV1 decline was also evaluated after the chlorine spill. Measurements and Main Results: In the year of the accident, we observed a significant reduction in mean FEV1 (–4.2% predicted; P = 0.019) when compared with the year before the incident. In the second year, partial recovery in the mean FVC % predicted level was seen, but the cohort’s average FEV1/FVC ratio continued to decrease over time. Severe annual FEV1 decline was most prevalent in the year of the accident, and independent of mill worker smoking status. Conclusions: The Graniteville mill worker cohort revealed significant reductions in lung function immediately after the chlorine incident. Improvement was seen in the second year; but the proportion of mill workers experiencing accelerated FEV1 annual decline significantly increased in the 18 months after the chlorine incident. PMID:26695511

  17. Combined Treatment with Low Concentrations of Aqueous and Gaseous Chlorine Dioxide Inactivates Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium Inoculated on Paprika.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Song, Kyung Bin

    2017-03-28

    Combined treatment with gaseous and aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) was performed to improve the microbiological safety and quality of paprika. A single treatment of 50 ppmv ClO2 gas for 30 min decreased the populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium by 2.33 and 2.91 log CFU/g, respectively. In addition, a single treatment of aqueous ClO2 (50 ppm) for 5 min decreased these populations by 1.86 and 1.37, respectively. The most dramatic effects were achieved by combined treatment of 50 ppm aqueous and gaseous ClO2 for 30 min, which decreased populations of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium by 4.11 and 3.61 log CFU/g, respectively. With regard to the qualities of paprika, no adverse effects were elicited by the combined treatment. Thus, combined treatment with aqueous and gaseous ClO2 is a suitable approach that can be used to improve the microbial safety and quality of paprika.

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

    2003-08-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry.

  20. Oxidation of diclofenac by aqueous chlorine dioxide: identification of major disinfection byproducts and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai

    2014-03-01

    Diclofenac (DCF), a synthetic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this work, the mechanism and toxicity of DCF degradation by ClO2 under simulated water disinfection conditions were investigated. Experimental results indicate that rapid and significant oxidation of DCF occurred within the first few minutes; however, its mineralization process was longer than its degradation process. UPLC-MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were performed to identify major disinfection byproducts that were generated in three tentative degradation routes. The two main routes were based on initial decarboxylation of DCF on the aliphatic chain and hydroxylation of the phenylacetic acid moiety at the C-4 position. Subsequently, the formed aldehyde intermediates were the starting point for further multistep degradation involving decarboxylation, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions of CN bond cleavage. The third route was based on transient preservation of chlorinated derivatives resulting from electrophilic attack by chlorine on the aromatic ring, which similarly underwent CN bond cleavage. Microtox bioassay was employed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of solutions treated by ClO2. The formation of more toxic mid-byproducts during the ClO2 disinfection process poses a potential risk to consumers.

  1. Identification and measurement of chlorinated organic pesticides in water by electron-capture gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, Donald F.; Law, LeRoy M.

    1965-01-01

    Pesticides, in minute quantities, may affect the regimen of streams, and because they may concentrate in sediments, aquatic organisms, and edible aquatic foods, their detection and their measurement in the parts-per-trillion range are considered essential. In 1964 the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif., began research on methods for monitoring pesticides in water. Two systems were selected--electron-capture gas chromatography and microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Studies on these systems are now in progress. This report provides current information on the development and application of an electron-capture gas chromatographic procedure. This method is a convenient and extremely sensitive procedure for the detection and measurement of organic pesticides having high electron affinities, notably the chlorinated organic pesticides. The electron-affinity detector is extremely sensitive to these substances but it is not as sensitive to many other compounds. By this method, the chlorinated organic pesticide may be determined on a sample of convenient size in concentrations as low as the parts-per-trillion range. To insure greater accuracy in the identifications, the pesticides reported were separated and identified by their retention times on two different types of gas chromatographic columns.

  2. Synergistic effect of chlorine dioxide and drying treatments for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoikyung; Kim, Haeyoung; Bang, Jihyun; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2010-07-01

    Studies were done to determine whether calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)(2)) and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) treatment followed by drying had a synergistic killing effect on microorganisms on radish seeds intended for sprout production. Uninoculated radish seeds and seeds inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 were treated with water, Ca(OCl)(2) (free chlorine concentrations of 50 or 200 microg/ml), or ClO(2) (50 or 200 microg/ml) for 5 min and subsequently dried at 25 degrees C for up to 24 h. Populations of total aerobic bacteria (TAB), molds and yeasts (MY), and E. coli O157:H7 on the seeds treated with Ca(OCl)(2) were not significantly different (P = 0.05) than populations on seeds treated with ClO(2) at the same concentrations. However, populations of microorganisms on seeds treated with ClO(2) decreased more rapidly during drying. Treatment with ClO(2) (200 microg/ml) followed by drying caused reductions in TAB, MY, and E. coli O157:H7 of 3.1, 2.0, and 3.8 log CFU/g, respectively. When seeds were treated with water, Ca(OCl)(2) (50 or 200 microg/ml), and ClO(2) (50 microg/ml) and subsequently dried, reductions in TAB, MY, and E. coli O157:H7 were 0.2 to 2.0, 0.4 to 2.0, and 1.4 to 2.2 log CFU/g, respectively. Results indicate that inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on radish seeds is greater after treatment with ClO(2) followed by drying than after treatment with Ca(OCl)(2) followed by drying, thus providing a synergistic treatment combination for reducing the safety risk associated with sprouts produced from these seeds.

  3. The Chlorination Quandary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Current use of chlorination technology to disinfect water supplies can cause the production of undesirable products, among them chloroform and chlorobenzene. Alternatives to this methodology include the use of ozone, chlorine dioxide, and bromine chloride in place of chlorine. Presently, the methods are feasible in developed countries only. (MA)

  4. The Chlorination Quandary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Current use of chlorination technology to disinfect water supplies can cause the production of undesirable products, among them chloroform and chlorobenzene. Alternatives to this methodology include the use of ozone, chlorine dioxide, and bromine chloride in place of chlorine. Presently, the methods are feasible in developed countries only. (MA)

  5. In Situ Detection of Chlorine Dioxide (C1O2) in the Radiolysis of Perchlorates and Implications for the Stability of Organics on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góbi, Sándor; Bergantini, Alexandre; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-12-01

    Magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2 · 6H2O) samples were exposed to energetic electrons to investigate the products of the decomposition of perchlorates in the Martian soil and to infer their role in the degradation of organics on Mars. The samples were monitored online and in situ via infrared spectroscopy as well as electron impact (EI-QMS) and reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with single photon ionization (PI-ReTOF-MS). Our study reveals that besides chlorates ({{{ClO}}3}-) and molecular oxygen (O2), the chlorine dioxide radical (ClO2) was observed online and in situ for the first time as a radiolysis product of solid perchlorates. Chlorine dioxide, which is used on Earth as a strong oxidizing agent in water disinfection and bleaching, represents a proficient oxidizer—potentially more powerful than molecular oxygen—to explain the lack of abundant organics in the Martian soil.

  6. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Vineet Vaman; Padhye, Ashvini

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an oxidizing agent with known bactericidal, viricidal and fungicidal properties. Its efficacy in reducing the halitosis has been established by previous literature. However, data evaluating its antiplaque property is scarce. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is considered as the gold standard and an effective adjunctive to mechanical plaque removal. However, it is associated with few reversible side effects. Therefore a study was conducted to assess the antiplaque property of ClO2 containing mouthrinse against CHX mouthrinse. Aims and Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of stabilized chlorine dioxide containing mouthrinse and CHX containing mouthrinse in inhibition of tongue coat accumulation and dental plaque formation using a four day plaque regrowth model clinically and microbiologically in a healthy dental cohort. Materials and Methods A Single Center, Randomized, Triple blinded, Microbiological clinical trial was conducted involving 25 healthy dental students volunteers (11 males, 14 females). Two commercially available mouthrinse: Mouthrinse A – Aqueous based ClO2 mouthrinse Freshchlor® and Mouthrinse B - Aqueous based 0.2% CHX mouthrinse Hexidine® were selected as the test products. Subjects were asked to rinse and gargle for 1 minute with the allocated mouthrinse under supervision after supragingival scaling, polishing and tongue coat removal. After four hours, smears were taken from the buccal mucosa and tooth surface. On the fifth day from baseline of four day non brushing plaque regrowth model the samples were again taken from buccal mucosa and tooth surface followed by recording of plaque scores by Rastogi Modification of Navy Plaque index, extent of tongue coat by Winkel’s tongue coating index and measuring tongue coat wet weight in grams. The samples collected were subjected to microbial analysis and the results were expressed as colony forming units (CFUs) per sample. Statistical Analysis The Data was analysed using SPSS

  7. Laboratory studies on the reactions between chlorine, sulfur dioxide, and oxygen - Implications for the Venus stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Leu, M.-T.; Smith, R. H.; Yung, Y. L.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform IR spectrophotometry is used to monitor the reactants and products in a Venus stratosphere simulation study involving the photolysis of mixtures of Cl2 and SO2, with and without O2 present in an atmosphere of N2. When several speculative reactions inferred from these experiments are incorporated by the Yung and DeMore (1982) model of Venus stratospheric chemistry, it emerges that SO2Cl2 is a key reservoir species for chlorine, and that the reaction between Cl and SO2 furnishes an important cycle for the destruction of O2 and the conversion of SO2 to H2SO4, thereby providing a possible solution to the photochemistry of the Venus stratosphere.

  8. Quantification of Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins by Deuterodechlorination Combined with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Haijun; Zou, Lili; Wu, Ping; Yu, Zhengkun; Lu, Xianbo; Chen, Jiping

    2016-04-05

    Analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) is extremely difficult because of their complex compositions with thousands of isomers and homologues. A novel analytical method, deuterodechlorination combined with high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS), was developed. A protocol is applied in the deuterodechlorination of SCCPs with LiAlD4, and the formed deuterated n-alkanes of different alkane chains can be distinguished readily from each other on the basis of their retention time and fragment mass ([M](+)) by HRGC-HRMS. An internal standard quantification of individual SCCP congeners was achieved, in which branched C10-CPs and branched C12-CPs were used as the extraction and reaction internal standards, respectively. A maximum factor of 1.26 of the target SCCP concentrations were determined by this method, and the relative standard deviations for quantification of total SCCPs were within 10%. This method was applied to determine the congener compositions of SCCPs in commercial chlorinated paraffins and environmental and biota samples after method validation. Low-chlorinated SCCP congeners (Cl1-4) were found to account for 32.4%-62.4% of the total SCCPs. The present method provides an attractive perspective for further studies on the toxicological and environmental characteristics of SCCPs.

  9. Simulation Based on Negative ion pair Techniques of Electric propulsion In Satellite Mission Using Chlorine Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    R.Bakkiyaraj,Assistant professor,Government college of Engineering ,Bargur,Tamilnadu. *C.Sathiyavel, PG Student and Department of Aeronautical Engineering/Branch of Avionics, PSN college of Engineering and Technology,Tirunelveli,India. Abstract: Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of repulsive between negative ions with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 eV/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The distance between negative ions pair is important for the evaluation of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of ions is related to the ion beam current. Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense grids and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with low electric power for simulating the ion propulsion rocket system

  10. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  11. Heterogeneity of Chlorinity distribution within gas hydrate reservoir at Daini-Atsumi knoll, based on logging data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Takayama, T.; Fujii, T.

    2016-12-01

    We will present possible heterogeneity of pore-water salinity within methane hydrate reservoir of Daini-Atsumi knoll, on the basis of Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data and several kind of wire-line logging dataset. The LWD and the wire-line logging had been carried out during 2012 to 2013, before/after the first offshore gas-production-test from marine-methane-hydrate reservoir at Daini-Atsumi Knoll along the northeast Nankai trough. Several data from the logging, especially data from the reservoir saturation tool; RST, gave us some possible interpretation for heterogeneity distribution of chlorinity within the methane-hydrate reservoir. The computed pore-water chlorinity could be interpreted as condense of chlorinity at gas-hydrate formation. This year, we drilled several number of wells at Daini-Atsumi Knoll, again for next gas production test, and we have also found out possibility of chlorinity heterogeneity from LWD data of Neutron-capture cross section; i.e. Sigma. The distribution of chlorinity within gas-hydrate reservoir may help our understanding of gas hydrate-crystallization and/or dissociation in turbidite reservoir at Daini-Atsumi Knoll. This research is conducted as a part of the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resource in Japan (MH21 Research consortium).

  12. Sensing Materials for the Detection of Chlorine Gas Using Embedded Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    T. L. Porter, T. Vail, A. Wooley, R. J. Venedam

    2008-10-01

    Embedded piezoresistive microcantilever (EPM) sensors may be constructed for a variety of sensing applications. In each application, a custom sensing material is designed that will respond volumetrically to the desired analyte. Here, we have constructed EPM sensors for the detection of chlorine gas (Cl2). The sensing materials used consisted of polymer matrices combined with sodium iodide crystals. Sensors constructed from a silicone-based matrix exhibited the greatest response to Cl2, with detection limits in an outdoor exposure setting of approximately 20 parts per million.

  13. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  14. Combustion synthesis of tin dioxide nanocomposites for gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakrania, Smitesh Dhirajlal

    The current work focuses on understanding the mechanisms controlling tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticle morphology in combustion synthesis systems and how nanoarchitecture affects performance of solid-state gas sensors. A range of analytical methods (including transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nitrogen absorption, and XEDS) were used to characterize the materials properties as a function of the combustion synthesis conditions. A novel method of generating tin dioxide materials was developed which provides a new degree of control over SnO2 morphology; including spherical, nanorod and encapsulated particle architectures. A simplified model for particle formation based on characteristic times was developed to identify the physical and chemical processes affecting the morphologies observed using transmission electron microscope imaging. The SnO2 nanoparticles evolve from primary particles sizes of 7 nm to 14 nm through the synthesis region, and the results indicate interparticle collision and sintering are the dominant mechanisms in determining particle size and morphology for the flame conditions studied. Metal acetates were used to create metal/SnO 2 nanocomposite materials, and the processes controlling gold acetate decomposition in particular were explored. The results of the studies suggest a relationship between the precursor crystallite size and the product nanoparticles. The well-characterized SnO2 particles were evaluated as the active materials for gas-sensing. Sensor sensitivity and time response to carbon monoxide in dry air was used to investigate microstructure-performance links. Excellent sensitivity (3 7, based on the ratio of the resistance of the sensor in air to the resistance in the target gas) and time response (4--20 seconds) were demonstrated for the thin film gas sensors. Fabrication studies demonstrated the sensor performance was a strong function of the film deposition method. A novel method for manufacturing

  15. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer

  16. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  17. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-10-01

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2005, and September 30, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 10% sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) was obtained and characterized. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) testing confirmed that the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} sorbent reacted with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) at temperatures between 40 and 160 C. Although the rate of reaction was more rapid at lower temperatures, these data suggest that SO{sub 2} will not be released from the sorbent under expected sorbent-regeneration conditions. Preliminary work has been conducted to establish the design specifications for a laboratory screw-conveyor sorbent regeneration/cooling apparatus. A plan for a scheduled pilot-scale test of a heated hollow-screw conveyor was developed. This test will be conducted at facilities of the screw conveyor fabricator. This test will confirm the extent of sorbent regeneration and will provide data to evaluate multi-cycle sorbent attrition rates associated with this type of processing.

  18. Experimental Study of Closed System in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodide-Sulfuric Acid Reaction by UV-Vis Spectrophotometric Method

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Shi, Laishun; Wang, Xiaomei; Guo, Fang; Yan, Chunying

    2011-01-01

    The mole ratio r(r = [I−]0/[ClO2]0) has great influence on ClO2-I−-H2SO4 closed reaction system. By changing the initiate concentration of potassium iodide, the curve of absorbance along with the reaction time was obtained at 350 nm and 297 nm for triiodide ion, and 460 nm for iodine. The changing point of the absorbance curve's shape locates at r = 6.00. For the reaction of ClO2-I− in the absence of H2SO4, the curve of absorbance along with the reaction time can be obtained at 350 nm for triiodide ion, 460 nm for iodine. The mole ratio r is equal to 1.00 is the changing point of the curve's shape no matter at which wavelength to determine the reaction. For the reaction of ClO2-I−-H+ in different pH buffer solution, the curve of absorbance along with the reaction time was recorded at 460 nm for iodine. When r is greater than 1.00, the transition point of the curve's shape locates at pH 2.0, which is also the point of producing chlorite or chloride for chlorine dioxide at different pH. When r is less than 1.00, the transition point locates at pH 7.0. PMID:21808646

  19. Geminate recombination and vibrational relaxation dynamics of aqueous chlorine dioxide: A time-resolved resonance Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Sophia C.; Philpott, Matthew J.; Reid, Philip J.

    1998-08-01

    The photochemical dynamics of aqueous chlorine dioxide (OClO) are investigated using time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra are measured as a function of time following photoexcitation of OClO using degenerate pump and probe wavelengths at 390 nm. The temporal evolution of OClO Stokes intensity is found to be consistent with the reformation of ground-state OClO by subpicosecond geminate recombination of the primary ClO and O photofragments. Anti-Stokes intensity is observed for transitions corresponding to the symmetric stretch of OClO demonstrating that upon geminate recombination, excess vibrational energy is deposited along this coordinate. Dissipation of this energy to the surrounding solvent occurs with a time constant of ˜9 ps. Finally, a delay in the appearance of OClO anti-Stokes intensity relative to geminate recombination is observed demonstrating that the excess vibrational energy available to OClO is initially deposited along the resonance Raman inactive asymmetric stretch coordinate with the exchange of energy between this coordinate and the symmetric stretch occurring with a time-constant of ˜5 ps.

  20. Evidence for the 2B1-2A1 electronic transition in chlorine dioxide from resonance Raman depolarization ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Philip J.; Esposito, Anthony P.; Foster, Catherine E.; Beckman, Robert A.

    1997-11-01

    The resonance Raman depolarization ratios of chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in cyclohexane are measured and analyzed to establish the existence of a 2A1 excited state that is nearly degenerate with the optically stronger, 2A2 excited state. The depolarization ratio of the symmetric stretch fundamental transition is measured at several excitation wavelengths spanning the lowest-energy electronic transition centered at ˜360 nm. The depolarization ratio of this transition reaches a maximum value of 0.25±0.04 directly on resonance suggesting that scattered intensity is not derived from a single excited state. The depolarization ratios are modeled utilizing the time-dependent formalism for Raman scattering. This analysis demonstrates that the observed Raman depolarization ratios are derived from contributions of two excited states of 2A1 and 2A2 symmetry to the observed scattering. The results presented here support the emerging picture of OClO excited-state reaction dynamics in which photoexcitation to the 2A2 excited state is followed by internal conversion from this state to the 2A1 surface. Both the role of the 2A1 state in the photochemistry of OClO and the importance of this state in modeling resonance Raman intensities are discussed.

  1. The Biocide Chlorine Dioxide Stimulates Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis by Activation of the Histidine Kinase KinC▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shemesh, Moshe; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms in response to signals that remain poorly defined. We report that biofilm formation is stimulated by sublethal doses of chlorine dioxide (ClO2), an extremely effective and fast-acting biocide. ClO2 accelerated biofilm formation in B. subtilis as well as in other bacteria, suggesting that biofilm formation is a widely conserved response to sublethal doses of the agent. Biofilm formation depends on the synthesis of an extracellular matrix that holds the constituent cells together. We show that the transcription of the major operons responsible for the matrix production in B. subtilis, epsA-epsO and yqxM-sipW-tasA, was enhanced by ClO2, in a manner that depended on the membrane-bound kinase KinC. Activation of KinC appeared to be due to the ability of ClO2 to collapse the membrane potential. Importantly, strains unable to make a matrix were hypersensitive to ClO2, indicating that biofilm formation is a defensive response that helps protect cells from the toxic effects of the biocide. PMID:20971918

  2. Susceptibility of Penicillium expansum spores to sodium hypochlorite, electrolyzed oxidizing water, and chlorine dioxide solutions modified with nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Okull, Derrick O; Demirci, Ali; Rosenberger, Dave; LaBorde, Luke F

    2006-08-01

    The use of water flotation tanks during apple packing increases the risk of contamination of apples by spores of Penicillium expansum, which may accumulate in the recirculating water. Routine addition of sanitizers to the water may prevent such contamination. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorine dioxide (ClO2), and electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water have varied activity against spores of P. expansum, and their effectiveness could be enhanced using surfactants. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of three nonionic surfactants, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20), and sorbitan monolaurate (Span 20), to enhance the efficacy of NaOCl, ClO2, and EO water against spores of P. expansum in aqueous suspension at various temperatures and pH conditions. The efficacy of NaOCl solutions was enhanced by the addition of surfactants at both pH 6.3 and pH 8 (up to 5 log CFU reduction). EO water and ClO2 were effective against P. expansum spores (up to 5 log CFU and 4 log CFU reduction, respectively), but addition of surfactants was not beneficial. All solutions were less effective at 4 degrees C compared to 24 degrees C irrespective of the presence of surfactants. Nonionic surfactants could potentially be used with NaOCl to improve control of P. expansum in flotation tanks, but the efficacy of such formulations should be validated under apple packing conditions.

  3. Effects of aqueous chlorine dioxide treatment on nutritional components and shelf-life of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Chuanhe; Han, Ziqiang

    2011-06-01

    Effects of aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) treatment on nutritional components and shelf-life of mulberry fruit (Morus alba L.) were investigated. Mulberry fruit were immersed into 20, 60, and 80 mg/l ClO(2) solutions for 5, 10, and 15 min, respectively. Mulberries were then rinsed with potable tap water for 1 min and stored at -1°C for 14 d. ClO(2) treatment was effective in retention of flavonoid, ascorbic acid, reducing sugar, and titratable acid. ClO(2) concentration and treatment time were significant factors affecting ClO(2) treatment. The shelf-life of the samples treated by 60 mg/l ClO(2) for 15 min was extended to 14 d compared to 8 d for the control. No ClO(2), ClO(2)(-), or ClO(3)(-) residues were detected in samples treated by 60 mg/l ClO(2) for 15 min. These results indicated that ClO(2) treatment was a promising approach to preserve mulberry fruit with no significant risks of chemical residues. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Moderate and high doses of sodium hypochlorite, neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water, peroxyacetic acid, and gaseous chlorine dioxide did not affect the nutritional and sensory qualities of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce (Lactuca sativa Var. capitata L.) after washing.

    PubMed

    Vandekinderen, Isabelle; Van Camp, John; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Veramme, Kim; Bernaert, Nathalie; Denon, Quenten; Ragaert, Peter; Devlieghere, Frank

    2009-05-27

    Besides the traditionally used sodium hypochlorite (20 and 200 mg L(-1)), alternative sanitizers such as peroxyacetic acid (80 and 250 mg L(-1)) and neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (4.5 and 30 mg L(-1) free chlorine) as well as chlorine dioxide gas (1.54 mg L(-1)) were evaluated for their efficiency in reducing the microbial load of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce. An additional rinsing step with tap water and cooling of the sanitizing solutions, which are obvious for the fresh-cut industry, were not performed within the current study. The high doses of sodium hypochlorite and peroxyacetic acid tested within this study do not conform to the normally used concentrations within the fresh-cut industry. Neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water (30 mg L(-1)), peroxyacetic acid (250 mg L(-1)), and gaseous chlorine dioxide significantly reduced the total aerobic plate count of cut lettuce in comparison with water wash treatments alone. None of the treatments significantly affected the sensory quality of the lettuce, although small color changes were observed after colorimetric measurements. From a nutritional point of view water rinsing significantly decreased the vitamin C (maximum 35%) and phenol (maximum 17%) contents, but did not affect the carotenoid and α-tocopherol contents. Additional effects caused by adding a sanitizer to the wash water were not observed for vitamin C and phenols. Conversely, washing with 250 mg L(-1) peroxyacetic acid reduced the β-carotene content by about 30%, whereas using 200 mg L(-1) sodium hypochlorite reduced both the lactucaxanthin and the lutein contents by about 60%. Use of gaseous chlorine dioxide also had an impact on the lutein content (-18%). Furthermore, the α-tocopherol content was reduced by 19.7 and 15.4% when the two concentrations of neutral electrolyzed oxidizing water were used, respectively. These data represent the situation on day 0. In a next phase, shelf-life studies considering microbial and sensory quality and

  5. Determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water by solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Kang, Haiyan; Wu, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    Given the potential risks of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the analysis of their presence in water is very urgent. We have developed a novel procedure for determining chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water based on solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The extraction parameters of solid-phase extraction were optimized in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method showed wide linear ranges (1.0-1000 ng/L) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9952 to 0.9998. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0.015-0.591 and 0.045-1.502 ng/L, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 82.5 to 102.6% with relative standard deviations below 9.2%. The obtained method was applied successfully to the determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in real water samples. Most of the chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected and 1-monochloropyrene was predominant in the studied water samples. This is the first report of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples in China. The toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the studied tap water were 9.95 ng the toxic equivalency quotient m(-3) . 9,10-Dichloroanthracene and 1-monochloropyrene accounted for the majority of the total toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water.

  6. Chlorine gas release associated with employee language barrier--Arkansas, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-12-07

    On June 27, 2011, a worker at a poultry processing plant in Arkansas began to pour sodium hypochlorite into a 55-gallon drum that contained residual acidic antimicrobial solution. When the sodium hypochlorite reacted with the solution, greenish-yellow chlorine gas was released into the small room where the drum was located and then spread into the plant, where approximately 600 workers were present. These workers promptly were evacuated. Chlorine is a respiratory irritant and can produce symptoms ranging from mild eye, nose, and throat irritation to severe inflammation of the lung, which can lead to death. Of the approximately 600 workers who were evacuated; 545 were later interviewed, 195 reported seeking medical treatment, 152 reported being hospitalized, and the plant nurse reported that five were admitted to intensive-care units. The next day, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) asked for technical assistance from CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to evaluate health effects of the release and make recommendations to prevent future occurrences. This report describes the results of that evaluation, including findings from two follow-up site visits conducted approximately 4 and 6 months after the release. Of the 545 workers who participated in the evaluation, three developed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS), an irritant-induced form of asthma that can persist for life. The worker who inadvertently mixed the two solutions indicated that the drum was labeled in English but he could only read Spanish. This incident underscores the danger posed by chlorine gas and the importance of employers providing adequate training and communication of health and safety precautions to employees.

  7. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric identification of chlorinated and oxygenated cyclohexene artifacts formed during the analysis of chlorinated water samples.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, A M; Christman, R F; Durell, G S

    1988-04-15

    Chlorinated and oxygenated cyclohexene derivatives detected in methylene chloride extracts of chlorinated drinking water were demonstrated to be artifacts produced during sample preparation. Commercial methylene chloride contains cyclohexene as a preservative, and this reacted during the extraction/concentration process to produce microgram amounts of chlorocyclohexene, 2-chlorocyclohexanol, trans-1,2-dichlorocyclohexane, cyclohexenone and cyclohexenol. Quantitative analysis indicated that over 90% of the initial cyclohexene was consumed during the process. Dechlorination of drinking water with sodium arsenite significantly reduced but did not eliminate cyclohexene artifact formation.

  8. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO{sub 2} capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and transport

  9. The Immediate Pulmonary Disease Pattern following Exposure to High Concentrations of Chlorine Gas

    PubMed Central

    Balte, Pallavi P.; Clark, Kathleen A.; Mohr, Lawrence C.; Karmaus, Wilfried J.; Van Sickle, David; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Classification of pulmonary disease into obstructive, restrictive, and mixed patterns is based on 2005 ATS/ERS guidelines and modified GOLD criteria by Mannino et al. (2003), but these guidelines are of limited use for simple spirometry in situations involving mass casualties. Aim. The purpose of this study was to apply these guidelines to patients who underwent simple spirometry following high concentration of chlorine gas inhalation after a train derailment in Graniteville, South Carolina. Methods. We retrospectively investigated lung functions in ten patients. In order to classify pulmonary disease pattern, we used 2005 ATS/ERS guidelines and modified GOLD criteria along with our own criteria developed using available simple spirometry data. Results. We found predominant restrictive pattern in our patients with both modified GOLD and our criteria, which is in contrast to other chlorine exposure studies where obstructive pattern was more common. When compared to modified GOLD and our criteria, 2005 ATS/ERS guidelines underestimated the frequency of restrictive disease. Conclusion. Diagnosis of pulmonary disease patterns is of importance after irritant gas inhalation. Acceptable criteria need to be developed to evaluate pulmonary disease through simple spirometry in events leading to mass casualty and patient surge in hospitals. PMID:24386566

  10. Simulation of natural gas production from submarine gas hydrate deposits combined with carbon dioxide storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2013-04-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several submarine sediments and permafrost regions around the world so far is considered to be a promising measure to overcome future shortages in natural gas as fuel or raw material for chemical syntheses. Being aware that natural gas resources that can be exploited with conventional technologies are limited, research is going on to open up new sources and develop technologies to produce methane and other energy carriers. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, South Korea, India, China and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop technologies to destabilize the hydrates and obtain the pure gas. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from combustion processes to reduce climate change. While different natural or manmade reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide, the storage of carbon dioxide as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in form of hydrates. This has been shown in several laboratory tests and simulations - technical field tests are still in preparation. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like CMG STARS and COMSOL Multiphysics. New simulations based on field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the evaluation of the gas production

  11. Aqueous chlorine dioxide treatment of horticultural produce: Effects on microbial safety and produce quality - A review.

    PubMed

    Praeger, Ulrike; Herppich, Werner B; Hassenberg, Karin

    2016-05-19

    Microbial load on fresh fruit and vegetables causes decay and losses after harvest and may lead to foodborne illness in case of contamination with human pathogens on raw consumed produces. Washing with tap water only marginally reduces microorganisms attached to produce surfaces. Chlorine is widely used for decontamination on fresh horticultural produces. However, due to harmful by-products and the questionable efficacy it has become increasingly challenged. During the last 20 years, the interest to study ClO2 treatments as an alternative sanitation agent for industrially prepared fresh produce has largely increased. For a wide range of commodities, the application of gaseous ClO2 has meanwhile been investigated. In addition, since several years, the interest in aqueous ClO2 treatments has further risen because of the better manageability in postharvest processing lines compared to gaseous application. This article critically evaluated the effects of postharvest application of aqueous ClO2, either alone or in combination with other treatments, on microbial loads for various horticultural produces. In laboratory investigations, application of aqueous ClO2 at concentrations between 3 and 100 ppm effectively reduced counts of natural or inoculated microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts and mold) in the range of 1 and 5 log. However, various effects of ClO2 treatments on produce quality have been described. These mainly comprise implication on sensory and visual attributes. In this context, there is increasing focus on the potential impacts of aqueous ClO2 on relevant nutritional components of produces such as organic acids or phenolic substances.

  12. The photolysis of chlorine in the presence of ozone, nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuper, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The following three systems were investigated: the Cl2-O3 system, the Cl2-O2-NO system and the Cl2-NO2-M system. In the first system, the reaction between ClO and O3, the reaction between OClO and O3, and the mechanism of the Cl2-O3 system were studied. In the second system, the reaction between ClOO and NO was investigated. In the last system, the reaction between Cl and NO2 was investigated as well as the kinetics of the chemiluminescence of the Cl-NO2-O3 reaction. In the first system, Cl2 was photolyzed at 366 nm in the presence of O3 within the temperature range 254-297 K. O3 was removed with quantum yields of 5.8 + or - 0.5, 4.0 + or - 0.3, 2.9 + or - 0.3 and 1.9 + or - 0.2 at 297, 283, 273, and 252 K respectively, invariant to changes in the initial O3 or Cl2 concentration, the extent of conversion or the absorbed intensity, I sub a. The addition of nitrogen had no effect on -phi(03). The Cl2 removal quantum yields were 0.11 + or - 0.02 at 297 K for Cl2 conversions of about 30%, much higher than expected from mass balance considerations based on the initial quantum yield of 0.089 + or - 0.013 for OClO formation at 297 K. The final chlorine-containing product was Cl2O7. It was produced at least in part through the formation of OClO as an intermediate which was also observed with an initial quantum yield of phi sub i(OClO) = 2500 exp(-(3025 + or - 625)/T) independent of (O3) or I sub a.

  13. The Effect of Exposure to Low Levels of Chlorine Gas on the Pulmonary Function and Symptoms in a Chloralkali Unit.

    PubMed

    Neghab, Masoud; Amiri, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Esmaeel; Hosseini, Seyed Younus

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to ascertain whether (or not) long term occupational exposure to low (sub-TLV levels) atmospheric concentrations of chlorine gas was associated with any significant decrements in the parameters of pulmonary function and/or  increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms. In this retrospective cohort study that was performed in 2012, 54 workers of a local chloralkali unit and 38 non-exposed office staff were enrolled and compared. Atmospheric concentrations of chlorine gas were measured by numerous sampling with gas detector tubes. Data on respiratory symptoms were gathered using a standard questionnaire. Furthermore, spirometry test was performed for subjects both prior to and at the end of shift. Mean atmospheric concentration of chlorine gas was 0.27 ±0.05 ppm that was lower than the existing TLV value for this toxic irritant gas. Symptoms of respiratory diseases were significantly more frequent among exposed subjects than in referent individuals. Additionally, mean values of most parameters of pulmonary function including FEV1 (P=0.031), FEV1/FVC ratio (P=0.003) and PEF (P=0.005) were significantly lower than their corresponding values for unexposed subjects. Additional cross shift decrements were also noted in some lung functional capacities, although changes were not statistically significant. Exposure to sub-TLV levels of chlorine gas is associated with statistically significant decrements in the parameters of pulmonary function as well as increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms.

  14. Anatase titanium dioxide thin film based carbon monoxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Homoudi, Ibrahim Abdullah

    2005-11-01

    Gas sensors are finding increasing number of applications in home, industrial and automotive areas. Incomplete combustion in gas and coal fired electricity plants can generate harmful gases and pollutants. The purpose of the proposed research was to develop titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin film based materials for carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing to detect a very low concentration (20--100 ppm) of CO gas. Anatase TiO2 thin films (100--1000 nm) have been developed using pulsed DC magnetron reactive sputtering technique on glass, Si(100) and sapphire substrates. Optimum deposition parameters were determined by studying the crystalline quality of the films using X-ray diffraction. The x-ray photo-emission (XPS) studies indicated a good stoichiometric TiO 2 surface with O to Ti ratio of 1.95 +/- 0.05. Film residual stress was measured using curvature measurements of the substrates before and after deposition of the films. The anatase TiO2 thin films on sapphire showed lower stress compared to glass and Si substrates. Raman spectroscopy measurements were further used to study the correlation between the residual stress and Raman shifts of characteristic peaks to obtain a calibration factor. Anatase TiO2 thin films showed n-type electrical conductivity indicating the presence of shallow electron donors caused by oxygen vacancies. The response of films was tested for 100 ppm of CO in 100 sccm of N2 gas flow as a function of temperature, film thickness, and the substrate. The films show the highest response at 200°C. The films grown on sapphire substrates show the highest response. The response is higher for a film with 1000 nm thickness than the 250 nm thickness film. The CO sensor was tested as a function of CO concentration and as well as under different environs: The films respond to very low concentration, 20--100 ppm, of CO gas, with good reversibility. The response and recovery time were from 2 min to 1 min as the concentration increased from 20 to 100 ppm. It can be

  15. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus will...

  16. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus will...

  17. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus will...

  18. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus will...

  19. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus will...

  20. Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon-in-place volumes and formation volume factors for all the oil, gas, and gas-condensate reservoirs within the U.S. sedimentary basins. The procedures to calculate in-place volumes for oil and gas reservoirs have already been presented by Verma and Bird (2005) to help with the USGS assessment of the undiscovered resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, but there is no straightforward procedure available for calculating in-place volumes for gas-condensate reservoirs for the carbon sequestration project. The objective of the present study is to propose a simple procedure for calculating the hydrocarbon-in-place volume of a condensate reservoir to help estimate the hydrocarbon pore volume for potential CO2 sequestration.

  1. Market-driven emissions from recovery of carbon dioxide gas.

    PubMed

    Supekar, Sarang D; Skerlos, Steven J

    2014-12-16

    This article uses a market-based allocation method in a consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) framework to estimate the environmental emissions created by recovering carbon dioxide (CO2). We find that 1 ton of CO2 recovered as a coproduct of chemicals manufacturing leads to additional greenhouse gas emissions of 147-210 kg CO2 eq , while consuming 160-248 kWh of electricity, 254-480 MJ of heat, and 1836-4027 kg of water. The ranges depend on the initial and final purity of the CO2, particularly because higher purity grades require additional processing steps such as distillation, as well as higher temperature and flow rate of regeneration as needed for activated carbon treatment and desiccant beds. Higher purity also reduces process efficiency due to increased yield losses from regeneration gas and distillation reflux. Mass- and revenue-based allocation methods used in attributional LCA estimate that recovering CO2 leads to 19 and 11 times the global warming impact estimated from a market-based allocation used in consequential LCA.

  2. Novel cellulose derivative, process for preparing the same and sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Tezuka, Y.

    1987-09-15

    This patent relates to a novel cellulose derivative and a sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same, and particularly to hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose, a process for preparing the same and the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same. An object of the present invention is to provide hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose which is a novel cellulose derivative and useful as a material for the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane and a process for preparing the same. Another object of the present invention is to supply a novel sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane having an excellent sulfur dioxide gas permselectivity. The present invention provides hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose. The novel hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose of the present invention indicates markedly high sulfur dioxide gas permselectivity compared with the conventional cellulose derivatives, for example, cellulose acetate, ethyl cellulose, etc. Accordingly, the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane of the present invention can be utilized for separation, purification of sulfur dioxide gas from a gas mixture such as air or for concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in a gas mixture, and is highly practical in industrial use. More specifically, the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane is useful for, for example, removal of harmful sulfur dioxide gas from discharged gases from the viewpoint of environmental protection and purification of starting gases for synthesis, etc. from the viewpoint of industrial production. Further, the hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose of the present invention is useful for a thickening agent, binder, protective colloidal agent, etc.

  3. 42 CFR 84.207 - Bench tests; gas and vapor tests; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 1000 32 4 50 50 Chlorine As received Cl2 500 64 3 5 35 Chlorine Equilibrated Cl2 500 32 4 5 35 Hydrogen... type of gas or vapor, as for use in ammonia and in chlorine, the minimum life shall be one-half that... more than one gas of a type, as for use in chlorine and sulfur dioxide, the stated minimal life...

  4. 42 CFR 84.207 - Bench tests; gas and vapor tests; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 1000 32 4 50 50 Chlorine As received Cl2 500 64 3 5 35 Chlorine Equilibrated Cl2 500 32 4 5 35 Hydrogen... type of gas or vapor, as for use in ammonia and in chlorine, the minimum life shall be one-half that... more than one gas of a type, as for use in chlorine and sulfur dioxide, the stated minimal life...

  5. 42 CFR 84.207 - Bench tests; gas and vapor tests; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 1000 32 4 50 50 Chlorine As received Cl2 500 64 3 5 35 Chlorine Equilibrated Cl2 500 32 4 5 35 Hydrogen... type of gas or vapor, as for use in ammonia and in chlorine, the minimum life shall be one-half that... more than one gas of a type, as for use in chlorine and sulfur dioxide, the stated minimal life...

  6. 42 CFR 84.207 - Bench tests; gas and vapor tests; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 1000 32 4 50 50 Chlorine As received Cl2 500 64 3 5 35 Chlorine Equilibrated Cl2 500 32 4 5 35 Hydrogen... type of gas or vapor, as for use in ammonia and in chlorine, the minimum life shall be one-half that... more than one gas of a type, as for use in chlorine and sulfur dioxide, the stated minimal life...

  7. 42 CFR 84.207 - Bench tests; gas and vapor tests; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 1000 32 4 50 50 Chlorine As received Cl2 500 64 3 5 35 Chlorine Equilibrated Cl2 500 32 4 5 35 Hydrogen... type of gas or vapor, as for use in ammonia and in chlorine, the minimum life shall be one-half that... more than one gas of a type, as for use in chlorine and sulfur dioxide, the stated minimal life...

  8. The application of high-concentration short-time chlorine dioxide treatment for selected specialty crops including Roma tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum), cantaloupes (Cucumis melo ssp. melo var. cantaloupensis) and strawberries (Fragaria×ananassa).

    PubMed

    Trinetta, V; Linton, R H; Morgan, M T

    2013-06-01

    The effects of high-concentration short-time chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas treatment on food-borne pathogens inoculated onto the surface of tomatoes, cantaloupes, and strawberries were studied. Produce were spot-inoculated with a mixture of Salmonella enterica (serotypes Montevideo, Javiana and Baildon), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (serotypes 204 P, EDL 933 and C792) or Listeria monocytogenes (serotypes Scott A, F 5069 and LCDC 81-861), and treated with ClO2 gas at 10 mg/l for 180 s. After ClO2 gas treatment, surviving populations were determined and shelf-life studies were conducted (microbial spoilage population, change in color and overall appearance). Significant microbial reduction (p < 0.05) was observed for all treated samples. Nearly a 5LogCFU/cm(2)Salmonella reduction was found on tomatoes, cantaloupe and strawberries, while a ~3LogCFU/cm(2) reduction was observed for E. coli and Listeria on all produce surfaces. E. coli and Listeria appeared to be more resistant to ClO2 gas as compared to Salmonella spp. Treatments significantly (p < 0.05) reduced initial microflora population, while produce color surface was not significantly influenced, as compared to the control (p > 0.05). Results obtained suggest the potential use of high-concentration short-time ClO2 gas treatment as an effective online pathogen inactivation technology for specialty crops in large-scale produce packing operations.

  9. Characterization of halogenated DBPs and identification of new DBPs trihalomethanols in chlorine dioxide treated drinking water with multiple extractions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiarui; Zhang, Xiangru; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhu, Xiaohu; Gong, Tingting

    2017-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used alternative disinfectant due to its high biocidal efficiency and low-level formation of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. A major portion of total organic halogen (TOX), a collective parameter for all halogenated DBPs, formed in ClO2-treated drinking water is still unknown. A commonly used pretreatment method for analyzing halogenated DBPs in drinking water is one-time liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), which may lead to a substantial loss of DBPs prior to analysis. In this study, characterization and identification of polar halogenated DBPs in a ClO2-treated drinking water sample were conducted by pretreating the sample with multiple extractions. Compared to one-time LLE, the combined four-time LLEs improved the recovery of TOX by 2.3 times. The developmental toxicity of the drinking water sample pretreated with the combined four-time LLEs was 1.67 times higher than that pretreated with one-time LLE. With the aid of ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, a new group of polar halogenated DBPs, trihalomethanols, were detected in the drinking water sample pretreated with multiple extractions; two of them, trichloromethanol and bromodichloromethanol, were identified with synthesized standard compounds. Moreover, these trihalomethanols were found to be the transformation products of trihalomethanes formed during ClO2 disinfection. The results indicate that multiple LLEs can significantly improve extraction efficiencies of polar halogenated DBPs and is a better pretreatment method for characterizing and identifying new polar halogenated DBPs in drinking water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Formation of iodinated disinfection by-products during oxidation of iodide-containing waters with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Xu, Bin; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2013-06-01

    This study was to explore the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs), including iodoform (CHI3), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), when iodide-containing artificial synthesized waters and raw waters are in contact with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Among the investigated I-DBPs, CHI3 was the major species during ClO2 oxidation in artificial synthesized waters. Impact factors were evaluated, including the concentrations of ClO2, iodide (I(-)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH. Formation of CHI3, IAA and TIAA followed an increasing and then decreasing pattern with increased ClO2 or DOC concentration. I-DBPs yield was significantly affected by solution pH. High concentrations of I-DBPs were generated under circumneutral conditions with the maximum formation at pH 8. The increase of I(-) concentration can increase I-DBPs yields, but the increment was suppressed when I(-) concentration was higher than 50 μM. When 100 μg/L I(-)and ClO2 (7.5-44.4 μM) were spiked to the raw water samples from Yangshupu and Minhang drinking water treatment plant, certain amounts of CHI3 and IAA were found under pH 7 and the concentrations were strongly correlated with ClO2 dosage and water qualities, however, no TIAA was detected. Finally, we investigated I-DBPs formation of 18 model compounds, including 4 carboxylic acids, 5 phenols and 8 amino acids, treating with ClO2 when I(-) was present. Results showed that most of these model compounds could form a considerable amount of I-DBPs, especially for propanoic acid, butanoic acid, resorcinol, hydroquinone, alanine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine and serine.

  11. Reduction of Salmonella enterica on the surface of eggshells by sequential treatment with aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seonyeong; Park, Sunhyung; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Byeong-sam; Beuchat, Larry R; Hoikyung, Kim; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    The synergistic effects of sequential treatments with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and drying in killing Salmonella enterica on the surface of chicken eggshells were investigated. Initial experiments were focused on comparing lethalities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ClO2. Eggs surface-inoculated with S. enterica in chicken feces as a carrier were immersed in water, NaOCl (50 or 200 μg/mL), or ClO2 (50 or 200 μg/mL) for 1 or 5 min. For 1-min treatments, lethal activities of sanitizers were not significantly different (P>0.05). However, after treatment with ClO2 for 5 min, reductions of S. enterica were significantly greater (P≤0.05) than reductions after treatment with water or NaOCl. The effect of treatment of eggs with ClO2 or NaOCl, followed by drying at 43% relative humidity and 25 °C for 24 and 48 h, were determined. Populations of S. enterica decreased during drying, regardless of the type of sanitizer treatment. ClO2 treatment, compared to water or NaOCl treatments, resulted in additional reductions of ca. >1.3 log CFU/egg during drying. This indicates that sequential treatments with ClO2 and drying induced synergistic lethal effects against S. enterica on the surface of eggshells. These observations will be useful when selecting a sanitizer to control S. enterica on the surface of eggshells and designing an effective egg sanitization system exploiting the synergistic lethal effects of sanitizer and drying.

  12. Comparisons of the film peeling from the composite oxides of quartz sand filters using ozone, hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingming; Huang, Tinglin; Wen, Gang; Cao, Xin

    2015-08-01

    To solve the problem of shortened backwashing intervals in groundwater plants, several disinfectants including ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) were examined to peel off the film from the quartz sand surface in four pilot-scale columns. An optimized oxidant dosage and oxidation time were determined by batch tests. Subsequently, the optimized conditions were tested in the four pilot-scale columns. The results demonstrated that the backwashing intervals increased from 35.17 to 54.33 (H2O2) and to 53.67 hr (ClO2) after the oxidation treatments, and the increase of backwashing interval after treatment by O3 was much less than for the other two treatments. Interestingly, the treatment efficiency of filters was not affected by O3 or H2O2 oxidation; but after oxidation by ClO2, the treatment efficiency was deteriorated, especially the ammonia removal (from 96.96% to 24.95%). The filter sands before and after the oxidation were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the oxidation by O3 and H2O2, the structures on the surface of filter sands were seriously damaged after oxidation by ClO2. The chemical states of manganese on the surfaces of those treated sands were only changed by ClO2. The damage of the structures and the change of the chemical states of manganese might have a negative effect on the ammonia removal. In summary, H2O2 is a suitable agent for film peeling.

  13. Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide in inactivating Bacillus cereus spores attached to and in a biofilm on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyegyeong; Seo, Hyun-Sun; Bang, Jihyun; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the lethal activity of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) against Bacillus cereus spores attached to and in biofilm formed on a stainless steel surface. Aqueous ClO2 was prepared by mixing sulfuric acid (5% w/v) with sodium chlorite (10mg/mL), and gaseous ClO2 was produced by vaporization of aqueous ClO2 in an air-tight container. The concentration of gaseous ClO2 in the air within the container increased rapidly at first but gradually decreased over time. The lethality of gaseous ClO2 against B. cereus spores attached to stainless steel coupons (SSCs) and in biofilm formed by the pathogen on SSCs was determined. The B. cereus spores attached to SSCs (5.3±0.1logCFU/coupon) were completely inactivated within 1h at 25°C when treated with gaseous ClO2 (peak concentration: 115.3±5.0 parts per million [ppm]). The total number of vegetative cells and spores in biofilm formed by B. cereus on SSCs was 5.9±0.3logCFU/coupon; the spore count was 5.3±0.1logCFU/coupon. The vegetative cells and spores in biofilm were completely inactivated within 6h (peak concentration: 115.3±5.0ppm). Results show that B. cereus spores in biofilms are more resistant to gaseous ClO2 than are attached spores not in biofilms. Gaseous ClO2 was, nevertheless, very effective in killing B. cereus spores in biofilm on the surface of stainless steel. Results show promise for application of gaseous ClO2 to enhance the microbiological safety of foods that may come in contact with stainless steel and possibly other hard surfaces on which B. cereus biofilms have formed.

  14. Using aqueous chlorine dioxide to prevent contamination of tomatoes with Salmonella enterica and erwinia carotovora during fruit washing.

    PubMed

    Pao, S; Kelsey, D F; Khalid, M F; Ettinger, M R

    2007-03-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an antimicrobial agent recognized for its disinfectant properties. In this study, the sanitizing effects of ClO2 solutions against Salmonella enterica and Erwinia carotovora in water, on tomato surfaces, and between loads of tomatoes were evaluated. In water, ClO2 at 5, 10, and 20 ppm caused a > or = 5-log reduction of S. enterica within 6, 4, and 2 s, respectively. Higher lethality was observed with E. carotovora; a 5-log reduction was achieved after only 2 s with 10 ppm ClO2. On fruit surfaces, however, the sanitizing effects were compromised. A full minute of contact with ClO2 at 20 and 10 ppm was required to achieve a 5-log reduction in S. enterica and E. carotovora counts, respectively, on freshly spot-inoculated tomatoes. On inoculated fruit surfaces, populations decreased > 3 log CFU/cm2 during desiccation at 24 +/- 1 degrees C for 24 h. Populations of air-dried Salmonella and Erwinia were not significantly reduced (P > 0.05) by ClO2 at < or = 20 ppm after 1 min. Either wet or dry inoculum of these two pathogens could contaminate immersion water, which in turn can cross-contaminate a subsequent load of clean fruit and water. ClO2 at 5 ppm used for immersion effectively prevented cross-contamination. Pathogen contamination during fruit handling is best prevented with an effective disinfectant. Once a load of fruit is contaminated with pathogens, even a proven disinfectant such as ClO2 cannot completely eliminate such contaminants, particularly when they are in a dehydrated state on fruit.

  15. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and structurally related amines by chlorine dioxide: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of widely prescribed antibiotics and have been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven FQs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), lomefloxacin (LOM), pipemidic acid (PIP) and flumequine (FLU)) and three structurally related amines (1-phenylpiperazine (PP), N-phenylmorpholine (PM) and 4-phenylpiperidine (PD)) toward chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated to elucidate the behavior of FQs during ClO(2) disinfection processes. The reaction kinetics are highly pH-dependent, can be well described by a second-order kinetic model incorporating speciation of FQs, and follow the trend of OFL > ENR > CIP ∼ NOR ∼ LOM > > PIP in reactivity. Comparison among FQs and related amines and product characterization indicate that FQs' piperazine ring is the primary reactive center toward ClO(2). ClO(2) likely attacks FQ's piperazinyl N4 atom followed by concerted fragmentation involving piperazinyl N1 atom, leading to dealkylation, hydroxylation and intramolecular ring closure at the piperazine moiety. While FQs with tertiary N4 react faster with ClO(2) than FQs with secondary N4, the overall reactivity of the piperazine moiety also depends strongly on the quinolone ring through electronic effects. The reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to model the decay of CIP by ClO(2) in surface water samples, but overestimate the decay in wastewater samples. Overall, transformation of FQs, particularly for those with tertiary N4 amines, could be expected under typical ClO(2) disinfection conditions. However, the transformation may not eliminate antibacterial activity because of little destruction at the quinolone ring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Bixby, Teresa J.; Reid, Philip J.

    2005-08-22

    We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, and acetonitrile. Following the photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density for frequencies corresponding to asymmetric stretch of OClO is measured with a time resolution of 120{+-}50 fs. The experimentally determined optical-density evolution is compared with theoretical models of OClO vibrational relaxation derived from collisional models as well as classical molecular-dynamics (MD) studies. The vibrational relaxation rates in D{sub 2}O are reduced by a factor of 3 relative to H{sub 2}O consistent with the predictions of MD. This difference reflects modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling accompanying isotopic substitution of the solvent. Also, the geminate-recombination quantum yield for the primary photofragments resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is reduced in D{sub 2}O relative to H{sub 2}O. It is proposed that this reduction reflects enhancement of the dissociation rate accompanying vibrational excitation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. In contrast to H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the vibrational-relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile are not well described by the theoretical models. Reproduction of the optical-density evolution in acetonitrile requires significant modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling derived from MD. It is proposed that this modification reflects vibrational-energy transfer from the asymmetric stretch of OClO to the methyl rock of acetonitrile. In total, the results presented here provide a detailed description of the solvent-dependent geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of OClO in solution.

  17. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Bixby, Teresa J.; Reid, Philip J.

    2005-08-01

    We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in H2O, D2O, and acetonitrile. Following the photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density for frequencies corresponding to asymmetric stretch of OClO is measured with a time resolution of 120±50fs. The experimentally determined optical-density evolution is compared with theoretical models of OClO vibrational relaxation derived from collisional models as well as classical molecular-dynamics (MD) studies. The vibrational relaxation rates in D2O are reduced by a factor of 3 relative to H2O consistent with the predictions of MD. This difference reflects modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling accompanying isotopic substitution of the solvent. Also, the geminate-recombination quantum yield for the primary photofragments resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is reduced in D2O relative to H2O. It is proposed that this reduction reflects enhancement of the dissociation rate accompanying vibrational excitation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. In contrast to H2O and D2O, the vibrational-relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile are not well described by the theoretical models. Reproduction of the optical-density evolution in acetonitrile requires significant modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling derived from MD. It is proposed that this modification reflects vibrational-energy transfer from the asymmetric stretch of OClO to the methyl rock of acetonitrile. In total, the results presented here provide a detailed description of the solvent-dependent geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of OClO in solution.

  18. Disinfection by-products of chlorine dioxide (chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes): Occurrence in drinking water in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Otoum, Fatima; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Ahmed, Talaat A; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed; Ali, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water, namely, chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes (THMs), was investigated. Two-hundred-ninety-four drinking water samples were collected from seven desalination plants (DPs), four reservoirs (R), and eight mosques (M) distributed within various locations in southern and northern Qatar. The ClO2 concentration levels ranged from 0.38 to <0.02 mg L(-1), with mean values of 0.17, 0.12, and 0.04 mg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorite levels varied from 13 μg L(-1) to 440 μg L(-1), with median values varying from 13 to 230 μg L(-1), 77-320 μg L(-1), and 85-440 μg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorate levels varied from 11 μg L(-1) to 280 μg L(-1), with mean values varying from 36 to 280 μg L(-1), 11-200 μg L(-1), and 11-150 μg L(-1) in the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The average concentration of THMs was 5 μg L(-1), and the maximum value reached 77 μg L(-1) However, all of the DBP concentrations fell within the range of the regulatory limits set by GSO 149/2009, the World Health Organization (WHO), and Kahramaa (KM).

  19. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co

  20. Time course of airway remodelling after an acute chlorine gas exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Stephanie A; Ramos-Barbón, David; Campbell, Holly; McGovern, Toby; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Martin, James G

    2008-01-01

    Accidental chlorine (Cl2) gas inhalation is a common cause of acute airway injury. However, little is known about the kinetics of airway injury and repair after Cl2 exposure. We investigated the time course of airway epithelial damage and repair in mice after a single exposure to a high concentration of Cl2 gas. Mice were exposed to 800 ppm Cl2 gas for 5 minutes and studied from 12 hrs to 10 days post-exposure. The acute injury phase after Cl2 exposure (≤ 24 hrs post-exposure) was characterized by airway epithelial cell apoptosis (increased TUNEL staining) and sloughing, elevated protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and a modest increase in airway responses to methacholine. The repair phase after Cl2 exposure was characterized by increased airway epithelial cell proliferation, measured by immunoreactive proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), with maximal proliferation occurring 5 days after Cl2 exposure. At 10 days after Cl2 exposure the airway smooth muscle mass was increased relative to controls, suggestive of airway smooth muscle hyperplasia and there was evidence of airway fibrosis. No increase in goblet cells occurred at any time point. We conclude that a single exposure of mice to Cl2 gas causes acute changes in lung function, including pulmonary responsiveness to methacholine challenge, associated with airway damage, followed by subsequent repair and airway remodelling. PMID:18702818