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Sample records for chlorine dioxide gas

  1. Chlorine Dioxide (Gas)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is registered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a sterilant for use in manufacturing, laboratory equipment, medical devices, environmental surfaces, tools and clean rooms. Aqueous ClO2 is registered by the EPA as a surface disinfectant and sanitizer fo...

  2. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas

    PubMed Central

    Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry. PMID:27499670

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyobi; Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak; Myeong, Donghoon; Chang, Byungjoon; Choe, Nong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry. PMID:27499670

  4. Chloroxyanion residue quantification in cantaloupes treated with chlorine dioxide gas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/L for 10 minutes, results in a significant reduction (p<0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6 and 4.3 log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monoc...

  5. Potential biodefense model applications for portable chlorine dioxide gas production.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Jeannie M; Newsome, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Development of decontamination methods and strategies to address potential infectious disease outbreaks and bioterrorism events are pertinent to this nation's biodefense strategies and general biosecurity. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas has a history of use as a decontamination agent in response to an act of bioterrorism. However, the more widespread use of ClO2 gas to meet current and unforeseen decontamination needs has been hampered because the gas is too unstable for shipment and must be prepared at the application site. Newer technology allows for easy, onsite gas generation without the need for dedicated equipment, electricity, water, or personnel with advanced training. In a laboratory model system, 2 unique applications (personal protective equipment [PPE] and animal skin) were investigated in the context of potential development of decontamination protocols. Such protocols could serve to reduce human exposure to bacteria in a decontamination response effort. Chlorine dioxide gas was capable of reducing (2-7 logs of vegetative and spore-forming bacteria), and in some instances eliminating, culturable bacteria from difficult to clean areas on PPE facepieces. The gas was effective in eliminating naturally occurring bacteria on animal skin and also on skin inoculated with Bacillus spores. The culturable bacteria, including Bacillus spores, were eliminated in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Results of these studies suggested portable, easily used ClO2 gas generation systems have excellent potential for protocol development to contribute to biodefense strategies and decontamination responses to infectious disease outbreaks or other biothreat events.

  6. Potential biodefense model applications for portable chlorine dioxide gas production.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Jeannie M; Newsome, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Development of decontamination methods and strategies to address potential infectious disease outbreaks and bioterrorism events are pertinent to this nation's biodefense strategies and general biosecurity. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas has a history of use as a decontamination agent in response to an act of bioterrorism. However, the more widespread use of ClO2 gas to meet current and unforeseen decontamination needs has been hampered because the gas is too unstable for shipment and must be prepared at the application site. Newer technology allows for easy, onsite gas generation without the need for dedicated equipment, electricity, water, or personnel with advanced training. In a laboratory model system, 2 unique applications (personal protective equipment [PPE] and animal skin) were investigated in the context of potential development of decontamination protocols. Such protocols could serve to reduce human exposure to bacteria in a decontamination response effort. Chlorine dioxide gas was capable of reducing (2-7 logs of vegetative and spore-forming bacteria), and in some instances eliminating, culturable bacteria from difficult to clean areas on PPE facepieces. The gas was effective in eliminating naturally occurring bacteria on animal skin and also on skin inoculated with Bacillus spores. The culturable bacteria, including Bacillus spores, were eliminated in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Results of these studies suggested portable, easily used ClO2 gas generation systems have excellent potential for protocol development to contribute to biodefense strategies and decontamination responses to infectious disease outbreaks or other biothreat events. PMID:25812425

  7. Chlorine dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine dioxide ; CASRN 10049 - 04 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  8. Effect of Chlorine Dioxide Gas on Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permeability, solubility and diffusion coefficients of chlorine dioxide for high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), nylon, and multilayer of ethylene viny...

  9. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6- and 4.3-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, respectively. However, this treatment could result in the presence of chloroxyanion residues, such as chloride (Cl(-)), chlorite (ClO2(-)), chlorate (ClO3(-)), and perchlorate (ClO4(-)), which, apart from chloride, are a toxicity concern. Radiolabeled chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This

  10. Chloroxyanion Residue Quantification in Cantaloupes Treated with Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simran; Smith, David J; Morgan, Mark T

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies show that treatment of cantaloupes with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at 5 mg/liter for 10 min results in a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in initial microflora, an increase in shelf life without any alteration in color, and a 4.6- and 4.3-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, respectively. However, this treatment could result in the presence of chloroxyanion residues, such as chloride (Cl(-)), chlorite (ClO2(-)), chlorate (ClO3(-)), and perchlorate (ClO4(-)), which, apart from chloride, are a toxicity concern. Radiolabeled chlorine dioxide ((36)ClO2) gas was used to describe the identity and distribution of chloroxyanion residues in or on cantaloupe subsequent to fumigation with ClO2 gas at a mean concentration of 5.1 ± 0.7 mg/liter for 10 min. Each treated cantaloupe was separated into rind, flesh, and mixed (rind and flesh) sections, which were blended and centrifuged to give the corresponding sera fractions. Radioactivity detected, ratio of radioactivity to mass of chlorite in initial ClO2 gas generation reaction, and distribution of chloroxyanions in serum samples were used to calculate residue concentrations in flesh, rind, and mixed samples. Anions detected on the cantaloupe were Cl(-) (∼ 90%) and ClO3(-) (∼ 10%), located primarily in the rind (19.3 ± 8.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of rind and 4.8 ± 2.3 μg of ClO3(-)/g of rind, n = 6). Cantaloupe flesh (∼ 200 g) directly exposed to(36)ClO2 gas treatment showed the presence of only Cl(-) residues (8.1 ± 1.0 μg of Cl(-)/g of flesh, n = 3). Results indicate chloroxyanion residues Cl(-) and ClO3(-) are only present on the rind of whole cantaloupes treated with ClO2 gas. However during cutting, residues may be transferred to the fruit flesh. Because Cl(-) is not toxic, only ClO3(-) would be a toxicity concern, but the levels transferred from rind to flesh are very low. In the case of fruit flesh directly exposed to ClO2 gas, only nontoxic Cl(-) was detected. This

  11. Chloroxyanion residues in cantaloupe and tomatoes after chlorine dioxide gas sanitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide gas is effective at cleansing fruits and vegetables of bacterial pathogens and(or) rot organisms, but few data are available on chemical residues remaining subsequent to chlorine gas treatment. Therefore, studies were conducted to quantify chlorate and perchlorate residues after tom...

  12. Chlorine Dioxide Gas Sterilization under Square-Wave Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, David K.; Woodworth, Archie G.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to study chlorine dioxide (CD) gas sterilization under square-wave conditions. By using controlled humidity, gas concentration, and temperature at atmospheric pressure, standard biological indicators (BIs) and spore disks of environmental isolates were exposed to CD gas. The sporicidal activity of CD gas was found to be concentration dependent. Prehumidification enhanced the CD activity. The D values (time required for 90% inactivation) of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger ATCC 9372 BIs were estimated to be 1.5, 2.5, and 4.2 min when exposed to CD concentrations of 30, 15, and 7 mg/liter, respectively, at 23°C and ambient (20 to 40%) relative humidity (RH). Survivor tailings were observed. Prehumidification of BIs to 70 to 75% RH in an environmental chamber for 30 min resulted in a D value of 1.6 min after exposure to a concentration of 6 to 7 mg of CD per liter at 23°C and eliminated survivor tailing. Prolonging prehumidification at 70 to 75% RH for up to 16 h did not further improve the inactivation rate. Prehumidification by ultrasonic nebulization was found to be more effective than prehumidification in the environmental chamber, improving the D value to 0.55 min at a CD concentration of 6 to 7 mg/liter. Based on the current observations, CD gas is estimated, on a molar concentration basis, to be 1,075 times more potent than ethylene oxide as a sterilant at 30°C. A comparative study showed B. subtilis var. niger BIs were more resistant than other types of BIs and most of the tested bacterial spores of environmental isolates. PMID:16348127

  13. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Prodduk, Vara; Annous, Bassam A; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2014-11-01

    Although freshly sprouted beans and grains are considered to be a source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide good matrices for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to reduce Salmonella on artificially inoculated mungbean sprouts. The effectiveness of gaseous chlorine dioxide (0.5 mg/liter of air) with or without tumbling (mechanical mixing) was compared with an aqueous chlorine (200 ppm) wash treatment. Tumbling the inoculated sprouts during the chlorine dioxide gas application for 15, 30, and 60 min reduced Salmonella populations by 3.0, 4.0, and 5.5 log CFU/g, respectively, as compared with 3.0, 3.0, and 4.0 log CFU/g reductions obtained without tumbling, respectively. A 2.0 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella was achieved with an aqueous chlorine wash. The difference in microbial reduction between chlorine dioxide gas versus aqueous chlorine wash points to the important role of surface topography, pore structure, bacterial attachment, and/or biofilm formation on sprouts. These data suggested that chlorine dioxide gas was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells that are attached to inaccessible sites and/or are within biofilms on the sprout surface as compared with an aqueous chlorine wash. Consequently, scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that chlorine dioxide gas treatment was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells attached to inaccessible sites and within biofilms on the sprout surfaces.

  14. Selective chlorine dioxide determination using gas-diffusion flow injection analysis with chemiluminescent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, D.A.; Gord, J.R.; Gordon, G.; Pacey, G.E.

    1986-06-01

    An automated chemiluminescent technique has been developed utilizing the advantages of gas-diffusion flow injection analysis. A gas-diffusion membrane separates the donor (sampling) stream from the acceptor (detecting) stream and removes ionic interferences. A novel chemiluminescence flow-through detector cell is used to measure the concentration of chlorine dioxide as a function of the intensity of the chemiluminescence produced from its reaction with luminol. The chemiluminescent reagent merges with the analyte directly in front of the photomultiplier tube in order to maximize the sensitivity of the system. The detection limit for chlorine dioxide is approximately 5 ppb. The method is over 1500 times more selective for chlorine dioxide than for chlorine on a mole basis. This method eliminates interference from iron and manganese compounds, as well as other oxychlorinated compounds such as chlorite ion and chlorate ion.

  15. Effect of chlorine dioxide gas on fungi and mycotoxins associated with sick building syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S C; Wu, C; Andriychuk, L A; Martin, J M; Brasel, T L; Jumper, C A; Straus, D C

    2005-09-01

    The growth of indoor molds and their resulting products (e.g., spores and mycotoxins) can present health hazards for human beings. The efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigation treatment for inactivating sick building syndrome-related fungi and their mycotoxins was evaluated. Filter papers (15 per organism) featuring growth of Stachybotrys chartarum, Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Cladosporium cladosporioides were placed in gas chambers containing chlorine dioxide gas at either 500 or 1,000 ppm for 24 h. C. globosum was exposed to the gas both as colonies and as ascospores without asci and perithecia. After treatment, all organisms were tested for colony growth using an agar plating technique. Colonies of S. chartarum were also tested for toxicity using a yeast toxicity assay with a high specificity for trichothecene mycotoxins. Results showed that chlorine dioxide gas at both concentrations completely inactivated all organisms except for C. globosum colonies which were inactivated an average of 89%. More than 99% of ascospores of C. globosum were nonculturable. For all ascospore counts, mean test readings were lower than the controls (P < 0.001), indicating that some ascospores may also have been destroyed. Colonies of S. chartarum were still toxic after treatment. These data show that chlorine dioxide gas can be effective to a degree as a fumigant for the inactivation of certain fungal colonies, that the perithecia of C. globosum can play a slightly protective role for the ascospores and that S. chartarum, while affected by the fumigation treatment, still remains toxic. PMID:16151130

  16. Plant physiological response of strawberry fruit to chlorine dioxide gas treatment during postharvest storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide, a strong oxidizing and sanitizing agent, is used as a postharvest sanitizer for fruits and vegetables and generally applied on a packing line using a chlorine dioxide generator. The objective of this research was to study the physiological responses of strawberries to ClO2 when app...

  17. Chlorine dioxide and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.P. . Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology)

    1989-05-01

    Because it has little or no tendency to generate carcinogenic trihalomethanes such as chloroform, chlorine dioxide is an attractive alternative to chlorine for drinking water disinfection. There are, however, concerns about its acute toxicity, and the toxic effects of its by-products, chlorite and chlorate. The human experience with chlorine dioxide in both controlled, prospective studies and in actual use situations in community water supplies have as yet failed to reveal adverse health effects. The EPA has recommended standards of 0.06 mg/L for chlorine dioxide and standards of 0.007 mg/L for chlorite and chlorate in drinking water. Among groups who may be at special risk from oxychlorines in drinking water are patients who must undergro chronic extracorporeal hemodialysis. Although even units for home hemodialysis are supposed to be equipped with devices which effectively remove oxychlorines, there is a always a possibility of operator error or equipment failure. When the equipment is adequately maintained, it is likely that dialysis patients will have more intensive exposures from drinking water than from dialysis fluids despite the much larger volumes of water that are involved in dialysis. This paper discusses a hemodialysis and the standards and effects of oxychlorines. 90 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Reaction products of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, A A

    1982-01-01

    Inspection of the available literature reveals that a detailed investigation of the aqueous organic chemistry of chlorine dioxide and systematic identification of products formed during water disinfection has not been considered. This must be done before an informed assessment can be made of the relative safety of using chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant alternative to chlorine. Although trihalomethanes are generally not formed by the action of chlorine dioxide, the products of chlorine dioxide treatment of organic materials are oxidized species, some of which also contain chlorine. The relative amounts of species types may depend on the amount of chlorine dioxide residual maintained and the concentration and nature of the organic material present in the source water. The trend toward lower concentrations of chlorinated by-products with increasing ClO2 concentration, which was observed with phenols, has not been observed with natural humic materials as measured by the organic halogen parameter. Organic halogen concentrations have been shown to increase with increasing chlorine dioxide dose, but are much lower than those observed when chlorine is applied. Aldehydes have been detected as apparent by-products of chlorine dioxide oxidation reactions in a surface water that is a drinking water source. Some other nonchlorinated products of chlorine dioxide treatment may be quinones and epoxides. The extent of formation of these moieties within the macromolecular humic structure is also still unknown. PMID:7151750

  19. A pilot study on using chlorine dioxide gas for disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes* #

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ying; Hao, Li-mei; Ma, Shu-ren; Wu, Jin-hui; Wang, Tao; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zong-xing; Qi, Jian-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study of employing chlorine dioxide (CD) gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes was conducted to meet the expectations of many endoscopy units in China for a high-efficiency and low-cost disinfectant. Methods: An experimental prototype with an active circulation mode was designed to use CD gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes. One type of testing device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes (2 m long, inner diameter 1 mm) and bacterial carrier containers was used to simulate the channel of the endoscope. PTFE bacterial carriers inoculated with Bacillus atrophaeus with or without organic burden were used to evaluate the sporicidal activity of CD gas. Factors including exposure dosage, relative humidity (RH), and flow rate (FR) influencing the disinfection effect of CD gas were investigated. Moreover, an autoptic disinfecting test on eight real gastrointestinal endoscopes after clinical use was performed using the experimental prototype. Results: RH, exposure dosage, organic burden, and the FR through the channel significantly (P<0.05) affected the disinfection efficacy of CD gas for a long and narrow lumen. The log reduction increased as FR decreased. Treatment with 4 mg/L CD gas for 30 min at 0.8 L/min FR and 75% RH, resulted in complete inactivation of spores. Furthermore, all eight endoscopes with a maximum colony-forming unit of 915 were completely disinfected. The cost was only 3 CNY (0.46 USD) for each endoscope. Conclusions: The methods and results reported in this study could provide a basis for further studies on using CD gas for the disinfection of endoscopes. PMID:27381729

  20. A study of the properties of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigant

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Matsuura, Ayumi; Uekusa, Masashi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a strong oxidant that possesses an antimicrobial activity. We demonstrated here that ClO2 gas is easily generated by mixing 3.35% sodium chlorite solution (Purogene) and 85% phosphoric acid at a 10:1 volume ratio without using an expensive machine. In a test room (87 m3), experiments were carried out using various amounts of sodium chlorite solution (0.25 ml/m3 to 20.0 ml/m3). The gas concentration increased in a sodium chlorite volume-dependent manner and reached peak values of from 0.8 ppm to 40.8 ppm at 2 h–3 h, and then gradually decreased. No differences in gas concentrations were observed between 0.1 and 2.5 m above the floor, indicating that the gas was evenly distributed. Under high-humidity (approximately 80% relative humidity), colony formation of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was completely inhibited by ClO2 gas exposure at 1.0 ml/m3 sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 3.0 ppm). Exposure at 4.0 ml/m3 sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 10.6 ppm) achieved complete inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores. In contrast, without humidification, the efficacy of ClO2 gas was apparently attenuated, suggesting that the atmospheric moisture is indispensable. Delicate electronic devices (computer, camera, etc.) operated normally, even after being subjected to more than 20 times of fumigation. Considering that our method for gas generation is simple, reproducible, and highly effective at decontaminating microbes, our approach is expected to serve as an inexpensive alternative method for cleaning and disinfecting animal facilities. PMID:27041456

  1. A study of the properties of chlorine dioxide gas as a fumigant.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, Yasufumi; Matsuura, Ayumi; Uekusa, Masashi; Ito, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Toshiaki

    2016-07-29

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a strong oxidant that possesses an antimicrobial activity. We demonstrated here that ClO2 gas is easily generated by mixing 3.35% sodium chlorite solution (Purogene) and 85% phosphoric acid at a 10:1 volume ratio without using an expensive machine. In a test room (87 m(3)), experiments were carried out using various amounts of sodium chlorite solution (0.25 ml/m(3) to 20.0 ml/m(3)). The gas concentration increased in a sodium chlorite volume-dependent manner and reached peak values of from 0.8 ppm to 40.8 ppm at 2 h-3 h, and then gradually decreased. No differences in gas concentrations were observed between 0.1 and 2.5 m above the floor, indicating that the gas was evenly distributed. Under high-humidity (approximately 80% relative humidity), colony formation of both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was completely inhibited by ClO2 gas exposure at 1.0 ml/m(3) sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 3.0 ppm). Exposure at 4.0 ml/m(3) sodium chlorite solution (mean maximal concentration of 10.6 ppm) achieved complete inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores. In contrast, without humidification, the efficacy of ClO2 gas was apparently attenuated, suggesting that the atmospheric moisture is indispensable. Delicate electronic devices (computer, camera, etc.) operated normally, even after being subjected to more than 20 times of fumigation. Considering that our method for gas generation is simple, reproducible, and highly effective at decontaminating microbes, our approach is expected to serve as an inexpensive alternative method for cleaning and disinfecting animal facilities. PMID:27041456

  2. Environmental monitoring and bactericidal efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas in a dental office.

    PubMed

    Kuroyama, Iwao; Osato, Shigeo; Nakajima, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryoichi; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2010-09-01

    We monitored the quantity of airborne microorganisms at 11 points (points A to K) in a dental office on a routine day of use, and tested the bactericidal efficacy of chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) gas in the dental operatory after consulting hours. Fallen airborne microorganisms were collected under air-conditioning (AC) in the dental office, and under four conditions in the operatory. Specimens of the microbes were cultivated on nutrient and Sabouraud agar media (NAM and SAM). Many colonies were observed at the entrance hall and on the cabinet in a disinfection room in the NAM and SAM tests, respectively, while no colony was observed at the foot position of the operating table and treatment bed, and above the head position of the operating room in the NAM and SAM tests, respectively. In the bactericidal efficacy test using ClO₂ gas, the dental operatory could be kept clean by the use of 4 mg/L-ClO₂ gas in addition to the use of an AC with a plasma filter and the HEPA filter. PMID:20938095

  3. Mass Transfer Study of Chlorine Dioxide Gas Through Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A continuous system for measuring the mass transfer of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2), a strong oxidizing agent and used in food and pharmaceutical packaging, through 10 different types of polymeric packaging material was developed utilizing electrochemical sensor as a detector. Permeability, diff...

  4. Distribution and chemical fate of chlorine dioxide gas during sanitation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of studies was conducted to establish the 1) distribution and chemical fate of 36-ClO2 on tomatoes and cantaloupe; and 2) the magnitude of residues in kilogram quantities of tomatoes and cantaloupe sanitized with a slow-release chlorine dioxide formulation. Tomatoes and cantaloupe were resp...

  5. Inactivation of Airborne Bacteria and Viruses Using Extremely Low Concentrations of Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio; Sakasegawa, Miyusse; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Takigawa, Yasuhiro; Taura, Kouichi; Taguchi, Kazuhiko; Matsubara, Kazuki; Nakahara, Kouichi; Kato, Daisuke; Sogawa, Koushirou; Oka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Infectious airborne microbes, including many pathological microbes that cause respiratory infections, are commonly found in medical facilities and constitute a serious threat to human health. Thus, an effective method for reducing the number of microbes floating in the air will aid in the minimization of the incidence of respiratory infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate that chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas at extremely low concentrations, which has no detrimental effects on human health, elicits a strong effect to inactivate bacteria and viruses and significantly reduces the number of viable airborne microbes in a hospital operating room. In one set of experiments, a suspension of Staphylococcus aureus, bacteriophage MS2, and bacteriophage ΦX174 were released into an exposure chamber. When ClO2 gas at 0.01 or 0.02 parts per million (ppm, volume/volume) was present in the chamber, the numbers of surviving microbes in the air were markedly reduced after 120 min. The reductions were markedly greater than the natural reductions of the microbes in the chamber. In another experiment, the numbers of viable airborne bacteria in the operating room of a hospital collected over a 24-hour period in the presence or absence of 0.03 ppm ClO2 gas were found to be 10.9 ± 6.7 and 66.8 ± 31.2 colony-forming units/m3 (n = 9, p < 0.001), respectively. Taken together, we conclude that ClO2 gas at extremely low concentrations (≤0.03 ppm) can reduce the number of viable microbes floating in the air in a room. These results strongly support the potential use of ClO2 gas at a non-toxic level to reduce infections caused by the inhalation of pathogenic microbes in nursing homes and medical facilities. PMID:26926704

  6. Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores on selected surfaces by chlorine dioxide gas*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-ju; Zhu, Neng; Jia, Hai-quan; Wu, Jin-hui; Yi, Ying; Qi, Jian-cheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Chlorine dioxide (CD) gas has been used as a fumigant in the disinfection of biosafety laboratories. In this study, some experiments were conducted to assess the inactivation of spores inoculated on six materials [stainless steel (SS), painted steel (PS), polyvinyl chlorid (PVC), polyurethane (PU), glass (GS), and cotton cloth (CC)] by CD gas. The main aims of the study were to determine the sporicidal efficacy of CD gas and the effect of prehumidification before decontamination on sporicidal efficacy. Methods: Material coupons (1.2 cm diameter of SS, PS, and PU; 1.0 cm×1.0 cm for PVC, GS, and CC) were contaminated with 10 μl of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (ATCC 9372) spore suspension in mixed organic burden and then dried in a biosafety cabinet for 12 h. The spores were recovered by soaking the coupons in 5 ml of extraction liquid for 1 h and then vortexing the liquid for 1 min. Results: The log reductions in spore numbers on inoculated test materials exposed to CD gas [0.080% (volume ratio, v/v) for 3 h] were in the range of from 1.80 to 6.64. Statistically significant differences were found in decontamination efficacies on test material coupons of SS, PS, PU, and CC between with and without a 1-h prehumidification treatment. With the extraction method, there were no statistically significant differences in the recovery ratios between the porous and non-porous materials. Conclusions: The results reported from this study could provide information for developing decontamination technology based on CD gas for targeting surface microbial contamination. PMID:22467366

  7. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits.

  8. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfectant byproducts (DNPS) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low-resolu...

  9. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, IN, which uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. Unconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high- and low reso...

  10. Improved method generates more chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.W.; Kosinski, A.J.; Baker, R.J.

    1980-10-01

    The addition of acid can greatly improve the chlorine-chlorite process and enhance the use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine for disinfection. The process is economical for use in taste and odor control, and for manganese, oxidation. The maximum yield is obtained using no excess chlorine, and the amount of unreacted sodium chlorite and chlorine in the product stream is reduced. (1 diagram, 4 graphs, 9 references)

  11. Combination treatment of chlorine dioxide gas and aerosolized sanitizer for inactivating foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas and aerosolized sanitizer, when applied alone or in combination, on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto spinach leaves and tomato surfaces. Spinach leaves and tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of the three foodborne pathogens. ClO2 gas (5 or 10 ppmv) and aerosolized peracetic acid (PAA) (80 ppm) were applied alone or in combination for 20 min. Exposure to 10 ppmv of ClO2 gas for 20 min resulted in 3.4, 3.3, and 3.4 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on spinach leaves, respectively. Treatment with 80 ppm of aerosolized PAA for 20 min caused 2.3, 1.9, and 0.8 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) for 20 min caused 5.4, 5.1, and 4.1 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on tomatoes experienced similar reduction patterns to those on spinach leaves. As treatment time increased, most combinations of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA showed additive effects in the inactivation of the three pathogens. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA produced injured cells of three pathogens on spinach leaves while generally did not produce injured cells of these pathogens on tomatoes. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the color and texture of samples during 7 days of storage.

  12. Combination treatment of chlorine dioxide gas and aerosolized sanitizer for inactivating foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas and aerosolized sanitizer, when applied alone or in combination, on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto spinach leaves and tomato surfaces. Spinach leaves and tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of the three foodborne pathogens. ClO2 gas (5 or 10 ppmv) and aerosolized peracetic acid (PAA) (80 ppm) were applied alone or in combination for 20 min. Exposure to 10 ppmv of ClO2 gas for 20 min resulted in 3.4, 3.3, and 3.4 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on spinach leaves, respectively. Treatment with 80 ppm of aerosolized PAA for 20 min caused 2.3, 1.9, and 0.8 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) for 20 min caused 5.4, 5.1, and 4.1 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on tomatoes experienced similar reduction patterns to those on spinach leaves. As treatment time increased, most combinations of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA showed additive effects in the inactivation of the three pathogens. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA produced injured cells of three pathogens on spinach leaves while generally did not produce injured cells of these pathogens on tomatoes. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the color and texture of samples during 7 days of storage. PMID:26001524

  13. Inactivation Kinetics and Mechanism of a Human Norovirus Surrogate on Stainless Steel Coupons via Chlorine Dioxide Gas

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Jia Wei; Kaur, Simran; Lou, Fangfei; DiCaprio, Erin; Morgan, Mark; Linton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis caused by human norovirus is a significant public health issue. Fresh produce and seafood are examples of high-risk foods associated with norovirus outbreaks. Food contact surfaces also have the potential to harbor noroviruses if exposed to fecal contamination, aerosolized vomitus, or infected food handlers. Currently, there is no effective measure to decontaminate norovirus on food contact surfaces. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a strong oxidizer and is used as a decontaminating agent in food processing plants. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and mechanism of ClO2 gas inactivation of a norovirus surrogate, murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), on stainless steel (SS) coupons. MNV-1 was inoculated on SS coupons at the concentration of 107 PFU/coupon. The samples were treated with ClO2 gas at 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 4 mg/liter for up to 5 min at 25°C and a relative humidity of 85%, and virus survival was determined by plaque assay. Treatment of the SS coupons with ClO2 gas at 2 mg/liter for 5 min and 2.5 mg/liter for 2 min resulted in at least a 3-log reduction in MNV-1, while no infectious virus was recovered at a concentration of 4 mg/liter even within 1 min of treatment. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanism of ClO2 gas inactivation included degradation of viral protein, disruption of viral structure, and degradation of viral genomic RNA. In conclusion, treatment with ClO2 gas can serve as an effective method to inactivate a human norovirus surrogate on SS contact surfaces. PMID:26475110

  14. Effect of chlorine dioxide gas on physical, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of p[olymeric packaging materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the first part of our study we determined permeability, diffusion, and solubility coefficients of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) through the following packaging material: biaxial-oriented polypropylene (BOPP); polyethylene terephthalate (PET); poly lactic acid (PLA); multilayer structure of ethy...

  15. Impact of Chlorine dioxide Gas on the Barrier Properties of Polymeric Packaging Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One important criterion of polymeric material selection and packaging design for fresh produce is choosing the material with suitable ratio of carbon dioxide and oxygen permabilities (PCO2/P O2), to the respiratory proportion of the targeted produce. The ratio of [O2] and [CO2] in the head space var...

  16. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  17. Identification of a non-pathogenic surrogate organism for chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Mok; Linton, Richard H

    2008-06-01

    The identification of non-pathogenic surrogate microorganisms is beneficial for determining and validating the efficacy of antimicrobial treatments in food manufacturing environments. A surrogate organism was identified to aid in the decontamination process of fresh produce when treated with chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas. Thirty-two known strains of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms and seven unknown microbial isolates from mushroom, tomatoes, and strawberries were evaluated. The primary goal was to find alternative non-pathogenic organisms that had an equal or higher resistance compared to Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Among the strains tested, MR1 (mushroom isolate), E. coli O157:H7 C7927, E. coli O157:H7 204P, STB2 (strawberry isolate), and vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus 232 in wet inoculum were found to be the most resistant to gaseous ClO(2) treatment at 0.3 mg/l for 1 min and D-values at 0.3 mg/l ClO(2) were 3.53, 1.95, 1.72, 1.68, and 1.57 min, respectively. For identification, the MR1 and STB2 strains were identified using a Ribotyper with the EcoRI restriction enzyme of 16S rDNA sequence. MR1 was identified as Hafnia alvei with a similarity value of 94% using the ribotype pattern and with a 93.6% similarity using an API 20E strip, and with a 99% similarity using 16S rDNA analysis. The Ped-2E9-based cytotoxicity assay was conducted for the MRI strain extracellular toxin and whole cell toxicity and did not show cytotoxicity. Analysis, using multiplex PCR, was performed to verify absence of the eaeA gene. H. alvei is a suitable non-pathogenic surrogate, with higher resistance to ClO(2) gas compared to pathogens studied, that may be useful to establish optimum conditions of ClO(2) gas decontamination systems.

  18. Gaseous, chlorine-free chlorine dioxide for drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Rosenblatt, A.

    1996-11-01

    The benefits of applying chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the oxidative treatment of drinking water are well established. Chlorine dioxide treated finished water typically has substantially lower trihalomethane (THM) levels because ClO{sub 2} will not form chlorinated organic species as a by-product of disinfection. The THMs that are formed are probably due to chlorine from the generator or chlorine used to maintain a post-disinfection residual. An emerging regulatory issue concerning the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is causing the water industry to set standards for the generation and delivery of ClO{sub 2}. The Federal Register (11 February 1994) contains language developed to limit the production of the unwanted inorganic by-products chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}), chlorate (ClO{sub 3}{sup -}), and bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup -}) ions by requiring utilities to maintain high (95%) generation efficiencies and by limiting the amount of excess Cl{sub 2} that can be used during the generation process. The efficiency and excess Cl{sub 2} regulations may be problematic for utilities that over-chlorinate to attain chlorine dioxide high yields. Many utilities will have to decide either to reduce the amount of Cl{sub 2} used to react with sodium chlorite (NaClO{sub 2}), thereby increasing the ClO{sub 2}{sup -} residual in finished water, or over-chlorinate to increase yields and surpass the excess Cl{sub 2} limits.

  19. Chlorine dioxide treatment for zebra mussel control

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarik, D.; Byron, J.; Germer, M.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine is recognized and commonly used biocide for power plant cooling water and service water treatment programs, including the control of zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide has recently become a popular method of zebra mussel control because of its economy, safety, environmental acceptability, and effectiveness when compared to other mussel control methods. This control technique was recently demonstrated at Dairyland Power Cooperative`s Alma Generating Station on the east bank of the upper Mississippi River in Alma, Wisconsin. The project was assisted with EPRI Tailored Collaboration Program funds. The Dairyland Power Alam Generating Station consists of five generating units that utilize raw, untreated Mississippi River water for condenser, circulating, and service water supplies. The first units were built in 1947, with the final and largest unit being completed in 1960. Total station generating capacity is 200 MW. Because of recent increases in the zebra mussel density at the station intake, Dairyland Power selected the team of Nalco and Rio Linda to perform a chlorine dioxide treatment of the station`s new water systems to eradicate and control the mussels before their presence created operational difficulties. This paper will present the results of the treatment including treatment theory, design and construction of the treatment system, the method of chlorine dioxide generation, treatment concentration, analytical methods o monitoring chlorine dioxide generation, residuals and trihalomethane (THM) concentrations, protocol for monitoring treatment mortality, and the effects of chlorine dioxide and detoxification on other water chemistry parameters and equipment materials. The goal of this paper is to inform and assist users with establishing consistent and uniform practices for safely utilizing and monitoring chlorine dioxide in the eradication and control of zebra mussels.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  1. Kinetics of Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger Spores and Staphylococcus albus on Paper by Chlorine Dioxide Gas in an Enclosed Space

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Jinhui; Hao, Limei; Yi, Ying; Zhang, Zongxing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spore and Staphylococcus albus are typical biological indicators for the inactivation of airborne pathogens. The present study characterized and compared the behaviors of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus in regard to inactivation by chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas under different gas concentrations and relative humidity (RH) conditions. The inactivation kinetics under different ClO2 gas concentrations (1 to 5 mg/liter) were determined by first-order and Weibull models. A new model (the Weibull-H model) was established to reveal the inactivation tendency and kinetics for ClO2 gas under different RH conditions (30 to 90%). The results showed that both the gas concentration and RH were significantly (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with the inactivation of the two chosen indicators. There was a rapid improvement in the inactivation efficiency under high RH (>70%). Compared with the first-order model, the Weibull and Weibull-H models demonstrated a better fit for the experimental data, indicating nonlinear inactivation behaviors of the vegetative bacteria and spores following exposure to ClO2 gas. The times to achieve a six-log reduction of B. subtilis subsp. niger spore and S. albus were calculated based on the established models. Clarifying the kinetics of inactivation of B. subtilis subsp. niger spores and S. albus by ClO2 gas will allow the development of ClO2 gas treatments that provide an effective disinfection method. IMPORTANCE Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is a novel and effective fumigation agent with strong oxidization ability and a broad biocidal spectrum. The antimicrobial efficacy of ClO2 gas has been evaluated in many previous studies. However, there are presently no published models that can be used to describe the kinetics of inactivation of airborne pathogens by ClO2 gas under different gas concentrations and RH conditions. The first-order and Weibull (Weibull-H) models established in this study can

  2. Basic Gas Chlorination Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    This manual was developed for use at workshops designed to introduce treatment plant operators to the safe operation and maintenance of gas chlorination systems employing the variable vacuum gas chlorinator. Each of the lessons in this document has clearly stated behavioral objectives to tell the trainee what he should know or do after completing…

  3. Disinfectants: Chlorine and chlorine dioxide. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the antimicrobial properties of chlorine and chlorine dioxide. The use of chlorine for the inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and fungi in wastewater treatment plants is discussed, including the mode of action and factors influencing inactivation. The use of chlorine dioxide as an alternative to chlorine disinfection in swimming pools and water supplies, and possible adverse effects are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 157 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Development of Combined Dry Heat and Chlorine Dioxide Gas Treatment with Mechanical Mixing for Inactivation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Montevideo on Mung Bean Seeds.

    PubMed

    Annous, Bassam A; Burke, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh sprouted beans. The sprouting conditions of mung bean seeds provide optimal conditions of temperature and relative humidity for any potential pathogenic contaminant on the seeds to grow. The lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. Thus, the use of a kill step on the seeds prior to a sprouting step would enhance the safety of fresh sprouts. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combined thermal and chlorine dioxide gas (3.5 mg/liter of air) treatment with mechanical mixing (tumbling) to eliminate Salmonella on artificially inoculated mung bean seeds. Although no viable Salmonella was recovered from seeds treated in hot water at 60°C for 2 h, these treated seeds failed to germinate. Dry heat treatments (55, 60, or 70°C) for up to 8 h reduced Salmonella populations in excess of 3 log CFU/g. The use of tumbling, while treating the seeds, resulted in up to 1.6 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella populations compared with no tumbling. Dry heat treatment at 65°C for 18 h with tumbling resulted in a complete inactivation of Salmonella populations on inoculated seeds with low inoculum levels (2.83 log CFU/g) as compared with high inoculum levels (4.75 log CFU/g). The increased reductions in pathogenic populations on the seeds with the use of tumbling could be attributed to increased uniformity of heat transfer and exposure to chlorine dioxide gas. All treated seeds were capable of germinating, as well as the nontreated controls. These results suggest that this combined treatment would be a viable process for enhancing the safety of fresh sprouts. PMID:25951379

  5. Development of Combined Dry Heat and Chlorine Dioxide Gas Treatment with Mechanical Mixing for Inactivation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Montevideo on Mung Bean Seeds.

    PubMed

    Annous, Bassam A; Burke, Angela

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh sprouted beans. The sprouting conditions of mung bean seeds provide optimal conditions of temperature and relative humidity for any potential pathogenic contaminant on the seeds to grow. The lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. Thus, the use of a kill step on the seeds prior to a sprouting step would enhance the safety of fresh sprouts. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combined thermal and chlorine dioxide gas (3.5 mg/liter of air) treatment with mechanical mixing (tumbling) to eliminate Salmonella on artificially inoculated mung bean seeds. Although no viable Salmonella was recovered from seeds treated in hot water at 60°C for 2 h, these treated seeds failed to germinate. Dry heat treatments (55, 60, or 70°C) for up to 8 h reduced Salmonella populations in excess of 3 log CFU/g. The use of tumbling, while treating the seeds, resulted in up to 1.6 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella populations compared with no tumbling. Dry heat treatment at 65°C for 18 h with tumbling resulted in a complete inactivation of Salmonella populations on inoculated seeds with low inoculum levels (2.83 log CFU/g) as compared with high inoculum levels (4.75 log CFU/g). The increased reductions in pathogenic populations on the seeds with the use of tumbling could be attributed to increased uniformity of heat transfer and exposure to chlorine dioxide gas. All treated seeds were capable of germinating, as well as the nontreated controls. These results suggest that this combined treatment would be a viable process for enhancing the safety of fresh sprouts.

  6. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  7. High resolution spectrophotometry for identification of chlorine dioxide in concentrated chlorine solutions.

    PubMed

    Gauw, R D; Emmert, G L; Bubnis, B; Gordon, G

    1999-12-01

    Electrolyzed salt brine generators hold great promise for water disinfection in small communities and remote locations. Electrolysis cell liquors have been reported to contain chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone. High resolution spectrophotometry was used to observe the presence (or absence) of a unique spectral absorbance pattern present in solutions containing 1-2 mg/l chlorine dioxide. PMID:18967802

  8. Study on encapsulation of chlorine dioxide in gelatin microsphere for reducing release rate

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Ying; Wang, Lin; Guo, Yanchuan; Sun, Ruixue; Wang, Xijie; Li, Jinyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the effects of encapsulation of chlorine dioxide in a hydrophilic biodegradable polymer gelatin to reduce its release rate. Methods: An emulsification-coacervation method was adopted. The characterizations of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres were described. Using UV-vis spectrophotometer the λmax of chlorine dioxide was observed at 358 nm. The particle size and distribution of chlorine oxide-gelatin microspheres was measured by a dynamic light scattering (DLS) method, the diameter was (1400~1900) nm. The entrapment of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres was confirmed by IR. The surface morphology, size, and shape of chlorine dioxide-gelatin microspheres were analyzed using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: It showed that the encapsulated microspheres size was around 2000 nm with uniform distribution. The percentage entrapment of chlorine dioxide in the encapsulated samples was about 80~85%. A slow release study of chlorine dioxide from the encapsulated biopolymer (gelatin) in air was also carried out, which showed continuous release up to ten days. Conclusions: It can be concluded that it is possible to make a slow release formulation of ClO2 by entrapped in a hydrophilic biodegradable polymer gelatin. ClO2-gelatin microspheres can stable release low concentration ClO2 gas over an extended period. PMID:26550151

  9. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  10. Chlorine Dioxide Induced Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: MMPI Validity Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This paper discusses Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data obtained from individuals exposed to chlorine dioxide in the workplace who developed Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Syndrome. The paper explores current research on chlorine dioxide exposed persons who were misdiagnosed on the basis of MMPI interpretations. Difficulties…

  11. Ultrafast measurements of chlorine dioxide photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, P.D.

    1997-08-01

    Time-resolved mass spectrometry and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy are used to study the ultrafast photodissociation dynamics of chlorine dioxide, an important constituent in stratospheric ozone depletion. Chapter 1 introduces these pump/probe techniques, in which a femtosecond pump pulse excites a molecule to a dissociative state. At a later time, a second femtosecond probe pulse ionizes the molecule. The resulting mass and photoelectron spectra are acquired as a function of the delay between the pump and probe pulses, which follows the evolution of the molecule on the excited state. A comparison to other techniques used to study reaction dynamics is discussed. Chapter 2 includes a detailed description of the design and construction of the experimental apparatus, which consists of a femtosecond laser system, a molecular beam time-of-flight spectrometer, and a data acquisition system. The time-of-flight spectrometer is specifically designed to have a short flight distance to maximize the photoelectron collection efficiency without degrading the resolution, which is limited by the bandwidth of the femtosecond laser system. Typical performance of the apparatus is demonstrated in a study of the time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitric oxide. The results of the time-resolved mass spectrometry experiments of chlorine dioxide are presented in Chapter 3. Upon excitation to the A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state near 3.2 eV, the molecule dissociates through an indirect two-step mechanism. The direct dissociation channel has been predicted to be open, but is not observed. A quantum beat is observed in the OClO{sup +} species, which is described as a vibrational coherence of the optically prepared A {sup 2}A{sub 2} state. Chapter 4 presents the results of the time-resolved photoelectron experiments of chlorine dioxide. At short delay time, the quantum beat of the OClO{sup +} species is observed in the X {sup 1}A{sub 1} state of the ion. At infinite delay, the signal

  12. Distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as was major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated 36Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2-hour exposure t...

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine dioxide-trithionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Cseko, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2012-03-22

    The trithionate-chlorine dioxide reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in a slightly acidic medium at 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in acetate/acetic acid buffer monitoring the decay of chlorine dioxide at constant ionic strength (I = 0.5 M) adjusted by sodium perchlorate. We found that under our experimental conditions two limiting stoichiometries exist and the pH, the concentration of the reactants, and even the concentration of chloride ion affects the actual stoichiometry of the reaction that can be augmented by an appropriate linear combination of these limiting processes. It is also shown that although the formal kinetic order of trithionate is strictly one that of chlorine dioxide varies between 1 and 2, depending on the actual chlorine dioxide excess and the pH. Moreover, the otherwise sluggish chloride ion, which is also a product of the reaction, slightly accelerates the initial rate of chlorine dioxide consumption and may therefore act as an autocatalyst. In addition to that, overshoot-undershoot behavior is also observed in the [(·)ClO(2)]-time curves in the presence of chloride ion at chlorine dioxide excess. On the basis of the experiments, a 13-step kinetic model with 6 fitted kinetic parameter is proposed by nonlinear parameter estimation.

  14. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.; Coyle, J.; Crone, D.

    1996-08-01

    This paper summarizes the EPRI report (TR-105202) on the same topic as well as presents changes in current thinking on the suitability (applicability) of chlorine dioxide for fouling control. Chlorine dioxide was tested as a zebra mussel biocide at two steam electric generating stations in Illinois and one in Indiana. The purpose of these studies was to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in killing zebra mussels and to develop site specific treatment programs for the three utilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Consortium sponsored the testing of this recent use of chlorine dioxide. The raw water system at Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station, on the Illinois River, received applications of chlorine dioxide in April, July, and September 1994. The raw water system at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station, on the Mississippi River, received applications in July 1993, January, April, May, July, and September 1994. The Gallagher Station, on the Ohio River, was treated in July and October 1994. Chlorine dioxide was generated on-site and injected into the water intake structure. Both cooling and service water systems were treated at the facilities. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Distribution and chemical fate of ³⁶Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe.

    PubMed

    Smith, D J; Ernst, W; Giddings, J M

    2014-12-01

    The distribution and chemical fate of (36)Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as were major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated (36)Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2 h exposure to approximately 5 mg of (36)Cl-ClO2. A water rinse removed 14% of the radiochlorine while tomato homogenate contained ∼63% of the tomato radioactivity; 24% of the radiochlorine was present in the tomato stem scar area. Radioactivity in tomato homogenate consisted of (36)Cl-chloride (≥80%), (36)Cl-chlorate (5 to 19%), and perchlorate (0.5 to 1.4%). In cantaloupe, 55% of the generated (36)Cl-ClO2 was present on melons fumigated with 100 mg of (36)Cl-ClO2 for a 2 h period. Edible cantaloupe flesh contained no detectable radioactive residue (LOQ = 0.3 to 0.4 μg/g); >99.9% of radioactivity associated with cantaloupe was on the inedible rind, with <0.1% associated with the seed bed. Rind radioactivity was present as (36)Cl-chloride (∼86%), chlorate (∼13%), and perchlorate (∼0.6%). Absent from tomatoes and cantaloupe were (36)Cl-chlorite residues. Follow-up studies have shown that chlorate and perchlorate formation can be completely eliminated by protecting fumigation chambers from light sources.

  16. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield facilities treatment fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.G.; Knippers, M.L.

    1995-11-01

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean water flood injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material such as iron sulfide sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide for the removal of iron sulfide sludge from water flood injection distribution systems. This technology has evolved from the use of chlorine dioxide in well stimulation applications. The use of chlorine dioxide for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, Wyoming was the site for the application described. 4,500 barrels of chlorine dioxide was pumped in three phases to clean sixty-six miles of the water flood distribution system. Results indicate that chlorine dioxide was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids and the injection wells.

  17. Controlling Mold on Library Materials with Chlorine Dioxide: An Eight-Year Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Meyers, Pat L.; Kowaleski, Barbara; Stolt, Wilbur A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with mold growth at the University of Oklahoma libraries and describes the results of using chlorine dioxide in aqueous and gaseous forms. Highlights include toxicity compared to other preservation treatments; environmental controls; and explanations of a preference for the use of a self-activating gas packet.…

  18. Influences of packaging design on antimicrobial effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas is an effective surface disinfectant, for it has the ability to reach and inactivate bacterial cells in biofilms which are attached to inaccessible sites on produce surfaces. One of the most promising applications of gaseous ClO2 is to be included in the headspace of foo...

  19. Impacts of water quality on chlorine and chlorine dioxide efficacy in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Benoit; Desjardins, Raymond; Mysore, Chandra; Prévost, Michele

    2005-05-01

    The impact of disinfection efficacy in natural waters was evaluated by performing disinfection assays using four untreated surface waters of various qualities and ultra-pure buffered waters as a baseline condition for comparison. Bacillus subtilis spores were spiked in these waters and disinfection assays were conducted at 22 degrees C using either free chlorine or chlorine dioxide. Assays using indigenous aerobic spores were also completed. The inactivation kinetics in natural and ultra-pure buffered waters were not statistically different (at p = 0.05) while using free chlorine, as long as disinfectant decay was taken into account. Filtering natural waters through a 0.45 microm did not improve the sporicidal efficacy of chlorine. For three out of the four waters tested, the efficacy of chlorine dioxide was greater in natural waters compared to that observed in ultra-pure buffered waters. Such results are consistent with previous observations using ultra-pure waters supplemented with NOM-extract from the Suwannee River. Similar to free chlorine results, the impact of filtration (0.45 microm) on the efficacy of chlorine dioxide was not statistically significant.

  20. The Health Effects of Chlorine Dioxide as a Disinfectant in Potable Water: A Literature Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Edward J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant in water is being considered by the EPA. This article presents a summary of the known published reports concerning health effects of chlorine dioxide on animal and human populations. (Author/MA)

  1. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water.

  2. The effect of chlorine dioxide on polymeric packaging materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2), with its high oxidizing capacity and broad disinfecting property, is used frequently as a disinfectant in many applications. As a biocide in food applications, it showed a microbial inactivating capacity against many important pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, located ...

  3. Zebra mussel control using periodic chlorine dioxide treatments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mussalli, Y.G.; Martin, P.D.

    1995-11-01

    Chlorine dioxide was injected into the water intakes at two power plants in Illinois and one in Indiana in an effort to eradicate the existing population of zebra mussels and mitigate further settlement in station river water cooling systems. Results of the treatments at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station on the Mississippi River, Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station on the Illinois River, and SI Energy`s Gallagher Station on the Ohio River are reported. Treatments were performed on a turnkey basis, with three treatments performed at Meredosia Station in 1994, six treatments performed at Wood River Station between July 1993 and September 1994, and 2 treatments performed at Gallagher Station in 1994. For each treatment, a contractor installed and operated a portable chlorine dioxide generator, monitored water quality and oxidant levels, and provided and monitored bioboxes containing test mussels. Results of the treatments were very favorable, indicating a good potential for periodic treatments with chlorine dioxide to control zebra mussel infestations in the raw water systems of power plants and other industrial facilities. Some difficulties with the chlorine dioxide generation system and cold temperature effects reduced the treatment effectiveness, particularly the second treatment at Gallagher Station. Average induced mortalities ranged from 70 to 100% at Wood River, 87 to 92% at Meredosia, and 30 to 100% at Gallagher for native mussels. Dechlorination successfully kept total oxidant residual levels at or below 0.05 ppM during all treatments at all stations.

  4. Effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on human rotavirus infectivity and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Jin, Min; Yang, Dong; Guo, Xuan; Chen, Zhaoli; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Qiu, Zhigang; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Junwen

    2013-06-15

    Despite the health risks posed by waterborne human rotavirus (HRV), little information is available concerning the effectiveness of chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2), two common disinfectants of public water sources, against HRV and their effects on its genome remain poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of chlorine and ClO2 on purified HRV by using cell culture and RT-PCR to assess virus infectivity and genetic integrity, respectively. The disinfection efficacy of ClO2 was found to be higher than that of chlorine. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct value (mg/L min) ranges required for a 4-log reduction of HRV at 20 °C by chlorine and ClO2 were 5.55-5.59 and 1.21-2.47 mg/L min, respectively. Detection of the 11 HRV genome segments revealed that damage to the 1227-2354 bp of the VP4 gene was associated with the disappearance of viral infectivity by chlorine. However, no complete accordance between culturing and RT-PCR assays was observed after treatment of HRV with ClO2. These results collectively indicate that the current practice of chlorine disinfection may be inadequate to manage the risk of waterborne HRV infection, and offer the potential to monitor the infectivity of HRV adapting PCR-based protocols in chlorine disinfection.

  5. Contrasting effects of sulfur dioxide on cupric oxide and chloride during thermochemical formation of chlorinated aromatics.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Nishimoto, Yoshihiro; Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas has been reported to be an inhibitor of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) formation in fly ash. However, other research has suggested little or no inhibitory effect of SO2 gas. Although these studies focused on reactions between SO2 gas and gas-phase chlorine (Cl) species, no attention was paid to thermochemical gas-solid reactions. In this study, we found contrasting effects of SO2 gas depending on the chemical form of copper (CuO vs CuCl2) with a solid-phase inorganic Cl source (KCl). Chlorinated aromatics (PCDD/Fs, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorobenzenes) increased and decreased in model fly ash containing CuO + KCl and CuCl2 + KCl, respectively, with increased SO2 injection. According to in situ Cu K-edge and S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Cl gas and CuCl2 were generated and then promoted the formation of highly chlorinated aromatics after thermochemical reactions of SO2 gas with the solid-phase CuO + KCl system. In contrast, the decrease in aromatic-Cls in a CuCl2 + KCl system with SO2 gas was caused mainly by the partial sulfation of the Cu. The chemical form of Cu (especially the oxide/chloride ratio) may be a critical factor in controlling the formation of chlorinated aromatics using SO2 gas.

  6. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide tablets on inactivation of cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Haas, Charles N; Arrowood, Michael J; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-05-20

    The ability of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to achieve 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in drinking water has been documented. No studies have specifically addressed the effects of ClO2 on C. parvum oocyst infectivity in chlorinated recreational water venues (e.g., pools). The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of ClO2 as an alternative to existing hyperchlorination protocols that are used to achieve a 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in such venues. To obtain a 3-log inactivation of C. parvum Iowa oocysts, contact times of 105 and 128 min for a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 2.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. Contact times of 294 and 857 min for a solution containing 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 3.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. The hyperchlorination control (21 mg/L free chlorine only) required 455 min for a 3-log inactivation. Use of a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 and solutions containing 5 or 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with the addition of free chlorine appears to be a promising alternative to hyperchlorination for inactivating Cryptosporidium in chlorinated recreational water venues, but further studies are required to evaluate safety constraints on use.

  7. Disinfection of football protective equipment using chlorine dioxide produced by the ICA TriNova system

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Anthony L; DuBois, John D; Tenney, Joel D

    2009-01-01

    Backround Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks have occurred in individuals engaged in athletic activities such as wrestling and football. Potential disease reduction interventions include the reduction or elimination of bacteria on common use items such as equipment. Chlorine dioxide has a long history of use as a disinfectant. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of novel portable chlorine dioxide generation devices to eliminate bacteria contamination of helmets and pads used by individuals engaged in football. Methods In field studies, the number of bacteria associated with heavily used football helmets and shoulder pads was determined before and after overnight treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Bacteria were recovered using cotton swabs and plated onto trypticase soy agar plates. In laboratory studies, Staphylococcus aureus was applied directly to pads. The penetration of bacteria into the pads was determined by inoculating agar plates with portions of the pads taken from the different layers of padding. The ability to eliminate bacteria on the pad surface and underlying foam layers after treatment with chlorine dioxide was also determined. Results Rates of recovery of bacteria after treatment clearly demonstrated that chlorine dioxide significantly (p < 0.001) reduce and eliminated bacteria found on the surface of pads. For example, the soft surface of shoulder pads from a university averaged 2.7 × 103 recoverable bacteria colonies before chlorine dioxide treatment and 1.3 × 102 recoverable colonies after treatment. In addition, the gas was capable of penetrating the mesh surface layer and killing bacteria in the underlying foam pad layers. Here, 7 × 103 to 4.5 × 103 laboratory applied S. aureus colonies were recovered from underlying layers before treatment and 0 colonies were present after treatment. Both naturally occurring bacteria and S. aureus were susceptible to the treatment process

  8. Oxidative elimination of cyanotoxins: comparison of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Eva; Onstad, Gretchen D; Kull, Tomas P J; Metcalf, James S; Acero, Juan L; von Gunten, Urs

    2007-08-01

    As the World Health Organization (WHO) progresses with provisional Drinking Water Guidelines of 1 microg/L for microcystin-LR and a proposed Guideline of 1 microg/L for cylindrospermopsin, efficient treatment strategies are needed to prevent cyanotoxins such as these from reaching consumers. A kinetic database has been compiled for the oxidative treatment of three cyanotoxins: microcystin-LR (MC-LR), cylindrospermopsin (CYN), and anatoxin-a (ANTX) with ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate. This kinetic database contains rate constants not previously reported and determined in the present work (e.g. for permanganate oxidation of ANTX and chlorine dioxide oxidation of CYN and ANTX), together with previously published rate constants for the remaining oxidation processes. Second-order rate constants measured in pure aqueous solutions of these toxins could be used in a kinetic model to predict the toxin oxidation efficiency of ozone, chlorine, chlorine dioxide and permanganate when applied to natural waters. Oxidants were applied to water from a eutrophic Swiss lake (Lake Greifensee) in static-dose testing and dynamic time-resolved experiments to confirm predictions from the kinetic database, and to investigate the effects of a natural matrix on toxin oxidation and by-product formation. Overall, permanganate can effectively oxidize ANTX and MC-LR, while chlorine will oxidize CYN and MC-LR and ozone is capable of oxidizing all three toxins with the highest rate. The formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the treated water may be a restriction to the application of sufficiently high-chlorine doses.

  9. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw ); Vaughn, J.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  10. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J; Duerr, Mark A; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity.

  11. Formation of chlorinated lipids post-chlorine gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Ford, David A; Honavar, Jaideep; Albert, Carolyn J; Duerr, Mark A; Oh, Joo Yeun; Doran, Stephen; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas can occur during accidents and intentional release scenarios. However, biomarkers that specifically indicate Cl2 exposure and Cl2-derived products that mediate postexposure toxicity remain unclear. We hypothesized that chlorinated lipids (Cl-lipids) formed by direct reactions between Cl2 gas and plasmalogens serve as both biomarkers and mediators of post-Cl2 gas exposure toxicities. The 2-chloropalmitaldehyde (2-Cl-Pald), 2-chlorostearaldehyde (2-Cl-Sald), and their oxidized products, free- and esterified 2-chloropalmitic acid (2-Cl-PA) and 2-chlorostearic acid were detected in the lungs and plasma of mouse and rat models of Cl2 gas exposure. Levels of Cl-lipids were highest immediately post-Cl2 gas exposure, and then declined over 72 h with levels remaining 20- to 30-fold higher at 24 h compared with baseline. Glutathione adducts of 2-Cl-Pald and 2-Cl-Sald also increased with levels peaking at 4 h in plasma. Notably, 3-chlorotyrosine also increased after Cl2 gas exposure, but returned to baseline within 24 h. Intranasal administration of 2-Cl-PA or 2-Cl-Pald at doses similar to those formed in the lung after Cl2 gas exposure led to increased distal lung permeability and inflammation and systemic endothelial dysfunction characterized by loss of eNOS-dependent vasodilation. These data suggest that Cl-lipids could serve as biomarkers and mediators for Cl2 gas exposure and toxicity. PMID:27324796

  12. A comparison of iodinated trihalomethane formation from chlorine, chlorine dioxide and potassium permanganate oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yang; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Yi-Li; Lin, Lin; Ye, Tao; Tian, Fu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the formation of iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) from iodide-containing raw waters oxidized by chlorine, chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) and potassium permanganate (KMnO₄) at different oxidant concentrations, reaction times, pHs, initial iodide concentrations and bromide to iodide mass ratios. Among the six investigated I-THMs, iodoform was the major species formed during the oxidation using chlorine, ClO₂ and KMnO₄. When oxidant concentration increased from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/L, the formation of I-THMs increased and then decreased for chlorine and ClO₂, but kept increasing for KMnO₄. As the reaction time went by, I-THM concentration increased to a plateau within 10 h (ClO₂ within only 1 h, especially) for all the three oxidants. I-THM formation gradually increased from pH 3.0 to 9.0 and remained stable at pH values higher than 7.5 for chlorine; however, for ClO₂ and KMnO₄ the highest I-THM formation showed at pH 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. As initial iodide concentration increased from 20 to 800 μg/L, the total amount and species of I-THMs increased for the three oxidants. Iodide contributed to I-THM formation much more significantly than bromide.

  13. Chlorine dioxide reactions with indoor materials during building disinfection: surface uptake.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Heidi; Poppendieck, Dustin; Corsi, Richard L

    2009-03-01

    Chlorine dioxide received attention as a building disinfectant in the wake of Bacillus anthracis contamination of several large buildings in the fall of 2001. It is increasingly used for the disinfection of homes and other indoor environments afflicted by mold. However, little is known regarding the interaction of chlorine dioxide and indoor materials, particularly as related to the removal of chlorine dioxide from air. Such removal may be undesirable with respect to the subsequent formation of localized zones of depleted disinfectant concentrations and potential reductions in disinfection effectiveness in a building. The focus of this paper is on chlorine dioxide removal from air to each of 24 different indoor materials. Experiments were completed with materials housed in flow-through 48-L stainless steel chambers under standard conditions of 700 ppm chlorine dioxide inlet concentration, 75% relative humidity, 24 degrees C, and 0.5 h(-1) air changes. Chlorine dioxide concentration profiles, deposition velocities, and reaction probabilities are described in this paper. Deposition velocities and reaction probabilities varied over approximately 2 orders of magnitude across all materials. For most materials, deposition velocity decreased significantly over a 16-h disinfection period; that is, materials became smaller sinks for chlorine dioxide with time. Four materials (office partition, ceiling tile, medium density fiberboard, and gypsum wallboard) accounted for the most short- and long-term consumption of chlorine dioxide. Deposition velocity was observed to be a strong function of chlorine dioxide inlet concentration, suggesting the potential importance of chemical reactions on or within test materials.

  14. Low-temperature decontamination with hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide for space applications.

    PubMed

    Pottage, T; Macken, S; Giri, K; Walker, J T; Bennett, A M

    2012-06-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m(3) exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry. PMID:22492450

  15. Low-Temperature Decontamination with Hydrogen Peroxide or Chlorine Dioxide for Space Applications

    PubMed Central

    Macken, S.; Giri, K.; Walker, J. T.; Bennett, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m3 exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry. PMID:22492450

  16. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  17. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  18. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  19. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  20. 49 CFR 173.229 - Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. 173.229 Section 173.229 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.229 Chloric acid solution or chlorine dioxide hydrate, frozen. When...

  1. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%.

  2. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%. PMID:24534637

  3. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  4. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  5. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  6. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  7. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  8. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  9. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  10. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  11. 40 CFR 141.535 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.535 Section 141.535 Protection of Environment... § 141.535 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection, you must...

  12. 40 CFR 141.544 - What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? 141.544 Section 141.544 Protection of Environment... Benchmark § 141.544 What if my system uses chloramines, ozone, or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection? If your system uses chloramines, ozone or chlorine dioxide for primary disinfection your system...

  13. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  14. Core-level excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, R.; Plenge, J.; Rühl, E.

    2006-03-01

    Inner-shell excitation and fragmentation of chlorine dioxide (OClO) in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-excitation regime is reported. The electronic structure of the element-selectively excited radical is studied by X-ray absorption and total cation yields. A comparison of both approaches allows us to estimate the absolute photoionization cross-section and the ionization yield near the Cl 2p- and O 1s-absorption edges. The latter quantity is characteristically enhanced in core-ionization continua. We observe below both core-absorption edges intense core-to-valence-transitions. These are assigned in comparison with related work on core-excited sulfur dioxide. These results give clear evidence that the highest molecular orbital of OClO is half-filled. High-resolution spectra recorded in the Cl 2p-regime show evidence for Rydberg transitions. The extrapolation of the term values of the low-lying Rydberg states allows us to derive the Cl 2p-ionization energy of OClO. Fragmentation of core-excited OClO is reported. Photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (PEPICO) spectra are recorded, indicating that singly and doubly charged fragments are formed. Fission of the doubly and multiply charged OClO leads to singly charged fragments. These are measured by photoion-photoion-coincidence (PIPICO) spectra, where characteristic changes in intensity of the fission channels in the Cl 2p- and O 1s-continuum are observed.

  15. Chlorine Gas: An Evolving Hazardous Material Threat and Unconventional Weapon

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert; Wills, Brandon; Kang, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine gas represents a hazardous material threat from industrial accidents and as a terrorist weapon. This review will summarize recent events involving chlorine disasters and its use by terrorists, discuss pre-hospital considerations and suggest strategies for the initial management for acute chlorine exposure events. PMID:20823965

  16. Field Experience with Chlorine Dioxide Fumigation of a Hospital: Timeline and Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine dioxide (Cl02) fumigation technology was developed and successfully used to remediate four large buildings contaminated with anthrax spores from 2001 through 2004. As a first application of the technology, those remediations were complex, costly and time consuming. There...

  17. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth. PMID:26767238

  18. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1:13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2:17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth. PMID:26591249

  19. Sterilization of hydrogen peroxide resistant bacterial spores with stabilized chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony; Zachariah, Malcolm; Middaugh, Amy; Heiser, Matt; Khanna, Neeraj; Vaishampayan, Parag; Rice, Charles V

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores isolated from a clean room environment are known to exhibit enhanced resistance to peroxide, desiccation, UV radiation and chemical disinfection than other spore-forming bacteria. The survival of B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard clean room sterilization practices requires development of more stringent disinfection agents. Here, we report the effects of a stabilized chlorine dioxide-based biocidal agent against spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. Viability was determined via CFU measurement after exposure. Chlorine dioxide demonstrated efficacy towards sterilization of spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 equivalent or better than exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate efficacy of chlorine dioxide delivered through a stabilized chlorine dioxide product as a means of sterilization of peroxide- and UV-resistant spores.

  20. Evaluation of the use of chlorine dioxide to control zebra mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, J.; Coyle, J.; Pallo, S.

    1995-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide was tested as a zebra mussel biocide at two steam electric generating stations in Illinois. The purpose of these studies was to determine the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in killing zebra mussels and to develop site specific treatment programs for the two utilities. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Zebra Mussel Consortium sponsored the testing of this recent use of chlorine dioxide. The raw water system at Central Illinois Public Service`s Meredosia Station, on the Illinois River, received two to four day applications of chlorine dioxide in April, July, and September 1994. The raw water system at Illinois Power Company`s Wood River Station, on the Mississippi River, received two to four day applications in July 1993, January, April, May, July, and September 1994. Chlorine dioxide was generated on-site and injected into the water intake structure, in front of or just behind the traveling screens, at both power stations. Both cooling and service water systems were treated at the facilities. Various water quality parameters, including residual chlorine in the discharge effluent, were measured during the studies. Residual chlorine was neutralized with sodium bisulfite prior to discharge at both plants. Bioboxes, containing healthy zebra mussels, were placed at various strategic locations throughout the power stations. Control bioboxes were also placed in the rivers, upstream of the chlorine dioxide injection locations. Results of the chlorine dioxide applications varied from 35 percent to 100 percent. These varied results appear to be related to seasonal water temperature differences, water quality, and/or plant design. Mortality differences were also noted in bioboxes which contained zebra mussels imported from Lake Erie and those which contained local mussels. These and other data are presented.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT QUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that is highly resistant to chlorine, has been implicated in a number of waterborne disease outbreaks. This organism appears, however, to be efectively controlled by other oxidants such as chlorine dioxide or ozone. A major element of ...

  2. Chlorine dioxide-facilitated oxidation of the azo dye amaranth.

    PubMed

    Nadupalli, S; Koorbanally, N; Jonnalagadda, S B

    2011-10-27

    The oxidation reaction of amaranth (trisodium 2-hydroxy-1-(4-sulfonato-1-naphthylazo)naphthalene-3,6-disulfonate or AM(-)) by chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in aqueous conditions was investigated in detail. The major reaction products immediately after decolorization of AM(-) were 1,2-naphthoquinone disulfonate sodium salt and 1,4-napthalenedione. The reaction had first-order dependence on both AM(-) and ClO(2). The rate-limiting step involved the reaction between AM(-) and OH(-) ions. The role of hydroxide ion as a catalyst was established. The second-order rate constant increased with pH, from (19.8 ± 0.9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.0, (97.1 ± 2.3) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 8.0 to (132.5 ± 2.8) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 9.0. In the pH range of 6.0-7.5, the catalytic constant for OH(-) ion was 4.0 × 10(9) M(-2) s(-1). The energy and entropy of activation values for the reaction were 50.0 kJ mol(-1) and -658.7 J K(-1) mol(-1), respectively. A probable reaction mechanism was elucidated and was validated by simulations.

  3. Removal of hexenuronic acid by xylanase to reduce adsorbable organic halides formation in chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuangxi; Wang, Shuangfei; Qin, Chengrong; Yao, Shuangquan; Ebonka, Johnbull Friday; Song, Xueping; Li, Kecheng

    2015-11-01

    Xylanase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp was investigated. The pulp was pretreated with xylanase and followed a chlorine dioxide bleaching stage. The ATR-FTIR and XPS were employed to determine the surface chemistry of the control pulp, xylanase treated and chlorine dioxide treated pulps. The hexenuronic acid (HexA) could obviously be reduced after xylanase pretreatment, and the adsorbable organic halides (AOX) were reduced after chlorine dioxide bleaching. Compared to the control pulp, AOX could be reduced by 21.4-26.6% with xylanase treatment. Chlorine dioxide demand could be reduced by 12.5-22% to achieve the same brightness. The ATR-FTIR and XPS results showed that lignin and hemicellulose (mainly HexA) were the main source for AOX formation. Xylanase pretreatment could remove HexA and expose more lignin, which decreased the chlorine dioxide demand and thus reduced formation of AOX. PMID:26263004

  4. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol.

    PubMed

    Parga, J R; Shukla, S S; Carrillo-Pedroza, F R

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O(3)) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  5. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol

    SciTech Connect

    Parga, J.R.; Shukla, S.S.; Carrillo-Pedroza, F.R

    2003-07-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O{sub 3}) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  6. Lethality of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a commercial produce sanitizer to Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas in a liquid detergent, on stainless steel, and in biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kreske, Audrey C; Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Pettigrew, Charles A; Beuchat, Larry R

    2006-11-01

    Many factors that are not fully understood may influence the effectiveness of sanitizer treatments for eliminating pathogens and spoilage microorganisms in food or detergent residues or in biofilms on food contact surfaces. This study was done to determine the sensitivities of Pseudomonas cells and Bacillus cereus cells and spores suspended in a liquid dishwashing detergent and inoculated onto the surface of stainless steel to treatment with chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a commercial produce sanitizer (Fit). Cells and spores were incubated in a liquid dishwashing detergent for 16 to 18 h before treatment with sanitizers. At 50 microg/ml, chlorine dioxide killed a significantly higher number of Pseudomonas cells (3.82 log CFU/ml) than did chlorine (a reduction of 1.34 log CFU/ml). Stainless steel coupons were spot inoculated with Pseudomonas cells and B. cereus cells and spores, with water and 5% horse serum as carriers. Chlorine was more effective than chlorine dioxide in killing cells and spores of B. cereus suspended in horse serum. B. cereus biofilm on stainless steel coupons that were treated with chlorine dioxide or chlorine at 200 microg/ml had total population reductions (vegetative cells plus spores) of > or = 4.42 log CFU per coupon; the number of spores was reduced by > or = 3.80 log CFU per coupon. Fit (0.5%) was ineffective for killing spot-inoculated B. cereus and B. cereus in biofilm, but treatment with mixtures of Fit and chlorine dioxide caused greater reductions than did treatment with chlorine dioxide alone. In contrast, when chlorine was combined with Fit, the lethality of chlorine was completely lost. This study provides information on the survival and sanitizer sensitivity of Pseudomonas and B. cereus in a liquid dishwashing detergent, on the surface of stainless steel, and in a biofilm. This information will be useful for developing more effective strategies for cleaning and sanitizing contact surfaces in food preparation and processing

  7. Evaluation of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip under experimental and natural exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, P A; Wildman, E E; Pankey, J W

    1990-08-01

    A postmilking teat dip containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide was evaluated by experimental challenge and in two herds under natural exposure. The test product had an efficacy of 78.9% against Staphylococcus aureus and 52.5% against Streptococcus agalactiae in the experimental challenge trial. The product was compared with a 1% iodine product in a 15-mo natural exposure study. Post-dipping with chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide reduced incidence of udder infection by major mastitis pathogens 36.1% when data were combined from the two herds. The 1% iodine and the chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide products were not equivalent for major mastitis pathogens; the test product was more effective. Incidence of udder infection by environmental mastitis pathogens was reduced 36.8% in both herds combined. Efficacy of the two teat dips was equivalent for environmental pathogens. PMID:2229601

  8. In situ bioremediation of chlorinated solvent with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rabold, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    A bioremediation system for the removal of chlorinated solvents from ground water and sediments is described. The system involves the the in-situ injection of natural gas (as a microbial nutrient) through an innovative configuration of horizontal wells.

  9. Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite in Water Supply Systems by Verified Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáčová, Jana; Božíková, Jarmila

    2014-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the development and optimization of appropriate analytical methods for the determination of chlorine dioxide and chlorite in drinking water in order to obtain accurate and correct results in the quality control of drinking water. The work deals with the development and optimization of a method for the determination of chlorine dioxide using chlorophenol red. Furthermore, a new spectrophotometric method for the determination of chlorite via bromometry using methyl orange was developed, optimized and validated. An electrochemical method for the determination of chlorite by flow coulometry was also developed, optimized and validated.

  10. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes.

  11. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW USING CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is a state-of-the-art review of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) used for high-rate disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO). The review includes bench-, pilot-, and fullscale studies on the use of ClO2 as a disinfecting agent for a variety of wastewaters. Specific ...

  12. Development of chlorine dioxide releasing film and its application in decontaminating fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A feasibility study was conducted to develop chlorine dioxide releasing packaging films for decontaminating fresh produce. Sodium chlorite and citric acid powder were incorporated into polylactic acid (PLA) polymer. Films made with different amount of PLA (100 & 300 mg), percentage of reactant (5-60...

  13. USING REDUCING AGENTS TO ELIMINATE CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ION RESIDUALS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to determine the viability of various disinfection alternatives, the Evansville, Ind. Water and Sewer Utility is engaged in a pilot-plant investigation to compare chlorine dioxide and ozone pretreatment. As a result of increased speculation that the total residual c...

  14. New packaging design for fresh produce with effective distribution of antimicrobial gaseous chlorine dioxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last decade, the potential use of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as an antimicrobial agent for vapor-phase decontamination to extend the shelf-life of fresh produce has been widely studied. Most of the works focused on the dose of gaseous ClO2 for particular food product and/or specific microorganis...

  15. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management.

  16. Formation of disinfection byproducts upon chlorine dioxide preoxidation followed by chlorination or chloramination of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Lee, Wontae

    2013-06-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is often used as an oxidant to remove taste, odor and color during water treatment. Due to the concerns of the chlorite formation, chlorination or chloramination is often applied after ClO2 preoxidation. We investigated the formation of regulated and emerging disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in sequential ClO2-chlorination and ClO2-chloramination processes. To clarify the relationship between the formation of DBPs and the characteristics of natural organic matter (NOM), changes in the properties of NOM before and after ClO2 oxidation were characterized by fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and size and resin fractionation techniques. ClO2 preoxidation destroyed the aromatic and conjugated structures of NOM and transformed large aromatic and long aliphatic chain organics to small and hydrophilic organics. Treatment with ClO2 alone did not produce significant amount of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), but produced chlorite. ClO2 preoxidation reduced THMs, HAAs, haloacetonitriles (HANs) and chloral hydrate (CH) during subsequent chlorination, but no reduction of THMs was observed during chloramination. Increasing ClO2 doses enhanced the reduction of most DBPs except halonitromethanes (HNMs) and haloketones (HKs). The presence of bromide increased the formation of total amount of DBPs and also shifted DBPs to more brominated ones. Bromine incorporation was higher in ClO2 treated samples. The results indicated that ClO2 preoxidation prior to chlorination is applicable for control of THM, HAA and HAN in both pristine and polluted waters, but chlorite formation is a concern and HNMs and HKs are not effectively controlled by ClO2 preoxidation.

  17. Examination of the potential of chlorine dioxide for use in zebra mussel veliger control

    SciTech Connect

    Rusznak, L.; Smolik, N.; Hale, L.; Freymark, S.

    1995-06-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel) veligers were treated with various concentrations of chlorine dioxide and exposed at several time intervals to determine the effectiveness of this oxidant as a veliger control agent. The direction of this testing was based on previous studies which determined the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide as a molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control. Zebra mussel veligers were collected from the Niagara River shoreline at an untreated site and tested using filtered river water from the same source. All testing was conducted on site at an industrial plant in order to insure the integrity of veligers collected for this study. The plankton wheel method was used to examine the effects of chlorine dioxide. This methodology involves intense microscopic examination of the test organism prior to and after chemical exposure todeterminen molluscicidal efficacy. Veliger mortality was determined based on observations of veliger movement. Typical criteria for the determination of mortality was expanded to include four categories; veliger actively swimming, internal musculature movement, no internal musculature movement observed, however not necessarily indicating a mortality and obviously a mortality. The treatment levels ranged from 0.75 ppm - 2.0 ppm which are considered to simulate treatment levels in actual applications. Mortality levels ranged on average from 16%-42% based on 30 minute or 60 minute exposure times. The determination exposure time was based on water flow time intervals in actural applications. Sodium hypochlorite was also evaluated in order to compare the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide against this known veliger control agent. Testing resulted in chlorine dioxide providing significantly better veliger control than sodium hypochlorite under similar conditions.

  18. Susceptibility of the brine shrimp Artemia and its pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus to chlorine dioxide in contaminated sea-water.

    PubMed

    Puente, M E; Vega-Villasante, F; Holguin, G; Bashan, Y

    1992-12-01

    Adults and nauplii of the brine shrimp, Artemia, together with Vibrio parahaemolyticus, were placed in sewage-contaminated sea-water which had been treated with chlorine dioxide (Hallox E-100TM) to test its potential as a disinfectant for salt water aquaculture. The nauplii were very susceptible to low concentrations of chlorine dioxide (47 micrograms/l Cl-), but the adults were slightly more resistant. Sterile sea-water treated with lower concentrations of chlorine dioxide (less than 47 micrograms/l Cl-) had no effect on the shrimp, but inhibited the growth of V. parahaemolyticus. In sewage-contaminated sea-water, chlorine dioxide levels of 285-2850 micrograms/l, necessary for the inactivation of V. parahaemolyticus and any native bacteria, destroyed the Artemia culture. Hallox E-100TM persisted in sea-water for 18 h, but later decayed. We conclude that: (i) Artemia nauplii are a sensitive and convenient test-organism to determine low concentrations of chlorine dioxide in sea-water; (ii) chlorine dioxide is efficient for controlling V. parahaemolyticus in sea-water; and (iii) chlorine dioxide should be further evaluated as a potential disinfectant for aquaculture, but, for higher organisms than Artemia. PMID:1490907

  19. Studies on process parameters for chlorine dioxide production using IrO2 anode in an un-divided electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Pillai, K Chandrasekara; Kwon, Tae Ouk; Park, Bo Bae; Moon, Il Shik

    2009-05-30

    Chlorine dioxide is potentially a powerful oxidant with environmentally compatible application in several strategic areas relating to pollution control typically for water disinfection, and its sustained production is a key factor for its successful application. Although increased attention has been paid for on-line chlorine dioxide generation by several chemical and electrochemical methods, the details are mostly confined as patents. We studied in this work the electrochemical generation of chlorine dioxide from an un-buffered solution of sodium chlorite and sodium chloride mixture in an un-divided electrochemical cell under constant current mode, with a view to optimize various process parameters, which have a direct bearing on the chlorine dioxide formation efficiency under laboratory conditions. The effect of feed flow rate (10-150 ml min(-1)), feed solution pH (2.3-5.0), concentration of sodium chloride (0-169.4mM), concentration of sodium chlorite (0-7.7 mM), and the applied current (100-1200 mA) on the formation of dissolved ClO(2) gas in solution and the pH of the product-containing solution was investigated by performing single pass experiments, with no circulation, in a cell set-up with Ti/IrO(2) anode and Ti/Pt cathode. The current efficiency and the power consumption were calculated for the optimized conditions. PMID:18838217

  20. Chlorine dioxide disinfection of single and dual species biofilms, detached biofilm and planktonic cells.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Sabrina; Camper, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Disinfection efficacy testing is usually done with planktonic cells or more recently, biofilms. While disinfectants are much less effective against biofilms compared to planktonic cells, questions regarding the disinfection tolerance of detached biofilm clusters remain largely unanswered. Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were grown in chemostats and biofilm tubing reactors, with the tubing reactor serving as a source of detached biofilm clusters. Chlorine dioxide susceptibility was assessed for B. cepacia and P. aeruginosa in these three sample types as monocultures and binary cultures. Similar doses of chlorine dioxide inactivated samples of chemostat and tubing reactor effluent and no statistically significant difference between the log(10) reductions was found. This contrasts with chlorine, shown previously to be generally less effective against detached biofilm particles. Biofilms were more tolerant and required chlorine dioxide doses ten times higher than chemostat and tubing reactor effluent samples. A second species was advantageous in all sample types and resulted in lower log(10) reductions when compared to the single species cultures, suggesting a beneficial interaction of the species.

  1. Commodity chemicals from natural gas by methane chlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Che, S.C.; Minet, R.G.; Giacobbe, F.; Mullick, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Ethylene and vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) can be produced from natural gas through methane chlorination by reacting methane and chlorine at 900/sup 0/C or higher. Experimental results indicate total ethylene equivalent yield from methane of 45%(wt) and marginal process economics. Fundamental kinetic modeling predicts improved C/sub 2/ yields of up to 70%(wt) at optimum reaction conditions. This optimum condition established the basis for the process design study to evaluate the potential for producing ethylene and VCM from natural gas. HCl by-product is recycled for economic viability. Using the Kel-Chlor process for recycling HCl, the proposed plant produces 27,200 TPA of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 383,800 TPA of VCM. The Midwest is an ethylene consumption area requiring imports of ethylene derivatives from other regions. A methane chlorination plant located on a Midwestern natural gas pipeline network has a good commercial potential.

  2. The use of chlorine dioxide for zebra mussel control - A perspective of treatment histories

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, N.; Rusznak, L.; Anderson, J.; Hale, L.

    1995-06-01

    It is of utmost importance to provide updated performance results of various chemical treatments presently being utilized for zebra mussel control. Zebra mussels have a distinctive ability to endure environmental changes by reproducing effectively and attaching to various hard surfaces. These traits are cause for concern and have resulted in some operating difficulties for industries bordering infested waterways. Various methods are being employed by industries to deal with the problems associated with these species. One of the options is control via chemical treatment. Prior field test studies showed that chlorine dioxide was determined to be an effective molluscicidal agent for adult zebra mussel eradication. Continuous feed of chlorine dioxide at treatment levels ranging from 0.25 - 5.0 ppm above the oxidant demand provided 100% adult zebra mussel mortality which required between 2.9 - 8.8 days of treatment. Previous studies also showed that water temperature was an essential parameter in determining the time required to achieve 100% mortality of adult zebra mussels. Further field applications were undertaken at three electric utility sites located in the midwest. These facilities were concerned with the potential for zebra mussels to reduce efficiency and availability by blocking water flow or plugging equipment. Treatment applications at these facilities consisted of a continuous feed of chlorine dioxide ranging from 0.15 - 0.5 ppm above the oxidant demand. Significant mortality was achieved in monitored mussels tested at each utility in a period ranging from two to four days. This time period was directly related to a number of parameters, with the predominant one being water temperature. Data from these field applications is presented in this paper and confirms that chlorine dioxide is an effective molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control.

  3. Reducing the chlorine dioxide demand in final disinfection of drinking water treatment plants using activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Crotti, Barbara Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is one of the most widely employed chemicals in the disinfection process of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP). The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the adsorption process with granular activated carbon (GAC) on the chlorine dioxide consumption in final oxidation/disinfection. A first series of tests was performed at the laboratory scale employing water samples collected at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter of Cremona (Italy). The adsorption process in batch conditions with seven different types of GAC was studied. A second series of tests was performed on water samples collected at the outlet of four GAC columns installed at the outlet of the DWTP sand filter. The results showed that the best chlorine dioxide demand (ClO2-D) reduction yields are equal to 60-80% and are achieved in the first 30 min after ClO2 addition, during the first 16 days of the column operation using a mineral, coal-based, mesoporous GAC. Therefore, this carbon removes organic compounds that are more rapidly reactive with ClO2. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the ClO2-D and UV absorbance at wavelength 254 nm using mineral carbons; therefore, the use of a mineral mesoporous GAC is an effective solution to control the high ClO2-D in the disinfection stage of a DWTP.

  4. Process for removing sulfur dioxide from gas

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, W.R.

    1980-06-03

    There is disclosed a process for obtaining purer sodium sulfate from a mixture of solids containing sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite. The process involves contacting an aqueous slurry of the sulfate-sulfite mixture with a sulfur dioxide-containing gas under conditions which solubilize a significant amount of the sulfite as sodium bisulfite dissolved in the liquid aqueous phase. The remaining solid phase contains sodium sulfate of greater purity than in the mixture treated with sulfur dioxide. The mixture of sodium sulfate and sodium sulfite which is purified by the process may be obtained advantageously as a purge material from a process for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream.

  5. Chemical oxidation of dissolved organic matter by chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and ozone: effects on its optical and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jannis; Aeschbacher, Michael; Salhi, Elisabeth; Canonica, Silvio; von Gunten, Urs; Sander, Michael

    2013-10-01

    In water treatment dissolved organic matter (DOM) is typically the major sink for chemical oxidants. The resulting changes in DOM, such as its optical properties have been measured to follow the oxidation processes. However, such measurements contain only limited information on the changes in the oxidation states of and the reactive moieties in the DOM. In this study, we used mediated electrochemical oxidation to quantify changes in the electron donating capacities (EDCs), and hence the redox states, of three different types of DOM during oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO2), chlorine (as HOCl/OCl(-)), and ozone (O3). Treatment with ClO2 and HOCl resulted in comparable and prominent decreases in EDCs, while the UV light absorbances of the DOM decreased only slightly. Conversely, ozonation resulted in only small decreases of the EDCs but pronounced absorbance losses of the DOM. These results suggest that ClO2 and HOCl primarily reacted as oxidants by accepting electrons from electron-rich phenolic and hydroquinone moieties in the DOM, while O3 reacted via electrophilic addition to aromatic moieties, followed by ring cleavage. This study highlights the potential of combined EDC-UV measurements to monitor chemical oxidation of DOM, to assess the nature of the reactive moieties and to study the underlying reaction pathways.

  6. Reaction of chlorine dioxide with amino acids and peptides: kinetics and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, H K; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1987-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is currently being considered as an alternate to chlorine as a disinfectant for water treatment. Many organic compounds present in water and food treated with ClO2 are subject to oxidation. 21 amino acids and 3 peptides (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame), L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine) were studied for their reactivity with ClO2. Chlorine dioxide reacted only with 6 amino acids in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.0. The reaction with cysteine, tryptophan and tyrosine was too rapid to be monitored either iodometrically or spectrophotometrically. The reaction with histidine, hydroxyproline and proline was found to be pseudo-first order. ClO2 readily reacted with L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine but not with aspartame. Mutagenicity studies with the Salmonella microsome assay of the reaction mixtures of ClO2 with those 6 reactive amino acids and the 3 peptides indicated that the reaction products of the 3 peptides, hydroxyproline, and tyrosine exerted mutagenic activity toward both tester strains of TA98 and TA100 in the presence and absence of rat-liver S9 mix.

  7. Detection of chlorinated methanes by tin oxide gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Son, Y C; Shaw, B R; Creasy, K E; Suib, S L

    2001-08-01

    Tin oxide thin films prepared by thermal oxidation of Sn films were used for the detection of chlorinated methanes (CH2Cl2, CHCl3 and CCl4). This resulted in better chemical selectivity, sensitivity, response speed and detection limit than seen with previous detectors. The temperature dependence of the sensing of 1% CCl4 gas was studied and the best sensing behavior was observed at 300 degrees C. The films showed different chemical selectivity in both speed and direction of sensing response to each gas and were stable for more than 3 weeks under operating conditions. The films showed rapid gas sensing (<40 s to reach 90% of full response) and low detection limits (< 4 ppm CCl4). The role of oxygen in the detection of chlorinated methanes and in resistance changes without chlorinated methanes was also studied. The changes at the surface of the film after gas sensing were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. PMID:11534610

  8. Controlled clinical evaluations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, J R; Chauan, S; Bianchine, J R

    1982-01-01

    To assess the relative safety of chronically administered chlorine water disinfectants in man, a controlled study was undertaken. The clinical evaluation was conducted in the three phases common to investigational drug studies. Phase I, a rising dose tolerance investigation, examined the acute effects of progressively increasing single doses of chlorine disinfectants to normal healthy adult male volunteers. Phase II considered the impact on normal subjects of daily ingestion of the disinfectants at a concentration of 5 mg/l. for twelve consecutive weeks. Persons with a low level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may be expected to be especially susceptible to oxidative stress; therefore, in Phase III, chlorite at a concentration of 5 mg/l. was administered daily for twelve consecutive weeks to a small group of potentially at-risk glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects. Physiological impact was assessed by evaluation of a battery of qualitative and quantitative tests. The three phases of this controlled double-blind clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide and its potential metabolites in human male volunteer subjects were completed uneventfully. There were no obvious undesirable clinical sequellae noted by any of the participating subjects or by the observing medical team. In several cases, statistically significant trends in certain biochemical or physiological parameters were associated with treatment; however, none of these trends was judged to have physiological consequence. One cannot rule out the possibility that, over a longer treatment period, these trends might indeed achieve proportions of clinical importance. However, by the absence of detrimental physiological responses within the limits of the study, the relative safety of oral ingestion of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite and chlorate, was demonstrated. PMID:6961033

  9. Shelf-life extension of minimally processed carrots by gaseous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gómez-López, V M; Devlieghere, F; Ragaert, P; Debevere, J

    2007-05-10

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gas is a strong oxidizing and sanitizing agent that has a broad and high biocidal effectiveness and big penetration ability; its efficacy to prolong the shelf-life of a minimally processed (MP) vegetable, grated carrots (Daucus carota L.), was tested in this study. Carrots were sorted, their ends removed, hand peeled, cut, washed, spin dried and separated in 2 portions, one to be treated with ClO(2) gas and the other to remain untreated for comparisons. MP carrots were decontaminated in a cabinet at 91% relative humidity and 28 degrees C for up to 6 min, including 30 s of ClO(2) injection to the cabinet, then stored under equilibrium modified atmosphere (4.5% O(2), 8.9% CO(2), 86.6% N(2)) at 7 degrees C for shelf-life studies. ClO(2) concentration in the cabinet rose to 1.33 mg/l after 30 s of treatment, and then fell to nil before 6 min. The shelf-life study included: O(2) and CO(2) headspace concentrations, microbiological quality (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts), sensory quality (odour, flavour, texture, overall visual quality, and white blushing), and pH. ClO(2) did not affect respiration rate of MP carrots significantly (alpha< or =0.05), and lowered the pH significantly (alpha< or =0.05). The applied packaging configuration kept O(2) headspace concentrations in treated samples in equilibrium and prevented CO(2) accumulation. After ClO(2) treatment, the decontamination levels (log CFU/g) achieved were 1.88, 1.71, 2.60, and 0.66 for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, and yeasts respectively. The initial sensory quality of MP carrots was not impaired significantly (alpha< or =0.05). A lag phase of at least 2 days was observed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, psychrotrophs, and lactic acid bacteria in treated samples, while mesophilic aerobic bacteria and psychrotrophs increased parallelly. Odour was the only important attribute in sensory deterioration, but it reached an

  10. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  11. Acute health effects of accidental chlorine gas exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to report the course of an accidental release of chlorine gas that occurred in a factory in Gumi-si, South Korea, on March 5, 2013. We describe the analysis results of 2 patients hospitalized because of chlorine-induced acute health problems, as well as the clinical features of 209 non-hospitalized patients. Methods We analyzed the medical records of the 2 hospitalized patients admitted to the hospital, as well as the medical records and self-report questionnaires of 209 non-hospitalized patients completed during outpatient treatment. Results Immediately after the exposure, the 2 hospitalized patients developed acute asthma-like symptoms such as cough and dyspnea, and showed restrictive and combined pattern ventilatory defects on the pulmonary function test. The case 1 showed asthma-like symptoms over six months and diurnal variability in peak expiratory flow rate was 56.7%. In case 2, his FEV1 after treatment (93%) increased by 25% compared to initial FEV1 (68%). Both cases were diagnosed as chlorine-induced reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) on the basis of these clinical features. The most frequent chief complaints of the 209 non-hospitalized patients were headache (22.7%), followed by eye irritation (18.2%), nausea (11.2%), and sore throat (10.8%), with asymptomatic patients accounting for 36.5%. The multiple-response analysis of individual symptom revealed headache (42.4%) to be the most frequent symptom, followed by eye irritation (30.5%), sore throat (30.0%), cough (29.6%), nausea (27.6%), and dizziness (27.3%). Conclusions The 2 patients hospitalized after exposure to chlorine gas at the leakage site showed a clinical course corresponding to RADS. All of the 209 non-hospitalized patients only complained of symptoms of the upper airways and mucous membrane irritation. PMID:25852940

  12. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  13. Formation of disinfection by-products after pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide or ferrate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Guo, Wanhong; Zhang, Xing; Chen, Feng; Ye, Tingjin; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The effect of pre-oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or ferrate (Fe(VI)) on the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination or chloramination was tested with natural waters from 12 sources (9 surface waters, 1 groundwater, and 2 wastewater effluents). DBPs investigated included trihalomethanes (THM), chloral hydrate (CH), haloketones (HK), haloacetonitriles (HAN) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM), chlorite and chlorate. Chlorite and chlorate were found in the ClO2-treated waters. Application of 1 mg/L ClO2 ahead of chlorination reduced the formation potential for THM by up to 45% and the formation of HK, HAN and TCNM in most of the samples. The CH formation results were mixed. The formation of CH and HK was enhanced with low doses of Fe(VI) (1 mg/L as Fe), but was greatly reduced at higher doses (20 mg/L Fe). Fe(VI) reduced the formation of THM, HAN and TCNM in most of the samples. Reduced potential for the formation of NDMA was observed in most of the samples after both ClO2 and Fe(VI) pre-oxidation.

  14. Characterization of pharmaceuticals and personal care products as N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors during disinfection processes using free chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai; Li, Yongmei; Song, Yun; Lv, Juan; Yang, Juan

    2014-07-15

    The worldwide detection of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in aquatic environment and drinking water has caused wide concern in recent years. The possibility for concurrent formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) during disinfection has become another significant concern for water quality. This study demonstrates that a group of PPCPs containing amine groups can serve as NDMA precursors during free chlorine or chlorine dioxide (ClO2) chlorination processes. Selected PPCPs after screening by NDMA yield were further investigated for NDMA formation conditions. High disinfectant dose and initial PPCP concentration resulted in relatively high NDMA formation potential. Linear kinetic models were developed for NDMA formation during chlorination of selected PPCPs. Although the PPCP precursors were removed significantly during chlorination, they were not completely mineralized based on the total organic carbon (TOC) loss. The existence of another possible pathway for direct formation of NDMA from tertiary amine during chlorination was indicated, in which dimethylamine (DMA) was not involved. It is recommended to control the initial PPCP concentrations prior to disinfection and to shorten the contact time to reduce the NDMA formation. ClO2 is suggested to be a proper disinfectant in order to reduce the NDMA formation.

  15. Nitrite therapy improves survival postexposure to chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Honavar, Jaideep; Doran, Stephen; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Steele, Chad; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to relatively high levels of chlorine (Cl₂) gas can occur in mass-casualty scenarios associated with accidental or intentional release. Recent studies have shown a significant postexposure injury phase to the airways, pulmonary, and systemic vasculatures mediated in part by oxidative stress, inflammation, and dysfunction in endogenous nitric oxide homeostasis pathways. However, there is a need for therapeutics that are amenable to rapid and easy administration in the field and that display efficacy toward toxicity after chlorine exposure. In this study, we tested whether nitric oxide repletion using nitrite, by intramuscular injection after Cl₂ exposure, could prevent Cl₂ gas toxicity. C57bl/6 male mice were exposed to 600 parts per million Cl₂ gas for 45 min, and 24-h survival was determined with or without postexposure intramuscular nitrite injection. A single injection of nitrite (10 mg/kg) administered either 30 or 60 min postexposure significantly improved 24-h survival (from ∼20% to 50%). Survival was associated with decreased neutrophil accumulation in the airways. Rendering mice neutropenic before Cl₂ exposure improved survival and resulted in loss of nitrite-dependent survival protection. Interestingly, female mice were more sensitive to Cl₂-induced toxicity compared with males and were also less responsive to postexposure nitrite therapy. These data provide evidence for efficacy and define therapeutic parameters for a single intramuscular injection of nitrite as a therapeutic after Cl₂ gas exposure that is amenable to administration in mass-casualty scenarios. PMID:25326579

  16. Combined effect of aqueous chlorine dioxide and modified atmosphere packaging on inhibiting Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Jin, H-H; Lee, S-Y

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) combined with modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on inhibiting total mesophilic microorganisms, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in mungbean sprouts during refrigerated storage. Mungbean sprouts were packaged using 4 different methods (air, vacuum, CO2 gas, and N2 gas) following treatment with water or 100 ppm ClO2 for 5 min and stored at 5 +/- 2 degrees C. The population of total mesophilic microorganisms in mungbean sprouts was about 8.4-log(10) CFU/g and this level was not significantly reduced by treatment with water or ClO2 (P > 0.05). However, when samples were packaged under vacuum, N2 gas, or CO2 gas following treatment with ClO2, the populations of total mesophilic microorganisms were significantly reduced during storage (P < 0.05). Levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes in mungbean sprouts following inoculation were 4.6- and 5.6-log(10) CFU/g and treatment with water followed by different packaging conditions (air, vacuum, N2 gas, and CO2 gas) had no significant effect on population reduction (P > 0.05). However, treatment with ClO2 significantly reduced populations of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 3.0- and 1.5-log CFU/g, respectively (P < 0.05), and these reduced cell levels were maintained or decreased in samples packaged under vacuum or in N2 or CO2 gas during storage. These results suggest that the combination of ClO2 treatment and MAP such as CO2 gas packaging may be useful for inhibiting microbial contamination and maintaining quality in mungbean sprouts during storage.

  17. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  20. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  1. 21 CFR 868.1400 - Carbon dioxide gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. 868.1400 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1400 Carbon dioxide gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of carbon...

  2. Chlorine

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine ; CASRN 7782 - 50 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  3. Chlorine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical chlorine, produced in small quantities in the laboratory, is presented. The profile summarizes physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  4. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  5. Chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith

    2009-01-01

    Following a brief description of the use of chlorine as a chemical warfare agent in World War I, this chapter summarizes physical and chemical data and recent clinical and controlled laboratory studies on the irritant and lethal effects of chlorine. The mechanism of toxicity for both irritation and lethal effects is described. The mathematical relationship between concentration and exposure duration for a set endpoint is given for both an irritancy response and mortality. This information can be used to assist in time-scaling for the set endpoint to other exposure durations. Risk assessment addresses the potential for greater effects in sensitive populations such as asthmatics. A concentration of 0.5 ppm for up to 8 hours is a no-adverse-effect concentration in most sensitive subjects; whereas, a concentration of 1.0 ppm induces some sensory irritation and transient changes in respiratory tract airflow parameters. Treatment and intervention of exposed individuals is dependent upon symptoms

  6. Effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeturu, Sravan Kumar; Acharya, Shashidhar; Urala, Arun Sreenivas; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of Aloe vera, chlorine dioxide, and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingivitis in orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A randomized single-center, single-blind, parallel group, controlled trial was conducted among 90 subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. The subjects were randomly divided into one of the three study groups (Aloe vera, chlorhexidine, chlorine dioxide). Plaque and gingivitis were assessed using modified Silness and Loe Plaque Index and Gingival Index at baseline and at follow-up after 15 days. Paired t-test and ANOVA with post hoc Dunnett test were used. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 85 participants completed the study; among them, 40 were male and 45 were female. There was significant reduction in mean plaque and gingival scores in all the 3 groups at follow-up when compared to baseline. A significantly higher reduction (plaque and gingival scores) was found in chlorhexidine when compared with the Aloe vera group. However, no significant difference was seen between chlorhexidine and chlorine dioxide with respect to mean reduction in plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion Chlorine dioxide can be a suitable and economical alternative for chlorhexidine. Further long-term studies are recommended for evaluating their effectiveness. PMID:26937371

  7. Survival of Salmonella enterica on soybean sprouts following treatments with gaseous chlorine dioxide and biocontrol Pseudomonas bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of Salmonella enterica on sprouts and minimally processed, ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables is important for food and consumer safety. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of gaseous chlorine dioxide(ClO2)and biocontrol microorganisms (Pseudomonas chlororaphis and P. fluoresc...

  8. The effect of chlorine dioxide and chitosan/essential oil coatings on the safety and quality of fresh blueberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries are high-value fruit with strong antioxidant capacity and other health-promoting benefits. Controlled release chlorine dioxide (ClO2) or chitosan coating plus different essential oils were applied to fresh blueberries to preserve their quality and safety during postharvest storage. In vi...

  9. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  10. Novel pod for chlorine dioxide generation and delivery to control aerobic bacteria on the inner surface of floor drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Floor drains in poultry processing and further processing plants are a harborage site for bacteria both free swimming and in biofilms. This population can include Listeria monocytogenes which has been shown to have potential for airborne spreading from mishandled open drains. Chlorine dioxide (ClO...

  11. A coupled chemical burster: The chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction in two flow reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the chlorine dioxide-iodide reaction has been studied in a system consisting of two continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The reactors are coupled by computer monitoring of the electrochemical potential in each reactor, which is then used to control the input into the other reactor. Two forms of coupling are employed: reciprocally triggered, exponentially decreasing stimulation, and alternating mass exchange. The reaction, which exhibits oscillatory and excitable behavior in a single CSTR, displays neuronlike bursting behavior with both forms of coupling. Reciprocal stimulation yields bursting in both reactors, while with alternating mass exchange, bursting is observed in one reactor and complex oscillation in the other. A simple model of the reaction gives good agreement between the experimental observations and numerical simulations.

  12. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bercz, J.P.; Jones, L.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Bawa, R.; Condie, L.

    1986-11-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO/sub 2/ ingestion, it seems that ClO/sub 2/ does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrient, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen.

  13. A review of the contrasting behavior of two magmatic volatiles: Chlorine and carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are common magmatic volatiles with contrasting behaviors. CO2 solubility increases with pressure whereas Cl solubility shows relatively little pressure or temperature effect. CO2 speciation changes with silicate melt composition, dissolving as carbonate in basaltic magmas and molecular CO2 in more silicic compositions. In H2O-bearing systems, the strongly non-ideal behavior of alkali chlorides causes unmixing of the volatile phase to form a H2O-rich vapor and a hydrosaline phase with important implications for the maximum concentration of Cl in magmas. Addition of CO2 to magma hastens immiscibility at crustal pressures (<500 MPa), inducing the formation of CO2-rich vapors and Cl-rich hydrosaline melts. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.Chlorine (Cl) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are common magmatic volatiles with contrasting behaviors. CO2 solubility increases with pressure whereas Cl solubility shows relatively little pressure or temperature effect. CO2 speciation changes with silicate melt composition, dissolving as carbonate in basaltic magmas and molecular CO2 in more silicic compositions. In H2O-bearing systems, the strongly non-ideal behavior of alkali chlorides causes unmixing of the volatile phase to form a H2O-rich vapor and a hydrosaline phase with important implications for the maximum concentration of Cl in magmas. Addition of CO2 to magma hastens immiscibility at crustal pressures (<500 MPa), inducing the formation of CO2-rich vapors and Cl-rich hydrosaline melts.

  14. Systematic Evaluation of the Efficacy of Chlorine Dioxide in Decontamination of Building Interior Surfaces Contaminated with Anthrax Spores▿

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vipin K.; Ryan, Shawn P.; Wallace, Lalena; Smith, Lisa S.; Shah, Saumil S.; Martin, G. Blair

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of chlorine dioxide (CD) gas generated by two distinct generation systems, Sabre (wet system with gas generated in water) and ClorDiSys (dry system with gas generated in air), was evaluated for inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on six building interior surfaces. The six building materials included carpet, acoustic ceiling tile, unpainted cinder block, painted I-beam steel, painted wallboard, and unpainted pinewood. There was no statistically significant difference in the data due to the CD generation technology at a 95% confidence level. Note that a common method of CD gas measurement was used for both wet and dry CD generation types. Doses generated by combinations of different concentrations of CD gas (500, 1,000, 1,500, or 3,000 parts per million of volume [ppmv]) and exposure times (ranging between 0.5 and 12 h) were used to evaluate the relative role of fumigant exposure period and total dose in the decontamination of building surfaces. The results showed that the time required to achieve at least a 6-log reduction in viable spores is clearly a function of the material type on which the spores are inoculated. The wood and cinder block coupons required a longer exposure time to achieve a 6-log reduction. The only material showing a clear statistical difference in rate of decay of viable spores as a function of concentration was cinder block. For all other materials, the profile of spore kill (i.e., change in number of viable spores with exposure time) was not dependent upon fumigant concentration (500 to 3,000 ppmv). The CD dose required for complete spore kill on biological indicators (typically, 1E6 spores of Bacillus atrophaeus on stainless steel) was significantly less than that required for decontamination of most of the building materials tested. PMID:20305025

  15. Systematic evaluation of the efficacy of chlorine dioxide in decontamination of building interior surfaces contaminated with anthrax spores.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Vipin K; Ryan, Shawn P; Wallace, Lalena; Smith, Lisa S; Shah, Saumil S; Martin, G Blair

    2010-05-01

    Efficacy of chlorine dioxide (CD) gas generated by two distinct generation systems, Sabre (wet system with gas generated in water) and ClorDiSys (dry system with gas generated in air), was evaluated for inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores on six building interior surfaces. The six building materials included carpet, acoustic ceiling tile, unpainted cinder block, painted I-beam steel, painted wallboard, and unpainted pinewood. There was no statistically significant difference in the data due to the CD generation technology at a 95% confidence level. Note that a common method of CD gas measurement was used for both wet and dry CD generation types. Doses generated by combinations of different concentrations of CD gas (500, 1,000, 1,500, or 3,000 parts per million of volume [ppmv]) and exposure times (ranging between 0.5 and 12 h) were used to evaluate the relative role of fumigant exposure period and total dose in the decontamination of building surfaces. The results showed that the time required to achieve at least a 6-log reduction in viable spores is clearly a function of the material type on which the spores are inoculated. The wood and cinder block coupons required a longer exposure time to achieve a 6-log reduction. The only material showing a clear statistical difference in rate of decay of viable spores as a function of concentration was cinder block. For all other materials, the profile of spore kill (i.e., change in number of viable spores with exposure time) was not dependent upon fumigant concentration (500 to 3,000 ppmv). The CD dose required for complete spore kill on biological indicators (typically, 1E6 spores of Bacillus atrophaeus on stainless steel) was significantly less than that required for decontamination of most of the building materials tested.

  16. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  17. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  18. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  19. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  20. 40 CFR 180.1095 - Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1095 Section 180.1095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1095 Chlorine gas; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance....

  1. Gas diffusion cell removes carbon dioxide from occupied airtight enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Small, lightweight permeable cell package separates and removes carbon dioxide from respiratory gas mixtures. The cell is regenerative while chemically inert in the presence of carbon dioxide so that only adsorption takes place.

  2. Enriching blast furnace gas by removing carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongmin; Sun, Zhimin; Chen, Shuwen; Wang, Baohai

    2013-12-01

    Blast furnace gas (BF gas) produced in the iron making process is an essential energy resource for a steel making work. As compared with coke oven gas, the caloric value of BF gas is too low to be used alone as fuel in hot stove because of its high concentrations of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. If the carbon dioxide in BF gas could be captured efficiently, it would meet the increasing need of high caloric BF gas, and develop methods to reusing and/or recycling the separated carbon dioxide further. Focused on this, investigations were done with simple evaluation on possible methods of removing carbon dioxide from BF gas and basic experiments on carbon dioxide capture by chemical absorption. The experimental results showed that in 100 minutes, the maximum absorbed doses of carbon dioxide reached 20 g/100 g with ionic liquid as absorbent.

  3. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  4. Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide as a sanitizer against Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanensis, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis on produce.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ynes R; Mann, Amy; Torres, Maria P; Cama, Vitaliano

    2008-12-01

    The efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide to reduce parasite and bacterial burden in produce was studied. Basil and lettuce leaves were inoculated with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis oocysts, Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores, and a cocktail of two isolates of nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7. The inoculated samples were then treated for 20 min with gaseous chlorine dioxide at 4.1 mg/liter. Cryptosporidium had a 2.6 and 3.31 most-probable-number log reduction in basil and lettuce, respectively. Reduction of Encephalitozoon in basil and lettuce was 3.58 and 4.58 CFU/g respectively. E. coli loads were significantly reduced (2.45 to 3.97 log), whereas Cyclospora sporulation was not affected by this treatment. PMID:19244892

  5. Efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide as a sanitizer against Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanensis, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis on produce.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Ynes R; Mann, Amy; Torres, Maria P; Cama, Vitaliano

    2008-12-01

    The efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide to reduce parasite and bacterial burden in produce was studied. Basil and lettuce leaves were inoculated with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis oocysts, Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores, and a cocktail of two isolates of nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7. The inoculated samples were then treated for 20 min with gaseous chlorine dioxide at 4.1 mg/liter. Cryptosporidium had a 2.6 and 3.31 most-probable-number log reduction in basil and lettuce, respectively. Reduction of Encephalitozoon in basil and lettuce was 3.58 and 4.58 CFU/g respectively. E. coli loads were significantly reduced (2.45 to 3.97 log), whereas Cyclospora sporulation was not affected by this treatment.

  6. Chlorine

    MedlinePlus

    ... gas are inhaled. Fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) that may be delayed for a few hours ... problems such as fluid in the lungs (pulmonary edema) following the initial exposure. How people can protect ...

  7. Microscale Chemistry in a Plastic Petri Dish: Preparation and Chemical Properties of Chlorine Gas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Martin M. F.

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates some of the chemistry of chlorine on a microscale about the size of a water droplet. Chlorine gas was prepared from an acidified bleach solution in a plastic petri dish. Provides suitable hands-on experience for students at the secondary-school level. (MM)

  8. Use of chlorine dioxide in a secondary recovery process to inhibit bacterial fouling and corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Knickrehm, M.; Caballero, E.; Romualdo, P.; Sandidge, J.

    1987-01-01

    A major oil company operates a secondary recovery waterflood in Inglewood, California. The waterflood currently processes 250,000 bbls. per day of produced fluid. The major economic and operational problems associated with a secondary recovery waterflood are: 1) corrosion due to oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and bacteria (sulfate reducers and slime biomass), 2) plugging from deposits due to salts, sulfides, and biofilms. These problems lead to deterioration of water handling equipment, injection lines (surface and subsurface), and decreased water quality resulting in the plugging of injection wells. During the last 8 years the operator has used varying mechanical and chemical technology to solve these problems. From 1978 to 1982 traditional chemical programs were in effect. Over this time period there was a continuing decline in water quality, and a substantial increase in chemical and operational costs. It was determined at that time that the major reason for this was due to microbiological activity. With this in mind, the operator proceeded to test the effects of using Aqueous Chlorine Dioxide in one portion of their water handling facilities. Due to the success of the program it was applied field wide. Presently, the primary problems associated with bacteria have been arrested. Solving one corrosion problem can lead to the onset of another. The operator is now in the process of making a concentrated effort to eliminate the other synergistically related corrosive and plugging agents (O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S). A field history of the problems, findings, and solutions, are discussed along with an overview of our present direction.

  9. Prevention of bovine mastitis by a postmilking teat disinfectant containing chlorous acid and chlorine dioxide in a soluble polymer gel.

    PubMed

    Oliver, S P; King, S H; Torre, P M; Shull, E P; Dowlen, H H; Lewis, M J; Sordillo, L M

    1989-11-01

    A natural exposure study was conducted in a herd of 150 lactating dairy cows for 18 mo to determine the effectiveness of chlorous acid and chlorine dioxide in a soluble polymer gel as a postmilking teat disinfectant for the prevention of bovine mastitis. Right quarters of cows were dipped in the experimental teat dip after milking machine removal. Left quarters were not dipped and served as within-cow negative controls. The experimental teat dip reduced Staphylococcus aureus infections 67.4%, Streptococcus dysgalactiae infections 63.8%, and Streptococcus uberis infections 27.8%. Overall efficacy of the chlorous acid and chlorine dioxide teat dip against major mastitis pathogens was 52.2%. The experimental teat dip reduced Corynebacterium bovis infections and coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections also by 45.8 and 38.7%, respectively. Overall efficacy against minor mastitis pathogens was 43.4%. Under conditions of this trial, the experimental teat dip containing chlorous acid and chlorine dioxide was effective in preventing new intramammary infections against a variety of mastitis pathogens. PMID:2625499

  10. Using RuO(2) anode for chlorine dioxide production in an un-divided electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara Pillai, K; Kwon, Tae Ok; Park, Bo Bae; Moon, Il Shik

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a well known powerful disinfectant. Although there are several chemical and electrochemical methods developed for on-line chlorine dioxide generation, the details are mostly confined as patents. We studied in this work the electrochemical generation of dissolved chlorine dioxide from an un-buffered solution of sodium chlorite and sodium chloride mixture in an un-divided electrochemical cell set-up with RuO(2)-coated-Ti anode and Pt-coated-Ti cathode under constant current mode. Various process parameters including feed flow rate (10 to 150 ml/min), feed solution pH (2.3 to 9.4), concentration of sodium chloride (0 to 170 mM), concentration of sodium chlorite (0 to 7.7 mM), and the applied current (100 to 1,200 mA) were optimized. Experiments were conducted by performing single pass experiments, with no circulation. The current efficiency and the power consumption were calculated for the optimized conditions, and compared with IrO(2) electrode of our previous investigation. PMID:20389015

  11. Pneumomediastinum from acute inhalation of chlorine gas in 2 young patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Baiqiang; Jia, Ling; Shao, Danbing; Liu, Hongmei; Nie, Shinan; Tang, Wenjie; Xu, Baohua; Hu, Zongfeng; Sun, Haichen

    2011-03-01

    Trichloroisocyanuric acid is a high-efficiency and-low toxicity fungicide and bleach. It is commonly used as disinfectant for industrial circulating water, swimming pools, restaurants, and other public places in China. When trichloroisocyanuric acid is put into water, chlorine gas is produced. Chlorine gas is a potent pulmonary irritant that causes acute damage in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts (J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1998;36(1-2):87-93). Pneumomediastinum is a rare complication in patients with acute chlorine gas poisoning. A small amount of gas can be asymptomatic, but a large amount of gas entering the mediastinum suddenly will lead to respiratory and circulatory disorder, mediastinal swing, or even cardiopulmonary arrest. Severe chlorine gas poisoning patients usually need mechanical ventilation; if the pneumomediastinum is not found on time, threat to life would be greatly increased. It requires a high index of suspicion for diagnosis and rapid treatment. The proper use of ventilator, timely and effective treatment of original disease, and multiple system organ support had significant impact on the prognosis. The pneumomediastinum case secondary to inhalation of chlorine gas that we report here should remind all emergency department physicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease and seek immediate and proper intervention when treating patients with acute chlorine gas poisoning, once diagnosed, especially in younger patients. PMID:20627215

  12. Multistate vibronic interactions and nonadiabatic wave packet dynamics in the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Susanta; Ritschel, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    We report theoretical investigations on the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide molecule by ab initio quantum dynamical methods. This band exhibits a highly complex structure and represents a composite portrait of five excited energetically close-lying electronic states of ClO 2+. Much of this complexity is likely to be arising due to strong vibronic interactions among these electronic states - which we address and examine herein. The near equilibrium MRCI potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these five cationic states reported by Peterson and Werner [J. Chem. Phys. 99 (1993) 302] for the C2v configuration, are extended for the Cs geometry assuming a harmonic vibration along the asymmetric stretching mode. The strength of the vibronic coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian are calculated by ab initio CASSCF-MRCI method and conical intersections of the PESs are established. The diabatic Hamiltonian matrix is constructed within a linear vibronic coupling scheme and the resulting PESs are employed in the nuclear dynamical simulations, carried out with the aid of a time-dependent wave packet approach. Companion calculations are performed for transitions to the uncoupled electronic states in order to reveal explicitly the impact of the nonadiabatic coupling on the photoelectron dynamics. The theoretical findings are in good accord with the experimental observations. The femtosecond nonradiative decay dynamics of ClO 2+ excited electronic states mediated by conical intersections is also examined and discussed.

  13. Application of Highly Purified Electrolyzed Chlorine Dioxide for Tilapia Fillet Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen-Hsing; Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Chao-Chin; Huang, Hao-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to develop an electrolysis method to generate high-concentration chlorine dioxide (ClO2) for tilapia fillet disinfection. The designed generator produced up to 3500 ppm of ClO2 at up to 99% purity. Tilapia fillets were soaked in a 400 ppm ClO2 solution for 5, 10, and 25 min. Results show that total plate counts of tilapia, respectively, decreased by 5.72 to 3.23, 2.10, and 1.09 log CFU/g. In addition, a 200 ppm ClO2 solution eliminated coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli in 5 min with shaking treatment. Furthermore, ClO2 and trihalomethanes (THMs) residuals on tilapia fillets were analyzed by GC/MS and were nondetectable (GC-MS detection limit was 0.12 ppb). The results conform to Taiwan's environmental protection regulations and act governing food sanitation. PMID:24696651

  14. Chlorine dioxide: a new agent for dialysis monitor disinfection in a pediatric center.

    PubMed

    Palo, T D; Atti, M; Bellantuono, R; Giordano, M; Caringella, D A

    1997-01-01

    In order to evaluate the bacterial and endotoxin contamination in the dialysis fluids of our pediatric center and the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide (CD) compared with a conventional method, (1) deionized water, (2) dialysate fluid, (3) basic concentrate, and (4) acid concentrate were tested in 4 dialysis machines. Monitor sterilization was made using CD in protocol A and sodium hypochlorite/acetic acid in protocol B. Once every 2 weeks the deionized water set of distribution was routinely disinfected with peracetic acid. Each protocol lasted 1 months and the samples were taken, under aseptic conditions, on the 15th, 22nd and 27th day. All samples, at all stages of the study, showed an endotoxin concentration below the limits recommended by the Canadian Standard Association. Fifty-nine out of 72 samples in A and 62 out of 72 samples in B showed a bacterial count within the range recommended by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation. The data show that both protocols produced the same results. However, protocol A is to be preferred for its simultaneous disinfecting-cleaning and descaling activity which proves time-saving. PMID:9262845

  15. Application of chlorine dioxide as an oilfield-facilities-treatment fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, J.; Strawser, T.J.; Knippers, M.L.

    1996-02-01

    Both mechanical and chemical treatments are used to clean waterflood-injection distribution systems whose efficiency has been reduced as a result of plugging material, such as iron sulfide (FeS) containing sludge. Most mechanical treatments rely on uniform-line diameter to be effective, while chemical treatments require good contact with the plugging material for efficient removal. This paper describes the design and operation of a new innovative application using chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) for the removal of FeS sludge from waterflood-injection distribution systems. The use of ClO{sub 2} for continuous treatment of injection brines will also be discussed. Exxon USA`s Hartzog Draw facility in Gillette, WY, was the site for the application described. A total of 4,500 bbl of ClO{sub 2} was pumped in three phases to clean 66 miles of the waterflood-distribution system. Results indicated that ClO{sub 2} was effective in cleaning the well guard screens, the injection lines, and the injection wells. The addition of excess ClO{sub 2} to the frac tanks used to collect the treatment fluids also reduced waste handling and disposal costs.

  16. On the cause of the tailing phenomenon during virus disinfection by chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sigstam, Thérèse; Rohatschek, Andreas; Zhong, Qingxia; Brennecke, Moritz; Kohn, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanisms underlying the deviation from Chick-Watson kinetics, namely a tailing curve, during the disinfection of viruses by chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Tailing has been previously reported, but is typically attributed to the decay in disinfectant concentration. Herein, it is shown that tailing occurs even at constant ClO2 concentrations. Four working hypothesis to explain the cause of tailing were tested, specifically changes in the solution's disinfecting capacity, aggregation of viruses, resistant virus subpopulations, and changes in the virus properties during disinfection. In experiments using MS2 as a model virus, it was possible to rule out the solution's disinfecting capacity, virus aggregation and the resistant subpopulation as reasons for tailing. Instead, the cause for tailing is the deposition of an adduct onto the virus capsid over the course of the experiment, which protects the viruses. This adduct could easily be removed by washing, which restored the susceptibility of the viruses to ClO2. This finding highlights an important shortcoming of ClO2, namely its self-limiting effect on virus disinfection. It is important to take this effect into account in treatment applications to ensure that the water is sufficiently disinfected before human consumption. PMID:24139105

  17. The use of chlorine dioxide for the inactivation of copepod zooplankton in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Chen, Wei; Cai, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The presence of zooplankton in drinking water treatment system may cause a negative effect on the aesthetic value of drinking water and may also increase the threat to human health due to they being the carriers of bacteria. Very little research has been done on the effects of copepod inactivation and the mechanisms involved in this process. In a series of bench-scale experiments we used a response surface method to assess the sensitivity of copepod to inactivation when chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) was used as a disinfectant. We also assessed the effects of the ClO₂dosage, exposure time, organic matter concentration and temperature. Results indicated that the inactivation rate improved with increasing dosage, exposure time and temperature, whereas it decreased with increasing organic matter concentration. Copepod inactivation was more sensitive to the ClO₂dose than that to the exposure time, while being maintained at the same Ct-value conditions. The activation energy at different temperatures revealed that the inactivation of copepods with ClO₂was temperature-dependent. The presence of organic matter resulted in a lower available dose as well as a shorter available exposure time, which resulted in a decrease in inactivation efficiency.

  18. A gas electrode - Behavior of the chlorine injection electrode in fused alkali chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantelme, Frederic; Alexopoulos, Hiraclis; Devilliers, Didier; Chemla, Marius

    1991-06-01

    The electroreduction of chlorine in fused alkali chlorides was studied by transient electrochemical techniques on graphite and carbon electrodes. Two types of experiments were carried out. First, on massive electrodes, the separate contributions of dissolved chlorine and of chlorine from bubbles at the electrode surface were detected. Second, injection electrodes were used to improve the efficiency of the reduction; the chlorine gas introduced inside the electrode flowed through the wall of the electrode. A model is presented to describe the behavior of this gas electrode; the model takes into consideration the main parameters which influence the electrode process: the properties of carbon and graphite (density, porosity, pore distribution), the wetting properties or the electrode process, the chlorine pressure, and the temperature.

  19. The Effects of Oxy-firing Conditions on Gas-phase Mercury Oxidation by Chlorine and Bromine

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula; Silcox, Geoffrey

    2010-06-30

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a quartz-lined, natural gas-fired reactor with the combustion air replaced with a blend of 27 mole percent oxygen, with the balance carbon dioxide. Quench rates of 210 and 440 K/s were tested. In the absence of sulfur dioxide, the oxy-firing environment caused a remarkable increase in oxidation of mercury by chlorine. At 400 ppm chlorine (as HCl equivalent), air-firing results in roughly 5 percent oxidation. At the same conditions with oxy-firing, oxidation levels are roughly 80 percent. Oxidation levels with bromine at 25 and 50 ppm (as HBr equivalent) ranged from 80 to 95 percent and were roughly the same for oxy- and air-firing conditions. Kinetic calculations of levels of oxidation at air- and oxy-conditions captured the essential features of the experimental results but have not revealed a mechanistic basis for the oxidative benefits of oxy-firing conditions. Mixtures of 25 ppm bromine and 100 and 400 ppm chlorine gave more than 90 percent oxidation. At all conditions, the effects of quench rate were not significant. The presence of 500 ppm SO2 caused a dramatic decline in the levels of oxidation at all oxy-fired conditions examined. This effect suggests that SO2 may be preventing oxidation in the gas phase or preventing oxidation in the wetconditioning system that was used in quantifying oxidized and elemental mercury concentrations. Similar effects of SO2 have been noted with air-firing. The addition of sodium thiosulfate to the hydroxide impingers that are part of wet conditioning systems may prevent liquid-phase oxidation from occurring.

  20. Direct Chlorination Process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5% hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90% excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  1. Quality of fresh chicken breasts using a combination of modified atmosphere packaging and chlorine dioxide sachets.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M; Cooksey, K; Dawson, P; Han, I; Vergano, P

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this research was to observe the effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) combined with modified atmosphere packaging on the quality of fresh chicken breasts under refrigerated storage for 15 days. Each chicken breast was inoculated with a 4-log CFU/ml culture of Salmonella Typhimurium (nalidixic acid-resistant strain) and placed into a barrier foam tray. Fast- or slow-release ClO2 sachets were placed next to the chicken in each package. A control set of packages that did not contain a ClO2 sachet was also included in the study. Packages were flushed with either 100% N2 or 75% N2-25% CO2 and stored at 3 degrees C. Microbial analysis, CIE L.a.b. color, and sensory (appearance and aroma) were performed every 3 days for 15 days. Total plate counts for chicken increased steadily after 6 to 9 days of storage regardless of package atmosphere or ClO2 treatment. However, those treated with ClO2 sachets had 1 to 1.5 log CFU per chicken breast lower total plate counts compared with those without ClO2 sachets. After 15 days, samples treated with ClO2 (fast- and slow-release sachets) had significantly lower Salmonella Typhimurium (nalidixic acid-resistant strain) populations (approximately 1 log) compared with chicken that did not contain ClO2 sachets. The ClO2 adversely affected the color of the chicken in areas close to the sachet. No off-odor was detected by the sensory panelists.

  2. Development of chlorine dioxide releasing film and its application in decontaminating fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Ray, Soumi; Jin, Tony; Fan, Xuetong; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2013-02-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to develop chlorine dioxide (ClO(2) )-releasing packaging films for decontaminating fresh produce. Sodium chlorite and citric acid powder were incorporated into polylactic acid (PLA) polymer. Films made with different amounts of PLA (100 and 300 mg), percentages of reactant (5% to 60%), and ratios of sodium chlorite to citric acid (1:2 or 2:1) were prepared using a solvent casting method. The release of ClO(2) from the resultant films was activated by moisture. Increase of reactants in the films produced more ClO(2) while higher PLA content in the films resulted in less release of ClO(2) . The ratio of sodium chlorite to citric acid and activation temperature (22 °C compared with 10 °C) did not affect the ClO(2) release from the films. Antimicrobial efficacy of ClO(2) released from the films was evaluated using grape tomato as a model food. The results indicate that the films were activated by moisture from tomatoes in the package and the released ClO(2) reduced Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated on the tomatoes to undetectable levels (<5 colony forming units (CFU)/tomato), achieving more than 3 log reduction. The film-treated tomatoes did not show significant changes in color and texture as compared to controls during storage at 10 °C for 21 d. This study demonstrated the technical feasibility for development of gaseous ClO(2) -releasing packaging system to enhance microbial safety and extend shelf life of fresh produce.

  3. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools.

  4. Development of chlorine dioxide releasing film and its application in decontaminating fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Ray, Soumi; Jin, Tony; Fan, Xuetong; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2013-02-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to develop chlorine dioxide (ClO(2) )-releasing packaging films for decontaminating fresh produce. Sodium chlorite and citric acid powder were incorporated into polylactic acid (PLA) polymer. Films made with different amounts of PLA (100 and 300 mg), percentages of reactant (5% to 60%), and ratios of sodium chlorite to citric acid (1:2 or 2:1) were prepared using a solvent casting method. The release of ClO(2) from the resultant films was activated by moisture. Increase of reactants in the films produced more ClO(2) while higher PLA content in the films resulted in less release of ClO(2) . The ratio of sodium chlorite to citric acid and activation temperature (22 °C compared with 10 °C) did not affect the ClO(2) release from the films. Antimicrobial efficacy of ClO(2) released from the films was evaluated using grape tomato as a model food. The results indicate that the films were activated by moisture from tomatoes in the package and the released ClO(2) reduced Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated on the tomatoes to undetectable levels (<5 colony forming units (CFU)/tomato), achieving more than 3 log reduction. The film-treated tomatoes did not show significant changes in color and texture as compared to controls during storage at 10 °C for 21 d. This study demonstrated the technical feasibility for development of gaseous ClO(2) -releasing packaging system to enhance microbial safety and extend shelf life of fresh produce. PMID:23294122

  5. Disinfection of indoor air microorganisms in stack room of university library using gaseous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Lu, Ming-Chun; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    As with all indoor public spaces in Taiwan, the stack rooms in public libraries should meet the air quality guidelines laid down by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration. Accordingly, utilizing a university library in Taiwan for experimental purposes, this study investigates the efficiency of gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as a disinfection agent when applied using three different treatment modes, namely a single-daily disinfection mode (SIM), a twice-daily disinfection mode (TWM), and a triple-daily disinfection mode (TRM). For each treatment mode, the ClO2 is applied using an ultrasonic aerosol device and is performed both under natural lighting conditions and under artificial lighting conditions. The indoor air quality is evaluated before and after each treatment session by measuring the bioaerosol levels of bacteria and fungi. The results show that for all three disinfection modes, the application of ClO2 reduces the indoor bacteria and fungi concentrations to levels lower than those specified by the Taiwan EPA (i.e., bacteria <1500 CFU/m(3), fungi <1000 CFU/m(3)), irrespective of the lighting conditions under which the disinfection process is performed. For each disinfection mode, a better disinfection efficiency is obtained under natural lighting conditions since ClO2 readily decomposes under strong luminance levels. Among the three treatment modes, the disinfection efficiencies of the TWM and TRM modes are very similar under natural lighting conditions and are significantly better than that of the SIM mode. Thus, overall, the results suggest that the TWM treatment protocol represents the most cost-effective and efficient method for meeting the indoor air quality requirements of the Taiwan EPA. PMID:25626564

  6. Disinfection of herbal spa pool using combined chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite treatment.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pathogenic microorganisms in public spa pools poses a serious threat to human health. The problem is particularly acute in herbal spas, in which the herbs and microorganisms may interact and produce undesirable consequences. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effectiveness of a combined disinfectant containing chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite in improving the water quality of a public herbal spa in Taiwan. Water samples were collected from the spa pool and laboratory tests were then performed to measure the variation over time of the microorganism content (total CFU and total coliforms) and residual disinfectant content given a single disinfection mode (SDM) with disinfectant concentrations of 5.2 × 10, 6.29 × 10, 7.4 × 10, and 11.4 × 10(-5) N, respectively. Utilizing the experience gained from the laboratory tests, a further series of on-site investigations was performed using three different disinfection modes, namely SDM, 3DM (once every 3 h disinfection mode), and 2DM (once every 2 h disinfection mode). The laboratory results showed that for all four disinfectant concentrations, the CFU concentration reduced for the first 6 h following SDM treatment, but then increased. Moreover, the ANOVA results showed that the sample treated with the highest disinfectant concentration (11.4 × 10(-5) N) exhibited the lowest rate of increase in the CFU concentration. In addition, the on-site test results showed that 3DM and 2DM treatments with disinfectant concentrations in excess of 9.3 × 10 and 5.5 × 10(-5) N, respectively, provided an effective reduction in the total CFU concentration. In conclusion, the experimental results presented in this study provide a useful source of reference for spa businesses seeking to improve the water quality of their spa pools. PMID:25632897

  7. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, David W.; Haag, Gary L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants.

  8. Oxidative stress induced by chlorine dioxide as an insecticidal factor to the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Park, Jiyeong; Kim, Eunseong; Na, Jahyun; Chun, Yong Shik; Kwon, Hyeok; Kim, Wook; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-10-01

    A novel fumigant, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a commercial bleaching and disinfection agent. Recent study indicates its insecticidal activity. However, its mode of action to kill insects is yet to be understood. This study set up a hypothesis that an oxidative stress induced by ClO2 is a main factor to kill insects. The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, is a lepidopteran insect pest infesting various stored grains. Larvae of P. interpunctella were highly susceptible to ClO2 gas, which exhibited an acute toxicity. Physiological damages by ClO2 were observed in hemocytes. At high doses, the larvae of P. interpunctella suffered significant reduction of total hemocytes. At low doses, ClO2 impaired hemocyte behaviors. The cytotoxicity of ClO2 was further analyzed using two insect cell lines, where Sf9 cells were more susceptible to ClO2 than High Five cells. The cells treated with ClO2 produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). The produced ROS amounts increased with an increase of the treated ClO2 amount. However, the addition of an antioxidant, vitamin E, significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity of ClO2 in a dose-dependent manner. To support the oxidative stress induced by ClO2, two antioxidant genes (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thioredoxin-peroxidase (Tpx)) were identified from P. interpunctella EST library using ortholog sequences of Bombyx mori. Both SOD and Tpx were expressed in larvae of P. interpunctella especially under oxidative stress induced by bacterial challenge. Exposure to ClO2 gas significantly induced the gene expression of both SOD and Tpx. RNA interference of SOD or Tpx using specific double stranded RNAs significantly enhanced the lethality of P. interpunctella to ClO2 gas treatment as well as to the bacterial challenge. These results suggest that ClO2 induces the production of insecticidal ROS, which results in a fatal oxidative stress in P. interpunctella.

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-07-01

    Sodium based sorbents including sodium carbonate may be used to capture carbon dioxide from flue gas. A relatively concentrated carbon dioxide stream may be recoverable for sequestration when the sorbent is regenerated. Electrobalance tests indicated that sodium carbonate monohydrate was formed in a mixture of helium and water vapor at temperatures below 65 C. Additional compounds may also form, but this could not be confirmed. In the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor, both the initial reaction rate of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water and the sorbent capacity decreased with increasing temperature, consistent with the results from the previous quarter. Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration at constant temperature and water vapor concentration produced a measurable increase in rate, as did increasing the water vapor concentration at constant carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. Runs conducted with a flatter TGA pan resulted in a higher initial reaction rate, presumably due to improved gas-solid contact, but after a short time, there was no significant difference in the rates measured with the different pans. Analyses of kinetic data suggest that the surface of the sodium carbonate particles may be much hotter than the bulk gas due to the highly exothermic reaction with carbon dioxide and water, and that the rate of heat removal from the particle may control the reaction rate. A material and energy balance was developed for a cyclic carbonation/calcination process which captures about 26 percent of the carbon dioxide present in flue gas available at 250 C.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  11. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskins, Delora K.; Pruc, Emily E.; Epstein, Irving R.; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-01

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation.

  12. Lack of enhanced effect of a chlorine dioxide-based cleaning regimen on environmental contamination with Clostridium difficile spores.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, S D; Patel, A; Tucker, D; French, G L

    2012-09-01

    Spores of Clostridium difficile may play a significant role in transmission of disease within the healthcare environment and are resistant to a variety of detergents and cleaning fluids. A range of environmental cleaning agents has recently become available, many of which claim to be sporicidal. We investigated the effect of changing to a chlorine dioxide-based cleaning regimen on C. difficile environmental contamination and patient infection rates. The prevalence of environmental contamination was unaffected with a rate of 8% (9/120) before and 8% (17/212) following the change. Rates of patient infection were also unchanged during these periods.

  13. Multifold Increases in Turing Pattern Wavelength in the Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction-Diffusion System.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Delora K; Pruc, Emily E; Epstein, Irving R; Dolnik, Milos

    2016-07-29

    Turing patterns in the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction were modified through additions of sodium halide salt solutions. The range of wavelengths obtained is several times larger than in the previously reported literature. Pattern wavelength was observed to significantly increase with sodium bromide or sodium chloride. A transition to a uniform state was found at high halide concentrations. The observed experimental results are qualitatively well reproduced in numerical simulations with the Lengyel-Epstein model with an additional chemically realistic kinetic term to account for the added halide and an adjustment of the activator diffusion rate to allow for interhalogen formation. PMID:27517779

  14. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  15. Removal of ethylene and bioaerosol by chlorine dioxide using a chemical scrubbing system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsu-Hua; Wu, Li-Chun; You, Ya-Ting; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2009-02-15

    Ethylene (C2H4) and bioaerosol are commonly present in the inside atmosphere of postharvest fruit and vegetable storage facilities, which may affect the aging of postharvest fruit and human health. We have assessed the feasibility of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as the scrubbing solution in a chemical scrubbing tower for simultaneously removing C2H4 and bioaerosol emissions from a gas stream. Parameters such as the ClO2concentration, contact time, and liquid-to-gas (L/G) ratio were examined with the aim of determining the optimal operating conditions. Using the system reported here, the optimal C2H4 removal efficiency was 99.5% when 500 ppm ClO2 was used at a reaction time of 30-60 s under a continuous non-recycle ClO2 flow mode. In terms of C2H4 removal, a greater L/G resulted in a higher C2H4 removal efficiency up to the optimal ratio of 12.5. In terms of the simultaneous removal of C2H4 and bioaerosol, the removal efficiency of C2H4 was 99.2% and those for the bioaersols of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were 99.92 and 99.10%, respectively, under a continuous non-recycle flow mode. Our results also indicate that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) can be a valuable indicator for the timing of the replacement of the scrubbing solution in the system under a continuous recycle flow mode. Additional confirmation of the feasibility of the ORP as an indicator of C2H4 and bioaerosol removal in situ was obtained in a 3-month test of our system in continuous recycle flow mode with the periodical replacement of scrubbing solution, ClO2. The removal efficiencies for C2H4, bacterial and fungus aerosol, and total hydrocarbon compounds (THC) were 83.4, 96.8, 96.1, and 76.5%, respectively. Our results prove that ClO2 is an excellent scrubbing solution in the chemical scrubbing tower for the removal of C2H4 emissions and bioaerosol. We demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this system in a fruit and vegetable storage facility. PMID:19132588

  16. Enhanced chlorine dioxide decay in the presence of metal oxides: relevance to drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; von Gunten, Urs; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) decay in the presence of typical metal oxides occurring in distribution systems was investigated. Metal oxides generally enhanced ClO2 decay in a second-order process via three pathways: (1) catalytic disproportionation with equimolar formation of chlorite and chlorate, (2) reaction to chlorite and oxygen, and (3) oxidation of a metal in a reduced form (e.g., cuprous oxide) to a higher oxidation state. Cupric oxide (CuO) and nickel oxide (NiO) showed significantly stronger abilities than goethite (α-FeOOH) to catalyze the ClO2 disproportionation (pathway 1), which predominated at higher initial ClO2 concentrations (56-81 μM). At lower initial ClO2 concentrations (13-31 μM), pathway 2 also contributed. The CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay is a base-assisted reaction with a third-order rate constant of 1.5 × 10(6) M(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 0.1 g L(-1) CuO at 21 ± 1 °C, which is 4-5 orders of magnitude higher than in the absence of CuO. The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) significantly enhanced the formation of chlorite and decreased the ClO2 disproportionation in the CuO-ClO2 system, probably because of a higher reactivity of CuO-activated ClO2 with NOM. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to simulate CuO-enhanced ClO2 decay at various pH values. Model simulations that agree well with the experimental data include a pre-equilibrium step with the rapid formation of a complex, namely, CuO-activated Cl2O4. The reaction of this complex with OH(-) is the rate-limiting and pH-dependent step for the overall reaction, producing chlorite and an intermediate that further forms chlorate and oxygen in parallel. These novel findings suggest that the possible ClO2 loss and the formation of chlorite/chlorate should be carefully considered in drinking water distribution systems containing copper pipes.

  17. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  18. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  19. Enhancing the efficacy of electrolytic chlorination for ballast water treatment by adding carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung-Gon; Seo, Min-Ho; Lee, Heon-Young; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Sup; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Choi, Keun-Hyung

    2015-06-15

    We examined the synergistic effects of CO2 injection on electro-chlorination in disinfection of plankton and bacteria in simulated ballast water. Chlorination was performed at dosages of 4 and 6ppm with and without CO2 injection on electro-chlorination. Testing was performed in both seawater and brackish water quality as defined by IMO G8 guidelines. CO2 injection notably decreased from the control the number of Artemia franciscana, a brine shrimp, surviving during a 5-day post-treatment incubation (1.8 and 2.3 log10 reduction in seawater and brackish water, respectively at 6ppm TRO+CO2) compared with water electro-chlorinated only (1.2 and 1.3 log10 reduction in seawater and brackish water, respectively at 6ppm TRO). The phytoplankton Tetraselmis suecica, was completely disinfected with no live cell found at >4ppm TRO with and without CO2 addition. The effects of CO2 addition on heterotrophic bacterial growth was not different from electro-chlorination only. Total residual oxidant concentration (TRO) more rapidly declined in electro-chlorination of both marine and brackish waters compared to chlorine+CO2 treated waters, with significantly higher amount of TRO being left in waters treated with the CO2 addition. Total concentration of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) measured at day 0 in brackish water test were found to be 2- to 3-fold higher in 6ppm TRO+CO2-treated water than in 6ppm TRO treated water. The addition of CO2 to electro-chlorination may improve the efficiency of this sterilizing treatment of ballast water, yet the increased production of some disinfection byproducts needs further study.

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2004-09-30

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu; Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2004-05-01

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate of carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.

  2. Management of chlorine gas-related injuries from the Graniteville, South Carolina, train derailment.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Emily; Svendsen, Erik; Grant, Stephen; Michels, Jill E; Richardson, William H

    2014-10-01

    A widely produced chemical, chlorine is used in various industries including automotive, electronics, disinfectants, metal production, and many others. Chlorine is usually produced and transported as a pressurized liquid; however, as a gas it is a significant pulmonary irritant. Thousands of people are exposed to chlorine gas every year, and while large-scale exposures are uncommon, they are not rare. Symptoms are usually related to the concentration and length of exposure, and although treatment is largely supportive, certain specific therapies have yet to be validated with randomized controlled trials. The majority of those exposed completely recover with supportive care; however, studies have shown the potential for persistent inflammation and chronic hyperreactivity. This case report describes an incident that occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina, when a train derailment exposed hundreds of people to chlorine gas. This report reviews the events of January 6, 2005, and the current treatment options for chlorine gas exposure.(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-6).

  3. Management of chlorine gas-related injuries from the Graniteville, South Carolina, train derailment.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Emily; Svendsen, Erik; Grant, Stephen; Michels, Jill E; Richardson, William H

    2014-10-01

    A widely produced chemical, chlorine is used in various industries including automotive, electronics, disinfectants, metal production, and many others. Chlorine is usually produced and transported as a pressurized liquid; however, as a gas it is a significant pulmonary irritant. Thousands of people are exposed to chlorine gas every year, and while large-scale exposures are uncommon, they are not rare. Symptoms are usually related to the concentration and length of exposure, and although treatment is largely supportive, certain specific therapies have yet to be validated with randomized controlled trials. The majority of those exposed completely recover with supportive care; however, studies have shown the potential for persistent inflammation and chronic hyperreactivity. This case report describes an incident that occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina, when a train derailment exposed hundreds of people to chlorine gas. This report reviews the events of January 6, 2005, and the current treatment options for chlorine gas exposure.(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2014;0:1-6). PMID:25225966

  4. Effect of disinfection of drinking water with ozone or chlorine dioxide on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Mazás, E A; Masschelein, W J; Villacorta Martiez de Maturana, I; Debacker, E

    1989-01-01

    Demineralized water was seeded with controlled numbers of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum purified from fresh calf feces and subjected to different treatments with ozone or chlorine dioxide. The disinfectants were neutralized by sodium thiosulfate, and neonatal mice were inoculated intragastrically and sacrificed 7 days later for enumeration of oocyst production. Preliminary trials indicated that a minimum infection level of 1,000 oocysts (0.1-ml inoculum) per mouse was necessary to induce 100% infection. Treatment of water containing 10(4) oocysts per ml with 1.11 mg of ozone per liter (concentration at time zero [C0]) for 6 min totally eliminated the infectivity of the oocysts for neonatal mice. A level of 2.27 mg of ozone per liter (C0) was necessary to inactivate water containing 5 x 10(5) oocysts per ml within 8 min. Also, 0.4 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter (C0) significantly reduced infectivity within 15 min of contact, although some oocysts remained viable. PMID:2764564

  5. Carbon dioxide capture and use: organic synthesis using carbon dioxide from exhaust gas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Hyo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Hong, Soon Hyeok

    2014-01-13

    A carbon capture and use (CCU) strategy was applied to organic synthesis. Carbon dioxide (CO2) captured directly from exhaust gas was used for organic transformations as efficiently as hyper-pure CO2 gas from a commercial source, even for highly air- and moisture-sensitive reactions. The CO2 capturing aqueous ethanolamine solution could be recycled continuously without any diminished reaction efficiency.

  6. Sevoflurane as a therapy for acute chlorine gas exposure in an austere healthcare environment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellenger, Sarah R; Frizzi, James D

    2014-06-01

    Chlorine is a common agent found worldwide in industrial and household applications. This element is found everywhere and anywhere around the globe. Because of its ubiquitous nature in the world, chlorine-injured patients may be expected at all medical facilities, from large-urban to small-community to austere-tent facilities. Chlorine has been used as a chemical weapon since 1915 and has been accidentally released in transport, storage, and use, causing industrial accidents worldwide. A patient with a history of severe chlorine inhalational injury sustained 2 chlorine gas exposures within 48 hours. The patient was treated with intubation, mechanical ventilation, and directed therapies for severe injury by chlorine gas inhalation. Sevoflurane has a role in treating chlorine inhalation injury. Additional therapies are possible, some of which are not available in remote locations. PMID:25109161

  7. Sevoflurane as a therapy for acute chlorine gas exposure in an austere healthcare environment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellenger, Sarah R; Frizzi, James D

    2014-06-01

    Chlorine is a common agent found worldwide in industrial and household applications. This element is found everywhere and anywhere around the globe. Because of its ubiquitous nature in the world, chlorine-injured patients may be expected at all medical facilities, from large-urban to small-community to austere-tent facilities. Chlorine has been used as a chemical weapon since 1915 and has been accidentally released in transport, storage, and use, causing industrial accidents worldwide. A patient with a history of severe chlorine inhalational injury sustained 2 chlorine gas exposures within 48 hours. The patient was treated with intubation, mechanical ventilation, and directed therapies for severe injury by chlorine gas inhalation. Sevoflurane has a role in treating chlorine inhalation injury. Additional therapies are possible, some of which are not available in remote locations.

  8. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Thomas Nelson; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Two supported sorbents were tested in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor system. The sorbents were prepared by impregnation of sodium carbonate on to an inert support at a commercial catalyst manufacturing facility. One sorbent, tested through five cycles of carbon dioxide sorption in an atmosphere of 3% water vapor and 0.8 to 3% carbon dioxide showed consistent reactivity with sodium carbonate utilization of 7 to 14%. A second, similarly prepared material, showed comparable reactivity in one cycle of testing. Batches of 5 other materials were prepared in laboratory scale quantities (primarily by spray drying). These materials generally have significantly greater surface areas than calcined sodium bicarbonate. Small scale testing showed no significant adsorption of mercury on representative carbon dioxide sorbent materials under expected flue gas conditions.

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-04-01

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2005 and March 31, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Engineered sorbents composed of sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were tested in a laboratory fluidized bed reactor system and found to be capable of essentially complete removal of carbon dioxide at 60 C in a short residence time. Upon breakthrough the sorbents can be thermally regenerated to recover essentially all of the absorbed carbon dioxide. An optimized supported sorbent tested in a pilot-scale entrained bed absorber retained its reactivity in multicycle tests and experienced no attrition. Removal of >90% of carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas was achieved in an entrained bed reactor.

  11. Chlorine Diffusion in Uranium Dioxide: Thermal Effects versus Radiation Enhanced Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pipon, Yves; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Bererd, Nicolas; Jaffrezic, Henri; Raimbault, Louis; Scheidegger, Andre M.; Carlot, Gaelle

    2007-07-01

    Chlorine is present as an impurity in the UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel. {sup 35}Cl is activated into {sup 36}Cl by thermal neutron capture. In case of interim storage or deep geological disposal of the spent fuel, this isotope is known to be able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction because of its mobile behavior and its long half life (around 300000 years). It is therefore important to understand its migration behavior within the fuel rod. During reactor operation, chlorine diffusion can be due to thermally activated processes or can be favoured by irradiation defects induced by fission fragments or alpha decay. In order to decouple both phenomena, we performed two distinct experiments to study the effects of thermal annealing on the behaviour of chlorine on one hand and the effects of the irradiation with fission products on the other hand. During in reactor processes, part of the {sup 36}Cl may be displaced from its original position, due to recoil or to collisions with fission products. In order to study the behavior of the displaced chlorine, {sup 37}Cl has been implanted into sintered depleted UO{sub 2} pellets (mean grain size around 18 {mu}m). The spatial distribution of the implanted and pristine chlorine has been analyzed by SIMS before and after treatment. Thermal annealing of {sup 37}Cl implanted UO{sub 2} pellets (implantation fluence of 10{sup 13} ions.cm{sup -2}) show that it is mobile from temperatures as low as 1273 K (E{sub a}=4.3 eV). The irradiation with fission products (Iodine, E=63.5 MeV) performed at 300 and 510 K, shows that the diffusion of chlorine is enhanced and that a thermally activated contribution is preserved (E{sub a}=0.1 eV). The diffusion coefficients measured at 1473 K and under fission product irradiation at 510 K are similar (D = 3.10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}). Considering in first approximation that the diffusion length L can be expressed as a function of the diffusion coefficient D and time t by : L

  12. Disinfection aboard cruise liners and naval units: formation of disinfection by-products using chlorine dioxide in different qualities of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ufermann, Petra; Petersen, Hauke; Exner, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The world-wide deployment of cruise liners and naval units has caused an increased need for the disinfection of drinking water. The main cause for this is the unknown quality of drinking water in foreign harbours--besides the formation of bio-films due to the climatically disadvantageous conditions in the operational area. Water conduits on board are currently disinfected with calcium hypochlorite in case of microbiological contamination. Chemical and physical analyses after disinfection with calcium hypochlorite have shown that organic by-products consisting of trihalomethanes develop in considerable amounts during disinfection. Furthermore, the method is susceptible to handling errors and thus often leads to insufficient disinfection results. Hitherto, the use of other disinfection methods allowed by government regulations, especially chlorine dioxide, is not widely spread. Unlike disinfection with calcium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide does not lead to the formation of trihalomethanes. Typical disinfection by-products (DBP) are the anions chlorite and chlorate, which are formed in oxidative processes. The formation conditions of these anions have not yet been elucidated. For this reason, the probability of the generation of inorganic by-products after disinfection with chlorine dioxide has been determined, and their occurrence in drinking water on board has been examined with respect to a possible correlation between water quality and the formation of chlorate and chlorite. Therefore, a chromatographic method was developed and validated in order to determine the periodical development of chlorate and chlorite from chorine dioxide in purified water at different pH-values as well as in actual drinking water samples from water conduits on board. The formation of the by-products chlorite and chlorate after disinfection with chlorine dioxide is influenced neither by pH-value nor by chemical properties of the disinfected water. Considering the examined conditions

  13. Investigation of heavy metal partitioning influenced by flue gas moisture and chlorine content during waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghai; Meng, Aihong; Jia, Jinyan; Zhang, Yanguo

    2010-01-01

    The impact of moisture on the partitioning of the heavy metals including Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in municipal solid waste (MSW) was studied in a laboratory tubular furnace. A thermodynamic investigation using CHEMKIN software was performed to compare the experimental results. Simulated waste, representative of typical MSW with and without chlorine compounds, was burned at the background temperature of 700 and 950 degrees C, respectively. In the absence of chlorine, the moisture content has no evident effect on the volatility of Pb, Zn and Cu at either 700 or 950 degrees C, however, as flue gas moisture increasing the Cd distribution in the bottom ash increased at 700 degrees C and reduced at 950 degrees C, respectively. In the presence of chlorine, the flue gas moisture reduced the volatility of Pb, Zn and Cu due to the transformation of the more volatile metal chlorides into less volatile metal oxides, and the reduction became significant as chlorine content increase. For Cd, the chlorine promotes its volatility through the formation of more volatile CdCl2. As a result, the increased moisture content increases the Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd concentrations in the bottom ash, which limits the utilization of the bottom ash as a construction material. Therefore, in order to accumulate heavy metals into the fly ash, MSW should be dried before incineration. PMID:20608514

  14. Sequential disinfection of E. coli O157:H7 on shredded lettuce leaves by aqueous chlorine dioxide, ozonated water, and thyme essential oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nepal; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Stroshine, Richard L.; Simon, James E.

    2001-03-01

    There have been numerous studies on effectiveness of different sanitizers for microbial inactivation. However, results obtained from different studies indicate that microorganism cannot be easily removed from fresh cut vegetables because of puncture and cut surfaces with varying surface topographies. In this study, three step disinfection approach was evaluated for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on shredded lettuce leaves. Sequential application of thyme oil, ozonated water, and aqueous chlorine dioxide was evaluated in which thyme oil was applied first followed by ozonated water and aqueous chlorine dioxide. Shredded lettuce leaves inoculated with cocktail culture of E. coli O157:H7 (C7927, EDL 933 and 204 P), were washed with ozonated water (15 mg/l for 10min), aqueous chlorine dioxide (10 mg/l,for 10min) and thyme oil suspension (0.1%, v/v for 5min). Washing of lettuce leaves with ozonated water, chlorine dioxide and thyme oil suspension resulted in 0.44, 1.20, and 1.46 log reduction (log10 cfu/g), respectively. However, the sequential treatment achieved approximately 3.13 log reductions (log10 cfu/g). These results demonstrate the efficacy of sequential treatments in decontaminating shredded lettuce leaves containing E. coli O157:H7.

  15. Removal of chlorine gas by an amine functionalized metal-organic framework via electrophilic aromatic substitution.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Browe, Matthew A; Wagner, George W; Rossin, Joseph A; Peterson, Gregory W

    2015-08-11

    Here we report the removal of chlorine gas from air via a reaction with an amine functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF). It is found that UiO-66-NH2 has the ability to remove 1.24 g of Cl2 per g of MOF via an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction producing HCl, which is subsequently neutralized by the MOF.

  16. Real-time detection of chlorine gas using Ni/Si shell/core nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Jin; Heo, Kwang; Lee, Hyungwoo; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Chang, Hochan; Park, Minjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Byung Yang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the selective adsorption of Ni/Si shell/core nanowires (Ni-Si NWs) with a Ni outer shell and a Si inner core on molecularly patterned substrates and their application to sensors for the detection of chlorine gas, a toxic halogen gas. The molecularly patterned substrates consisted of polar SiO2 regions and nonpolar regions of self-assembled monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). The NWs showed selective adsorption on the polar SiO2 regions, avoiding assembly on the nonpolar OTS regions. Utilizing these assembled Ni-Si NWs, we demonstrate a sensor for the detection of chlorine gas. The utilization of Ni-Si NWs resulted in a much larger sensor response of approximately 23% to 5 ppm of chlorine gas compared to bare Ni NWs, due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio of the Ni-Si shell/core structure. We expect that our sensor will be utilized in the future for the real-time detection of halogen gases including chlorine with high sensitivity and fast response.

  17. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment⋆

    PubMed Central

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J.; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met Po2/Fio2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and Po2/Fio2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity. PMID:19041527

  18. Soil gas screening for chlorinated solvents at three contaminated karst sites in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.; Williams, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    Soil gas was sampled using active sampling techniques and passive collectors at three sites in Tennessee to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques for locating chlorinated solvent sources and flowpaths in karst aquifers. Actively collected soil gas samples were analyzed in the field with a portable gas chromatograph, and the passive soil gas collectors were analyzed in the lab with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results of the sampling indicate that the effectiveness of both techniques is highly dependent on the distribution of the contaminants in the subsurface, the geomorphic and hydrogeologic characteristics of the site, and, in one case, on seasonal conditions. Both active and passive techniques identified areas of elevated subsurface chlorinated solvent concentrations at a landfill site where contamination remains concentrated in the regolith. Neither technique detected chlorinated solvents known to be moving in the bedrock at a manufacturing site characterized by thick regolith and an absence of surficial karst features. Passive soil gas sampling had varied success detecting flowpaths for chloroform in the bedrock at a train derailment site characterized by shallow regolith and abundant surficial karst features. At the train derailment site, delineation of the contaminant flowpath through passive soil gas sampling was stronger and more detailed under Winter conditions than summer.

  19. [Purification of lake water using a combined ozonization, filtration and chlorine dioxide treatments. Experience with the water of Garda lake].

    PubMed

    Zanetti, F; Leoni, E; Muccioli, S; Ambrogiani, E; Sacchetti, R

    2005-01-01

    The hygienic characteristics of the freshwater from Garda Lake used for the water supply of Sirmione were evaluated before and during the various phases of treatment. The samples were taken at the moment of entry, after ozonization, after filtration and after the addition of chlorine dioxide. The coliforms and Escherichia coli, occasionally detected in the incoming water, were reduced by ozone and eliminated by filtration. Enterococci were always absent. The overall reduction in the total bacteria count was satifactory, considering the low initial levels (96.0% and 83.0% respectively for the Heterotrophic plate count at 22 degrees and the Heterotrophic plate count at 36 degrees). The chemical and physical indicators that underwent the greatest reductions were the sulphates, iron, manganese, ammonia and the turbidity. Several species of unicellular algae belonging to Chlorophyta, Cyanophyta and Bacillariophyta were identified in the water at entry and after ozonization, but were completely eliminated during the subsequent phase of filtration. deliver of high quality services.

  20. Efficacies of chlorine dioxide and lodophor teat dips during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    2000-12-01

    We tested two postmilking teat dips for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae using experimental challenge procedures recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The chlorine dioxide teat dip that contained 0.7% sodium chlorite reduced the number of new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 86.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 88.4%. The 0.5% iodophor teat dip reduced the number of new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 92.9% and reduced the number of new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 43.4%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the study, and no deleterious effects were noted among dipped quarters compared with undipped control quarters for either teat dip. PMID:11132869

  1. Ag-doped titanium dioxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaei Sheini, Navid; Rohani, Mahsa

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been utilized for the fabrication of oxygen sensitive ceramic bodies. In this work, disk-shaped TiO2 pellets are fabricated by the sintering of the press- formed anatase powder at 1000°C. Two silver contacts are printed on one of the top base of each sample. Silver wire segments are connected to the printed electrodes. It is shown that the gradual diffusion of silver into titanium dioxide from the electrodes profoundly affects the resistive properties of the ceramic samples. SEM, XRD and EDAX analyses are carried out to determine the position of the silver diffused in the structure. At 35°C, before silver diffusion, the electrical resistance of the device decreases ten times in response to the presence of 3000 ppm ethanol contamination. Sensitivity (Rair/Rgas) to reducing gases is severely affected by the silver doping level in the titanium dioxide. The progress of silver diffusion continuously decreases the sensitivity till it become less than one. Further progress in silver diffusion brings the devices to the condition at which the resistance increases at the presents of reducing gases. In this condition, inverse sensitivities (Rgas/Rair) as large as 103 are demonstrated.

  2. Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    New coal gasification processes are now being developed which can generate electricity with high thermal efficiency either in a combined gas-turbine, steam-turbine cycle or in a fuel cell. Both of these coal-to-electricity pathways require that the coal-derived fuel gas be at a high temperature and be free of potential pollutants, such as sulfur compounds. Unfortunately, some high-sulfur Illinois coals also contain significant chlorine which converts into hydrogen chloride (HC1) in the coal-gas. This project investigates the effect of HC1, in concentrations typical of a gasifier fed by high-chlorine Illinois coals, on zinc-titanate sorbents that are currently being developed for H{sub 2}S and COS removal from hot coal-gas. This study is designed to identify any deleterious changes in the sorbent caused by the HC1, both in adsorptive operation and in the regeneration cycle, and will pave the way to modify the sorbent formulation or the process operating procedure to remove HC1 along with the H{sub 2}S and COS from the coal-gas. This will negate any harmful consequences of utilizing high-chlorine Illinois in these processes. The bench- scale fluidized bed has been modified to prevent potential HC1 corrosion and startup experiments have proven the reactor system operable and capable of yielding reliable experimental results. The first of the planned experiments in the project are now being performed. 1 fig.

  3. Continuous analysis of nitrogen dioxide in gas streams of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkin, W. T.; Kispert, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    Analyzer and sampling system continuously monitors nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the feed and tail gas streams of a facility recovering nitric acid. The system, using a direct calorimetric approach, makes use of readily available equipment and is flexible and reliable in operation.

  4. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  5. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  6. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  7. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  8. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards to control hydrogen chloride... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine...

  9. Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Using Ion Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W L; Johnson, M R

    2006-04-21

    We are developing a new way of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas based on ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, which can be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a nearly pure gas. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas. The slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is impervious to trace acid gases that destroy existing solvents, and no pre-separation is necessary. The simple, robust nature of the process lends itself to small separation plants. Although the energy cost of the ion pump is significant, we anticipate that it will be compete favorably with the current 35% energy penalty of chemical stripping systems in use at power plants. There is the distinct possibility that this simple method could be significantly more efficient than existing processes.

  10. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2008-07-02

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  11. Oxidation of diclofenac by aqueous chlorine dioxide: identification of major disinfection byproducts and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai

    2014-03-01

    Diclofenac (DCF), a synthetic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this work, the mechanism and toxicity of DCF degradation by ClO2 under simulated water disinfection conditions were investigated. Experimental results indicate that rapid and significant oxidation of DCF occurred within the first few minutes; however, its mineralization process was longer than its degradation process. UPLC-MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were performed to identify major disinfection byproducts that were generated in three tentative degradation routes. The two main routes were based on initial decarboxylation of DCF on the aliphatic chain and hydroxylation of the phenylacetic acid moiety at the C-4 position. Subsequently, the formed aldehyde intermediates were the starting point for further multistep degradation involving decarboxylation, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions of CN bond cleavage. The third route was based on transient preservation of chlorinated derivatives resulting from electrophilic attack by chlorine on the aromatic ring, which similarly underwent CN bond cleavage. Microtox bioassay was employed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of solutions treated by ClO2. The formation of more toxic mid-byproducts during the ClO2 disinfection process poses a potential risk to consumers.

  12. Oxidation of diclofenac by aqueous chlorine dioxide: identification of major disinfection byproducts and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai

    2014-03-01

    Diclofenac (DCF), a synthetic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is one of the most frequently detected pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this work, the mechanism and toxicity of DCF degradation by ClO2 under simulated water disinfection conditions were investigated. Experimental results indicate that rapid and significant oxidation of DCF occurred within the first few minutes; however, its mineralization process was longer than its degradation process. UPLC-MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were performed to identify major disinfection byproducts that were generated in three tentative degradation routes. The two main routes were based on initial decarboxylation of DCF on the aliphatic chain and hydroxylation of the phenylacetic acid moiety at the C-4 position. Subsequently, the formed aldehyde intermediates were the starting point for further multistep degradation involving decarboxylation, hydroxylation, and oxidation reactions of CN bond cleavage. The third route was based on transient preservation of chlorinated derivatives resulting from electrophilic attack by chlorine on the aromatic ring, which similarly underwent CN bond cleavage. Microtox bioassay was employed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of solutions treated by ClO2. The formation of more toxic mid-byproducts during the ClO2 disinfection process poses a potential risk to consumers. PMID:24388821

  13. The Chlorination Quandary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1978-01-01

    Current use of chlorination technology to disinfect water supplies can cause the production of undesirable products, among them chloroform and chlorobenzene. Alternatives to this methodology include the use of ozone, chlorine dioxide, and bromine chloride in place of chlorine. Presently, the methods are feasible in developed countries only. (MA)

  14. Fireside corrosion of superheater materials in chlorine containing flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, T.

    2001-10-01

    Corrosion resistance of three types of candidate materials for superheater sections under simulated waste incineration conditions was evaluated. A 9Cr1Mo steel, an AISI 310SS, and the Ni-based alloy Sanicro 28 were tested on a laboratory and on a pilot scale with different flue gas compositions (up to 2500 mg/Nm3 of HCl and 1500 mg/Nm3 of fly ash). Laboratory tests were carried out in a furnace up to 200 h. Metal and gas temperature were kept constant at 500 °C. Pilot scale tests were carried out by using a 0.3 × 0.3 m cross-sectional combustor, with flue gas velocity of 5 m/s. Air-cooled probes, designed to operate at a metal temperature of 500 °C and facing gas temperatures as high as 600 °C, were used for 200 h as maximum test time. Qualitative correspondence was found between results obtained by the two sets of experimental tests, but quantitative values were not comparable. Metallographic evaluations, metal loss measurements, and weight loss analysis evidenced as the most suitable alloy Sanicro28. Maximum metal loss observed was 240, 182, and 107 µm, respectively, for 9Cr1Mo, AISI310SS, and Sanicro 28 under the most aggressive conditions. Intergranular corrosion attack was evidenced for AISI310SS, limiting the choice of materials to 9Cr1Mo and Sanicro 28, depending upon the lifetime expected at the design stage.

  15. Novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Lui, Junfang; Yuan, Mei

    2000-08-01

    The feasibility of sensing carbon dioxide with a IR single- beam optical structure is studied, and a novel carbon dioxide gas sensor based on IR absorption is achieved. Applying the Lambert-Beer law and some key techniques such as current stabilization for IR source, using a high-quality IR detector, and data compensation for the influences of ambience temperature and atmosphere total pressure, the sensor can measure carbon dioxide with high precision and efficiency. The mathematical models for providing temperature and pressure compensation for the sensor are established. Moreover the solutions to the models are proposed. Both the models and the solutions to the models are verified via experiments. The sensor possesses the advantages of small volume, light weight, low power consumption, and high reliability. Therefore it can be used in many associated fields, such as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-07-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

  17. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Vineet Vaman; Padhye, Ashvini

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an oxidizing agent with known bactericidal, viricidal and fungicidal properties. Its efficacy in reducing the halitosis has been established by previous literature. However, data evaluating its antiplaque property is scarce. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is considered as the gold standard and an effective adjunctive to mechanical plaque removal. However, it is associated with few reversible side effects. Therefore a study was conducted to assess the antiplaque property of ClO2 containing mouthrinse against CHX mouthrinse. Aims and Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of stabilized chlorine dioxide containing mouthrinse and CHX containing mouthrinse in inhibition of tongue coat accumulation and dental plaque formation using a four day plaque regrowth model clinically and microbiologically in a healthy dental cohort. Materials and Methods A Single Center, Randomized, Triple blinded, Microbiological clinical trial was conducted involving 25 healthy dental students volunteers (11 males, 14 females). Two commercially available mouthrinse: Mouthrinse A – Aqueous based ClO2 mouthrinse Freshchlor® and Mouthrinse B - Aqueous based 0.2% CHX mouthrinse Hexidine® were selected as the test products. Subjects were asked to rinse and gargle for 1 minute with the allocated mouthrinse under supervision after supragingival scaling, polishing and tongue coat removal. After four hours, smears were taken from the buccal mucosa and tooth surface. On the fifth day from baseline of four day non brushing plaque regrowth model the samples were again taken from buccal mucosa and tooth surface followed by recording of plaque scores by Rastogi Modification of Navy Plaque index, extent of tongue coat by Winkel’s tongue coating index and measuring tongue coat wet weight in grams. The samples collected were subjected to microbial analysis and the results were expressed as colony forming units (CFUs) per sample. Statistical Analysis The Data was analysed using SPSS

  18. Removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gorin, E.

    1980-06-17

    An improvement is provided in the regeneration system of aqueous regenerative processes for the removal of SO/sub 2/ from SO/sub 2/-containing gas streams which have a scrubbing system containing (1) a scrubbing zone through which a recirculating stream of sodium or potassium thiosulfate solution continuously passes as a vehicle for the SO/sub 2/ absorbent, sodium or potassium carbonate, under conditions favorable to the formation of sulfite by the reaction of carbonate and SO/sub 2/ and (2) a thiosulfate generation zone in which the sulfite is converted by reaction with a sulfide to thiosulfate. The improvement comprises converting, in a regeneration system, the net make of thiosulfate to a mixture of sulfide and carbonate by first converting the thiosulfate to sulfate, then reducing the sulfate to sulfide; and thereafter partially carbonating the sulfide to form a mixture of sulfide and carbonate for return to the scrubbing system.

  19. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nano crystalline nickel zinc ferrite for chlorine gas sensor at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, C. S.; Gujar, M. P.; Mathe, V. L.

    2015-06-24

    Nano crystalline Nickel Zinc ferrite (Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) thin films were synthesized by Sol Gel method for gas response. The phase and microstructure of the obtained Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanostructured Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film shows single spinel phase. Magnetic study was obtained with the help of VSM. The effects of working temperature on the gas response were studied. The results reveal that the Ni{sub 0.25}Zn{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin film gas sensor shows good selectivity to chlorine gas at room temperature. The sensor shows highest sensitivity (∼50%) at room temperature, indicating its application in detecting chlorine gas at room temperature in the future.

  1. The photolysis of chlorine in the presence of ozone, nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuper, W. W.

    1979-01-01

    The following three systems were investigated: the Cl2-O3 system, the Cl2-O2-NO system and the Cl2-NO2-M system. In the first system, the reaction between ClO and O3, the reaction between OClO and O3, and the mechanism of the Cl2-O3 system were studied. In the second system, the reaction between ClOO and NO was investigated. In the last system, the reaction between Cl and NO2 was investigated as well as the kinetics of the chemiluminescence of the Cl-NO2-O3 reaction. In the first system, Cl2 was photolyzed at 366 nm in the presence of O3 within the temperature range 254-297 K. O3 was removed with quantum yields of 5.8 + or - 0.5, 4.0 + or - 0.3, 2.9 + or - 0.3 and 1.9 + or - 0.2 at 297, 283, 273, and 252 K respectively, invariant to changes in the initial O3 or Cl2 concentration, the extent of conversion or the absorbed intensity, I sub a. The addition of nitrogen had no effect on -phi(03). The Cl2 removal quantum yields were 0.11 + or - 0.02 at 297 K for Cl2 conversions of about 30%, much higher than expected from mass balance considerations based on the initial quantum yield of 0.089 + or - 0.013 for OClO formation at 297 K. The final chlorine-containing product was Cl2O7. It was produced at least in part through the formation of OClO as an intermediate which was also observed with an initial quantum yield of phi sub i(OClO) = 2500 exp(-(3025 + or - 625)/T) independent of (O3) or I sub a.

  2. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2014-06-03

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  3. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J.; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B.; Tour, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  4. Identification and measurement of chlorinated organic pesticides in water by electron-capture gas chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, Donald F.; Law, LeRoy M.

    1965-01-01

    Pesticides, in minute quantities, may affect the regimen of streams, and because they may concentrate in sediments, aquatic organisms, and edible aquatic foods, their detection and their measurement in the parts-per-trillion range are considered essential. In 1964 the U.S. Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif., began research on methods for monitoring pesticides in water. Two systems were selected--electron-capture gas chromatography and microcoulometric-titration gas chromatography. Studies on these systems are now in progress. This report provides current information on the development and application of an electron-capture gas chromatographic procedure. This method is a convenient and extremely sensitive procedure for the detection and measurement of organic pesticides having high electron affinities, notably the chlorinated organic pesticides. The electron-affinity detector is extremely sensitive to these substances but it is not as sensitive to many other compounds. By this method, the chlorinated organic pesticide may be determined on a sample of convenient size in concentrations as low as the parts-per-trillion range. To insure greater accuracy in the identifications, the pesticides reported were separated and identified by their retention times on two different types of gas chromatographic columns.

  5. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-04-01

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2004 and March 31, 2004 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. RTI has produced laboratory scale batches (approximately 300 grams) of supported sorbents (composed of 20 to 40% sodium carbonate) with high surface area and acceptable activity. Initial rates of weight gain of the supported sorbents when exposed to a simulated flue gas exceeded that of 100% calcined sodium bicarbonate. One of these sorbents was tested through six cycles of carbonation/calcination by thermogravimetric analysis and found to have consistent carbonation activity. Kinetic modeling of the regeneration cycle on the basis of diffusion resistance at the particle surface is impractical, because the evolving gases have an identical composition to those assumed for the bulk fluidization gas. A kinetic model of the reaction has been developed on the basis of bulk motion of water and carbon dioxide at the particle surface (as opposed to control by gas diffusion). The model will be used to define the operating conditions in future laboratory- and pilot-scale testing.

  6. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  7. Simulation Based on Negative ion pair Techniques of Electric propulsion In Satellite Mission Using Chlorine Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    R.Bakkiyaraj,Assistant professor,Government college of Engineering ,Bargur,Tamilnadu. *C.Sathiyavel, PG Student and Department of Aeronautical Engineering/Branch of Avionics, PSN college of Engineering and Technology,Tirunelveli,India. Abstract: Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of repulsive between negative ions with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 eV/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The distance between negative ions pair is important for the evaluation of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of ions is related to the ion beam current. Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense grids and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with low electric power for simulating the ion propulsion rocket system

  8. Sensing Materials for the Detection of Chlorine Gas Using Embedded Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    T. L. Porter, T. Vail, A. Wooley, R. J. Venedam

    2008-10-01

    Embedded piezoresistive microcantilever (EPM) sensors may be constructed for a variety of sensing applications. In each application, a custom sensing material is designed that will respond volumetrically to the desired analyte. Here, we have constructed EPM sensors for the detection of chlorine gas (Cl2). The sensing materials used consisted of polymer matrices combined with sodium iodide crystals. Sensors constructed from a silicone-based matrix exhibited the greatest response to Cl2, with detection limits in an outdoor exposure setting of approximately 20 parts per million.

  9. Comparisons of the film peeling from the composite oxides of quartz sand filters using ozone, hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingming; Huang, Tinglin; Wen, Gang; Cao, Xin

    2015-08-01

    To solve the problem of shortened backwashing intervals in groundwater plants, several disinfectants including ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) were examined to peel off the film from the quartz sand surface in four pilot-scale columns. An optimized oxidant dosage and oxidation time were determined by batch tests. Subsequently, the optimized conditions were tested in the four pilot-scale columns. The results demonstrated that the backwashing intervals increased from 35.17 to 54.33 (H2O2) and to 53.67 hr (ClO2) after the oxidation treatments, and the increase of backwashing interval after treatment by O3 was much less than for the other two treatments. Interestingly, the treatment efficiency of filters was not affected by O3 or H2O2 oxidation; but after oxidation by ClO2, the treatment efficiency was deteriorated, especially the ammonia removal (from 96.96% to 24.95%). The filter sands before and after the oxidation were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the oxidation by O3 and H2O2, the structures on the surface of filter sands were seriously damaged after oxidation by ClO2. The chemical states of manganese on the surfaces of those treated sands were only changed by ClO2. The damage of the structures and the change of the chemical states of manganese might have a negative effect on the ammonia removal. In summary, H2O2 is a suitable agent for film peeling.

  10. Formation of iodinated disinfection by-products during oxidation of iodide-containing waters with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Xu, Bin; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2013-06-01

    This study was to explore the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs), including iodoform (CHI3), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), when iodide-containing artificial synthesized waters and raw waters are in contact with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Among the investigated I-DBPs, CHI3 was the major species during ClO2 oxidation in artificial synthesized waters. Impact factors were evaluated, including the concentrations of ClO2, iodide (I(-)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH. Formation of CHI3, IAA and TIAA followed an increasing and then decreasing pattern with increased ClO2 or DOC concentration. I-DBPs yield was significantly affected by solution pH. High concentrations of I-DBPs were generated under circumneutral conditions with the maximum formation at pH 8. The increase of I(-) concentration can increase I-DBPs yields, but the increment was suppressed when I(-) concentration was higher than 50 μM. When 100 μg/L I(-)and ClO2 (7.5-44.4 μM) were spiked to the raw water samples from Yangshupu and Minhang drinking water treatment plant, certain amounts of CHI3 and IAA were found under pH 7 and the concentrations were strongly correlated with ClO2 dosage and water qualities, however, no TIAA was detected. Finally, we investigated I-DBPs formation of 18 model compounds, including 4 carboxylic acids, 5 phenols and 8 amino acids, treating with ClO2 when I(-) was present. Results showed that most of these model compounds could form a considerable amount of I-DBPs, especially for propanoic acid, butanoic acid, resorcinol, hydroquinone, alanine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine and serine.

  11. Reduction of Salmonella enterica on the surface of eggshells by sequential treatment with aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seonyeong; Park, Sunhyung; Kim, Yoonsook; Kim, Byeong-sam; Beuchat, Larry R; Hoikyung, Kim; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    The synergistic effects of sequential treatments with chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and drying in killing Salmonella enterica on the surface of chicken eggshells were investigated. Initial experiments were focused on comparing lethalities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and ClO2. Eggs surface-inoculated with S. enterica in chicken feces as a carrier were immersed in water, NaOCl (50 or 200 μg/mL), or ClO2 (50 or 200 μg/mL) for 1 or 5 min. For 1-min treatments, lethal activities of sanitizers were not significantly different (P>0.05). However, after treatment with ClO2 for 5 min, reductions of S. enterica were significantly greater (P≤0.05) than reductions after treatment with water or NaOCl. The effect of treatment of eggs with ClO2 or NaOCl, followed by drying at 43% relative humidity and 25 °C for 24 and 48 h, were determined. Populations of S. enterica decreased during drying, regardless of the type of sanitizer treatment. ClO2 treatment, compared to water or NaOCl treatments, resulted in additional reductions of ca. >1.3 log CFU/egg during drying. This indicates that sequential treatments with ClO2 and drying induced synergistic lethal effects against S. enterica on the surface of eggshells. These observations will be useful when selecting a sanitizer to control S. enterica on the surface of eggshells and designing an effective egg sanitization system exploiting the synergistic lethal effects of sanitizer and drying.

  12. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  13. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Andreas Weber; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-01-01

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A field test was conducted to examine the extent to which RTI's supported sorbent can be regenerated in a heated, hollow screw conveyor. This field test was conducted at the facilities of a screw conveyor manufacturer. The sorbent was essentially completely regenerated during this test, as confirmed by thermal desorption and mass spectroscopy analysis of the regenerated sorbent. Little or no sorbent attrition was observed during 24 passes through the heated screw conveyor system. Three downflow contactor absorption tests were conducted using calcined sodium bicarbonate as the absorbent. Maximum carbon dioxide removals of 57 and 91% from simulated flue gas were observed at near ambient temperatures with water-saturated gas. These tests demonstrated that calcined sodium carbonate is not as effective at removing CO{sub 2} as are supported sorbents containing 10 to 15% sodium carbonate. Delivery of the hollow screw conveyor for the laboratory-scale sorbent regeneration system was delayed; however, construction of other components of this system continued during the quarter.

  14. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  15. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  16. Determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water by solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Kang, Haiyan; Wu, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    Given the potential risks of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the analysis of their presence in water is very urgent. We have developed a novel procedure for determining chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water based on solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The extraction parameters of solid-phase extraction were optimized in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method showed wide linear ranges (1.0-1000 ng/L) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9952 to 0.9998. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0.015-0.591 and 0.045-1.502 ng/L, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 82.5 to 102.6% with relative standard deviations below 9.2%. The obtained method was applied successfully to the determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in real water samples. Most of the chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected and 1-monochloropyrene was predominant in the studied water samples. This is the first report of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples in China. The toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the studied tap water were 9.95 ng the toxic equivalency quotient m(-3) . 9,10-Dichloroanthracene and 1-monochloropyrene accounted for the majority of the total toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water.

  17. Determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water by solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianli; Kang, Haiyan; Wu, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    Given the potential risks of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the analysis of their presence in water is very urgent. We have developed a novel procedure for determining chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water based on solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The extraction parameters of solid-phase extraction were optimized in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method showed wide linear ranges (1.0-1000 ng/L) with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9952 to 0.9998. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0.015-0.591 and 0.045-1.502 ng/L, respectively. Recoveries ranged from 82.5 to 102.6% with relative standard deviations below 9.2%. The obtained method was applied successfully to the determination of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in real water samples. Most of the chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected and 1-monochloropyrene was predominant in the studied water samples. This is the first report of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples in China. The toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the studied tap water were 9.95 ng the toxic equivalency quotient m(-3) . 9,10-Dichloroanthracene and 1-monochloropyrene accounted for the majority of the total toxic equivalency quotients of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water. PMID:26960154

  18. Removal of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures by wollastonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsht, V. S.; Muratalieva, V. Zh.

    2013-09-01

    Wollastonite synthesis and decomposition were analyzed from the viewpoint of thermodynamics (using the TERRA software). It is shown that wollastonite synthesis from limestone and silica takes place at a minimum content of nitrogen (10-5 N2) with a release of carbon dioxide. The synthesis temperature is T ≥ 560 K. Wollastonite is decomposed in the presence of flue gas (4N2) with limestone and silica formation and burial of carbon dioxide in the form of CaCO3(c). Wollastonite decomposition temperature is T ≤ 420 K. The cyclic reciprocating process for complete removal of carbon dioxide by wollastonite is suggested. Four strokes of the reciprocating system with the fixed temperatures of wollastonite decomposition (T=300 K) and wollastonite synthesis (T=560 K) are presented. Total energy consumption (T = 560 K) is Δ I ≈ 130 kJ/mole, 30 % of energy is spent for heating and 70 % of energy is spent for chemical reaction. This is comparable with the heat of CO2 solution in ethanolamin.

  19. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

    2003-08-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

  20. Enhanced elemental mercury removal from coal-fired flue gas by sulfur-chlorine compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Nai-Qiang Yan; Zan Qu; Yao Chi; Shao-Hua Qiao; Ray L. Dod; Shih-Ger Chang; Charles Miller

    2009-07-15

    Oxidation of Hg{sup 0} with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl{sub 2}) and sulfur monochloride (S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), were investigated as oxidants for Hg{sup 0} by gas-phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas-phase reaction between Hg{sup 0} and SCl{sub 2} is shown to be more rapid than the gas-phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1({+-}0.5) x 10{sup -18} mL-molecules{sup -1}.s{sup -1} at 373 K. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg{sup 0} removal is about 90% with 5 ppm SCl {sub 2} or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and 40 g/m{sup 3} of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl{sub 2} (or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90% of Hg{sup 0} can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3% of SCl{sub 2} or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} is used. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg{sup 0}/SCl{sub 2} or Hg{sup 0}/S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} reactions. Additionally, about 8% of SCl{sub 2} or S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates, through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests conducted at LSU indicated that exposure of sorbent to water vapor prior to contact with carbonation gas does not significantly increase the reaction rate. Calcined fine mesh trona has a greater initial carbonation rate than calcined sodium bicarbonate, but appears to be more susceptible to loss of reactivity under severe calcination conditions. The Davison attrition indices for Grade 5 sodium bicarbonate, commercial grade sodium carbonate and extra fine granular potassium carbonate were, as tested, outside of the range suitable for entrained bed reactor testing. Fluidized bed testing at RTI indicated that in the initial stages of reaction potassium carbonate removed 35% of the carbon dioxide in simulated flue gas, and is reactive at higher temperatures than sodium carbonate. Removals declined to 6% when 54% of the capacity of the sorbent was exhausted. Carbonation data from electrobalance testing was correlated using a shrinking core reaction model. The activation energy of the reaction of sodium carbonate with carbon dioxide and water vapor was determined from nonisothermal thermogravimetry.

  2. Chlorine gas sensing performance of palladium doped nickel ferrite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratibha; Godbole, R. V.; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2016-05-01

    NiFe2O4 and Pd:NiFe2O4 (Pd=1 w/o, 3 w/o and 5 w/o) thin films, p-type semiconducting oxides with an inverse spinel structure have been used as a gas sensor to detect chlorine. These films were prepared by spray pyrolysis technique and XRD was used to confirm the structure. The surface morphology was studied using SEM. Magnetization measurements were carried out at room temperature using SQUID VSM, which shows ferrimagnetic behavior of the samples. The reduction in optimum operating temperature and enhancement in response was observed on Pd-incorporation in nickel ferrite thin films. Faster response and recovery characteristic is observed Pd-incorporated nickel ferrite thin films. The long-term stability is evaluated over a period of six months. This feature may be regarded as a significant facet towards their practical application as gas sensors.

  3. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  4. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  5. Tin dioxide nanoparticles: Reverse micellar synthesis and gas sensing properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Vaidya, Sonalika; Ahmad, Tokeer; Sujatha Devi, P.; Das, Dipankar; Ganguli, Ashok K.

    2008-02-05

    Tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been synthesized by reverse micellar route using cetyltrimethyl ammoniumbromide (CTAB) as the surfactant. Monophasic tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) was obtained using NaOH as the precipitation agent at 60 deg. C, however, when liquor NH{sub 3} was used as precipitating agent then crystalline SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles are obtained at 500 deg. C. SnO{sub 2} prepared using NaOH show crystallite size of 4 and 12 nm after heating at 60 and 500 deg. C respectively using X-ray line broadening studies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show agglomerated particles of sizes 70 and 150 nm, respectively. The grain size was found to be 6-8 nm after heating the precursor obtained (using liquor NH{sub 3}) at 500 deg. C by X-ray line broadening and the TEM studies. Dynamic light-scattering (DLS) studies show the aggregates of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with uniform size distribution. Moessbauer studies show an increase of s-electron density at the Sn sites compared to bulk SnO{sub 2} and a finite quadrupole splitting indicative of lowering of symmetry around tin atoms. The gas sensing characteristics have also been investigated using n-butane which show high sensitivity and fast recovery time.

  6. Combustion synthesis of tin dioxide nanocomposites for gas sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakrania, Smitesh Dhirajlal

    The current work focuses on understanding the mechanisms controlling tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticle morphology in combustion synthesis systems and how nanoarchitecture affects performance of solid-state gas sensors. A range of analytical methods (including transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nitrogen absorption, and XEDS) were used to characterize the materials properties as a function of the combustion synthesis conditions. A novel method of generating tin dioxide materials was developed which provides a new degree of control over SnO2 morphology; including spherical, nanorod and encapsulated particle architectures. A simplified model for particle formation based on characteristic times was developed to identify the physical and chemical processes affecting the morphologies observed using transmission electron microscope imaging. The SnO2 nanoparticles evolve from primary particles sizes of 7 nm to 14 nm through the synthesis region, and the results indicate interparticle collision and sintering are the dominant mechanisms in determining particle size and morphology for the flame conditions studied. Metal acetates were used to create metal/SnO 2 nanocomposite materials, and the processes controlling gold acetate decomposition in particular were explored. The results of the studies suggest a relationship between the precursor crystallite size and the product nanoparticles. The well-characterized SnO2 particles were evaluated as the active materials for gas-sensing. Sensor sensitivity and time response to carbon monoxide in dry air was used to investigate microstructure-performance links. Excellent sensitivity (3 7, based on the ratio of the resistance of the sensor in air to the resistance in the target gas) and time response (4--20 seconds) were demonstrated for the thin film gas sensors. Fabrication studies demonstrated the sensor performance was a strong function of the film deposition method. A novel method for manufacturing

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Chlorine gas sensors using hybrid organic semiconductors of PANI/ZnPcCl16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingping, Lei; Yunbo, Shi; Wenlong, Lü; Yang, Liu; Wei, Tao; Pengliang, Yuan; Liwei, Lin; Daoheng, Sun; Liquan, Wang

    2010-08-01

    PANI/ZnPcCl16 (polyaniline doped with sulfosalicylic acid/hexadecachloro zinc phthalocyanine) powders were vacuum co-deposited onto Si substrates, where Pt interdigitated electrodes were made by micromachining. The PANI/ZnPcCl16 films were characterized and analyzed by SEM, and the influencing factors on its intrinsic performance were analyzed and sensitivities of the sensors were investigated by exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas. The results showed that powders prepared with a stoichiometric ratio of (ZnPcCl16)0.6(PANI)0.4 had a preferential sensitivity to Cl2 gas, superior to those prepared otherwise; the optimal vacuum co-deposition conditions for the films are a substrate temperature of 160 °C, an evaporation temperature of 425 °C and a film thickness of 75 nm; elevating the operation temperature (above 100 °C) or increasing the gas concentration (over 100 ppm) would improve the response characteristics, but there should be upper levels for each. Finally, the gas sensing mechanism of PANI/ZnPcCl16 films was also discussed.

  8. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilm on food-contact surfaces by sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jihyun; Hong, Ayoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Rhee, Min Suk; Kim, Younghoon; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the efficacy of sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide and drying in killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilms formed on stainless steel, glass, plastic, and wooden surfaces. Cells attached to and formed a biofilm on wooden surfaces at significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher levels compared with other surface types. The lethal activities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on various food-contact surfaces were compared. Chlorine dioxide generally showed greater lethal activity than NaOCl against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on the same type of surface. The resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to both sanitizers increased in the order of wood>plastic>glass>stainless steel. The synergistic lethal effects of sequential ClO₂ and drying treatments on E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on wooden surfaces were evaluated. When wooden surfaces harboring E. coli O157:H7 biofilm were treated with ClO₂ (200 μg/ml, 10 min), rinsed with water, and subsequently dried at 43% relative humidity and 22 °C, the number of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface decreased by an additional 6.4 CFU/coupon within 6 h of drying. However, when the wooden surface was treated with water or NaOCl and dried under the same conditions, the pathogen decreased by only 0.4 or 1.0 log CFU/coupon, respectively, after 12 h of drying. This indicates that ClO₂ treatment of food-contact surfaces results in residual lethality to E. coli O157:H7 during the drying process. These observations will be useful when selecting an appropriate type of food-contact surfaces, determining a proper sanitizer for decontamination, and designing an effective sanitization program to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 on food-contact surfaces in food processing, distribution, and preparation environments.

  9. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products. PMID:9749396

  10. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2006-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer (transportation layer phase) is used for the increase of absorption rate. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the liquid mass transfer

  11. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. Testing conducted previously confirmed that the reaction rate and achievable CO{sub 2} capacity of sodium carbonate decreased with increasing temperature, and that the global rate of reaction of sodium carbonate to sodium bicarbonate increased with an increase in both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O concentrations. Energy balance calculations indicated that the rate of heat removal from the particle surface may determine the reaction rate for a particular particle system. This quarter, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were conducted which indicated that calcination of sodium bicarbonate at temperatures as high as 200 C did not cause a significant decrease in activity in subsequent carbonation testing. When sodium bicarbonate was subjected to a five cycle calcination/carbonation test, activity declined slightly over the first two cycles but was constant thereafter. TGA tests were also conducted with two other potential sorbents. Potassium carbonate was found to be less active than sodium carbonate, at conditions of interest in preliminary TGA tests. Sodium carbonate monohydrate showed negligible activity. Testing was also conducted in a 2-inch internal diameter quartz fluidized-bed reactor system. A five cycle test demonstrated that initial removals of 10 to 15 percent of the carbon dioxide in a simulated flue gas could be achieved. The carbonation reaction proceeded at temperatures as low as 41 C. Future work by TGA and in fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and transport

  13. Medical planning for toxic releases into the community: the example of chlorine gas.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, P J; Davies, P C; Murray, V

    1989-01-01

    Emergency planning for a major accidental release of chlorine gas from industrial installations into the community is outlined for emergency services and hospitals. Realistic planning has been made possible with the advent of computer models for gas dispersion which may be used to estimate the numbers of deaths and casualties, according to their severity. For most purposes sufficient accuracy may be obtained by using a small number of computer analyses for the most serious reasonably foreseeable events under typical day and night weather conditions, and allowing for the emergency response to be scaled up or down according to the size of an actual release. In highly populated areas triage should be preplanned to deal with a large number of victims; field stations will be needed for the treatment and observation of minor casualties. The management and treatment of casualties is summarised. The best protection against a gas cloud is afforded by buildings whose windows, doors, and ventilation systems have been closed. Hospitals in the vicinity of an installation should draw up plans to protect patients and staff. Coordination in a disaster will require toxicological and epidemiological expertise and hospital plans should allow for this. PMID:2713283

  14. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  15. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  16. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  17. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  18. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  19. Process for removal of sulfur dioxide from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, D.E.

    1982-02-02

    An improved apparatus and process are disclosed for the removal of sulfur oxides such as sulfur dioxide from waste gas streams. The process comprises scrubbing the waste gas with a circulating aqueous sodium sulfite/sodium bisulfite absorption solution at a relatively low ph followed by subjecting a portion of the circulating absorption solution to an improved multi-stage regeneration procedure wherein lime is employed to regenerate sulfite from bisulfite. The bleed from the scrubbing step which is subjected to regneration has a low ph and hence can dissolve more lime thereby increasing the lime utilization efficiency. In the regeneration procedure, a lime slurry is separated into a slurry of coarser lime particles and a second portion which contains very fine lime particles. The main regeneration is accomplished by adding the coarse lime slurry to the scrubber bleed. Due to the low ph in this reaction, not all the bisulfite is regenerated to sulfite. However, any remaining bisulfite is regenerated to sulfite in later regeneration steps by reaction with the second portion of the lime slurry in order to precipitate as much calcium as possible in the form of sulfate.

  20. Simulation of natural gas production from submarine gas hydrate deposits combined with carbon dioxide storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2013-04-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several submarine sediments and permafrost regions around the world so far is considered to be a promising measure to overcome future shortages in natural gas as fuel or raw material for chemical syntheses. Being aware that natural gas resources that can be exploited with conventional technologies are limited, research is going on to open up new sources and develop technologies to produce methane and other energy carriers. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, South Korea, India, China and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop technologies to destabilize the hydrates and obtain the pure gas. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from combustion processes to reduce climate change. While different natural or manmade reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide, the storage of carbon dioxide as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in form of hydrates. This has been shown in several laboratory tests and simulations - technical field tests are still in preparation. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR«, different technological approaches are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical effects are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs like CMG STARS and COMSOL Multiphysics. New simulations based on field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the evaluation of the gas production

  1. Biofilm formation and sporulation by Bacillus cereus on a stainless steel surface and subsequent resistance of vegetative cells and spores to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and a peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizer.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Beuchat, Larry R

    2005-12-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus 038-2 on stainless steel coupons, sporulation in the biofilm as affected by nutrient availability, temperature, and relative humidity, and the resistance of vegetative cells and spores in biofilm to sanitizers were investigated. Total counts in biofilm formed on coupons immersed in tryptic soy broth (TSB) at 12 and 22 degrees C consisted of 99.94% of vegetative cells and 0.06% of spores. Coupons on which biofilm had formed were immersed in TSB or exposed to air with 100, 97, 93, or 85% relative humidity. Biofilm on coupons immersed in TSB at 12 degrees C for an additional 6 days or 22 degrees C for an additional 4 days contained 0.30 and 0.02% of spores, respectively, whereas biofilm exposed to air with 100 or 97% relative humidity at 22 degrees C for 4 days contained 10 and 2.5% of spores, respectively. Sporulation did not occur in biofilm exposed to 93 or 85% relative humidity at 22 degrees C. Treatment of biofilm on coupons that had been immersed in TSB at 22 degrees C with chlorine (50 microg/ml), chlorine dioxide (50 microg/ml), and a peroxyacetic acid-based sanitizer (Tsunami 200, 40 microg/ml) for 5 min reduced total cell counts (vegetative cells plus spores) by 4.7, 3.0, and 3.8 log CFU per coupon, respectively; total cell counts in biofilm exposed to air with 100% relative humidity were reduced by 1.5, 2.4, and 1.1 log CFU per coupon, respectively, reflecting the presence of lower numbers of vegetative cells. Spores that survived treatment with chlorine dioxide had reduced resistance to heat. It is concluded that exposure of biofilm formed by B. cereus exposed to air at high relative humidity (> or =97%) promotes the production of spores. Spores and, to a lesser extent, vegetative cells embedded in biofilm are protected against inactivation by sanitizers. Results provide new insights to developing strategies to achieve more effective sanitation programs to minimize risks associated with B. cereus in biofilm formed on

  2. Desulfurization of hot fuel gas produced from high-chlorine Illinois coals. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, W.S.

    1991-12-31

    New coal gasification processes are now being developed which can generate electricity with high thermal efficiency either in a combined gas-turbine, steam-turbine cycle or in a fuel cell. Both of these coal-to-electricity pathways require that the coal-derived fuel gas be at a high temperature and be free of potential pollutants, such as sulfur compounds. Unfortunately, some high-sulfur Illinois coals also contain significant chlorine which converts into hydrogen chloride (HC1) in the coal-gas. This project investigates the effect of HC1, in concentrations typical of a gasifier fed by high-chlorine Illinois coals, on zinc-titanate sorbents that are currently being developed for H{sub 2}S and COS removal from hot coal-gas. This study is designed to identify any deleterious changes in the sorbent caused by the HC1, both in adsorptive operation and in the regeneration cycle, and will pave the way to modify the sorbent formulation or the process operating procedure to remove HC1 along with the H{sub 2}S and COS from the coal-gas. This will negate any harmful consequences of utilizing high-chlorine Illinois in these processes. The bench- scale fluidized bed has been modified to prevent potential HC1 corrosion and startup experiments have proven the reactor system operable and capable of yielding reliable experimental results. The first of the planned experiments in the project are now being performed. 1 fig.

  3. Calculation of hydrocarbon-in-place in gas and gas-condensate reservoirs - Carbon dioxide sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2012-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2), requiring estimation of hydrocarbon-in-place volumes and formation volume factors for all the oil, gas, and gas-condensate reservoirs within the U.S. sedimentary basins. The procedures to calculate in-place volumes for oil and gas reservoirs have already been presented by Verma and Bird (2005) to help with the USGS assessment of the undiscovered resources in the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska, but there is no straightforward procedure available for calculating in-place volumes for gas-condensate reservoirs for the carbon sequestration project. The objective of the present study is to propose a simple procedure for calculating the hydrocarbon-in-place volume of a condensate reservoir to help estimate the hydrocarbon pore volume for potential CO2 sequestration.

  4. Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Kim, Chul H.

    2009-11-15

    A high-negative voltage at the cathode initiates a dark discharge, resulting in a reduction of the carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust gas from the burning of hydrocarbon fuel. An experiment indicated that nearly 44% of the carbon dioxide in exhaust gas disappears after a high-voltage application to the cathode. The energy needed for the endothermic reaction of the carbon dioxide dissociation corresponding to this concentration reduction is provided mainly by the internal energy reduction of the discharge gas, which is nearly 20 times the electrical energy for electron emission.

  5. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co

  7. Carbon dioxide control in an open system that measures canopy gas exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration affects both C3 carbon net assimilation as well as crop water use. Methods for measuring whole canopy gas exchange responses under carbon dioxide enrichment are needed for breeding programs aiming to develop crop cultivars resistant to stresses like drought i...

  8. Protein turnover in the breast muscle of broiler chicks and studies addressing chlorine dioxide sanitation of hatching eggs, poultry leg problems and wheat middling diets for laying hens

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Developmental changes occurred in breast muscle Ks measured by {sup 14}C-tyrosine incorporation at 10, 16, 22 and 34 days of age. Protein synthesis rates decreased as the birds matures: 30 to 11.2%/d between 10 and 34 days of age. In a second study birds fed diets low in lysine or protein-energy had reduced fractional rates of protein synthesis and free tyrosine, branched chain and large neutral amino acid concentrations as compared to control birds the same body weight. Artificial weight loading and reduced dietary protein levels were used to study the effects of body weight on the severity of leg deformities in chicks and poults. Experiments investigating the practicality of wheat middlings as an alternate feedstuff for laying hens suggested that high levels in the diet will reduce egg production, feed conversion, hen livability and egg yolk color. Lastly, chlorine dioxide foam and dipping solutions were compared with formaldehyde fumigation for sanitizing hatching eggs.

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates or intermediate salts through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that high calcination temperatures decrease the activity of sodium bicarbonate Grade 1 (SBC No.1) during subsequent carbonation cycles, but there is little or no progressive decrease in activity in successive cycles. SBC No.1 appears to be more active than SBC No.3. As expected, the presence of SO{sub 2} in simulated flue gas results in a progressive loss of sorbent capacity with increasing cycles. This is most likely due to an irreversible reaction to produce Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}. This compound appears to be stable at calcination temperatures as high as 200 C. Tests of 40% supported potassium carbonate sorbent and plain support material suggest that some of the activity observed in tests of the supported sorbent may be due to adsorption by the support material rather than to carbonation of the sorbent.

  10. Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K.

    2009-06-15

    This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

  11. The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS), D-FENS, and D-FEND ALL: Novel Chlorine Dioxide Decontamination Technologies for the Military

    PubMed Central

    Doona, Christopher J.; Feeherry, Florence E.; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J.; Leighton, Terrence J.

    2014-01-01

    There is a stated Army need for a field-portable, non-steam sterilizer technology that can be used by Forward Surgical Teams, Dental Companies, Veterinary Service Support Detachments, Combat Support Hospitals, and Area Medical Laboratories to sterilize surgical instruments and to sterilize pathological specimens prior to disposal in operating rooms, emergency treatment areas, and intensive care units. The following ensemble of novel, ‘clean and green’ chlorine dioxide technologies are versatile and flexible to adapt to meet a number of critical military needs for decontamination6,15. Specifically, the Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS) was invented to meet urgent battlefield needs and close critical capability gaps for energy-independence, lightweight portability, rapid mobility, and rugged durability in high intensity forward deployments3. As a revolutionary technological breakthrough in surgical sterilization technology, the PCS is a Modern Field Autoclave that relies on on-site, point-of-use, at-will generation of chlorine dioxide instead of steam. Two (2) PCS units sterilize 4 surgical trays in 1 hr, which is the equivalent throughput of one large steam autoclave (nicknamed “Bertha” in deployments because of its cumbersome size, bulky dimensions, and weight). However, the PCS operates using 100% less electricity (0 vs. 9 kW) and 98% less water (10 vs. 640 oz.), significantly reduces weight by 95% (20 vs. 450 lbs, a 4-man lift) and cube by 96% (2.1 vs. 60.2 ft3), and virtually eliminates the difficult challenges in forward deployments of repairs and maintaining reliable operation, lifting and transporting, and electrical power required for steam autoclaves. PMID:24998679

  12. The Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS), D-FENS, and D-FEND ALL: novel chlorine dioxide decontamination technologies for the military.

    PubMed

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J; Leighton, Terrence J

    2014-06-29

    There is a stated Army need for a field-portable, non-steam sterilizer technology that can be used by Forward Surgical Teams, Dental Companies, Veterinary Service Support Detachments, Combat Support Hospitals, and Area Medical Laboratories to sterilize surgical instruments and to sterilize pathological specimens prior to disposal in operating rooms, emergency treatment areas, and intensive care units. The following ensemble of novel, 'clean and green' chlorine dioxide technologies are versatile and flexible to adapt to meet a number of critical military needs for decontamination(6,15). Specifically, the Portable Chemical Sterilizer (PCS) was invented to meet urgent battlefield needs and close critical capability gaps for energy-independence, lightweight portability, rapid mobility, and rugged durability in high intensity forward deployments(3). As a revolutionary technological breakthrough in surgical sterilization technology, the PCS is a Modern Field Autoclave that relies on on-site, point-of-use, at-will generation of chlorine dioxide instead of steam. Two (2) PCS units sterilize 4 surgical trays in 1 hr, which is the equivalent throughput of one large steam autoclave (nicknamed "Bertha" in deployments because of its cumbersome size, bulky dimensions, and weight). However, the PCS operates using 100% less electricity (0 vs. 9 kW) and 98% less water (10 vs. 640 oz.), significantly reduces weight by 95% (20 vs. 450 lbs, a 4-man lift) and cube by 96% (2.1 vs. 60.2 ft(3)), and virtually eliminates the difficult challenges in forward deployments of repairs and maintaining reliable operation, lifting and transporting, and electrical power required for steam autoclaves.

  13. Comparative evaluation of human pulp tissue dissolution by different concentrations of chlorine dioxide, calcium hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, Sonali; Mishra, Neha; Malik, Shubhra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Irrigation plays an indispensable role in removal of tissue remnants and debris from the complicated root canal system. This study compared the human pulp tissue dissolution by different concentrations of chlorine dioxide, calcium hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods: Pulp tissue was standardized to a weight of 9 mg for each sample. In all,60 samples obtained were divided into 6 groups according to the irrigating solution used- 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, 5% calcium hypochlorite (Ca(OCl)2), 10% Ca(OCl)2, 5%chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and 13% ClO2. Pulp tissue was placed in each test tube carrying irrigants of measured volume (5ml) according to their specified subgroup time interval: 30 minutes (Subgroup A) and 60 minutes (Subgroup B). The solution from each sample test tube was filtered and was left for drying overnight. The residual weight was calculated by filtration method. Results: Mean tissue dissolution increases with increase in time period. Results showed 5.25% NaOCl to be most effective at both time intervals followed by 2.5% NaOCl at 60 minutes, 10%Ca(OCl)2 and 13% ClO2 at 60 minutes. Least amount of tissue dissolving ability was demonstrated by 5% Ca(OCl)2 and 5% ClO2 at 30 minutes. Distilled water showed no pulp tissue dissolution. Conclusion: Withinthe limitations of the study, NaOCl most efficiently dissolved the pulp tissue at both concentrations and at both time intervals. Mean tissue dissolution by Ca(OCl)2 and ClO2 gradually increased with time and with their increase in concentration. PMID:25506141

  14. Membrane loop process for separating carbon dioxide for use in gaseous form from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Baker, Richard W; Merkel, Timothy C

    2014-10-07

    The invention is a process involving membrane-based gas separation for separating and recovering carbon dioxide emissions from combustion processes in partially concentrated form, and then transporting the carbon dioxide and using or storing it in a confined manner without concentrating it to high purity. The process of the invention involves building up the concentration of carbon dioxide in a gas flow loop between the combustion step and a membrane separation step. A portion of the carbon dioxide-enriched gas can then be withdrawn from this loop and transported, without the need to liquefy the gas or otherwise create a high-purity stream, to a destination where it is used or confined, preferably in an environmentally benign manner.

  15. 3-Chlorotyrosine and 3,5-Dichlorotyrosine as biomarkers of respiratory tract exposure to chlorine gas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modification of tyrosine by reactive chlorine can produce both 3-chlorotyrosine (CY) and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine (dCY). Both of these amino acids have proven to be promising biomarkers for assessing the extent of myeloperoxidase-catalyzed chlorine stress in a number of adverse physi...

  16. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-11-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium

  17. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

    2004-09-30

    Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium

  18. First-principles thermochemistry for gas phase species in an industrial rutile chlorinator.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Raphael; Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Kraft, Markus; Downing, Jim; Day, Nick E; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2010-11-01

    This work presents thermochemical data for possible gas phase intermediate species in an industrial rutile chlorinator. An algorithm developed for previous work is employed to ensure that all possible species are considered, reducing the number of important species neglected. Thermochemical data and enthalpies of formation are calculated for 22 new species using density functional theory, post Hartree-Fock coupled cluster calculations, and statistical mechanics. Equilibrium calculations are performed to identify whether any Ti/C intermediates are likely to be important to the high temperature industrial process. These new species are not present at high concentration in the exit stream. It is therefore likely that the two chemical processes do not interact. Rather, the Cl₂ rapidly reacts with the solid TiO₂ to form TiCl₄ and O₂. The latter then reacts with the solid C to form CO and CO₂ and provide the heat. Data for all the new species is provided as Supporting Information. Finally, a new methodology for data collaboration is investigated in which the data is made openly accessible using the resource description framework. Example scripts are provided to demonstrate how to query and retrieve the data automatically.

  19. Controllable preparation of copper phthalocyanine single crystal nano column and its chlorine gas sensing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhong; Qiao, Zhenfang; Zhang, Yumin; Zou, Taoyu; Yu, Leiming; Luo, Li; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yiji; Wang, Hai; Tang, Libin

    2016-09-01

    The unsubstituted copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) single crystal nano columns were fabricated for the first time as chlorine (Cl2) gas sensors in this paper. The nano columns of CuPc have been prepared on different substrates via template-free physical vapor deposition (PVD) approach. The growth mechanism of CuPc nano column on quartz was explored and the same condition used on other substrates including glass, sapphire (C-plane<0001>, M-plane<10 1 ¯ 0 >, R-plane<1 1 ¯ 02 >), Si and SiO2/Si came to a same conclusion, which confirmed that the aligned growth of CuPc nano column is not substrate-dependent. And then the CuPc nano column with special morphology was integrated as in-situ sensor device which exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity towards Cl2 at room temperature with a minimum detection limit as low as 0.08 ppm. The response of sensor was found to increase linearly (26 ˜659 % ) with the increase for Cl2 within concentration range (0.08 ˜4.0 ppm ) . These results clearly demonstrate the great potential of the nano column growth and device integration approach for sensor device.

  20. Sulfur and Chlorine in Late Cretaceous Deccan Magmas and Eruptive Gas Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, Stephen; Blake, Stephen; Sharma, Kirti; Widdowson, Mike; Sephton, Sarah

    2008-03-01

    Large-volume pāhoehoe lava flows erupted 67 to 65 million years ago, forming the Deccan Traps, India. The impact of these flood basalt eruptions on the global atmosphere and the coeval end-Cretaceous mass extinction has been uncertain. To assess the potential gas release from this volcanism, we measured sulfur and chlorine concentrations in rare glass inclusions inside crystals and on glassy selvages preserved within lavas. Concentrations range from ~1400 parts per million of S and 900 parts per million of Cl in inclusions down to a few hundred parts per million in the lava. These data indicate that eruptions of Deccan lavas could have released at most 0.103 weight % of S, yielding up to 5.4 teragrams of SO2 per cubic kilometer of lava. A more conservative estimate is 0.07 weight % of S and 0.04 weight % of Cl, yielding 3.5 teragrams of SO2 and 1 teragram of HCl for every cubic kilometer of lava erupted. The flows were very large in volume, and these results imply that huge amounts of S and Cl gases were released. The environmental impact from even individual eruptions during past flood basalt activity was probably severe.

  1. Sulfur and chlorine in late Cretaceous Deccan magmas and eruptive gas release.

    PubMed

    Self, Stephen; Blake, Stephen; Sharma, Kirti; Widdowson, Mike; Sephton, Sarah

    2008-03-21

    Large-volume pāhoehoe lava flows erupted 67 to 65 million years ago, forming the Deccan Traps, India. The impact of these flood basalt eruptions on the global atmosphere and the coeval end-Cretaceous mass extinction has been uncertain. To assess the potential gas release from this volcanism, we measured sulfur and chlorine concentrations in rare glass inclusions inside crystals and on glassy selvages preserved within lavas. Concentrations range from approximately 1400 parts per million of S and 900 parts per million of Cl in inclusions down to a few hundred parts per million in the lava. These data indicate that eruptions of Deccan lavas could have released at most 0.103 weight % of S, yielding up to 5.4 teragrams of SO2 per cubic kilometer of lava. A more conservative estimate is 0.07 weight % of S and 0.04 weight % of Cl, yielding 3.5 teragrams of SO2 and 1 teragram of HCl for every cubic kilometer of lava erupted. The flows were very large in volume, and these results imply that huge amounts of S and Cl gases were released. The environmental impact from even individual eruptions during past flood basalt activity was probably severe.

  2. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  3. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple, inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable, sodium-based sorbent. The sorbent being used in this project is sodium carbonate which is converted to sodium bicarbonate, or ''baking soda,'' through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Sodium bicarbonate is regenerated to sodium carbonate when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, five cycle thermogravimetric tests were conducted at the Louisiana State University (LSU) with sodium bicarbonate Grade 3 (SBC{number_sign}3) which showed that carbonation activity declined slightly over 5 cycles following severe calcination conditions of 200 C in pure CO{sub 2}. Three different sets of calcination conditions were tested. Initial carbonation activity (as measured by extent of reaction in the first 25 minutes) was greatest subsequent to calcination at 120 C in He, slightly less subsequent to calcination in 80% CO{sub 2}/20% H{sub 2}O, and lowest subsequent to calcination in pure CO{sub 2} at 200 C. Differences in the extent of reaction after 150 minutes of carbonation, subsequent to calcination under the same conditions followed the same trend but were less significant. The differences between fractional carbonation under the three calcination conditions declined with increasing cycles. A preliminary fixed bed reactor test was also conducted at LSU. Following calcination, the sorbent removed approximately 19% of the CO{sub 2} in the simulated flue gas. CO{sub 2} evolved during subsequent calcination was consistent with an extent of carbonation of approximately 49%. Following successful testing of SBC{number_sign}3 sorbent at RTI reported in the last quarter, a two cycle fluidized bed reactor test was conducted with trona as the sorbent precursor, which was calcined to sodium carbonate. In the first carbonation cycle, CO

  4. Carbon dioxide capture strategies from flue gas using microalgae: a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniya M; Mechery, Jerry; Paulose, Sylas V

    2016-09-01

    Global warming and pollution are the twin crises experienced globally. Biological offset of these crises are gaining importance because of its zero waste production and the ability of the organisms to thrive under extreme or polluted condition. In this context, this review highlights the recent developments in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas using microalgae and finding the best microalgal remediation strategy through contrast and comparison of different strategies. Different flue gas microalgal remediation strategies discussed are as follows: (i) Flue gas to CO2 gas segregation using adsorbents for microalgal mitigation, (ii) CO2 separation from flue gas using absorbents and later regeneration for microalgal mitigation, (iii) Flue gas to liquid conversion for direct microalgal mitigation, and (iv) direct flue gas mitigation using microalgae. This work also studies the economic feasibility of microalgal production. The study discloses that the direct convening of flue gas with high carbon dioxide content, into microalgal system is cost-effective.

  5. Carbon dioxide capture strategies from flue gas using microalgae: a review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniya M; Mechery, Jerry; Paulose, Sylas V

    2016-09-01

    Global warming and pollution are the twin crises experienced globally. Biological offset of these crises are gaining importance because of its zero waste production and the ability of the organisms to thrive under extreme or polluted condition. In this context, this review highlights the recent developments in carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from flue gas using microalgae and finding the best microalgal remediation strategy through contrast and comparison of different strategies. Different flue gas microalgal remediation strategies discussed are as follows: (i) Flue gas to CO2 gas segregation using adsorbents for microalgal mitigation, (ii) CO2 separation from flue gas using absorbents and later regeneration for microalgal mitigation, (iii) Flue gas to liquid conversion for direct microalgal mitigation, and (iv) direct flue gas mitigation using microalgae. This work also studies the economic feasibility of microalgal production. The study discloses that the direct convening of flue gas with high carbon dioxide content, into microalgal system is cost-effective. PMID:27397026

  6. Real time air monitoring of hydrogen chloride and chlorine gas during a chemical fire.

    PubMed

    Karellas, N S; Chen, Q F; De Brou, G B; Milburn, R K

    2003-08-15

    On 9 August 2000 a fire started at a facility that manufactures pool chemicals in Guelph, Ontario. A mobile trace atmospheric gas analyzer (TAGA) unit was summoned to provide on-site air monitoring operated by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment (OMOE). The responsibility of the TAGA unit was to monitor in real time the airborne contaminants released through the combustion of pool chemicals. This was accomplished by using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source with the newest TAGA (model IIe): a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer which allows for the direct sampling and real time analysis of air for a wide range of toxics at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. The ionization mechanism under negative APCI conditions is dominated by charge transfer reactions, yielding parent ions which are selected in Q1, dissociated in Q2 and the resultant daughter ions are identified in Q3. By monitoring specific parent/daughter (P/D) ion pairs, the TAGA IIe was able to simultaneously measure, in real time, levels of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine (Cl2) present in the air. The response of the TAGA IIe was characterized by multi-point calibration curves which were linear up to 250 microg/m3 for HCl and up to 600 microg/m3 for Cl2. The average detection limit (DL) for this application was 0.50 microg/m3 for both HCl and Cl2. On-site measurements of HCl and Cl2 were made at several locations upwind and downwind of the fire site over a period of 3 days. The data collected by the TAGA unit was used by the local officials for a real time assessment of the airborne levels of HCl and Cl2.

  7. Respiratory symptoms in children and indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide and gas stoves.

    PubMed

    Garrett, M H; Hooper, M A; Hooper, B M; Abramson, M J

    1998-09-01

    Nitrogen dioxide levels were measured in 80 homes in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia, using passive samplers. Some 148 children between 7 and 14 yr of age were recruited as study participants, 53 of whom had asthma. Health outcomes for the children were studied using a respiratory questionnaire, skin prick tests, and peak flow measurements. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations were low, with an indoor median of 11.6 microgram/m3 (6.0 ppb), and a maximum of 246 microgram/m3 (128 ppb). Respiratory symptoms were more common in children exposed to a gas stove (odds ratio 2.3 [95% CI 1. 0-5.2], adjusted for parental allergy, parental asthma, and sex). Nitrogen dioxide exposure was a marginal risk factor for respiratory symptoms, with a dose-response association present (p = 0.09). Gas stove exposure was a significant risk factor for respiratory symptoms even after adjusting for nitrogen dioxide levels (odds ratio 2.2 [1.0-4.8]), suggesting an additional risk apart from the average nitrogen dioxide exposure associated with gas stove use. Atopic children tended to have a greater risk of respiratory symptoms compared with nonatopic children with exposure to gas stoves or nitrogen dioxide, but the difference was not significant.

  8. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  9. CFD modeling to improve safe and efficient distribution of chlorine dioxide gas for packaging fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficiency of the packaging system in inactivating food borne pathogens and prolonging the shelf life of fresh-cut produce is influenced by the design of the package apart from material and atmospheric conditions. Three different designs were considered to determine a specific package design ens...

  10. Electrochemical and Integrated Process Opportunities for On-Site/On-Demand Generation of Chlorine Dioxide - Final Report - 08/02/1996 - 08/01/1999

    SciTech Connect

    Tatarchuk, Bruce J.; Krishnagopalan, G.; Nickell, Ryan A.

    2000-01-30

    Due to continued evidence of environmental harm from elemental chlorine bleaching, the nation's paper industry continues to search for cost effective alternative bleaching. A practical and cost effective bleaching alternative is chlorine dioxide manufactured entirely from sodium chlorate. Sodium chlorate is produced by the electrolysis of brine in an undivided cell with steel plate cathodes and dimensionally stable anodes. Although the overpotential at the anode is only 50 mV, the cathodic overpotential is 940 mV. Thus, nearly one volt of electricity is wasted in driving hydrogen evolution at the cathode. Auburn University's Center for Microfibrous Materials Manufacturing has demonstrated that high performance, three dimensional, microfibrous electrodes can improve the performance of capacitors, batteries, hybrid power cells, and electrolysis electrodes in a variety of applications. The goal of this research was to apply this technology to a chlorate cell's cathode and reduce the overpotential between 200 and 400 mV. An economic analysis of the industry has shown that for every 100 mV reduction in overpotential, $100 per square meter of electrode can be saved annually. Due to their enhanced surface area over plates, corrosion of microfibrous electrodes is a major issue in this research. Samples based on chromium protection (i.e. stainless steel) have proved unfeasible for chlorate application. However, samples based on stainless steel and nickel show dramatic performance improvements over industry status quo in chlor-alkali application. Building microfibrous electrodes on a titanium base protected with a silver coating alleviates the corrosion problem and provides 100 mV or more of overpotential reduction. Further reduction is realized by impregnating silver-titanium microfibrous mesh with a PVDF binder and dispersed platinum on activated carbon. The resulting electrodes are mechanically sound, active towards hydrogen evolution, and hold promise for practical

  11. Proton conduction in electrolyte made of manganese dioxide for hydrogen gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanaka, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Takeuchi, K; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    We propose a network model of oxygen-pairs to store and conduct protons on the surface of manganese dioxide with a weak covalent bond like protons stored in pressured ice. The atomic distances of oxygen-pairs were estimated between 2.57 and 2.60 angstroms in crystal structures of ramsdellite-type and lambda-type manganese dioxides by using protonated samples and inelastic neutron scattering measurements. Good properties for a hydrogen gas sensor using electrolytes made of manganese dioxides that contain such oxygen-pairs were confirmed experimentally.

  12. Loss of Basal Cells Precedes Bronchiolitis Obliterans–Like Pathological Changes in a Murine Model of Chlorine Gas Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    O’Koren, Emily G.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a major cause of chronic airway dysfunction after toxic chemical inhalation. The pathophysiology of BO is not well understood, but epithelial cell injury has been closely associated with the development of fibrotic lesions in human studies and in animal models of both toxin-induced and transplant-induced BO. However, whereas almost all cases and models of BO include epithelial injury, not all instances of epithelial injury result in BO, suggesting that epithelial damage per se is not the critical event leading to the development of BO. Here, we describe a model of chlorine-induced BO in which mice develop tracheal and large airway obliterative lesions within 10 days of exposure to high (350 parts per million [ppm]), but not low (200 ppm), concentrations of chlorine gas. Importantly, these lesions arise only under conditions and in areas in which basal cells, the resident progenitor cells for large airway epithelium, are eliminated by chlorine exposure. In areas of basal cell loss, epithelial regeneration does not occur, resulting in persistent regions of epithelial denudation. Obliterative airway lesions arise specifically from regions of epithelial denudation in a process that includes inflammatory cell infiltration by Day 2 after exposure, fibroblast infiltration and collagen deposition by Day 5, and the ingrowth of blood vessels by Day 7, ultimately leading to lethal airway obstruction by Days 9–12. We conclude that the loss of epithelial progenitor cells constitutes a critical factor leading to the development of obliterative airway lesions after chemical inhalation. PMID:23742075

  13. DISINFECTION: CHLORINE, MONOCHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection process in the treatment of water is designed to insure the inactivation of microbial pathogens. These pathogens which serve as the etiological agents of waterborne disease comprise a diverse group of microorganisms, which include bacterial, viral and protozoan s...

  14. Inactivation of influenza virus haemagglutinin by chlorine dioxide: oxidation of the conserved tryptophan 153 residue in the receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Norio

    2012-12-01

    Airborne influenza virus infection of mice can be prevented by gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)). This study demonstrated that ClO(2) abolished the function of the haemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (H1N1) in a concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent manner. The IC(50) during a 2 min reaction with ClO(2) at 25 °C was 13.7 µM, and the half-life time of HA with 100 µM ClO(2) at 25 °C was 19.5 s. Peptides generated from a tryptic digest of ClO(2)-treated virus were analysed by mass spectrometry. An HA fragment, (150)NLLWLTGK(157) was identified in which the tryptophan residue (W153) was 32 mass units greater than expected. The W153 residue of this peptide, which is derived from the central region of the receptor-binding site of HA, is highly conserved. It was shown that W153 was oxidized to N-formylkynurenine in ClO(2)-treated virus. It was concluded that the inactivation of influenza virus by ClO(2) is caused by oxidation of W153 in HA, thereby abolishing its receptor-binding ability.

  15. Chlorine Dioxide is a Better Disinfectant than Sodium Hypochlorite against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Hinenoya, Atsushi; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Yasuda, Noritomo; Shima, Ayaka; Morino, Hirofumi; Koizumi, Tomoko; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Shibata, Takashi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the antibacterial activity of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) on various multidrug-resistant strains in the presence of bovine serum albumin and sheep erythrocytes to mimic the blood contamination that frequently occurs in the clinical setting. The 3 most important species that cause nosocomial infections, i.e., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP), and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRA), were evaluated, with three representative strains of each. At a 10-ppm concentration, ClO2 drastically reduced the number of bacteria of all MDRP and MDRA strains, and 2 out of 3 MRSA strains. However, 10 ppm of NaClO did not significantly kill any of the 9 strains tested in 60 seconds (s). In addition, 100 ppm of ClO2 completely killed all MRSA strains, whereas 100 ppm of NaClO failed to significantly lower the number of 2 MRSA strains and 1 MDRA strain. A time-course experiment demonstrated that, within 15 s, 100 ppm of ClO2, but not 100 ppm of NaClO, completely killed all tested strains. Taken together, these data suggest that ClO2 is more effective than NaClO against MRSA, MDRP, and MDRA, and 100 ppm is an effective concentration against these multidrug-resistant strains, which cause fatal nosocomial infections.

  16. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of nitrogen dioxide and pans with luminol chemiluminescent detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Bornick, R. M.; Chen, Y.-H.; Marley, N. A.; Environmental Research

    1998-01-01

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) and nitrogen dioxide are important atmospheric air pollutants in the troposphere. These atmospheric nitrogen species are strongly coupled chemically by a clearly temperature-dependent equilibrium in the troposphere. A chemical method that can measure both nitrogen dioxide and PANs rapidly and with sub-part-per-billion detection is described that is based upon a modified luminol detection system coupled to a capillary gas chromatographic column by using helium as a carrier. The system can readily separate and detect nitrogen dioxide, peroxyacetyl nitrate, peroxyproprionyl nitrate, and peroxybutyrl nitrate with detection limits in the low tens of parts per trillion with total analysis time of less than 1 min. Calibration of PAN by thermal decomposition to nitrogen dioxide is demonstrated with PAN detection sensitivities approximately 75% of the sensitivities observed for NO2 luminol detection by using helium as a carrier gas. The advantages of this method for simultaneous measurement of nitrogen dioxide and PANs over ozone chemiluminescent detection and electron capture detection are discussed, as well as potential applications of this method for heterogeneous surface chemistry studies of PANs and nitrogen dioxide and for tropospheric measurements.

  17. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P.Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.

  18. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  19. Automatic Carbon Dioxide-Methane Gas Sensor Based on the Solubility of Gases in Water

    PubMed Central

    Cadena-Pereda, Raúl O.; Rivera-Muñoz, Eric M.; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto; Gomez-Melendez, Domingo J.; Anaya-Rivera, Ely K.

    2012-01-01

    Biogas methane content is a relevant variable in anaerobic digestion processing where knowledge of process kinetics or an early indicator of digester failure is needed. The contribution of this work is the development of a novel, simple and low cost automatic carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor based on the solubility of gases in water as the precursor of a sensor for biogas quality monitoring. The device described in this work was used for determining the composition of binary mixtures, such as carbon dioxide-methane, in the range of 0–100%. The design and implementation of a digital signal processor and control system into a low-cost Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform has permitted the successful application of data acquisition, data distribution and digital data processing, making the construction of a standalone carbon dioxide-methane gas sensor possible. PMID:23112626

  20. MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHLORINE SPECIES: HOMOGENOUS GAS PHASE AND HETEROGENOUS GAS-SOLID PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics of mercury chlorination (with HC1) were studied using a flow reactor system with an on-line Hg analyzer and spciation sampling using a set of impingers. Kinetic parameters, such as reaction order (a), activation energy (Eu) and the overall rate constant (k') were es...

  1. Increases in Atmospheric Chlorine from Dichloromethane, a Gas Not Controlled by the Montreal Protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, S. A.; Hossaini, R.; Hall, B. D.; Hu, L.; Miller, B.; Siso, C.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.; Elkins, J. W.; Chipperfield, M.

    2015-12-01

    Short-lived, anthropogenically produced chlorinated gases historically have not been controlled by the Montreal Protocol; their contribution to stratospheric halogen loading has been relatively small and constant. Since 2000, however, tropospheric mole fractions of dichloromethane (mean lifetime of 5 months) have increased by a factor of 2 at remote sites throughout the globe. Dichloromethane currently adds more chlorine to the atmosphere (~80 ppt) than either HCFC-141b or HCFC-142b, and the implied resulting increase in stratospheric chlorine in recent years is comparable to the increase in total Cl from HCFCs. Emissions driving this global increase have been estimated at 800 Gg/yr in 2012, which is more than half of the chlorine emitted from the three main CFCs during their peak emissions in the late 1980s. Although dichloromethane is used typically as a cleaning agent, solvent, and feedstock in the production of other chemicals, the cause of the recent atmospheric increase is not well understood. Here we will show that the substantial increase in emissions does not appear to be coming from the U.S., as our ongoing observations from tall towers and aircraft profiles over North America since 2005 show a decreasing trend in measured mole fractions in the continental boundary layer relative to the background atmosphere during this period. Instead, our data from remote sites across the Northern Hemisphere reveal a shift in the atmospheric distribution of dichloromethane since 2000 that implies increased emissions from lower latitudes in the northern hemisphere. These changing distributions will be presented and discussed, along with an exploration of the potential causes for the large inter-annual variations observed in the rate of increase and what the results suggest about the main loss mechanism for dichloromethane: oxidation by the hydroxyl radical.

  2. Experimental study of methane replacement in gas hydrate by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Voronov, V P; Gorodetskii, E E; Muratov, A R

    2010-09-30

    The process of replacement of methane molecules in clathrate hydrate by carbon dioxide is studied experimentally. The dependence of the replacement extent on the concentration of the gas mixture coexisting with the hydrate is determined. The kinetics of the replacement is governed by two relaxation modes with a characteristic time ratio of about 10.

  3. Carbon dioxide control in an open system that measures canopy gas exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) effects both C3 net assimilation (A) as well as crop water use. Methods for measuring whole canopy gas exchange responses under [CO2] enrichment are needed for breeding programs aiming to develop crop cultivars resistant to stresses like drought in a...

  4. Estimation of Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacity for Depleted Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yen Ting; Shen, Chien-Hao; Tseng, Chi-Chung; Fan, Chen-Hui; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    A depleted gas reservoir is one of the best options for CO2 storage for many reasons. First of all, the storage safety or the caprock integrity has been proven because the natural gas was trapped in the formation for a very long period of time. Also the formation properties and fluid flow characteristics for the reservoir have been well studied since the discovery of the gas reservoir. Finally the surface constructions and facilities are very useful and relatively easy to convert for the use of CO2 storage. The purpose of this study was to apply an analytical approach to estimate CO2 storage capacity in a depleted gas reservoir. The analytical method we used is the material balance equation (MBE), which have been widely used in natural gas storage. We proposed a modified MBE for CO2 storage in a depleted gas reservoir by introducing the z-factors of gas, CO2 and the mixture of the two. The MBE can be derived to a linear relationship between the ratio of pressure to gas z-factor (p/z) and the cumulative term (Gp-Ginj, where Gp is the cumulative gas production and Ginj is the cumulative CO2 injection). The CO2 storage capacity can be calculated when constraints of reservoir recovery pressure are adopted. The numerical simulation was also used for the validation of the theoretical estimation of CO2 storage capacity from the MBE. We found that the quantity of CO2 stored is more than that of gas produced when the reservoir pressure is recovered from the abandon pressure to the initial pressure. This result was basically from the fact that the gas- CO2 mixture z-factors are lower than the natural gas z-factors in reservoir conditions. We also established a useful p/z plot to easily observe the pressure behavior of CO2 storage and efficiently calculate the CO2 storage capacity. The application of the MBE we proposed was demonstrated by a case study of a depleted gas reservoir in northwestern Taiwan. The estimated CO2 storage capacities from conducting reservoir simulation

  5. Device for the removal of sulfur dioxide from exhaust gas by pulsed energization of free electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, A.; Clements, J.S.; Davis, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a new device using pulsed streamer corona for the removal of sulfur dioxide from humid air has been evaluated. The pulsed streamer corona produced free electrons which enhance gas-phase chemical reactions, and convert SO/sub 2/ to sulfuric acid mist. The SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency was compared with that of the electron-beam flue-gas treatment process. The comparison demonstrates the advantage of the novel device.

  6. Ambient nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations over a region of natural gas production, Northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S. M. Nazrul; Jackson, Peter L.; Aherne, Julian

    2016-10-01

    The Peace River district of Northeastern British Columbia, Canada is a region of natural gas production that has undergone rapid expansion since 2005. In order to assess air quality implications, Willems badge passive diffusive samplers were deployed for six two-week exposure periods between August and November 2013, at 24 sites across the region to assess the ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The highest concentrations of both species (NO2: 9.1 ppb, SO2: 1.91 ppb) during the whole study period (except the 1st exposure period), were observed in Taylor (Site 14), which is consistent with its location near major industrial sources. Emissions from industrial activities, and their interaction with meteorology and topography, result in variations in atmospheric dispersion that can increase air pollution concentrations in Taylor. However, relatively high concentrations of NO2 were also observed near the center of Chetwynd (site F20), indicating the importance of urban emissions sources in the region as well. Observations of both species from the other study sites document the spatial variability and show relatively high concentrations near Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, where unconventional oil and gas development activities are quite high. Although a few sites in Northeastern British Columbia recorded elevated concentrations of NO2 and SO2 during this investigation, the concentrations over the three-month period were well below provincial annual ambient air quality objectives. Nonetheless, given the limited observations in the region, and the accelerated importance of unconventional oil and gas extraction in meeting energy demands, it is imperative that monitoring networks are established to further assess the potential for elevated ambient concentrations associated with industrial emissions sources in the Peace River region.

  7. High efficiency chlorine removal from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pyrolysis with a gas-liquid fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, G; Chen, D; Yin, L; Wang, Z; Zhao, L; Wang, J Y

    2014-06-01

    In this research a gas-liquid fluidized bed reactor was developed for removing chlorine (Cl) from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to favor its pyrolysis treatment. In order to efficiently remove Cl within a limited time before extensive generation of hydrocarbon products, the gas-liquid fluidized bed reactor was running at 280-320 °C, where hot N2 was used as fluidizing gas to fluidize the molten polymer, letting the molten polymer contact well with N2 to release Cl in form of HCl. Experimental results showed that dechlorination efficiency is mainly temperature dependent and 300 °C is a proper reaction temperature for efficient dechlorination within a limited time duration and for prevention of extensive pyrolysis; under this temperature 99.5% of Cl removal efficiency can be obtained within reaction time around 1 min after melting is completed as the flow rate of N2 gas was set around 0.47-0.85 Nm(3) kg(-1) for the molten PVC. Larger N2 flow rate and additives in PVC would enhance HCl release but did not change the final dechlorination efficiency; and excessive N2 flow rate should be avoided for prevention of polymer entrainment. HCl is emitted from PVC granules or scraps at the mean time they started to melt and the melting stage should be taken into consideration when design the gas-liquid fluidized bed reactor for dechlorination.

  8. Sustainable synthesis of aldehydes, ketones or acids from neat alcohols using nitrogen dioxide gas, and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Naimi-Jamal, M Reza; Hamzeali, Hamideh; Mokhtari, Javad; Boy, Jürgen; Kaupp, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Benzylic alcohols are quantitatively oxidized by gaseous nitrogen dioxide to give pure aromatic aldehydes. The reaction gas mixtures are transformed to nitric acid, which renders the processes free of waste. The exothermic gas-liquid or gas-solid reactions profit from the solubility of nitrogen dioxide in the neat benzylic alcohols. The acid formed impedes further oxidation of the benzaldehydes. The neat isolated benzaldehydes and nitrogen dioxide quantitatively give the benzoic acids. Solid long-chain primary alcohols are directly and quantitatively oxidized with nitrogen dioxide gas to give the fatty acids in the solid state. The oxidations with ubiquitous nitrogen dioxide are extended to solid heterocyclic thioamides, which gives disulfides, and to diphenylamine, which gives tetraphenylhydrazine. These sustainable (green) specific oxidation procedures produce no dangerous residues from the oxidizing agent or from auxiliaries. PMID:19115303

  9. Simulation Based on Ion-Ion Plasma Techniques of Electric propulsion In Mars Mission Using Chlorine Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyavel, C.

    Abstract:The recently(Nov-5/2013) launched Mangalyan by the Indian space Research Organization (ISRO) to Mars orbit with Mankalyan contained by small liquid engine(MMH+N2O4).This will take long time to reach the Mars orbit that is around the 9 Months. Bi-Propellant rocket system has good thrust but low specific impulse and velocity. In future we need a rocket with good high specific impulse and high velocity of rocket system, to reduce the trip time to Mars. Electric propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because this needs low propellant, Design thrust range is 1.5 N with high efficiency. An ion - ion pair of Electric propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work. Ion-Ion(positive ion- negative ion) Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.The negative ionization stage with electro negative propellant 2. Ion-Ion plasma formation and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negative gas are produced by adding up the gas, such as chlorine with electron emitted from an Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a Cl- ion, it releases energy of 3.6eV. The negative ion density becomes several orders of magnitude larger than that of the electrons, hence forming ion-ion (positive ion - negative ion) plasma at the periphery of the discharge. The distance between ion- ions is important for the evaluate the rocket thrust and it also that the distance is determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. Accelerate the ion-ion plasma to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction via electron gun and the exhaust of ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we

  10. Reaction kinetics and transformation of antipyrine chlorination with free chlorine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Quan; Feng, Li; Jiang, Jin; Qi, Fei; Zhang, Li-Qiu

    2013-05-15

    Chlorine has been documented that it can effectively remove some pharmaceuticals. Recently, new active oxidants chlorine monoxide and molecular chlorine, which exist as free active chlorine in solution, were reported during pharmaceuticals chlorination. In this study, reaction kinetics, active oxidants, and transformation products during antipyrine chlorination were investigated with batch experiments. The reaction orders in [chlorine] were determined at various pH (6.53-7.62) and ranged from 1.13 ± 0.15 to 1.59 ± 0.08, which indicated that antipyrine chlorination is the concurrent existence of reactions appearing first-order and second-order in [chlorine]. The results by varying solution conditions (solution pH, chloride, ionic strength, and buffer concentration) show that chlorine monoxide and molecular chlorine play significant roles during the process of antipyrine chlorination. With kinetics modeling, the second-order rate constants for hypochlorous acid, chlorine monoxide, and molecular chlorine were obtained at 25 ± 2 °C (units: M(-1) s(-1)): kHOCl = 3.23 × 10(3), kCL2 = 2.86 × 10(7), kCL2O= 8.38 × 10(9) (R(2) = 0.9801). At pH 7, hypochlorous acid and chlorine monoxide are the main contributors to the degradation of antipyrine, about 80% and 20%, respectively (calculated by kHOCl, kCL2 and kCL2O. By applying these rate constants to predict the antipyrine elimination in real water matrixes (surface water, ground water), a good agreement was obtained, particularly in ground water. Moreover, liquid chromatography-tandems mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used for products identification. Two main intermediate products and three stable products were observed during the process of antipyrine chlorination. The possible routes for antipyrine chlorination were proposed, which mainly consisted of halogenations, dealkylations and hydroxylations.

  11. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  12. Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide with Enhanced Gas Recovery-CaseStudy Altmark, North German Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Rebscher, Dorothee; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2005-10-12

    Geologic carbon dioxide storage is one strategy for reducingCO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Depleted natural gas reservoirs are anobvious target for CO2 storage due to their proven record of gascontainment. Germany has both large industrial sources of CO2 anddepleting gas reservoirs. The purpose of this report is to describe theanalysis and modeling performed to investigate the feasibility ofinjecting CO2 into nearly depleted gas reservoirs in the Altmark area inNorth Germany for geologic CO2 storage with enhanced gasrecovery.

  13. Super liquid-repellent gas membranes for carbon dioxide capture and heart-lung machines.

    PubMed

    Paven, Maxime; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Schöttler, Susanne; Deng, Xu; Mailänder, Volker; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In a gas membrane, gas is transferred between a liquid and a gas through a microporous membrane. The main challenge is to achieve a high gas transfer while preventing wetting and clogging. With respect to the oxygenation of blood, haemocompatibility is also required. Here we coat macroporous meshes with a superamphiphobic-or liquid repellent-layer to meet this challenge. The superamphiphobic layer consists of a fractal-like network of fluorinated silicon oxide nanospheres; gas trapped between the nanospheres keeps the liquid from contacting the wall of the membrane. We demonstrate the capabilities of the membrane by capturing carbon dioxide gas into a basic aqueous solution and in addition use it to oxygenate blood. Usually, blood tends to clog membranes because of the abundance of blood cells, platelets, proteins and lipids. We show that human blood stored in a superamphiphobic well for 24 h can be poured off without leaving cells or adsorbed protein behind.

  14. Super liquid-repellent gas membranes for carbon dioxide capture and heart–lung machines

    PubMed Central

    Paven, Maxime; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Schöttler, Susanne; Deng, Xu; Mailänder, Volker; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In a gas membrane, gas is transferred between a liquid and a gas through a microporous membrane. The main challenge is to achieve a high gas transfer while preventing wetting and clogging. With respect to the oxygenation of blood, haemocompatibility is also required. Here we coat macroporous meshes with a superamphiphobic—or liquid repellent—layer to meet this challenge. The superamphiphobic layer consists of a fractal-like network of fluorinated silicon oxide nanospheres; gas trapped between the nanospheres keeps the liquid from contacting the wall of the membrane. We demonstrate the capabilities of the membrane by capturing carbon dioxide gas into a basic aqueous solution and in addition use it to oxygenate blood. Usually, blood tends to clog membranes because of the abundance of blood cells, platelets, proteins and lipids. We show that human blood stored in a superamphiphobic well for 24 h can be poured off without leaving cells or adsorbed protein behind. PMID:24065073

  15. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  16. Effect of water treatment chemicals on limestone/sulfur dioxide reaction in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    A simple laboratory test has been developed which simulates the reaction between limestone/water and sulfur dioxide in flue gas desulfurization systems. By adding various chemicals, in differing concentrations, to the limestone/water mixture, the quantitative impact on the sulfur dioxide/limestone reaction can be qualified and quantified. This paper will present the impact of several water treatment chemicals on the reaction of limestone and sulfur dioxide. An attempt has been made to predict the effect through mathematical correlations. All of the additive chemicals tend to decrease the rate of dissolution of limestone to various degrees. Some of the chemicals retard crystal growth thus adversely impacting solids separation in the thickener. The physical appearance of the crystal growth retarded limestone absorber slurry approaches a colloidal suspension.

  17. Direct reduction of carbon dioxide to formate in high-gas-capacity ionic liquids at post-transition-metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, John D; Bocarsly, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    As an approach to combat the increasing emissions of carbon dioxide in the last 50 years, the sequestration of carbon dioxide gas in ionic liquids has become an attractive research area. Ionic liquids can be made that possess incredibly high molar absorption and specificity characteristics for carbon dioxide. Their high carbon dioxide solubility and specificity combined with their high inherent electrical conductivity also creates an ideal medium for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide. Herein, a lesser studied ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate, was used as both an effective carbon dioxide capture material and subsequently as an electrochemical matrix with water for the direct reduction of carbon dioxide into formate at indium, tin, and lead electrodes in good yield (ca. 3 mg h(-1) cm(-2)).

  18. Estimation of atmospheric lifetimes of hydrofluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and olefins by chlorine photolysis using gas-phase NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marchione, Alexander A; Fagan, Paul J; Till, Eric J; Waterland, Robert L; LaMarca, Concetta

    2008-08-15

    An empirical correlation has been derived between accepted atmospheric lifetimes of a set of hydrofluorocarbons and hydrofluoroethers and relative rates of reaction with photolyzed chlorine in excess at ambient temperature. These kinetic systems were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the gas phase, marking the first application of NMR spectroscopy to this field. The square of the Pearson coefficient R for the linear correlation between observed reaction rates and accepted atmospheric lifetimes was 0.87 for compounds of lifetime less than 20 years. The method was extended to the study of ethene and propene; the rate of reaction of propene was found to be 1.25 times that of ethene at 23 degrees C. The chief advantage of this method is its simplicity and reliance only on common tools and techniques of an industrial chemical laboratory.

  19. Process for separating carbon dioxide from flue gas using sweep-based membrane separation and absorption steps

    DOEpatents

    Wijmans, Johannes G.; Baker, Richard W.; Merkel, Timothy C.

    2012-08-21

    A gas separation process for treating flue gases from combustion processes, and combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the flue gas stream to be treated to an absorption-based carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the flue gas across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas to the combustor.

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz

    2001-01-01

    Four grades of sodium bicarbonate and two grades of trona were characterized in terms of particle size distribution, surface area, pore size distribution, and attrition. Surface area and pore size distribution determinations were conducted after calcination of the materials. The sorbent materials were subjected to thermogravimetric testing to determine comparative rates and extent of calcination (in inert gas) and sorption (in a simulated coal combustion flue gas mixture). Selected materials were exposed to five calcination/sorption cycles and showed no decrease in either sorption capacity or sorption rate. Process simulations were conducted involving different heat recovery schemes. The process is thermodynamically feasible. The sodium-based materials appear to have suitable physical properties for use as regenerable sorbents and, based on thermogravimetric testing, are likely to have sorption and calcination rates that are rapid enough to be of interest in full-scale carbon sequestration processes.

  1. Carbon dioxide as working gas for laboratory plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, R.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements with a RF probe, retarding potential analyzer and mass spectrometer in a laboratory plasma tank were performed using the gases CO2, N2, A and He in order to compare their properties as working gases for laboratory plasma production. The overall result of that CO2 leads to higher plasma densities at lower neutral-gas pressures as well as to a larger Maxwellian component of the electron population, while the electron temperature is lower than that when N2, A and He are used.

  2. The carbon dioxide-water interface at conditions of gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Lietz, Daniela; Venturini, Federica; Gutt, Christian; Tolan, Metin

    2009-01-21

    The structure of the carbon dioxide-water interface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and reflectivity at temperature and pressure conditions which allow the formation of gas hydrate. The water-gaseous CO2 and the water-liquid CO2 interface were examined. The two interfaces show a very different behavior with respect to the formation of gas hydrate. While the liquid-gas interface exhibits the formation of thin liquid CO2 layers on the water surface, the formation of small clusters of gas hydrate was observed at the liquid-liquid interface. The data obtained from both interfaces points to a gas hydrate formation process which may be explained by the so-called local structuring hypothesis.

  3. The carbon dioxide-water interface at conditions of gas hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lehmkühler, Felix; Paulus, Michael; Sternemann, Christian; Lietz, Daniela; Venturini, Federica; Gutt, Christian; Tolan, Metin

    2009-01-21

    The structure of the carbon dioxide-water interface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and reflectivity at temperature and pressure conditions which allow the formation of gas hydrate. The water-gaseous CO2 and the water-liquid CO2 interface were examined. The two interfaces show a very different behavior with respect to the formation of gas hydrate. While the liquid-gas interface exhibits the formation of thin liquid CO2 layers on the water surface, the formation of small clusters of gas hydrate was observed at the liquid-liquid interface. The data obtained from both interfaces points to a gas hydrate formation process which may be explained by the so-called local structuring hypothesis. PMID:19105749

  4. Kinetic analysis of photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase formaldehyde over titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmin; Lian, Zhiwei; Ye, Xiaojiang; Shangguan, Wenfeng

    2005-07-01

    Degradation of formaldehyde with different initial concentration over titanium dioxide was carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. Photocatalytic rates were well described by the simplified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The kinetic analysis shows that the apparent first-order reaction coefficient is lower and half-life of photocatalysis is longer for low concentration than for high concentration formaldehyde. A network formation model of the photocatalytic products was established. Experimental results and analysis demonstrate that carbon dioxide concentration and carbon monoxide concentration in gas phase vary exponentially with the illumination time and may be even higher than gas-phase formaldehyde concentration if there is much pre-adsorbed formaldehyde in adsorption equilibrium on catalysts before illumination. Carbon monoxide is found to be one of the by-products during formaldehyde photooxidation.

  5. Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

    2014-07-08

    The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

  6. Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400-1400 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, R. L.; Farrar, L. W.; Di Cecca, S.; Jeys, T. H.

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectra of ammonia (NH3), chlorine (Cl2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), phosgene (COCl2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) toxic gases have been measured in the fingerprint region 400-1400 cm-1. A relatively compact (<2'x2'x2'), sensitive, 532 nm 10 W CW Raman system with double-pass laser and double-sided collection was used for these measurements. Two Raman modes are observed at 934 and 967 cm-1 in NH3. Three Raman modes are observed in Cl2 at 554, 547, and 539 cm-1, which are due to the 35/35 35/37, and 37/37 Cl isotopes, respectively. Raman modes are observed at 870, 570, and 1151 cm-1 in H2S, COCl2, and SO2, respectively. Values of 3.68 ± 0.26x10-32 cm2/sr (3.68 ± 0.26x10-36 m2/sr), 1.37 ± 0.10x10-30 cm2/sr (1.37 ± 0.10x10-34 m2/sr), 3.25 ± 0.23x10-31 cm2/sr (3.25 ± 0.23x10-35 m2/sr), 1.63 ± 0.14x10-30 cm2/sr (1.63 ± 0.14x10-34 m2/sr), and 3.08 ± 0.22x10-30 cm2/sr (and 3.08 ± 0.22x10-34 m2/sr) were determined for the differential Raman cross section of the 967 cm-1 mode of NH3, sum of the 554, 547, and 539 cm-1 modes of Cl2, 870 cm-1 mode of H2S, 570 cm-1 mode of COCl2, and 1151 cm-1 mode of SO2, respectively, using the differential Raman cross section of 3.56 ± 0.14x10-31 cm2/sr (3.56 ± 0.14x10-35 m2/sr) for the 1285 cm-1 mode of CO2 as the reference.

  7. Rapid determination of chlorinated pesticides in fish by freezing-lipid filtration, solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jongki; Kima, Hye-Young; Kim, Do-Gyun; Seo, Jungju; Kimb, Kang-Jin

    2004-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed for measuring 24 chlorinated pesticides in fish tissue samples. Extraction of chlorinated pesticides was carried out by ultrasonication using an acetone-n-hexane (5:2, v/v) mixture. Most of the lipids in the extract were eliminated by freezing-lipid filtration, prior to solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup. During freezing-lipid filtration, about 90% of the lipids extracted from the fish samples were easily removed without any significant losses of chlorinated pesticides. For purification, SPE using Florisil was shown to be more effective than silica. Quantification was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode. Spiking experiments were carried out to determine the recovery, precision, and limits of detection (LODs) of the method. The overall recovery was above 80% in the spiked fish tissue sample at 100 ng/g level. The detection limits for chlorinated pesticides were ranged from 0.5 to 5 ppb, except for endosulfan I and II which was 20 ppb. The newly developed method is demonstrated to give efficient recoveries and LODs for detecting chlorinated pesticides spiked into fish tissue with high lipid content.

  8. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Hladik, Michelle L; Vajda, Alan M; Fitzgerald, Kevin C; Douville, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m(3) d(-1) design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration=2.7 μg L(-1); n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration=4.5 μg L(-1)), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration=1.4 μg L(-1)) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative proportions of

  9. Impact of wastewater infrastructure upgrades on the urban water cycle: Reduction in halogenated reaction byproducts following conversion from chlorine gas to ultraviolet light disinfection.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Hladik, Michelle L; Vajda, Alan M; Fitzgerald, Kevin C; Douville, Chris

    2015-10-01

    The municipal wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) infrastructure of the United States is being upgraded to expand capacity and improve treatment, which provides opportunities to assess the impact of full-scale operational changes on water quality. Many WWTFs disinfect their effluent prior to discharge using chlorine gas, which reacts with natural and synthetic organic matter to form halogenated disinfection byproducts (HDBPs). Because HDBPs are ubiquitous in chlorine-disinfected drinking water and have adverse human health implications, their concentrations are regulated in potable water supplies. Less is known about the formation and occurrence of HDBPs in disinfected WWTF effluents that are discharged to surface waters and become part of the de facto wastewater reuse cycle. This study investigated HDBPs in the urban water cycle from the stream source of the chlorinated municipal tap water that comprises the WWTF inflow, to the final WWTF effluent disinfection process before discharge back to the stream. The impact of conversion from chlorine-gas to low-pressure ultraviolet light (UV) disinfection at a full-scale (68,000 m(3) d(-1) design flow) WWTF on HDBP concentrations in the final effluent was assessed, as was transport and attenuation in the receiving stream. Nutrients and trace elements (boron, copper, and uranium) were used to characterize the different urban source waters, and indicated that the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade water chemistry was similar and insensitive to the disinfection process. Chlorinated tap water during the pre-upgrade and post-upgrade samplings contained 11 (mean total concentration=2.7 μg L(-1); n=5) and 10 HDBPs (mean total concentration=4.5 μg L(-1)), respectively. Under chlorine-gas disinfection conditions 13 HDBPs (mean total concentration=1.4 μg L(-1)) were detected in the WWTF effluent, whereas under UV disinfection conditions, only one HDBP was detected. The chlorinated WWTF effluent had greater relative proportions of

  10. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  11. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  6. Carbon Dioxide Gas Sensing Application of GRAPHENE/Y2O3 Quantum Dots Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemade, K. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    Graphene/Y2O3 quantum dots (QDs) composite was investigated towards the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas at room temperature. Graphene synthesized by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite. The composite prepared by mixing 20-wt% graphene into the 1 g Y2O3 in organic medium (acetone). The chemiresistor of composite prepared by screen-printing on glass substrate. The optimum value of sensing response (1.08) was showed by 20-wt% graphene/Y2O3 QDs composite. The excellent stability with optimum sensing response evidenced for the composite. The gas sensing mechanism discussed on the basis of electron transfer reaction.

  7. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  8. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  9. Upgrading Titanium Ore Through Selective Chlorination Using Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jungshin; Okabe, Toru H.

    2013-06-01

    To develop a simple and effective process for upgrading low-grade titanium ore (ilmenite, mainly FeTiO3), a new selective chlorination process based on the use of calcium chloride (CaCl2) as the chlorine source was investigated in this study. Titanium ore and a titanium ore/CaCl2 mixture were placed in two separate crucibles inside a gas-tight quartz tube that was then positioned in a horizontal furnace. In the experiments, the titanium ore in the two crucibles reacted with either HCl produced from CaCl2 or CaCl2 itself at 1100 K (827 °C), leading to the selective removal of the iron present in the titanium ore as iron chlorides [FeCl x (l,g) ( x = 2, 3)]. Various kinds of titanium ores produced in different countries were used as feedstock, and the influence of the particle size and atmosphere on the selective chlorination was investigated. Under certain conditions, titanium dioxide (TiO2) with purity of about 97 pct was directly obtained in a single step from titanium ore containing 51 pct TiO2. Thus, selective chlorination is a feasible method for producing high purity titanium dioxide from low-grade titanium ore.

  10. Room Temperature ppb Level Chlorine Gas Sensor Based on Copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bedi, R. K.; Saini, Rajan; Mahajan, Aman

    2010-12-01

    Spin coating technique has been used to fabricate room temperature chlorine gas sensor based on copper (II) 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, 18, 22, 25-octabutoxy-29 H, 31 H-phthalocyanine (CuPc(OBu){sub 8}) films. Gas sensor shows a response of 185% to few parts per billion level of Cl{sub 2} gas with response time of 9.5 minutes at room temperature. The interactions between sensor and analytes followed first order kinetics with rate constant 0.01{<=}k{<=}0.02. The chemiresistive sensor showed very good stability at room temperature over a long period of time.

  11. [Occurrence of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides during the use of gas stoves].

    PubMed

    Prescher, K E

    1982-01-01

    The concentrations of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide arising from gas burning have been measured under experimental and field conditions. In the test room propane, butane and town-gas have been burned, whereas in the apartments investigated only town-gas has been used. The most important influence on the concentration of the four substances arises from the changes in the burning conditions of the flame. Laboratory experiments have been carried out in the test room with open flames and with an aluminum block or a kettle on the flame. The following results have been obtained: (a) for CO the lowest concentration is obtained with open flames irrespective of the type of gas burned. Higher concentrations have been found with aluminum blocks, whereas the highest concentrations were associated with the use of kettles and pots, (b) the experimental conditions have only a small influence on the CO2 concentration, (c) NO concentrations are influenced by the gas type and by the experimental conditions. They are low with kettles but high with open flames, (d) NO2 concentrations are less influenced by the experimental conditions than are NO concentrations. The results of more than 1000 paired determinations of NO2 in kitchen and other rooms are presented. The concentrations which have been measured using diffusion tubes according to Palmes which were exposed for 48 h, were highest in kitchens of dwellings fully equipped with gas devices (heating, cooking, warming water). The mean value of the concentrations was about 50 micrograms/m3, whereas the mean for dwellings without any gas device has been found to be lower than 20 micrograms/m3. PMID:6820854

  12. [Removal of Waste Gas Containing Mixed Chlorinated Hydrocarbons by the Biotrickling Filter].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-zhi; Miao, Xiao-ping; Ouyang, Du-juan; Ye, Jie-xu; Chen, Jian-meng

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation on purification of waste gas contaminated with a mixture of dichloromethane (DCM) and dichloroethane(1,2-DCA) was conducted in a biotrickling filter (BTF) inoculated with activated sludge of pharmaceuticals industry. Stable removal efficiency(RE) above 80% for DCM and above 75% for 1,2-DCA were achieved after 35 days, indicating that biofilm was developed. The best elimination capacity (EC) of DCM and 1,2-DCA were 13 g.(m3.h)-1 and 10 g.(m3.h)-1 respectively. And there was a linear relationship between the production of CO2 and mixed gas EC, the maximum mineralization rate of mixed gas stabled at 61. 2%. The interaction test indicated that DCM and 1,2-DCA would inhibit with each other. The changing of biomass of BTF during the operation process was also been studied.

  13. [Removal of Waste Gas Containing Mixed Chlorinated Hydrocarbons by the Biotrickling Filter].

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong-zhi; Miao, Xiao-ping; Ouyang, Du-juan; Ye, Jie-xu; Chen, Jian-meng

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation on purification of waste gas contaminated with a mixture of dichloromethane (DCM) and dichloroethane(1,2-DCA) was conducted in a biotrickling filter (BTF) inoculated with activated sludge of pharmaceuticals industry. Stable removal efficiency(RE) above 80% for DCM and above 75% for 1,2-DCA were achieved after 35 days, indicating that biofilm was developed. The best elimination capacity (EC) of DCM and 1,2-DCA were 13 g.(m3.h)-1 and 10 g.(m3.h)-1 respectively. And there was a linear relationship between the production of CO2 and mixed gas EC, the maximum mineralization rate of mixed gas stabled at 61. 2%. The interaction test indicated that DCM and 1,2-DCA would inhibit with each other. The changing of biomass of BTF during the operation process was also been studied. PMID:26717675

  14. Fast gas chromotography with luminol detection for measurement of nitrogen dioxide and PANs.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Drayton, P. J.

    1999-09-30

    Fast capillary gas chromatography has been coupled to a luminol-based chemiluminescence detection system for the rapid monitoring of nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacyl nitrates. A first-generation instrument was described recently (Gaffney et al., 1998). This system is capable of monitoring nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs; to and including the C4 species) with 1-min time resolution. This is an improvement by a factor of five over gas chromatography methods with electron capture detection. In addition, the luminol method is substantially less expensive than laser fluorescent detection or mass spectroscopic methods. Applications in aircraft-based research have been published electronically and will appear shortly in Environmental Science and Technology (Gaffney et al., 1999a). An improved version of the instrument that has been designed and built makes use of a Hammamatsu photon-counting system. Detection limits of this instrumentation are at the low tens of ppt. The range of the instrument can be adjusted by modifying sampling volumes and detection counting times. A review of past work and of recent application of the instrumentation to field measurements of nitrogen dioxide and PANs is presented. The data clearly indicate that the luminol approach can determine the target species with time resolution of less than 1 min. Examples of applications for estimation of peroxyacetyl radical concentrations and nitrate radical formation rates are also presented. This instrumentation can further be used for evaluation of surfaces for loss of nitrogen dioxide and PANs, phenomena of possible importance for sampling interfaces and chamber wall design. Our high-frequency field data clearly indicate that the ''real world'' is not well mixed and that turbulent mixing and plume-edge chemistries might play an important role in urban- and regional-scale interactions. Dynamic flow systems might be required to evaluate such effects in new-generation chamber studies.

  15. A semiclosed-cycle gas turbine with carbon dioxide-argon as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Ulizar, I.; Pilidis, P.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the performance analysis of a semiclosed-cycle gas turbine. The working fluid is carbon dioxide and the fuel is low heating value gas synthesized from coal. The objective of the machine is to produce clean electricity with the smallest efficiency penalty. First, the thermodynamic properties of the gases in the cycle were obtained as a function of temperature and pressure. Then two performance simulation codes were developed. These have the ability of simulating different configurations of open, closed, and semiclosed cycles. The first code was used for cycle optimization and the second for off-design studies. The design and off-design performances of the machine are predicted. The production of clean electricity will be at the expense of a lower efficiency compared with current equipment. Finally, some critical issues for the development of such a gas turbine are identified.

  16. [Determination of short chain chlorinated paraffins in leather products by solid phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiya; Wan, Xin; Li, Lixia; Wang, Chengyun; Jin, Shupei; Xing, Jun

    2014-10-01

    The short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are the additives frequently used in the leather production in China, but they have been put into the list of forbidden chemicals issued by European Union recently. In fact, there is not a commonly recognized method for the determination of the SCCPs in the leather products due to the serious matrix interferences from the leather products and the complex chemical structures of the SCCPs. A method of solid phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-GC-MS) was established for the determination of the SCCPs in the leather products after the optimization of the SPE conditions. It was found that the interferences from the leather products were thor- oughly separated from the analyte of the SCCPs on a home-made solid phase extraction (SPE) column filled with silica packing while eluted with a mixed solvent of n-hexane-methylene chloride (2:1, v/v). With this method, the recoveries for the SCCPs spiked in the real leather samples varied from 90.47% to 99.00% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 6.7%, and the limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.069 and 0.110 mg/kg. This method is suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of SCCPs in the leather products.

  17. Sensitive detection of black powder by stand-alone ion mobility spectrometer with chlorinated hydrocarbon modifiers in drift gas.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xixi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Weiguo; Zhou, Qinghua; Chen, Chuang; Peng, Liying; Wen, Meng; Qu, Tuanshuai; Wang, Zhenxin; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2014-04-01

    This paper introduces a simple method for selective and sensitive detection of black powder by adding chlorinated hydrocarbons in the drift gas instead of changing the structure of conventional ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). The function of chloride modifiers was to substitute Cl(-)(H₂O)n for [O₂⁻ (H₂O)(n)] in the drift region so as to avoid the overlap between O₂⁻ (H₂O)(n) and sulfur ion peaks. Among CH₂Cl₂, CHCl₃ and CCl₄, CCl₄ was chosen as the modifier due to the best peak-to-peak resolution and stability towards the fluctuation of modifier concentration. With 1.4 ppm CCl₄ as the modifier, the minimum detectable quantity of 0.1 ng for sulfur was achieved. Moreover, this method showed the ability for detection of common explosives at sub-nanogram level, such as black powder (BP), ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). In summary, this method requiring no configuration modification has high sensitivity and selectivity, and consumes trace amount of modifier. And these characteristics make it easy to be adopted in current deployed IMS to detect black powder explosives.

  18. Analysis of BTEX and chlorinated solvents in meconium by headspace-solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Monath, Marie; Beaumont, Jérôme; Morel, Isabelle; Rouget, Florence; Tack, Karine; Lestremau, Francois

    2014-07-01

    Meconium is the earliest stool of newborns, and is a complex matrix that reflects the degree of exposure of the fetus to xenobiotics. To investigate fetal exposure to volatile organic compounds, an analytical method was developed to identify and quantify BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o,m,p-xylene) and two chlorinated solvents (trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) in meconium. Headspace-solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was selected because it is simple, sensitive, can be automated, and requires no extensive sample preparation. Several extraction variables were optimized (fiber type, incubation time, temperature of fiber, and use of salt). Because meconium is a complex matrix, quantification by SPME was considered carefully because of potential interference, for example competitive adsorption. Calibration in water was compared with calibration in meconium using external and internal methods (with isotope-labeled compounds). In meconium, limits of quantification were determined to be in the range 0.064-0.096 ng g(-1) for the investigated compounds. All target compounds were determined in "real-case" meconium samples.

  19. Optimization of matrix solid phase dispersion coupled with gas chromatography electron capture detection for determination of chlorinated pesticides in soil.

    PubMed

    Salemi, Amir; Shafiei, Elham; Vosough, Maryam

    2012-11-15

    A fast, simple and efficient technique based on matrix solid phase dispersion has been presented for extraction and clean-up of some chlorinated pesticides and derivative products; α-BHC, β-BHC, γ-BHC, δ-BHC, heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan 1, endosulfan 2, 4,4'-DDT, 4,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDD, heptachlor epoxide, endrin aldehyde, endosulfan sulfate. Box-Behnken response surface methodology was employed for optimization of the extraction efficiency. As the optimized procedure, 0.5 g of dried and sieved soil samples were mixed with 2.0 g of 10% C18 in silica (w/w) as dispersant and after transferring into the extraction tube they were extracted with 8 mL of dichloromethane-n-hexane (1:1, v/v). Gas chromatography with electron capture detector was used for selective and sensitive determination of the analytes. Recoveries for the extraction of the proposed analytes were calculated and were satisfying (more than 75%), except for endrin aldehyde (59%) and endosulfan sulfate (62%). Also the method was linear over the calibration range (R(2)>0.991) and the quantitative results were reasonably reproducible and sensitive (LODs ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 ng g(-1)).

  20. Antarctic stratospheric chemistry of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and ice - Release of active chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, Mario J.; Tso, Tai-Ly; Molina, Luisa T.; Wang, Frank C.-Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reaction rate between atmospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is greatly enhanced in the presence of ice particles; HCl dissolves readily into ice, and the collisional reaction probability for ClONO2 on the surface of ice with HCl in the mole fraction range from about 0.003 to 0.010 is in the range from about 0.05 to 0.1 for temperatures near 200 K. Chlorine is released into the gas phase on a time scale of at most a few milliseconds, whereas nitric acid (HNO3), the other product, remains in the condensed phase. This reaction could play an important role in explaining the observed depletion of ozone over Antarctica; it releases photolytically active chlorine from its most abundant reservoir species, and it promotes the formation of HNO3 and thus removes nitrogen dioxide from the gas phase. Hence it establishes the necessary conditions for the efficient catalytic destruction of ozone by halogenated free radicals.

  1. Administration of nitrite after chlorine gas exposure prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality.

    PubMed

    Samal, Andrey A; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-10-01

    Cl(2) gas toxicity is complex and occurs during and after exposure, leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl(2) exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios, highlighting the need for postexposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a single dose of nitrite (1 mg/kg) to decrease ALI when administered to rats via intraperitoneal (ip) or intramuscular (im) injection 30 min after Cl(2) exposure. Exposure of rats to Cl(2) gas (400 ppm, 30 min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6-24h postexposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein and polymorphonucleocytes (PMNs) and increased airway resistance and elastance before and after methacholine challenge. Intraperitoneal nitrite decreased Cl(2)-dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMNs. In contrast im nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase-dependent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h postexposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl(2)-exposed rats. Both ip and im nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl(2) gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with im compared to ip nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine-induced resistance and elastance after Cl(2) gas exposure. Interestingly, im nitrite, but not ip nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of im and ip therapy showed a twofold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl(2) exposure-dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the im nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of BAL protein levels, indicating a distinct

  2. Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

    2002-07-01

    The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  3. Cryogenic Heat-Exchanger Design for Freeze-out Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Landfill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Seong Bum

    A cryogenic heat exchanger to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas (LFG) is proposed and designed for applications to LNG production in distributed-scale. Since the major components of LFG are methane and carbon dioxide, CO2 removal is a significant pre-process in the liquefaction systems. A new and simple approach is proposed to directly remove carbon dioxide as frost on the surface wall along the cooling passage in a liquefying heat exchanger and to install two identical heat exchangers in parallel for alternative switching. As a first step of feasibility study, combined heat and mass transfer analysis is performed on the freeze-out process of CO2 in a counterflow heat exchanger, where CH4-CO2 mixture is cooled below its frost temperature in thermal contact with cold refrigerant. Engineering correlations for the analogy of heat and mass transfer are incorporated into numerical heat exchanger analysis with detailed fluid properties. The developed analytical model is used to estimate the distribution of CO2 accumulation and the required heat exchanger size with latent thermal load for the cryogenic CO2 removal in various operating conditions.

  4. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  5. Occurrence and gas/particle partitioning of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in the atmosphere of Fildes Peninsula of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xindong; Zhang, Haijun; Zhou, Hongqiang; Na, Guangshui; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Chen; Chen, Jingwen; Chen, Jiping

    2014-06-01

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) were measured in air samples at a remote air monitoring site established in Georgia King Island, Fildes Peninsula of Antarctica (Great Wall Station, China) to study the long-range atmospheric transport of these anthropogenic pollutants to the Antarctic. Gas- and particle-phase CPs were collected using polyurethane foam plugs (PUF) and glass fiber filters (GFF) respectively during summertime of 2012. The total atmospheric levels of SCCPs and MCCPs ranged from 9.6 to 20.8 pg m-3 (average: 14.9 pg m-3) and 3.7-5.2 pg m-3 (average: 4.5 pg m-3), respectively. C10 and C11 carbon chain homologues with Cl5 and Cl6 chlorine atoms predominated in SCCP formula groups both in gas- and particle-phase. Significant linear correlation was found between gas/particle partition coefficients (KP) and sub-cooled liquid vapor pressures (pL°) (R2 = 0.437, p < 0.01), as well as KP and octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) (R2 = 0.442, p < 0.01). Absolute slope values of two regression models (0.31 and 0.39) were less than 0.6 indicating that the way of absorption into organic matter of aerosol played a more important role on atmospheric partitioning and transferring of CPs in remote Antarctic area. Both the Junge-Pankow model and the KOA-based model tended to underestimate the sorption of lower chlorinated CPs and overestimate the sorption of highly chlorinated CPs.

  6. Kinetic study of the reaction of chlorine atoms with hydroxyacetone in gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeffler, Clara; Joly, Lilian; Durry, Georges; Cousin, Julien; Dumelié, Nicolas; Bruyant, Aurélien; Roth, Estelle; Chakir, Abdelkhaleq

    2013-12-01

    function of temperature (233-298 K) were performed by Dillon et al. [7]. An experimental (laser photolysis/FIL) and theoretical approach (quantum calculation) were realized. This study showed that the oxidation of HA by OH-radicals has a negative temperature coefficient which is explained by an intermediate complex formation. Another study as a function of temperature was conducted by Butkovskaya et al. using the technique of a turbulent flow reactor coupled with a mass spectrometer chemical ionization [8]. This work was purely mechanistic and it shows that the mechanism of this reaction changes with temperature: a temperature increase favors the production yields of methanoic and ethanoic acids and reduces the formation yield of methylglyoxal [8]. Our work is motivated by the fact that the kinetic studies of the reaction of HA with chlorine radicals are rare in comparison with the kinetic studies of the reaction of HA with OH radicals. So far, only one such kinetic study is reported in the literature. It has been carried out by Orlando et al. at 294 K [6]. To the best of our knowledge, this reaction has not yet been studied as a function of temperature. Therefore, to enrich kinetic data concerning this compound, the study of HA with Cl atoms reaction as a function of temperature has been undertaken. Experiments are carried out using the relative technique in a simulation chamber coupled with an infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) spectrometer and a quantum cascade laser in external cavity (ECQCL) at 1 bar with the temperature ranging 277-350 K. Using both FTIR and ECQCL techniques allows comparing the measurements sensitivity and improving the kinetic precision determination. The FTIR spectroscopy is widely used to perform kinetic measurements whereas the ECQCL spectrometer is quite original in kinetic studies. Laser spectrometry indeed presents advantages such as high sensitivity, high resolution, and fast acquisition time compared to the FTIR spectrometer. The ECQCL

  7. Decarb/Desal: Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas with Simultaneous Fresh Water Production

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, R; Bourcier, W

    2009-10-21

    If fossil fuels continue to be a major part of the world's energy supply, effective means must be developed to deal with the carbon emissions. Geologic sequestration of supercritical CO{sub 2} is expected to play a major role in mitigating this problem. Separating carbon dioxide from other gases is the most costly aspect of schemes for geologic sequestration. That cost is driven by the complexity and energy intensity of current chemical-stripping methods for separating carbon dioxide. Our experience in water treatment technology indicated that an entirely new approach could be developed, taking advantage of water's propensity to separate gases that ionize in water (like CO{sub 2}) from those that do not (like N{sub 2}). Even though water-based systems might not have the extreme selectivity of chemicals like substituted amines used in industrial systems today, they have the potential to tolerate NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates while also producing clean drinking water as a valuable byproduct. Lower capital cost, broader range of applicability, environmental friendliness, and revenue from a second product stream give this approach the potential to significantly expand the worldwide application of carbon separation for geologic sequestration. Here we report results for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas by two methods that simultaneously separate carbon dioxide and fresh water: ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water, and thermal distillation. The ion pumping method dramatically increases dissolved carbonate ion in solution and hence the overlying vapor pressure of CO{sub 2} gas, allowing its removal as a pure gas. We have used two common water treatment methods to drive the ion pumping approach, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis to produce pure CO{sub 2}. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas, because the slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is

  8. LPG ammonia and nitrogen dioxide gas sensing properties of nanostructured polypyrrole thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagul, Sagar B.; Upadhye, Deepak S.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured Polypyrrole thin film was synthesized by easy and economic chemical oxidative polymerization technique on glass at room temperature. The prepared thin film of Polypyrrole was characterized by optical absorbance study by UV-visible spectroscopy and electrical study by I-V measurement system. The optical absorbance spectrum of Polypyrrole shows two fundamental peaks in region of 420 and 890 nm, which confirms the formation of Polypyrrole on glass substrate. The I-V graph of nanostructured Polypyrrole represents the Ohmic nature. Furthermore, the thin film of Polypyrrole was investigated by Scanning electron microscopy for surface morphology study. The SEM micrograph represents spherical nanostructured morphology of Polypyrrole on glass substrate. In order to investigate gas sensing properties, 100 ppm of LPG, Ammonia and Nitrogen Dioxide were injected in the gas chamber and magnitude of resistance has been recorded as a function of time in second. It was observed that nanostructured Polypyrrole thin film shows good sensing behavior at room temperature.

  9. Molecular gas sensing below parts per trillion: radiocarbon-dioxide optical detection.

    PubMed

    Galli, I; Bartalini, S; Borri, S; Cancio, P; Mazzotti, D; De Natale, P; Giusfredi, G

    2011-12-30

    Radiocarbon ((14)C) concentrations at a 43 parts-per-quadrillion level are measured by using saturated-absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy by exciting radiocarbon-dioxide ((14)C(16)O(2)) molecules at the 4.5 μm wavelength. The ultimate sensitivity limits of molecular trace gas sensing are pushed down to attobar pressures using a comb-assisted absorption spectroscopy setup. Such a result represents the lowest pressure ever detected for a gas of simple molecules. The unique sensitivity, the wide dynamic range, the compactness, and the relatively low cost of this table-top setup open new perspectives for ^{14}C-tracing applications, such as radiocarbon dating, biomedicine, or environmental and earth sciences. The detection of other very rare molecules can be pursued as well thanks to the wide and continuous mid-IR spectral coverage of the described setup.

  10. Gas-phase removal of biofilms from various surfaces using carbon dioxide aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minju; Hong, Seongkyeol; Kang, Min-Yeong; Lee, Jin-Won; Jang, Jaesung

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the removal of Escherichia coli XL1-blue biofilms using periodic jets of carbon dioxide aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO(2)) with nitrogen gas. The aerosols were generated by the adiabatic expansion of high-pressure CO(2) gas through a nozzle and used to remove air-dried biofilms. The areas of the biofilms were measured from scanning electron micrographs before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured with various air-drying times of the biofilms before the treatment, surface materials, and durations of CO(2) aerosols in each 8-s aerosol-nitrogen cleaning cycle. Nearly 100% of the fresh biofilms were removed from the various surfaces very reliably within 90 s. This technique can be useful for removing unsaturated biofilms on solid surfaces and has potential applications for cleaning bio-contaminated surfaces.

  11. Implications of treating water containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with chlorine: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric study.

    PubMed Central

    Oyler, A R; Liukkonen, R J; Lukasewycz, M K; Cox, D A; Peake, D A; Carlson, R M

    1982-01-01

    The products of aqueous chlorination reactions of 1-methylnaphthalene, fluorene, dibenzofuran, anthracene, phenanthrene, 1-methylphenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene have been determined. The conditions employed for these reactions approximated those that might be encountered in water treatment facilities. Reactions at pH greater than 6 tended to produce oxygenated products (epoxides, phenols, quinones, etc.), and reactions at pH less than 6 tended to produce both oxygenated (quinones) and chlorinated products. PMID:7151769

  12. Design of a semiclosed-cycle gas turbine with carbon dioxide-argon as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Ulizar, I.; Pilidis, P.

    1998-04-01

    The main performance features of a semiclosed-cycle gas turbine with carbon dioxide-argon working fluid are described here. This machine is designed to employ coal synthetic gas fuel and to produce no emissions. The present paper outlines three tasks carried out. First, the selection of main engine variables, mainly pressure and temperature ratios. Then a sizing exercise is carried out where many details of its physical appearance are outlined. Finally the off-design performance of the engine is predicted. This two-spool gas turbine is purpose built for the working fluid, so its physical characteristics reflect this requirement. The cycle is designed with a turbine entry temperature of 1650 K and the optimum pressure ratio is found to be around 60. Two major alternatives are examined, the simple and the precooled cycle. A large amount of nitrogen is produced by the air separation plant associated with this gas turbine and the coal gasifier. An investigation has been made on how to use this nitrogen to improve the performance of the engine by precooling the compressor, cooling the turbine nozzle guide vanes, and using it to cool the delivery of the low-pressure compressor. The efficiencies of the whole plant have been computed, taking into account the energy requirements of the gasifier and the need to dispose of the excess carbon dioxide. Hence the overall efficiencies indicated here are of the order of 40%. This is a low efficiency by current standards, but the fuel employed is coal and no emissions are produced.

  13. Hydrodesulfurization of chlorinized coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of desulfurization is described in which high sulfur coals are desulfurized by low temperature chlorinolysis of coal in liquid media, preferably water, followed by hydrodesulfurization at a temperature above 500 C. The coals are desulfurized to an extent of up to 90% by weight and simultaneously dechlorinated to a chlorine content below 0.1% by weight. The product coals have lower volatiles loss, lower oxygen and nitrogen content and higher fixed carbon than raw coals treated with hydrogen under the same conditions. Heating the chlorinated coal to a temperature above 500 C. in inert gas such as nitrogen results in significantly less desulfurization.

  14. Gas chromatographic method for measuring nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacetyl nitrate in air without compressed gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhardt, M.R.; Maniga, N.I.; Stedman, D.H.; Paur, R.J.

    1988-04-15

    A gas chromatographic technique that measures atmospheric concentrations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and NO/sub 2/ has been developed that uses luminol-based chemiluminescence for detection. The carrier gas is air that has been scrubbed by passing it over FeSO/sub 4/, which eliminates the need for any compressed gas cylinders. A novel gas sampling system and time enable variable sample volumes of contaminated air to be injected. Ambient PAN and NO/sub 2/ measurements can be made every 40 s with detection limits of 0.12 ppb for PAN and 0.2 ppb for NO/sub 2/. Seven other atmospheric species, including ozone, gave no interference. Linear response was observed for NO/sub 2/ from 0.2 to 170 ppb and for PAN from 1 to 70 ppb.

  15. The evaluation of the pyrochemistry for the treatment of Gen IV nuclear fuels Inert matrix chlorination studies in the gas phase or molten chloride salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, S.; Péron, F.; Lacquement, J.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fuels for the future Gen IV nuclear reactors will be totally different from those of PWR, especially for the GFR concept including a closed cycle. In these reactors, fissile materials (carbides or nitrides of actinides) should be surrounded by an inert matrix. In order to build a reprocessing process scheme, the behavior of the potential inert matrices (silicon carbide, titanium nitride, and zirconium carbide and nitride) was studied by hydro- and pyrometallurgy. This paper deals with the chlorination results at high temperature by pyrometallurgy. For the first time, the reactivity of the matrix towards chlorine gas was assessed in the gas phase. TiN, ZrN and ZrC are very reactive from 400 °C whereas it is necessary to be over 900 °C for SiC to be as fast. In molten chloride melts, the bubbling of chlorine gas is less efficient than in gas phase but it is possible to attack the matrices. Electrochemical methods were also used to dissolve the refractory materials, leading to promising results with TiN, ZrN and ZrC. The massive SiC samples used were not conductive enough to be studied and in this case specific SiC-coated carbon electrodes were used. The key point of these studies was to find a method to separate the matrix compounds from the fissile material in order to link the head to the core of the process (electrochemical separation or liquid-liquid reductive extraction in the case of a pyrochemical reprocessing).

  16. Response to 'Comment on 'Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning'' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 014701 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Kim, Chul H.

    2010-01-15

    A high-voltage cathode initiates an electron emission, resulting in a reduction in the carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust gas from the burning of hydrocarbon fuel. Assuming that the observed carbon dioxide reduction is originated from the molecular decomposition, the energy needed for the endothermic reaction of this carbon dioxide reduction may stem primarily from the internal energy reduction in the exhaust gas in accordance of the first law of the thermodynamics. An oxygen increase due to the reduction in carbon dioxide in a discharge gas was observed in real time.

  17. Comparison of water-based foam and carbon dioxide gas emergency depopulation methods of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Rankin, M K; Alphin, R L; Benson, E R; Johnson, A L; Hougentogler, D P; Mohankumar, P

    2013-12-01

    Recommended response strategies for outbreaks of avian influenza and other highly contagious poultry diseases include surveillance, quarantine, depopulation, disposal, and decontamination. The best methods of emergency mass depopulation should maximize human health and safety while minimizing disease spread and animal welfare concerns. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 mass depopulation methods on adult tom turkeys. The methods tested were carbon dioxide gassing and water-based foam. The time to unconsciousness, motion cessation, brain death, and altered terminal cardiac activity were recorded for each bird through the use of an electroencephalogram, accelerometer, and electrocardiogram. Critical times for physiological events were extracted from sensor data and compiled in a spreadsheet for statistical analysis. A statistically significant difference was observed in time to brain death, with water-based foam resulting in faster brain death (µ = 190 s) than CO2 gas (µ = 242 s). Though not statistically significant, differences were found comparing the time to unconsciousness (foam: µ = 64 s; CO2 gas: µ = 90 s), motion cessation (foam: µ = 182 s; CO2 gas: µ = 153 s), and altered terminal cardiac activity (foam: µ = 208 s; CO2 gas µ = 242 s) between foam and CO2 depopulation treatments. The results of this study demonstrate that water-based foam can be used to effectively depopulate market size male turkeys.

  18. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  19. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Farrar, C.D.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Hausback, B.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source (??13C = -4.5 to -5???, 3He/4He = 4.5 to 6.7 RA) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO2 discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m-2 d-1 at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO2 discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO2 flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30-50 t/d of CO2 are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO2 and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N2/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values

  20. Chlorination. Training Module 2.300.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with chlorine, the reasons for chlorination and safe operation and maintenance of gas chlorine, dry calcium hypochlorite and liquid sodium hypochlorite chlorination systems for water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. Included are…

  1. Identification of halogenated photoproducts generated after ultraviolet-irradiation of parabens and benzoates in water containing chlorine by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rivera, Gerardo; Llompart, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Lores, Marta

    2014-07-01

    This work presents a new solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-based approach to investigate the formation of halogenated by-products generated by the UV-induced photodegradation of parabens and their congener benzoates in water containing chlorine. Degradation of parent species, and further identification of their transformation by-products were monitored by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In order to improve detectability, SPME was applied as a preconcentration step after UV-irradiation of target preservatives. Experiments performed with dechlorinated water, ultrapure water, and tap water showed that under UV-light, the presence of even low levels of free chlorine, increases the photodegradation rate of target preservatives, enhancing the formation of halogenated photoproducts. Monobrominated, dibrominated and bromochlorinated hydroxybenzoates were identified, and the transformation of benzoates into halogenated parabens was also confirmed. Bromination is expected to occur when free chlorine is present, due to the presence of traces of bromide in water samples. Five halogenated phenols (mainly brominated) were detected as breakdown photoproducts from both families of target preservatives. On the basis of the appearance of the aforementioned by-products, a tentative transformation pathway, consistent with the photoformation-photodecay kinetics of the by-products, is proposed herein for the first time.

  2. Is chlorination one of the major pathways in the formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in municipal solid waste combustion?

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae-Yong; Kim, Do-Hyong; Jang, Seong-Ho

    2013-03-01

    The chlorination patterns of unsubstituted naphthalene were studied using a laminar flow reactor with a 1 cm particle bed of 0.5% (mass) copper(II) chloride (CuCl2) mixed with silicon dioxide (SiO2), operated over a temperature range of 100 to 400 °C and at gas velocities of 2.7 and 0.32 cm/s. The polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) yield increased until a temperature reached at 250 °C, where a peak yield of 3.07% (percent of naphthalene input, carbon basis) was observed. All PCN homologue groups, mono- through octa-chlorinated naphthalenes, were observed. To test the hypothesis that PCNs in combustion processes are formed via chlorination pathways, the PCN homologue and isomer patterns from the experiments were compared with those observed in municipal solid waste combustion (MSW) incinerators. PCN congeners with 1,4-substituents dominated formation in the naphthalene chlorination experiments, whereas 2,3-substituents were major congeners in both MSW combustion flue gas and fly ash samples. These results suggest that contrary to the hypothesis, chlorination is not a primary PCN formation route in either the flue gas or fly ash from MSW combustion. Even so, naphthalene chlorination pathways presented in this paper provide an improved means for evaluating PCN formation mechanisms in combustion processes.

  3. Aircraft measurements of nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacyl nitrates using luminol chemiluminescence with fast capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Drayton, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    Peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) are important trace gas species associated with photochemical air pollution. The PANs are in thermal equilibrium with the peroxyacetyl radical and NO{sub 2}. Because PANs are trapped peroxy radicals, they are an important indicator species of the photochemical age of an air parcel, as well as being a means of long-range transporting of NO{sub 2}, leading to the formation of regional ozone and other oxidants. Typically, PANs are measured by using a gas chromatograph with electron-capture detection (ECD). Once automated, this method has been shown to be reliable and quite sensitive, allowing the levels of PANs to be measured at low parts per trillion in the troposphere. Unfortunately, a number of other atmospheric gases also have strong ECD signals or act as inferences and limit the speed in which the analysis can be completed. Currently, the shortest analysis time for PAN is approx. 5 minutes with ECD. The authors recent examined the luminol detection of NO{sub 2} and PANs using gas capillary chromatography for rapid monitoring of these important trace gases. Analysis of the PANs (PAN, PPN, and PBN) and NO{sub 2} in one minute has been demonstrated in laboratory studies by using this approach. Reported here are modifications of this instrument for aircraft operation and preliminary results from test flights taken near Pasco, Washington in August of 1997.

  4. Undoped and doped poly(tetraphenylbenzidine) as sensitive material for an impedimetric nitrogen dioxide gas dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, I.; Moos, R.; Neumann, K.; Thelakkat, M.

    2014-09-29

    This article presents a nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) detecting gas dosimeter based on poly(tetraphenylbenzidine) poly(TPD) as nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) sensitive layer. Gas dosimeters are suitable devices to determine reliably low levels of analytes over a long period of time. During NO{sub x} exposure, the analyte molecules are accumulated irreversibly in the sensing layer of the dosimeter enhancing the conductivity of the hole conducting poly(TPD), which can be measured by impedance spectroscopy. Due to their possibility for low cost production by simple printing techniques and very good physical, photochemical, and electrochemical properties, poly(TPD)s are suitable for application in gas dosimeters operated at room temperature. We studied the effect of doping with a Co(III)-complex in combination with a conducting salt on the dosimeter behavior. Compared to the undoped material, a strong influence of the doping can be observed: the conductivity of the sensing material increases significantly, the noise of the signal decreases and an unwanted recovery of the sensor signal can be prevented, leading to a NO{sub x} detection limit <10 ppm.

  5. Undoped and doped poly(tetraphenylbenzidine) as sensitive material for an impedimetric nitrogen dioxide gas dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marr, I.; Neumann, K.; Thelakkat, M.; Moos, R.

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a nitrogen dioxide (NO2) detecting gas dosimeter based on poly(tetraphenylbenzidine) poly(TPD) as nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitive layer. Gas dosimeters are suitable devices to determine reliably low levels of analytes over a long period of time. During NOx exposure, the analyte molecules are accumulated irreversibly in the sensing layer of the dosimeter enhancing the conductivity of the hole conducting poly(TPD), which can be measured by impedance spectroscopy. Due to their possibility for low cost production by simple printing techniques and very good physical, photochemical, and electrochemical properties, poly(TPD)s are suitable for application in gas dosimeters operated at room temperature. We studied the effect of doping with a Co(III)-complex in combination with a conducting salt on the dosimeter behavior. Compared to the undoped material, a strong influence of the doping can be observed: the conductivity of the sensing material increases significantly, the noise of the signal decreases and an unwanted recovery of the sensor signal can be prevented, leading to a NOx detection limit <10 ppm.

  6. TRACKING THE EMISSION OF CARBON DIOXIDE BY NATION, SECTOR, AND FUEL TYPE: A TRACE GAS ACCOUNTING SYSTEM (TGAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a new way to estimate an efficient econometric model of global emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) by nation, sector, and fuel type. Equations for fuel intensity are estimated for coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, and heat for six sectors: agricultural, indus...

  7. Efficient utilization of greenhouse gas in a gas-to-liquids process combined with carbon dioxide reforming of methane.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyoung-Su; Bae, Jong Wook; Woo, Kwang-Jae; Jun, Ki-Won

    2010-02-15

    A process model for a gas-to-liquids (GTL) process mainly producing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic oils has been developed to assess the effects of reforming methods, recycle ratio of unreacted syngas mixture on the process efficiency and the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The reforming unit of our study is composed of both steam reforming of methane (SRM) and carbon dioxide reforming of methane (CDR) to form syngas, which gives composition flexibility, reduction in GHG emission, and higher cost-competitiveness. With recycling, it is found that zero emission of CO(2) from the process can be realized and the required amount of natural gas (NG) can be significantly reduced. This GTL process model has been built by using Aspen Plus software, and it is mainly composed of a feeding unit, a reforming unit, an FT synthesis unit, several separation units and a recycling unit. The composition flexibility of the syngas mixture due to the two different types of reforming reactions raises an issue that in order to attain the optimized feed composition of FT synthesis the amount of flow rate of each component in the fresh feed mixture should be determined considering the effects of the recycle and its split ratio. In the FT synthesis unit, the 15 representative reactions for the chain growth and water gas shift on the cobalt-based catalyst are considered. After FT synthesis, the unreacted syngas mixture is recycled to the reforming unit or the FT synthesis unit or both to enhance process efficiency. The effect of the split ratio, the recycle flow rate to the FT reactor over the recycle flow rate to the reforming unit, on the efficiency of the process was also investigated. This work shows that greater recycle to the reforming unit is less effective than that to the FT synthesis unit from the standpoint of the net heat efficiency of the process, since the reforming reactions are greatly endothermic and greater recycle to the reformer requires more energy.

  8. Transformation of iopamidol during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Wendel, Friedrich M; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Machek, Edward J; Duirk, Stephen E; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-11-01

    The transformation of the iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol, and diatrizoate was examined in purified water over the pH range from 6.5 to 8.5 in the presence of sodium hypochlorite, monochloramine, and chlorine dioxide. In the presence of aqueous chlorine, only iopamidol was transformed. All other ICM did not show significant reactivity, regardless of the oxidant used. Chlorination of iopamidol followed a second order reaction, with an observed rate constant of up to 0.87 M(-1) s(-1) (±0.021 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8.5. The hypochlorite anion was identified to be the reactive chlorine species. Iodine was released during the transformation of iopamidol, and was mainly oxidized to iodate. Only a small percentage (less than 2% after 24 h) was transformed to known organic iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of low molecular weight. Some of the iodine was still present in high-molecular weight DBPs. The chemical structures of these DBPs were elucidated via MSn fragmentation and NMR. Side chain cleavage was observed as well as the exchange of iodine by chlorine. An overall transformation pathway was proposed for the degradation of iopamidol. CHO cell chronic cytotoxicity tests indicate that chlorination of iopamidol generates a toxic mixture of high molecular weight DBPs (LC50 332 ng/μL).

  9. The natural chlorine cycle - Formation of the carcinogenic and greenhouse gas compound chloroform in drinking water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Forczek, Sándor T; Pavlík, Milan; Holík, Josef; Rederer, Luděk; Ferenčík, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine cycle in natural ecosystems involves formation of low and high molecular weight organic compounds of living organisms, soil organic matter and atmospherically deposited chloride. Chloroform (CHCl3) and adsorbable organohalogens (AOX) are part of the chlorine cycle. We attempted to characterize the dynamical changes in the levels of total organic carbon (TOC), AOX, chlorine and CHCl3 in a drinking water reservoir and in its tributaries, mainly at its spring, and attempt to relate the presence of AOX and CHCl3 with meteorological, chemical or biological factors. Water temperature and pH influence the formation and accumulation of CHCl3 and affect the conditions for biological processes, which are demonstrated by the correlation between CHCl3 and ΣAOX/Cl(-) ratio, and also by CHCl3/ΣAOX, CHCl3/AOXLMW, CHCl3/ΣTOC, CHCl3/TOCLMW and CHCl3/Cl(-) ratios in different microecosystems (e.g. old spruce forest, stagnant acidic water, humid and warm conditions with high biological activity). These processes start with the biotransformation of AOX from TOC, continue via degradation of AOX to smaller molecules and further chlorination, and finish with the formation of small chlorinated molecules, and their subsequent volatilization and mineralization. The determined concentrations of chloroform result from a dynamic equilibrium between its formation and degradation in the water; in the Hamry water reservoir, this results in a total amount of 0.1-0.7 kg chloroform and 5.2-15.4 t chloride. The formation of chloroform is affected by Cl(-) concentration, by concentrations and ratios of biogenic substrates (TOC and AOX), and by the ratios of the substrates and the product (feedback control by chloroform itself).

  10. The natural chlorine cycle - Formation of the carcinogenic and greenhouse gas compound chloroform in drinking water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Forczek, Sándor T; Pavlík, Milan; Holík, Josef; Rederer, Luděk; Ferenčík, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Chlorine cycle in natural ecosystems involves formation of low and high molecular weight organic compounds of living organisms, soil organic matter and atmospherically deposited chloride. Chloroform (CHCl3) and adsorbable organohalogens (AOX) are part of the chlorine cycle. We attempted to characterize the dynamical changes in the levels of total organic carbon (TOC), AOX, chlorine and CHCl3 in a drinking water reservoir and in its tributaries, mainly at its spring, and attempt to relate the presence of AOX and CHCl3 with meteorological, chemical or biological factors. Water temperature and pH influence the formation and accumulation of CHCl3 and affect the conditions for biological processes, which are demonstrated by the correlation between CHCl3 and ΣAOX/Cl(-) ratio, and also by CHCl3/ΣAOX, CHCl3/AOXLMW, CHCl3/ΣTOC, CHCl3/TOCLMW and CHCl3/Cl(-) ratios in different microecosystems (e.g. old spruce forest, stagnant acidic water, humid and warm conditions with high biological activity). These processes start with the biotransformation of AOX from TOC, continue via degradation of AOX to smaller molecules and further chlorination, and finish with the formation of small chlorinated molecules, and their subsequent volatilization and mineralization. The determined concentrations of chloroform result from a dynamic equilibrium between its formation and degradation in the water; in the Hamry water reservoir, this results in a total amount of 0.1-0.7 kg chloroform and 5.2-15.4 t chloride. The formation of chloroform is affected by Cl(-) concentration, by concentrations and ratios of biogenic substrates (TOC and AOX), and by the ratios of the substrates and the product (feedback control by chloroform itself). PMID:27231877

  11. Method for combined removal of mercury and nitrogen oxides from off-gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Livengood, C. David

    2006-10-10

    A method for removing elemental Hg and nitric oxide simultaneously from a gas stream is provided whereby the gas stream is reacted with gaseous chlorinated compound to convert the elemental mercury to soluble mercury compounds and the nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxide. The method works to remove either mercury or nitrogen oxide in the absence or presence of each other.

  12. Method and apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H.J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for converting hydrocarbon fuel or an alcohol into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide. The apparatus includes a first vessel having a partial oxidation reaction zone and a separate steam reforming reaction zone that is distinct from the partial oxidation reaction zone. The first vessel has a first vessel inlet at the partial oxidation reaction zone and a first vessel outlet at the steam reforming zone. The reformer also includes a helical tube extending about the first vessel. The helical tube has a first end connected to an oxygen-containing source and a second end connected to the first vessel at the partial oxidation reaction zone. Oxygen gas from an oxygen-containing source can be directed through the helical tube to the first vessel. A second vessel having a second vessel inlet and second vessel outlet is annularly disposed about the first vessel. The helical tube is disposed between the first vessel and the second vessel and gases from the first vessel can be directed through second vessel.

  13. Quantifying the impact of nitric oxide calibration gas mixture oxidation on reported nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Bryan P.; Quincey, Paul G.; Green, David; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    Chemiluminescent analysers for measuring nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in ambient air are generally calibrated with certified gas standard cylinders of NO in nitrogen. Verification of the NOx and NO amount fractions has been carried out on many such 'on-site' calibration cylinders at air quality monitoring stations. These measurements indicate that significant numbers of these gas mixtures have become somewhat degraded, with several percent of the NO oxidised to NO2. The effect of not compensating for this degradation on reported concentrations is discussed. If such degradation is not quantified and corrected for, there will be a systematic under-reporting of NO2 concentrations, which, due to the non-linearity of the effect, could reduce high reported NO2 concentrations at kerbside sites by around 20%. This could significantly reduce the number of reported exceedances of the NO2 limit value at such sites, compared to results obtained where there is no degradation of the NO cylinder.

  14. Removal of Sulfur Dioxide from Flue Gas Using the Sludge Sodium Humate

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the ability of sodium humate from alkaline treatment sludge on removing sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the simulated flue gas. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of various operating parameters, like the inlet SO2 concentration or temperature or O2, on the SO2 absorption efficiency and desulfurization time in a lab-scale bubbling reactor. The sludge sodium humate in the supernatant after alkaline sludge treatment shows great performance in SO2 absorption, and such efficiency can be maintained above 98% with 100 mL of this absorption solution at 298 K (flue gas rate of 0.12 m3/h). The highest SO2 absorption by 1.63 g SHA-Na is 0.946 mmol in the process, which is translated to 0.037 g SO2 g−1 SHA-Na. The experimental results indicate that the inlet SO2 concentration slightly influences the SO2 absorption efficiency and significantly influences the desulfurization time. The pH of the absorption solution should be above 3.5 in this process in order to make an effective desulfurization. The products of this process were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It can be seen that the desulfurization products mainly contain sludge humic acid sediment, which can be used as fertilizer components. PMID:24453875

  15. Chlorine and hydrogen cyanide gas interactions with human skin: in vitro studies to inform skin permeation and decontamination in HAZMAT incidents.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Pisaniello, Dino; Edwards, John W; Bromwich, David; Reed, Sue; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2013-11-15

    Accidental or intentional toxic gas releases may result in significant public health and psychological consequences. Management of exposed individuals during HAZMAT incidents should be risk-based and supported by a suitable scientific evidence base. There appear to be large evidence gaps in relation to dermal absorption of gases, as well as management advice for potentially exposed individuals. Chlorine and hydrogen cyanide are two common HAZMAT gases and this paper addresses the need for experimental data tailored to HAZMAT scenarios and first responders. In addition to time variations of gas concentration, the modifying effects of clothing, temperature, and oil-based sunscreen on epidermal absorption and penetration are assessed. Results for chlorine show little penetration up to 500 ppm but with small enhancing effects due to heavy cotton and oil-based sunscreen. Hydrogen cyanide up to 800 ppm shows minor penetration consistent with previous studies, with little variability in the presence of sunscreen and clothing. Practical guidelines to support the decision-making of emergency responders with regard to personal decontamination have been derived.

  16. Chlorine and hydrogen cyanide gas interactions with human skin: in vitro studies to inform skin permeation and decontamination in HAZMAT incidents.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Pisaniello, Dino; Edwards, John W; Bromwich, David; Reed, Sue; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2013-11-15

    Accidental or intentional toxic gas releases may result in significant public health and psychological consequences. Management of exposed individuals during HAZMAT incidents should be risk-based and supported by a suitable scientific evidence base. There appear to be large evidence gaps in relation to dermal absorption of gases, as well as management advice for potentially exposed individuals. Chlorine and hydrogen cyanide are two common HAZMAT gases and this paper addresses the need for experimental data tailored to HAZMAT scenarios and first responders. In addition to time variations of gas concentration, the modifying effects of clothing, temperature, and oil-based sunscreen on epidermal absorption and penetration are assessed. Results for chlorine show little penetration up to 500 ppm but with small enhancing effects due to heavy cotton and oil-based sunscreen. Hydrogen cyanide up to 800 ppm shows minor penetration consistent with previous studies, with little variability in the presence of sunscreen and clothing. Practical guidelines to support the decision-making of emergency responders with regard to personal decontamination have been derived. PMID:24140525

  17. Chlorine cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 77 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  18. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. Kennedy, B.M. Farrar, C.D. Hainsworth, L.J. Hausback, B.

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with

  19. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chlorinated pesticides in aquatic tissue by capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leiker, Thomas J.; Madsen, J.E.; Deacon, J.R.; Foreman, W.T.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the determination of chlorinated organic compounds in aquatic tissue by dual capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection is described. Whole-body-fish or corbicula tissue is homogenized, Soxhlet extracted, lipid removed by gel permeation chromatography, and fractionated using alumina/silica adsorption chromatography. The extracts are analyzed by dissimilar capillary-column gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. The method reporting limits are 5 micrograms per kilogram (μg/kg) for chlorinated compounds, 50 μg/kg for polychlorinated biphenyls, and 200 μg/kg for toxaphene.

  20. Chlorination of lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Gaviría, Juan P; Navarro, Lucas G; Bohé, Ana E

    2012-03-01

    The reactive system La(2)O(3)(s)-Cl(2)(g) was studied in the temperature range 260-950 °C. The reaction course was followed by thermogravimetry, and the solids involved were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the reaction leads to the formation of solid LaOCl, and for temperatures above 850 °C, the lanthanum oxychloride is chlorinated, producing LaCl(3)(l). The formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism, and the kinetic analysis showed that at temperatures below 325 °C the system is under chemical control. The influence of diffusive processes on the kinetics of production of LaOCl was evaluated by studying the effect of the reactive gas flow rate, the mass of the sample, and the chlorine diffusion through the boundary layer surrounding the solid sample. The conversion curves were analyzed and fitted according to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami description, and the reaction order with respect to the chlorine partial pressure was obtained by varying this partial pressure between 10 and 70 kPa. The rate equation was obtained, which includes the influence of the temperature, chlorine partial pressure, and reaction degree.

  1. Chlorination of lanthanum oxide.

    PubMed

    Gaviría, Juan P; Navarro, Lucas G; Bohé, Ana E

    2012-03-01

    The reactive system La(2)O(3)(s)-Cl(2)(g) was studied in the temperature range 260-950 °C. The reaction course was followed by thermogravimetry, and the solids involved were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the reaction leads to the formation of solid LaOCl, and for temperatures above 850 °C, the lanthanum oxychloride is chlorinated, producing LaCl(3)(l). The formation of the oxychloride progresses through a nucleation and growth mechanism, and the kinetic analysis showed that at temperatures below 325 °C the system is under chemical control. The influence of diffusive processes on the kinetics of production of LaOCl was evaluated by studying the effect of the reactive gas flow rate, the mass of the sample, and the chlorine diffusion through the boundary layer surrounding the solid sample. The conversion curves were analyzed and fitted according to the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami description, and the reaction order with respect to the chlorine partial pressure was obtained by varying this partial pressure between 10 and 70 kPa. The rate equation was obtained, which includes the influence of the temperature, chlorine partial pressure, and reaction degree. PMID:22280490

  2. Simultaneous determination of chlorinated ethenes and ethene in groundwater using headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ziv-El, Michal; Kalinowski, Tomasz; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-02-01

    Widespread contamination of groundwater by chlorinated ethenes and their biological dechlorination products necessitates the reliable monitoring of liquid matrices; current methods approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) require a minimum of 5 mL of sample volume and cannot simultaneously detect all transformative products. This paper reports on the simultaneous detection of six chlorinated ethenes and ethene itself, using a liquid sample volume of 1 mL by concentrating the compounds onto an 85-µm carboxen-polydimenthylsiloxane solid-phase microextraction fiber in 5 min and subsequent chromatographic analysis in 9.15 min. Linear increases in signal response were obtained over three orders of magnitude (∼0.05 to ∼50 µM) for simultaneous analysis with coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of ≥ 0.99. The detection limits of the method (1.3-6 µg/L) were at or below the maximum contaminant levels specified by the EPA. Matrix spike studies with groundwater and mineral medium showed recovery rates between 79-108%. The utility of the method was demonstrated in lab-scale sediment flow-through columns assessing the bioremediation potential of chlorinated ethene-contaminated groundwater. Owing to its low sample volume requirements, good sensitivity and broad target analyte range, the method is suitable for routine compliance monitoring and is particularly attractive for interpreting the bench-scale feasibility studies that are commonly performed during the remedial design stage of groundwater cleanup projects.

  3. Stability and effectiveness of chlorine disinfectants in water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, V.P.; Snead, M.C.; Kruse, C.W.; Kawata, K.

    1986-11-01

    A test system for water distribution was used to evaluate the stability and effectiveness of three residual disinfectants - free chlorine, combined chlorine, and chlorine dioxide - when challenged with a sewage contaminant. The test distribution system consisted of the street main and internal plumbing for two barracks at Fort George G. Meade, MD. To the existing pipe network, 152 m (500 ft) of 13-mm (0.5 in.) copper pipe were added for sampling, and 60 m (200 ft) of 2.54-cm (1.0 in.) plastic pipe were added for circulation. The levels of residual disinfectants tested were 0.2 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as available chlorine. In the absence of a disinfectant residual, microorganisms in the sewage contaminant were consistently recovered at high levels. The presence of any disinfectant residual reduced the microorganism level and frequency of occurrence at the consumer's tap. Free chlorine was the most effective residual disinfectant and may serve as a marker or flag in the distribution network. Free chlorine and chlorine dioxide were the least stable in the pipe network. The loss of disinfectant in the pipe network followed first-order kinetics. The half-life determined in static tests for free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and combined chlorine was 140, 93, and 1680 min.

  4. Determination of chlorinated insecticides in bottom sediment using an electron-capture gas chromatography screening method, Austin, Texas, 1991 and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, Robert D.; Murtagh, Lucinda K.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-two bottom-sediment samples were collected from Town Lake in Austin, Texas, in 1991 and 1992 and analyzed for chlorinated insecticides by a reconnaissance-quality, electron-capture gas chromatography screening method developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Four different chlorinated insecticides (aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, and p,p'-DDT) and two degradation products of p,p'-DDT (p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE) were detected in these samples. The most significant insecticides detected were chlordane, which was detected in 20 of the 22 samples at concentrations that ranged from 26 to 140 micrograms per kilogram, and p,p'-DDT, which was detected in all 22 samples at concen- trations that ranged from 5 to 40 micrograms per kilogram. Degradation products of p,p'-DDT were detected in all 22 samples. Concentrations of p,p'-DDD ranged from not detected to 117 micrograms per kilogram and for p,p'-DDE from 9 to 97 micrograms per kilogram. Of the 22 samples collected, 15 also were analyzed by the standard USGS laboratory analytical method for chlorinated insecticides to determine the comparability of the two methods. Correlation coefficients were calculated for chlordane (0.8662), p,p'-DDT (0.6393), p,p'-DDD (0.9401), p,p'-DDE (0.8595), and dieldrin (0.3819). A paired sign test at the 95 percent confidence level showed no significant difference between the screening method and laboratory analytical method for all detected insecticides except aldrin. P-values were calculated from the data for chlordane (l.0000), p,p'-DDT (0.1796), p,p'-DDD (l,0000), p,p'-DDE (0.1796), and dieldrin (0.2891).

  5. Observations of interstellar chlorine and phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Copernicus observations of interstellar Cl I, Cl II, and P II UV lines toward 10 stars are reported. Column densities are estimated for each species, and upper limits are computed for HCl column densities. Derivation of the gas-phase abundances of chlorine and phosphorus indicates that the averages of both the chlorine and the phosphorus logarithmic abundances relative to hydrogen are between 5.0 and 5.1. It is suggested that interstellar chlorine may be depleted by about a factor of 3 relative to the solar abundance and that interstellar phosphorus is depleted by a factor of 2 to 3. The results are shown to support the prediction that chlorine is ionized in regions containing primarily atomic oxygen and is neutral in regions where there is a significant amount of molecular hydrogen. The photoionization rate of neutral chlorine toward 15 Mon is estimated, and it is concluded that most chlorine is contained within the gas phase.

  6. Formation of trichloromethane in chlorinated water and fresh-cut produce and as a result of reacting with citric acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) is commonly used by the fresh produce industry to sanitize wash water, fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. However, possible formation of harmful chlorine by-products is a concern. The objectives of this study were to compare chlorine and chlorine dioxide in t...

  7. Real-time measurement of nitrogen dioxide in vehicle exhaust gas by mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Sumizawa, H.; Yamada, H.; Tonokura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The application of pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) was demonstrated for the measurement of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in automotive exhaust gas. The transition of the ν 3 vibrational band assigned to the antisymmetric stretching mode of NO2 was probed with a thermoelectrically cooled, pulsed, mid-infrared, distributed feedback, quantum cascade laser (QCL) at 6.13 μm. The measurement of NO2 in the exhaust gas from two diesel vehicles equipped with different aftertreatment devices was demonstrated using a CRDS-based NO2 sensor, which employs a HEPA filter and a membrane gas dryer to remove interference from water as well as particulates in the exhaust gas. Stable and sensitive measurement of NO2 in the exhaust gas was achieved for more than 30 minutes with a time resolution of 1 s.

  8. Optimization of carbon dioxide supply in raceway reactors: Influence of carbon dioxide molar fraction and gas flow rate.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Santos, T; Mendoza-Martín, J L; Acién Fernández, F G; Molina, E; Vieira-Costa, J A; Heaven, S

    2016-07-01

    Influence of CO2 composition and gas flow rate to control pH in a pilot-scale raceway producing Scenedesmus sp. was studied. Light and temperature determined the biomass productivity whereas neither the CO2 molar fraction nor the gas flow rate used influenced it; because pH was always controlled and carbon limitation did not take place. The CO2 molar fraction and the gas flow rate influenced carbon loss in the system. At low CO2 molar fraction (2-6%) or gas flow rate (75-100l·min(-1)) the carbon efficiency in the sump was higher than 95%, 85% of the injected carbon being transformed into biomass. Conversely, at high CO2 molar fraction (14%) or gas flow rate (150l·min(-1)) the carbon efficiency in the sump was lower than 67%, 32% of the carbon being fixed as biomass. Analysis here reported allows the pH control to be optimized and production costs to be reduced by optimizing CO2 efficiency.

  9. Chlorine Clues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This plot shows that levels of the element chlorine rise dramatically in the deeper rocks lining the walls of the crater dubbed 'Endurance.' The data shown here were taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer at Endurance and 'Eagle Crater,' the site where Opportunity first landed at Meridiani Planum.

    Opportunity has been inching down the walls of Endurance Crater, investigating distinct layers of rock as it goes for clues to Mars' buried past. The various Endurance layers have been informally labeled 'A' through 'F.' Targets within these layers are listed on the graph along with previous targets from Eagle Crater. All the rocks listed here were observed after they had been drilled by the rover's rock abrasion tool.

    The observations indicate that the elements making up the shallow rock layers of Endurance Crater resemble those of Eagle, while the deeper layers of Endurance possess increasingly higher concentrations of the element chlorine.

    Opportunity will continue to roll deeper into Endurance to see if this puzzling trend continues. Scientists hope the new data will help them figure out how the presence of chlorine fits into the history of water at Endurance Crater.

  10. Aircraft measurements of nitrogen dioxide and peroxyacetyl nitrates using luminol chemiluminescence with fast capillary gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Steele, H.D.; Drayton, P.J.; Hubbe, J.M.

    1999-10-01

    Fast capillary gas chromatography with luminol detection has been used to make airborne measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). The analysis system allows for the simultaneous measurement of NO{sub 2} and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) with time resolution of less than 1 min, and improvement of a factor of 4--5 over previously reported methods using electron capture detection. Data presented were taken near Pasco, Washington, in August 1997, during a test flight onboard the US Department of Energy G-1 aircraft. The authors report measurements of NO{sub 2} in the boundary layer in a paper mill plume and a plume from a grass fire, in addition to analyses for free tropospheric NO{sub 2} and PAN. Ratios of PAN/NO{sub 2} were observed to increase with altitude (decreasing temperature) and to reach values of 2--4 above the boundary layer, consistent with the thermal equilibrium of the peroxyacetyl radical and NO{sub 2} and PAN. Estimates for the peroxyacetyl radical in the continental free troposphere, calculated from this equilibrium, were found to be in the range of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} molecules per cubic centimeter. These results demonstrate the application of this approach for airborne measurements of NO{sub 2} and PAN in a wide range of field study scenarios.

  11. Adsorption of carbon dioxide from gas streams via mesoporous spherical-silica particles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chungsying; Bai, Hsunling; Su, Fengsheng; Chen, Wenfa; Hwang, Jyh Feng; Lee, Hsiu-Hsia

    2010-04-01

    A relatively new mesoporous silica sorbent for environmental protection applications (i.e., mesoporous spherical-silica particles [MSPs]), was modified by N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (EDA) solution and was tested for its potential in the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The CO2 adsorption capacity of MSP and MSP (EDA) increased with temperature from 20 to 60 degrees C but decreased with temperature from 60 to 100 degrees C. The mechanism of CO2 adsorption on both samples is mainly attributed to physical interaction regardless of temperature change. The MSP (EDA) have good adsorption performance as compared with EDA-modified zeolite or granular activated carbon conducted in this study and many types of silica sorbents reported in the literature. The cyclic CO2 adsorption showed that spent MSP (EDA) could be effectively regenerated at 120 degrees C for 25 min and CO2 adsorption capacity of MSP (EDA) was preserved during 16 cycles of adsorption and thermal regeneration. These results suggests that MSP (EDA) are efficient CO2 sorbents and can be stably used in the prolonged cyclic operation.

  12. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Sikhwivhilu, Lucky M; Mpelane, Siyasanga; Mwakikunga, Bonex W; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2012-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanostructures were synthesized by microwave-assisted and conventionally heated hydrothermal treatment of TiO(2) powder. The tubular structures were converted to a rodlike shape by sintering the samples at various temperatures in air for 3 h. This was accompanied by phase transformation largely influenced by the method of synthesis and the mode of heating. The X-ray diffraction results are in agreement with the structural transformation indicating the gradual changes in the phase and crystallinity of the as prepared samples. The tubular structure is found to collapse at high temperature. UV-vis-IR spectroscopic results suggest that nanorods tend to absorb photons of higher energy (λ = 280 nm) than nanotubes (λ = 300 nm) but emit photons with lower energy than nanotubes. It was found that the nanotubes have a sharper photoluminance emission line at 340 nm that is absent in the nanorods. We also found that nanotubes have higher efficiency, lower threshold sensing temperature, longer response time, and shorter recovery time for hydrogen gas sensing than nanorods. PMID:22352872

  13. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  14. Gas-Phase Energetics of Actinide Oxides: An Assessment of Neutral and Cationic Monoxides and Dioxides from Thorium to Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-09-01

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  15. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry. PMID:19725530

  16. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  17. Importance of network density of nanotube: Effect on nitrogen dioxide gas sensing by solid state resistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Prabhash; Grachyova, D. V.; Moskalenko, A. S.; Shcherbak, M. A.; Pavelyev, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    Dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an established fact, however, its effect on toxic gas sensing for the development of solid state resistive sensor was not well reported. In this report, the dispersion quality of SWCNTs has been investigated and improved, and this well-dispersed SWCNTs network was used for sensor fabrication to monitor nitrogen dioxide gas. Ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopic studies shows the strength of SWNTs dispersion and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging provides the morphological properties of the sensor device. In this gas sensor device, two sets of resistive type sensors were fabricated that consisting of a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) using dielectrophoresis technique with different SWCNTs network density. With low-density SWCNTs networks, this fabricated sensor exhibits a high response for nitrogen dioxide sensing. The sensing of nitrogen dioxide is mainly due to charge transfer from absorbed molecules to sidewalls of nanotube and tube-tube screening acting a major role for the transport properties of charge carriers.

  18. Chlorine Gas Sensing Performance of On-Chip Grown ZnO, WO3, and SnO2 Nanowire Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van Dang; Nguyen, Duc Hoa; Nguyen, Van Duy; Nguyen, Van Hieu

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring toxic chlorine (Cl2) at the parts-per-billion (ppb) level is crucial for safe usage of this gas. Herein, ZnO, WO3, and SnO2 nanowire sensors were fabricated using an on-chip growth technique with chemical vapor deposition. The Cl2 gas-sensing characteristics of the fabricated sensors were systematically investigated. Results demonstrated that SnO2 nanowires exhibited higher sensitivity to Cl2 gas than ZnO and WO3 nanowires. The response (RCl2/Rair) of the SnO2 nanowire sensor to 50 ppb Cl2 at 50 °C was about 57. Hence, SnO2 nanowires can be an excellent sensing material for detecting Cl2 gas at the ppb level under low temperatures. Abnormal sensing characteristics were observed in the WO3 and SnO2 nanowire sensors at certain temperatures; in particular, the response level of these sensors to 5 ppm of Cl2 was lower than that to 2.5 ppm of Cl2. The sensing mechanism of the SnO2 nanowire sensor was also elucidated by determining Cl2 responses under N2 and dry air as carrier gases. We proved that the Cl2 molecule was first directly adsorbed on the metal oxide surface and was then substituted for pre-adsorbed oxygen, followed by lattice oxygen.

  19. Analysis of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues in chlorine-treated water by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Planas, Carles; Ventura, Francesc; Caixach, Josep; Martín, Jordi; Boleda, M Rosa; Paraira, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the analysis of the strong mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues (BMXs) in chlorine-treated water has been developed. The method is based on gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS), previous liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of a smaller sample volume compared to other methods and on-line derivatization with a silylation reactive. GC-QqQ-MS/MS has been raised as an alternative easier to perform than gas chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) for the analysis of MX and BMXs, and it allows to achieve low LODs (0.3 ng/L for MX and 0.4-0.9 ng/L for BMXs). This technique had not been previously described for the analysis of MX and BMXs. Quality parameters were calculated and real samples related to 3 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), tap water and both untreated and chlorinated groundwater were analyzed. Concentrations of 0.3-6.6 ng/L for MX and 1.0-7.3 ng/L for BMXs were detected. Results were discussed according to five of the main factors affecting MX and BMXs formation in chlorine-treated water (organic precursors, influence of bromide ions, evolution of MX and BMXs in the drinking water distribution system, groundwater chlorination and infiltration of water coming from chlorination processes in groundwater).

  20. Gas transfer rates from airlifts used for concurrent aeration, carbon dioxide stripping, and recirculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airlifts simplify recirculating aquaculture systems and can potentially reduce capital costs and minimize maintenance issues. Airlifts have the ability to move and aerate water as well as degass the water of any carbon dioxide. This study evaluated the oxygen transfer and carbon dioxide removal abil...

  1. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  2. INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS GLOBIGII BY CHLORINATION: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent events where spores of Bacillus anthracis have been used as a bioterrorist weapon have prompted interest in determining the resistance of this organism to commonly used disinfectants, such as chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone. This work was undertaken to study ...

  3. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Donnals, G.L.; Cao, J.; Ruch, R.R.; Pan, W.P.; Shao, D.

    1992-10-01

    Four replicate experiments of pyrolysis with quadrupole gas analyzer and ion selective electrode were conducted to monitor the release of chlorine and sulfur from a high-chlorine Illinois coal IBC-109 (0.42% chlorine on dry basis). The chlorine in coal is released solely as HCl, and the HCl release profile shows a broad peak between 250{degree}C and 600{degree}C with a maximum at 445{degree}C. In contrast, the sulfur release profile shows three peaks; the sulfur released around 370{degree}C may be derived from a labile (possibly aliphatic) component of organic sulfur, the main peak at 475{degree}C corresponds to the release of the main component (thiophenic) of organic sulfur, and the third peak at 600{degree} results from the decomposition of pyrite. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is the major sulfur species under an oxidizing condition in the combustion gas; additional gaseous sulfur species (COS and H{sub 2}S) are observed when the atmosphere is changed to a reducing condition. Sodium and chlorine contents in char residues determined by neutron activation analysis showed that 98% of chlorine in coal was volatilized during pyrolysis to 800{degree}C, and all the sodium is retained in the chars. The thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy experiments were carried out to characterize gaseous species during pyrolysis of four Illinois coals (IBC-103, -105, -106, and -109). Gas evolution profiles of sulfur (H{sub 2}S, S0{sub 2}, and COS), chlorine (HCl), and nitrogen (NH{sub 3} and HCN) species were determined. Similar release profiles of HCl and NH{sub 3} supported an interpretation that chlorine and nitrogen are closely associated in coal. COS may be formed by reaction of CO with H{sub 2}S in the gas phase.

  4. Methane hydrate behavior when exposed to a 23% carbon dioxide 77% nitrogen gas under conditions similar to the ConocoPhillips 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, S. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ replacement of methane hydrate by carbon dioxide hydrate is considered to be a promising technique for producing natural gas, while simultaneously sequestering greenhouse gas in deep geological formations. For effective application of this technique in the field, kinetic models of gas exchange rates in hydrate under a variety of environmental conditions need to be established, and the impact of hydrate substitution on geophysical (seismic) properties has to be quantified in order to optimize monitoring techniques. We performed a series of laboratory tests in which we monitored changes in methane hydrate-bearing samples while a nitrogen/carbon dioxide gas mixture was flowed through. These experiments were conducted to gain insights into data obtained from a field test in which the same mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen was injected into a methane hydrate-bearing unit beneath the north slope of the Brooks Range in northern Alaska (ConocoPhillips 2012 Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate field trial). We have measured the kinetic gas exchange rate for a range of hydrate saturations and different test configurations, to provide an estimate for comparison to numerical model predictions. In our tests, the exchange rate decreased over time during the tests as methane was depleted from the system. Following the elution of residual gaseous methane, the exchange rate ranged from 3.8×10-7 moles methane/(mole water*s) to 5×10-8 moles methane/(mole water*s) (Note that in these rates, the moles of water refers to water originally held in the hydrate.). In addition to the gas exchange rate, we also monitored changes in permeability occurring due to the gas substitution. Further, we determined the seismic P and S wave velocities and attenuations using our Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar apparatus (e.g. Nakagawa, 2012, Rev. Sci. Instr.). In addition to providing geophysical signatures, changes in the seismic properties can also be related to changes in the mechanical strength of

  5. Reduction of listeria monocytogenes on green peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) by gaseous and aqueous chlorine dioxide and water washing and its growth at 7 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Han, Y; Linton, R H; Nielsen, S S; Nelson, P E

    2001-11-01

    Reduction of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A on uninjured and injured surfaces of green peppers after 0.3- and 3-mg/ liter gaseous and aqueous ClO2 treatment and water washing for 10 min at 20 degrees C was studied. Growth of the L. monocytogenes untreated or treated with 0.6 mg/liter ClO2 gas for 30 min at 20 degrees C on green peppers also was investigated. A membrane-surface-plating method was used for resuscitation and enumeration of L monocytogenes treated with ClO2. The bacterial viability on pepper surfaces was visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Live and dead cells of L. monocytogenes were labeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibody and propidium iodide, respectively. More than 6 log CFU/5 g L. monocytogenes on uninjured surfaces and about 3.5 log CFU/5 g on injured surfaces were inactivated by both 3-mg/liter and 0.6-mg/liter ClO2 gas treatments. The 3-mg/liter aqueous ClO2 treatment achieved 3.7- and 0.4-log reductions on uninjured and injured surfaces, respectively; whereas, water washing alone showed 1.4- and 0.4-log reductions, respectively. ClO2 gas treatment was the most effective in reducing L. monocytogenes on both uninjured and injured green pepper surfaces, when compared with aqueous ClO2 treatment and water washing. The significant difference (P < 0.05) between log reductions on uninjured and injured surfaces and the results from CLSM analysis suggested that injured surfaces protected more bacteria from sanitation treatments than did uninjured surfaces. Not only could L. monocytogenes grow on green pepper surfaces at 7 degrees C, bacteria that survived the 0.6-mg/liter ClO2 gas treatment also could grow.

  6. Exposure Assessment for Carbon Dioxide Gas: Full Shift Average and Short-Term Measurement Approaches.

    PubMed

    Hill, R Jedd; Smith, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up a relatively small percentage of atmospheric gases, yet when used or produced in large quantities as a gas, a liquid, or a solid (dry ice), substantial airborne exposures may occur. Exposure to elevated CO2 concentrations may elicit toxicity, even with oxygen concentrations that are not considered dangerous per se. Full-shift sampling approaches to measure 8-hr time weighted average (TWA) CO2 exposures are used in many facilities where CO2 gas may be present. The need to assess rapidly fluctuating CO2 levels that may approach immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions should also be a concern, and several methods for doing so using fast responding measurement tools are discussed in this paper. Colorimetric detector tubes, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) detector, and a portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instrument were evaluated in a laboratory environment using a flow-through standard generation system and were found to provide suitable accuracy and precision for assessing rapid fluctuations in CO2 concentration, with a possible effect related to humidity noted only for the detector tubes. These tools were used in the field to select locations and times for grab sampling and personal full-shift sampling, which provided laboratory analysis data to confirm IDLH conditions and 8-hr TWA exposure information. Fluctuating CO2 exposures are exemplified through field work results from several workplaces. In a brewery, brief CO2 exposures above the IDLH value occurred when large volumes of CO2-containing liquid were released for disposal, but 8-hr TWA exposures were not found to exceed the permissible level. In a frozen food production facility nearly constant exposure to CO2 concentrations above the permissible 8-hr TWA value were seen, as well as brief exposures above the IDLH concentration which were associated with specific tasks where liquid CO2 was used. In a poultry processing facility the use of dry

  7. Exposure Assessment for Carbon Dioxide Gas: Full Shift Average and Short-Term Measurement Approaches.

    PubMed

    Hill, R Jedd; Smith, Philip A

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) makes up a relatively small percentage of atmospheric gases, yet when used or produced in large quantities as a gas, a liquid, or a solid (dry ice), substantial airborne exposures may occur. Exposure to elevated CO2 concentrations may elicit toxicity, even with oxygen concentrations that are not considered dangerous per se. Full-shift sampling approaches to measure 8-hr time weighted average (TWA) CO2 exposures are used in many facilities where CO2 gas may be present. The need to assess rapidly fluctuating CO2 levels that may approach immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) conditions should also be a concern, and several methods for doing so using fast responding measurement tools are discussed in this paper. Colorimetric detector tubes, a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) detector, and a portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instrument were evaluated in a laboratory environment using a flow-through standard generation system and were found to provide suitable accuracy and precision for assessing rapid fluctuations in CO2 concentration, with a possible effect related to humidity noted only for the detector tubes. These tools were used in the field to select locations and times for grab sampling and personal full-shift sampling, which provided laboratory analysis data to confirm IDLH conditions and 8-hr TWA exposure information. Fluctuating CO2 exposures are exemplified through field work results from several workplaces. In a brewery, brief CO2 exposures above the IDLH value occurred when large volumes of CO2-containing liquid were released for disposal, but 8-hr TWA exposures were not found to exceed the permissible level. In a frozen food production facility nearly constant exposure to CO2 concentrations above the permissible 8-hr TWA value were seen, as well as brief exposures above the IDLH concentration which were associated with specific tasks where liquid CO2 was used. In a poultry processing facility the use of dry

  8. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  9. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  10. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  11. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  12. 49 CFR 176.225 - Stowage of chlorine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of chlorine. 176.225 Section 176.225 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Requirements for Class 2 (Compressed Gas) Materials § 176.225 Stowage of chlorine. Chlorine (UN 1017) must...

  13. Study on chlorine removal from mixture of waste plastics.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsumi; Sugano, Motoyuki; Mashimo, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The recycling of waste plastics that include plastics that contain chlorine, such as polyvinyl chloride, is difficult because the chlorine leads to the corrosion of equipment. Then, the dechlorination method of waste plastics containing chlorine (CCWP) that consists of a series of melt process and hot water process was examined. CCWP was put into the melt process with coal tar (HOB) and converter dust (CD) to inhibit the diffusion of the chlorine-containing gas. The results indicated that iron oxide of the principal element of CD combines with chlorine eliminated from CCWP, and forms water-soluble iron chloride on the melt process. HOB dissolves or adsorbs a part of the chlorine during the melt process, and inhibits the diffusion of the chlorine-containing gas. Approximately 98% of the chlorine in the CCWP reacts with CD and forms iron chloride, which can be extracted on the hot water process. PMID:17482803

  14. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  15. Treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with lactic acid, neutralized electrolyzed oxidizing water and chlorine dioxide followed by growth under sub-optimal conditions of temperature, pH and modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Smigic, Nada; Rajkovic, Andreja; Antal, Eszter; Medic, Helga; Lipnicka, Barbara; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Devlieghere, Frank

    2009-09-01

    The utilization of sub-lethal decontamination treatments gains more and more interest due to the increased consumers' demand for fresh, minimally processed and convenient food products. These products rely on cold chain and hurdle (combination) technology to provide microbiological safety and quality during their shelf life. To investigate the ability of surviving cells to resuscitate and grow in a food simulating environment, sub-lethal decontamination treatments were coupled with subsequent storage under sub-optimal growth conditions. For this purpose chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and neutralized electrolyzed oxidizing water (NEW)-treated cultures of Escherichia coli O157:H7 were inoculated in TSB-YE of pH 5.8 and aw 0.99, and stored at 10 degrees C, 12.5 degrees C and 15 degrees C, under four different atmospheres (0%, 30% and 60% CO2 balanced with N2, and air). Due to the severity of injury, lactic acid-treated cells were inoculated in TSB-YE pH 7.0. Data obtained reveal that the fraction of sub-lethally injured E. coli O157:H7 undergoes an additional inhibitory effect during the storage period under of sub-optimal conditions. Observed extension in the lag growth phase was a direct consequence prior sub-lethal injury. The effects of liquid ClO2 and NEW were less pronounced in comparison to lactic acid. The current study signifies the potential utilization of appropriate combination of different extrinsic and intrinsic factors in the elimination or growth inhibition of food-borne pathogens.

  16. Production and stability of chlorine dioxide in organic acid solutions as affected by pH, type of acid, and concentration of sodium chlorite, and its effectiveness in inactivating Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoikyung; Kang, Youngjee; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2008-12-01

    We studied the production and stability of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in organic acid solutions and its effectiveness in killing Bacillus cereus spores. Sodium chlorite (5000, 10,000, or 50,000 microg/ml) was added to 5% acetic, citric, or lactic acid solution, adjusted to pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, or 6.0, and held at 21 degrees C for up to 14 days. The amount of ClO(2) produced was higher as the concentration of sodium chlorite was increased and as the pH of the acid solutions was decreased. However, the stability in production of ClO(2) was enhanced by increasing the pH of the organic acid solutions. To evaluate the lethal activity of ClO(2) produced in various acid solutions as affected by acidulant and pH, suspensions of B. cereus spores were treated at 21 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, or 10 min in hydrochloric acid or organic acid solutions (pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, or 6.0) containing ClO(2) at concentrations of 100, 50, or 25 microg/ml. Populations of viable spores treated with ClO(2) at concentrations of 100 or 50 microg/ml in organic acid solutions decreased more rapidly than populations treated with the same concentrations of ClO(2) in HCl. Rates of inactivation tended to increase with higher pH of ClO(2) solutions. Results show that ClO(2) formed in organic acid solutions has higher stability and is more lethal to B. cereus spores than ClO(2) formed at the same concentration in HCl solution. This finding emphasizes the benefits of using organic acid solutions to prepare ClO(2) intended for use as an antimicrobial.

  17. Respiratory symptoms and lung function 8–10 months after community exposure to chlorine gas: a public health intervention and cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    questionnaire self-report of symptoms were low at 55.8% and 61.6%, respectively. Persistent cough (41%) and shortness of breath (39%) were the most frequently reported respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Eight to ten months after acute chlorine exposure, the Graniteville health screening participants under-reported respiratory symptoms when compared to abnormal spirometry results. Sensitivity and specificity were low, and we determined that relying upon the self-report questionnaire was not adequate to objectively assess the lung health of our population following irritant gas exposure. PMID:24107111

  18. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  19. Live fire support services: Expansion of n-gas model to include nitrogen dioxide effects in the rat. Final report, 15 November 1993-31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The N-gas model is an empirical tool developed by the fire science community to predict toxic potency of various materials when burned based on the chemical nature of gases produced. This research is extending applicability of the N-gas equation to military scenarios by expanding the empirical formula to include the effects of exposure to NO2 (in rodents). Rats are exposed, nose-only and under controlled conditions, to nitrogen dioxide singly and in combination with carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and air. LC5O values are determined based on 30 minute exposure, followed by 2 week post exposure. Blood gas, hemoglobin and respiratory data are collected.

  20. EOS7C Version 1.0 TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen in Natural Gas

    2008-01-11

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methane-carbon dioxide (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}) or methane-nitrogen (CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2}) with or without an aqueous phase and H{sub 2}O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy's Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestrationmore » sites and natural gas reservoirs. EOS7C models supercritical CO{sub 2{ and subcritical CO{sub 2} as a non-condensible gas, hence EOS7C does not model the transitions to liquid or solid CO{sub 2} conditions. The components modeled in EOS7C are water, brine, non-condensible gas, gas tracer, methane, and optional heat. The non-condensible gas (NCG) can be selected by the user to be CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2}. The real gas properties module has options for Peng-Robinson, Redlich-Kwong, or Soave-Redlich-Kwong equations of state to calculate gas mixture density, enthalpy departure, and viscosity. Partitioning of the NCG and CH{sub 4} between the aqueous and gas phases is calculated using a very accurate chemical equilibrium approach. Transport of the gaseous and dissolved components is by advection and Fickian molecular diffusion. EOS7C is written in FORTAN77.« less

  1. Mass transfer phenomena of gaseous hydrocarbons and nitrogen dioxide across gas-inorganic pigments boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birbatakou, S.; Pagopoulou, I.; Kalantzopoulos, A.; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F.

    1998-11-01

    Reversed-flow gas chromatography was used to study the kinetics of the action of five hydrocarbons namely, ethane, ethene, ethyne, propene and butene and of the nitrogen dioxide, on three known and widely used pigments, the white one TiO2, and the yellows CdS and PbCrO4. The calculation of kinetic parameters and mass transfer coefficients is based on an experimental adsorption isotherm. All these calculations are based on a non linear adsorption isotherm model as it is well accepted that the linear one is inadequate for inorganic substances like these mentioned in this work. The inadequacy is mainly attributed to the non-uniformity of the solid surface. Five physicochemical parameters have been obtained for each of the twenty heterogeneous reactions studied. With these systematic experiments under conditions which are similar to the atmospheric ones, an extrapolation of the results obtained to “real" atmospheres with a high degree of confidence is possible. Some of the calculations were based on the linear model for comparison. La cinétique de la réaction de cinq hydrocarbures (éthane, éthylène, acétylène, propène, boutène) et du dioxyde d'azote avec trois pigments (le blanc de TiO2 et les jaunes de CdS et PbCrO4) a été étudiée par chromatographie en phase gazeuse a flux inversé. Le calcul des paramètres cinétiques et des coefficients de transfert de masse a été effectué à partir des isothermes d'adsorption expérimentales en faisant l'hypothèse d`un modèle d'adsorption non-linéaire, qui résulte de la non-uniformité de la surface. Cinq paramètres physico-chimiques ont été obténus pour chacune des vingt réaction hétérogènes étudiées. À partir de ces résultats obténus dans des conditions similaires aux conditions atmosphériques, l'extrapolation à des atmosphères réelles paraît possible avec une bonne confiance. Quelques calculs ont été effectués avec un modèle linéaire pour comparaison.

  2. TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON, ORGANIC RESIDUE AND PRODUCTION CHEMICAL DAMAGE MECHANISMS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence J. Pekot; Ron Himes

    2004-05-31

    Core specimens and several material samples were collected from two natural gas storage reservoirs. Laboratory studies were performed to characterize the samples that were believed to be representative of a reservoir damage mechanism previously identified as arising from the presence of hydrocarbons, organic residues or production chemicals. A series of laboratory experiments were performed to identify the sample materials, use these materials to damage the flow capacity of the core specimens and then attempt to remove or reduce the induced damage using either carbon dioxide or a mixture of carbon dioxide and other chemicals. Results of the experiments showed that pure carbon dioxide was effective in restoring flow capacity to the core specimens in several different settings. However, in settings involving asphaltines as the damage mechanism, both pure carbon dioxide and mixtures of carbon dioxide and other chemicals provided little effectiveness in damage removal.

  3. Evaluation of some regenerable sulfur dioxide absorbents for flue gas desulfurization. [Diethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.J.; Schwartz, C.H.; Wildman, D.J.; Gasior, S.J.

    1982-07-01

    The vapor pressure of sulfur dioxide above aqueous solutions of citric acid (2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylic acid), glycolic acid (hydroxyacetic acid), 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, ethylenediamine (1,2 diaminoethane), and diethylenetriamine (2,2' diaminodiethylamine), as well as above pure tri-n-butyl phosphate, 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and water, were measured for temperatures from 46.2/sup 0/C to 91.1/sup 0/C for possible application to regenerable flue gas desulfurization systems. Sulfur dioxide loadings in the absorbent ranged from 3.1 x 10/sup -5/ to 5.27 x 10/sup -1/ g/g. Measurements were made in a laboratory apparatus using N/sub 2//SO/sub 2/ mixtures. Results were used to estimate the steam rate and principal costs of processes for 11 of the absorbents. For sulfur dioxide absorption followed by indirect steam stripping, a 9.75% ethylenediamine solution had the lowest steam rate. The ethylenediamine steam rate was 25% of the next lowest steam rate, which was for 100% 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. However, cost of losses of ethylenediamine vapor up the stack were excessive, indicating that a higher-boiling-point amine would be preferable.

  4. Nitrogen dioxide detection

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.; Agnew, Stephen F.; Christensen, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

  5. Behavior of sulfur and chlorine in coal during combustion and boiler corrosion. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.L.; Hackley, K.C.; Donnals, G.L.; Cao, J.; Ruch, R.R.; Pan, W.P.; Shao, D.

    1992-08-01

    The goal of this project is to study the evolution of gaseous sulfur and chlorine species during temperature-controlled pyrolysis and combustion and their effect on boiler corrosion. We have been developing two techniques for determining the gas evolution profiles of sulfur and chlorine during coal pyrolysis and combustion. First, using a pyrolysis-combustion system in combination with a quadrupole gas analyzer, the evolution of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in combustion gas during temperature-programmed coal pyrolysis-combustion was monitored. When the atmosphere of the combustion chamber was changed to a reducing condition, gaseous COS and H{sub 2}S were also detected in the combustion gas. Detection of hydrogen chloride by QGA has been improved by using a larger-diameter (75 {mu}m) capillary tubing. The HC1 evolution profile during the pyrolysis of coal IBC-109 was determined by QGA and by a chloride ion selective electrode for quantitative purposes. Second, the technique of thermogravimetry (TG) in conjunction with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to characterize gaseous species during coal pyrolysis. Gas evolution profiles of sulfur (SO{sub 2} and COS), chlorine (HC1), and nitrogen (NH{sub 3} and HCN) species were determined for coal IBC-109. Similar release profiles of HCI and NH{sub 3} supported an interpretation that chlorine gnd nitrogen are closely associated in coal. COS may be formed by reaction of CO with H{sub 2}S in the gas phase. A mass balance study of chlorine evolution from coal IBC-109 in a TG-FTIR experiment was completed; the chloride dissolved in solutions was determined by an ion chromatographic technique.

  6. The effect of coal combustion flue gas components on low-level chlorine speciation using EPA method 26A.

    PubMed

    Sun, J Q; Crocker, C R; Lillemoen, C M

    2000-06-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 26A is the recommended procedure for capturing and speciating halogen (X2) and hydrogen halide (HX) stack emissions from combustion sources. Previous evaluation studies of Method 26A have focused primarily on hydrogen chloride (HCl) speciation. Capture efficiency, bias, and the potential interference of Cl2 at high levels (> 20 ppm [microgram/m3]) and NH4Cl in the flue gas stream have been investigated. It has been suggested that precise Cl2 measurement and accuracy in quantifying HX or X2 using Method 26A are difficult to achieve at Cl2 concentrations < 5 ppm; however, no performance data exist to support this. Coal contains low levels of Cl, in the range of 5-2000 ppmw, which results in the presence of HCl and Cl2 in the products of combustion. HCl is the predominant Cl compound formed in the high-temperature combustion process, and it persists in the gas as the products of combustion cool. Concentrations of Cl2 in coal combustion flue gas at stack temperatures typically do not exceed 5 ppm. For this research, bench-scale experiments using simulated combustion flue gas were designed to validate the ability of Method 26A to speciate low levels of Cl2 accurately. This paper presents the results of the bench-scale tests. The effect of various flue gas components is discussed. The results indicate that SO2 is the only component in coal combustion flue gas that has an appreciable effect on Cl2 distribution in Method 26A impingers, and that Method 26A cannot accurately speciate HCl and Cl2 in coal combustion flue gas without modification.

  7. Application of the carbon dioxide-barium hydroxide hydrate gas-solid reaction for the treatment of dilute carbon dioxide-bearing gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The removal of trace components from gas streams via irreversible gas-solid reactions in an area of interest to the chemical engineering profession. This research effort addresses the use of fixed beds of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate flakes for the removal of an acid gas, CO/sub 2/, from air that contains approx. 330 ppM/sub v/ CO/sub 2/. Areas of investigation encompassed: (1) an extensive literature review of Ba(OH)/sub 2/ hydrate chemistry, (2) microscale studies on 0.150-g samples to develop a better understanding of the reaction, (3) process studies at the macroscale level with 10.2-cm-ID fixed-bed reactors, and (4) the development of a model for predicting fixed-bed performance. Experimental studies indicated fixed beds of commercial Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O flakes at ambient temperatures to be capable of high CO/sub 2/-removal efficiencies (effluent concentrations <100 ppB), high reactant utilization (>99%), and an acceptable pressure drop (1.8 kPa/m at a superficial gas velocity of 13 cm/s). Ba(OH)/sub 2/.8H/sub 2/O was determined to be more reactive toward CO/sub 2/ than either Ba(OH)/sub 2/.3H/sub 2/O or Ba(OH)/sub 2/.1H/sub 2/O. A key variable in the development of this fixed-bed process was relative humidity. Operation at conditions with effluent relative humidities >60% resulted in significant recrystallization and restructuring of the flake and subsequent pressure-drop problems.

  8. Siphonic Concepts Examined: A Carbon Dioxide Gas Siphon and Siphons in Vacuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, Joshua J.; Ramette, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Misconceptions of siphon action include assumptions that intermolecular attractions play a key role and that siphons will operate in a vacuum. These are belied by the siphoning of gaseous carbon dioxide and behaviour of siphons under reduced pressure. These procedures are suitable for classroom demonstrations. The principles of siphon action are…

  9. SIMULATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM DAIRY FARMS TO ASSESS GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION STRATEGIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farming practices can have a large impact on the soil carbon cycle and the resulting net emission of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide (CO**2), methane and nitrous oxide. Primary sources of CO**2 emission on dairy farms are soil, plant, and animal respiration with smaller contributions from ...

  10. Thin film transistors gas sensors based on reduced graphene oxide poly(3-hexylthiophene) bilayer film for nitrogen dioxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tao; Xie, Guangzhong; Zhou, Yong; Huang, Junlong; Wu, Mei; Jiang, Yadong; Tai, Huiling

    2014-10-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) bilayer films were firstly utilized as active layers in OTFT gas sensors for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) detection. The OTFT with RGO/P3HT bilayer film exhibited the typical transistor characteristics and better gas sensing properties at room temperature. The electrical parameters of OTFTs based on pure P3HT film and RGO/P3HT bilayer film were calculated. The threshold voltage of OTFT was positively shifted due to the high concentration carriers in RGO. The sensing properties of the sensor with RGO/P3HT bilayer film were also investigated. Moreover, the sensing mechanism was analyzed as well.

  11. Biological sulfate reduction using gas-lift reactors fed with hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Houten, R.T. van; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lettinga, G. . Dept. of Environmental Technology)

    1994-08-20

    Feasibility and engineering aspects of biological sulfate reduction in gas-lift reactors were studied. Hydrogen and carbon dioxide were used as energy and carbon source. Attention was paid to biofilm formation, sulfide toxicity, sulfate conversion rate optimization, and gas-liquid mass transfer limitations. Sulfate-reducing bacteria formed stable biofilms on pumice particles. Biofilm formation was not observed when basalt particles were used. However, use of basalt particles led to the formation of granules of sulfate-reducing biomass. The sulfate-reducing bacteria, grown on pumice, easily adapted to free H[sub 2]S concentrations up to 450 mg/L. Biofilm growth rate then equilibrated biomass loss rate. These high free H[sub 2]S concentrations caused reversible inhibition rather than acute toxicity. When free H[sub 2]S concentrations were kept below 450 mg/L, a maximum sulfate conversion rate of 30 g SO[sub 4][sup 2[minus

  12. Analysis of 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues in chlorine-treated water by gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Planas, Carles; Ventura, Francesc; Caixach, Josep; Martín, Jordi; Boleda, M Rosa; Paraira, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive method for the analysis of the strong mutagen 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and its brominated analogues (BMXs) in chlorine-treated water has been developed. The method is based on gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS/MS), previous liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of a smaller sample volume compared to other methods and on-line derivatization with a silylation reactive. GC-QqQ-MS/MS has been raised as an alternative easier to perform than gas chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) for the analysis of MX and BMXs, and it allows to achieve low LODs (0.3 ng/L for MX and 0.4-0.9 ng/L for BMXs). This technique had not been previously described for the analysis of MX and BMXs. Quality parameters were calculated and real samples related to 3 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs), tap water and both untreated and chlorinated groundwater were analyzed. Concentrations of 0.3-6.6 ng/L for MX and 1.0-7.3 ng/L for BMXs were detected. Results were discussed according to five of the main factors affecting MX and BMXs formation in chlorine-treated water (organic precursors, influence of bromide ions, evolution of MX and BMXs in the drinking water distribution system, groundwater chlorination and infiltration of water coming from chlorination processes in groundwater). PMID:26452804

  13. Summary of airborne chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas measurements for August 20 and September 5, 1977 Voyager launches at Air Force Eastern Test Range, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Emerson, B. R., Jr.; Hudgins, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne chlorine and hydrogen chloride measurements were made in the tropospheric ground cloud following the Voyager launches of August 20 and September 5, 1977. The maximum observed hydrogen chloride concentration for both launches was about 25 to 30 parts per million (ppm) occurring typically 2 to 6 minutes after launch. By completion of the sampling mission (1-1/2 hours for August, 4-1/2 hours for September), the maximum in-cloud concentration decayed to about 1 to 2 ppm. Maximum observed chlorine concentrations were about 40 to 55 parts per billion (ppb) about 2 to 8 minutes after launch; by about 15 minutes after launch, chlorine concentrations were less than 10 ppb (detection limit). In-cloud chlorine concentrations were well below 1 percent of hydrogen chloride concentrations. The appendix of the report discusses the chlorine instrument and the laboratory evaluation of the detector.

  14. Evaluation of gaseous chlorine dioxide as a sanitizer for killing Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and yeasts and molds on fresh and fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sy, Kaye V; Murray, Melinda B; Harrison, M David; Beuchat, Larry R

    2005-06-01

    Gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) was evaluated for effectiveness in killing Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut lettuce, cabbage, and carrot and Salmonella, yeasts, and molds on apples, peaches. tomatoes, and onions. Inoculum (100 microl, ca. 6.8 log CFU) containing five serotypes of Salmonella enterica, five strains of E. coli O157:H7, or five strains of L. monocytogenes was deposited on the skin and cut surfaces of fresh-cut vegetables, dried for 30 min at 22 degrees C, held for 20 h at 4 degrees C, and then incubated for 30 min at 22 degrees C before treatment. The skin surfaces of apples, peaches, tomatoes, and onions were inoculated with 100 microl of a cell suspension (ca. 8.0 log CFU) containing five serotypes of Salmonella, and inoculated produce was allowed to dry for 20 to 22 h at 22 degrees C before treatment. Treatment with ClO2 at 4.1 mg/liter significantly (alpha = 0.05) reduced the population of foodborne pathogens on all produce. Reductions resulting from this treatment were 3.13 to 4.42 log CFU/g for fresh-cut cabbage, 5.15 to 5.88 log CFU/g for fresh-cut carrots, 1.53 to 1.58 log CFU/g for fresh-cut lettuce, 4.21 log CFU per apple, 4.33 log CFU per tomato, 1.94 log CFU per onion, and 3.23 log CFU per peach. The highest reductions in yeast and mold populations resulting from the same treatment were 1.68 log CFU per apple and 2.65 log CFU per peach. Populations of yeasts and molds on tomatoes and onions were not significantly reduced by treatment with 4.1 mg/liter ClO2. Substantial reductions in populations of pathogens on apples, tomatoes, and onions but not peaches or fresh-cut cabbage, carrot, and lettuce were achieved by treatment with gaseous ClO2 without markedly adverse effects on sensory qualities.

  15. Analysis of a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls and chlorinated pesticides in human serum by column fractionation and dual-column capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Najam, A R; Korver, M P; Williams, C C; Burse, V W; Needham, L L

    1999-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for precise identification and quantitation of 29 specific polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 15 chlorinated pesticides in human serum. Analyte surrogates PCB 30, PCB 204, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromo-biphenyl, perthane, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane, and dichlorobenzophenone were added to each sample. The serum was extracted with an organic solvent and separated by adsorption chromatography into 3 elution fractions for high-resolution gas chromatographic analysis. Each fraction was analyzed by dual-column capillary chromatography followed by electron capture detection. Two capillary columns, DB-5 and DB-1701, with different polarities were used to increase selectivity for each analyte. Quantitation was performed by selecting 2 sets of calibration standard mixtures and 1,2-dichloronaphthalene as an internal standard. Mean recoveries ranged from 39 to 126% for selected analytes and from 31 to 88% for surrogates. Detection limits for specific congeners and pesticides are reported. Typical chromatographic profiles of calibration standard mixtures, as well as a human sample, are illustrated. Verification of each analyte is assessed, and results of analyses of selected human samples and quality control criteria used to ensure data validity also are presented.

  16. On-line analysis of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons in air by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry Improvements in preconcentration and injection steps.

    PubMed

    Zoccolillo, Lelio; Amendola, Luca; Insogna, Susanna; Pastorini, Elisabetta

    2010-06-11

    An analytical system composed of a cryofocusing trap injector device coupled to a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometric detection (CTI-GC-MS) specific for the on-line analysis in air of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHCs) (dichloromethane; chloroform; 1,1,1-trichloroethane; tetrachloromethane; 1,1,2-trichloroethylene; tetrachloroethylene) was developed. The cryofocusing trap injector was the result of appropriate low cost modifications to an original purge-and-trap device to make it suitable for direct air analysis even in the case of only slightly contaminated air samples, such as those from remote zones. The CTI device can rapidly and easily be rearranged into the purge-and-trap allowing water and air analysis with the same apparatus. Air samples, collected in stainless steel canisters, were introduced directly into the CTI-GC-MS system to realize cryo-concentration (at -120 degrees C), thermal desorption (at 200 degrees C) and for the subsequent analysis of volatiles. The operating phases and conditions were customised and optimized. Recovery efficiency was optimized in terms of moisture removal, cold trap temperature and sampling mass flow. The injection of entrapped volatiles was realized through a direct transfer with high chromatographic reliability (capillary column-capillary column). These improvements allowed obtaining limits of detection (LODs) at least one order of magnitude lower than current LODs for the investigated substances. The method was successfully employed on real samples: air from urban and rural areas and air from remote zones such as Antarctica.

  17. Simulation study to determine the feasibility of injecting hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas injection to improve gas and oil recovery oil-rim reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eid, Mohamed El Gohary

    This study is combining two important and complicated processes; Enhanced Oil Recovery, EOR, from the oil rim and Enhanced Gas Recovery, EGR from the gas cap using nonhydrocarbon injection gases. EOR is proven technology that is continuously evolving to meet increased demand and oil production and desire to augment oil reserves. On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industrial and urban development has generated an unprecedented power demand, particularly during summer months. The required gas supplies to meet this demand are being stretched. To free up gas supply, alternative injectants to hydrocarbon gas are being reviewed to support reservoir pressure and maximize oil and gas recovery in oil rim reservoirs. In this study, a multi layered heterogeneous gas reservoir with an oil rim was selected to identify the most optimized development plan for maximum oil and gas recovery. The integrated reservoir characterization model and the pertinent transformed reservoir simulation history matched model were quality assured and quality checked. The development scheme is identified, in which the pattern and completion of the wells are optimized to best adapt to the heterogeneity of the reservoir. Lateral and maximum block contact holes will be investigated. The non-hydrocarbon gases considered for this study are hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, utilized to investigate miscible and immiscible EOR processes. In November 2010, re-vaporization study, was completed successfully, the first in the UAE, with an ultimate objective is to examine the gas and condensate production in gas reservoir using non hydrocarbon gases. Field development options and proces schemes as well as reservoir management and long term business plans including phases of implementation will be identified and assured. The development option that maximizes the ultimate recovery factor will be evaluated and selected. The study achieved satisfactory results in integrating gas and oil

  18. Halogenase‐Inspired Oxidative Chlorination Using Flavin Photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Hering, Thea; Mühldorf, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chlorine gas or electropositive chlorine reagents are used to prepare chlorinated aromatic compounds, which are found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and polymers, and serve as synthetic precursors for metal‐catalyzed cross‐couplings. Nature chlorinates with chloride anions, FAD‐dependent halogenases, and O2 as the oxidant. A photocatalytic oxidative chlorination is described based on the organic dye riboflavin tetraacetate mimicking the enzymatic process. The chemical process allows within the suitable arene redox potential window a broader substrate scope compared to the specific activation in the enzymatic binding pocket. PMID:26991557

  19. Halogenase-Inspired Oxidative Chlorination Using Flavin Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Hering, Thea; Mühldorf, Bernd; Wolf, Robert; König, Burkhard

    2016-04-18

    Chlorine gas or electropositive chlorine reagents are used to prepare chlorinated aromatic compounds, which are found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and polymers, and serve as synthetic precursors for metal-catalyzed cross-couplings. Nature chlorinates with chloride anions, FAD-dependent halogenases, and O2 as the oxidant. A photocatalytic oxidative chlorination is described based on the organic dye riboflavin tetraacetate mimicking the enzymatic process. The chemical process allows within the suitable arene redox potential window a broader substrate scope compared to the specific activation in the enzymatic binding pocket.

  20. Exploration of gas sensing possibilities with edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes: nitrogen dioxide detection.

    PubMed

    Banks, Craig E; Goodwin, Alexander; Heald, Charles G R; Compton, Richard G

    2005-03-01

    The voltammetric response of nitrogen dioxide in aqueous sulfuric acid using an edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrode has been explored and contrasted with that from basal plane pyrolytic graphite, glassy carbon or boron-doped diamond electrodes. Edge plane graphite electrode is found to produce an excellent voltammetric signal in comparison with other carbon-based electrodes exhibiting a well-defined analytically useful voltammetric redox couple in 2.5 M sulfuric acid which is absent on the alternative electrodes.

  1. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chlorate with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sulfuric acid. (iii) Treating an aqueous solution of... 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition...

  2. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hypochlorite and hydrochloric acid. (ii) Treating an aqueous solution of sodium chlorate with hydrogen peroxide... (“Amperometric Method II”) is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51....

  3. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chlorate with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sulfuric acid. (iii) Treating an aqueous solution of... 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition...

  4. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chlorate with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sulfuric acid. (iii) Treating an aqueous solution of... 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition...

  5. 21 CFR 173.300 - Chlorine dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chlorate with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of sulfuric acid. (iii) Treating an aqueous solution of... 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition...

  6. Seasonal variation of indoor and outdoor air quality of nitrogen dioxide in homes with gas and electric stoves.

    PubMed

    Dėdelė, Audrius; Miškinytė, Auksė

    2016-09-01

    Indoor air pollution significantly influences personal exposure to air pollution and increases health risks. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the major air pollutants, and therefore it is important to properly determine indoor concentration of this pollutant considering the fact that people spend most of their time inside. The aim of this study was to assess indoor and outdoor concentration of NO2 during each season; for this purpose, passive sampling was applied. We analyzed homes with gas and electric stoves to determine and compare the concentrations of NO2 in kitchen, living room, and bedroom microenvironments (MEs). The accuracy of passive sampling was evaluated by comparing the sampling results with the data from air quality monitoring stations. The highest indoor concentration of NO2 was observed in kitchen ME during the winter period, the median concentration being 28.4 μg m(-3). Indoor NO2 levels in homes with gas stoves were higher than outdoor levels during all seasons. The concentration of NO2 was by 2.5 times higher in kitchen MEs with gas stoves than with electric stoves. This study showed that the concentration of NO2 in indoor MEs mainly depended on the stove type used in the kitchen. Homes with gas stoves had significantly higher levels of NO2 in all indoor MEs compared with homes where electric stoves were used. PMID:27250086

  7. Seasonal variation of indoor and outdoor air quality of nitrogen dioxide in homes with gas and electric stoves.

    PubMed

    Dėdelė, Audrius; Miškinytė, Auksė

    2016-09-01

    Indoor air pollution significantly influences personal exposure to air pollution and increases health risks. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the major air pollutants, and therefore it is important to properly determine indoor concentration of this pollutant considering the fact that people spend most of their time inside. The aim of this study was to assess indoor and outdoor concentration of NO2 during each season; for this purpose, passive sampling was applied. We analyzed homes with gas and electric stoves to determine and compare the concentrations of NO2 in kitchen, living room, and bedroom microenvironments (MEs). The accuracy of passive sampling was evaluated by comparing the sampling results with the data from air quality monitoring stations. The highest indoor concentration of NO2 was observed in kitchen ME during the winter period, the median concentration being 28.4 μg m(-3). Indoor NO2 levels in homes with gas stoves were higher than outdoor levels during all seasons. The concentration of NO2 was by 2.5 times higher in kitchen MEs with gas stoves than with electric stoves. This study showed that the concentration of NO2 in indoor MEs mainly depended on the stove type used in the kitchen. Homes with gas stoves had significantly higher levels of NO2 in all indoor MEs compared with homes where electric stoves were used.

  8. [Inactivation of Mycobacteria mucogenicum in drinking water: chlorine resistance and mechanism analysis].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Lu, Pin-Pin; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Qiao

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, chlorine-resistant bacteria were detected in drinking water distribution systems which threatened the drinking water safety. Our group detected one strain named Mycobacteria mucogenicum from the drinking water distribution system of a city in south China. This paper studied chlorine resistance and mechanism of Mycobacteria mucogenicum. Inactivation experiments of one strain Mycobacteria mucogenicum were conducted with free chlorine, monochloramind and chlorine dioxide. The CT values of 99.9% inactivation by free chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide were detected as (76.25 +/- 47.55)mg.min.L-1, (1396 +/-382)mg.min.L-1, (13.5 +/- 4.9) mg.min L-1. Using transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) observed the inactivation process of Mycobacteria mucogenicum. The bacteria surface hydrophobic of Mycobacteria mucogenicum was 37.2%. Mycobacteria mucogenicum has a higher hydrophobicity than other bacteria which prevented the diffusion of chlorine into cells. Mycobacteria mucogenicum is more resistant to chorine than other bacteria.

  9. Part I. Analyzing the distribution of gas law questions in chemistry textbooks. Part II. Chlorine-35 NQR spectra of group 1 and silver dichloromethanesulfonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Gabriel

    Part I. Two studies involving the gas law questions in eight high school and Advanced Placement/college chemistry textbooks were performed using loglinear analysis to look for associations among six variables. These variables included Bloom's Taxonomy (higher-order, lower-order), Book Type (high school, college), Question Format (multiple-choice, problem, short answer), Question Placement (in-chapter, end-of-chapter, test bank), Representation (macroscopic, microscopic, symbolic), and Arkansas Science Standard (conceptual, mathematical; gas laws, pressure conversion, stoichiometry). The first study, involving the conceptual gas law questions, found the Book Type and Question Placement variables had the biggest impact, each appearing in 5 of the 11 significant associations. The second study, involving the mathematical gas law questions, found the Question Placement had the biggest impact, appearing in 7 of the 11 significant associations, followed by Book Type and the Arkansas Science Standard variables, which appeared in 5 of the 11 significant associations. These studies showed that compared to the high school books, college books have fewer multiple-choice questions (compared to short-answer and problem questions), fewer in-chapter questions (compared to end-of-chapter and test bank questions), fewer questions in the chapters and more questions at the end of the chapters and fewer multiple-choice questions in and at the end of the books and more multiple-choice questions in the test banks. Part II. The dichloromethanesulfonate salts of several +1 charged cations, M+Cl2CHSO3 - (M = Li, Na, K, Rb Ag, Cs Tl) were synthesized and studied by 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). Dichloromethanesulfonic acid was prepared by the methanolysis of dichloromethanesulfonyl chloride, which was neutralized with the metal carbonates to produce the corresponding metal dichloromethanesulfonate salts. This study completed the NQR investigation of the family of chloroacetates

  10. Carbon dioxide removal process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  11. Simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their chlorination by-products in drinking water and the coatings of water pipes by automated solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Jocelyn; Hollard, Caroline; Bach, Cristina; Rosin, Christophe; Munoz, Jean-François; Dauchy, Xavier

    2013-11-01

    In this study, an automated method for the simultaneous determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their chlorination by-products in drinking water was developed based on online solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main focus was the optimisation of the solid-phase microextraction step. The influence of the agitation rate, type of fibre, desorption time, extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption temperature, and solvent addition was examined. The method was developed and validated using a mixture of 17 PAHs, 11 potential chlorination by-products (chlorinated and oxidised PAHs) and 6 deuterated standards. The limit of quantification was 10 ng/L for all target compounds. The validated method was used to analyse drinking water samples from three different drinking water distribution networks and the presumably coal tar-based pipe coatings of two pipe sections. A number of PAHs were detected in all three networks although individual compositions varied. Several PAH chlorination by-products (anthraquinone, fluorenone, cyclopenta[d,e,f]phenanthrenone, 3-chlorofluoranthene, and 1-chloropyrene) were also found, their presence correlating closely with that of their respective parent compounds. Their concentrations were always below 100 ng/L. In the coatings, all PAHs targeted were detected although concentrations varied between the two coatings (76-12,635 mg/kg and 12-6295 mg/kg, respectively). A number of chlorination by-products (anthraquinone, fluorenone, cyclopenta[d,e,f]phenanthrenone, 3-chlorofluoranthene, and 1-chloropyrene) were also detected (from 40 to 985 mg/kg), suggesting that the reaction of PAHs with disinfectant agents takes place in the coatings and not in the water phase after migration.

  12. Biodegration of chlorinated ethenes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes by naturally occurring or artificially enhanced processes is an important component of current site remediation strategies. At this writing, several microbial mechanisms for chlorinated ethene transformation and degradation have been identified. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly summarize the current understanding of those processes that lead to the biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes.

  13. Water chlorination Vol. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Bull, R.J.; Davis, W.P.; Katz, S.; Roberts, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book describes the significant original contributions in the field of water chlorination of the last three years. It includes chlorination research, developments and alternatives. Issues covered include: water chlorination; risk; epidemiology; carcinogenic and mutagenic effects; toxicology of disinfectants; aquatic models and tumor induction; environmental effects; disinfection; reaction dynamics; chemical methods; drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment.

  14. Carbon dioxide gas purification and analytical measurement for leading edge 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle Vogt, Sarah; Landoni, Cristian; Applegarth, Chuck; Browning, Matt; Succi, Marco; Pirola, Simona; Macchi, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    The use of purified carbon dioxide (CO2) has become a reality for leading edge 193 nm immersion lithography scanners. Traditionally, both dry and immersion 193 nm lithographic processes have constantly purged the optics stack with ultrahigh purity compressed dry air (UHPCDA). CO2 has been utilized for a similar purpose as UHPCDA. Airborne molecular contamniation (AMC) purification technologies and analytical measurement methods have been extensively developed to support the Lithography Tool Manufacturers purity requirements. This paper covers the analytical tests and characterizations carried out to assess impurity removal from 3.0 N CO2 (beverage grade) for its final utilization in 193 nm and EUV scanners.

  15. Coal desulfurization by aqueous chlorination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Vasilakos, N.; Corcoran, W. H.; Grohmann, K.; Rohatgi, N. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of desulfurizing coal is described in which chlorine gas is bubbled through an aqueous slurry of coal at low temperature below 130 degrees C., and at ambient pressure. Chlorinolysis converts both inorganic and organic sulfur components of coal into water soluble compounds which enter the aqueous suspending media. The media is separated after chlorinolysis and the coal dechlorinated at a temperature of from 300 C to 500 C to form a non-caking, low-sulfur coal product.

  16. Tubular ceramic-supported sol-gel silica-based membranes for flue gas carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C. Y.; Xomeritakis, George K.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiang, Ying-Bing

    2009-03-01

    Pure, amine-derivatized and nickel-doped sol-gel silica membranes have been developed on tubular Membralox-type commercial ceramic supports for the purpose of carbon dioxide separation from nitrogen under coal-fired power plant flue gas conditions. An extensive synthetic and permeation test study was carried out in order to optimize membrane CO{sub 2} permeance, CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} separation factor and resistance against densification. Pure silica membranes prepared under optimized conditions exhibited an attractive combination of CO{sub 2} permeance of 2.0 MPU (1 MPU = 1 cm{sup 3}(STP) {center_dot} cm{sup -2} min{sup -1} atm{sup -1}) and CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} separation factor of 80 with a dry 10:90 (v/v) CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} feed at 25 C. However, these membranes exhibited flux decline phenomena under prolonged exposure to humidified feeds, especially in the presence of trace SO{sub 2} gas in the feed. Doping the membranes with nickel (II) nitrate salt was effective in retarding densification, as manifested by combined higher permeance and higher separation factor of the doped membrane compared to the pure (undoped) silica membrane after 168 hours exposure to simulated flue gas conditions.

  17. Deactivation of titanium dioxide photocatalyst by oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane and silicon sealant off-gas in a recirculating batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chemweno, Maurice K; Cernohlavek, Leemer G; Jacoby, William A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied deactivation of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst by oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane and silicone sealant off-gas in a recirculating batch reactor. Polydimethylsiloxane vapor is a model indoor air pollutant. It does not adsorb strongly on TiO2 in the dark, but undergoes oxidation when the ultraviolet (UV) photons are also present. Commercial silicone (room-temperature vulcanizing) sealant off-gas is an actual indoor air pollutant subject to short-term spikes in concentration. It does adsorb on the TiO2 surface in the dark, but UV photons also catalyze its oxidation. The oxidation of the Si-containing vapors was monitored using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope equipped with a gas cell. Subsequent to each incremental exposure, a hexane oxidation reaction was performed to track the titania catalyst's activity. The exposures were repeated until substantial deactivation was achieved. We have also documented the regenerative effect of washing the catalyst surface with water. Surface science techniques were used to view the topography of the catalyst and to identify the elements causing the deactivation. Procedural observations of interest in the context of our recirculating batch reactor include the following: the rate of oxidation of hexane was used to assess the activity of a photocatalyst sample; hexane is an appropriate choice of a probe molecule because it does not adsorb in the dark and it undergoes photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) completely, forming CO2; and hexane does not deactivate the photocatalyst surface.

  18. Application of water-insoluble polymers to orally disintegrating tablets treated by high-pressure carbon dioxide gas.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshitaka; Maeda, Atsushi; Kondo, Hiromu; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-09-10

    The phase transition of pharmaceutical excipients that can be induced by humidifying or heating is well-known to increase the hardness of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs). However, these conditions are not applicable to drug substances that are chemically unstable against such stressors. Here, we describe a system which enhances the hardness of tablets containing water-insoluble polymers by using high-pressure carbon dioxide (CO2). On screening of 26 polymeric excipients, aminoalkyl methacrylate copolymer E (AMCE) markedly increased tablet hardness (+155N) when maintained in a high-pressure CO2 environment. ODTs containing 10% AMCE were prepared and treatment with 4.0MPa CO2 gas at 25°C for 10min increased the hardness to +30N, whose level corresponded to heating at 70°C for 720min. In addition, we confirmed the effects of CO2 pressure, temperature, treatment time, and AMCE content on the physical properties of ODTs. Optimal pressure of CO2 gas was considered to be approximately 3.5MPa for an AMCE formula, as excessive pressure delayed the disintegration of ODTs. Combination of high-pressure CO2 gas and AMCE is a prospective approach for increasing the tablet hardness for ODTs, and can be conducted without additional heat or moisture stress using a simple apparatus. PMID:27374202

  19. Potential Flue Gas Impurities in Carbon Dioxide Streams Separated from Coal-fired Power Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    For geological sequestration of CO2 separated from pulverized coal combustion flue gas, it is necessary to adequately evaluate the potential impacts of flue gas impurities on groundwater aquifers in the case of the CO2 leakage from its storage sites. This s...

  20. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.