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Sample records for chlorite matrix wf10

  1. WF 10: Macrokine, TCDO, tetrachlorodecaoxide.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    WF 10 [TCDO, Oxoferin, Immunokine, Macrokine] is a 1:10 dilution of tetrachlorodecaoxide formulated for IV delivery. It was developed by Oxo Chemie in Switzerland as an adjunctive therapy to combination antiretroviral and opportunistic infection prophylaxis regimens in AIDS patients. WF 10 specifically targets macrophages. Oxo Chemie has worldwide patent rights to WF 10 and Dimethaid Research has an exclusive licence for marketing and distribution in Canada. In May 2002, Oxo Chemie was acquired by Dimethaid Research. Oxo completed a trial in 72 cervical cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy in 1989. Results from this trial demonstrated complete remission in 75% of patients receiving WF 10. A follow-up placebo controlled trial in 1996 produced similar results. WF 10 has received regulatory approval in Thailand for postradiation cystitis following a trial completed in 1998 in 20 patients following radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma. This authorisation also allows limited availability of WF 10 at the physician's request in Germany. WF 10 is also available under Health Canada's Special Access Program. Oxo Chemie has completed a controlled randomised, crossover study in France in 1991 that examined the effects of 103 patients with acute radiation dermatitis and radiation- or chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Results demonstrated that WF 10 significantly improved lesions and accelerated recovery without side effects. Topical tetrachlorodecaoxide in a less concentrated formulation (1:55) is marketed in many countries as Oxoferin for wound healing. WF 10 is approved for use in Thailand under the name IMMUNOKINE in patients with postradiation chronic inflammatory disease including cystitis, proctitis and mucositis. In July 2003, the European examiners informed Oxo Chemie that they intend to grant the company additional patents to the technology platform that supports WF 10, extending the European protection granted in 1992 to cover a much broader range of

  2. Differential effects on innate versus adaptive immune responses by WF10.

    PubMed

    Giese, Thomas; McGrath, Michael S; Stumm, Susanne; Schempp, Harald; Elstner, Erich; Meuer, Stefan C

    2004-06-01

    Oxidative compounds that are physiologically generated in vivo can induce natural defense mechanisms to enhance the elimination of pathogens and to limit inflammatory tissue damage in the course of inflammation. Here, we have investigated WF10, a chlorite-based non-toxic compound for its functional activities on human PBMC in vitro. WF10 exerts potent immune-modulatory effects through generating endogenous oxidative compounds such as taurine chloramine. Proliferation and IL-2 production of anti-CD3 stimulated PBMC were inhibited by WF10, as was the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFATc. In PBMC and monocytes, however, WF10 induced pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1beta, IL-8, and TNF-alpha. In the monocytic cell line THP-1, the activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and NFkappaB by WF10 was demonstrated. Inhibition of NFAT regulated genes in activated lymphocytes in concert with the induction of several myeloid cell associated pro-inflammatory genes in monocytes represents a novel mechanism of immune modulation.

  3. Comparative study on the effects of chlorite oxygen reaction product TCDO (tetrachlorodecaoxygen) and sodium chlorite solution (NaClO2) with equimolar chlorite content on bone marrow and peripheral blood of BDIX rats.

    PubMed

    Kempf, S R; Blaszkiewitz, K; Reim, M; Ivankovic, S

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the chlorite-oxygen reaction product TCDO (tetrachlorodecaoxygen, active ingredient of the systemic application form of WF 10) were investigated on bone marrow and peripheral blood of BDIX rats in comparison to a sodium chlorite solution with a chlorite content identical to that of WF 10. Despite difficulties in determining the chemical differences between TCDO and a sodium chlorite solution, their differing effects on cells, tissue and organism were striking. The following characteristics have been observed: Stimulation of the bone marrow, evidenced by the pronounced increase in mature granulocytes, pronormo- and normoblasts, or increased cell proliferation rate, determined by means of the BrdUrd method, was achieved only with WF 10 (TCDO). Stimulation of the bone marrow led in turn to increased numbers of leucocytes and monocytes in the peripheral blood. In addition, WF 10 induced the production of large granular lymphocytes (LGLs), referred to as natural killer cells (NK-cells). In contrast, NaClO2 solution suppressed bone marrow function, exhibiting a toxic effect when given on a long-term basis. At the same time the number of mature granulocytes as well as pronormo- and normoblasts decreased, while the presence of LGLs was not observed. The results showed that TCDO is a potent stimulator of the bone marrow function and an effective modulator of the entire immune system. The toxic effect of chlorite, derived from the TCDO matrix, is not noticeable, being completely compensated by the favourable effects of TCDO.

  4. The pro-oxidative drug WF-10 inhibits serial killing by primary human cytotoxic T-cells.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, G H; Balta, E; Schindler, S; Kirchgessner, H; Jahraus, B; Meuer, S; Samstag, Y

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs) play an important role in many immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Targeting cytotoxicity of CTLs would allow to interfere with immune-mediated tissue destruction. Here we demonstrate that WF-10, a pro-oxidative compound, inhibits CTL-mediated cytotoxicity. WF-10 did not influence early steps of target-cell killing, but impaired the ability of CTLs to detach from the initial target cell and to move to a second target cell. This reduced serial killing was accompanied by stronger enrichment of the adhesion molecule LFA-1 in the cytolytic immune synapse. LFA-1 clustering requires activation of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin and was accordingly diminished in L-plastin knockdown cells. Interestingly, WF-10 likely acts through regulating L-plastin: (I) It induced L-plastin activation through phosphorylation leading to enhanced LFA-1-mediated cell adhesion, and, importantly, (II) WF-10 lost its influence on target-cell killing in L-plastin knockdown cells. Finally, we demonstrate that WF-10 can improve immunosuppression by conventional drugs. Thus, while cyclosporine A alone had no significant effect on cytotoxicity of CTLs, a combination of cyclosporine A and WF-10 blocked target-cell killing synergistically. Together, our findings suggest that WF-10 - either alone or in combination with conventional immunosuppressive drugs - may be efficient to control progression of diseases, in which CTLs are crucially involved.

  5. Chlorite (sodium salt)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 00 / 007 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORITE ( CAS Nos . 10049 - 04 - 4 and 7758 - 19 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the ( IRIS ) Integrated Risk Information System September 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  6. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2) exists as... solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels from 125 to...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food... of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS... passing chlorine dioxide into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient...

  10. 21 CFR 186.1750 - Sodium chlorite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium chlorite. 186.1750 Section 186.1750 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1750 Sodium chlorite. (a) Sodium chlorite (NaCLO2, CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2... into a solution of sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide. (b) the ingredient is used at levels from...

  11. Correlation of Chlorite Frictional Strength with Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorite is a common phyllosilicate mineral in crustal fault zones, and it is generally considered to contribute to fault-zone weakening. However, very little is known about its frictional properties, in part because of the difficulty in obtaining suitable material for study. Synthetic gouges (<90 μm grain size) have been prepared from four chlorite-rich separates whose compositions range between 18.3 and 33.6 wt% MgO, 1.3-21.6 wt% FeO (total Fe content), and 25.0-33.0 wt% SiO2 (electron microprobe analysis). Magnesium contents vary directly with Si and inversely with Fe. Frictional strengths were measured in the temperature range 25-300°C and shearing rates between 0.00115 and 1.15 μm/s, with fluid pressure and effective normal stress held constant at 60 and 100 MPa, respectively. The chlorites are velocity strengthening at all tested conditions, promoting stable slip. No obvious trends in strength relative to either temperature or velocity were discernible for a given chlorite. In contrast, the frictional strength at any given set of physical conditions is a function of chlorite composition, the most Fe-rich chlorite being the strongest (coefficient of friction, μ in the range 0.26-0.36) and the most Mg- and Si-rich sample the weakest (μ = 0.16-0.22). This is one of the first reports of a compositional influence on the frictional properties of a mineral. The results confirm that chlorite will contribute to strength reduction in fault gouge, but the Mg-rich chlorites associated with ultramafic rocks will be more effective weakening agents than the relatively high-Fe chlorites more typical of quartzofeldspathic crustal rocks.

  12. Toxicological effects of chlorite in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, G S; Calabrese, E J

    1982-01-01

    When exposed to a maximum level of 100 ppm chlorine dioxide in their drinking water, neither A/J or C57L/J mice exhibited any hematologic changes. Chlorite exposure under similar conditions produced increases for red blood cells in osmotic fragility, mean corpuscular volume, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity for both strains. Chlorite exposure of pregnant A/J mice resulted in a significant decrease in the weight of pups at weaning and a lower average birth to weaning growth rate. Mice exposed to as much as 100 ppm sodium chlorite (NaClO2) in their drinking water for up to 120 days failed to demonstrate any histopathological changes in kidney structure. PMID:7151765

  13. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acidified sodium chlorite solutions. 173.325... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.325 Acidified sodium chlorite solutions. Acidified sodium chlorite solutions may be safely used in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a...

  14. Chlorite reactivity and contribution to flow path modifications under conditions relevant for CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, L. E.; Yang, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Voltolini, M.; Banuelos, J. L.; Anovitz, L. M.; Bourg, I. C.; Steefel, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Iron-bearing clay minerals, such as chlorite, have been identified as key reactants with CO2 in caprock and reservoir formations and have been frequently shown to coat pores and even govern connected microporosity in these formations. Some studies have linked the total amount of CO2 trapped as carbonate minerals to the abundance of chlorite, glauconite, and smectite. However, the reactivity of these minerals under the conditions and timescales relevant for geologic sequestration of CO2 is largely unknown. When these minerals occur along a fracture leakage pathway, dissolution and precipitation reactions may create self-sealing or self-enhancing leakage pathways. In this presentation, we describe experiments that probe the reactivity of chlorite and its potential to alter connected porosity and either enhance or seal fracture leakage pathways. Our experiments use a network of capillary tubes packed with chlorite to mimic the case where a CO2-acidified brine flows through a fracture and reacts with iron-bearing clays in the caprock matrix. Before and after reaction, the chlorite-filled capillaries are imaged using 3D X-ray synchrotron microtomography at three points along the column to track changes in the pore structure. During the experiment, effluent ion concentrations are tracked using ICP-MS to infer mineralogical changes. The packed capillaries are imaged periodically during the experiment using Raman Spectroscopy to interpret the evolution of minerals along the tube length. Alteration of nanoporosity is assessed through TEM imaging or SAXS. Our experiments reveal how the couplings between mass transport, weathering reactions, and pore structure alteration affect the geochemical evolution of fracture permeability.

  15. Sensitivity of antioxidant-deficient yeast to hypochlorite and chlorite.

    PubMed

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Spickett, Corinne M

    2011-08-01

    Sodium hypochlorite and sodium chlorite are commonly used as disinfectants, and understanding the mechanisms of microbial resistance to these compounds is of considerable importance. In this study, the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in the sensitivity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hypochlorite and chlorite was studied. Yeast mutants lacking Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, but not mutants deficient in cytoplasmic and peroxisomal catalase, were hypersensitive to the action of both hypochlorite and chlorite. Both compounds depleted cellular glutathione, induced the production of reactive oxygen species and decreased the viability of the cells. The toxicity of hypochlorite and chlorite was abolished by hypoxic and anoxic conditions and ameliorated by thiol antioxidants and ascorbate. The results demonstrated that the action of hypochlorite and chlorite involves the formation of superoxide and peroxide and that SOD1 is protective, probably by limiting the formation of hydroxyl radicals and damage to proteins.

  16. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. PMID:24987389

  17. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  18. Redox kinetics and colloid formation during water-chlorite interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. G.; Ahn, H.; Ryu, J. H.; Jo, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    For the isolation of high-level radioactive wastes from biosphere, the deep geological repository should be maintained reducing conditions. Surface groundwater can flow along fractures into the deep geological repository, which may cause oxic conditions. In the oxic conditions, uranium can be oxidized from U(Ⅳ) to U(Ⅵ) and U(Ⅵ) can easily migrate in groundwater due to its high mobility. Chlorite with Fe(Ⅱ), which is a phyllosilicate minerals generally occurred in fractures, can help maintenance of the reducing condition because chlorite can consume oxidizing agents by redox reactions. In this study, redox kinetics of chlorite were investigated by conducting redox batch kinetic tests at various conditions (i.e., concentration of oxidizing agent, pH, and presence of NaCl). Colloidal particle formation during redox reactions of chlorite was also investigated. Two types of chlorite samples: low iron content (CCa-2) and high iron content (Chlorite from Daejeon, South Korea) were used. Redox batch kinetic tests were conducted for 60 days. The solutions, reactants, and colloidal particles collected from the redox batch kinetic tests every 10 days were characterized. Results show that the concentration of oxidizing agent decreased more in the chlorite sample having higher Fe(Ⅱ) content than that having lower Fe(Ⅱ) content. After 10 days, both the chlorite samples tend to be reached steady-state conditions and then no changes in the concentration of oxidizing agent were observed. SEM analysis shows that surface and edge of the chlorite samples tend to be crispy and smoothy with increasing reaction time. SEM-EDS analysis on colloidal particles shows that colloidal particles consisted of Fe and O, which were identified as ferrihydrite.

  19. [Teratogenicity study of sodium chlorite in rats by oral administration].

    PubMed

    Sakemi, K; Usami, M; Kurebayashi, H; Ohno, Y

    1999-01-01

    The teratogenicity of sodium chlorite (NaClO2) was assessed in Wistar rats (Crj: Wistar). Sodium chlorite dissolved in distilled water was given to pregnant Wistar rats by gavage once a day from day 6 through 15 of pregnancy at doses of 0, 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg/day. The pregnant rats were sacrificed on day 20 of pregnancy, and their fetuses were examined for malformations. Sodium chlorite caused decreased food consumption, anemia, sedation, hematuria, and death in the pregnant rats at 100 mg/kg, but no fetal effects, such as malformations or growth retardation, were observed even at 100 mg/kg. It was concluded that sodium chlorite has no teratogenicity in rats when administered orally. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was 50 mg/kg/day for pregnant rats and 100 mg/kg/day or more for rat fetuses.

  20. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Specific Usage Additives § 173.325 Acidified sodium chlorite solutions. Acidified...., College Park, MD 20740, or may be examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's...

  1. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F.; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification. PMID:24632343

  2. Mechanism of reaction of chlorite with mammalian heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Pirker, Katharina F; Flemmig, Jörg; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schlorke, Denise; Furtmüller, Paul G; Arnhold, Jürgen; Obinger, Christian

    2014-06-01

    This study demonstrates that heme peroxidases from different superfamilies react differently with chlorite. In contrast to plant peroxidases, like horseradish peroxidase (HRP), the mammalian counterparts myeloperoxidase (MPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are rapidly and irreversibly inactivated by chlorite in the micromolar concentration range. Chlorite acts as efficient one-electron donor for Compound I and Compound II of MPO and LPO and reacts with the corresponding ferric resting states in a biphasic manner. The first (rapid) phase is shown to correspond to the formation of a MPO-chlorite high-spin complex, whereas during the second (slower) phase degradation of the prosthetic group was observed. Cyanide, chloride and hydrogen peroxide can block or delay heme bleaching. In contrast to HRP, the MPO/chlorite system does not mediate chlorination of target molecules. Irreversible inactivation is shown to include heme degradation, iron release and decrease in thermal stability. Differences between mammalian peroxidases and HRP are discussed with respect to differences in active site architecture and heme modification.

  3. Identification of chlorite and serpentine in cosmetic or pharmaceutical talc.

    PubMed Central

    Blount, A M; Vassiliou, A H

    1983-01-01

    Chlorite is the most common accessory mineral group found in high purity talc ore used in cosmetic or pharmaceutical consumer talcum products. X-ray diffraction and wet chemical analytical data obtained on geologic samples representing commercial talc ore deposits of high purity and on processed samples representing talc found in consumer talcum products indicate that clinochlore and penninite are the two chlorite minerals most commonly found in all talc samples irrespective of origin or source, but sheridanite is also found in some samples representing talc deposits that are associated with serpentinite rocks. The chlorite minerals exhibit certain well-defined X-ray diffraction characteristics which differentiate them from each other as well as from those of serpentine minerals, including the hazardous chrysotile asbestos. PMID:6641661

  4. Chlorites in reservoir sandstones of the Guadalupian Delaware Mountain Group

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, S.D. )

    1992-04-01

    Late-stage authigenic clay minerals are pervasive in the very fine-grained, subarkosic sandstones of the Guadalupian Delaware Mountain Group, comprising up to 10% of the bulk rock. Thus, reservoir rock properties are influenced by these minerals. Samples selected from cored intervals, ranging from 600 to 2500 m, were studied using optical and electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction methods to determine the distribution and nature of occurrence of the authigenic clay minerals. In thin sections, the clay minerals are recognizable as grain coatings, with thickness varying from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers. A correlation between the morphology and the amount of interstratification has been observed, with more interstratification corresponding to the formless chlorite variety. The structural and morphological evidence suggests that the chlorites represent different stages of development, possibly evolving from a smectite component through an interstratified intermediate, to a more well-ordered form. There appears to be no systematic trends vertically or laterally in clay mineralogy. The importance of understanding the clay mineralogy and chemistry in these sandstones is evident when considering enhanced recovery procedures. Different clay structures and chemistries may respond differently to production and stimulation techniques. The proposed chlorite diagenetic sequence suggests that drastic changes in borehole fluid chemistry may cause retrogression of chlorite to some expansive forms, which may be water sensitive or inclined to migration.

  5. 21 CFR 173.325 - Acidified sodium chlorite solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... solution of sodium chlorite (CAS Reg. No. 7758-19-2) with any generally recognized as safe (GRAS) acid. (b... accordance with current industry practice in the processing of red meat, red meat parts, and organs as a component of a spray or in the processing of red meat parts and organs as a component of a dip. Applied as...

  6. Mössbauer study of some Argentinian chlorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, Daniel A.; Mercader, R. C.

    1994-12-01

    Three chlorite samples obtained from mining areas in Mendoza, Argentina, have been studied by wet chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The total Fe contents and the Fe2+/Fe3+ atomic ratio are used to characterize the samples and are discussed in connection to the likely genesis of the minerals.

  7. On topotaxy and compaction during antigorite and chlorite dehydration: an experimental and natural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Mainprice, David

    2015-04-01

    Dehydration reactions result in minerals' replacement and a transient fluid-filled porosity. These reactions involve interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation and might therefore lead to fixed crystallographic orientation relations between reactant (protolith) and product phases (i.e. topotaxy). We investigate these two phenomena in the dehydration of a foliated antigorite (atg) serpentinite by comparing the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) developed by olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx) and chlorite (chl) during high-pressure antigorite and chlorite dehydration in piston-cylinder experiments and in natural samples recording the dehydration of antigorite (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experiments were performed under undrained conditions resulting in fluid-filled porosity and in strong CPO of the prograde minerals, controlled by the pre-existing antigorite CPO in the reactant foliated serpentinite. The orientation of a ol,opx and is parallel to from the protolith. The Cerro del Almirez samples show similar, locally well-developed topotactic relations between orthopyroxene, chlorite and antigorite, but the product CPOs are weaker and more complex at the thin section scale. In contrast to the experiments, olivine from natural samples shows a weak correlation between b ol and the former . We relate the strengthening of local topotactic relations and the weakening of the inherited CPO at a larger scale in natural samples to compaction and associated fluid migration. Microstructural features that might be related to compaction in the natural samples include: (1) smooth bending of the former foliation, (2) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 16°) of prismatic orthopyroxene due to buckling by dislocation creep, (3) inversion of enstatite to low clinoenstatite (P21/c) along lamellae and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic orthopyroxene enclosed by plastically deformed chlorite. The coexistence of orthopyroxene buckling and

  8. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sodium chlorite; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1070 Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Sodium chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with good...

  9. Reactions of aquacobalamin and cob(II)alamin with chlorite and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dereven'kov, Ilia A; Shpagilev, Nikita I; Valkai, László; Salnikov, Denis S; Horváth, Attila K; Makarov, Sergei V

    2017-06-01

    Reactions of aquacobalamin (H2O-Cbl(III)) and its one-electron reduced form (cob(II)alamin, Cbl(II)) with chlorite (ClO2(-)) and chlorine dioxide (ClO 2(•) ) were studied by conventional and stopped-flow UV-Vis spectroscopies and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). ClO2(-) does not react with H2O-Cbl(III), but oxidizes Cbl(II) to H2O-Cbl(III) as a major product and corrin-modified species as minor products. The proposed mechanism of chlorite reduction involves formation of OCl(-) that modifies the corrin ring during the course of reaction with Cbl(II). H2O-Cbl(III) undergoes relatively slow destruction by ClO 2(•) via transient formation of oxygenated species, whereas reaction between Cbl(II) and ClO 2(•) proceeds extremely rapidly and leads to the oxidation of the Co(II)-center.

  10. A Dimeric Chlorite Dismutase Exhibits O2-Generating Activity and Acts as a Chlorite Antioxidant in Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH 78578

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) convert chlorite to O2 and Cl–, stabilizing heme in the presence of strong oxidants and forming the O=O bond with high efficiency. The enzyme from the pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae (KpCld) represents a subfamily of Clds that share most of their active site structure with efficient O2-producing Clds, even though they have a truncated monomeric structure, exist as a dimer rather than a pentamer, and come from Gram-negative bacteria without a known need to degrade chlorite. We hypothesized that KpCld, like others in its subfamily, should be able to make O2 and may serve an in vivo antioxidant function. Here, it is demonstrated that it degrades chlorite with limited turnovers relative to the respiratory Clds, in part because of the loss of hypochlorous acid from the active site and destruction of the heme. The observation of hypochlorous acid, the expected leaving group accompanying transfer of an oxygen atom to the ferric heme, is consistent with the more open, solvent-exposed heme environment predicted by spectroscopic measurements and inferred from the crystal structures of related proteins. KpCld is more susceptible to oxidative degradation under turnover conditions than the well-characterized Clds associated with perchlorate respiration. However, wild-type K. pneumoniae has a significant growth advantage in the presence of chlorate relative to a Δcld knockout strain, specifically under nitrate-respiring conditions. This suggests that a physiological function of KpCld may be detoxification of endogenously produced chlorite. PMID:25437493

  11. Neoarchean high-pressure margarite-phengitic muscovite-chlorite corona mantled corundum in quartz-free high-Mg, Al phlogopite-chlorite schists from the Bundelkhand craton, north central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, L.; Pant, N. C.; Pati, J. K.; Upadhyay, D.; Berndt, J.; Bhattacharya, A.; Satynarayanan, M.

    2011-04-01

    In quartz-free Fe, Na-poor and high-Mg, Al schists from the Bundelkhand craton in north central India, corundum porphyroblasts in finely interleaved phlogopite-chlorite aggregates with rare clinozoisite are mantled by fine-grained (<3 μm) intergrowths of outer collars (>200 μm wide) of phengitic-muscovite and chlorite (phlogopite + corundum + H2O → phengitic-muscovite + chlorite), and <100 μm wide inner collars of margarite-muscovite (corundum + clinozoisite + phengitic muscovite → margarite + muscovite + H2O). Wide-beam electron probe microanalyses indicate Mg in the bi-layered corona increases from corundum outwards, with a complementary decrease in Al and K. Si and Ca increase and then decrease to matrix values. The sharp chemical gradients across the highly structured bi-layered corona are inferred to suggest that the corona-forming reactions were promoted by local grain-boundary-controlled thermodynamic instability as opposed to element transport by advective diffusion. The P-T convergence of KMASH reactions and NCKMASH pseudosection phase relations computed using micro-domain compositions indicate the chlorite-phengitic muscovite outer collar formed at 18-20 kbar and ca. 630°C. The NCKMASH margarite-muscovite inner collar yielded lower metamorphic P-T conditions of 11 ± 3 kbar, ca. 630°C. U-Th-Pb chemical dating of metamorphic monazite and LA-ICPMS U-Pb isotope dating of re-equilibrated zircon yield ca. 2.78 Ga ages, which are interpreted to date corona formation and Neoarchean high-P metamorphism in the Bundelkhand craton, hitherto unknown in the Indian Precambrian. (220)

  12. A true chemical clock: Serially coupled chlorite iodide oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David A.; Chodroff, Leah; O'Neal, Tim M.; Hemkin, Sheryl

    2007-10-01

    A set of serially coupled flow reactors are modeled which contain chlorite-iodide oscillators. By independently varying the reactor flow rates it is possible to produce oscillatory systems with differing periods where the ratio of the period of oscillation between reactors is always an integer value. This system was thoroughly examined and utilized to produce a 'true' chemical clock whose three reactors oscillate with a frequency of minutes, hours, and days.

  13. Chlorite-Oxidized Amylose as an Adjuvant for Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Hilton B.; Duenwald, Jeff; Buckler, Charles E.

    1973-01-01

    Chlorite-oxidized amylose (COAM), when given intraperitoneally to mice and to cats, increased the titer of serum interferon subsequently induced by polyinosinic·polycytidylic acid (In·Cn). Increases ranged from 6- to 100-fold. Maximal effect was observed when COAM was given 3 h prior to In·Cn. COAM given intravenously prior to Newcastle disease virus also significantly increased serum interferon titers. PMID:4713694

  14. Measurement of chlorite dismutase activities in perchlorate respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianlin; Logan, Bruce E

    2003-08-01

    Chlorite dismutase (CD) catalyzes the disproportionation of chlorite to chloride (ClO(2)(-)-->Cl(-)+O(2)) and is present in bacteria capable of cell respiration using perchlorate or chlorate. The activity of this enzyme has previously been measured by monitoring oxygen evolution using a Clark-type dissolved oxygen (DO) probe. We demonstrate here, using two other methods to measure CD activity (a chloride-specific electrode and ion chromatography (IC)) via chloride production, that the DO probe method underestimates dismutation rates. Of the three methods, the chloride probe was the easiest to use and did not require extensive sample handling or post-experimental analysis. Using the chloride electrode method, we determined whole cell rate constants (V(max)=64 U/mg DW, K(m)=0.17 mM) for the chlorate-grown suspensions of Dechlorosoma sp. strain KJ. We compared the CD activities of strain KJ at a fixed chlorite concentration (0.6 mM) to four other perchlorate respiring bacteria (PRB), and to one non-PRB (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Chlorate-grown cultures of the five PRB strains had CD activities ranging from 25 to 50 U/mg of cell dry weight (DW), while aerobically grown cultures of the PRB had much lower CD activities (0.5-4 U/mg DW). To our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of the different methods to measure CD activities, and the first comparison of CD activities of different PRBs.

  15. Concerted dismutation of chlorite ion: water-soluble iron-porphyrins as first generation model complexes for chlorite dismutase.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Michael J; Lee, Amanda Q; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2009-03-02

    Three iron-5,10,15,20-tetraarylporphyrins (Fe(Por-Ar4), Ar = 2,3,5,6-tetrafluro-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (1), N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (2), and p-sulfonatophenyl (3)) have been investigated as catalysts for the dismutation of chlorite (ClO2-). Degradation of ClO2- by these catalysts occurs by two concurrent pathways. One leads to formation of chlorate (ClO3-) and chloride (Cl-), which is determined to be catalyzed by O=FeIV(Por) (Compound II) based on stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy, competition with 2,2'-Azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonicacid), 18O-labeling studies, and kinetics. The second pathway is a concerted dismutation of chlorite to dioxygen (O2) and chloride. On the basis of isotope labeling studies using a residual gas analyzer, the mechanism is determined to be formation of O=FeIV(Por)*+ (Compound I) from oxygen atom transfer, and subsequent rebound with the resulting hypochlorite ion (ClO-) to give dioxygen and chloride. While the chlorate production pathway is dominant for catalysts 2 and 3, the O2-producing pathway is significant for catalyst 1. In addition to chlorite dismutation, complex 1 catalyzes hypochlorite disproportionation to chloride and dioxygen quantitatively.

  16. Stochastic dynamics of the chlorite-iodide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagués, F.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    A recently proposed theoretical framework appropriate to the study of the stochastic behavior of several chemical systems is used to analyze the irreproducibility of the observed reaction times in the chlorite-iodide clock reaction. Noise terms are incorporated through the kinetic constants and their intensity is further correlated with the inverse of the stirring rate. Analytical and simulation results are obtained for the first moments of the reaction time distribution. These results are compared with recent experimental data obtained by Nagypál and Epstein.

  17. Sodium chlorite as an efficient oxidant and hydroxy ion pump in osmium-catalyzed asymmetric dihydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Junttila, Mikko H; Hormi, Osmo E O

    2004-07-09

    Sodium chlorite is an efficient stoichiometric oxidant in Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation. One sodium chlorite provides the reaction with the stoichiometric number of electrons and hydroxide ions needed to dihydroxylate two olefins without the consumption of any additional base. 100% conversion in sodium chlorite asymmetric dihydroxylation of styrene was achieved twice as fast as in the established Sharpless K(3)[Fe(CN)(6)] dihydroxylation. Even internal olefins were dihydroxylated fast with sodium chlorite without hydrolysis aids. Eight olefins were dihydroxylated to corresponding vicinal diols with yields and ees as good as those reported in the literature for other similar processes.

  18. Kinetics of chlorite dismutase in a perchlorate degrading reactor sludge.

    PubMed

    Nadaraja, Anupama Vijaya; Veetil, Prajeesh Gangadharan Puthiya; Vidyadharan, Athira; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of chlorite dismutase (CD), the terminal enzyme involved in the perchlorate (ClO4(-)) reduction pathway, in a ClO4(-)-degrading bioreactor are reported in this study. Enzyme activity was determined from dissolved oxygen released during disproportionation of chlorite (ClO2(-)). CD activity was in the range 29.8-36.4 U/mg dry weight sludge, and kinetic constants Vmax and K(m) of the enzyme were 37.83 U/mg dry weight and 0.28 mM, respectively. Among reactor operational conditions, enzyme activity was observed at pH 4.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 6.0. Redox potential in the range -50 to +120mV and NaCl up to 3.5 g/L had no significant effect on CD activity. However, co-occurring pollutants such as ammonium at 10 ppm, nitrite at 50 ppm and EDTA at 100 microM reduced CD activity substantially. The present study highlights ideal bioreactor conditions to avoid ClO2(-) toxicity, while indicating the buffering potential of a mixed microbial system against inhibiting factors to maintain stable CD activity in bioreactors.

  19. Interstratification and other reaction microstructures in the chlorite-berthierine series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Veblen, David R.

    1996-08-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show there is a series of periodically and nonperiodically interstratified structures composed of berthierine and chlorite layers in low-temperature “chlorite” that is one of the alteration products of granulite-facies Archean ironstone from the eastern border of the Beartooth Mountains, Montana. An antiphase domain structure suggests that the interstratified structures are intermediate transformation products formed by reaction from berthierine (serpentine structure) to chlorite. Periodically interstratified structures consisting of chlorite (C) and serpentine-like (S) (or berthierine) layers include (CS), (CCS), (CCCS), (CCCCS), and (CCCCCCS). The layer sequences in interstratified chlorite-berthierine are indicative of the reaction mechanisms that produce the interstratified structures (e.g., crystallization from solution or solid-state transformation). The reaction from berthierine to chlorite is crystallographically much like a cell-preserved phase transformation, even though it is highly reconstructive. Berthierine can be considered a polymorph of the Fe-rich chlorite mineral chamosite, with berthierine as the los-temperature phase. Interstratification and integrowths in the chlorite-berthierine series may be common phenomena in low-temperature layer silicates resembling chlorite. Although such relations are difficult to recognize from chemical analyses or powder X-ray diffraction patterns, they can be observed readily with TEM method.

  20. Acidified sodium chlorite antimicrobial treatment of broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Kemp, G K; Aldrich, M L; Waldroup, A L

    2000-08-01

    An acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution was investigated for its antimicrobial effects on broiler carcasses processed under conditions similar to those used in U.S. commercial poultry facilities. Of particular interest was the ability of the ASC solution to reduce natural bioburden in a prechill procedure. A number of parameters such as pretreatment washing of carcasses with water (no wash versus water wash), ASC concentration (500, 850, and 1,200 ppm), method of application (spray versus dip), and method of acid activation (phosphoric acid versus citric acid) were explored to evaluate disinfection conditions. ASC dip solutions (18.9 liters) were freshly prepared for groups of five prechill eviscerated carcasses per treatment (n = 10 carcasses). ASC treatment was shown to be an effective method for significantly reducing naturally occurring microbial contamination on carcasses. Reductions following immersion dipping were demonstrated at all disinfectant concentrations for total aerobes (82.9 to 90.7%), Escherichia coli (99.4 to 99.6%), and total coliforms (86.1 to 98.5%). Additionally, testing showed that ASC solutions maintained stable pH and minimal chlorite ion concentration deviations throughout each treatment. The results of the parameter evaluations indicated that maximal antimicrobial activity was achieved in carcasses that were prewashed and then exposed to a 5-s dip in a solution containing phosphoric acid- or citric acid-activated ASC. At 1,200 ppm ASC, a mild but transitory whitening of the skin was noted on dipped carcasses. The results support the methods currently approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the use of ASC solutions as a prechill antimicrobial intervention in U.S. poultry processing plants.

  1. Structural features promoting dioxygen production by Dechloromonas aromatica chlorite dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Streit, Bennett R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a heme enzyme capable of rapidly and selectively decomposing chlorite (ClO2−) to Cl− and O2. The ability of Cld to promote O2 formation from ClO2− is unusual. Heme enzymes generally utilize ClO2− as an oxidant for reactions such as oxygen atom transfer to, or halogenation of, a second substrate. The X-ray crystal structure of Dechloromonas aromatica Cld co-crystallized with the substrate analogue nitrite (NO2−) was determined to investigate features responsible for this novel reactivity. The enzyme active site contains a single b-type heme coordinated by a proximal histidine residue. Structural analysis identified a glutamate residue hydrogen-bonded to the heme proximal histidine that may stabilize reactive heme species. A solvent-exposed arginine residue likely gates substrate entry to a tightly confined distal pocket. On the basis of the proposed mechanism of Cld, initial reaction of ClO2− within the distal pocket generates hypochlorite (ClO−) and a compound I intermediate. The sterically restrictive distal pocket probably facilitates the rapid rebound of ClO− with compound I forming the Cl− and O2 products. Common to other heme enzymes, Cld is inactivated after a finite number of turnovers, potentially via the observed formation of an off-pathway tryptophanyl radical species through electron migration to compound I. Three tryptophan residues of Cld have been identified as candidates for this off-pathway radical. Finally, a juxtaposition of hydrophobic residues between the distal pocket and the enzyme surface suggests O2 may have a preferential direction for exiting the active site. PMID:20386942

  2. Structural features promoting dioxygen production by Dechloromonas aromatica chlorite dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Goblirsch, Brandon R.; Streit, Bennett R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2010-08-12

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a heme enzyme capable of rapidly and selectively decomposing chlorite (ClO{sub 2}{sup -}) to Cl{sup -} and O{sub 2}. The ability of Cld to promote O{sub 2} formation from ClO{sub 2}{sup -} is unusual. Heme enzymes generally utilize ClO{sub 2}{sup -} as an oxidant for reactions such as oxygen atom transfer to, or halogenation of, a second substrate. The X-ray crystal structure of Dechloromonas aromatica Cld co-crystallized with the substrate analogue nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) was determined to investigate features responsible for this novel reactivity. The enzyme active site contains a single b-type heme coordinated by a proximal histidine residue. Structural analysis identified a glutamate residue hydrogen-bonded to the heme proximal histidine that may stabilize reactive heme species. A solvent-exposed arginine residue likely gates substrate entry to a tightly confined distal pocket. On the basis of the proposed mechanism of Cld, initial reaction of ClO{sub 2}{sup -} within the distal pocket generates hypochlorite (ClO{sup -}) and a compound I intermediate. The sterically restrictive distal pocket probably facilitates the rapid rebound of ClO{sup -} with compound I forming the Cl{sup -} and O{sub 2} products. Common to other heme enzymes, Cld is inactivated after a finite number of turnovers, potentially via the observed formation of an off-pathway tryptophanyl radical species through electron migration to compound I. Three tryptophan residues of Cld have been identified as candidates for this off-pathway radical. Finally, a juxtaposition of hydrophobic residues between the distal pocket and the enzyme surface suggests O{sub 2} may have a preferential direction for exiting the active site.

  3. Geochemistry of sericite and chlorite in well 14-2 Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system and in mineralized hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ballantyne, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    Chemical compositions of chlorite and sericite from one production well in the Roosevelt geothermal system have been determined by electron probe methods and compared with compositions of chlorite and sericite from porphyry copper deposits. Modern system sericite and chlorite occur over a depth interval of 2 km and a temperature interval of 250/sup 0/C.

  4. Investigation of Ion Binding in Chlorite Dismutases by Means of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases are prokaryotic heme b oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. It has been postulated that during turnover hypochlorite is formed transiently, which might be responsible for the observed irreversible inactivation of these iron proteins. The only charged distal residue in the heme cavity is a conserved and mobile arginine, but its role in catalysis and inactivation is not fully understood. In the present study, the pentameric chlorite dismutase (Cld) from the bacterium Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii was probed for binding of the low spin ligand cyanide, the substrate chlorite, and the intermediate hypochlorite. Simulations were performed with the enzyme in the ferrous, ferric, and compound I state. Additionally, the variant R173A was studied. We report the parametrization for the GROMOS force field of the anions ClO–, ClO2–, ClO3–, and ClO4– and describe spontaneous binding, unbinding, and rebinding events of chlorite and hypochlorite, as well as the dynamics of the conformations of Arg173 during simulations. The findings suggest that (i) chlorite binding to ferric NdCld occurs spontaneously and (ii) that Arg173 is important for recognition and to impair hypochlorite leakage from the reaction sphere. The simulation data is discussed in comparison with experimental data on catalysis and inhibition of chlorite dismutase. PMID:24988286

  5. Investigation of U(VI) adsorption in quartz-chlorite mineral mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-07-15

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5×10(-7) M and 5×10(-6) M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity possibly caused by surface modifications stemming from chlorite dissolution; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual luminescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The luminescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction-likely due to ill-defined luminescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and reprecipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase with approximate linear correlations, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components with luminescence spectroscopy.

  6. Investigation of U(VI) Adsorption in Quartz-Chlorite Mineral Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Shang, Jianying; Jeon, Choong; Liu, Juan; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-08-25

    A batch and cryogenic laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy investigation of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz-chlorite mixtures with variable mass ratios have been performed under field-relevant uranium concentrations (5x10-7 M and 5x10-6 M) in pH 8.1 synthetic groundwater. The U(VI) adsorption Kd values steadily increased as the mass fraction of chlorite increased, indicating preferential sorption to chlorite. For all mineral mixtures, U(VI) adsorption Kd values were lower than that calculated from the assumption of component additivity; The largest deviation occurred when the mass fractions of the two minerals were equal. U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite displayed characteristic individual fluorescence spectra that were not affected by mineral mixing. The spectra of U(VI) adsorbed within the mixtures could be simulated by one surface U(VI) species on quartz and two on chlorite. The fluorescence intensity decreased in a nonlinear manner as the adsorbed U(VI) concentration increased with increasing chlorite mass fraction – likely due to ill-defined fluorescence quenching by both structural Fe/Cr in chlorite, and trace amounts of solubilized and re-precipitated Fe/Cr in the aqueous phase. However, the fractional spectral intensities of U(VI) adsorbed on quartz and chlorite followed the same trend of fractional adsorbed U(VI) concentration in each mineral phase; approximate linear correlations in the quartz:chlorite mass ratio ranges of 0.0 - 0.2 and 0.2 - 1.0, offering a method to estimate of U(VI) concentration distribution between the mineral components.

  7. The distribution of Fe and Mn between chlorite and fluid: Evidence from fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Bottrell, S.H.; Yardley, B.W.D. )

    1991-01-01

    The Fe/Mn ratio of fluid inclusions from low-grade metamorphic quartz veins has been analyzed by an improved crush-leach method. When compared with Fe and Mn in coexisting vein chlorites, exchange between fluid and chlorite is shown to vary with the redox state of the wall rocks, but is independent of the salinity of the fluid. Agreement between our results and theoretical predictions of Fe/Mn partitioning between fluid and chlorite are good for veins from relatively oxidized rocks, but vein fluids from reduced hosts are enriched in Fe.

  8. Determination of Chlorine Dioxide and Chlorite in Water Supply Systems by Verified Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkáčová, Jana; Božíková, Jarmila

    2014-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the development and optimization of appropriate analytical methods for the determination of chlorine dioxide and chlorite in drinking water in order to obtain accurate and correct results in the quality control of drinking water. The work deals with the development and optimization of a method for the determination of chlorine dioxide using chlorophenol red. Furthermore, a new spectrophotometric method for the determination of chlorite via bromometry using methyl orange was developed, optimized and validated. An electrochemical method for the determination of chlorite by flow coulometry was also developed, optimized and validated.

  9. Reaction pathways of NO oxidation by sodium chlorite powder.

    PubMed

    Byun, Youngchul; Ko, Kyoung Bo; Cho, Moohyun; Namkung, Won; Lee, Kiman; Shin, Dong Nam; Koh, Dong Jun

    2009-07-01

    NO oxidation is an important prerequisite step to assist selective catalytic reduction at low temperatures (< 250 degrees C). If sodium chlorite powder (NaClO2(s)) can oxidize NO to NO2, the injection of NaClO2(s) can be simply adapted to NO oxidation. Therefore, we explored the reaction pathways of NO oxidation by NaClO2(s). Known concentrations of NO and NO2 in N2 balance were injected into packed-bed reactor containing NaClO2(s) at 130 degreesC. NaClO2(s) oxidized NO to NO2 which reacts again with NaClO2(s) to produce OClO. Comparison of experimental data with simulation results demonstrates that each NO2 molecule removed by the reaction with NaClO2(s) generated one OClO molecule, which also oxidized NO to NO2 with the production of ClNO and ClNO2. Using these results, we conclude that the oxidation of NO by NaClO2(s) occurred by two pathways. One is through the direct reaction of NO with NaClO(s). The other is through both the reaction of NO with OlCO produced by the reaction of NO2 with NaClO2(s) and the reaction of NO with ClO produced by the reaction of NO with OClO.

  10. Inhibition of apple polyphenol oxidase activity by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shengmin; Luo, Yaguang; Feng, Hao

    2006-05-17

    Sodium chlorite (SC) was shown to have strong efficacy both as a sanitizer to reduce microbial growth on produce and as a browning inhibitor on fresh-cut apples in previous experiments. This study was undertaken to investigate the inhibitory effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and the associated mechanisms. The experiment showed that SC had a strong inhibition of apple PPO. The extent of inhibition was influenced by SC concentration and pH. Inhibition was most prominent at pH 4.5, at which approximately 30% of enzyme activity was lost in the presence of 10 mM SC, followed closely by that at pH 4.0 with a 26% reduction in PPO activity. The inhibition mode was determined using Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots, which established SC to be a mixed inhibitor of apple PPO for the oxidation of catechol. Preincubation of PPO with 8 mM SC for 8 min caused a maximum of 46% activity reduction compared to noninhibited control. However, preincubation of SC with catechol for 8 min resulted in no additional loss of PPO activity. These findings provide further evidence that the inhibition of PPO activity by SC is due to the inhibition of the enzyme itself rather than removal of the substrate.

  11. Determination of chlorite in drinking water by differential pulse voltammetry on graphite.

    PubMed

    Pezzatini, Giovanni; Midili, Ilaria; Toti, Gabriele; Loglio, Francesca; Innocenti, Massimo

    2004-10-01

    The chlorite ion is an unavoidable by-product of the disinfection of drinking water by means of chlorine dioxide. The maximum concentration values of chlorite accepted in many countries' regulations range from 0.2 to 1.0 mg L(-1). A simple, inexpensive and quickly set up voltammetric procedure for the on-site determination of chlorite in drinking water networks is described. This procedure is suitable for the whole range of applications in drinking water plants. A useful cell for on-field analysis has been developed. Surface morphology and behaviour of carbon-based working electrodes have been investigated by voltammetry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Actual samples of different types of water networks have been analysed for chlorite concentration.

  12. [Determination of sodium chlorite in processed herring roe by ion chromatography with a conductivity detector].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Yoko; Kubota, Hiroki; Yomota, Chikako; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2005-08-01

    An analytical method for residual sodium chlorite in several kinds of processed herring roe treated with sodium chlorite was studied. Sodium chlorite was extracted with 9 mmol/L sodium carbonate. After centrifugation, the supernatant was filtered through a 0.2 microm nylon filter. The filtrate was deproteinized by ultrafiltration and chloride ion was removed with an On-Guard Ag cartridge column. The eluate was subjected to conductivity detector-ion chromatography. Recoveries of sodium chlorite from herring roe spiked at the level of 5 mg/kg were 88 +/- 3.7% (n = 5, CV 4.2%). The method had a quantitation limit of 5 mg/kg for processed herring roes.

  13. A case of sodium chlorite toxicity managed with concurrent renal replacement therapy and red cell exchange.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Adam; Djogovic, Dennis; Chin, Dat

    2013-03-01

    Sodium chlorite is a powerful oxidizing agent with multiple commercial applications. We report the presentation and management of a single case of human toxicity of sodium chlorite. A 65-year-old man presented to hospital after accidentally ingesting a small amount of a sodium chlorite solution. His principal manifestations were mild methemoglobinemia, severe oxidative hemolysis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and anuric acute kidney injury. He was managed with intermittent hemodialysis, followed by continuous venovenous hemofiltration for management of acute kidney injury and in an effort to remove free plasma chlorite. Concurrently, he underwent two red cell exchanges, as well as a plasma exchange, to reduce the burden of red cells affected by chlorite. These interventions resulted in the cessation of hemolysis with stabilization of serum hemoglobin and platelets. The patient survived and subsequently recovered normal renal function. This is only the second case of sodium chlorite intoxication reported in the medical literature and the first to report the use of renal replacement therapy in combination with red cell exchange in its management.

  14. The smectite to chlorite transition in the Chipilapa geothermal system, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.; Santana de Zamora, A.

    1999-04-01

    Clay mineralogical, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe studies have been carried out on separated <2 {micro}m fractions from cutting and core material from three wells in the Chipilapa geothermal system in El Salvador. The data indicate that the smectite to chlorite transition is prevalent, but a secondary smectite to illite transition is also present. At depths approximately <750 m, smectite with very minor chlorite mixed-layers (approximately <15%) is dominant, and has a composition midway between a di- and tri-smectite. At {approximately}750 m there is a very clear distinction and sharp transition into discrete chlorite with very minor smectite mixed-layers (approximately <10%). Corrensite is recorded only as a rare and minor phase. Smectite occurs in abundance at temperatures up to {approximately}200 C, and the transition from a smectite-dominant to chlorite-dominant assemblage takes place over a narrow temperature range ({approximately}150 to 200 C). The stability range of smectite is very similar to that recorded in other geothermal systems, whereas the smectite to chlorite transition differs greatly from that recorded in other systems. The transition does not involve continuous chlorite/smectite mixed-layering but a marked step: It is the sharpest and most discontinuous stepped sequence of this mineralogical transition recorded.

  15. The effect of sodium chlorite solutions on zebra mussel mortality

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, J.; Richer, Y.; Messer, R.

    1995-06-01

    The effect of four dilutions, 8 ppm, 40 ppm, 120 ppm and 473 ppm of the stock solution of a first product, Z-8, on zebra mussel mortality was investigated in static continuous exposure systems and compared to controls. The entire size class spectrum of the mussel population present at the sampling site was tested by leaving mussels attached to their original rock substrata. Two size class grouping of mussels, 13 mm and less and more than 13 mm in length, were exposed in the same test chambers but were analyzed separately. No mortality occurred in the controls. Concentration 8 ppm had no effect after 166 hours on both size class groupings. Concentrations 40, 120 and 473 ppm had observable killing effect within the 331 hours of experiment for both size groupings. The smaller mussels died faster than the larger ones. Another product, Z-11, was similarly tested during fall 1994 with dilutions 8, 40, 80 and 120 ppm. At 8 ppm dilution, Z-11 had induced only little mortality on both size class groupings after 739 hours. At 40, 80 and 120 ppm dilutions, Z-11 had interesting killing effect for both mussel size groupings within the 739 hours of experiment considering the somehow intermittent treatment used. The results already appear to show that sodium chlorite solutions have the potential for eventually becoming a surrogate to the use of chlorine for the control of zebra mussels. That is because they already show a good killing efficiency without being involved in the formation of undesired by-products such as the use of chlorine is. On this purpose, the product is engaged in the process of homologation by Agriculture Canada for it use as treatment against zebra mussels.

  16. Kinetics and mechanism of styrene epoxidation by chlorite: role of chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Jessica K; Rajput, Jonathan; Richardson, David E

    2014-07-07

    An investigation of the kinetics and mechanism for epoxidation of styrene and para-substituted styrenes by chlorite at 25 °C in the pH range of 5-6 is described. The proposed mechanism in water and water/acetonitrile includes seven oxidation states of chlorine (-I, 0, I, II, III, IV, and V) to account for the observed kinetics and product distributions. The model provides an unusually detailed quantitative mechanism for the complex reactions that occur in mixtures of chlorine species and organic substrates, particularly when the strong oxidant chlorite is employed. Kinetic control of the reaction is achieved by the addition of chlorine dioxide to the reaction mixture, thereby eliminating a substantial induction period observed when chlorite is used alone. The epoxidation agent is identified as chlorine dioxide, which is continually formed by the reaction of chlorite with hypochlorous acid that results from ClO produced by the epoxidation reaction. The overall stoichiometry is the result of two competing chain reactions in which the reactive intermediate ClO reacts with either chlorine dioxide or chlorite ion to produce hypochlorous acid and chlorate or chloride, respectively. At high chlorite ion concentrations, HOCl is rapidly eliminated by reaction with chlorite, minimizing side reactions between HOCl and Cl2 with the starting material. Epoxide selectivity (>90% under optimal conditions) is accurately predicted by the kinetic model. The model rate constant for direct reaction of styrene with ClO2(aq) to produce epoxide is (1.16 ± 0.07) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) for 60:40 water/acetonitrile with 0.20 M acetate buffer. Rate constants for para substituted styrenes (R = -SO3(-), -OMe, -Me, -Cl, -H, and -NO2) with ClO2 were determined. The results support the radical addition/elimination mechanism originally proposed by Kolar and Lindgren to account for the formation of styrene oxide in the reaction of styrene with chlorine dioxide.

  17. Vanadium chlorite from a sandstone-hosted vanadium-uranium deposit, Henry basin, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.; Northrop, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    This ore deposit formed by reduction and precipitation of U and V in the presence of organic matter at the interface between a stagnant brine and overlying circulating meteoric water. Some samples of the vanadium chlorite (heated before analysis) contain = or >10% V2O5; in fresh samples most of the V is in the V3+ state. XRD data suggest that Fe and V are concentrated preferentially in the interlayer hydroxide sheets of the chlorite. A d060 value of 1.52 A indicates that the chlorite probably has a dioctahedral structure distended by the presence of octahedral Fe and V; it is a IIb polytype. The V ore zone is flanked by peripheral zones with perfectly ordered chlorite/smectite containing much less V than the pure chlorite. Chemical analysis of a sample heated to 900oC before analysis gave SiO2 44.89, Al2O3 25.14, TiO2 0.35, Fe2O3 8.29, MgO 8.47, CaO 0.84, Na2O 0.27, K2O 2.18, Li2O 0.16, UO3 0.92, V2O5 9.14, = 100.65, together with Cr 10, Mn 200, Co 150, Ni 5.8, Cu 10, Zn 140 ppm; XRD, DTG, TG and IR curves are presented. -R.A.H.

  18. Transiently Produced Hypochlorite Is Responsible for the Irreversible Inhibition of Chlorite Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b-containing prokaryotic oxidoreductases that catalyze the reduction of chlorite to chloride with the concomitant release of molecular oxygen. Over time, they are irreversibly inactivated. To elucidate the mechanism of inactivation and investigate the role of the postulated intermediate hypochlorite, the pentameric chlorite dismutase of “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) and two variants (having the conserved distal arginine 173 exchanged with alanine and lysine) were recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli. Exchange of the distal arginine boosts the extent of irreversible inactivation. In the presence of the hypochlorite traps methionine, monochlorodimedone, and 2-[6-(4-aminophenoxy)-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl]benzoic acid, the extent of chlorite degradation and release of molecular oxygen is significantly increased, whereas heme bleaching and oxidative modifications of the protein are suppressed. Among other modifications, hypochlorite-mediated formation of chlorinated tyrosines is demonstrated by mass spectrometry. The data obtained were analyzed with respect to the proposed reaction mechanism for chlorite degradation and its dependence on pH. We discuss the role of distal Arg173 by keeping hypochlorite in the reaction sphere for O–O bond formation. PMID:24754261

  19. Chloritization and associated alteration at the Jabiluka unconformity-type uranium deposit, Northern Territory, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, Constance J.

    1989-01-01

    Jabiluka is the largest of four known uncomformity-type uranium deposits that are hosted by brecciated and altered metasedimentary rocks in the Pine Creek geosyncline, Northern Territory, Australia. The alteration zone at Jabiluka is dominated by chlorite, but also contains white mica, tourmaline and apatite; hematite is present, but only in minor amounts. Added quartz is mainly restricted to fractures and breccias. Chlorite, which formed during episodic fluid movement, partly to totally replaced all pre-existing minerals. Chloritized rocks are enriched in Mg, and depleted in K, Ca, Na and Si. Five types of chlorite are optically and chemically distinguishable in the rocks at Jabiluka. Chloritization is proposed as a mechanism that lowered the pH of the circulating fluid, and also caused significant loss of silica from the altered rocks. The proposed constraints on alteration, and presumably on at least part of the uranium mineralization, neither require nor preclude the existence of the unconformity as necessary for the formation of ore.

  20. Unexpected Diversity of Chlorite Dismutases: a Catalytically Efficient Dimeric Enzyme from Nitrobacter winogradskyi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mlynek, Georg; Sjöblom, Björn; Kostan, Julius; Füreder, Stephanie; Maixner, Frank; Gysel, Kira; Furtmüller, Paul Georg; Obinger, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a unique heme enzyme catalyzing the conversion of ClO2− to Cl− and O2. Cld is usually found in perchlorate- or chlorate-reducing bacteria but was also recently identified in a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium of the genus Nitrospira. Here we characterized a novel Cld-like protein from the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizer Nitrobacter winogradskyi which is significantly smaller than all previously known chlorite dismutases. Its three-dimensional (3D) crystal structure revealed a dimer of two identical subunits, which sharply contrasts with the penta- or hexameric structures of other chlorite dismutases. Despite a truncated N-terminal domain in each subunit, this novel enzyme turned out to be a highly efficient chlorite dismutase (Km = 90 μM; kcat = 190 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.1 × 106 M−1 s−1), demonstrating a greater structural and phylogenetic diversity of these enzymes than was previously known. Based on comparative analyses of Cld sequences and 3D structures, signature amino acid residues that can be employed to assess whether uncharacterized Cld-like proteins may have a high chlorite-dismutating activity were identified. Interestingly, proteins that contain all these signatures and are phylogenetically closely related to the novel-type Cld of N. winogradskyi exist in a large number of other microbes, including other nitrite oxidizers. PMID:21441524

  1. Effect of acid-chlorite delignification on cellulose degree of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, Christopher A; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2010-10-01

    Two types of pure cellulose, Avicel PH-101 and Whatman filter paper, were treated with an acid-chlorite delignification procedure in the presence of varying amounts of incorporated lignin, and the molecular weight distributions and degrees of polymerization (DP) of derivatized cellulose were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Avicel samples with 0% added lignin showed a DP reduction of nearly 5% during acid-chlorite delignification, compared to a 1% drop in DP with 30% added lignin. Lignin-free filter paper samples showed a DP reduction of nearly 35% after hollocellulose delignification. This drop in DP was reduced to less than 12% for samples which contained 30% lignin. Thus, the presence of lignin in biomass samples minimized the DP reduction of cellulose due to acid catalyzed cleavage during acid-chlorite delignification.

  2. Direct chemical method for preparing 2,3-epoxyamides using sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Lilia; Osorio, Urbano; Quintero, Leticia; Höpfl, Herbert; Vázquez-Cabrera, Nixache; Sartillo-Piscil, Fernando

    2012-07-06

    A direct method for preparing 2,3-epoxyamides from tertiary allylamines via a tandem C-H oxidation/double bond epoxidation using sodium chlorite is reported. Apparently, the reaction course consists of two steps: (i) allylic oxidation of the starting allylamine to corresponding unsaturated allylamide with sodium chlorite followed by (ii) epoxidation of the allylamide to the 2,3-epoxyamide mediated by hypochlorite ion, which is formed in situ by reduction of sodium chlorite. The reaction conditions tolerate the presence of free hydroxyl groups and typical functional groups such as TBS, aryl, alkyl, allyl, acetyl, and benzyl groups; however, when an activated aromatic ring (e.g., sesamol) is present in the substrate, the use of a scavenger is necessary.

  3. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10−3 S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10−1 S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  4. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges.

    PubMed

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10(-3) S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10(-1) S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front.

  5. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease presenting after consumption of 'Miracle Mineral Solution' (sodium chlorite).

    PubMed

    Loh, John Ming Ren; Shafi, Humaira

    2014-11-24

    We present a case report of a 41-year-old woman of Malay ethnicity who presented with an 11-day history of fever and left-sided lymphadenopathy after consuming 'Miracle Mineral Solution' (sodium chlorite solution) for the first time. A diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease was established via lymph node biopsy after other differentials were excluded. The aetiology of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease remains controversial, but viral, autoimmune and physicochemical causes have been suggested as possibilities. In this case, we hypothesise that oxidative injury from sodium chlorite initiated an inflammatory response, which triggered the onset of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease presenting after consumption of ‘Miracle Mineral Solution’ (sodium chlorite)

    PubMed Central

    Loh, John Ming Ren; Shafi, Humaira

    2014-01-01

    We present a case report of a 41-year-old woman of Malay ethnicity who presented with an 11-day history of fever and left-sided lymphadenopathy after consuming ‘Miracle Mineral Solution’ (sodium chlorite solution) for the first time. A diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease was established via lymph node biopsy after other differentials were excluded. The aetiology of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease remains controversial, but viral, autoimmune and physicochemical causes have been suggested as possibilities. In this case, we hypothesise that oxidative injury from sodium chlorite initiated an inflammatory response, which triggered the onset of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease. PMID:25422331

  7. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of chlorite dismutase: a detoxifying enzyme producing molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Geus, Daniël C. de Thomassen, Ellen A. J.; Feltz, Clarisse L. van der; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2008-08-01

    Preliminary X-ray data collection and analysis for crystals of chlorite dismutase, a haem-based enzyme that very effectively reduces chlorite to chloride while producing molecular oxygen, is reported to 2.1 Å resolution. Chlorite dismutase, a homotetrameric haem-based protein, is one of the key enzymes of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria. It is highly active (< 2 kU mg{sup −1}) in reducing the toxic compound chlorite to the innocuous chloride anion and molecular oxygen. Chlorite itself is produced as the intermediate product of (per)chlorate reduction. The chlorite dismutase gene in Azospira oryzae strain GR-1 employing degenerate primers has been identified and the active enzyme was subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Chlorite dismutase was purified, proven to be active and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 2000 MME, KSCN and ammonium sulfate as precipitants. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and were most likely to contain six subunits in the asymmetric unit. The refined unit-cell parameters were a = 164.46, b = 169.34, c = 60.79 Å. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.1 Å resolution on a synchrotron-radiation source and a three-wavelength MAD data set has been collected. Determination of the chlorite dismutase structure will provide insights into the active site of the enzyme, for which no structures are currently available.

  8. Structure and heme-binding properties of HemQ (chlorite dismutase-like protein) from Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Krutzler, Michael; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Pirker, Katharina F.; Obinger, Christian; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are structurally closely related to functional chlorite dismutases which are heme b-dependent oxidoreductases capable of reducing chlorite to chloride with simultaneous production of dioxygen. Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are incapable of performing this reaction and their biological role is still under discussion. Recently, members of this large protein family were shown to be involved in heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, and thus the protein was renamed HemQ in these organisms. In the present work the structural and heme binding properties of the chlorite dismutase-like protein from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LmCld) were analyzed in order to evaluate its potential role as a regulatory heme sensing protein. The homopentameric crystal structure (2.0 Å) shows high similarity to chlorite-degrading chlorite dismutases with an important difference in the structure of the putative substrate and heme entrance channel. In solution LmCld is a stable hexamer able to bind the low-spin ligand cyanide. Heme binding is reversible with KD-values determined to be 7.2 μM (circular dichroism spectroscopy) and 16.8 μM (isothermal titration calorimetry) at pH 7.0. Both acidic and alkaline conditions promote heme release. Presented biochemical and structural data reveal that the chlorite dismutase-like protein from L. monocytogenes could act as a potential regulatory heme sensing and storage protein within heme biosynthesis. PMID:25602700

  9. Interference of chlorate and chlorite with nitrate reduction in resting cells of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Igor

    2006-12-01

    When grown anaerobically on a succinate+nitrate (SN) medium, Paracoccus denitrificans forms the membrane-bound, cytoplasmically oriented, chlorate-reducing nitrate reductase Nar, while the periplasmic enzyme Nap is expressed during aerobic growth on butyrate+oxygen (BO) medium. Preincubation of SN cells with chlorate produced a concentration-dependent decrease in nitrate utilization, which could be ascribed to Nar inactivation. Toluenization rendered Nar less sensitive to chlorate, but more sensitive to chlorite, suggesting that the latter compound may be the true inactivator. The Nap enzyme of BO cells was inactivated by both chlorate and chlorite at concentrations that were at least two orders of magnitude lower than those shown to affect Nar. Partial purification of Nap resulted in insensitivity to chlorate and diminished sensitivity to chlorite. Azide was specific for SN cells in protecting nitrate reductase against chlorate attack, the protective effect of nitrate being more pronounced in BO cells. The results are discussed in terms of different metabolic activation of chlorine oxoanions in both types of cells, and limited permeation of chlorite across the cell membrane.

  10. Chlorite dismutases – a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite is a serious environmental concern, as rising concentrations of this harmful anthropogenic compound have been detected in groundwater, drinking water, and soil. Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are therefore important molecules in bioremediation as Clds catalyze the degradation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. Clds are heme b-containing oxidoreductases present in numerous bacterial and archaeal phyla. This review presents the phylogeny of functional Clds and Cld-like proteins, and demonstrates the close relationship of this novel enzyme family to the recently discovered dye-decolorizing peroxidases. The available X-ray structures, biophysical and enzymatic properties, as well as a proposed reaction mechanism, are presented and critically discussed. Open questions about structure-function relationships are addressed, including the nature of the catalytically relevant redox and reaction intermediates and the mechanism of inactivation of Clds during turnover. Based on analysis of currently available data, chlorite dismutase from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” is suggested as a model Cld for future application in biotechnology and bioremediation. Additionally, Clds can be used in various applications as local generators of molecular oxygen, a reactivity already exploited by microbes that must perform aerobic metabolic pathways in the absence of molecular oxygen. For biotechnologists in the field of chemical engineering and bioremediation, this review provides the biochemical and biophysical background of the Cld enzyme family as well as critically assesses Cld's technological potential. PMID:24519858

  11. Chlorite dismutases - a heme enzyme family for use in bioremediation and generation of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Chlorite is a serious environmental concern, as rising concentrations of this harmful anthropogenic compound have been detected in groundwater, drinking water, and soil. Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are therefore important molecules in bioremediation as Clds catalyze the degradation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. Clds are heme b-containing oxidoreductases present in numerous bacterial and archaeal phyla. This review presents the phylogeny of functional Clds and Cld-like proteins, and demonstrates the close relationship of this novel enzyme family to the recently discovered dye-decolorizing peroxidases. The available X-ray structures, biophysical and enzymatic properties, as well as a proposed reaction mechanism, are presented and critically discussed. Open questions about structure-function relationships are addressed, including the nature of the catalytically relevant redox and reaction intermediates and the mechanism of inactivation of Clds during turnover. Based on analysis of currently available data, chlorite dismutase from "Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii" is suggested as a model Cld for future application in biotechnology and bioremediation. Additionally, Clds can be used in various applications as local generators of molecular oxygen, a reactivity already exploited by microbes that must perform aerobic metabolic pathways in the absence of molecular oxygen. For biotechnologists in the field of chemical engineering and bioremediation, this review provides the biochemical and biophysical background of the Cld enzyme family as well as critically assesses Cld's technological potential. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Studies of carcinogenicity of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Yokose, Y; Uchida, K; Nakae, D; Shiraiwa, K; Yamamoto, K; Konishi, Y

    1987-01-01

    The carcinogenic activities of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice were examined. Sodium chlorite was given at concentrations of 0 (control), 0.025% (low dose), or 0.05% (high dose) in the drinking water of 150 female and 150 male mice for 80 weeks, after which time the animals were returned to distilled water without sodium chlorite. All mice were sacrificed 85 weeks from the beginning of the experiment. The incidence of tumor-bearing animals was 32% (control), 34% (low dose), and 26% (high dose) in female mice, and 46% (control), 57% (low dose), and 53% (high dose) in male mice. The types and incidence of neoplasms that occurred frequently in each group of both sexes were similar to those observed spontaneously in B6C3F1 mice. The incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in the high dose group of females (2%), however, was lower than that in the control group (15%). Furthermore, the incidence of pulmonary adenomas in the high dose group of males (12%) was higher than that in the control group (0%), but neither dose-related increases in the adenoma incidences nor increased incidences of the adenocarcinomas were observed. These results indicated no clear evidence of a carcinogenic potential of sodium chlorite in B6C3F1 mice. PMID:3447900

  13. A simple method for epoxidation of olefins using sodium chlorite as an oxidant without a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xue-Li; Wang, Zhi; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Zhang, Chi

    2005-11-11

    [Reaction: see text]. Sodium chlorite has been demonstrated to be capable of epoxidizing a variety of olefins at 55-65 degrees C (oil bath). Chlorine dioxide is believed to be the pivotal epoxidizing agent in the reaction on the basis of the mechanistic studies.

  14. Efficacy of chlorine and acidified sodium chlorite on microbial population and quality changes of spinach leaves.

    PubMed

    Nei, Daisuke; Choi, Ji-Weon; Bari, Md Latiful; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Inatsu, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-01

    Efficacy of washing with distilled water, chlorine solution, and acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution on populations of microorganisms on spinach leaves was evaluated. Washing with chlorine (100 mg/L) and ASC (sodium chlorite, 15 mg/L; citric acid, 200 mg/L) resulted in significant population reduction (1.1-1.9 log CFU/g) of aerobic microflora, coliform, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (p < 0.05). There was no remarkable difference in decontamination efficacy between chlorine and ASC solution. In recent years, several sodium chlorite chemicals have been commercially available, and no difference in decontamination efficacy among the chemicals was observed when same concentration of sodium chlorite and citric acid were used. In addition, the reduction of E. coli O157:H7 population was influenced depending on the inoculation method and type of washing. It has been seen that dip-inoculated spinach leaves showed lower reduction than that of spot-inoculated spinach. After washing, populations of aerobic microflora, coliform, and E. coli O157:H7 were increased during storage at 10 degrees C, and washing condition before storage did not affect the subsequent increases in microbial population. Color of spinach leaves washed with ASC solution was not different from the color of those washed with water or chlorine solution, and washing with ASC solution was concluded to has no effect on appearance of spinach leaves.

  15. Acidified sodium chlorite as an alternative to chlorine for elimination of Salmonella on alfalfa seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disadvantage associated with the use of chlorine for food processing and water treatment had been documented previously. This study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be used to replace calcium hypochlorite [Ca(OCl)2] for disinfection of alfalfa seeds. Seeds co...

  16. Higher acid-chlorite reactivity of cell corner middle lamella lignin in black spruce

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2007-01-01

    To determine if there was a delignification behavior difference between secondary wall (S2) and middle lamella (cell corner or CC) lignin, black spruce cross-sections were acid-chlorite delignified and the tissue was evaluated in-situ by Raman imaging. Lignin concentration in S2 and CC was determined in numerous latewood cell areas in the two hour delignified cross...

  17. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC using chlorogenic acid (CA) and PPO extracted from mushroom to emulate the b...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1070 - Sodium chlorite; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... chlorite is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues when used in accordance with good agricultural practice as a seed-soak treatment in the growing of the raw agricultural commodities...

  19. Spectral characteristics of chlorites and Mg-serpentines using high- resolution reflectance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.V.V.; Clark, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    The present laboratory study using high-resolution reflectance spectroscopy (0.25-2.7 ??m) focuses on two primary phyllosilicate groups, serpentines and chlorites. The results show that it is possible to spectrally distinguish between isochemical end-members of the Mg-rich serpentine group (chrysotile, antigorite, and lizardite) and to recognize spectral variations in chlorites as a function of Fe/Mg ratio (~8-38 wt% Fe). The position and relative strength of the 1.4-??m absorption feature in the trioctahedral chlorites appear to be correlated to the total iron content and/or the Mg/Si ratio and the loss on ignition values of the sample. Spectral differences in the 2.3-??m wavelength region can be attributed to differences in lattice environments and are characteristic for specific trioctahedral chlorites. The 1.4-??m feature in the isochemical Mg-rich serpentines (total iron content ~1.5-7.0 wt%) show marked spectral differences, apparently due to structural differences. -Authors

  20. Influence of drinking water treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and chlorite/chlorate formation.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Gialdini, Francesca; Biasibetti, Michela; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Disinfection is the last treatment stage of a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) and is carried out to maintain a residual concentration of disinfectant in the water distribution system. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is a widely used chemical employed for this purpose. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of several treatments on chlorine dioxide consumption and on chlorite and chlorate formation in the final oxidation/disinfection stage. A number of tests was performed at laboratory scale employing water samples collected from the DWTP of Cremona (Italy). The following processes were studied: oxidation with potassium permanganate, chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite, coagulation/flocculation with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate, filtration and adsorption onto activated carbon. The results showed that the chlorine dioxide demand is high if sodium hypochlorite or potassium permanganate are employed in pre-oxidation. On the other hand, chlorine dioxide leads to the highest production of chlorite and chlorate. The coagulation/flocculation process after pre-oxidation shows that chlorine dioxide demand decreases if potassium permanganate is employed as an oxidant, both with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate. Therefore, the combination of these processes leads to a lower production of chlorite and chlorate. Aluminum sulfate is preferable in terms of the chlorine dioxide demand reduction and minimization of the chlorite and chlorate formation. Activated carbon is the most effective solution as it reduced the chlorine dioxide consumption by about 50% and the DBP formation by about 20-40%.

  1. Pedogenic chlorites in podzolic soils with different intensities of hydromorphism: Origin, properties, and conditions of their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolpeshta, I. I.; Sokolova, T. A.; Bonifacio, E.; Falcone, G.

    2010-07-01

    Minerals of the pedogenic chlorite group were studied in the clay fractions isolated from the mineral horizons of podzolic and gleyic peat-podzolic soils. In the AE and E horizons of the podzolic soil, pedogenic chlorites are thought to develop from vermiculite, whereas in the E horizon of the gleyic peat-podzolic soil, they can be formed from smectite minerals. For estimating the degree of chloritization (the degree of filling of the interlayer space of 2: 1 minerals with Al hydroxides), a numerical criterion was is proposed. The difference between the values of this criterion before and after the treatment of the preparations with NH4F indicated that the degree of chloritization in the pedogenic chlorites decreases in the following sequence: the E horizon of the podzolic soil > the AE horizon of the podzolic soil > the E horizon of the gleyic peat-podzolic soil. Another numerical criterion was proposed to estimate the degree of polymerization of Al-hydroxy complexes in pedogenic chlorites. This criterion was based on the thermal stability of soil chlorites and represented the temperature at which an increase in the intensity of the 1.0-nm peak after heating the K-saturated preparations exceeds 50% of its initial value. According to this criterion, the degree of polymerization of the Al-hydroxy interlayers in pedogenic chlorites decreases in the following sequence: the E horizon of the podzolic soil > the E horizon of the gleyic peat-podzolic soil ≥ the AE horizon of the podzolic soil. The distinct interrelation between the soil properties and the degrees of chloritization and polymerization of the Al-hydroxy interlayers attests to the modern origin of the pedogenic chlorites.

  2. Assessment of maternal toxicity, embryotoxicity and teratogenic potential of sodium chlorite in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed Central

    Couri, D; Miller, C H; Bull, R J; Delphia, J M; Ammar, E M

    1982-01-01

    Groups of up to 13 pregnant rats were individually caged. Body weight, food and water consumption were recorded at days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of gestation and the dams were treated on days 8-15 with sodium chlorite, 0.1%, 0.5% or 2% in drinking water or by injection of 10, 20, or 50 mg/kg IP or by gavaging with 200 mg/kg. To prevent ingestion of stillborn pups some dams were sacrificed at day 22. Other dams were allowed to deliver at term. Fetuses were weighed, measured and examined for soft tissue and skeletal malformations. Sodium chlorite, 20 or 50 mg/kg daily IP or gavaging with 200 mg/kg, caused vaginal and urethral bleeding. Doses of 10, 20 or 50 mg/kg daily IP caused 0, 50 and 100% mortality of dams, respectively. No deaths were caused by sodium chlorite in the drinking water, but the dams' body weight, water and food consumption decreased during all treatments except 0.1% in the drinking water. Blood smears from the dams injected IP or drinking 2% sodium chlorite showed irregular, bizarre and ruptured erythrocytes. Injection of 10 or 20 mg/kg or drinking 2% resulted in decreased litter size and increased stillbirths and resorption sites. Drinking 0.1% or 0.5% sodium chlorite did not produce any significant embryotoxicity. With all treatments, no significant gross soft tissue or skeletal malformations were observed. Postnatal growth of the pups was not affected by any treatment of the dams during the gestation period. PMID:7151764

  3. Contribution of long-term hydrothermal experiments for understanding the smectite-to-chlorite conversion in geological environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser-Ruck, Régine; Pignatelli, Isabella; Bourdelle, Franck; Abdelmoula, Mustapha; Barres, Odile; Guillaume, Damien; Charpentier, Delphine; Rousset, Davy; Cathelineau, Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    The smectite-to-chlorite conversion is investigated through long-duration experiments (up to 9 years) conducted at 300 °C. The starting products were the Wyoming bentonite MX80 (79 % smectite), metallic iron and magnetite in contact with a Na-Ca chloride solution. The predominant minerals in the run products were an iron-rich chlorite (chamosite like) and interstratified clays interpreted to be chlorite/smectite and/or corrensite/smectite, accompanied by euhedral crystals of quartz, albite and zeolite. The formation of pure corrensite was not observed in the long-duration experiments. The conversion of smectite into chlorite over time appears to take place in several steps and through several successive mechanisms: a solid-state transformation, significant dissolution of the smectite and direct precipitation from the solution, which is over-saturated with respect to chlorite, allowing the formation of a chamosite-like mineral. The reaction mechanisms are confirmed by X-ray patterns and data obtained on the experimental solutions (pH, contents of Si, Mg, Na and Ca). Because of the availability of some nutrients in the solution, total dissolution of the starting smectite does not lead to 100 % crystallization of chlorite but to a mixture of two dominant clays: chamosite and interstratified chlorite/smectite and/or corrensite/smectite poor in smectite. The role of Fe/(Fe + Mg) in the experimental medium is highlighted by chemical data obtained on newly formed clay particles alongside previously published data. The newly formed iron-rich chlorite has the same composition as that predicted by the geothermometer for diagenetic to low-grade metamorphic conditions, and the quartz + Fe-chlorite + albite experimental assemblage in the 9-year experiment is close to that fixed by water-rock equilibrium.

  4. The importance of the location of sodium chlorite application in a multipollutant flue gas cleaning system.

    PubMed

    Krzyzynska, Renata; Hutson, Nick D

    2012-06-01

    In this study, removing sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), and mercury (Hg) from simulated flue gas was investigated in two laboratory-sized bubbling reactors that simulated an oxidizing reactor (where the NO and Hg(0) oxidation reactions are expected to occur) and a wet limestone scrubber, respectively. A sodium chlorite solution was used as the oxidizing agent. The sodium chlorite solution was an effective additive that enhanced the NO(x), Hg, and SO2 capture from the flue gas. Furthermore, it was discovered that the location of the sodium chlorite application (before, in, or after the wet scrubber) greatly influences which pollutants are removed and the amount removed. This effect is related to the chemical conditions (pH, absence/presence of particular gases) that are present at different positions throughout the flue gas cleaning system profile. The research results indicated that there is a potential to achieve nearly zero SO2, NO(x), and Hg emissions (complete SO2, NO, and Hg removals and -90% of NO(x) absorption from initial values of 1500 ppmv of SO2, 200 ppmv of NO(x), and 206 microg/m3 of Hg(0)) from the flue gas when sodium chlorite was applied before the wet limestone scrubber. However applying the oxidizer after the wet limestone scrubber was the most effective configuration for Hg and NO(x) control for extremely low chlorite concentrations (below 0.002 M) and therefore appears to be the best configuration for Hg control or as an additional step in NO(x) recleaning (after other NO(x) control facilities). The multipollutant scrubber, into which the chlorite was injected simultaneously with the calcium carbonate slurry, appeared to be the least expensive solution (when consider only capital cost), but exhibited the lowest NO(x) absorption at -50%. The bench-scale test results presented can be used to develop performance predictions for a full- or pilot-scale multipollutant flue gas cleaning system equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization

  5. Serpentines, talc, chlorites, and their high-pressure phase transitions: a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, Bruno; Bezacier, Lucile; Caracas, Razvan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectra of magnesian phyllosilicates belonging to the serpentine, talc, and chlorite groups have been obtained at ambient conditions, and at high pressures and up to 200 °C in order to study high-pressure transformations in the 10 GPa range. The complex and distinct Raman spectra of these minerals allow straightforward identification, which may otherwise be difficult from optical microscopy. High-pressure measurements are in good agreement with DFT calculations for talc and lizardite. Pressure-induced displacive modifications are identified in lizardite and antigorite serpentines, and in chlorite at ~4, 7 and 8 GPa, respectively, while talc shows no transition up to ~11 GPa. At high temperature, the high-pressure distortions of serpentines shift to higher pressures. Given the stability limits of these minerals, and the natural range of P-T conditions, none of the high-pressure distortions observed at high pressure are likely to occur at depth in the Earth.

  6. Barium chlorite hydrate, Ba(ClO2)2.3.5H2O.

    PubMed

    Smolentsev, Anton I; Naumov, Dmitry Yu

    2005-05-01

    The structure of barium chlorite hydrate, Ba(ClO2)2.3.5H2O, has been determined by single-crystal X-ray analysis at 150 K. The structure is monoclinic, space group C2/c, with Z = 8. It contains layers of Ba2+ cations coordinated by ClO2- anions and water molecules. There are also solvate water molecules involved only in hydrogen bonding of the layers. Three solvate water O atoms are on sites of twofold symmetry, while all other atoms are in general positions. The full coordination environment of the Ba2+ cation consists of ten O atoms belonging to six chlorites and three water molecules, forming a bicapped square antiprism.

  7. Microscopic distribution of trace elements in minerals (chlorites, sulfides, sulfates) in submarine hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Benjamin, T.M.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Haymon, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed trace elements in two types of hydrothermal precipitates using the Los Alamos Nuclear Microprobe. Chlorites and epidotes in basalt were analyzed from the Samail Ophiolite of Oman. Sulfide and sulfate minerals were analyzed from samples of active chimney walls from 21/degree/N. East Pacific Rise. These samples are ideal for our study because of the extensive background information available on processes and component characteristics. Initial results indicate significant differences in mobile trace elements between chlorites associated with and those distinctly separate from major stockwork flow zones, consistent with greater water-rock reaction within stockworks. Trace element concentrations across chimney walls also exhibit distinctive patterns which can be correlated with mineral/chemical zonation and possible also with variations in elemental source. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Effect of sodium chloride, chlorite, and perchlorate on the hypochlorite-induced peroxidation of phospholipid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Panasenko, O M; Arnhold, J; Sergienko, V I

    1997-01-01

    The abilities of sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), chlorite (NaClO2), chlorate (NaClO3), and perchlorate (NaClO4) to initiate lipid peroxidation (LP) in liposomes formed from unsaturated phosphatidylcholine were compared. It was shown that only NaClO induced an intensive accumulation of LP products (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and diene conjugates) in the liposomes as a result of their co-incubation. The other oxochlorates produced no similar effects and did not affect the hypochlorite-induced LP. This indicates that the observed hypochlorite-induced LP does not result from the presence of chlorite, chlorate, or perchlorate anion admixtures in the medium.

  9. Occurrence of bromate, chlorite and chlorate in drinking waters disinfected with hypochlorite reagents. Tracing their origins.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Hernández Hierro, J Miguel; de Castro Alfageme, Santiago; García Hernández, Cristina

    2010-05-15

    Bromate was first reported as a disinfection by-product from ozonated waters, but more recently it has been reported also as a result of treatment using hypochlorite solutions worldwide. The aim of this study was to study the scope of this phenomenon in the drinking waters (n=509) of Castilla y León, Spain, and in the hypochlorite disinfectant reagents. Two thirds of the treated waters monitored were found to have bromate concentrations higher than 1 microg/l, and of them a median value of 8 microg/l and a maximum of 49 microg/l. These concentrations are higher than those reported so far, however, a great variability can be found. Median values for chlorite were of 5 microg/l, and of 119 microg/l for chlorate. Only 7 out of 40 hypochlorite feedstock solutions were negative for bromate, the rest showing a median of 1022 mg/l; and 4 out of 14 calcium hypochlorite pellets were also negative, the rest with a median of 240 mg/kg. Although bromate is cited as potentially added to water from calcium hypochlorite pellets, no reference is found in scientific literature regarding its real content. Chlorite (median 2646 mg/l) and chlorate (median 20,462 mg/l) and chlorite (median 695 mg/kg) and chlorate (median 9516 mg/kg) were also monitored, respectively, in sodium hypochlorite solutions and calcium hypochlorite pellets. The levels of chlorite and chlorate in water are considered satisfactory, but not those of bromate, undoubtedly owing to the high content of bromide in the raw brines employed by the chlor-alkali manufacturers. Depending on the manufacturer, the bromate concentrations in the treated waters may be very heterogeneous owing to the lack of specification for this contaminant in the disinfectant reagents -the European Norms EN 900 and 901 do not mention it.

  10. An AFM study of the chlorite-fluid interface. [Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vrdoljak, G.A.; Henderson, G.S.; Fawcett, J.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Chlorite is a ubiquitous mineral in many geologic environments and plays an important role in elemental adsorption and retention in soils. Chlorite has a 2:1 layer structure consisting of two tetrahedral sheets with an octahedral sheet between them (talc-like layer). The 2:1 layer is charge balanced and hydrogen-bonded by an interlayer of MgOH[sub 6] octahedra (brucite-like layer). The nature of chlorite's structure, its ease of imaging, and perfect 001 cleavage, make this mineral an ideal substrate for use in elemental adsorption studies in solution, with the AFM. The 001 cleavage plane of a 2b polytype with composition (Mg[sub 4.4]Fe[sub 0.6]Al[sub 1.0])[(Si[sub 2.9]Al[sub 1.1])]O[sub 10](OH)[sub g] has been imaged in air, water, and oil by atomic force microscopy. Dissolution features are observed in water, showing sub-micron features dissolving in real-time. Atomic resolution of both the talc-like and brucite-like layers has been obtained in air. However, only the tetrahedral sheet of the talc-like layer has been imaged at atomic resolution in oil and water, which may indicate a structural instability of the brucite-like surface in solution. Measurements of the unit-cell dimensions (a and b) for the talc-like layer in the three different media indicate a structural expansion of the mineral surface in solution. The a unit cell dimension expands by 7.4 [+-] 0.1% when in water; conversely, the b dimension varies greatly when in oil ([minus]10% to +20%), relative to air. The effects of these solution media on the structure of chlorite are revealed by characterization with the AFM. This information should prove useful in future studies of adsorption onto layer silicates.

  11. Manipulating Conserved Heme Cavity Residues of Chlorite Dismutase: Effect on Structure, Redox Chemistry, and Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen. In order to elucidate the role of conserved heme cavity residues in the catalysis of this reaction comprehensive mutational and biochemical analyses of Cld from “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were performed. Particularly, point mutations of the cavity-forming residues R173, K141, W145, W146, and E210 were performed. The effect of manipulation in 12 single and double mutants was probed by UV–vis spectroscopy, spectroelectrochemistry, pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetics, and X-ray crystallography. Resulting biochemical data are discussed with respect to the known crystal structure of wild-type NdCld and the variants R173A and R173K as well as the structures of R173E, W145V, W145F, and the R173Q/W146Y solved in this work. The findings allow a critical analysis of the role of these heme cavity residues in the reaction mechanism of chlorite degradation that is proposed to involve hypohalous acid as transient intermediate and formation of an O=O bond. The distal R173 is shown to be important (but not fully essential) for the reaction with chlorite, and, upon addition of cyanide, it acts as a proton acceptor in the formation of the resulting low-spin complex. The proximal H-bonding network including K141-E210-H160 keeps the enzyme in its ferric (E°′ = −113 mV) and mainly five-coordinated high-spin state and is very susceptible to perturbation. PMID:24364531

  12. Evaluation of chlorite and chlorate genotoxicity using plant bioassays and in vitro DNA damage tests.

    PubMed

    Feretti, D; Zerbini, I; Ceretti, E; Villarini, M; Zani, C; Moretti, M; Fatigoni, C; Orizio, G; Donato, F; Monarca, S

    2008-09-01

    In the last few years chlorine dioxide has been increasingly used for disinfecting drinking water in many countries. Although it does not react with humic substances, chlorine dioxide added to water is reduced primarily to chlorite and chlorate ions, compounds that are under investigation for their potential adverse effects on human health. The aim of this research was to study the genotoxicity of chlorite and chlorate and their mixtures. The end-points included two plant tests (chromosomal aberration test in Allium cepa and micronucleus assay in Tradescantia, carried out at different times of exposure) and two genotoxicity tests in human HepG2 cells (comet assay and cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus test). Preliminary toxicity tests were carried out for both plant and HepG2 assays. The results showed that chlorite and chlorate are able to induce chromosomal damage to plant systems, particularly chromosomal aberrations in A. cepa root tip cells, even at concentrations lower than the limit established by Italian normative law and WHO guidelines. In HepG2 cells increased DNA damage was only observed for chlorate at the lowest concentration. No increase in micronuclei frequency was detected in any of the samples tested in human HepG2 cells.

  13. “Development of an Automated On-line Electrochemical Chlorite Ion Sensor”

    PubMed Central

    Myers, John N.; Steinecker, William H.; Sandlin, Zechariah D.; Cox, James A.; Gordon, Gilbert; Pacey, Gilbert E.

    2012-01-01

    A sensor system for the automatic, in-line, determination of chlorite ion is reported. Electroanalytical measurements were performed in electrolyte-free liquids by using an electrochemical probe (EC), which enables in-line detection in high-resistance media such as disinfected water. Cyclic voltammetry scan rate studies suggest that the current arising from the oxidation of chlorite ion at an EC probe is mass-transfer limited. By coupling FIA with an EC probe amperometric cell, automated analysis was achieved. This sensor is intended to fulfill the daily monitoring requirements of the EPA DBP regulations for chlorite ion. Detection limits of 0.02-0.13 mg/L were attained, which is about one order of magnitude below the MRDL. The sensor showed no faradaic signal for perchlorate, chlorate, or nitrate. The lifetime and stability of the sensor were investigated by measuring calibration curves over time under constant-flow conditions. Detection limits of <0.1 mg/L were repeatedly achieved over a period of three weeks. PMID:22608440

  14. Production of bio-sugar and bioethanol from coffee residue (CR) by acid-chlorite pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Myeong; Choi, Yong-Soo; Lee, Dae-Seok; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, coffee residue (CR) after roasting is recognized as one of the most useful resources in the world for producing the biofuel and bio-materials. In this study, we evaluated the potential of bio-sugar and bioethanol production from acid-chlorite treated CR. Notably, CR treated three times with acid-chlorite after organic solvent extraction (OSE-3), showed the high monosaccharide content, and the efficient sugar conversion yield compared to the other pretreatment conditions. The OSE-3 (6% substrate loading, w/v) can produce bio-sugar (0.568g/g OSE-3). Also, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) produced ethanol (0.266g/g OSE-3), and showed an ethanol conversion yield of 73.8% after a 72-h reaction period. These results suggest that acid-chlorite pretreatment can improve the bio-sugar and bioethanol production of CR by removing the phenolic and brown compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of thiosulfate for neutralization of acidified sodium chlorite in microbiological testing.

    PubMed

    Kemp, G K; Schneider, K R

    2000-12-01

    At low pH, acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) has antimicrobial activity against a variety of foodborne contaminants. To evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of ASC at specific time points posttreatment, it is necessary to halt the action of the disinfectant by removing residual chlorite or by increasing the pH. In this study, thiosulfate was investigated at varying concentrations for its effect on microbial survival and was investigated at a concentration of 0.1% in the presence of ASC for its effect on the antimicrobial and chemical activity of the test solution. Additionally, sodium thiosulfate was tested in two buffering systems, buffered peptone water (BPW) and Butterfield's phopshate buffer (BPB), for its ability to inactivate ASC chemistry. The results of this study show that, at a concentration of 0.1%, sodium thiosulfate has no deleterious effect on Escherichia coli survival and is effective in halting the antimicrobial action of ASC by eliminating the production of residual chlorite. The BPW alone and BPB in combination with thiosulfate were found to be effective inactivators of ASC chemistry.

  16. Environmental genomics reveals a functional chlorite dismutase in the nitrite-oxidizing bacterium 'Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii'.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Wagner, Michael; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Hace, Karin; Spieck, Eva; Konrat, Robert; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger

    2008-11-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrospira are ubiquitous in natural ecosystems and also in wastewater treatment plants. Nitrospira are members of a distinct phylum, not closely related to other nitrifiers, and no genomic sequences from this genus have been available so far. Here we applied an environmental genomics approach to sequence and assemble a 137 kbp-long genome fragment of 'Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii', which had been enriched from activated sludge and belongs to Nitrospira sublineage I without isolated representatives. The annotation of this contig, which carried the 16S rRNA gene of N. defluvii, offered first insight into the genome of Nitrospira. Surprisingly, we found a gene similar to genes encoding chlorite dismutase (CLD), an enzyme degrading chlorite (ClO(2)(-)) to Cl(-) and O(2). To date, CLDs with high catalytic activity have been found only in perchlorate- and chlorate-reducing bacteria but not in nitrifiers. Heterologous expression in E. coli followed by enzymatic tests confirmed that this gene of Nitrospira encodes a highly active CLD, which is also expressed in situ by Nitrospira, indicating that this nitrite oxidizer might be involved in the bioremediation of perchlorate and chlorite. Phylogenetic analyses showed that CLD and related proteins are widely distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea, and indicated that this enzyme family appeared relatively early in evolution, has been subject to functional diversification and might play yet unknown roles in microbial metabolism.

  17. Development of an automated on-line electrochemical chlorite ion sensor.

    PubMed

    Myers, John N; Steinecker, William H; Sandlin, Zechariah D; Cox, James A; Gordon, Gilbert; Pacey, Gilbert E

    2012-05-30

    A sensor system for the automatic, in-line, determination of chlorite ion is reported. Electroanalytical measurements were performed in electrolyte-free liquids by using an electrochemical probe (EC), which enables in-line detection in high-resistance media such as disinfected water. Cyclic voltammetry scan rate studies suggest that the current arising from the oxidation of chlorite ion at an EC probe is mass-transfer limited. By coupling FIA with an EC probe amperometric cell, automated analysis was achieved. This sensor is intended to fulfill the daily monitoring requirements of the EPA DBP regulations for chlorite ion. Detection limits of 0.02-0.13 mg/L were attained, which is about one order of magnitude below the MRDL. The sensor showed no faradaic signal for perchlorate, chlorate, or nitrate. The lifetime and stability of the sensor were investigated by measuring calibration curves over time under constant-flow conditions. Detection limits of <0.1 mg/L were repeatedly achieved over a period of three weeks.

  18. Temporal and spatial organization of chemical and hydrodynamic processes. The system Pb(2+)-chlorite-thiourea.

    PubMed

    Udovichenko, Vladimir V; Strizhak, Peter E; Toth, Agata; Horwath, Dezso; Ning, Steven; Maselko, Jerzy

    2008-05-22

    Precise spatio-temporal organization of chemical, hydrodynamic, and mechanical processes is typical for biological systems where particular chemical reactions have to accrue in precisely assignment place and time. It is rarely studied and observed in chemical systems. We report unusual precipitation pattern formation of PbSO(4) in chemical media (Pb(2+)-Chlorite-Thiourea System). We have found that there is a region in a plane of initial concentrations of chlorite ions and thiourea where precipitation of lead sulfate appears in a form of ring if a pellet of lead nitrate is placed into the system. The whole process may be divided into three stages: movement of first circular front of lead containing solution, formation of a ringlike pattern of lead sulfate, and finally, propagation of this pattern resulting in a formation of ring with final inside diameter. Our experiments indicate that the following values are reproducible and quantify the PbSO(4) ring evolution: induction time, radius of the ring birth, speed of ring propagation toward the center, and final inside radius of the ring. Numerical solution of kinetic equations allowed us to give a qualitative explanation for the phenomenon observed. Formation and evolution of the PbSO(4) rings are caused by interplay of concentration gradients in the system and chemical reactions that occur in excitable chlorite-thiourea system. Chemical reactions and hydrodynamic processes form a complex causal network that made morphogenesis of this unusual pattern possible.

  19. Use of layer silicate for protein crystallization: effects of Micromica and chlorite powders in hanging drops.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Masahide; Ino, Keita; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Oshikane, Hiroyuki; Nureki, Osamu; Ebina, Takeo; Mizukami, Fujio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2008-02-15

    Two kinds of layer silicate powder, Micromica and chlorite, were used to aid protein crystallization by the addition to hanging drops. Using appropriate crystallization buffers, Micromica powder facilitated crystal growth speed for most proteins tested in this study. Furthermore, the addition of Micromica powder to hanging drops allowed the successful crystallization of lysozyme, catalase, concanavalin A, and trypsin even at low protein concentrations and under buffer conditions that otherwise would not generate protein crystals. Except for threonine synthase and apoferritin, the presence of chlorite delayed crystallization but induced the formation of large crystals. X-ray analysis of thaumatin crystals generated by our novel procedure gave better quality data than did that of crystals obtained by a conventional hanging drop method. Our results suggest that the speed of crystal growth and the quality of the corresponding X-ray data may be inversely related, at least for the formation of thaumatin crystals. The effect of Micromica and chlorite powders and the application of layer silicate powder for protein crystallization are discussed.

  20. Nanoscale channels on ectomycorrhizal-colonized chlorite: Evidence for plant-driven fungal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzè, Salvatore A.; Saccone, Loredana; Vala Ragnarsdottir, K.; Smits, Mark M.; Duran, Adele L.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Banwart, Steven A.; McMaster, Terence J.

    2012-09-01

    The roots of many trees in temperate and boreal forests are sheathed with ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) that extend into the soil, forming intimate contact with soil minerals, from which they absorb nutrient elements required by the plants and, in return, are supported by the organic carbon photosynthesized by the trees. While EMF are strongly implicated in mineral weathering, their effects on mineral surfaces at the nanoscale are less documented. In the present study, we investigated the effects of symbiotic EMF on the topography of a chlorite mineral using atomic force microscopy. A cleaning protocol was successfully applied to remove fungal hyphae without altering the underlying mineral structure and topography. Examination of the exposed chlorite surface showed the presence of primary channels, of the order of a micron in width and up to 50 nm in depth, the morphology of which strongly indicates a fungal-induced origin. Smaller secondary channels were observed extending from the primary channels and would appear to be involved in their enlargement. The presence of channels is the first nanoscale demonstration of the effects of fungal interaction, fuelled by plant photosynthate, on the topography of a chlorite mineral, and it provides clear evidence of the ability of EMF to enhance mineral dissolution.

  1. Efficacy of acidified sodium chlorite treatments in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Bari, Md Latiful; Kawasaki, Susumu; Isshiki, Kenji; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2005-02-01

    Efficacy of acidified sodium chlorite for reducing the population of Escherichia coli O157:H7 pathogens on Chinese cabbage leaves was evaluated. Washing leaves with distilled water could reduce the population of E. coli O157:H7 by approximately 1.0 log CFU/g, whereas treating with acidified chlorite solution could reduce the population by 3.0 log CFU/g without changing the leaf color. A similar level of reduction was achieved by washing with sodium chlorite solution containing various organic acids. However, acidified sodium chlorite in combination with a mild heat treatment reduced the population by approximately 4.0 log CFU/g without affecting the color, but it softened the leaves. Moreover, the efficacy of the washing treatment was similar at low (4 degrees C) and room (25 degrees C) temperatures, indicating that acidified sodium chloride solution could be useful as a sanitizer for surface washing of fresh produce.

  2. Structure and heme-binding properties of HemQ (chlorite dismutase-like protein) from Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Hagmüller, Andreas; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Krutzler, Michael; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Pirker, Katharina F; Obinger, Christian; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G

    2015-05-15

    Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are structurally closely related to functional chlorite dismutases which are heme b-dependent oxidoreductases capable of reducing chlorite to chloride with simultaneous production of dioxygen. Chlorite dismutase-like proteins are incapable of performing this reaction and their biological role is still under discussion. Recently, members of this large protein family were shown to be involved in heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, and thus the protein was renamed HemQ in these organisms. In the present work the structural and heme binding properties of the chlorite dismutase-like protein from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (LmCld) were analyzed in order to evaluate its potential role as a regulatory heme sensing protein. The homopentameric crystal structure (2.0Å) shows high similarity to chlorite-degrading chlorite dismutases with an important difference in the structure of the putative substrate and heme entrance channel. In solution LmCld is a stable hexamer able to bind the low-spin ligand cyanide. Heme binding is reversible with KD-values determined to be 7.2μM (circular dichroism spectroscopy) and 16.8μM (isothermal titration calorimetry) at pH 7.0. Both acidic and alkaline conditions promote heme release. Presented biochemical and structural data reveal that the chlorite dismutase-like protein from L. monocytogenes could act as a potential regulatory heme sensing and storage protein within heme biosynthesis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How active site protonation state influences the reactivity and ligation of the heme in chlorite dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Bennett R.; Blanc, Béatrice; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase catalyzes O2 release from chlorite with exquisite efficiency and specificity. The spectroscopic properties, ligand binding affinities, and steady state kinetics of chlorite dismutase from Dechloromonas aromatica were examined over pH 3–11.5 to gain insight into how the protonation state of the heme environment influences dioxygen formation. An acid/base transition was observed by UV/visible and resonance Raman spectroscopy with a pKa of 8.7, 2–3 pH units below analogous transitions observed in typical His-ligated peroxidases. This transition marks the conversion of a five coordinate high spin Fe(III) to a mixed high/low spin ferric-hydroxide, as confirmed by resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy. The two Fe–OH stretching frequencies are quite low, consistent with a weak Fe–OH bond, despite the nearly neutral imidazole side chain of the proximal histidine ligand. The hydroxide is proposed to interact strongly with a distal H-bond donor, thereby weakening the Fe–OH bond. The rR spectra of Cld-CO as a function of pH reveal two forms of the complex, one in which there is minimal interaction of distal residues with the carbonyl oxygen and another, acidic form in which the oxygen is under the influence of positive charge. Recent crystallographic data reveal arginine 183 as the lone H-bond donating residue in the distal pocket. It is likely that this Arg is the strong, positively charged H-bond donor implicated by vibrational data to interact with exogenous axial heme ligands. The same Arg in its neutral (pKa ~ 6.5) form also appears to act as the active site base in binding reactions of protonated ligands, such as HCN, to ferric Cld. The steady state profile for the rate of chlorite decomposition is characterized by these same pKas. The 5 coordinate high spin acidic Cld is more active than the alkaline hydroxide-bound form. The acid form decomposes chlorite most efficiently when the distal Arg is protonated/cationic (maximum kcat = 2.0 (±0.6)

  4. Two-generation reproduction and developmental neurotoxicity study with sodium chlorite in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gill, M W; Swanson, M S; Murphy, S R; Bailey, G P

    2000-01-01

    The potential for sodium chlorite to produce reproductive toxicity, developmental neurotoxicity and alterations in hematology and thyroid hormones was evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats administered sodium chlorite in the drinking water continuously for two generations. The F(0) generation animals (30 of each gender per group) and F(1) generation animals (25 of each gender per group) selected to rear the F(2) generation were allowed free access to drinking water containing 0, 35, 70 or 300 ppm sodium chlorite for a 10-week prebreed period, through mating for males and through mating, gestation and lactation for females. These drinking water concentrations corresponded to sodium chlorite doses of approximately 4, 8 and 30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for males and 5, 10 and 39 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for females, respectively. Evaluations included standard reproductive and postnatal indices, sperm morphology and motility, estrous cyclicity, a functional observational battery, motor activity, auditory startle, swim maze, hematology, serum thyroid hormone analyses and histopathology of reproductive and nervous system tissues. Sodium chlorite resulted in a decrease in water consumption in all groups and a decrease in food consumption and body weights in the 70 and 300 ppm groups. There was no evidence of reproductive toxicity. Pup body weight was decreased in the 300 ppm group and small delays were observed in the time to preputial separation and vaginal opening. Mild anemia and mild methemoglobinemia were observed for animals in the 300 ppm group. Thyroid hormone levels were not affected by treatment. Changes to the nervous system were limited to small decreases in amplitude of auditory startle response for postnatal day (PND) 25 pups in the 70 and 300 ppm groups and a small decrease in absolute brain weight for PND 11 pups in the 300 ppm group. These effects were considered to be of questionable neurotoxicological significance. Based on the results of this study, the no

  5. [Exposure to organic halogen compounds in drinking water of 9 Italian regions: exposure to chlorites, chlorates, thrihalomethanes, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene].

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Aggazzotti, G; Righi, E; Predieri, G; Giacobazzi, P; Kanitz, S; Barbone, F; Sansebastiano, G; Ricci, C; Leoni, V; Fabiani, L; Triassi, M

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the exposure to organohalogens compounds in drinking water from 9 Italian towns (Udine, Genova, Parma, Modena, Siena, Roma, L'Aquila, Napoli and Catania). Overall, 1199 samples collected from 72 waterworks were analyzed. THMs, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were evaluated using the head-space gas chromatographic technique (detection limit of 0.01 microg/l; chlorite and chlorate analysis was performed by ion chromatography (detection limit of 20 microg/l). THMs were evidenced in 925 samples (77%) (median value: 1.12 micro/l; range: 0.01-54 mciro/l) and 7 were higher than the THMs Italian limit of 30 microg/l. Chlorite and chlorate levels were higher than the detection limit in 45% for chlorite and in 34% for chlorate samples; median values were 221 microg/l and 76 microg/l, respectively. Chlorite values were higher than the chlorite Italian limit (700 microg/l) in 35 samples (8.7%). Trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene were measured in 29% and 44% of the investigated samples and showed values lower than the Italian limit (highest levels of 6 microg/l and 9 microg/l, respectively). The low levels detected of THMs, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene have no potentials effects on human health, whereas, the levels of chlorite and chlorates should be further evaluated and their potential effects for the populations using these drinking waters, better understood.

  6. Mechanism of and exquisite selectivity for O–O bond formation by the heme-dependent chlorite dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amanda Q.; Streit, Bennett R.; Zdilla, Michael J.; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a heme b-dependent, O–O bond forming enzyme that transforms toxic chlorite (ClO2−) into innocuous chloride and molecular oxygen. The mechanism and specificity of the reaction with chlorite and alternate oxidants were investigated. Chlorite is the sole source of dioxygen as determined by oxygen-18 labeling studies. Based on ion chromatography and mass spectrometry results, Cld is highly specific for the dismutation of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen with no other side products. Cld does not use chlorite as an oxidant for oxygen atom transfer and halogenation reactions (using cosubstrates guaiacol, thioanisole, and monochlorodimedone, respectively). When peracetic acid or H2O2 was used as an alternative oxidant, oxidation and oxygen atom transfer but not halogenation reactions occurred. Monitoring the reaction of Cld with peracetic acid by rapid-mixing UV-visible spectroscopy, the formation of the high valent compound I intermediate, [(Por•+)FeIV = O], was observed [k1 = (1.28 ± 0.04) × 106 M−1 s−1]. Compound I readily decayed to form compound II in a manner that is independent of peracetic acid concentration (k2 = 170 ± 20 s−1). Both compound I and a compound II-associated tryptophanyl radical that resembles cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp) compound I were observed by EPR under freeze-quench conditions. The data collectively suggest an O–O bond-forming mechanism involving generation of a compound I intermediate via oxygen atom transfer from chlorite, and subsequent recombination of the resulting hypochlorite and compound I. PMID:18840691

  7. Mineralogy and geochemistry of laterites developed on chlorite schists in Tchollire region, North Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakeng, L. A.; Zame, P. Zo'o.; Tchameni, R.; Mamdem, L.; Bitom, D.

    2016-07-01

    Laterites developed from the weathering of chlorite schists have been studied in Tchollire region, North Cameroon. They include two profiles: a 5.5 m depth profile in Doudja site and a 12.3 m profile in Fimbe site. The chlorite schists have a lepidoblastic to lepidogranoblastic texture and are mainly composed of chlorite, muscovite, biotite, feldspars and quartz but that of Fimbe is marked by the presence of amphibole. It is felsic with a high SiO2 content (67%) and low Fe2O3 (5.8%) and MgO (2.4%) contents in Doudja site but has a lower content of SiO2 (46%) in the Fimbe site where it is mafic with higher contents in Fe2O3 (12.4%) and MgO (6.3%). The chlorite schists of Doudja show high contents in Zr, Sr, Ta, with moderate contents in Cr, V, U and Zn. That of Fimbe is particularly rich in Cr, V, Ni, Sr and Zn with a moderate Zr content. All chlorite schists have high barium contents (270-393 ppm) with LREE-enrichment. The soils are yellowish and, from bottom to top, are composed of a coarse saprolite, fine saprolite, loose clayey horizon and an organo mineral horizon. The main minerals are chlorite, muscovite, biotite, feldspars, quartz, smectites, vermiculite, kaolinite, hematite and goethite. In Doudja, SiO2 mainly decreases from the bottom to the top of the profile while, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 generally increase; in Fimbe, SiO2 and Al2O3 increase up the profile but Fe2O3 decreases; the general high Fe and corresponding decrease in Mg contents in the soils show that the smectite formed is nontronite. Chromium, V, Cu, Ba and Sr show high contents in the two studied profiles but Zr, U and Ta is higher in Doudja than in Fimbe. Copper generally has high contents in the loose clayey and organo mineral horizons. Nickel is higher in the Fimbe profile and probably issued from the Ni-rich mafic protolith. SiO2 has positive correlations with K2O, Zr, Li and Rb. Correlations of SiO2 with CaO, TiO2 and Cr are negative. Al2O3 and Fe2O3 have a positive correlation with Pb. Doudja

  8. Dimeric chlorite dismutase from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC7425.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Irene; Hofbauer, Stefan; Krutzler, Michael; Pirker, Katharina F; Bellei, Marzia; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Mlynek, Georg; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Daims, Holger; Obinger, Christian

    2015-06-01

    It is demonstrated that cyanobacteria (both azotrophic and non-azotrophic) contain heme b oxidoreductases that can convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen (incorrectly denominated chlorite 'dismutase', Cld). Beside the water-splitting manganese complex of photosystem II, this metalloenzyme is the second known enzyme that catalyses the formation of a covalent oxygen-oxygen bond. All cyanobacterial Clds have a truncated N-terminus and are dimeric (i.e. clade 2) proteins. As model protein, Cld from Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 (CCld) was recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli and shown to efficiently degrade chlorite with an activity optimum at pH 5.0 [kcat 1144 ± 23.8 s(-1), KM 162 ± 10.0 μM, catalytic efficiency (7.1 ± 0.6) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)]. The resting ferric high-spin axially symmetric heme enzyme has a standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of -126 ± 1.9 mV at pH 7.0. Cyanide mediates the formation of a low-spin complex with k(on)  = (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and k(off) = 1.4 ± 2.9 s(-1) (KD ∼ 8.6 μM). Both, thermal and chemical unfolding follows a non-two-state unfolding pathway with the first transition being related to the release of the prosthetic group. The obtained data are discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships of Clds. We ask for the physiological substrate and putative function of these O2 -producing proteins in (nitrogen-fixing) cyanobacteria. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Three-dimensional convection-driven fronts of the exothermic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Schuszter, Gábor; Pótári, Gábor; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2015-06-01

    Horizontally propagating autocatalytic reaction fronts in fluids are often accompanied by convective motion in the presence of gravity. We experimentally and numerically investigate the stable complex three-dimensional pattern arising in the exothermic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction as a result of the antagonistic thermal and solutal contribution to the density change. By particle image velocimetry measurements, we construct the flow field that stabilizes the front structure. The calculations applied for incompressible fluids using the empirical rate-law model reproduce the experimental observations with good agreement.

  10. Stochastic behavior and stirring rate effects in the chlorite-iodide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagypál, István; Epstein, Irving R.

    1988-12-01

    The autocatalytic reaction between chlorite and iodide ions in a closed system is a clock reaction, showing a sudden appearance of brown I2 followed by a rapid disappearance of the color. Under certain conditions, the reaction time displays a striking irreproducibility. This stochastic behavior is studied potentiometrically and spectrophotometrically as a function of initial [I- ], stirring rate and solution volume. The results imply that the irreproducibility is an inherent feature of the reaction generated by fluctuations in the solution after it is ``well mixed.'' The key contributors to the stochasticity are local concentration inhomogeneities resulting from imperfect stirring and the ``supercatalytic'' reaction kinetics. A qualitative explanation is given that incorporates these aspects.

  11. Evaluation of the immunomodulatory effects of the disinfection by-product, sodium chlorite, in female B6C3F1 mice: a drinking water study.

    PubMed

    Karrow, N A; Guo, T L; McCay, J A; Johnson, G W; Brown, R D; Musgrove, D L; Germolec, D R; Luebke, R W; White, K L

    2001-08-01

    Sodium chlorite is an inorganic by-product of chlorine dioxide formed during the chlorination of drinking water. Relatively little is known about the adverse health effects of exposure to sodium chlorite in drinking water. In this study, we evaluated sodium chlorite's immunomodulatory properties using female B6C3F1 mice and a panel of immune assays that were designed to evaluate potential changes in innate and acquired cellular and humoral immune responses. Female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to sodium chlorite in their drinking water (0, 0.1, 1, 5, 15, and 30 mg/L) for 28 days, and then evaluated for immunomodulation. Overall, minimal toxicological and immunological changes were observed after exposure to sodium chlorite. Increases in the percentages of blood reticulocytes, and the relative spleen weights were both observed at different sodium chlorite treatment levels; however, these increases were not dose-dependent. An increasing trend in the number of spleen antibody-forming cells was observed over the range of sodium chlorite concentrations. This increase was not, however, significant at any individual treatment level, and was not reflected by changes in serum IgM levels. A significant increase (26%) in the total number of splenic CD8+ cells was observed in mice treated with 30 mg/L of sodium chlorite, but not at the other concentrations. Splenic mixed leukocyte response and peritoneal macrophage activity were unaffected by sodium chlorite. Lastly, exposure to sodium chlorite did not affect natural killer cell activity, although a decrease in augmented natural killer cell activity (42%) was observed at the lowest sodium chlorite treatment level. These results suggest that sodium chlorite, within the range 0.1-30 mg/L, produces minimal immunotoxicity in mice.

  12. The clinical and microbiological effects of a novel acidified sodium chlorite mouthrinse on oral bacterial mucosal infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Naglik, L; Downes, J; Shirlaw, P; Wilson, R; Challacombe, S J; Kemp, G K; Wade, W G

    2001-09-01

    Acidified sodium chlorite mouthrinses have been shown to have equivalent anti-plaque activity to those containing chlorhexidine, the current 'gold standard'. In this study, sodium chlorite mouthrinses (ASC) acidified with either malic or gluconic acids were compared to each other and with a chlorhexidine rinse and sterile water for their effect on salivary bacterial counts. Sixteen subjects participated in the study, which had a cross-over Latin square design. In a second study, a sodium chlorite/gluconic acid rinse was compared with chlorhexidine for its clinical and microbiological effects in 36 patients with oral mucosal infections. The sodium chlorite rinses acidified with malic and gluconic acids and the chlorhexidine rinse caused significant reductions in salivary bacterial counts up to 7 h after a single rinse compared with water. There were no significant differences between the three active treatments. In the mucosal infection study, there was a significant reduction in erythema in the chlorhexidine group compared with the ASC group. Patients who received the ASC rinse reported significantly less discomfort following treatment than those receiving the chlorhexidine rinse. Staphylococcus aureus counts were significantly reduced in the group who received the sodium chlorite rinse. There were no other significant differences between the treatments. ASC appears to be an effective alternative to chlorhexidine mouthrinse.

  13. Magnesium isotopic behavior during the formation of chlorite-rich hydrothermal sediment in the middle Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Yang, S.; Teng, F. Z.; Cai, D.; Humphris, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorite is a common alteration product during water-rock reactions in seafloor hydrothermal systems. This chlorite is commonly characterized by high concentrations of magnesium. However, the source of the Mg and its behavior during hydrothermal alteration have yet to be clarified. Mg isotopes have been used in recent years to investigate a variety of geological processes, including low temperature weathering and metamorphism processes, and Mg cycling in sediments. In this study, we investigate the source of Mg and its behavior in chlorite-rich sediments collected during IODP Expedition 331 from the active hydrothermal Iheya North Knoll field in the middle Okinawa Trough — an intra-continental rift in continental crust. This area is characterized by hemipelagic muds with interbedded thick layers of felsic pumiceous volcanic material. Based on mineralogical, geochemical, and isotopic data, we have previously suggested that the chlorite-rich sediments resulted from hydrothermal alteration of the pumiceous layers at temperatures of 220-300°C. Prior to Mg isotope analysis, all selected samples were pretreated with 1N HCl in order to remove carbonates and other unstable minerals, and measurements were made on both the residues (mainly chlorite) and leachates, as well as on bulk samples. The residues are expected to show higher δ26Mg than the leachates reflecting the Mg isotopic signature of the pumiceous material precursor and provide insight into the behavior of Mg isotopes during the high-temperature hydrothermal processes.

  14. Chlorite topography and dissolution of the interlayer studied with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gazze, Salvatore; Stack, Andrew G; Ragnarsdottir, K. Vala; McMaster, Terence

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite has a structure composed of a combination of two distinct layers, the tetrahedral15 octahedral-tetrahedral (TOT) and the interlayer (i.e. the octahedral layer between TOT layers). In this study, the morphology and dissolution of chlorite in pure water has been visualized using Atomic Force Microscopy. Upon cleavage, the TOT layer shows atomically flat terraces and steps, while the interlayer presents strips and voids. In pure water, dissolution channels and equilateral, mono-oriented triangular etch pits form in the interlayer and lead to progressively increased solubilisation. Dissolution channels are proposed to originate from structural defects, while a conceptual model is discussed to explain the presence of triangular etch pits. In this model, their formation is driven by the different reactivity of the two octahedral configurations along the etch pits. It is not currently known which of these is the most stable configuration, however we propose arguments that point towards a specific orientation. The conceptual model is supported by experimental data and is potentially applicable to all mineral structures constituted by continuous octahedral layers.

  15. Determination of chlorate and chlorite and mutagenicity of seafood treated with aqueous chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Marshall, M R; Du, W X; Otwell, W S; Wei, C I

    1999-09-01

    The use of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) as a potential substitute for aqueous chlorine to improve the quality of seafood products has not been approved by regulatory agencies due to health concerns related to the production of chlorite (ClO(2)(-)) and chlorate (ClO(3)(-)) as well as possible mutagenic/carcinogenic reaction products. Cubes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and red grouper (Epinephelus morio) were treated with 20 or 200 ppm aqueous chlorine or ClO(2) solutions for 5 min, and extracts of the treated fish cubes and test solutions were checked for mutagenicity using the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. No mutagenic activity was detected in the treated fish samples or test solutions with ClO(2). Only the sample treated with 200 ppm chlorine showed weak mutagenic activity toward S. typhimurium TA 100. No chlorite residue was detected in sea scallops, mahi-mahi, or shrimp treated with ClO(2) at 3.9-34.9 ppm. However, low levels of chlorate residues were detected in some of the treated samples. In most cases, the increase in chlorate in treated seafood was time- and dose-related.

  16. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  17. Uranyl-chlorite sorption/desorption: Evaluation of different U(VI) sequestration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, David M.; Maher, Kate; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2009-10-01

    Sequestration of soluble uranium(VI) in the form of uranyl UO22+ by clay minerals such as chlorite is potentially a major sink for U in U-contaminated environments. We have used batch sorption/desorption experiments combined with U L III-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron-based microdiffraction, and surface complexation modeling to investigate the dominant sorption process(es) governing uranyl uptake by chlorite. Uranium(VI) sorption is independent of ionic strength, suggesting dominantly inner-sphere sorption, which was supported by selective chemical extraction results. The maximum sorption loadings were 0.28 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 4) and 6.3 μmol U g -1 chlorite (at pH 6.5 and 10). Uranium(VI) uptake as a function of solution composition followed the trends (at pH 6.5): CO 3-Ca-free system >CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-bearing system; (at pH 10): CO 3-Ca-bearing system >CO 3-Ca-free system ≈CO 3-bearing system. Desorption experiments based on selective chemical extractions indicated that (1) there is little or no weakly bound U(VI) or U(VI)-bearing precipitates, (2) 60-80% of U(VI) inner-sphere sorption complexes are desorbed following a 0.1 M HCl step over 1 week, and (3) 100% desorption of adsorbed U(VI) is accomplished by a 1.0 M HCl step over 1 week. Fits of the EXAFS spectra of the short-term sorption samples indicate that UO22+ forms inner-sphere sorption complexes with carbonate (when present) at [Fe(O,OH) 6] octahedral sites in a bidentate, edge-sharing manner. EXAFS-derived structural parameters were used to constrain the type(s) of U(VI)-bearing surface species and were combined with observed batch sorption trends as input for a diffuse double-layer surface complexation model (SCM). This model successfully predicts U(VI) sorption over a range of U(VI) concentrations, pH values, and solution

  18. Preservation of anomalously high porosity in deeply buried sandstones by grain-coating chlorite: Examples from the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenberg, S.N. )

    1993-07-01

    Five Lower to Middle Jurassic sandstone reservoirs from the Norwegian sector provide examples of deep porosity preservation caused by grain-coating, authigenic chlorite. Wide porosity variations in clean sandstones correlate with an abundance of grain-coating chlorite and consequent inhibition of quarts cementation. Maximum porosities tend to decrease with increasing depth but generally are 10-15% higher than would be predicted from regional trends of mean porosity vs. depth. It is proposed in this paper that the high chlorite content of the porous zones reflects syndepositional concentration of Fe-rich marine clays analogous to minerals of the modern verdine facies. Fe-clay mineralization would have been localized where Fe-rich river water was discharged into the sea. The syndepositional clays were transformed during burial diagenesis into grain coatings of radially oriented chlorite crystals. Petrographic relationships indicate that these coatings grew mainly before the beginning of quartz cementation and feldspar grain dissolution (probably within the first 2 km of burial) but after grain contacts had become adjusted by mechanical compaction. The Norwegian examples demonstrate that a wide range of nearshore marine sand-body types is susceptible to chlorite mineralization. The distribution of anomalous porosity and the proportion of the net sand affected depend upon sedimentary facies architecture and the pattern of discharge of Fe-rich river water during sand deposition. This phenomenon can be critically important for hydrocarbon exploration because it can provide good reservoir quality at depths far below the [open quotes]economic basement[close quotes] originally defined on the basis of sandstones lacking chlorite coatings. 58 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Chlorite dissolution kinetics at pH 3–10 and temperature to 275°C

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Megan M.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2015-12-02

    Sheet silicates and clays are ubiquitous in geothermal environments. Their dissolution is of interest because this process contributes to scaling reactions along fluid pathways and alteration of fracture surfaces which could affect reservoir permeability. Here, in order to better predict the geochemical impacts on long-term performance of engineered geothermal systems, we have measured chlorite dissolution and developed a generalized kinetic rate law applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature. Chlorite, (Mg,Al,Fe)12(Si,Al)8O20(OH)16, commonly occurs in many geothermal host rocks as either a primary mineral or alteration product.

  20. Kinetics and mechanisms of chlorine dioxide and chlorite oxidations of cysteine and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Ison, Ana; Odeh, Ihab N; Margerum, Dale W

    2006-10-16

    Chlorine dioxide oxidation of cysteine (CSH) is investigated under pseudo-first-order conditions (with excess CSH) in buffered aqueous solutions, p[H+] 2.7-9.5 at 25.0 degrees C. The rates of chlorine dioxide decay are first order in both ClO2 and CSH concentrations and increase rapidly as the pH increases. The proposed mechanism is an electron transfer from CS- to ClO2 (1.03 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)) with a subsequent rapid reaction of the CS* radical and a second ClO2 to form a cysteinyl-ClO2 adduct (CSOClO). This highly reactive adduct decays via two pathways. In acidic solutions, it hydrolyzes to give CSO(2)H (sulfinic acid) and HOCl, which in turn rapidly react to form CSO3H (cysteic acid) and Cl-. As the pH increases, the (CSOClO) adduct reacts with CS- by a second pathway to form cystine (CSSC) and chlorite ion (ClO2-). The reaction stoichiometry changes from 6 ClO2:5 CSH at low pH to 2 ClO2:10 CSH at high pH. The ClO2 oxidation of glutathione anion (GS-) is also rapid with a second-order rate constant of 1.40 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1). The reaction of ClO2 with CSSC is 7 orders of magnitude slower than the corresponding reaction with cysteinyl anion (CS-) at pH 6.7. Chlorite ion reacts with CSH; however, at p[H+] 6.7, the observed rate of this reaction is slower than the ClO2/CSH reaction by 6 orders of magnitude. Chlorite ion oxidizes CSH while being reduced to HOCl, which in turn reacts rapidly with CSH to form Cl-. The reaction products are CSSC and CSO3H with a pH-dependent distribution similar to the ClO2/CSH system.

  1. Dimeric chlorite dismutase from the nitrogen‐fixing cyanobacterium C yanothece sp. PCC7425

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Irene; Hofbauer, Stefan; Krutzler, Michael; Pirker, Katharina F.; Bellei, Marzia; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Mlynek, Georg; Djinovic‐Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Summary It is demonstrated that cyanobacteria (both azotrophic and non‐azotrophic) contain heme b oxidoreductases that can convert chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen (incorrectly denominated chlorite ‘dismutase’, Cld). Beside the water‐splitting manganese complex of photosystem II, this metalloenzyme is the second known enzyme that catalyses the formation of a covalent oxygen–oxygen bond. All cyanobacterial Clds have a truncated N‐terminus and are dimeric (i.e. clade 2) proteins. As model protein, Cld from C yanothece sp. PCC7425 (CCld) was recombinantly produced in E scherichia coli and shown to efficiently degrade chlorite with an activity optimum at pH 5.0 [k cat 1144 ± 23.8 s−1, KM 162 ± 10.0 μM, catalytic efficiency (7.1 ± 0.6) × 106 M−1 s−1]. The resting ferric high‐spin axially symmetric heme enzyme has a standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of −126 ± 1.9 mV at pH 7.0. Cyanide mediates the formation of a low‐spin complex with k on = (1.6 ± 0.1) × 105 M−1 s−1 and k off = 1.4 ± 2.9 s−1 (KD ∼ 8.6 μM). Both, thermal and chemical unfolding follows a non‐two‐state unfolding pathway with the first transition being related to the release of the prosthetic group. The obtained data are discussed with respect to known structure–function relationships of Clds. We ask for the physiological substrate and putative function of these O2‐producing proteins in (nitrogen‐fixing) cyanobacteria. PMID:25732258

  2. Chemical and Steady-State Kinetic Analyses of a Heterologously Expressed Heme Dependent Chlorite Dismutase†

    PubMed Central

    Streit, Bennett R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase carries out the heme-catalyzed decomposition of ClO2– to Cl– and O2, an unusual transformation with biotechnological and bioremediative applications. The enzyme has been successfully overexpressed for the first time in highly functional form in Escherichia coli and its steady state kinetics studied. The purified enzyme is abundant (55 mg/L cell culture), highly active (~4.7 × 103 μmol of ClO2– min–1 mg–1 subunit) and nearly stoichiometric in heme; further, it shares spectroscopic and physicochemical features with chlorite dismutases previously isolated from three organisms. A careful study of the enzyme's steady state kinetics has been carried out. ClO2– consumption and O2 release rates were measured, yielding comparable values of kcat (4.5 × 105 min–1), Km (~215 μM), and kcat/Km (3.5 × 107 M–1 s–1) via either method (4 °C, pH 6.8; all values referenced per heme-containing subunit). ClO2–:O2 stoichiometry exhibited a 1:1 relationship under all conditions measured. Though the value of kcat/Km indicates near diffusion control of the reaction, viscosogens had no effect on kcat/Km or Vmax. The product O2 did not inhibit the reaction at saturating [O2], but Cl– is a mixed inhibitor with relatively high values of KI (225 mM for enzyme and 95.6 mM for the enzyme–substrate complex), indicating a relatively low affinity of the heme iron for halogen ions. Chlorite irreversibly inactivates the enzyme after ~1.7 × 104 turnovers (per heme) and with a half-life of 0.39 min, resulting in bleaching of the heme chromophore. The inactivation KI (Kinact) of 166 μM is similar in magnitude to Km, consistent with a common Michaelis complex on the pathway to both reaction and inactivation. The one-electron peroxidase substrate guaiacol offers incomplete protection of the enzyme from inactivation. Mechanisms in keeping with the available data and the properties of other well-described heme enzymes are proposed. PMID:18422344

  3. The interaction of sodium chlorite with phospholipids and glutathione: a comparison of effects in vitro, in mammalian and in microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Paul R; Homer, Natalie Z M; Smith, Rachel A; Pitt, Andrew R; Wilson, Clive G; Olejnik, Orest; Spickett, Corinne M

    2003-02-01

    In this study the interaction of the preservative sodium chlorite with unsaturated lipids and glutathione was investigated, in comparison with peroxides, sodium hypochlorite, and benzalkonium chloride. The aim was to determine whether the action of sodium chlorite could involve membrane lipid damage or antioxidant depletion, and how this related to toxicity in both mammalian and microbial cells. The treatment of phospholipids with chlorite yielded low levels of hydroperoxides, but sodium chlorite oxidized the thiol-containing antioxidant glutathione to its disulfide form very readily in vitro, with a 1:4 oxidant:GSH stoichiometry. In cultured cells, sodium chlorite also caused a substantial depletion of intracellular glutathione, whereas lipid oxidation was not very prominent. Sodium chlorite had a lower toxicity to ocular mammalian cells than benzalkonium chloride, which could be responsible for the different effects of long-term application in the eye. The fungal cells, which were most resistant to sodium chlorite, maintained higher percentage levels of intracellular glutathione during treatment than the mammalian cells. The results show that sodium chlorite can cause oxidative stress in cells, and suggest that cell damage is more likely to be due to interaction with thiol compounds than with cell membrane lipids. The study also provides important information about the differential resistance of ocular cells and microbes to various preservatives and oxidants.

  4. Chlorite Dissolution Rates From 25 to 275 degrees and pH 3 to 10

    DOE Data Explorer

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-09-27

    We have calculated a chlorite dissolution rate equation at far from equilibrium conditions by combining new data (20 experiments at high temperature) with previously published data Smith et al. 2013 and Lowson et al. 2007. All rate data (from the 127 experiments) are tabulated in this data submission. More information on the calculation of the rate data can be found in our FY13 Annual support (Carroll LLNL, 2013) which has been submitted to the GDR. The rate equation fills a data gap in geothemal kinetic data base and can be used directly to estimate the impact of chemical alteration on all geothermal processes. It is especially important for understanding the role of chemical alteration in the weakening for shear zones in EGS systems.

  5. Fe-SAPONITE and Chlorite Growth on Stainless Steel in Hydrothermal Engineered Barrier Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheshire, M. C.; Caporuscio, F. A.; McCarney, M.

    2012-12-01

    The United States recently has initiated the Used Fuel Disposition campaign to evaluate various generic geological repositories for the disposal of high-level, spent nuclear fuel within environments ranging from hard-rock, salt/clay, to deep borehole settings. Previous work describing Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) for repositories focused on low temperature and pressure conditions. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize the stability and alteration of a bentonite-based EBS with different waste container materials in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. All experiments were run at ~150 bar and 125 to 300 C for ~1 month. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming was used in the experiments as the clay buffer material. The redox conditions for each system were buffered along the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve using Fe3O4 and Feo filings. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based salt solution was chosen to replicate deep groundwater compositions. The experimental mixtures were 1) salt solution-clay; 2) salt solution -clay-304 stainless steel; and 3) salt solution -clay-316 stainless steel with a water/bentonite ratio of ~9. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment was evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. No smectite illitization was observed in these reactions. However, it appears that K-smectite was produced, possibly providing a precursor to illitization. It is unclear whether reaction times were sufficient for bentonite illitization at 212 and 300 C or whether conditions conducive to illite formation were obtained. The more notable clay mineral reactions occurred at the stainless steel surfaces. Authigenic chlorite and Fe-saponite grew with their basal planes near perpendicular to the steel plate, forming a 10 - 40 μm thick 'corrosion' layer. Partial dissolution of the steel plates was the likely iron source for chlorite/saponite formation; however, dissolution of the Feo/Fe3O4 may also have acted as an iron source

  6. Identification of spectrally similar materials using the USGS Tetracorder algorithm: The calcite-epidote-chlorite problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, J.B.; Bove, D.J.; Mladinich, C.S.; Rockwell, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    A scheme to discriminate and identify materials having overlapping spectral absorption features has been developed and tested based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Tetracorder system. The scheme has been applied to remotely sensed imaging spectroscopy data acquired by the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) instrument. This approach was used to identify the minerals calcite, epidote, and chlorite in the upper Animas River watershed, Colorado. The study was motivated by the need to characterize the distribution of calcite in the watershed and assess its acid-neutralizing potential with regard to acidic mine drainage. Identification of these three minerals is difficult because their diagnostic spectral features are all centered at 2.3 ??m, and have similar shapes and widths. Previous studies overestimated calcite abundance as a result of these spectral overlaps. The use of a reference library containing synthetic mixtures of the three minerals in varying proportions was found to simplify the task of identifying these minerals when used in conjunction with a rule-based expert system. Some inaccuracies in the mineral distribution maps remain, however, due to the influence of a fourth spectral component, sericite, which exhibits spectral absorption features at 2.2 and 2.4 ??m that overlap the 2.3-??m absorption features of the other three minerals. Whereas the endmember minerals calcite, epidote, chlorite, and sericite can be identified by the method presented here, discrepancies occur in areas where all four occur together as intimate mixtures. It is expected that future work will be able to reduce these discrepancies by including reference mixtures containing sericite. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enhanced bactericidal action of acidified sodium chlorite caused by the saturation of reactants.

    PubMed

    Kim, N H; Park, T H; Rhee, M S

    2014-06-01

    Factors affecting the antibacterial action of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), a widely used disinfectant, have not been determined. This study investigated the significant factors suggesting efficient production method to maximize bactericidal action of ASC. The effects of (i) preparation procedures (total three methods); (ii) initial concentrations of reactants: sodium chlorite (SC) and citric acid (CTA) (up to maximum solubility of each reactant) and (iii) final pH values (3·0 and 2·5) to the bactericidal action of ASC were investigated with a fixed final concentration of SC (10 ppm) using various foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus). The antimicrobial compounds produced and the bactericidal effects depended on the preparation procedure and the initial concentrations of the reactants. The ASC prepared by premixing highly concentrated reactants (in particular > 40%) followed by dilution (dilution after reaction, DAR) was more effective in inactivating foodborne pathogens, and it produced higher antimicrobial compound (Cl(2) and ClO(2)) yields than the other procedures. A 5-min treatment with ASC, produced using the other procedures, resulted in a reduction of < 3·5 log CFU ml(-1) (Gram positive = 0·18-0·78; Gram negative = 0·03-3·49 log CFU ml(-1)), whereas ASC produced with the DAR procedure using the saturated reactants completely inactivated all of the test pathogens within 5 min without recovery (initial concentration = 6·94-7·08 log CFU ml(-1)). The ASC production with the DAR procedure using the saturated reactants maximizes both the antimicrobial compound yields and bactericidal effects of the ASC solutions. This study will contribute to increase the efficiency of ASC treatments for disinfections reducing the effective SC concentrations for industrial use. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Controlled clinical evaluations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, J R; Chauan, S; Bianchine, J R

    1982-01-01

    To assess the relative safety of chronically administered chlorine water disinfectants in man, a controlled study was undertaken. The clinical evaluation was conducted in the three phases common to investigational drug studies. Phase I, a rising dose tolerance investigation, examined the acute effects of progressively increasing single doses of chlorine disinfectants to normal healthy adult male volunteers. Phase II considered the impact on normal subjects of daily ingestion of the disinfectants at a concentration of 5 mg/l. for twelve consecutive weeks. Persons with a low level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may be expected to be especially susceptible to oxidative stress; therefore, in Phase III, chlorite at a concentration of 5 mg/l. was administered daily for twelve consecutive weeks to a small group of potentially at-risk glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects. Physiological impact was assessed by evaluation of a battery of qualitative and quantitative tests. The three phases of this controlled double-blind clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide and its potential metabolites in human male volunteer subjects were completed uneventfully. There were no obvious undesirable clinical sequellae noted by any of the participating subjects or by the observing medical team. In several cases, statistically significant trends in certain biochemical or physiological parameters were associated with treatment; however, none of these trends was judged to have physiological consequence. One cannot rule out the possibility that, over a longer treatment period, these trends might indeed achieve proportions of clinical importance. However, by the absence of detrimental physiological responses within the limits of the study, the relative safety of oral ingestion of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite and chlorate, was demonstrated. PMID:6961033

  9. Dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite for enzymatic browning inhibition and Escherichia coli inactivation on fresh-cut apples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigated the dual effectiveness of sodium chlorite (SC) for browning inhibition and microbial inactivation on fresh-cut apples. The SC treatment exhibited a strong inhibition on browning reaction of fresh-cut Red Delicious apples during cold storage. Test results from examination of t...

  10. Effects of postchill application of acidified sodium chlorite to control Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli on commercial broiler carcasses.

    PubMed

    Oyarzabal, Omar A; Hawk, Christopher; Bilgili, Sacit F; Warf, C Cayce; Kemp, G Kere

    2004-10-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the reduction of Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli in commercial broiler carcasses by postchill dip applications of acidified sodium chlorite. Carcass rinses were collected before the inside-outside-bird washer (IOBW), post-IOBW, postchill, and after the postchill application of acidified sodium chlorite. Prevalence and counts of Campylobacter spp. and E. coli were determined. The mean values for Campylobacter spp. and E. coli counts differed significantly at sampling sites. The IOBW reduced the bacterial counts significantly in only one experiment. The chiller reduced Campylobacter counts significantly in both experiments but failed to significantly reduce the counts of E. coli in one experiment. No major reduction in the prevalence after enrichment for Campylobacter spp. was detected post-IOBW or postchill. However, a significant reduction in Campylobacter spp. and in E. coli counts and Campylobacter spp. prevalence was seen after the postchill application of acidified sodium chlorite. These results demonstrate that the antimicrobial effect of acidified sodium chlorite applied postchill may be used to significantly reduce Campylobacter spp. and E. coli in commercial broiler carcasses. Postchill systems may eventually be used in different applications, such as mist, spray, or bath, which could be applied closer to the final stages in processing.

  11. A saponite and chlorite-rich clay assemblage in permian evaporite and red-bed strata, Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this Department of Energy-funded project, the author describes lithology of core samples from two Department of Energy wells in Randall and Swisher Counties and determines clay mineralogy and X-ray diffraction response using 73 samples from the Randall County well and 40 samples from the Swisher County well. On the basis of his analyses, the author identifies the clay assemblage in the Palo Duro Basin evaporites as consisting of saponite, a magnesium-rich smectite; mixed-layer chlorite/smectite; chlorite/vermiculite; chlorite/swelling chlorite; vermiculite/swelling chlorite; chlorite, and illite. Chemical analyses reveal that the chemical composition of the mixed-layer clays is intermediate between normal aluminum-rich detrital clays and normal vermiculite and chlorite, magnesium clays of hydrothermal or metamorphic origin. The author postulates that rates and amounts of clay alteration are probably controlled by magnesium ion activity, brine salinity, brine pH, and sediment and clay residence time in the marine evaporite environment.

  12. Scales of equilibrium and disequilibrium during cleavage formation in chlorite and biotite-grade phyllites, SE Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWilliams, C.K.; Wintsch, R.P.; Kunk, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed electron microprobe analyses of phyllosilicates in crenulated phyllites from south-eastern Vermont show that grain-scale zoning is common, and sympathetic zoning in adjacent minerals is nearly universal. We interpret this to reflect a pressure-solution mechanism for cleavage development, where precipitation from a very small fluid reservoir fractionated that fluid. Multiple analyses along single muscovite, biotite and chlorite grains (30-200 ??m in length) show zoning patterns indicating Tschermakitic substitutions in muscovite and both Tschermakitic and di/trioctahedral substitutions in biotite and chlorite. Using cross-cutting relationships and mineral chemistry it is shown that these patterns persist in cleavages produced at metamorphic conditions of chlorite-grade, chlorite-grade overprinted by biotite-grade and biotite-grade. Zoning patterns are comparable in all three settings, requiring a similar cleavage-forming mechanism independent of metamorphic grade. Moreover, the use of 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology demonstrates this is true regardless of age. Furthermore, samples with chlorite-grade cleavages overprinted by biotite porphyroblasts suggest the closure temperatures for the diffusion of Al, Si, Mg and Fe ions are greater than the temperature of the biotite isograd (>???400 ??C). Parallel and smoothly fanning tie lines produced by coexisting muscovite-chlorite, and muscovite-biotite pairs on compositional diagrams demonstrate effectively instantaneous chemical equilibrium and probably indicate simultaneous crystallization. These results do not support theories suggesting cleavages form in fluid-dominated systems. If crenulation cleavages formed in systems in which the chemical potentials of all major components are fixed by an external reservoir, then the compositions of individual grains defining these cleavages would be uniform. On the contrary, the fine-scale chemical zoning observed probably reflects a grain-scale process consistent with a

  13. The bactericidal effects of an acidified sodium chlorite-containing oral moisturizing gel: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kuroyama, Iwao; Osato, Shigeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the bactericidal effects and bactericidal time of an acidified sodium chlorite compound gel (ASC-Gel) on bacteria isolated from the peri-implant sulci of 10 patients who received implants 3-27 years previously, and the depth of each peri-implant sulcus was 5 mm or less. Porphyromonas gingivalis (ATCC33277) was used as the control bacterium. Five ASC-Gel preparations were created by adding 3.3%, 5.0%, 7.0%, 9.0%, and 11.0% citric acid (CA) (condition a, b, c, d, and e, respectively) into an oral moisturizing gel containing sodium chlorite. The concentrations of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) generated in ASC-Gel under conditions (a) to (e) were 12.1, 14.1, 17.2, 21.2, and 39.3 ppm, respectively. We examined the bactericidal effects of the 5 ASC-Gel preparations at volumes of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mL, and measured the bactericidal time when 2.0 mL of ASC-Gel was used under condition (e). The bactericidal effects of ASC-Gel became significantly greater with increased concentrations of CA and ClO2 and with increased usage (0.5-2.0 mL) of the gel. All bacteria were killed by using 2.0 mL of ASC-Gel under condition (e). ASC-Gel also needed between 45 and 90 minutes to kill all microbes under condition (e). Within the limits of the present investigation, these results suggest that ASC-Gel is useful as a chemical disinfectant against bacteria in the peri-implant sulcus. Further studies are also required to protect teeth, the surface of hydroxyapatite-coated implants, and the surrounding soft tissues from effects of chemical dissolution such as acid erosion due to the low pH of ASC-Gel.

  14. Immature pea seeds: effect of storage under modified atmosphere packaging and sanitation with acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Collado, Elena; Venzke Klug, Tâmmila; Martínez-Sánchez, Ascensión; Artés-Hernandez, Francisco; Aguayo, Encarna; Artés, Francisco; Fernández, Juan A; Gómez, Perla A

    2017-10-01

    Appropriate sanitation is a priority for extending the shelf life and promoting the consumption of immature pea seeds, as processing accelerates quality deterioration and microbial growth. The combined effect of disinfection with acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or sodium hypochlorite (SH) and packaging under a passive modified atmosphere (MAP) at 1 or 4 °C on quality was analysed. After 14 days, greenness and vitamin C had decreased, especially in the SH-disinfected samples. Total phenols and antioxidant capacity were not affected by disinfection. Proteins levels fell by around 27%, regardless of the sanitizer and storage temperature. Compared with the initial microbial load, samples stored at 1 °C showed an increase of 1 log CFU g(-1) in psychrophiles when treated with SH, whereas no increase of note occurred with ASC. In general, microbial counts were always below 3 log CFU g(-1) for all the treatments. Immature pea seeds could be stored for 14 days at 1-4 °C under MAP with only minor quality changes. Disinfection with ASC resulted in better sensory quality, higher content of vitamin C and lower psychrophile counts. More research is needed to analyse the effect of these treatments on other quality parameters. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Prewashing with acidified sodium chlorite reduces pathogenic bacteria in lightly fermented Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Yutaka; Bari, M L; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2005-05-01

    Efficacy of prewashing with acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) for the sanitation of lightly fermented Chinese cabbage was evaluated. The population of the natural microflora on the cabbage leaves was reduced about 2.0 log CFU/g just after washing with ASC, a significant reduction compared with the control distilled water wash (P < or = 0.05). In the control experiment, viable aerobic bacteria increased gradually when incubated at 10 degrees C; however, ASC-washed cabbage maintained a lower microbial concentration. The treatment of Chinese cabbage with ASC reduced the population of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes by 2.4 log CFU/g. The sanitation efficacy of ASC was 1.6 log CFU/g higher than that of distilled water washing. The viable cell counts of all pathogenic bacteria tested remained constant during 8 days of storage at 10 degrees C for both washing treatments, with the exception of L. monocytogenes, whose viable cell counts increased gradually with time for both treatments. No significant differences in color, odor, taste, and texture in raw leaves were observed after the ASC wash compared with after the distilled water wash. These results indicate that prewashing with ASC could control bacterial growth in lightly fermented Chinese cabbage without changing the product quality.

  16. Effect of acidified sodium chlorite treatment on chicken carcases processed in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Margaret; Raven, Geoff; Holds, Geoff; Pointon, Andrew; Kiermeier, Andreas; Sumner, John

    2007-04-10

    A trial on the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on Salmonella and Campylobacter was undertaken on chicken carcases after they exited the screw chiller of a commercial premises in Adelaide, Australia. On untreated carcases mean log10 total viable count (25 degrees C) was 2.78/cm2 compared with 1.23/cm2 on treated carcases. Prevalence of E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter was 100%, 90% and 100% respectively, on untreated carcases and 13%, 10% and 23% respectively, on treated carcases. The distributions of E. coli, Salmonella and Campylobacter (mean log10 of positive samples) from untreated carcases were 1.55, -1.80 and 1.59/cm2 respectively, and -0.64, -1.85 and -2.21/cm2 respectively, on treated carcases. On untreated carcases S. Sofia and S. Infantis were isolated from 73% and 37% of carcases, respectively; only S. Sofia was isolated from treated carcases. The significant reductions in both prevalence and concentration demonstrated in the present trial indicate that ASC is a risk management option immediately available to the poultry industry.

  17. Acidified sodium chlorite optimisation assessment to improve quality of fresh-cut tatsoi baby leaves.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Callejas, Alejandro; López-Velasco, Gabriela; Artés, Francisco; Artés-Hernández, Francisco

    2012-03-15

    The fresh-cut industry commonly uses sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) for disinfection. However, there are certain problems related to its use, and acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be an alternative sanitiser to replace it. There is limited research evaluating the effect of ASC on the overall quality of fresh-cut produce, especially sensory quality. In this study the decontamination efficacy and quality attribute effects of ASC on fresh-cut tatsoi after application and during storage were investigated. Tatsoi baby leaves were minimally processed at 8 °C and stored under passive modified atmosphere packaging for up to 11 days at 5 and 10 °C. Low to moderate doses of ASC (100-500 mg L⁻¹) showed an initial antimicrobial efficacy on natural microflora and Escherichia coli as effective as that of NaClO. Regarding contact time, ASC was effective in reducting the E. coli population during the first 30 s of washing, and an increase in contact time did not improve the antimicrobial effect. Sensory quality attributes were well kept for up to 11 days at 5 °C but for only 5 days at the abusive temperature of 10 °C. ASC provides an alternative sanitising technique to NaClO for maintaining the quality and safety of fresh-cut tatsoi baby leaves for up to 11 days at 5 °C. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Elucidation of the mechanism of enzymatic browning inhibition by sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    He, Qiang; Luo, Yaguang; Chen, Pei

    2008-10-15

    Sodium chlorite (SC) is a well known anti-microbial agent and its strong inhibitory effect on enzymatic browning of fresh-cut produce has recently been identified. We investigated the effect of SC on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and its substrate, chlorogenic acid (CA), as it relates to the mechanisms of browning inhibition by SC. Results indicate that the browning reaction of CA (1.0mM) catalyzed by PPO (33U/mL) was significantly inhibited by 1.0mM SC at pH 4.6. Two PPO isoforms were identified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and both were inactivated by SC (3.0mM). This suggests that SC serves as a PPO inhibitor to prevent enzymatic browning. Furthermore, the effect of SC on the stability of CA in both acidic (pH 4.5) and basic conditions (pH 8.3) was studied by UV-Vis scan and LC-MS analysis. The results showed that at the presence of SC (3.0mM), CA (0.1mM) degraded to quinic acid and caffeic acid as well as other intermediates. Hence, the anti-browning property of SC can be attributed to the two modes of action: the inactivation of polyphenol oxidase directly and the oxidative degradation of phenolic substrates. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Kinetics of the Inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Weakly Acidic Sodium Chlorite Solution.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Reiji; Fukuzaki, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

     The kinetics of the inactivation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in sodium chlorite (NaClO2) solution was studied in the weakly acidic pH range of 4.0 to 6.5 and at various temperatures. The logarithmic reduction of the survival ratio depended on the concentration-time product, and all the inactivation curves showed a linear reduction phase. The first-order inactivation rate constant (k) increased by approximately twice for every 0.44 unit fall in pH. During the inactivation experiments, no formation of chlorine dioxide occurred. These data indicated that undissociated HClO2 was the active species governing the inactivation of V. parahaemolyticus. It was also shown that the use of weakly acidic NaClO2 solutions containing high concentrations of ionized ClO2(-) gave slower kinetics of the inactivation, whereas it could achieve the significant reduction of viable cells of more than 4-log. The k value showed an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence in the temperature range of 5 to 40℃. The apparent activation energy for the inactivation of V. parahaemolyticus was estimated to be 43.5 kJ/mol. The k value increased by approximately 1.8 times for every 10℃ rise in temperature.

  20. Acid--chlorite pretreatment and liquefaction of cornstalk in hot-compressed water for bio-oil production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-Min; Feng, Bing; Sun, Run-Cang

    2011-10-12

    In this study, cornstalk was pretreated by an acid-chlorite delignification procedure to enhance the conversion of cornstalk to bio-oil in hot-compressed water liquefaction. The effects of the pretreatment conditions on the compositional and structural changes of the cornstalk and bio-oil yield were investigated. It was found that acid-chlorite pretreatment changed the main components and physical structures of cornstalk and effectively enhanced the bio-oil yield. Shorter residence time favored production of the total bio-oil products, whereas longer time led to cracking of the products. A high water loading was found to be favorable for high yields of total bio-oil and water-soluble oil. GC-MS analysis showed that the water-soluble oil and heavy oil were the complicated products of C(5-10) and C(8-11) organic compounds.

  1. Temperature micro-mapping and redox conditions of a chlorite zoning pattern in green-schist facies fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincal, Vincent; Lanari, Pierre; Lacroix, Brice; Buatier, Martine D.; Charpentier, Delphine; Labaume, Pierre; Muñoz, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Faults are major discontinuities driving fluid flows and playing a major role in precipitation of ore deposits. Mineral paragenesis and crystal chemistry depend on Temperature (T) condition, fluid composition but also on the redox environment of precipitation. The studied samples come from the Pic de Port Vieux thrust sheet, a minor thrust sheet associated to Gavarnie thrust fault zone (Central Pyrenees). The Pic de Port Vieux Thrust sheet comprises a 1-20 meter thick layer of Triassic red beds and mylonitized Cretaceous limestone. The thrust sheet is affected by faults and cleavage; the other important deformation product is a set of veins filled by quartz and chlorite. Microstructural and mineralogical investigations were performed based on the previous work of Grant (1992). The crystallization of chlorite is syn-tectonic and strongly controlled by the fluid circulation during the Gavarnie thrust sheet emplacement. Chlorite precipitated in extension veins, crack-seal shear veins or in open cavities. The chlorite filling the open cavities occurs as pseudo-uniaxial plates arranged in rosette-shaped aggregates. These aggregates appear to have developed as a result of radial growth of the chlorite platelets. According to point and microprobe X-ray images, these chlorites display oscillatory chemical zoning patterns with alternating iron rich and magnesium rich bands. The chlorite composition ranges from Fe rich pole (Si2.62Al1.38O10(Al1.47Fe1.87Mg2.61)6(OH)8) to Mg rich pole (Si2.68Al1.31O10(Al1.45Fe1.41Mg3.06)6(OH)8). In metamorphic rocks, zoning pattern or rimmed minerals results for varying P or T conditions and can be used to unravel the P-T history of the sample. In the present study, temperature maps are derived from standardized microprobe X-ray images using the program XMapTools (Lanari et al 2014). The (Fe3+/Fetot) value in chlorite was directly measured using μXANES spot analyses collected at the Fe-K edge. The results indicate a homogeneous temperature of

  2. Chlorite dissolution kinetics at pH 3–10 and temperature to 275°C

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Megan M.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2015-12-02

    Sheet silicates and clays are ubiquitous in geothermal environments. Their dissolution is of interest because this process contributes to scaling reactions along fluid pathways and alteration of fracture surfaces which could affect reservoir permeability. Here, in order to better predict the geochemical impacts on long-term performance of engineered geothermal systems, we have measured chlorite dissolution and developed a generalized kinetic rate law applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature. Chlorite, (Mg,Al,Fe)12(Si,Al)8O20(OH)16, commonly occurs in many geothermal host rocks as either a primary mineral or alteration product.

  3. Redox Interactions of Tc(VII), U(VI), and Np(V) with Microbially Reduced Biotite and Chlorite.

    PubMed

    Brookshaw, Diana R; Pattrick, Richard A D; Bots, Pieter; Law, Gareth T W; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Mosselmans, J Fredrick W; Vaughan, David J; Dardenne, Kathy; Morris, Katherine

    2015-11-17

    Technetium, uranium, and neptunium are contaminants that cause concern at nuclear facilities due to their long half-life, environmental mobility, and radiotoxicity. Here we investigate the impact of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in biotite and chlorite and the role that this has in enhancing mineral reactivity toward soluble TcO4(-), UO2(2+), and NpO2(+). When reacted with unaltered biotite and chlorite, significant sorption of U(VI) occurred in low carbonate (0.2 mM) buffer, while U(VI), Tc(VII), and Np(V) showed low reactivity in high carbonate (30 mM) buffer. On reaction with the microbially reduced minerals, all radionuclides were removed from solution with U(VI) reactivity influenced by carbonate. Analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed reductive precipitation to poorly soluble U(IV) in low carbonate conditions and both Tc(VII) and Np(V) in high carbonate buffer were also fully reduced to poorly soluble Tc(IV) and Np(IV) phases. U(VI) reduction was inhibited under high carbonate conditions. Furthermore, EXAFS analysis suggested that in the reaction products, Tc(IV) was associated with Fe, Np(IV) formed nanoparticulate NpO2, and U(IV) formed nanoparticulate UO2 in chlorite and was associated with silica in biotite. Overall, microbial reduction of the Fe(III) associated with biotite and chlorite primed the minerals for reductive scavenging of radionuclides: this has clear implications for the fate of radionuclides in the environment.

  4. [G6PD phenotype and red blood cell sensitivity to the oxidising action of chlorites in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Contu, A; Bajorek, M; Carlini, M; Meloni, P; Cocco, P; Schintu, M

    2005-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide is widely used to replace sodium hypochlorite in the disinfection of surface waters for human consumption, in order to avoid or reduce the formation of organohalogenated compounds with mutagenic and carcinogenic activity. However, chlorine dioxide may lead to the formation of by-products, such as chlorites and chlorates, that have an oxidative effect on the blood corpuscled fraction. In this investigation, blood crasis was assessed in relation to the G6PD phenotype and the consumption of tap water, disinfected with chlorine dioxide, or bottled mineral water from non-disinfected underground sources. The results show that the effect of oxidative stress resulting from the uptake of chlorites with drinking water is not additive to the effect due to G6PD deficiency. The observed change in haematological parameters, including those related to the G6PD polymorphism, is always within the normal range. However, it is still possible that more relevant changes would follow exposure to chlorites concentrations greater than that observed in the present study.

  5. Three autocatalysts and self-inhibition in a single reaction: a detailed mechanism of the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Attila K; Nagypál, István; Epstein, Irving R

    2006-11-27

    The chlorite-tetrathionate reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in the pH range of 4.65-5.35 at T = 25.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C with an ionic strength of 0.5 M, adjusted with sodium acetate as a buffer component. The reaction is unique in that it demonstrates autocatalysis with respect to the hydrogen and chloride ion products and the key intermediate, HOCl. The thermodynamically most-favorable stoichiometry, 2S(4)O(6)2- + 7ClO2- + 6H2O --> 8SO(4)2- + 7Cl- + 12H+, is not found. Under our experimental conditions, chlorine dioxide, the chlorate ion, or both are detected in appreciable amounts among the products. Initial rate studies reveal that the formation of chlorine dioxide varies in an unusual way, with the chlorite ion acting as a self-inhibitor. The reaction is supercatalytic (i.e., second order with respect to autocatalyst H+). The autocatalytic behavior with respect to Cl- comes from chloride catalysis of the chlorite-hypochlorous acid and hypochlorous acid-tetrathionate subsystems. A detailed kinetic study and a model that explains this unusual kinetic behavior are presented.

  6. Redox Thermodynamics of High-Spin and Low-Spin Forms of Chlorite Dismutases with Diverse Subunit and Oligomeric Structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chlorite dismutases (Clds) are heme b-containing oxidoreductases that convert chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. In this work, the thermodynamics of the one-electron reduction of the ferric high-spin forms and of the six-coordinate low-spin cyanide adducts of the enzymes from Nitrobacter winogradskyi (NwCld) and Candidatus “Nitrospira defluvii” (NdCld) were determined through spectroelectrochemical experiments. These proteins belong to two phylogenetically separated lineages that differ in subunit (21.5 and 26 kDa, respectively) and oligomeric (dimeric and pentameric, respectively) structure but exhibit similar chlorite degradation activity. The E°′ values for free and cyanide-bound proteins were determined to be −119 and −397 mV for NwCld and −113 and −404 mV for NdCld, respectively (pH 7.0, 25 °C). Variable-temperature spectroelectrochemical experiments revealed that the oxidized state of both proteins is enthalpically stabilized. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that changes in the protein structure are negligible, whereas solvent reorganization is mainly responsible for the increase in entropy during the redox reaction. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the known structures of the two Clds and the proposed reaction mechanism. PMID:23126649

  7. Acidified sodium chlorite as an alternative to chlorine for elimination of salmonella on alfalfa seeds.

    PubMed

    Liao, C-H

    2009-01-01

    The health and environmental hazard associated with the use of chlorine for food processing has been documented previously. This study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) could be used to replace calcium hypochlorite (Ca[OCl](2)) for disinfection of alfalfa seeds. Contaminated seeds containing approximately 1.5 x 10(7) CFU/g of Salmonella were treated with ASC or Ca(OCl)(2) at different concentrations and for different periods of time. Results showed that the efficacy of ASC and Ca(OCl)(2) for elimination of Salmonella on contaminated seeds could be improved greatly by extending the treatment time from the traditional 15 to 45 min. Treatment of seeds with 800 ppm of ASC for 45 min reduced the number of Salmonella by 3.9 log units, approximately 1.2 log units higher than that treated with 20000 ppm of Ca(OCl)(2). Treatment of seeds with a lower concentration (100 to 400 ppm) of ASC for 45 min reduced the number of Salmonella by 1.3 to 2.2 log units. Soaking alfalfa seeds in 800 ppm of ASC for 45 min did not affect seed germination. However, soaking seeds in 20000 ppm of Ca(OCl)(2) for 45 min reduced seed germination by 20%. Unlike Ca(OCl)(2), antimicrobial efficiency of ASC was not affected by pre-exposure to alfalfa seeds. Data presented also showed that Salmonella on newly inoculated seeds that had been stored at 4 degrees C for less than 7 d were more sensitive to sanitizer treatment than those on seeds that had been stored for 4 wk or longer.

  8. Reducing levels of Listeria monocytogenes contamination on raw salmon with acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Cheng; Morrissey, Michael T

    2003-05-01

    The antimicrobial activity of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) against Listeria monocytogenes in salmon was studied. Raw salmon (whole fish and fillets) inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10(3) CFU/cm2 or 10(4) CFU/g) were washed with ASC solution (50 ppm) for 1 min and stored at -18 degrees C for 1 month (whole salmon) or in ice for 7 days (fillets). L. monocytogenes populations were determined for whole salmon after frozen storage and for fillets on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of storage. A wash with ASC solution followed by ASC glazing did not reduce L. monocytogenes on the skin of whole salmon during frozen storage. However, the wash resulted in an L. monocytogenes reduction of 0.5 log CFU/g for salmon fillets. The populations of L. monocytogenes in fillets increased slowly during ice storage, but the growth of these populations was retarded by ASC ice. By day 7, the populations were 0.25 log units smaller in fillets stored in ASC ice and 0.62 log units smaller in fillets that had been washed with ASC solution and stored in ASC ice than in control fillets. Treatment with ASC also reduced total plate counts (TPCs) by 0.43 log CFU/cm2 on the skin of whole salmon and by 0.31 log CFU/g in fillets. The TPCs for skin decreased during frozen storage but increased gradually for fillets stored at 5 degrees C or in ice. However, TPCs of ASC-treated samples were lower than those for controls at any point during the study. Washing with ASC solution significantly (P < 0.05) reduced TPCs on the skin of whole salmon and in fillets, as well as L. monocytogenes in fillets. The antimicrobial activity of ASC was enhanced when salmon was washed with ASC solution and stored in ASC ice.

  9. Acidified sodium chlorite solution as an antimicrobial treatment for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets.

    PubMed

    Kamireddy, N; Kenney, P B; Jittinandana, S; Slider, S D

    2008-05-01

    Minimizing microbial growth and maintaining overall quality are priorities for intervention strategies that extend the shelf life of fresh, aquatic foods. Four treatments included a control (fresh fillets), water, 50 ppm of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), and 1,000 ppm of ASC. Fillets were stored at 1 to 2 degrees C for 0, 8, and 15 days. A significant (P < 0.05) interaction between treatment and storage time was observed for psychrotrophic counts. The increase in psychrotrophic counts with storage time was less for fillets treated with ASC, regardless of ASC concentration. Aerobic plate counts were not affected (P > 0.05) by intervention; however, a significant increase in counts was observed during storage (P < 0.05). Fillet pH, moisture, fat, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, fatty acid composition, color, cook yield, and shear force were not affected (P > 0.05) by intervention. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances decreased (P < 0.05) during storage. Percentages of individual fatty acids were constant, with the exception of C15 and C20:2; they decreased with storage to 15 days. Percent fat, L* (lightness) and b* (yellowness) values, and cook yield increased (P < 0.05) during storage. Fillet pH, moisture, a* (redness) value, and shear force did not change (P > 0.05) with storage to 15 days. Based on these data, 50 ppm of ASC performed equally as well as 1,000 ppm of ASC. The value of ASC is as a decontaminant; however, fillets in this study had low psychrotrophic counts pretreatment (2.3 log CFU/cm2) and posttreatment (2.03 log CFU/cm2), which did not demonstrate ASC's effectiveness as a decontaminant.

  10. Chlorite dissolution rates under CO2 saturated conditions from 50 to 120 °C and 120 to 200 bar CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Haese, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorite dissolution rates were measured in a series of batch reactor experiments testing the effect of pCO2, pH, chloride and bicarbonate concentrations and temperature. Chlorite is an important diagenetic mineral in sedimentary basins, often found cementing mineral grains and filling pore space in formations that may serve as reservoirs for storing carbon dioxide. Conflicting reports of whether chlorite acts as a barrier to reservoir rock reactivity or leads to enhanced porosity due to dissolution, after the injection of supercritical CO2 into a reservoir, makes studying the reactivity of chlorite in contact with CO2 saturated waters pertinent. Measured dissolution rates were initially rapid and decreased over time as the saturation state of solution relative to chlorite increased. Temperature had the strongest effect on dissolution rate, with an apparent activation energy of 16 ± 0.5 kJ mol-1 and rate constant of log k0 = -9.56 ± 0.07 mol m-2 s-1 assuming a rate law of the form: rate = k0exp(-EA/RT). The apparent activation energy is lower than previously accepted values, but is consistent with a study of chlorite dissolution using flow through techniques (Smith et al., 2013). Mineral dissolution rates are typically proton enhanced, but the lack of a significant pH effect or pCO2 effect on chlorite dissolution rate in this study suggests that the use of NaHCO3 to buffer the pH of CO2 saturated solutions led to an inhibition of mineral dissolution in competition with the expected pH effect. This is supported by the observed dissolution rate increasing dramatically (half a log unit) with the use of an organic acid buffer (KHpthalate) under CO2 free conditions. The effect of chloride (NaCl ∼5 to 50 g/L) was found not to affect the dissolution rate of chlorite. Various empirical rate laws are proposed and fit to the data and lead to the development of a surface complex model describing proton promoted dissolution and bicarbonate inhibition of chlorite

  11. Comparison of the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and sodium hypochlorite in reducing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Elano, Rachel Ramos; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Kawasaki, Susumu; Kawamoto, Shinichi; Inatsu, Yasuhiro

    2010-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) and sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) in reducing several Escherichia coli strains isolated from different retail meat and fresh produce. Forty nonpathogenic E. coli strains were isolated and used in this study. A type strain of E. coli (JCM 1649) and four O157:H7 serotypes of E. coli (CR-3, MN-28, MY-29, and DT-66) were used as reference. In vitro assay results revealed that the viable cell counts of each isolated E. coli strain and control strains exhibited a reduction of ∼ 4.3 ± 0.9 log and 7.8 ± 1.7 log CFU/mL after a 3-minute exposure to 100 mg/L NaClO and 20 mg/L ASC (pH 4.6), respectively, at 25°C, when compared with the viable bacterial counts obtained from phosphate-buffered saline. The one exception was the flocs-forming strain, which showed a reduction of only 1.0 log CFU/mL with both disinfectants. However, reductions of only 1.7 ± 0.3 log and 1.9 ± 0.4 log CFU/g were observed in lettuce after 5 minutes of washing with NaClO and ASC, respectively. On the other hand, reductions of 1.6 ± 0.2 log and 1.6 ± 0.4 log CFU/g were observed in spinach after 5 minutes of washing with NaClO and ASC, respectively. No reduction in the population was observed after washing the inoculated, fresh-cut vegetables with distilled water only. No significant difference in the reduction of E. coli was observed among all the tested strains with both sanitizers in the in vivo assay. These data suggest that the tested sanitizers exhibit a similar reduction of the surface-attached E. coli on leafy vegetables irrespective of the strain source.

  12. Preventing bovine mastitis by a postmilking teat disinfectant containing acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Hillerton, J E; Cooper, J; Morelli, J

    2007-03-01

    A split-herd study was performed to determine if an acidified, sodium chlorite teat disinfectant, UDDERgold Platinum Germicidal Barrier Teat Dip (UG Pt, Ecolab Inc., Redmond, WA), was effective in preventing new intramammary infections (IMI) in lactating dairy cows compared with a licensed, iodophor teat disinfectant (Iosan, Novartis Animal Health, Ltd., Whittlesford, UK), and to show that the test product was tolerated equally well by teat skin. The study lasted 114 d and covered all weather conditions. The teats of 176 cows were dipped after each milking in UG Pt and the teats of 172 cows were dipped in Iosan, the positive-control product. Routine milk samples were taken from each quarter of every cow every 4 wk. Additional samples were taken from newly calved cows joining the trial and from cows with clinical signs of mastitis. Milk samples were cultured for the presence of bacteria and the cause of clinical mastitis. Each quarter was eligible for only 1 infection during the trial. The number of clinical cases was identical in each group (n = 13) and the number of subclinical infections was slightly lower in the UG Pt group than in the Iosan group (n = 27 and 31, respectively). These rates of infection suggest that the products did not differ in their ability to prevent a new IMI. At least 203 cows were assessed for skin integrity before the start of the trial and every 28 d throughout. The UG Pt teat dip had no adverse effects on teat condition. The prevalence of hyperkeratosis did not change with time for both groups (0.90 +/- 1.08 and 0.95 +/- 1.06 at wk 0 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.87 and 0.49 +/- 0.74 at wk 16 for fore and hind teats, respectively, for UG Pt and 1.02 +/- 1.25 and 1.16 +/- 1.11 at wk 0 vs. 0.51 +/- 0.71 and 0.45 +/- 0.65 at wk 16, respectively, for Iosan); no redness of the skin was observed in either group. Application of recommended statistical methods to demonstrate noninferiority was problematic.

  13. Understanding the roles of strictly conserved tryptophan residues in O2 producing chlorite dismutases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Beatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (Clds) degrade ClO2− to O2 and Cl− in perchlorate respiring bacteria, and they serve still poorly defined cellular roles in other diverse microbes. These proteins share 3 highly conserved Trp residues, W155, W156, and W227, on the proximal side of the heme. The Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) has been shown to form protein-based radicals in its reactions with ClO2− and peracetic acid. The roles of the conserved Trp residues in radical generation and in enzymatic function were assessed via spectroscopic and kinetic analysis of their Phe mutants. The W155F mutant was the most dramatically affected, appearing to lose the characteristic pentameric oligomerization state, secondary structure, and heme binding properties of the WT protein. The W156F mutant initially retains many features of the WT protein but over time acquires many of the features of W155F. Conversion to an inactive, heme-free form is accelerated by dilution, suggesting loss of the protein’s pentameric state. Hence, both W155 and W156 are important for heme binding and maintenance of the protein’s reactive pentameric structure. W227F by contrast retains many properties of the WT protein. Important differences are noted in the transient kinetic reactions with peracetic acid (PAA), where W227F appears to form an [Fe(IV)=O]-containing intermediate, which subsequently converts to an uncoupled [Fe(IV)=O + AA+.] system in a [PAA]-dependent manner. This is in contrast to the peroxidase-like formation of [Fe(IV)=O] coupled to a porphyrin π-cation radical in the WT protein, which decays in a [PAA]-independent manner. These observations and the lack of redox protection for the heme in any of the Trp mutants suggests a tendency for protein radical formation in DaCld that is independent of any of these conserved active site residues. PMID:23241559

  14. Chlorite, Biotite, Illite, Muscovite, and Feldspar Dissolution Kinetics at Variable pH and Temperatures up to 280 C

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, S.; Smith, M.; Lammers, K.

    2016-10-05

    Summary Sheet silicates and clays are ubiquitous in geothermal environments. Their dissolution is of interest because this process contributes to scaling reactions along fluid pathways and alteration of fracture surfaces, which could affect reservoir permeability. In order to better predict the geochemical impacts on long-term performance of engineered geothermal systems, we have measured chlorite, biotite, illite, and muscovite dissolution and developed generalized kinetic rate laws that are applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature for each mineral. This report summarizes the rate equations for layered silicates where data were lacking for geothermal systems.

  15. Understanding How the Distal Environment Directs Reactivity in Chlorite Dismutase: Spectroscopy and Reactivity of Arg183 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Béatrice; Mayfield, Jeffery A.; McDonald, Claudia A.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The chlorite dismutase from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) catalyzes the highly efficient decomposition of chlorite to O2 and chloride. Spectroscopic, equilibrium thermodynamic, and kinetic measurements have indicated that Cld has two pH sensitive moieties; one is the heme, and Arg183 in the distal heme pocket has been hypothesized to be the second. This active site residue has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis to understand the roles of positive charge and hydrogen bonding in O–O bond formation. Three Cld mutants, Arg183 to Lys (R183K), Arg183 to Gln (R183Q), and Arg183 to Ala (R183A), were investigated to determine their respective contributions to the decomposition of chlorite ion, the spin state and coordination states of their ferric and ferrous forms, their cyanide and imidazole binding affinities, and their reduction potentials. UV–visible and resonance Raman spectroscopies showed that DaCld(R183A) contains five-coordinate high-spin (5cHS) heme, the DaCld(R183Q) heme is a mixture of five-coordinate and six-coordinate high spin (5c/6cHS) heme, and DaCld(R183K) contains six-coordinate low-spin (6cLS) heme. In contrast to wild-type (WT) Cld, which exhibits pKa values of 6.5 and 8.7, all three ferric mutants exhibited pH-independent spectroscopic signatures and kinetic behaviors. Steady state kinetic parameters of the chlorite decomposition reaction catalyzed by the mutants suggest that in WT DaCld the pKa of 6.5 corresponds to a change in the availability of positive charge from the guanidinium group of Arg183 to the heme site. This could be due to either direct acid–base chemistry at the Arg183 side chain or a flexible Arg183 side chain that can access various orientations. Current evidence is most consistent with a conformational adjustment of Arg183. A properly oriented Arg183 is critical for the stabilization of anions in the distal pocket and for efficient catalysis. PMID:22313119

  16. Germicidal activity of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip and a sodium chlorite teat dip during experimental challenge with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Boddie, R L; Nickerson, S C; Adkinson, R W

    1998-08-01

    Three postmilking teat dips were tested for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae in two separate studies using experimental challenge procedures that were recommended by the National Mastitis Council. The first study evaluated a barrier teat dip product containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide as the germicidal agent, and the second study evaluated a sodium chlorite product with a barrier component as well as a sodium chlorite product without a barrier component. The chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip reduced new intramammary infections (IMI) caused by Staph. aureus by 91.5% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 71.7%. The barrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus and Strep. agalactiae by 41.0 and 0%, respectively. The nonbarrier dip containing sodium chlorite reduced new IMI caused by Staph. aureus by 65.6% and reduced new IMI caused by Strep. agalactiae by 39.1%. Teat skin and teat end conditions were evaluated before and after the second study; no deleterious effects among dipped quarters compared with control quarters were noted for the two sodium chlorite products.

  17. [Simultaneous determination of iodate, chlorite and bromate in bottled drinking water by ion chromatography with post-column reaction and UV detection].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiqi; Wang, Zijian; Xu, Yiping; Ma, Mei

    2007-05-01

    Iodate, chlorite and bromate in bottled water are disinfectant by-products (DBPs) from ozonation. The established methods for simultaneous determination of iodate, chlorite and bromate are mostly based on pre- or post-column chemical reaction in which the target compound was converted to another easily detectable species. However, the procedure suffers from several time-consuming reaction steps that involve multiple chemicals, or where the reagents themselves are toxic. In the present study, a rapid, highly sensitive, precise and accurate method was established, and a post-column reaction with sodium nitrite and acid solution of potassium bromide was employed to enhance sensitivity and to reduce interferences. Under optimized conditions, the method limits for iodate, chlorite and bromate were 0.5, 0.4 microg/L and 0.1 microg/L, respectively. Percentage recoveries of iodate, chlorite and bromate varied from 70.8% to 98.0%, 92.4% to 100% and 93.2% to 104.1% respectively with different spiked water samples. The proposed method was demonstrated for detecting the concentrations of iodate, chlorite and bromate in bottled water produced from different water sources. Results showed that severe bromate contamination was present in bottled mineral water purchased from Beijing supermarket, which used spring water or ground water as the sources.

  18. Succession of Permian and Mesozoic metasomatic events in the eastern Pyrenees with emphasis on the Trimouns talc-chlorite deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Alexandre; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Poujol, Marc; Boulvais, Philippe; de Parseval, Philippe; Rouleau, Caroline; Robert, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies proposing pre-orogenic mantle exhumation models have helped renew the interest of the geosciences community in the Pyrenees, which should be now interpreted as a hyper-extended passive margin before the convergence between Iberia and Eurasia occurred. Unresolved questions of the Pyrenean geology, as well as the understanding of the formation of hyper-extended passive margins, are how the crust was thinned, and when, where and how the crustal breakoff occurred. The study of the Variscan and pre-Variscan Pyrenean basement is thus critical to document and understand this Cretaceous crustal thinning. In order to specify the timing of Mesozoic metasomatism and the associated deformation in the pre-Mesozoic basement of the Pyrenees, we carried out a U-Th-Pb laser ablation ICP-MS study on a large panel of REE and titanium-rich minerals (titanite and rutile) from talc-chlorite ores from the eastern Pyrenees, with a special emphasis on the Trimouns deposit, the world's largest talc quarry. Our results suggest that the Trimouns talc formation was restricted to the upper Aptian-Cenomanian time, while the talc and chlorite formation in the eastern Pyrenees occurred during several distinct Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous episodes. These results give strong constraints on the tectonic setting of the Pyrenean domain during the transition between the Variscan and Alpine orogenic cycles, and particularly on when and how the upper crust was thinned before the crustal breakoff and the final mantle exhumation.

  19. Chlorine dioxide-induced and Congo red-inhibited Marangoni effect on the chlorite-trithionate reaction front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ren, Xingfeng; Pan, Changwei; Zheng, Ting; Yuan, Ling; Zheng, Juhua; Gao, Qingyu

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic flows can exert multiple effects on an exothermal autocatalytic reaction, such as buoyancy and the Marangoni convection, which can change the structure and velocity of chemical waves. Here we report that in the chlorite-trithionate reaction, the production and consumption of chlorine dioxide can induce and inhibit Marangoni flow, respectively, leading to different chemo-hydrodynamic patterns. The horizontal propagation of a reaction-diffusion-convection front was investigated with the upper surface open to the air. The Marangoni convection, induced by gaseous chlorine dioxide on the surface, produced from chlorite disproportionation after the proton autocatalysis, has the same effect as the heat convection. When the Marangoni effect is removed by the reaction of chlorine dioxide with the Congo red (CR) indicator, an oscillatory propagation of the front tip is observed under suitable conditions. Replacing CR with bromophenol blue (BPB) distinctly enhanced the floating, resulting in multiple vortexes, owing to the coexistence between BPB and chlorine dioxide. Using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with reaction-diffusion and heat conduction equations, we numerically obtain various experimental scenarios of front instability for the exothermic autocatalytic reaction coupled with buoyancy-driven convection and Marangoni convection.

  20. Effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite and other sanitizers to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces.

    PubMed

    Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Kitagawa, Tomoko; Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Juneja, Vijay; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2010-06-01

    The use of a suitable sanitizer can reduce the risk of produce-related foodborne illnesses. We evaluated the effectiveness of several sanitizers to reduce inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the surface of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiform). Depending on the method of inoculation (dipping/spotting), each of 80 g (eight tomatoes) of inoculated cherry tomatoes was washed in 400 mL of sanitizer solutions or 400 mL distilled water for 5 minutes. The effectiveness of sanitizers on spot-inoculated E. coli O157:H7 on tomato surfaces was found higher than on dip-inoculated tomatoes. Washing with water or chlorine water (0.1 g/L as free chlorine) could reduce 1.3 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated (6.8 log CFU/g) tomatoes. Washing with lactic acid (LA) solution (1.0 g/L), phytic acid solution (1.0 g/L), calcinated seashells (oyster/sakhalin surf clam), and 1.0 g/L chitosan in 0.5 g/L LA (Chito) did not exhibit a significant higher effectiveness than that of water wash alone (1.0 log CFU/g). Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) solution prepared from 0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L LA or phytic acid reduced 3.5 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 in dip-inoculated tomato surfaces. ASC (0.5 g/L of sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L of LA) wash followed by a second wash with LA exhibited an additional sanitary effectiveness compared to a single wash with ASC. However, washing with ASC followed by a second wash with Chito exhibited an additional 1.0 log CFU/g reduction compared to a secondary wash with water. No significant difference of color, taste, and texture was observed among the washed cherry tomatoes.

  1. Multiple hydrothermal and metamorphic events in the Kidd Creek volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit, Timmins, Ontario: evidence from tourmalines and chlorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Coad, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The tourmalines and chlorites record a series of multiple hydrothermal and metamorphic events. Paragenetic studies suggest that tourmaline was deposited during several discrete stages of mineralization, as evidence by brecciation and cross-cutting relationships. Most of the tourmalines have two concentric growth zones defined by different colours (green, brown, blue, yellow). Some tourmalines also display pale discordant rims that cross-cut and embay the inner growth zones and polycrystalline, multiple-extinction domains. Late sulphide veinlets (chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite) transect the inner growth zones and pale discordant rims of many crystals. The concentric growth zones are interpreted as primary features developed by the main ore-forming hydrothermal system, whereas the discordant rims, polycrystalline domains, and cross-cutting sulphide veinlets reflect post-ore metamorphic processes. Variations in mineral proportions and mineral chemistry within the deposit mainly depend on fluctuations in temperature, pH, water/rock ratios, and amounts of entrained seawater. -from Authors

  2. Chlorite dismutases, DyPs, and EfeB: 3 microbial heme enzyme families comprise the CDE structural superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Goblirsch, Brandon; Kurker, Richard C.; Streit, Bennett R.; Wilmot, Carrie M.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Heme proteins are extremely diverse, widespread, and versatile biocatalysts, sensors, and molecular transporters. The chlorite dismutase family of hemoproteins received its name due to the ability of the first-isolated members to detoxify anthropogenic ClO2−, a function believed to have evolved only in the last few decades. Family members have since been found in fifteen bacterial and archaeal genera, suggesting ancient roots. A structure- and sequence-based examination of the family is presented, in which key sequence and structural motifs are identified and possible functions for family proteins are proposed. Newly identified structural homologies moreover demonstrate clear connections to two other large, ancient, and functionally mysterious protein families. We propose calling them collectively the CDE superfamily of heme proteins. PMID:21354424

  3. From chlorite dismutase towards HemQ–the role of the proximal H-bonding network in haeme binding

    PubMed Central

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Howes, Barry D.; Flego, Nicola; Pirker, Katharina F.; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Smulevich, Giulietta; Obinger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) and HemQ are structurally and phylogenetically closely related haeme enzymes differing fundamentally in their enzymatic properties. Clds are able to convert chlorite into chloride and dioxygen, whereas HemQ is proposed to be involved in the haeme b synthesis of Gram-positive bacteria. A striking difference between these protein families concerns the proximal haeme cavity architecture. The pronounced H-bonding network in Cld, which includes the proximal ligand histidine and fully conserved glutamate and lysine residues, is missing in HemQ. In order to understand the functional consequences of this clearly evident difference, specific hydrogen bonds in Cld from ‘Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii’ (NdCld) were disrupted by mutagenesis. The resulting variants (E210A and K141E) were analysed by a broad set of spectroscopic (UV–vis, EPR and resonance Raman), calorimetric and kinetic methods. It is demonstrated that the haeme cavity architecture in these protein families is very susceptible to modification at the proximal site. The observed consequences of such structural variations include a significant decrease in thermal stability and also affinity between haeme b and the protein, a partial collapse of the distal cavity accompanied by an increased percentage of low-spin state for the E210A variant, lowered enzymatic activity concomitant with higher susceptibility to self-inactivation. The high-spin (HS) ligand fluoride is shown to exhibit a stabilizing effect and partially restore wild-type Cld structure and function. The data are discussed with respect to known structure–function relationships of Clds and the proposed function of HemQ as a coprohaeme decarboxylase in the last step of haeme biosynthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. PMID:26858461

  4. Phyllosilicate weathering pathways in chlorite-talc bearing soil parent materials, D.R. Congo: early findings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumon, Mathijs; Oostermeyer, Fran; Timmermans, Els; De Meulemeester, Aschwin; Mees, Florias; Van Driessche, Isabel; Erens, Hans; Bazirake Mujinya, Basile; Van Ranst, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The study of the formation and transformation of clay minerals is of the upmost importance to understand soil formation and to adjust land-use management to the land surface conditions. These clay minerals determine to a large extent the soil physical and chemical properties. It is commonly observed that over time the mineralogy of any parent material is transformed to a simple assemblage composed mostly of Al and Fe oxides and low-activity clays, e.g. kaolinite. This is especially obvious in the humid tropics, which have been protected from glacial erosion, allowing deep, highly weathered soils to form. Despite the abundant presence of kaolinite in these soils, its formation pathways are still under debate: either neoformation by dissolution-crystallisation reactions or solid-state transformation of 2:1 phyllosilicates. To elucidate this, weathering sequences in a unique 40 m core taken below a termite mound, reaching a talc-chlorite bearing substrate in the Lubumbashi area, Katanga, DR Congo are being investigated in detail using a.o. quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, chemical characterization, micromorphology and µXRF-scanning with the main objective to improve the understanding of the formation pathways of kaolinite subgroup minerals in humid tropical environments. Based on an initial characterization of the core, two zones of interest were selected for more detailed analysis, for which the early findings will be presented. The first zone extends from ca. 9 m to 11 m below the surface is dominated by kaolinite but shows early traces of primary talc and micas. The second zone extends from 34 to 36 m below the surface and contains large amounts of chlorite, with smaller amounts of talc, micas and kaolinite.

  5. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes.

    PubMed

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-10-05

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes, which nature uses for the oxidation of metabolites and drugs. In biomimicry and bioremediation, an important reaction relates to the detoxification of ClOx(-) in water, which can lead to a mixture of products through bifurcated reactions. Herein we report the first three water-soluble non-heme iron(II) complexes that can generate chlorine dioxide from chlorite at ambient temperature and physiological pH. These complexes are highly active oxygenation oxidants and convert ClO2(-) into either ClO2 or ClO3¯ via high-valent iron(IV)-oxo intermediates. We characterize the short-lived iron(IV)-oxo species and establish rate constants for the bifurcation mechanism leading to ClO2 and ClO3(-) products. We show that the ligand architecture of the metal center plays a dominant role by lowering the reduction potential of the metal center. Our experiments are supported by computational modeling, and a predictive valence bond model highlights the various factors relating to the substrate and oxidant that determine the bifurcation pathway and explains the origins of the product distributions. Our combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational studies reveal the key components necessary for the future development of efficient chlorite oxidation catalysts.

  6. Reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium on beef carcass surfaces using acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Castillo, A; Lucia, L M; Kemp, G K; Acuff, G R

    1999-06-01

    The efficacy of a phosphoric acid-activated acidified sodium chloride (PASC) spray and a citric acid-activated acidified sodium chlorite (CASC) spray applied at room temperature (22.4 to 24.7 degrees C) in combination with a water wash was compared with that of a water wash only treatment for reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium inoculated onto various hot-boned individual beef carcass surface regions (inside round, outside round, brisket, flank, and clod). Initial counts of 5.5 and 5.4 log CFU/cm2 were obtained after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium, respectively. Initial numbers for both pathogens were reduced by 3.8 to 3.9 log cycles by water wash followed by PASC spray and by 4.5 to 4.6 log cycles by water wash followed by CASC spray. The sprays consisted of applying 140 ml of the appropriate sanitizing solution for 10 s at 69 kPa. Corresponding reduction values obtained by water wash alone were 2.3 log. The performance of CASC appeared to be consistently better than that of PASC. In general, no effect of the carcass surface region was observed on the log reductions for either pathogen, except for the inside round, which consistently had lower reductions. Both PASC and CASC were capable of effectively reducing pathogens spread to areas beyond the initial contaminated area of the cuts to levels close to or below the counting method detection limit (0.5 log CFU/cm2). However, 30 to 50% of the carcasses treated by these antimicrobial solutions still yielded countable colonies. Results of this study indicate that acidified sodium chlorite sprays are effective for decontaminating beef carcass surfaces.

  7. Effects of peroxyacetic acid, acidified sodium chlorite or lactic acid solutions on the microflora of chilled beef carcasses.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; Badoni, M

    2004-02-15

    The effects of solutions of 0.02% peroxyacetic acid, acidified 0.16% sodium chlorite, 2% lactic acid and 4% lactic acid on the natural flora of the distal surfaces of pieces of brisket, from chilled beef carcass quarters delivered from two slaughtering plants to a processing plant, were investigated. Peroxyacetic acid and acidified sodium chlorite solutions had little effect on the numbers of aerobes, coliforms or Escherichia coli on meat from one plant, and were less effective than 4% lactic acid for reducing the numbers of bacteria on meat from the other plant. With meat from both plants, treatment of meat with 4% lactic acid and holding for 5 or 60 min at 7+/-1 degrees C before sampling resulted in reductions of all three groups of bacteria by >/=1.5 log unit. Treatment with 2% lactic acid resulted in similar reductions when meat was sampled 5 min after the treatment, but reductions were about 1 log unit when meat was sampled 60 min after the treatment. Treatment of carcass quarters with 4% lactic acid resulted in reductions of bacterial numbers of >/=2 log units at distal surfaces, but

  8. Disinfection by-products of chlorine dioxide (chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes): Occurrence in drinking water in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Otoum, Fatima; Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Ahmed, Talaat A; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed; Ali, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    The occurrence of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water, namely, chlorite, chlorate, and trihalomethanes (THMs), was investigated. Two-hundred-ninety-four drinking water samples were collected from seven desalination plants (DPs), four reservoirs (R), and eight mosques (M) distributed within various locations in southern and northern Qatar. The ClO2 concentration levels ranged from 0.38 to <0.02 mg L(-1), with mean values of 0.17, 0.12, and 0.04 mg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorite levels varied from 13 μg L(-1) to 440 μg L(-1), with median values varying from 13 to 230 μg L(-1), 77-320 μg L(-1), and 85-440 μg L(-1) for the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The chlorate levels varied from 11 μg L(-1) to 280 μg L(-1), with mean values varying from 36 to 280 μg L(-1), 11-200 μg L(-1), and 11-150 μg L(-1) in the DPs, Rs, and Ms, respectively. The average concentration of THMs was 5 μg L(-1), and the maximum value reached 77 μg L(-1) However, all of the DBP concentrations fell within the range of the regulatory limits set by GSO 149/2009, the World Health Organization (WHO), and Kahramaa (KM).

  9. Chemistry of micas and chlorite in Proterozoic acid metavolcanics and associated rocks from the Hästefält area, Norberg ore district, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldahan, A. A.; Ounchanum, P.; Morad, S.

    1988-09-01

    Microprobe analyses are performed on micas (biotite, muscovite and phlogopite) and chlorite from 1.9 1.8 Ga acid K- or Na-rich metavolcanics, cordierit-emica schists and manganiferous rocks from the Hästefält area in central Sweden. The results indicate that Fe-rich biotites and muscovites containing ≥10 to ≤25% celadonite and/or pyrophyllite are common in the K- and Na-rich metavolcanics. In the cordierite-mica schists the biotites are Mg-rich and the muscovites contain less than 10% celadonite and/or pyrophyllite. The predominant mica in the manganiferous rocks are phlogopite and less frequent rather pure muscovite. The chlorites show a wide range in composition, but principally those occurring in the K- and Na-rich metavolcanics are brunsvigite and diabantite and those in the cordierite-mica schists and the manganiferous rocks are mainly sheridanite and clinochlore. The chlorites of the manganiferous rocks show enrichment in Mn compared to those in other rock types. In general the compositional variations in the micas and less commonly chlorites are strongly controlled by rock type and fluid chemistry, particularly with respect to the ratio of FeO/(FeO+MgO). Estimates of maximum prograde metamorphic temperature, based on phyllosilicates and co-existing cordierite and garnets, indicate a value of up to 500° C.

  10. Combined effects of sodium chlorite dip treatment and chitosan coatings on the quality of fresh-cut d’Anjou pears

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chlorite (SC) alone and its sequential treatment with edible coatings on browning inhibition and quality maintenance of fresh-cut d’Anjou pears. Edible coatings were prepared from chitosan (CH) and its water soluble derivative: carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCH...

  11. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT, SODIUM CHLORITE, IN FEMALE B6C3F1 MICE: A DRINKING WATER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of the Disinfection By-product, Sodium chlorite, in Female B6C3f1 mice: A Drinking Water Study.

    Niel A. Karrow, Tal, L. Guo, J. Ann McCay, Greg W. Johnson, Ronnetta D. Brown, Debrorah L. Musgrove, Dori R. Germolec, Robert W. Lueb...

  12. A novel, simple and sensitive resonance scattering spectral method for the determination of chlorite in water by means of rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cai-yan; Jiang, Zhi-liang; Xi, Dan-li; He, Xing-cun

    2006-01-01

    A new resonance scattering method was proposed for the determination of chlorite, basing on the resonance scattering effect of rhodamine dye. In HCl-sodium acetate buffer solution, chlorite oxidizes I- into I2 and the reaction of I2 and excess I- results in I3- It is respectively combined with rhodamine dyes, including rhodamine B (RhB), butyl rhodamine B (b-RhB), rhodamine G (RhG) and rhodamine S (RhS), to form association complex particles, which exhibit stronger resonance scattering (RS) effect at 400 nm. The chlorite concentration of ClO2- in the range of 0.00726-0.218 microg/ml, 0.0102-0.292 microg/ml, 0.00726 0.145 microg/ml and 0.0290 0.174 microg/ml is respectively linear to the RS intensity of association complex particle systems at 400 nm for the RhB, b-RhB, RhG and RhS. The detection limits of the four systems were respectively 0.00436, 0.00652, 0.00580 and 0.01450 microg/ml ClO2-. In the four systems, the RhB system possesses good stability and high sensitivity. It has been applied to the analysis of chlorite in wastewater with satisfactory results.

  13. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut ‘Granny Smith’ apples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. ‘Granny Smith’ apple slices, dipp...

  14. EVALUATION OF THE IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECTS OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT, SODIUM CHLORITE, IN FEMALE B6C3F1 MICE: A DRINKING WATER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of the Disinfection By-product, Sodium chlorite, in Female B6C3f1 mice: A Drinking Water Study.

    Niel A. Karrow, Tal, L. Guo, J. Ann McCay, Greg W. Johnson, Ronnetta D. Brown, Debrorah L. Musgrove, Dori R. Germolec, Robert W. Lueb...

  15. A new application of fiber-optic reflection spectroscopy (FORS): characterization of low-temperature alteration of chlorite schist and implications for understanding ancient stone cooking vessels.

    PubMed

    Namdar, Dvory; Verri, Giovanni; Stacey, Rebecca J; Middleton, Andrew; Simpson, St John

    2011-01-01

    Bulk thermal alterations to chlorite schist occurring at temperatures above 450 °C are traditionally studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, or thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), but lower temperature changes that lead to structural and chemical alteration, including changes in oxidation state that are not followed by a crystalline modification, are not detectable using these techniques. In this paper we present the results of the first study to examine the application of fiber-optic reflection spectroscopy (FORS) for the detection and quantification of low-temperature thermal alterations in chlorite schist. Such changes have been observed during research on the thermal behavior of medieval (12th-13th centuries AD) chlorite cooking pots from the archaeological site of Merv, Turkmenistan. FORS was used to investigate these changes, testing the archaeological samples against a model data set of experimental reference specimens. The results demonstrate the potential of FORS for tracking low-temperature thermal alterations and offer the opportunity to examine temperatures attained by ancient chlorite vessels during their past use in cooking activities.

  16. A thermodynamic model for di-trioctahedral chlorite from experimental and natural data in the system MgO-FeO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O: applications to P- T sections and geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, Pierre; Wagner, Thomas; Vidal, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    We present a new thermodynamic activity-composition model for di-trioctahedral chlorite in the system FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O that is based on the Holland-Powell internally consistent thermodynamic data set. The model is formulated in terms of four linearly independent end-members, which are amesite, clinochlore, daphnite and sudoite. These account for the most important crystal-chemical substitutions in chlorite, the Fe-Mg, Tschermak and di-trioctahedral substitution. The ideal part of end-member activities is modeled with a mixing-on-site formalism, and non-ideality is described by a macroscopic symmetric (regular) formalism. The symmetric interaction parameters were calibrated using a set of 271 published chlorite analyses for which robust independent temperature estimates are available. In addition, adjustment of the standard state thermodynamic properties of sudoite was required to accurately reproduce experimental brackets involving sudoite. This new model was tested by calculating representative P- T sections for metasediments at low temperatures (<400 °C), in particular sudoite and chlorite bearing metapelites from Crete. Comparison between the calculated mineral assemblages and field data shows that the new model is able to predict the coexistence of chlorite and sudoite at low metamorphic temperatures. The predicted lower limit of the chloritoid stability field is also in better agreement with petrological observations. For practical applications to metamorphic and hydrothermal environments, two new semi-empirical chlorite geothermometers named Chl(1) and Chl(2) were calibrated based on the chlorite + quartz + water equilibrium (2 clinochlore + 3 sudoite = 4 amesite + 4 H2O + 7 quartz). The Chl(1) thermometer requires knowledge of the (Fe3+/ΣFe) ratio in chlorite and predicts correct temperatures for a range of redox conditions. The Chl(2) geothermometer which assumes that all iron in chlorite is ferrous has been applied to partially recrystallized

  17. Matrix superpotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Anatoly G.; Karadzhov, Yuri

    2011-07-01

    We present a collection of matrix-valued shape invariant potentials which give rise to new exactly solvable problems of SUSY quantum mechanics. It includes all irreducible matrix superpotentials of the generic form W=kQ+\\frac{1}{k} R+P, where k is a variable parameter, Q is the unit matrix multiplied by a real-valued function of independent variable x, and P and R are the Hermitian matrices depending on x. In particular, we recover the Pron'ko-Stroganov 'matrix Coulomb potential' and all known scalar shape invariant potentials of SUSY quantum mechanics. In addition, five new shape invariant potentials are presented. Three of them admit a dual shape invariance, i.e. the related Hamiltonians can be factorized using two non-equivalent superpotentials. We find discrete spectrum and eigenvectors for the corresponding Schrödinger equations and prove that these eigenvectors are normalizable.

  18. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  19. Tetramethylbenzidine method for monitoring the free available chlorine and microbicidal activity of chlorite-based sanitizers under organic-matter-rich environments.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, H; Nakayama-Imaohji, H; Horiuchi, I; Yamasaki, H; Nagao, T; Fujita, Y; Maeda, H; Goda, H; Kuwahara, T

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine is a principal disinfectant for food and environmental sanitation. Monitoring of free available chlorine (FAC) is essential for ensuring the efficacy of food disinfection processes that rely on chlorine. N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) is commonly used for FAC monitoring. However, here, we show that upon contact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or broiler carcasses, chlorite (HClO2 )-based sanitizers acquire a pink colour, which can interfere with measurement of oxidized DPD absorbance at 513-550 nm. Alternatively, the pink colour did not interfere with 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)-based FAC monitoring. The FAC levels of NaClO and weakly acidified chlorous acid water (WACAW) were first adjusted by the TMB method and the killing activity of these sanitizers towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and feline calicivirus (FCV) was compared in the presence or absence of 0·5% BSA. At 200 ppm FAC, NaClO lost its bactericidal activity against MRSA after 10-min incubation with 0·5% BSA. Meanwhile, under the same conditions WACAW reduced the number of bacteria to below the detection limit. Similar results were obtained with FCV, indicating that the chlorite-based WACAW sanitizer is relatively stable under organic-matter-rich conditions. Moreover, TMB is suitable for in situ FAC monitoring of chlorite-based sanitizers in food and environmental disinfection processes. For practical applications of chlorine in food processing, monitoring of FAC is critical to validate disinfection efficacy. In this study we found that chlorite-based sanitizers acquired a pink colour upon contact with BSA or broiler carcasses. This pink colour interfered with FAC monitoring by methods that measure oxidized N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine absorbance between 513-550 nm. Alternatively, FAC levels of chlorite-based sanitizers could be monitored using the absorbance of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine at 650 nm, which does not overlap with the acquired

  20. Rare Earth Element Compositions of Chlorite-rich Hydrothermal Sediments in the middle Okinawa Trough, East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Yang, S.; Humphris, S. E.; Cai, D.; Wang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have been used as powerful tracers in the study of hot fluid-rock reaction in hydrothermal system. However, the behavior of the REEs during interaction of hydrothermal solution with rocks remains to be clarified more quantitatively. The Okinawa Trough (OT), located in the East Asian continental margin, is characterized by thick terrigenous sediment and ubiquitous volcanic-hydrothermal activities. In this study, the sediments collected during IODP Expedition 331 to the mid-OT were determined for mineralogical and REEs as well as Nd isotopic compositions, aiming to investigate the geochemical behavior of REEs during hydrothermal processes. All samples were separated into bulk and clay-size (˂ 2 μm) fractions and pretreated by 1N HCl to remove carbonate and other unstable components. The hydrothermal sediments in the mid-OT is dominated by Mg-rich chlorite based on the XRD analysis, especially the clay-size fraction comprising pure chlorite. The clay-size samples bear different mineralogical and geochemical compositions between the upper and lower parts in this hydrothermal area. All hydrothermal samples are relatively enriched in HREEs in the residues. The upper clays have higher values of δEu and (La/Yb)N as well as LREEs concentration than the lower part, while the bulk samples have weak REE differentiation. In the 1N HCl leachates, the concentrations of REEs in the bulk samples are higher than in the clays in the lower part but LREEs are obviously enriched in the upper clays. We infer that the grain size may be an important factor controlling the behavior of REEs in the mid-OT hydrothermal system. Both bulk and clay samples show negative Eu anomalies relative to chondrite, similar as the detrital sediments and volcanic rocks. This study confirms the hypothesis that HREEs patterns are constant throughout the system compatible with higher LREEs mobility as chlorine ion complexes in acidic solutions (Mills and Elderfield 1995; Douville

  1. Combination of sodium chlorite and calcium propionate reduces enzymatic browning and microbial population of fresh-cut "Granny Smith" apples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenqiang; Fan, Xuetong

    2010-03-01

    Tissue browning and microbial growth are the main concerns associated with fresh-cut apples. In this study, effects of sodium chlorite (SC) and calcium propionate (CP), individually and combined, on quality and microbial population of apple slices were investigated. "Granny Smith" apple slices, dipped for 5 min in CP solutions at 0%, 0.5%, 1%, and 2% (w/v) either alone or in combination with 0.05% (w/v) SC, were stored at 3 and 10 degrees C for up to 14 d. Color, firmness, and microflora population were measured at 1, 7, and 14 d of storage. Results showed that CP alone had no significant effect on the browning of cut apples. Even though SC significantly inhibited tissue browning initially, the apple slices turned brown during storage at 10 degrees C. The combination of CP and SC was able to inhibit apple browning during storage. Samples treated with the combination of SC with CP did not show any detectable yeast and mold growth during the entire storage period at 3 degrees C. At 10 degrees C, yeast and mold count increased on apple slices during storage while CP reduced the increase. However, high concentrations of CP reduced the efficacy of SC in inactivating E. coli inoculated on apples. Overall, our results suggested that combination of SC with 0.5% and 1% CP could be used to inhibit tissue browning and maintain firmness while reducing microbial population. Practical Application: Apple slices, which contain antioxidants and other nutrient components, have emerged as popular snacks in food service establishments, school lunch programs, and for family consumption. However, the further growth of the industry is limited by product quality deterioration caused by tissue browning, short shelf-life due to microbial growth, and possible contamination with human pathogens during processing. Therefore, this study was conducted to develop treatments to reduce microbial population and tissue browning of "Granny Smith" apple slices. Results showed that an antimicrobial

  2. Sync Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, William C.; Metz, W. Chris; Mitrani, Jacques E.; Hewett, Jr., Paul L.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  3. Reverse osmosis membrane composition, structure and performance modification by bisulphite, iron(III), bromide and chlorite exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, O; Gibert, O; Cortina, J L

    2016-10-15

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane exposure to bisulphite, chlorite, bromide and iron(III) was assessed in terms of membrane composition, structure and performance. Membrane composition was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and membrane performance was assessed by water and chloride permeation, using a modified version of the solution-diffusion model. Iron(III) dosage in presence of bisulphite led to an autooxidation of the latter, probably generating free radicals which damaged the membrane. It comprised a significant raise in chloride passage (chloride permeation coefficient increased 5.3-5.1 fold compared to the virgin membrane under the conditions studied) rapidly. No major differences in terms of water permeability and membrane composition were observed. Nevertheless, an increase in the size of the network pores, and a raise in the fraction of aggregate pores of the polyamide (PA) layer were identified, but no amide bond cleavage was observed. These structural changes were therefore, in accordance with the transport properties observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of acidified sodium chlorite, cetylpyridinium chloride and hot water on populations of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus on beef.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, H; Koluman, A; Yildirim, Y

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the individual and combined effects of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC, 0.1%, 24 +/- 1 degrees C), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC, 0.5%, 24 +/- 1 degrees C) and hot water (HW, 93 +/- 1 degrees C) treatments on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Beef samples inoculated with L. monocytogenes and S. aureus were treated with nine different applications singly or in combination. Treatment groups comprised (i) untreated control; (ii) sterile tap water; (iii) 0.1% ASC; (iv) 0.5% CPC; (v) HW; (vi) HW followed by 0.1% ASC; (vii) HW followed by 0.5% CPC; (viii) 0.1% ASC followed by HW; (ix) 0.5% CPC followed by HW. Compared with the untreated control group, the reductions in L. monocytogenes populations were 1.14-2.31 log CFU g(-1), while the reductions in S. aureus populations were 0.83-2.74 log CFU g(-1) on day 0. The reduction effect that occurred after combined treatment with ASC followed by HW, HW followed by ASC, CPC followed by HW and HW followed by CPC was found to be significantly greater (P < 0.05) than after treatment with ASC and CPC alone on days 0, 2 and 4 of storage. ASC, CPC and HW treatments can be used to reduce L. monocytogenes and S. aureus, which would provide an additional measure of safety on the production line.

  5. Efficacy of Sodium Hypochlorite and Acidified Sodium Chlorite in Preventing Browning and Microbial Growth on Fresh-Cut Produce

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-01-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables. PMID:24471086

  6. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and acidified sodium chlorite in preventing browning and microbial growth on fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shih Hui; Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Soo Jin; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2012-09-01

    The use of suitable sanitizers can increase the quality of fresh-cut produce and reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to compare the washing effects of 100 mg/L sodium hypochlorite (SH) and 500 mg/L acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the prevention of enzymatic browning and the growth of microbial populations, including aerobic plate counts, E. coli, and coliforms, throughout storage at 4°C and 10°C. Fresh-cut zucchini, cucumbers, green bell peppers, and root vegetables such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, and radishes were used. Compared to SH washing, ASC washing significantly (p<0.05) reduced microbial contamination on the fresh-cut produce and prevented browning of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes during storage. More effective inhibition of aerobic plate counts and coliforms growth was observed on fresh-cut produce treated with ASC during storage at 10°C. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of fresh-cut potatoes and sweet potatoes was more effectively inhibited after washing with ASC. The use of 500 mg/L ASC can provide effective antimicrobial and anti-browning treatments of fresh-cut produce, including processed root vegetables.

  7. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to acidified Sodium chlorite or tri-sodium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Karuppasamy, K; Yadav, Ajit S; Saxena, Gaurav K

    2015-12-01

    Thermal inactivation of normal and starved cells of Salmonella Enteritidis on chicken skin previously exposed to different concentrations of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or tri-sodium phosphate (TSP) was investigated. Inoculated skin was pretreated with different concentration of ASC or TSP, packaged in bags, and then immersed in a circulating water bath at 60 to 68 °C. The recovery medium was Hektoen enteric agar. D-values, determined by linear regression, for normal cells on chicken skin, were 2.79, 1.17 and 0.53 min whereas D-values for starved cells were 4.15, 1.83 and 0.66 at 60, 64 and 68 °C, respectively. z-values for normal cells were 3.54 and for starved cells were 2.29. Pretreatment of Salmonella Enteritidis cells with 0 to 200 ppm of ASC or 0 to 1.0 % TSP resulted in lower D-values at all temperatures. Sensory results indicated no significance differences for control and treatments. Thus, results of this study indicated that pretreatment of chicken skin with ASC or TSP increased sensitivity of Salmonella Enteritidis to heat without affecting organoleptic quality of chicken meat.

  8. Diversity of the chlorite dismutase gene in low and high organic carbon rhizosphere soil colonized by perchlorate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Struckhoff, Garrett C; Livermore, Joshua A; Parkin, Gene F

    2013-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (cld) is an essential enzyme in the biodegradation of perchlorate. The objective of this study was to determine the change in sequence diversity of the cld gene, and universal bacterial 16S rRNA genes, in soil samples under varying conditions of organic carbon, bioaugmentation, and plant influence. The cld gene diversity was not different between high organic carbon (HOC) and low organic carbon (LOC) soil. Combining results from HOC and LOC soil, diversity of the cld gene was decreased in soil that had been bioaugmented or planted. However, with both bioaugmentation and planting the cld diversity was not decreased. These observations were repeated when focusing on LOC soil. However, in HOC soil the cld diversity was not affected by reactor treatment. General bacterial diversity as measured with 16S rRNA was significantly greater in HOC soil than in LOC soil, but no significant difference was observed between reference soil and planted or bioaugmented soil. Different sequences of the cld gene occur in different species of microorganisms. In LOC soil, combining bioaugmentation and planting results in a highly diverse population of perchlorate degraders. This diverse population will be more resilient and is desirable where perchlorate reduction is a critical remediation process. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of International Journal of Phytoremediation to view the supplemental file.

  9. Crack-seal microstructure evolution in bi-mineralic quartz-chlorite veins in shales and siltstones from the RWTH-1 well, Aachen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Stephan; Hilgers, Christoph; Kukla, Peter A.; Urai, Janos L.

    2011-04-01

    In core samples from the deep geothermal well RWTH-1 we studied Variscan quartz-chlorite veins formed by crack-seal processes in siliciclastics at the brittle to ductile transition. These sheared veins are common in sections of the well, which are interpreted as Variscan thrust zones based on image logs and seismic data. Microstructures interpreted to reflect different stages in the evolution of such crack-seal veins suggest the veins started in microcracks sealed by quartz and chlorite, to veinlets crossing multiple grains, and bundles of veinlets evolving by progressive localization into low-angle extensional shear veins and high-angle dilational jog veins. In the sheared veins, chlorite and quartz ribbons show evidence for crack-seal and simultaneous ductile shearing during vein evolution, forming peculiar fin-shaped microstructures in quartz ribbons. In high-angle dilational jogs fibrous crystals of quartz and chlorite point to multiple crack-seal events with simultaneous growth of two different mineral phases. This is interpreted to be the basic microstructural process in the veins. We extend earlier models of polycrystal growth in fractures and present a series of 2D simulations of the kinematics of crystal growth in these bi-mineralic veins for both localized and non-localized cracking. Results are compared with the observed microstructures. We show that when the relative growth rates of the two mineral phases are different, serrated grain boundaries evolve. The similarities between observation and model suggest that the assumption of our model is valid, although many second order processes require a more detailed study. We propose that the principles observed here can be applied to other bi-mineralic crack-seal veins.

  10. The Chlorite Dismutase (HemQ) from Staphylococcus aureus Has a Redox-sensitive Heme and Is Associated with the Small Colony Variant Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Hammer, Neal D.; Kurker, Richard C.; Chen, Thomas K.; Ojha, Sunil; Skaar, Eric P.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorite dismutases (C-family proteins) are a widespread family of heme-binding proteins for which chemical and biological roles remain unclear. An association of the gene with heme biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria was previously demonstrated by experiments involving introduction of genes from two Gram-positive species into heme biosynthesis mutant strains of Escherichia coli, leading to the gene being renamed hemQ. To assess the gene product's biological role more directly, a Staphylococcus aureus strain with an inactivated hemQ gene was generated and shown to be a slow growing small colony variant under aerobic but not anaerobic conditions. The small colony variant phenotype is rescued by the addition of exogenous heme despite an otherwise wild type heme biosynthetic pathway. The ΔhemQ mutant accumulates coproporphyrin specifically under aerobic conditions. Although its sequence is highly similar to functional chlorite dismutases, the HemQ protein has no steady state reactivity with chlorite, very modest reactivity with H2O2 or peracetic acid, and no observable transient intermediates. HemQ's equilibrium affinity for heme is in the low micromolar range. Holo-HemQ reconstituted with heme exhibits heme lysis after <50 turnovers with peroxide and <10 turnovers with chlorite. The heme-free apoprotein aggregates or unfolds over time. IsdG-like proteins and antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenases are close sequence and structural relatives of HemQ that use heme or porphyrin-like organic molecules as substrates. The genetic and biochemical data suggest a similar substrate role for heme or porphyrin, with possible sensor-regulator functions for the protein. HemQ heme could serve as the means by which S. aureus reversibly adopts an SCV phenotype in response to redox stress. PMID:23737523

  11. Matrix Algebra.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    on courses being taught at NPS. LIST OF REFERENCES [1] Anton , Howard , Elementary Linear Algebra , John Wiley and Sons, New York, New York, 1994...and computational techniques for solving systems of linear equations. The goal is to enhance current matrix algebra textbooks and help the beginning... algebra is the study of algebraic operations on matrices and of their applications, primarily for solving systems of linear equations. Systems of

  12. A case of severe chlorite poisoning successfully treated with early administration of methylene blue, renal replacement therapy, and red blood cell transfusion: case report.

    PubMed

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-08-01

    The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100 mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum.Initial laboratory tests revealed 40% of methemoglobin. The formation of methemoglobin was effectively treated with methylene blue (10% after 29 hours).To remove the toxin, and because of the anuric acute renal failure, the patient received renal replacement therapy. Despite these therapeutic measures, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which were treated with red blood cell transfusion and intermittent hemodialysis. These interventions led to the improvement of his condition and the patient eventually fully recovered. Patient gave written informed consent.This is the third known case of chlorite poisoning that has been reported. Based upon this case, we suggest the management of sodium chlorite poisoning to comprise the early administration of methylene blue, in addition to renal replacement therapy and transfusion of red blood cells.

  13. Expression of chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase in the presence of oxygen and/or chlorate as the terminal electron acceptor in Ideonella dechloratans.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Miriam Hellberg; Johansson, Nicklas; Nilsson, Thomas; Rova, Maria

    2012-06-01

    The ability of microorganisms to perform dissimilatory (per)chlorate reduction is, for most species, known to be oxygen sensitive. Consequently, bioremediation processes for the removal of oxochlorates will be disturbed if oxygen is present. We measured the expression of chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase in the presence of different terminal electron acceptors in the chlorate reducer Ideonella dechloratans. Enzyme activity assays and mRNA analyses by real-time quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR were performed on cell extracts from cells grown aerobically with and without chlorate and on cells grown anaerobically in the presence of chlorate. Our results showed that both chlorite dismutase and chlorate reductase are expressed during aerobic growth. However, transfer to anaerobic conditions with chlorate resulted in significantly enhanced enzyme activities and mRNA levels for both enzymes. Absence of oxygen was necessary for the induction to occur, since chlorate addition under aerobic conditions produced neither increased enzyme activities nor higher relative levels of mRNA. For chlorite dismutase, the observed increase in activity was on the same order of magnitude as the increase in the relative mRNA level, indicating gene regulation at the transcriptional level. However, chlorate reductase showed about 200 times higher enzyme activity in anaerobically induced cells, whereas the increase in mRNA was only about 10-fold, suggesting additional mechanisms influence the enzyme activity.

  14. A Case of Severe Chlorite Poisoning Successfully Treated With Early Administration of Methylene Blue, Renal Replacement Therapy, and Red Blood Cell Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardtova, Andrea; Vavrinec, Peter; Vavrincova-Yaghi, Diana; Seelen, Mark; Dobisova, Anna; Flassikova, Zora; Cikova, Andrea; Henning, Robert H.; Yaghi, Aktham

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The case of a 55-year-old man who attempted suicide by ingesting <100 mL of 28% sodium chlorite solution is presented. On arrival in the intensive care unit, the patient appeared cyanotic with lowered consciousness and displayed anuria and chocolate brown serum. Initial laboratory tests revealed 40% of methemoglobin. The formation of methemoglobin was effectively treated with methylene blue (10% after 29 hours). To remove the toxin, and because of the anuric acute renal failure, the patient received renal replacement therapy. Despite these therapeutic measures, the patient developed hemolytic anemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation, which were treated with red blood cell transfusion and intermittent hemodialysis. These interventions led to the improvement of his condition and the patient eventually fully recovered. Patient gave written informed consent. This is the third known case of chlorite poisoning that has been reported. Based upon this case, we suggest the management of sodium chlorite poisoning to comprise the early administration of methylene blue, in addition to renal replacement therapy and transfusion of red blood cells. PMID:25144325

  15. An improved colorimetric method for chlorine dioxide and chlorite ion in drinking water using lissamine green B and horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Pepich, Barry V; Dattilio, Teri A; Fair, Patricia S; Munch, David J; Gordon, Gilbert; Körtvélyesi, Zsolt

    2007-07-16

    Lissamine Green B (LGB) was carefully selected as a potential candidate for the development of a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method that is intended for use at water utilities to determine chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in drinking water. Chlorine dioxide reacts with LGB in aqueous solution to decrease the absorbance of LGB in direct proportion to the ClO2 concentration. LGB was confirmed to have adequate sensitivity, and to suffer less interference than other dyes reported in the literature. The stoichiometry for the reaction between LGB and ClO2 was found not to be 1:1 and is dependent on the LGB concentration. This required calibration of each LGB stock solution and prompted the investigation of alternate means of calibration, which utilized a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed conversion of chlorite ion (ClO2(-)) to ClO2. This approach allowed the simultaneous determination of ClO2(-) concentration, which is also required each day at water plants that use ClO2. Studies were conducted to characterize and carefully optimize the HRP-conversion of ClO2(-) to ClO2 in order to yield reaction conditions that could be accomplished in less than 30 min at modest cost, yet meet EPA's sensitivity and robustness requirements for routine monitoring. An assessment of method detection limit, linearity and slope (or sensitivity), precision, and accuracy in finished drinking water matrices indicated that this approach was suitable for publication as EPA Method 327.0.

  16. Acidified sodium chlorite treatment for inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes growth on the surface of cooked roast beef.

    PubMed

    Beverly, Richelle L; Janes, Marlene E; Oliver, Grady

    2006-02-01

    The effects of acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) against Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of cooked roast beef were investigated. L. monocytogenes, strain V7, serotype 1/2a, was inoculated at numbers of 6.0 log CFU/g onto 5-g cubes of cooked regular or spicy roast beef. The samples were allowed to air dry for 1 h. The cooked roast beef samples were dipped into ASC or sprayed with ASC solutions of 250, 500, 750, or 1,000 ppm, then placed in bags with or without a vacuum and refrigerated at 4 degrees C. L. monocytogenes counts were determined after 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of storage by spread plating roast beef samples onto Oxford agar plates that were incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 h. At day 28, the number of L. monocytogenes on the > or = 500 ppm ASC-treated spicy roast beef samples had count reductions that were >4.0 log CFU/g, whereas the same concentrations of ASC-treated regular roast beef samples had approximately a 2.5 log CFU/g reduction in L. monocytogenes counts when compared with the untreated samples. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed in L. monocytogenes counts between the vacuum- or nonvacuum-packaged ASC-treated cooked roast beef samples. Sensory evaluation showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) between ASC-treated and untreated roast beef. ASC can be used as a processing aid in the form of a dip or spray treatment to control L. monocytogenes on the surface of cooked roast beef.

  17. The comparative effect of acidified sodium chlorite and chlorhexidine mouthrinses on plaque regrowth and salivary bacterial counts.

    PubMed

    Yates, R; Moran, J; Addy, M; Mullan, P J; Wade, W G; Newcombe, R

    1997-09-01

    Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) is recognised as a highly potent, broad spectrum antimicrobial system that has been successfully developed for uses in veterinary, food processing and medical device fields. The current studies aimed to investigate the persistence of antimicrobial action and plaque inhibitory properties of 3 ASC mouthrinses by comparison with positive control, chlorhexidine 0.12%, and placebo control, water, rinses. Both studies were randomised, double-blind, cross-over 5-cell designs balanced for carryover. The 1st study involved 15 healthy subjects who immediately before and at 30, 60, 180, 300 and 420 min after rinsing provided 2 ml saliva samples. The samples were immediately processed for total anaerobic bacterial counts recorded after 96 h incubation. Washout periods were a minimum of 3 days. The second study involved 20 healthy subjects who on day 1 of each study were rendered plaque free, suspended normal oral hygiene methods and commenced rinsing twice daily with the allocated rinse. On day 5, plaque was scored by index and area after disclosing with erythrosin. Washout periods were 2 1/2 days. The 3 ASC and chlorhexidine rinses produced similar reductions in salivary bacterial counts which remained significantly below the placebo control to 7 h. There were no significant differences between ASC and chlorhexidine rinses except at 30 and 60 min when significantly greater reductions were produced by 2 ASC rinses compared to the chlorhexidine rinse. Plaque indices and areas were considerably and significantly lower with the ASC and chlorhexidine rinses compared to the placebo rinse. There were no significant differences between plaque scores for the 3 ASC rinses and the chlorhexidine rinse, although for 2 ASC rinses plaque scores were lower than for the chlorhexidine rinse. The results indicate that the 3 ASC rinses have equivalent plaque inhibitory action to chlorhexidine as a rinse. Similar to chlorhexidine, the plaque inhibitory action of

  18. Continuous online processing of fecal- and ingesta-contaminated poultry carcasses using an acidified sodium chlorite antimicrobial intervention.

    PubMed

    Kemp, G K; Aldrich, M L; Guerra, M L; Schneider, K R

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the combined use of an inside-outside-bird-washer for the removal of visible contamination and an online acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) spray system in reducing microbial levels on contaminated poultry carcasses. Specifically, we attempted to determine if this technique (referred to as continuous online processing [COP]) would (i) eliminate the need for offline reprocessing of contaminated carcasses, (ii) meet Zero Fecal Tolerance standards, and (iii) attain significant reductions in titers of some of the commonly found bacterial species. Carcasses were sampled for Ercherichia coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter at five stations along the processing lines in a series of five commercial plant studies to compare the efficacy of the COP system to that of offline processing. The microbiological quality of fecally contaminated carcasses was found to be significantly better following COP treatment (E. coli, 0.59 log10 CFU/ml; Salmonella, 10.0% incidence) than after standard offline reprocessing (E. coli, 2.37 log10 CFU/ml; Salmonella, 31.6% incidence). Zero Fecal Tolerance requirements were met by all but 2 (0.2%) of the 1.127 carcasses following COP. COP also significantly reduced the titers of Campylobacter; residual titers were 1.14 log10 CFU/ml (49.1% incidence) following COP, compared to 2.89 log10 CFU/ml (73.2% incidence) in carcasses that underwent offline reprocessing. These results support the combined use of an inside-outside-bird-washer for the removal of visible contamination and an online ASC spray system to reduce microbial levels in commercially processed poultry.

  19. Effectiveness of trisodium phosphate, acidified sodium chlorite, citric acid, and peroxyacids against pathogenic bacteria on poultry during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    del Río, Elena; Muriente, Rebeca; Prieto, Miguel; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2007-09-01

    The effects of dipping treatments (15 min) in potable water or in solutions (wt/vol) of 12% trisodium phosphate (TSP), 1,200 ppm acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), 2% citric acid (CA), and 220 ppm peroxyacids (PA) on inoculated pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, and Yersinia enterocolitica) and skin pH were investigated throughout storage of chicken legs (days 0, 1, 3, and 5) at 3 +/- 1 degrees C. All chemical solutions reduced microbial populations (P < 0.001) as compared with the control (untreated) samples. Similar bacterial loads (P > 0.05) were observed on water-dipped and control legs. Type of treatment, microbial group, and sampling day influenced microbial counts (P < 0.001). Average reductions with regard to control samples were 0.28 to 2.41 log CFU/g with TSP, 0.33 to 3.15 log CFU/g with ASC, 0.82 to 1.97 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.07 to 0.96 log CFU/g with PA. Average reductions were lower (P < 0.001) for gram-positive (0.96 log CFU/g) than for gram-negative (1.33 log CFU/g) bacteria. CA and ASC were the most effective antimicrobial compounds against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, respectively. TSP was the second most effective compound for both bacterial groups. Average microbial reductions per gram of skin were 0.87 log CFU/g with TSP, 0.86 log CFU/g with ASC, 1.39 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.74 log CFU/g with PA for gram-positive bacteria, and 1.28 log CFU/g with TSP, 2.03 log CFU/g with ASC, 1.23 log CFU/g with CA, and 0.78 log CFU/g with PA for gram-negative bacteria. With only a few exceptions, microbial reductions in TSP- and ASC-treated samples decreased and those in samples treated with CA increased throughout storage. Samples treated with TSP and samples dipped in CA and ASC had the highest and lowest pH values, respectively, after treatment. The pH of the treated legs tended to return to normal (6.3 to 6.6) during storage. However, at the end of

  20. Chemometric analysis of the consumption of oral rinse chlorite (ClO2-) by human salivary biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hubert; Blackburn, John; Grootveld, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Oral rinse formulations containing chlorite anion (ClO(2)(-)) as an active agent exert a range of valuable oral healthcare activities. However, salivary biomolecules which chemically react with this oxidant can, at least in principle, serve as potentially significant barriers to these therapeutic properties in the oral environment. Therefore, in this investigation, we have explored the extent of ClO(2)(-) consumption by biomolecules which scavenge this agent in human salivary supernatants (HSSs) in vitro. HSS samples were equilibrated with oral rinse formulations containing this active agent (30 s at 35 °C in order to mimic oral rinsing episodes). Differential spectrophotometric and ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses were employed to determine residual ClO(2)(-) in these admixtures. Bioanalytical data acquired revealed the rapid consumption of ClO(2)(-) by biomolecular electron donors and/or antioxidants present in HSS samples. Mean ± 95 % confidence interval (CI) consumption levels of 7.14 ± 0.69 and 5.34 ± 0.69 % of the total ClO(2)(-) available were found for oral rinse products containing 0.10 and 0.40 % (w/v) ClO(2)(-), respectively. A mixed model analysis-of-variance performed on experimental data acquired demonstrated highly-significant differences between oral rinse ClO(2)(-) contents (p < 0.0001), trial participants (p < 0.001) and sampling days-within-participants (p < 0.001), and also revealed non-additive ClO(2)(-)-scavenging responses of participants' HSSs to increases in the oral rinse content of this oxidant (p < 0.0001). A slower, second phase of the reaction process (t (1/2) = 1.7-2.8 h) involved the oxidative consumption of salivary urate. These data clearly demonstrate that for recommended 30 s oral rinsing episodes performed at physiological temperature, <10 % of the total oral rinse ClO(2)(-) available is chemically and/or reductively consumed by HSS biomolecules for both

  1. The synergistic effect of sodium chlorite and bromochloroacetic acid on BrO3(-)-induced renal cell death.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Bull, Richard J; Fisher, Jeffery; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Cummings, Brian S

    2011-11-18

    Bromate (BrO(3)(-)) is a drinking water disinfection by-product (DBP) that induces renal cell death via DNA damage-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Drinking water contains other DBPs in addition to BrO(3)(-). We tested the effect of two of these, sodium chlorite (NaClO(2)) and bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA), on BrO(3)(-) cytotoxicity in normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. NaClO(2) and BCAA alone induced cytotoxicity at concentrations of over 20ppm, while BrO(3)(-) was only moderately cytotoxic at concentrations of 200ppm. Combining BrO(3)(-) with NaClO(2) or BCAA alone enhanced cytotoxicity 1.5-4 fold. Exposing cells to all three compounds induced synergistic-like increases in cytotoxicity. This effect did not correlate to increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), even though all three compounds induced ROS formation alone. NaClO(2), but not BCAA, increased BrO(3)(-)-mediated DNA damage as measured by 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) staining. In addition, NaClO(2), but not BCAA, decreased BrO(3)(-)-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Both compounds increased apoptosis in the presence of BrO(3)(-) as assessed by annexin V, PI, and DAPI staining. This is in contrast to BrO(3)(-) treatment alone, which induced necrosis. Immunoblot analysis showed that both NaClO(2) and BCAA increased p38 activation; however, consistent with 8-OHdG staining, only NaClO(2) increased BrO(3)(-)-induced histone H2AX phosphorylation, a marker of DNA damage. In contrast, BCAA, but not NaClO(2), increased BrO(3)(-)-induced phosphorylation of p53. These data support the novel finding that mixtures of DBPs increase BrO(3)(-)-induced renal cell death by DNA-dependent and -independent mechanisms, and could alter how the risk of these DBPs towards humans is assessed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sodium chlorite increases production of reactive oxygen species that impair the antioxidant system and cause morphological changes in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shaikh Nisar; Mahmood, Riaz

    2017-04-01

    Sodium chlorite (NaClO2 ) is used in the production of chlorine dioxide for bleaching and stripping of textiles, pulp, and paper. It is also used as disinfectant in municipal water treatment and as a component in therapeutic rinses and gels. The effect of NaClO2 on human erythrocytes has been studied under in vitro conditions. Incubation of 5% suspension of erythrocytes with NaClO2 (0.1-2.0 mM) at 37°C for 30 min resulted in marked cell lysis (1.2-3.8 fold) and increased their osmotic fragility. Several parameters were assayed in cell lysates prepared from NaClO2 -treated and -untreated (control) erythrocytes. Compared to controls, exposure to NaClO2 caused significant increase in protein oxidation (1.1-8.07 fold), lipid peroxidation (1.08-4.95 fold) with decrease in total sulfhydryl (-5 to -61%), and glutathione levels (-7 to -86%). Methemoglobin content was tremendously increased, by 5-52 fold when compared to control, while methemoglobin reductase activity decreased (-17 to -93%) upon NaClO2 treatment. NaClO2 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species by 3-21 fold and lowered the metal reducing and free radical quenching ability of erythrocytes. It also caused an increase in nitric oxide levels (2.7-15.4 fold) showing generation of nitrosative stress too. The activities of major antioxidant and membrane bound enzymes were significantly altered. Gross morphological changes, from discocytes to echinocytes, were seen in NaClO2 -treated erythrocytes under electron microscope. These results show that NaClO2 induces oxidative stress in human erythrocytes, damages the membrane, and impairs the cellular antioxidant defence system. This oxidative damage can shorten the life span of erythrocytes in blood resulting in red cell senescence. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1343-1353, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Decreased dosage of acidified sodium chlorite reduces microbial contamination and maintains organoleptic qualities of ground beef products.

    PubMed

    Bosilevac, Joseph M; Shackelford, Steven D; Fahle, Rick; Biela, Timothy; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2004-10-01

    Acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) spray was evaluated at decreased dosages and application rates to determine its efficacy for reducing bacterial contamination on boneless beef trimmings used for production of raw ground beef products while maintaining desirable consumer qualities in the finished ground beef products. Two different applications of ASC (600 ppm applied at a rate of 1.3 oz/lb and 300 ppm applied at a rate of 1 oz/lb) were used to treat boneless beef trimmings before grinding. The effect of ASC treatment on 50/50 lean beef trimmings was greater than on 90/10 trimmings. ASC at 600 ppm reduced both the aerobic plate counts (APC) and Enterobacteriaceae counts (EBC) by 2.3 log CFU/g on 50/50 trimmings, whereas treatment with 300 ppm ASC reduced APC and EBC of 50/50 trimmings by 1.1 and 0.7 log CFU/g, respectively. Ground beef formulations of 90/10 and 73/27 were produced from the treated boneless beef trim and packaged in chubs and in modified atmosphere packaging. The efficacy of ASC spray treatment to inhibit APC and EBC over the shelf life of each ground beef product was monitored. The APC and EBC in ground beef chubs were reduced by 1.0 to 1.5 log CFU/g until day 20. The APC and EBC for products in modified atmosphere packaging were reduced 1.5 to 3.0 log CFU/g throughout their shelf life. Both decreased dosages of ASC were equally effective on 90/10 lean ground beef, but the 300 ppm ASC treatment was slightly better at reducing the EBC of 73/27 ground beef. The organoleptic qualities (color, odor, and taste) of the ground beef products treated with 300 ppm ASC were found to be superior to those treated with 600 ppm ASC. Our results indicated that decreased dosages of ASC reduce contamination and lengthen the shelf life of ground beef. Furthermore, the 300 ppm ASC treatment reduced bacterial counts while maintaining desirable organoleptic ground beef qualities.

  4. Slaughterfloor decontamination of pork carcases with hot water or acidified sodium chlorite - a comparison in two Australian abattoirs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, D; Holds, G; Lorimer, M; Kiermeier, A; Kidd, C; Slade, J; Pointon, A

    2010-11-01

    A decontamination trial on the effectiveness of hot water or acidified sodium chlorite (SANOVA) treatment on Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Total Viable Count (TVC) was undertaken on pork carcases prior to primary chilling in two large pork abattoirs in Australia using belly-strip excision sampling. A total of 123 samples from Abattoir A and 400 samples from Abattoir B were cultured and analysed. Test pigs were selected from herds with a known high level of on-farm Salmonella infection. At Abattoir A, Salmonella spp. were not isolated from carcases. The prevalence of E. coli on control carcases was 92.9% compared with 9.8% for hot water and 12.5% for SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) E. coli concentration for control carcases was 0.89 cfu/gram, compared with -0.83 cfu/gram from hot water and -0.75 cfu/gram from SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) TVC for control carcases was 4.06 compared with 1.81 cfu/gram for hot water and 2.76 cfu/gram for SANOVA treated carcases. At Abattoir B, the prevalence of Salmonella on control carcases was 16% compared with 2.7% for hot water and 7.0% for SANOVA treated carcases. The prevalence of E. coli on control carcases was 69.3% compared with 22% for hot water and 30% for SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) E. coli concentration for control carcases was 0.45 cfu/gram, compared with -0.65 cfu/gram from hot water and -0.60 cfu/gram from SANOVA treated carcases. The mean log(10) TVC for control carcases was 3.00 cfu/gram compared with 2.10 cfu/gram for hot water and 2.53 cfu/gram for SANOVA treated carcases. The reductions in prevalence and mean log(10) concentrations in the present trial were all found to be statistically significant and indicate that carcases decontamination with either hot water or SANOVA are effective risk management options immediately available to the pork industry.

  5. Effect of acidified sodium chlorite, chlorine, and acidic electrolyzed water on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto leafy greens.

    PubMed

    Stopforth, J D; Mai, T; Kottapalli, B; Samadpour, M

    2008-03-01

    Recent foodborne outbreaks implicating spinach and lettuce have increased consumer concerns regarding the safety of fresh produce. While the most common commercial antimicrobial intervention for fresh produce is wash water containing 50 to 200 ppm chlorine, this study compares the effectiveness of acidified sodium chlorite, chlorine, and acidic electrolyzed water for inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto leafy greens. Fresh mixed greens were left uninoculated or inoculated with approximately 6 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and L. monocytogenes and treated by immersion for 60 or 90 s in different wash solutions (1:150, wt/vol), including 50 ppm of chlorine solution acidified to pH 6.5, acidic electrolyzed water (pH 2.1 +/- 0.2, oxygen reduction potential of 1,100 mV, 30 to 35 ppm of free chlorine), and acidified sodium chlorite (1,200 ppm, pH 2.5). Samples were neutralized and homogenized. Bacterial survival was determined by standard spread plating on selective media. Each test case (organism x treatment x time) was replicated twice with five samples per replicate. There was no difference (P > or = 0.05) in the time of immersion on the antimicrobial effectiveness of the treatments. Furthermore, there was no difference (P > or = 0.05) in survival of the three organisms regardless of treatment or time. Acidified sodium chlorite, resulted in reductions in populations of 3 to 3.8 log CFU/g and was more effective than chlorinated water (2.1 to 2.8 log CFU/g reduction). These results provide the produce industry with important information to assist in selection of effective antimicrobial strategies.

  6. Combined effect of low-dose irradiation and acidified sodium chlorite washing on Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated on mung bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Nei, Daisuke; Bari, Md Latiful; Inatsu, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Susumu; Todoriki, Setsuko; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2010-10-01

    The effect of low-dose irradiation (0.75 and 1.5 kGy) in combination with acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) on the reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on mung bean seeds was examined. Washing with ASC (0.2, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.2 g/L sodium chlorite and 1.0 g/L citric acid) for 2 h reduced the E. coli O157:H7 population from 5.2 to 2.3-3.3 log CFU/g, depending on the concentrations of sodium chlorite. Gamma ray irradiation at 0.75 and 1.5 kGy resulted in reductions of about 1.8 and 2.8 log CFU/g, respectively. Therefore, a single treatment with ASC washing or gamma ray irradiation at 0.75 or 1.5 kGy could not achieve the complete elimination of E. coli O157:H7 on mung bean seeds. Conversely, low-dose irradiation (0.75 and 1.5 kGy) followed by washing with ASC (0.5-1.2 g/L) reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 to below the detection limit (<1 log CFU/g). However, E. coli O157:H7 was detected in most samples in the enrichment and germination studies. When the treatment order was reversed (ASC washing followed by low-dose irradiation), the E. coli O157:H7 population was also observed to be below the detection limit. Under this treatment, fewer samples (16.7%) were shown to be positive in the enrichment and germination studies, and complete elimination was not achieved. The germination rates of mung bean seeds were not affected by ASC washing and gamma irradiation; however, the yield and length of sprouts were decreased by gamma irradiation.

  7. Precipitation of uraninite in chlorite-bearing veins of the hydrothermal alteration zone (argile de pile) of the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe, Republic of Gabon

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, P.; Ewing, R.; Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the mineralogy of a phyllosilicate/uraninite/galena-bearing vein located within the hydrothermal alteration halo associated with the Bangombe reactor. Phyllosilicates within the vein include a trioctahedral Al-Mg-Fe chlorite (ripidolite), Al-rich clay (kaolinite and/or donbassite) and illite. Textural relations obtained by backscattered-electron imaging suggest that ripidolite crystallized first among the sheet silicates. Uraninite is spatially associated with ripidolite and probably precipitated at a later time. While energy-dispersive X-ray analyses suggest that the uranium phase is predominantly uraninite, coffinite or other phases may also be present.

  8. Peroxidase-type reactions suggest a heterolytic/nucleophilic O–O joining mechanism in the heme-dependent chlorite dismutase†

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Blanc, Béatrice; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; DuBois, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Heme-containing chlorite dismutases (Clds) catalyze a highly unusual O–O bond forming reaction. The O–O cleaving reactions of hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid (PAA) with the Cld from Dechloromonas aromatica (DaCld) were studied to better understand the Cl–O cleavage of the natural substrate and subsequent O–O bond formation. While reactions with H2O2 resulted in slow destruction of the heme, at acidic pH, heterolytic cleavage of the O–O bond of PAA cleanly yielded the ferryl porphyrin cation radical (Compound I). At alkaline pH, the reaction proceeds more rapidly and the first observed intermediate is a ferryl heme. Freezequench EPR confirmed that the latter has an uncoupled protein-based radical, indicating that Compound I is the first intermediate formed at all pH values and that radical migration is faster at alkaline pH. These results suggest by analogy that two-electron Cl–O bond cleavage to yield a ferryl-porphyrin cation radical is the most likely initial step in O–O bond formation from chlorite. PMID:24001266

  9. Efficacy of two acidified chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid on prevention of contagious mastitis using an experimental challenge protocol.

    PubMed

    Oura, L Y; Fox, L K; Warf, C C; Kempt, G K

    2002-01-01

    Two acidified sodium chlorite postmilking teat disinfectants were evaluated for efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae by using National Mastitis Council experimental challenge procedures. The effect of these teat dips on teat skin and teat end condition was also determined. Both dips contained 0.32% sodium chlorite, 1.32% lactic, and 2.5% glycerin. Dips differed in the amount of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (0.53 or 0.27%) added as a surfactant. Both dips significantly reduced new intramammary infection (IMI) rates compared with undipped controls. The dip containing 0.53% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 72% and Strep. agalactiae by 75%. The dip containing 0.27% dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid reduced new IMI by Staph. aureus by 100% and by Strep. agalactiae by 88%. Changes in teat skin and teat end condition for treatment and control groups varied in parallel over time. Teats treated with either teat dip had higher mean teat skin and teat end scores than control teats at some weeks. However, teat skin and teat end condition did not tend to change from the start to the completion of the trial. Application of the two new postmilking teat dips was effective in reducing new IMI from contagious mastitis pathogens. (Key words: teat dip, contagious mastitis, chlorous acid)

  10. Effectiveness of the sulfur(IV) compound, sodium bisulfite, in reducing chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chlorite toxicity to Daphnia magna in well water and pond water.

    PubMed

    Yonkos, L T; Fisher, D J; Burton, D T; Whitekettle, W K; Peterille, J C

    2001-03-01

    Flow-through toxicity tests were conducted with Daphnia magna to determine the residual toxicity of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and chlorite after treatment with the sulfur(IV) compound sodium bisulfite. Daphnids were exposed separately to 0.5-mg/L concentrations of each of the three compounds without the addition of sodium bisulfite, with a low stoichiometric dose of sodium bisulfite, and with a high stoichiometric dose of sodium bisulfite. Tests were performed in well water with a low total organic carbon (TOC) content and pond water with a high TOC content. Analysis of results indicated that sodium bisulfite did not eliminate the toxicity of chlorine dioxide or chlorite to D. magna. Total residual oxidant (TRO) concentrations were reduced and survival times were extended, but acute toxicity persisted even with a S(IV) concentration 10.0 times the stoichiometric ratio of oxidant. Mortality occurred in chlorine dioxide treatments in which no TRO was detected, indicating that standard analytical (amperometric) techniques may be inadequate to detect toxicity. Sodium bisulfite did succeed in eliminating chlorine toxicity except in pond water receiving a low (3.0x) sodium bisulfite dose. Oxidant reactions with organic substrates may have produced chlorinated residuals that were resistant to S(IV) dechlorination.

  11. Ultramafic-hosted Hydrothermal Systems at Mid-Ocean Ridges: Serpentinization, Chloritization and Geochemical Controls on Mass-Transfer Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Pester, N. J.; Ding, K.

    2012-12-01

    concentrations and calculated subseafloor pH and temperature. The Rainbow hydrothermal system is also associated with a dome-like massif and morphology typical of Ocean Core Complexes. In sharp contrast with the LCHF, however, the Rainbow hydrothermal system is characterized by vent fluid temperatures in excess of 365°C, high dissolved Fe, Cu and Zn, and low pH (pH25°C=3.25). In-situ pH for Rainbow vent fluid (369°C) was determined to be 5.0±0.03. Trace alkali element concentrations indicate relatively low fluid/rock ratios, while dissolved B concentrations are depleted relative to seawater, but to a lesser degree than measured for Lost City vent fluid. Moderate concentrations of dissolved silica suggest fluid chemistry buffered by chlorite-fluid equilibria. Fluid flow in close proximity to gabbroic intrusions likely drives hydrothermal convection and mass transfer, although it is still unclear whether gabbroic intrusions alone can account for the enormous heat flux and the long duration of continuous hydrothermal activity observed for the Rainbow hydrothermal system.

  12. Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate, sodium hypochlorite, and sodium chlorite conducted in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Y; Takayama, S; Konishi, Y; Hiasa, Y; Asahina, S; Takahashi, M; Maekawa, A; Hayashi, Y

    1986-11-01

    Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate (KBrO3), sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and sodium chlorite (NaClO2) have been conducted in Japan from 1977 to 1985. In these investigations, groups of approximately 50 male and 50 female F344 rats or B6C3F1 mice were given solutions of the compounds as their drinking water ad libitum at two dose levels determined on the basis of preliminary 13-week tests. Control animals were given distilled water. The carcinogenic potential of KBrO3 was tested by administering doses of 500 or 250 ppm to rats for 110 weeks. Significantly elevated incidences of renal cell tumors in males and females and mesotheliomas of the peritoneum in males as compared to controls were observed. When female mice were given KBrO3 at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm for 78 weeks, no significant differences in tumor incidences between experimental and control groups were apparent. NaClO was administered to male and female rats, respectively, at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm and 2000 or 1000 ppm for 104 weeks. In mice, NaClO was given at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm to either sex for 103 weeks. The incidences of tumors in NaClO-treated and control animals of both sexes were not significantly different in both rat and mouse studies. NaClO2 was given to rats of both sexes at a dose of 600 or 300 ppm for 85 weeks. No statistically significant differences were observed in the incidences of tumor formation between NaClO2-treated and control groups of both sexes. NaClO2 was administered to mice at a concentration of 500 or 250 ppm for 85 weeks. In males, the combined incidences of hyperplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas of the liver in a low-dose group, and adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung in a high-dose group, were marginally increased compared to controls (p less than 0.05). However, these incidences in treated males were within the range of values of historical control data in our program. We concluded that KBrO3 was carcinogenic in rats of

  13. Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate, sodium hypochlorite, and sodium chlorite conducted in Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Y; Takayama, S; Konishi, Y; Hiasa, Y; Asahina, S; Takahashi, M; Maekawa, A; Hayashi, Y

    1986-01-01

    Long-term in vivo carcinogenicity tests of potassium bromate (KBrO3), sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and sodium chlorite (NaClO2) have been conducted in Japan from 1977 to 1985. In these investigations, groups of approximately 50 male and 50 female F344 rats or B6C3F1 mice were given solutions of the compounds as their drinking water ad libitum at two dose levels determined on the basis of preliminary 13-week tests. Control animals were given distilled water. The carcinogenic potential of KBrO3 was tested by administering doses of 500 or 250 ppm to rats for 110 weeks. Significantly elevated incidences of renal cell tumors in males and females and mesotheliomas of the peritoneum in males as compared to controls were observed. When female mice were given KBrO3 at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm for 78 weeks, no significant differences in tumor incidences between experimental and control groups were apparent. NaClO was administered to male and female rats, respectively, at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm and 2000 or 1000 ppm for 104 weeks. In mice, NaClO was given at doses of 1000 or 500 ppm to either sex for 103 weeks. The incidences of tumors in NaClO-treated and control animals of both sexes were not significantly different in both rat and mouse studies. NaClO2 was given to rats of both sexes at a dose of 600 or 300 ppm for 85 weeks. No statistically significant differences were observed in the incidences of tumor formation between NaClO2-treated and control groups of both sexes. NaClO2 was administered to mice at a concentration of 500 or 250 ppm for 85 weeks. In males, the combined incidences of hyperplastic nodules and hepatocellular carcinomas of the liver in a low-dose group, and adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the lung in a high-dose group, were marginally increased compared to controls (p less than 0.05). However, these incidences in treated males were within the range of values of historical control data in our program. We concluded that KBrO3 was carcinogenic in rats of

  14. Garnet peridotites and chlorite harzburgites from Cima di Gagnone (Central Alps, Switzerland). Examples of subduction-zone serpentinite dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Rampone, Elisabetta; Pettke, Thomas; Reusser, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Dehydration of oceanic serpentinites is rarely documented in nature because few rocks are exhumed from beyond the antigorite breakdown. Chlorite (chl) harzburgites from Almirez (Betic Cordillera, Spain) presently are the only known case (1-3). The garnet (grt) lherzolites from Cima di Gagnone have long been long considered to be serpentinized oceanic mantle subducted to 2.5 GPa and 800°C (4). Hence, they are unique in the Alps and relevant. Here we present the trace element survey of Gagnone grt lherzolites and associated chl harzburgites to test an origin from serpentinites and to characterize the fluids they released at breakdown of major hydrous phases. The grt peridotites are foliated and contain olivine (ol), ortho- and clinopyroxene (opx, cpx), Ca-amphibole (amph). Poikiloblastic grt overgrows former foliation(s) and is partially equilibrated with the above minerals. Olivine + ilmenite replace former Ti-clinohumite. Grt hosts solid polyphase inclusions deriving from co-genetic fluids: inclusions are both primary and along trails which never cut the grain boundaries. Chl harzburgites are texturally similar to the Betic ones (1) and can display foliated and massive textures. Massive rocks have randomly oriented ol and opx, minor chl, Ti-clinohumite and locally carbonate. Foliated harzburgites have dominant ol; opx and chl parallel the foliation and display equilibrium textures. Ol and opx of chl harzburgites also contain solid polyphase inclusions (from coexisting fluid) very similar to those of the Betic harzburgites (2). Chl harzburgites may also derive from retrogressed grt peridotites; in this case post-kinematic chl overgrows grt. In the field, chl harzburgites are associated with eclogites and HP metarodingites, which form stretched dikes of previous MORB materials discirdant to compositonal layering in peridotites. This indicates a common eclogite-facies equilibration of mafic and ultramafic material, most likely of former oceanic origin. Cpx from grt

  15. Examination of chloritization of biotite as a tool for reconstructing the physicochemical parameters of mineralization and associated alteration in the Zafarghand porphyry copper system, Ardestan, Central Iran: mineral-chemistry and stable isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminroayaei Yamini, Maryam; Tutti, Faramarz; Aminoroayaei Yamini, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadian, Jamshid; Wan, Bo

    2016-12-01

    The chloritization of biotite and stable isotopes of silicate have been studied for the Zafarghand porphyry copper deposit, Ardestan, Iran. The studied area, in the central part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic belt, contains porphyry-style Cu mineralization and associated hydrothermal alteration within the Miocene (19-26 Ma, Zircon U-Pb age) granodioritc stock and adjacent andesitic to rhyodacitic volcanic rocks (ca. 56 Ma, zircon U-Pb age). The primary and secondary biotite that formed during potassic alteration in this porphyry and these volcanic host rocks are variably chloritized. Chloritization of biotite pseudomorphically is characterized by an increase in MgO, FeOt, and MnO, with decreasing in SiO2, K2O, and TiO2. Based on the Ti-in-biotite geothermometer of Henry et al. (Am Mineral 90:316-328, 2005) and Al-in-chlorite geothermometer of Cathelineau (Clay Miner 23:417-485, 1988), crystallization temperatures of primary biotite representative of magmatic conditions and later chloritization temperature range from 617° to 675 °C ± 24 °C and 177° to 346 °C, respectively. Calculated isotopic compositions of fluids that chloritized primary and secondary biotite display isotopic compositions of 1.1 to 1.7 per mil for δ18O and -19.9 to -20.5 per mil for δD consistent with meteoric water. Sericite, barren, and A-type-quartz veins from phyllic alteration were produced by mixed magmatic and meteoric water with δ18O values from -2.8 to 2.5 and δD values of ˜ -23 per mil; the narrow range of δD values of the propylitic epidote may be due to a meteoric water with δ18O values from 0.8 to 1.6 and δD values from -14.6 to -16.9 per mil.

  16. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of formation of chlorate ion from the hypochlorous acid/chlorite ion reaction at pH 6-10

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, G.; Tachiyashiki, Satoshi )

    1991-03-01

    The reaction between free chlorine (HOCl/OCl{sup {minus}}) and chlorite ion (ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) has been studied in the pH 6.4-10.0 region. The reaction proceeds through the Cl{sub 2}O{sub 2} intermediate followed by a direct reaction of the intermediate with hypochlorous acid to form chlorate ion. Time-concentration profiles were measured for each chlorine species, resulting in both total chlorine and redox balance. Negligibly small amounts of chlorine dioxide are formed above pH 7. Indirect evidence suggests that, in this pH region, the formation of any chlorine dioxide is primarily due to the presence of concentration gradients or because of the adventitious presence of catalytic metal ion impurities. Details of the overall reaction mechanism for the formation of chlorate ion are presented.

  18. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  19. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  20. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  1. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  2. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOEpatents

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  3. Synergistic Effect of Sodium Chlorite and Edible Coating on Quality Maintenance of Minimally Processed Citrus grandis under Passive and Active MAP.

    PubMed

    Ban, Zhaojun; Feng, Jianhua; Wei, Wenwen; Yang, Xiangzheng; Li, Jilan; Guan, Junfeng; Li, Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Edible coating has been an innovation within the bioactive packaging concept. The comparative analysis upon the effect of edible coating, sodium chlorite (SC) and their combined application on quality maintenance of minimally processed pomelo (Citrus grandis) fruits during storage at 4 °C was conducted. Results showed that the combination of edible coating and SC dipping delayed the microbial development whereas the sole coating or dipping treatment was less efficient. The synergetic application of edible coating and SC treatment under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP, 10% O2 , 10% CO2 ) was able to maintain the total soluble solids level and ascorbic acid content, while reduce the weight loss as well as development of mesophiles and psychrotrophs. Nonetheless, the N, O-carboxymethyl chitosan solely coated samples showed significantly higher level of weight loss during storage with comparison to the untreated sample. Furthermore, the combined application of edible coating and SC dipping under active MAP best maintained the sensory quality of minimally processed pomelo fruit during storage.

  4. Major, trace and REE geochemistry in contrasted chlorite schist weathering profiles from southern Cameroon: Influence of the Nyong and Dja Rivers water table fluctuations in geochemical evolution processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onana, Vincent Laurent; Ntouala, Roger Firmin Donald; Tang, Sylvie Noa; Effoudou, Estelle Ndome; Kamgang, Veronique Kabeyene; Ekodeck, Georges Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Three weathering profiles developed on chlorite schists, formations on which little studies have been conducted, were chosen to understand the weathering processes prevailing downslope in Southern Cameroon. The materials nearest to Nyong River at Ayos weather under the influence of the fluctuations of groundwater table and acid rain, while those from Bengbis and Mbalmayo weather under the influence of acid rain. The result is the thickening of materials and weathering profiles, without formation of a nodular ferruginous horizon at Ayos. The Ayos weathered materials (CIA ∼ 92) are the most altered and the least lateritised (IOL ∼ 32). The most stable systems are Hf - U - Nb - Ti - Zr - Mo - W (Bengbis), Yb - U - Nb - Ti - Zr - Hf - Mo - W - Th (Mbalmayo) and Th - Nb - Zr - Hf - Mo - Ta (Ayos). Molybdenum accumulations are important in the studied materials. Uranium accumulations are found only in Mbalmayo. Coarse saprolitic materials at Ayos are the most depleted and fractionated in REE ((La/Yb)N = 0.07, Ce/Ce* = 2.24), while superficial clayey materials are less fractionated. This process is reversed at Bengbis and Mbalmayo. By contrast, weathered materials at Ayos do not show any Eu anomalies (as in Bengbis and Mbalmayo). Weathered materials from Bengbis, nearest to the Dja River, have (La/Yb)N < 1 ratios, indicating the relative immobility of HREE relative to LREE due to xenotime abnormally rich in HREE (HREE-PO4). Weak Ce anomalies (1.05-2.24) are ubiquitous in all the studied materials.

  5. Inhibition of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus on sliced roast beef by cetylpyridinium chloride and acidified sodium chlorite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungwha; Mustapha, Azlin

    2007-02-01

    The effects of 0.5% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), 0.12% acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) and a mix of equal volume of the two (0.25% CPC-0.06% ASC) on Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated on inoculated sliced roast beef. The antimicrobial agents were, respectively, sprayed on the beef surfaces and tray absorbent pads, and samples were stored at 4 degrees C for 10 days (d). At 0 d, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus were reduced to undetectable levels in 2 h after spraying with CPC. CPC-ASC treatment reduced E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes and S. aureus by 4.07, 6.37 and 4.32 log cfu/cm2, respectively, at 0 d. ASC treatment reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 by 6.09 log cfu/cm2 at 10 d. CPC treatment caused a slight discoloration and ASC-treated beef surfaces demonstrated the lowest redness and highest lightness. The grey colour and off-odour were significant in the ASC-treated beef samples, while CPC-treated samples demonstrated less off-odor and brown colour from 0 to 4 d. Based on our results, it appears that the application of CPC on sliced roast beef can extend the shelf-life of the product without impairing its quality.

  6. Water, sodium chloride and acidified sodium chlorite effects on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus on beef briskets.

    PubMed

    Hajmeer, M N; Marsden, J L; Fung, D Y C; Kemp, G K

    2004-10-01

    Effectiveness of spray application of potable water wash (WW), 25% (w/v) sodium chloride (NaCl), and 0.1% (v/v) acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) was evaluated against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus inoculated onto beef briskets. The purpose was to identify antimicrobial treatments which may be applied to beef carcasses and more specifically in kosher meat facilities. Treatments were applied for 10-60 s at pressure of 419 kPa. Water wash, NaCl, and ASC significantly reduced E. coli O157:H7 as compared with the control, although, only ASC resulted in improved removal with increased exposure time. Water wash did not significantly reduce S. aureus counts throughout exposure and NaCl was only effective after 60 s of exposure, while ASC reduced counts throughout exposure. E. coli O157:H7 was twice as sensitive to WW and NaCl as S. aureus in terms of percent reduction in cell count.

  7. Effects of potassium lactate, sodium metasilicate, peroxyacetic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite on physical, chemical, and sensory properties of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Quilo, S A; Pohlman, F W; Brown, A H; Crandall, P G; Dias-Morse, P N; Baublits, R T; Aparicio, J L

    2009-05-01

    Beef trimmings were treated with 3% potassium lactate (KL), 4% sodium metasilicate (NMS), 0.02% peroxyacetic acid (PAA) or 0.1% acidified sodium chlorite (ASC) or left untreated (CON). Beef trimmings were ground, pattied, and sampled for 7 days. Under simulated retail display, instrumental color, sensory characteristics, TBARS, pH, and Lee-Kramer shear force were measured to evaluate the impact of the treatments on the quality attributes. The NMS and PAA patties were redder (a(∗), P<0.05) than CON on days 0-3. Panelists found KL, NMS, PAA, and ASC patties to have less (P<0.05) or similar (P>0.05) off odor to CON on days 0-3. The NMS and PAA treated patties had lower (P<0.05) lipid oxidation than the CON at days 0, 3, and 7. Therefore, KL, NMS, PAA, and ASC treatments on beef trimmings can potentially improve or maintain quality attributes of beef patties.

  8. Effects of water, sodium hypochlorite, peroxyacetic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite on in-shell hazelnuts inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Panama.

    PubMed

    Weller, Lisa D; Daeschel, Mark A; Durham, Catherine A; Morrissey, Michael T

    2013-12-01

    Recent foodborne disease outbreaks involving minimally processed tree nuts have generated a need for improved sanitation procedures. Chemical sprays and dips have shown promise for reducing pathogens on fresh produce, but little research has been conducted for in-shell hazelnuts. This study analyzed the effectiveness of 3 chemical sanitizers for reducing Salmonella on in-shell hazelnuts. Treatments of water, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl; 25 and 50 ppm), peroxyacetic acid (PAA; 80 and 120 ppm), and acidified sodium chlorite (ASC; 450, 830, and 1013 ppm) were sprayed onto hazelnut samples inoculated with Salmonella enterica serovar Panama. Hazelnut samples were immersed in liquid cultures of S. Panama for 24 h, air-dried, and then sprayed with water and chemical treatments. Inoculation achieved S. Panama populations of approximately 8.04 log CFU/hazelnut. Surviving S. panama populations were evaluated using a nonselective medium (tryptic soy agar), incubated 3 h, and then overlaid with selective media (xylose lysine deoxycholate agar). All of the chemical treatments significantly reduced S. Panama populations (P ≤ 0.0001). The most effective concentrations of ASC, PAA, and NaOCl treatments reduced populations by 2.65, 1.46, and 0.66 log units, respectively. ASC showed the greatest potential for use as a postharvest sanitation treatment.

  9. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  10. Metal matrix composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krivov, G.A.; Beletsky, V.M.; Gribkov, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    High strength-weight properties, stiffness and fatigue resistance characteristics together with low sensitivity to stress concentration make metal matrix composites (MMC) rather promising for their use in structures. Metal matrix composites consist of a matrix (aluminum, magnesium, titanium and their alloys are the most frequently used) and reinforcers (carbon and boron fibers, high-strength steel wire, silicon carbide whiskers, etc.). This work considers various types of MMC and their applications in structures. The methods of structure production from metal matrix CM of aluminum-boron system with the help of machining, deformation, part joining by welding and riveting are given.

  11. Hacking the Matrix.

    PubMed

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix.

  12. Transfer function matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Given a multivariable system, it is proved that the numerator matrix N(s) of the transfer function evaluated at any system pole either has unity rank or is a null matrix. It is also shown that N(s) evaluated at any transmission zero of the system has rank deficiency. Examples are given for illustration.

  13. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  14. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  15. Fuzzy risk matrix.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Adam S; Mannan, M Sam

    2008-11-15

    A risk matrix is a mechanism to characterize and rank process risks that are typically identified through one or more multifunctional reviews (e.g., process hazard analysis, audits, or incident investigation). This paper describes a procedure for developing a fuzzy risk matrix that may be used for emerging fuzzy logic applications in different safety analyses (e.g., LOPA). The fuzzification of frequency and severity of the consequences of the incident scenario are described which are basic inputs for fuzzy risk matrix. Subsequently using different design of risk matrix, fuzzy rules are established enabling the development of fuzzy risk matrices. Three types of fuzzy risk matrix have been developed (low-cost, standard, and high-cost), and using a distillation column case study, the effect of the design on final defuzzified risk index is demonstrated.

  16. Influence of biogenic Fe(II) on the extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in clay minerals nontronite, illite, and chlorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaisi, Deb P.; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-03-01

    Microbial reduction of Fe(III) in clay minerals is an important process that affects properties of clay-rich materials and iron biogeochemical cycling in natural environments. Microbial reduction often ceases before all Fe(III) in clay minerals is exhausted. The factors causing the cessation are, however, not well understood. The objective of this study was to assess the role of biogenic Fe(II) in microbial reduction of Fe(III) in clay minerals nontronite, illite, and chlorite. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where lactate was used as the sole electron donor, Fe(III) in clay minerals as the sole electron acceptor, and Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as the mediator with and without an electron shuttle (AQDS). Our results showed that bioreduction activity ceased within two weeks with variable extents of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. When fresh CN32 cells were added to old cultures (6 months), bioreduction resumed, and extents increased. Thus, cessation of Fe(III) bioreduction was not necessarily due to exhaustion of bioavailable Fe(III) in the mineral structure, but changes in cell physiology or solution chemistry, such as Fe(II) production during microbial reduction, may have inhibited the extent of bioreduction. To investigate the effect of Fe(II) inhibition on CN 32 reduction activity, a typical bioreduction process (consisting of lactate, clay, cells, and AQDS in a single tube) was separated into two steps: (1) AQDS was reduced by cells in the absence of clay; (2) Fe(III) in clays was reduced by biogenic AH 2DS in the absence of cells. With this method, the extent of Fe(III) reduction increased by 45-233%, depending on the clay mineral involved. Transmission electron microscopy observation revealed a thick halo surrounding cell surfaces that most likely resulted from Fe(II) sorption/precipitation. Similarly, the inhibitory effect of Fe(II) sorbed onto clay surfaces was assessed by presorbing a certain amount of Fe

  17. Ion chromatographic determination of trace iodate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, bromate and nitrite in drinking water using suppressed conductivity detection and visible detection.

    PubMed

    Binghui, Zhu; Zhixiong, Zhong; Jing, Yao

    2006-06-16

    An ion chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of trace iodate, chlorite, chlorate, bromide, bromate and nitrite in drinking water has been developed using an anion-exchange column and the suppressed conductivity detector, followed by post-column addition of reagent to enhance visible absorbance detection of ions. A high capacity anion exchange Ion Pac9-HC column (250 mm x 4 mm I.D.) was used. Eight millimole per liter sodium carbonate was used as eluent, an auto-suppression external water mode was selected, 0.5 g/l o-dianisidine.2HCl (ODA)+4.5 g/l KBr+25% methanel+5.6% nitric acid was used as post-column reagent. The post-column reaction (PCR) temperature was at 60 degrees C, and the visible absorbance detected wavelength at 450 nm. The sample's pH and coexist anions had no influence on determination. The method enjoyed a wide linear range and a good linear correlation coefficient (r>0.999). The method detection limits were between 0.023 and 2.0 microg/l. The average recoveries ranged from 87.5 to 110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSD) were in the range of 1.1-4.6%. The analytical results by the method of post-column addition of reagent to enhance visible absorbance detection of anions was compared with that of the suppressed conductivity detection, and the former was proved to be better in sensitivity and selectivity. The results showed that this method was accurate, sensitive and might be good for application and suitable for trace analysis at the level of mug/l.

  18. The efficacy and safety of add-on 0.1% brimonidine tartrate preserved with sodium chlorite in on-treatment Japanese normal-tension glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Toyoaki; Yoshikawa, Keiji; Kimura, Tairo; Suzumura, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Miwako; Nanno, Mami; Ishijima, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of newly formulated brimonidine (0.1% brimonidine tartrate preserved with sodium chlorite: brimonidine) as add-on therapy in on-treatment Japanese normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients. Brimonidine was added to on-treatment NTG patients with intraocular pressures (IOP) of between 13 mmHg and 16 mmHg after three consecutive IOP measurements. The time courses of IOP, conjunctival hyperemia, superficial punctate keratitis, and adverse events were examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after brimonidine instillation. Though 75 of 83 patients (31 males and 52 females; mean age: 63.4±11.6 years) completed the study, six patients discontinued because of side effects and two patients withdrew. The mean IOP after brimonidine addition at week 4 (12.6±1.8 mmHg, P<0.001), week 8 (12.4±1.7 mmHg, P<0.001), and week 12 (12.6±1.8 mmHg, P<0.001) was significantly decreased compared with that before the addition of brimonidine (13.9±1.2 mmHg). No significant changes in superficial punctate keratitis or conjunctival hyperemia scores were observed throughout the study. Dizziness, sleepiness, eye pain, and itching (mild to moderate) were noted in five, four, three, and three patients, respectively. The addition of newly formulated brimonidine to on-treatment Japanese NTG patients with IOP of 13-16 mmHg further reduced the levels of IOP with minimal side effects and adverse events.

  19. Effects of cetylpyridinium chloride, acidified sodium chlorite, and potassium sorbate on populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus on fresh beef.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungwha; Mustapha, Azlin

    2004-02-01

    The effects of selected food-grade antimicrobial agents at decreasing the number of pathogenic bacteria on fresh beef were determined. Beef cubes inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, or Staphylococcus aureus were sprayed with 0.5% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), 0.12% acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), 0.1% potassium sorbate (PS), or an equal mix of any two solutions. The beef samples were placed on absorbent tray pads sprayed with each single or mixed solution, wrapped with polyvinyl chloride film, heat sealed, and stored at 4 degrees C for 2 weeks. Surface sanitization using CPC, ASC, or an equal mix of these two agents effectively reduced microbial numbers on the beef during storage. At day 0, ASC and the CPC-ASC mix reduced the number of E. coli O157:H7 by 2.50 and 1.58 log CFU/cm2, respectively. CPC demonstrated a 3.25-log reduction of L. monocytogenes and a 4.70-log reduction of S. aureus at 14 days. The CPC-PS mix reduced E. coli O157:H7 numbers by 1.46, L. monocytogenes by 2.95, and S. aureus by 4.41 log CFU/cm2 at 14 days. PS alone and the mixed solutions, CPC-ASC, CPC-PS, or ASC-PS, were not as effective as ASC or CPC alone. To effectively reduce E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, or S. aureus numbers, higher (> 0.1%) concentrations of PS were necessary. Loss of redness and light color of beef surfaces consistently coincided with decreases in pH for ASC-treated beef samples.

  20. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  1. Faces of matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    2012-08-01

    Partition functions of eigenvalue matrix models possess a number of very different descriptions: as matrix integrals, as solutions to linear and nonlinear equations, as τ-functions of integrable hierarchies and as special-geometry prepotentials, as result of the action of W-operators and of various recursions on elementary input data, as gluing of certain elementary building blocks. All this explains the central role of such matrix models in modern mathematical physics: they provide the basic "special functions" to express the answers and relations between them, and they serve as a dream model of what one should try to achieve in any other field.

  2. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  3. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  4. Functional Polymer Matrix Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the carbon nanofibers led to the deterioration of the polymeric cellulose structure. Extensive research on the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers...1 November 2003 - 14-Mar-05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-1-3042 Functional Polymer Matrix Fibres 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...MARYLABONE RD LONDON NWl 5TH PERFORMANCE REPORT Project title: Functional polymer matrix fibers Period of performance: 1 November 2003 - 31 October 2004

  5. Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Warren; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-02-01

    Metal matrix composites comprise a relatively wide range of materials defined by the metal matrix, reinforcement type, and reinforcement geometry. In the area of the matrix, most metallic systems have been explored for use in metal matrix composites, including Al, Be, Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, and Ag. By far, the largest usage is in aluminum matrix composites. From a reinforcement perspective, the materials used are typically ceramics since they provide a very desirable combination of stiffness, strength, and relatively low density. Candidate reinforcement materials include SiC, Al2O3, B4C, TiC, TiB2, graphite, and a number of other ceramics. In addition, there has been work on metallic materials as reinforcements, notably W and steel fibers. The morphology of the reinforcement material is another variable of importance in metal matrix composites. The three major classes of reinforcement morphology are continuous fiber, chopped fiber or whisker, and particulate. Typically, the selection of the reinforcement morphology is determined by the desired property/cost combination. Generally, continuous fiber reinforced MMCs provide the highest properties in the direction of the fiber orientation but are the most expensive. Chopped fiber and whisker reinforced materials can produce significant property improvements in the plane or direction of their orientation, at somewhat lower cost. Particulates provide a comparatively more moderate but isotropic increase in properties and are typically available at the lowest cost. By adding to the three variables of metallic matrix, reinforcement material, and reinforcement morphology the further options of reinforcement volume fraction, orientation, and matrix alloy composition and heat treatment, it is apparent that there is a very wide range of available material combinations and resultant properties. This paper will focus on how MMCs have been applied in specific application areas.

  6. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  7. Generalized matrix inversion is not harder than matrix multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Marko D.; Stanimirovic, Predrag S.

    2009-08-01

    Starting from the Strassen method for rapid matrix multiplication and inversion as well as from the recursive Cholesky factorization algorithm, we introduced a completely block recursive algorithm for generalized Cholesky factorization of a given symmetric, positive semi-definite matrix . We used the Strassen method for matrix inversion together with the recursive generalized Cholesky factorization method, and established an algorithm for computing generalized {2,3} and {2,4} inverses. Introduced algorithms are not harder than the matrix-matrix multiplication.

  8. Extracellular matrix structure.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  9. Matrix interdiction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  10. Quantum metrology matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haidong; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred

    2017-07-01

    Various strategies exist in quantum metrology, such as with or without ancillary system, with a fixed or optimized measurement, with or without monitoring the environment, etc. Different set of tools are usually needed for different strategies. In this article, we provide a unified framework for these different settings, in particular we introduce a quantum metrology matrix and show that the precision limits of different settings can all be obtained from the trace or the trace norm of the quantum metrology matrix. Furthermore, the probe state enters into the quantum metrology matrix linearly, which makes the identification of the optimal probe states, one of the main quests in quantum metrology, much more efficient than conventional methods.

  11. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  12. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  13. The Solution Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabinger, R. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the preparation of knowledge for problems appropriate for expert systems focuses on relationships among problem attributes and their solutions through the creation of a solution matrix. Two examples are given, one for wine selection and one for decisions that an automobile manufacturer's sales force might have to make. (LRW)

  14. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  15. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  16. Matrix product state renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, M.; Rams, M. M.; Zauner, V.; Haegeman, J.; Verstraete, F.

    2016-11-01

    The truncation or compression of the spectrum of Schmidt values is inherent to the matrix product state (MPS) approximation of one-dimensional quantum ground states. We provide a renormalization group picture by interpreting this compression as an application of Wilson's numerical renormalization group along the imaginary time direction appearing in the path integral representation of the state. The location of the physical index is considered as an impurity in the transfer matrix and static MPS correlation functions are reinterpreted as dynamical impurity correlations. Coarse-graining the transfer matrix is performed using a hybrid variational ansatz based on matrix product operators, combining ideas of MPS and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. Through numerical comparison with conventional MPS algorithms, we explicitly verify the impurity interpretation of MPS compression, as put forward by V. Zauner et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 053002 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/053002] for the transverse-field Ising model. Additionally, we motivate the conceptual usefulness of endowing MPS with an internal layered structure by studying restricted variational subspaces to describe elementary excitations on top of the ground state, which serves to elucidate a transparent renormalization group structure ingrained in MPS descriptions of ground states.

  17. Algal toxicity of the alternative disinfectants performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and their by-products hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite (ClO2(-)).

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Baun, Anders; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2016-12-01

    Environmental effect evaluation of disinfection of combined sewer overflow events with alternative chemical disinfectants requires that the environmental toxicity of the disinfectants and the main by-products of their use are known. Many disinfectants degrade quickly in water which should be included in the evaluation of both their toxicity as determined in standardized tests and their possible negative effect in the water environment. Here we evaluated according to the standardized ISO 8692 test the toxicity towards the green microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, of three disinfectants: performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as well as two by-products of their use: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite. All of the five chemicals investigated showed clear toxicity to the algae with well-defined dose response curves. The EC50 values ranged from 0.16 to 2.9mg/L based on nominal concentrations leading to the labeling of the chemicals as either toxic or very toxic. The five investigated chemicals decreased in toxicity in the order chlorine dioxide, performic acid, peracetic acid, chlorite and hydrogen peroxide. The stability of the chemicals increased in the same order as the toxicity decrease. This indicates that even though ClO2 has the highest environmental hazard potential, it may still be suitable as an alternative disinfectant due to its rapid degradation in water.

  18. The impact of single antimicrobial intervention treatment with potassium lactate, sodium metasilicate, peroxyacetic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite on non-inoculated ground beef lipid, instrumental color, and sensory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Quilo, S A; Pohlman, F W; Dias-Morse, P N; Brown, A H; Crandall, P G; Baublits, R T; Aparicio, J L

    2009-11-01

    The effect of using potassium lactate, sodium metasilicate, acidified sodium chlorite, or peroxyacetic acid as a single antimicrobial intervention on ground beef instrumental color, sensory color and odor characteristics, and lipid oxidation was evaluated. Prior to grinding, beef trimmings (90/10) were treated with 3% potassium lactate (KL), 4% sodium metasilicate (NMS), 200-ppm peroxyacetic acid (PAA), 1000-ppm acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), or left untreated (CON). Ground beef under simulated retail display was measured at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 7 of display for instrumental color, sensory characteristics, TBARS values, and pH to evaluate the impact of the treatments. The KL, NMS, PAA, and ASC were redder (a(∗); P<0.05) than CON. All treatments were scored by sensory panelists to have a brighter (P<0.05) red color than CON during days 1-3 of display. All treatments had less (P<0.05) lipid oxidation than CON on days 0, 3, and 7 of display. These results suggest that the use of these antimicrobial compounds on beef trimmings prior to grinding may not adversely affect, and may improve bulk packaged ground beef quality characteristics.

  19. Random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Alan; Rao, N. Raj

    Random matrix theory is now a big subject with applications in many disciplines of science, engineering and finance. This article is a survey specifically oriented towards the needs and interests of a numerical analyst. This survey includes some original material not found anywhere else. We include the important mathematics which is a very modern development, as well as the computational software that is transforming the theory into useful practice.

  20. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  1. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, Ruel H.; Imbriale, William A.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Lyons, James R.; Manshadi, Farzin; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to investigate the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Three scattering analysis codes are being implemented and assessed on a JPL/California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Mark 3 Hypercube. The codes, which utilize different underlying algorithms, give a means of evaluating the general applicability of this parallel architecture. The three analysis codes being implemented are a frequency domain method of moments code, a time domain finite difference code, and a frequency domain finite elements code. These analysis capabilities are being integrated into an electromagnetics interactive analysis workstation which can serve as a design tool for the construction of antennas and other radiating or scattering structures. The first two years of work on the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort is summarized. It includes both new developments and results as well as work previously reported in the Hypercube Matrix Computation Task: Final Report for 1986 to 1987 (JPL Publication 87-18).

  2. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  3. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  4. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  5. Supported Molecular Matrix Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yu-Ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are difficult to separate using conventional gel electrophoresis methods such as SDS-PAGE and agarose gel electrophoresis, owing to their large size and heterogeneity. On the other hand, cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis can separate these molecules, but is not compatible with glycan analysis. Here, we describe a novel membrane electrophoresis technique, termed "supported molecular matrix electrophoresis" (SMME), in which a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane filter is used to achieve separation. This description includes the separation, visualization, and glycan analysis of mucins with the SMME technique.

  6. Semiclassical integrable matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, J.J.

    1996-03-01

    A semiclassical expression for matrix elements of an arbitrary operator with respect to the eigenstates of an integrable Hamiltonian is derived. This is essentially the Heisenberg correspondence principle, and it is shown via the Weyl correspondence that the approximation is valid through the lowest two orders in {h_bar}. The result is used to prove that an asymptotic form of the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for two large and one small angular momenta is valid through two orders. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Validation of the use of organic acids and acidified sodium chlorite to reduce Escherichia coli O157 and Salmonella typhimurium in beef trim and ground beef in a simulated processing environment.

    PubMed

    Harris, K; Miller, M F; Loneragan, G H; Brashears, M M

    2006-08-01

    A study was conducted to determine if acidified sodium chlorite (1,200 ppm) and acetic and lactic acids (2 and 4%) were effective in reducing foodborne pathogens in beef trim prior to grinding in a simulated processing environment. The reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 at high (4.0 log CFU/g) and low (1.0 log CFU/g) inoculation doses was evaluated at various processing steps, including the following: (i) in trim just after treatment application, (ii) in ground beef just after grinding, (iii) in ground beef 24 h after refrigerated storage, (iv) in ground beef 5 days after refrigerated storage, and (v) in ground beef 30 days after frozen storage. All antimicrobial treatments reduced the pathogens on the trim inoculated with the lower inoculation dose to nondetectable numbers in the trim and in the ground beef. There were significant reductions of both pathogens in the trim and in the ground beef inoculated with the high inoculation doses. On the trim itself, E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were reduced by 1.5 to 2.0 log cycles, with no differences among all treatments. In the ground beef, the organic acids were more effective in reducing both pathogens than the acidified sodium chlorite immediately after grinding, but after 1 day of storage, there were no differences among treatments. Overall, in the ground beef, there was a 2.5-log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 and a 1.5-log reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium that was sustained over time in refrigerated and frozen storage. Very few sensory differences between the control samples and the treated samples were detected by a consumer panel. Thus, antimicrobial treatments did not cause serious adverse sensory changes. Use of these antimicrobial treatments can be a promising intervention available to ground beef processors who currently have few interventions in their process.

  8. Production and stability of chlorine dioxide in organic acid solutions as affected by pH, type of acid, and concentration of sodium chlorite, and its effectiveness in inactivating Bacillus cereus spores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoikyung; Kang, Youngjee; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2008-12-01

    We studied the production and stability of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in organic acid solutions and its effectiveness in killing Bacillus cereus spores. Sodium chlorite (5000, 10,000, or 50,000 microg/ml) was added to 5% acetic, citric, or lactic acid solution, adjusted to pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, or 6.0, and held at 21 degrees C for up to 14 days. The amount of ClO(2) produced was higher as the concentration of sodium chlorite was increased and as the pH of the acid solutions was decreased. However, the stability in production of ClO(2) was enhanced by increasing the pH of the organic acid solutions. To evaluate the lethal activity of ClO(2) produced in various acid solutions as affected by acidulant and pH, suspensions of B. cereus spores were treated at 21 degrees C for 1, 3, 5, or 10 min in hydrochloric acid or organic acid solutions (pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, or 6.0) containing ClO(2) at concentrations of 100, 50, or 25 microg/ml. Populations of viable spores treated with ClO(2) at concentrations of 100 or 50 microg/ml in organic acid solutions decreased more rapidly than populations treated with the same concentrations of ClO(2) in HCl. Rates of inactivation tended to increase with higher pH of ClO(2) solutions. Results show that ClO(2) formed in organic acid solutions has higher stability and is more lethal to B. cereus spores than ClO(2) formed at the same concentration in HCl solution. This finding emphasizes the benefits of using organic acid solutions to prepare ClO(2) intended for use as an antimicrobial.

  9. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  10. Matrix membranes and integrability

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.; Fairlie, D.; Curtright, T.

    1997-06-01

    This is a pedagogical digest of results reported in Curtright, Fairlie, {ampersand} Zachos 1997, and an explicit implementation of Euler`s construction for the solution of the Poisson Bracket dual Nahm equation. But it does not cover 9 and 10-dimensional systems, and subsequent progress on them Fairlie 1997. Cubic interactions are considered in 3 and 7 space dimensions, respectively, for bosonic membranes in Poisson Bracket form. Their symmetries and vacuum configurations are explored. Their associated first order equations are transformed to Nahm`s equations, and are hence seen to be integrable, for the 3-dimensional case, by virtue of the explicit Lax pair provided. Most constructions introduced also apply to matrix commutator or Moyal Bracket analogs.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz-Praga, S M; Dickson, R B; Hawkins, M J

    1997-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of at least fifteen secreted and membrane-bound zinc-endopeptidases. Collectively, these enzymes can degrade all of the components of the extracellular matrix, including fibrallar and non-fibrallar collagens, fibronectin, laminin and basement membrane glycoproteins. MMPs are thought to be essential for the diverse invasive processes of angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. Numerous studies have shown that there is a close association between expression of various members of the MMP family by tumors and their proliferative and invasive behavior and metastatic potential. In some of human cancers a positive correlation has also been demonstrated between the intensity of new blood vessel growth (angiogenesis) and the likelihood of developing metastases. Thus, control of MMP activity in these two different contexts has generated considerable interest as a possible therapeutic target. The tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are naturally occurring proteins that specifically inhibit matrix metalloproteinases, thus maintaining balance between matrix destruction and formation. An imbalance between MMPs and the associated TIMPs may play a significant role in the invasive phenotype of malignant tumors. TIMP-1 has been shown to inhibit tumor-induced angiogenesis in experimental systems. These findings raised the possibility of using an agent that affects expression or activity of MMPs as an anti-cancer therapy. TIMPs are probably not suitable for pharmacologic applications due to their short half-life in vivo. Batimastat (BB-94) and marimastat (BB-2516) are synthetic, low-molecular weight MMP inhibitors. They have a collagen-mimicking hydroxamate structure, which facilitates chelation of the zinc ion in the active site of the MMPs. These compounds inhibit MMPs potently and specifically. Batimastat was the first synthetic MMP inhibitor studied in humans with advanced malignancies, but its usefulness has been limited by

  12. Hyaluronan: A Matrix Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügheimer, Louise

    2008-09-01

    The glucosaminoglycan hyaluronan is a key component of the extracellular matrix. It is a large, negatively charged molecule that can act as an ion exchange reservoir for positive ions. Hyaluronan is involved in renomedullary water handling through its water-binding capacity. In the renal medulla, the main source for hyaluronan production is the renomedullary interstitial cells. Hyaluronan synthases are found in the inner part of the plasma membrane and polymerize hyaluronan chains which are extruded into the extracellular space. Hyaluronidases are a family of enzymes involved in the degradation of hyaluronan. They have a wide range of properties, including differences in size, inhibitor sensitivities, catalytic mechanisms, substrate specificities and pH optima.

  13. Google matrix of Twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, K. M.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    We construct the Google matrix of the entire Twitter network, dated by July 2009, and analyze its spectrum and eigenstate properties including the PageRank and CheiRank vectors and 2DRanking of all nodes. Our studies show much stronger inter-connectivity between top PageRank nodes for the Twitter network compared to the networks of Wikipedia and British Universities studied previously. Our analysis allows to locate the top Twitter users which control the information flow on the network. We argue that this small fraction of the whole number of users, which can be viewed as the social network elite, plays the dominant role in the process of opinion formation on the network.

  14. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  15. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  16. Lectures on Matrix Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydri, Badis

    The subject of matrix field theory involves matrix models, noncommutative geometry, fuzzy physics and noncommutative field theory and their interplay. In these lectures, a lot of emphasis is placed on the matrix formulation of noncommutative and fuzzy spaces, and on the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. In particular, the phase structure of noncommutative $\\phi^4$ theory is treated in great detail, and an introduction to noncommutative gauge theory is given.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    replacement of air space with the polymer matrix. A similar affinity is not known to exist between CNTs and aluminum , where the wetting angle between...Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites by Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna ARL-TR-5252 August 2010...Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  18. Homolumo gap and matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Andric, I.; Jonke, L.; Jurman, D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2008-06-15

    We discuss a dynamical matrix model by which probability distribution is associated with Gaussian ensembles from random matrix theory. We interpret the matrix M as a Hamiltonian representing interaction of a bosonic system with a single fermion. We show that a system of second-quantized fermions influences the ground state of the whole system by producing a gap between the highest occupied eigenvalue and the lowest unoccupied eigenvalue.

  19. A matrix model for WZW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-08-01

    We study a U( N) gauged matrix quantum mechanics which, in the large N limit, is closely related to the chiral WZW conformal field theory. This manifests itself in two ways. First, we construct the left-moving Kac-Moody algebra from matrix degrees of freedom. Secondly, we compute the partition function of the matrix model in terms of Schur and Kostka polynomials and show that, in the large N limit, it coincides with the partition function of the WZW model. This same matrix model was recently shown to describe non-Abelian quantum Hall states and the relationship to the WZW model can be understood in this framework.

  20. Matrix market: a web resource for test matrix collection

    SciTech Connect

    Boisvert, R.F.; Pozo, R.; Remington, K.; Barrett, R.F.; Dongarra, J.J. /

    1996-05-30

    We describe a repository of data for the testing of numerical algorithms and mathematical software for matrix computations. The repository is designed to accommodate both dense and sparse matrices, as well as software to generate matrices. It has been seeded with the well known Harwell-Boeing sparse matrix collection. The raw data files have been augmented with an integrated World Wide Web interface which describes the matrices in the collection quantitatively and visually, For example, each matrix has a Web page which details its attributes, graphically depicts its sparsity pattern, and provides access to the matrix itself in several formats. In addition, a search mechanism is included which allows retrieval of matrices based on a variety of attributes, such as type and size, as well as through free-text search in abstracts. The URL is http://math.nist.gov/MatrixMarket.

  1. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  2. Glass matrix armor

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  3. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, R.; Imbriale, W.; Liewer, P.; Lyons, J.; Manshadi, F.; Patterson, J.

    1987-01-01

    The Hypercube Matrix Computation (Year 1986-1987) task investigated the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Two existing electromagnetic scattering codes were selected for conversion to the Mark III Hypercube concurrent computing environment. They were selected so that the underlying numerical algorithms utilized would be different thereby providing a more thorough evaluation of the appropriateness of the parallel environment for these types of problems. The first code was a frequency domain method of moments solution, NEC-2, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The second code was a time domain finite difference solution of Maxwell's equations to solve for the scattered fields. Once the codes were implemented on the hypercube and verified to obtain correct solutions by comparing the results with those from sequential runs, several measures were used to evaluate the performance of the two codes. First, a comparison was provided of the problem size possible on the hypercube with 128 megabytes of memory for a 32-node configuration with that available in a typical sequential user environment of 4 to 8 megabytes. Then, the performance of the codes was anlyzed for the computational speedup attained by the parallel architecture.

  4. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extent to which graphite fibers are released from resin matrix composites that are exposed to fire and impact conditions was determined. Laboratory simulations of those conditions that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation were evaluated. The effectiveness of various hybridizing concepts in preventing this release of graphite fibers were also evaluated. The baseline (i.e., unhybridized) laminates examined were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy, graphite/polyimide, and graphite/phenolic materials. Hybridizing concepts investigated included resin fillers, laminate coatings, resin blending, and mechanical interlocking of the graphite reinforcement. The baseline and hybridized laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, were also compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that several hybrid concepts eliminated this fiber release. Isothermal and humidity aging did not appear to alter the fiber release tendencies.

  5. How to Study a Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  6. Matrix Methods to Analytic Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandy, C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of basis matrix methods to rotate axes is detailed. It is felt that persons who have need to rotate axes often will find that the matrix method saves considerable work. One drawback is that most students first learning to rotate axes will not yet have studied linear algebra. (MP)

  7. Cascade sample matrix inversion arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Timothy; Essman, Joseph

    It is shown that if a narrowband adaptive array is partitioned and processed as a cascade of adaptive arrays, computational complexity is reduced and performance is only slightly degraded. The sample matrix inversion (SMI) and covariance matrix estimation are discussed. Cascade SMI complexity is examined. Simulation results are presented.

  8. How to Study a Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  9. Micromechanics for ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The fiber substructuring concepts and the micromechanics equations that are embedded in the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer (CEMCAN) computer code are described as well as the code itself, its current features and capabilities, and some examples to demonstrate the code's versatility. The methodology is equally applicable to metal matrix and polymer matrix composites. The prediction of ply mechanical and thermal properties agree very well with the existing models in the Integrated Composite Analyzer and the Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer, lending credence to the fiber substructuring approach. Fiber substructuring can capture greater local detail than conventional unit-cell-based micromechanical theories. It offers promise in simulating complex aspects of micromechanics in ceramic matrix composites.

  10. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  11. Hot water postprocess pasteurization of cook-in-bag turkey breast treated with and without potassium lactate and sodium diacetate and acidified sodium chlorite for control of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Luchansky, John B; Cocoma, George; Call, Jeffrey E

    2006-01-01

    Surface pasteurization and food-grade chemicals were evaluated for the ability to control listeriae postprocess on cook-in-bag turkey breasts (CIBTB). Individual CIBTB were obtained directly from a commercial manufacturer and surface inoculated (20 ml) with a five-strain cocktail (ca. 7.0 log) of Listeria innocua. In each of two trials, the product was showered or submerged for up to 9 min with water heated to 190, 197, or 205 degrees F (ca. 87.8, 91.7, or 96.1 degrees C) in a commercial pasteurization tunnel. Surviving listeriae were recovered from CIBTB by rinsing and were then enumerated on modified Oxford agar plates following incubation at 37 degrees C for 48 h. As expected, higher water temperatures and longer residence times resulted in a greater reduction of L. innocua. A ca. 2.0-log reduction was achieved within 3 min at 205 and 197 degrees F and within 7 min at 190 degrees E In related experiments, the following treatments were evaluated for control of Listeria monocytogenes on CIBTB: (i) a potassium lactate-sodium diacetate solution (1.54% potassium lactate and 0.11% sodium diacetate) added to the formulation in the mixer and 150 ppm of acidified sodium chlorite applied to the surface with a pipette, or (ii) a potassium lactate-sodium diacetate solution only, or (iii) no potassium lactate-sodium diacetate solution and no acidified sodium chlorite. Each CIBTB was inoculated (20 ml) with ca. 5 log CFU of a five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes and then vacuum sealed. In each of two trials, half of the CIBTB were exposed to 203 degrees F water for 3 min in a pasteurization tunnel, and the other half of the CIBTB were not; then, all CIBTB were stored at 4 degrees C for up to 60 days, and L. monocytogenes was enumerated by direct plating onto modified Oxford agar. Heating resulted in an initial reduction of ca. 2 log CFU of L. monocytogenes per CIBTB. For heated CIBTB, L. monocytogenes increased by ca. 2 log CFU per CIBTB in 28 (treatment 1), 28 (treatment

  12. MatrixDB, the extracellular matrix interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Chautard, Emilie; Fatoux-Ardore, Marie; Ballut, Lionel; Thierry-Mieg, Nicolas; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    MatrixDB (http://matrixdb.ibcp.fr) is a freely available database focused on interactions established by extracellular proteins and polysaccharides. Only few databases report protein–polysaccharide interactions and, to the best of our knowledge, there is no other database of extracellular interactions. MatrixDB takes into account the multimeric nature of several extracellular protein families for the curation of interactions, and reports interactions with individual polypeptide chains or with multimers, considered as permanent complexes, when appropriate. MatrixDB is a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium (IMEx) and has adopted the PSI-MI standards for the curation and the exchange of interaction data. MatrixDB stores experimental data from our laboratory, data from literature curation, data imported from IMEx databases, and data from the Human Protein Reference Database. MatrixDB is focused on mammalian interactions, but aims to integrate interaction datasets of model organisms when available. MatrixDB provides direct links to databases recapitulating mutations in genes encoding extracellular proteins, to UniGene and to the Human Protein Atlas that shows expression and localization of proteins in a large variety of normal human tissues and cells. MatrixDB allows researchers to perform customized queries and to build tissue- and disease-specific interaction networks that can be visualized and analyzed with Cytoscape or Medusa. PMID:20852260

  13. MatrixDB, the extracellular matrix interaction database.

    PubMed

    Chautard, Emilie; Fatoux-Ardore, Marie; Ballut, Lionel; Thierry-Mieg, Nicolas; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    MatrixDB (http://matrixdb.ibcp.fr) is a freely available database focused on interactions established by extracellular proteins and polysaccharides. Only few databases report protein-polysaccharide interactions and, to the best of our knowledge, there is no other database of extracellular interactions. MatrixDB takes into account the multimeric nature of several extracellular protein families for the curation of interactions, and reports interactions with individual polypeptide chains or with multimers, considered as permanent complexes, when appropriate. MatrixDB is a member of the International Molecular Exchange consortium (IMEx) and has adopted the PSI-MI standards for the curation and the exchange of interaction data. MatrixDB stores experimental data from our laboratory, data from literature curation, data imported from IMEx databases, and data from the Human Protein Reference Database. MatrixDB is focused on mammalian interactions, but aims to integrate interaction datasets of model organisms when available. MatrixDB provides direct links to databases recapitulating mutations in genes encoding extracellular proteins, to UniGene and to the Human Protein Atlas that shows expression and localization of proteins in a large variety of normal human tissues and cells. MatrixDB allows researchers to perform customized queries and to build tissue- and disease-specific interaction networks that can be visualized and analyzed with Cytoscape or Medusa.

  14. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  15. The matrix of inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  16. Matrix cracking in brittle-matrix composites with tailored interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Danchaivijit, S.; Chao, L.Y.; Shetty, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    Matrix cracking from controlled through cracks with bridging filaments was studied in a model unidirectional composite of SiC filaments in an epoxy-bonded alumina matrix. An unbonded, frictional interface was produced by moderating the curing shrinkage of the epoxy with the alumina filler and coating the filaments with a releasing agent. Uniaxial tension test specimens (2.5 x 25 x 125 mm) with filament-bridged through cracks were fabricated by a novel two-step casting technique involving casting, precracking and joining of cracked and uncracked sections. Distinct matrix-cracking stresses, corresponding to the extension of the filament-bridged cracks, were measured in uniaxial tension tests using a high-sensitivity extensometer. The crack-length dependence of the matrix-cracking stress was found to be in good agreement with the prediction of a fracture-mechanics analysis that employed a new crack-closure force-crack-opening displacement relation in the calculation of the stress intensity for fiber-bridged cracks. The prediction was based on independent experimental measurements of the matrix fracture toughness (K{sub cm}), the interfacial sliding friction stress ({tau}) and the residual stress in the matrix ({sigma}{sub m}{sup I}). The matrix-cracking stress for crack lengths (2a) greater than 3 mm was independent of the crack length and agreed with the prediction of the steady-state theory of Budiansky, Hutchinson and Evans. Tests on specimens without the deliberately introduced cracks indicated a matrix-cracking stress significantly higher than the steady-state stress.

  17. New pole placement algorithm - Polynomial matrix approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafai, B.; Keel, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    A simple and direct pole-placement algorithm is introduced for dynamical systems having a block companion matrix A. The algorithm utilizes well-established properties of matrix polynomials. Pole placement is achieved by appropriately assigning coefficient matrices of the corresponding matrix polynomial. This involves only matrix additions and multiplications without requiring matrix inversion. A numerical example is given for the purpose of illustration.

  18. Matrix Fourth-Complex Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Marinov, Marin S.; Stoev, Peter

    2009-11-01

    In the paper we consider quasi-cyclic hyper-complex variables which are naturally related to the partial differential equations with complex variables. In fact, we develop a matrix 4×4 generalization of the classical bicomplex numbers [1], [2]. We recall that a matrix 2×2 isomorphic type treatment of the classical bicomplex numbers was developed in [3]. Here we develop a matrix 4×4 generalization of the bicomplex numbers including some improvement of the papers [3] and [4]. Let us remark that a deep generalization of the considered ideas was sketch in [5] before us.

  19. Mechanotransduction and extracellular matrix homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Jay D.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Soft connective tissues at steady state are yet dynamic; resident cells continually read environmental cues and respond to promote homeostasis, including maintenance of the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix that are fundamental to cellular and tissue health. The mechanosensing process involves assessment of the mechanics of the matrix by the cells through integrins and the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and is followed by a mechano-regulation process that includes the deposition, rearrangement, or removal of matrix to maintain overall form and function. Progress toward understanding the molecular, cellular, and tissue scale effects that promote mechanical homeostasis has helped identify key questions for future research. PMID:25355505

  20. Quadrality for supersymmetric matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Sebastián; Lee, Sangmin; Seong, Rak-Kyeong; Vafa, Cumrun

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a new duality for N = 1 supersymmetric gauged matrix models. This 0 d duality is an order 4 symmetry, namely an equivalence between four different theories, hence we call it Quadrality. Our proposal is motivated by mirror symmetry, but is not restricted to theories with a D-brane realization and holds for general N = 1 matrix models. We present various checks of the proposal, including the matching of: global symmetries, anomalies, deformations and the chiral ring. We also consider quivers and the corresponding quadrality networks. Finally, we initiate the study of matrix models that arise on the worldvolume of D(-1)-branes probing toric Calabi-Yau 5-folds.

  1. High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  2. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, Tito T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites Conference held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on March 16 to 18, 1983. The purpose of the conference is to provide scientists and engineers working in the field of high temperature polymer matrix composites an opportunity to review, exchange, and assess the latest developments in this rapidly expanding area of materials technology. Technical papers are presented in the following areas: (1) matrix development; (2) adhesive development; (3) Characterization; (4) environmental effects; and (5) applications.

  3. Genotype imputation via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K.; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  4. Direct injection ion chromatography for the control of chlorinated drinking water: simultaneous estimation of nine haloacetic acids and quantitation of bromate, chlorite and chlorate along with the major inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Villanova, Rafael J; Raposo Funcia, César; Oliveira Dantas Leite, M Vilani; Toruño Fonseca, Ivania M; Espinosa Nieto, Miguel; Espuelas India, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Most methods for the analysis of haloacetic acids published in recent years are based on ion chromatography with direct injection, employing a gradient elution with potassium hydroxide (KOH). This work reports the exploration of an alternative eluent, a buffer of sodium carbonate/sodium hydrogen carbonate, aimed at the simultaneous analysis of nine haloacetic acids along with bromate, chlorite and chlorate. The alternative of both a less alkaline eluent and a lower temperature of operation may prevent the partial decomposition of some of the haloacetic acids during the analytical process, especially the more vulnerable brominated ones. Gradient elution at temperature of 7 °C yielded the best results, with an acceptable separation of 17 analytes (which includes the major natural inorganic anions) and a good linearity. Precision ranges from 0.3 to 23.4 (% V.C.), and detection limits are within units of μg L⁻¹, except for tribromoacetic acid - somewhat high in comparison with those of the official methods. Nonetheless, with the basic instrumentation setup herein described, this method may be suitable for monitoring when the drinking water treatments are to be optimized. This is especially interesting for small communities or for developing/developed countries in which regulations on disinfection by-products others than trihalomethanes are being addressed.

  5. Microbiological and organoleptic characteristics of beef trim and ground beef treated with acetic acid, lactic acid, acidified sodium chlorite, or sterile water in a simulated commercial processing environment to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Harris, D; Brashears, M M; Garmyn, A J; Brooks, J C; Miller, M F

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the effectiveness of acetic and lactic acids (2% and 5%), acidified sodium chlorite (1000ppm), and sterile water in reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in inoculated beef trim in a simulated processing environment. Samples were collected to assess microbial characteristics at three processing points. Results from this study indicate that all treatments, including sterile water, reduced pathogen concentrations (P<0.05) of both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in ground beef up to 0.5 and 0.6 log by 24h, respectively. In some cases, there were no significant differences between the antimicrobial treatments and the sterile water using this application method. Triangle sensory test results of non-inoculated beef indicated there were no differences (P<0.05) in the means of correct responses between controls or antimicrobial treatments at 6 or 24h. While interventions are important for beef trim, use of the interventions must be validated under industry conditions to ensure proper effectiveness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  7. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-07

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  8. Performance Appraisal for Matrix Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, M. R.; Sproull, J. Ruth

    1985-01-01

    A matrix management system designed for use by a highly technical nuclear weapons research and development facility to improve productivity and flexibility by the use of multiple authority, responsibility, and accountability relationships is described. (MSE)

  9. Stochastic determination of matrix determinants.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Sebastian; Ensslin, Torsten A

    2015-07-01

    Matrix determinants play an important role in data analysis, in particular when Gaussian processes are involved. Due to currently exploding data volumes, linear operations-matrices-acting on the data are often not accessible directly but are only represented indirectly in form of a computer routine. Such a routine implements the transformation a data vector undergoes under matrix multiplication. While efficient probing routines to estimate a matrix's diagonal or trace, based solely on such computationally affordable matrix-vector multiplications, are well known and frequently used in signal inference, there is no stochastic estimate for its determinant. We introduce a probing method for the logarithm of a determinant of a linear operator. Our method rests upon a reformulation of the log-determinant by an integral representation and the transformation of the involved terms into stochastic expressions. This stochastic determinant determination enables large-size applications in Bayesian inference, in particular evidence calculations, model comparison, and posterior determination.

  10. Titanium matrix composites: Mechanical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Nicholas, T.

    1997-12-31

    Because of their unique mix of properties and behavior in high-performance applications, Titanium Matrix Composites are presently the focus of special research and development activity. This new book presents a review of current technology on the mechanical behavior of these materials. Each chapter was prepared specifically for this new book by one or more specialists in this subject. This book is divided into the following chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Monotonic Response; (3) Micromechanical Theories for Inelastic Fibrous Composite Materials; (4) Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites; (5) Fatigue Failure Mechanisms in TMCs; (6) Fatigue and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Prediction; (7) Creep Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Titanium Matrix Composites; (8) Fatigue Crack Growth; (9) Notch Strength of Titanium Matrix Composites; and (10) Micromechanical Analysis and Modeling.

  11. Performance Appraisal for Matrix Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, M. R.; Sproull, J. Ruth

    1985-01-01

    A matrix management system designed for use by a highly technical nuclear weapons research and development facility to improve productivity and flexibility by the use of multiple authority, responsibility, and accountability relationships is described. (MSE)

  12. Matrix quantum mechanics from qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Huijse, Liza; Mazenc, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a transverse field Ising model with order N 2 spins interacting via a nonlocal quartic interaction. The model has an O( N, ℤ), hyperoctahedral, symmetry. We show that the large N partition function admits a saddle point in which the symmetry is enhanced to O( N). We further demonstrate that this `matrix saddle' correctly computes large N observables at weak and strong coupling. The matrix saddle undergoes a continuous quantum phase transition at intermediate couplings. At the transition the matrix eigenvalue distribution becomes disconnected. The critical excitations are described by large N matrix quantum mechanics. At the critical point, the low energy excitations are waves propagating in an emergent 1 + 1 dimensional spacetime.

  13. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  14. Algorithmic deformation of matrix factorisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carqueville, Nils; Dowdy, Laura; Recknagel, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Branes and defects in topological Landau-Ginzburg models are described by matrix factorisations. We revisit the problem of deforming them and discuss various deformation methods as well as their relations. We have implemented these algorithms and apply them to several examples. Apart from explicit results in concrete cases, this leads to a novel way to generate new matrix factorisations via nilpotent substitutions, and to criteria whether boundary obstructions can be lifted by bulk deformations.

  15. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-02-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  16. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  17. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.; Gibbs, W. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  18. Universal Keplerian state transition matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A completely general method for computing the Keplerian state transition matrix in terms of Goodyear's universal variables is presented. This includes a new scheme for solving Kepler's problem which is a necessary first step to computing the transition matrix. The Kepler problem is solved in terms of a new independent variable requiring the evaluation of only one transcendental function. Furthermore, this transcendental function may be conveniently evaluated by means of a Gaussian continued fraction.

  19. Recycling of aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Izawa, Norihisa; Kuramasu, Yukio

    1999-03-01

    Separation of matrix metals in composites was tried on alumina short fiber-reinforced aluminum and 6061 alloy composites and SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite for recycling. It is possible to separate molten matrix metals from fibers in the composites using fluxes that are used for melt treatment to remove inclusions. About 50 vol pct of the matrix metals was separated from the alumina short fiber-reinforced composites. The separation ratio of the matrix from the SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite was low and about 20 vol pct. The separation mechanism was discussed thermodynamically using interface free energies. Since the flux/fiber interface energy is smaller than the aluminum/fiber interface energy, the replacement of aluminum with fluxes in composites takes place easily. Gases released by the decomposition of fluxes act an important role in pushing out the molten matrix metal from the composite. The role was confirmed by the great amount cavity formed in the composite after the matrix metal flowed out.

  20. Carbonate fuel cell matrix strengthening

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Haung, C.M.; Johnsen, R.

    1995-12-31

    The present baseline electrolyte matrix is a porous ceramic powder bed impregnated with alkali carbonate electrolyte. The matrix provides both ionic conduction and gas sealing. During fuel cell stack operation, the matrix experiences both mechanical and thermal stresses. Different mechanical characteristics of active and wet seal areas generate stress. Thermal stress is generated by nonuniform temperature distribution and thermal cycling. A carbonate fuel cell generally may experience planned and unplanned thermal cycles between 650 C and room temperature during its 40,000h life. During the cycling, the electrolyte matrix expands and contracts at a different rate from other cell components. Furthermore, the change in electrolyte volume associated with freezing/melting may generate additional thermal stress. Strengthening of the matrix may be beneficial for longer-term stability of the carbonate fuel cell with respect to repeated thermal cycling. Several promising strengtheners with improved chemical and mechanical stabilities were identified. Fibers provide the highest strengthening effect, followed by particulates. Matrix fabrication technique was successfully modified for uniformly incorporating the advanced strengtheners, maintaining the desired aspect ratio. Enhanced gas sealing demonstrated using the advanced matrices.

  1. Matrix-assisted diffusion-ordered spectroscopy: choosing a matrix.

    PubMed

    Gramosa, Nilce V; Ricardo, Nágila M S P; Adams, Ralph W; Morris, Gareth A; Nilsson, Mathias

    2016-06-07

    Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) is an important technique for separating the NMR signals of the components in a mixture, and relies on differences in diffusion coefficient. Standard DOSY experiments therefore struggle when the components of a mixture are of similar size, and hence diffuse at similar rates. Fortunately, the diffusion coefficients of solutes can be manipulated by changing the matrix in which they diffuse, using matrix components that interact differentially with them, a technique known as matrix-assisted DOSY. In the present investigation, we evaluate the performance of a number of new, previously used, and mixed matrices with an informative test mixture: the three positional isomers of dihydroxybenzene. The aim of this work is to present the matrix-assisted DOSY user with information about the potential utility of a set of matrices (and combinations of matrices), including ionic and non-ionic surfactants, complexing agents, polymers, and mixed solvents. A variety of matrices improved the diffusion resolution of the signals of the test system, with the best separation achieved by mixed micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide. The use of mixed matrices offers great potential for the analyst to tailor the matrix to a particular sample under study. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Astrobiology Matrix and the "Drake Matrix" in Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizser, A.; Kereszturi, A.

    2003-01-01

    We organized astrobiology lectures in the Eotvos Lorand University of Sciences and the Polaris Observatory in 2002. We present here the "Drake matrix" for the comparison of the astrobiological potential of different bodies [1], and astrobiology matrix for the visualization of the interdisciplinary connections between different fields of astrobiology. Conclusion: In Hungary it is difficult to integrate astrobiology in the education system but the great advantage is that it can connect different scientific fields and improve the view of students. We would like to get in contact with persons and organizations who already have experience in the education of astrobiology.

  3. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  4. Matrix factorizations and elliptic fibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Harun

    2016-09-01

    I use matrix factorizations to describe branes at simple singularities of elliptic fibrations. Each node of the corresponding Dynkin diagrams of the ADE-type singularities is associated with one indecomposable matrix factorization which can be deformed into one or more factorizations of lower rank. Branes with internal fluxes arise naturally as bound states of the indecomposable factorizations. Describing branes in such a way avoids the need to resolve singularities. This paper looks at gauge group breaking from E8 fibers down to SU (5) fibers due to the relevance of such fibrations for local F-theory GUT models. A purpose of this paper is to understand how the deformations of the singularity are understood in terms of its matrix factorizations. By systematically factorizing the elliptic fiber equation, this paper discusses geometries which are relevant for building semi-realistic local models. In the process it becomes evident that breaking patterns which are identical at the level of the Kodaira type of the fibers can be inequivalent at the level of matrix factorizations. Therefore the matrix factorization picture supplements information which the conventional less detailed descriptions lack.

  5. Noncommutative spaces from matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lei

    Noncommutative (NC) spaces commonly arise as solutions to matrix model equations of motion. They are natural generalizations of the ordinary commutative spacetime. Such spaces may provide insights into physics close to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity becomes relevant. Although there has been much research in the literature, aspects of these NC spaces need further investigation. In this dissertation, we focus on properties of NC spaces in several different contexts. In particular, we study exact NC spaces which result from solutions to matrix model equations of motion. These spaces are associated with finite-dimensional Lie-algebras. More specifically, they are two-dimensional fuzzy spaces that arise from a three-dimensional Yang-Mills type matrix model, four-dimensional tensor-product fuzzy spaces from a tensorial matrix model, and Snyder algebra from a five-dimensional tensorial matrix model. In the first part of this dissertation, we study two-dimensional NC solutions to matrix equations of motion of extended IKKT-type matrix models in three-space-time dimensions. Perturbations around the NC solutions lead to NC field theories living on a two-dimensional space-time. The commutative limit of the solutions are smooth manifolds which can be associated with closed, open and static two-dimensional cosmologies. One particular solution is a Lorentzian fuzzy sphere, which leads to essentially a fuzzy sphere in the Minkowski space-time. In the commutative limit, this solution leads to an induced metric that does not have a fixed signature, and have a non-constant negative scalar curvature, along with singularities at two fixed latitudes. The singularities are absent in the matrix solution which provides a toy model for resolving the singularities of General relativity. We also discussed the two-dimensional fuzzy de Sitter space-time, which has irreducible representations of su(1,1) Lie-algebra in terms of principal, complementary and discrete series. Field

  6. Matrix model approach to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, A.; Lu, Lei; Stern, A.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a systematic search for rotationally invariant cosmological solutions to toy matrix models. These models correspond to the bosonic sector of Lorentzian Ishibashi, Kawai, Kitazawa and Tsuchiya (IKKT)-type matrix models in dimensions d less than ten, specifically d =3 and d =5 . After taking a continuum (or commutative) limit they yield d -1 dimensional Poisson manifolds. The manifolds have a Lorentzian induced metric which can be associated with closed, open, or static space-times. For d =3 , we obtain recursion relations from which it is possible to generate rotationally invariant matrix solutions which yield open universes in the continuum limit. Specific examples of matrix solutions have also been found which are associated with closed and static two-dimensional space-times in the continuum limit. The solutions provide for a resolution of cosmological singularities, at least within the context of the toy matrix models. The commutative limit reveals other desirable features, such as a solution describing a smooth transition from an initial inflation to a noninflationary era. Many of the d =3 solutions have analogues in higher dimensions. The case of d =5 , in particular, has the potential for yielding realistic four-dimensional cosmologies in the continuum limit. We find four-dimensional de Sitter d S4 or anti-de Sitter AdS4 solutions when a totally antisymmetric term is included in the matrix action. A nontrivial Poisson structure is attached to these manifolds which represents the lowest order effect of noncommutativity. For the case of AdS4 , we find one particular limit where the lowest order noncommutativity vanishes at the boundary, but not in the interior.

  7. Shrinkage estimation of the realized relationship matrix

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The additive relationship matrix plays an important role in mixed model prediction of breeding values. For genotype matrix X (loci in columns), the product XX' is widely used as a realized relationship matrix, but the scaling of this matrix is ambiguous. Our first objective was to derive a proper ...

  8. Validation of lactic acid bacteria, lactic acid, and acidified sodium chlorite as decontaminating interventions to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in mechanically tenderized and brine-enhanced (nonintact) beef at the purveyor.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Alejandro; Brooks, J Chance; Miller, Markus F; Collins, Jesse A; Loneragan, Guy H; Brashears, Mindy M

    2010-12-01

    After three different outbreaks were linked to the consumption of nonintact meat products contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service published notice requiring establishments producing mechanically tenderized and moisture-enhanced beef products to reassess their respective hazard analysis and critical control point systems, due to potential risk to the consumers. The objective of this study was to validate the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), acidified sodium chlorite (ASC), and lactic acid (LA) sprays when applied under a simulated purveyor setting as effective interventions to control and reduce E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 in inoculated U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Choice strip loins (longissimus lumborum muscles) pieces intended for either mechanical blade tenderization or injection enhancement with a brine solution after an aging period of 14 or 21 days at 4.4°C under vacuum. After the mechanical process, translocation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 from the surface into the internal muscles occurred at levels between 1.00 and 5.72 log CFU/g, compared with controls. LAB and LA reduced internal E. coli O157:H7 loads up to 3.0 log, while ASC reduced the pathogen 1.4 to 2.3 log more than the control (P < 0.05), respectively. Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 was also reduced internally 1.3 to 2.8, 1.0 to 2.3, and 1.4 to 1.8 log after application of LAB, LA, and ASC, respectively. The application of antimicrobials by purveyors prior to mechanical tenderization or enhancement of steaks should increase the safety of these types of products.

  9. Information & Technology Literacy Standards Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Calvin J.; Lohr, Neah J.; Klein, Jim; Sorensen, Richard J.

    Intended to help library media specialists, technology educators, and curriculum planning teams identify where specific information and technology competencies might best fit into the assessed content areas of the curriculum, this document presents a matrix that identifies the correlation between Wisconsin's Information and Technology Literacy…

  10. The Lucas p-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhapatanakul, Kantaphon

    2015-11-01

    In this note, we study the Fibonacci and Lucas p-numbers. We introduce the Lucas p-matrix and companion matrices for the sums of the Fibonacci and Lucas p-numbers to derive some interesting identities of the Fibonacci and Lucas p-numbers.

  11. The Enrollment Analysis Matrix Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Mark

    The underlying assumptions and the structure of the enrollment analysis matrix (EAM) concept are discussed. EAM is a component of the Strategic Planning Project of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems. EAM relates changes in the population of potential students external to the institution to the impacts that might result…

  12. Extracellular matrix and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Maquart, F X; Monboisse, J C

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular matrix has been known for a long time as an architectural support for the tissues. Many recent data, however, have shown that extracellular matrix macromolecules (collagens, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and connective tissue glycoproteins) are able to regulate many important cell functions, such as proliferation, migration, protein synthesis or degradation, apoptosis, etc., making them able to play an important role in the wound repair process. Not only the intact macromolecules but some of their specific domains, that we called "Matrikines", are also able to regulate many cell activities. In this article, we will summarize main findings showing the effects of extracellular matrix macromolecules and matrikines on connective tissue and epithelial cells, particularly in skin, and their potential implication in the wound healing process. These examples show that extracellular matrix macromolecules or some of their specific domains may play a major role in wound healing. Better knowledge of these interactions may suggest new therapeutic targets in wound healing defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [Matrix Support: a bibliographical study].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Alexandra; Avellar, Luziane Zacché

    2014-09-01

    This article presents a bibliographical review of matrix support in mental health. A search was conducted in the Virtual Health Library and the LILACS, SciELO and Google Scholar databases using the key words: "matrix support in mental health." Fourteen articles were located with the desired characteristics, which indicates that only a restricted number of publications are in circulation. The articles were analyzed with respect to their structural and methodological aspects, which revealed the absolute predominance of the use of qualitative methods and health professionals as the target research population. The same articles were then analyzed for their theoretical discussions. Among other issues, the importance of matrix support to enhance the primary health care teams provided to people suffering from psychic distress is highlighted. However, there is still considerable confusion regarding the proposal of the matrix support and shared responsibilities between teams of reference and mental health professionals, which emphasizes the need for training of these professionals, as well as better coordination and organization of the mental health care network.

  14. Matrix Algorithms in Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    low rank perturbations with applications, SIAM J. MATRIX ANAL. APPL. 9, 40-58 (1988). [2] (with P . Arbenz and W. Gander), Restricted rank...key idea is to approximate the secular equation by an integral and then bound the integral using the ideas of Gauss- Radau integration. The Lanczos

  15. Matrix Treatment of Ray Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quon, W. Steve

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method to combine two learning experiences--optical physics and matrix mathematics--in a straightforward laboratory experiment that allows engineering/physics students to integrate a variety of learning insights and technical skills, including using lasers, studying refraction through thin lenses, applying concepts of matrix…

  16. Matrix Treatment of Ray Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quon, W. Steve

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method to combine two learning experiences--optical physics and matrix mathematics--in a straightforward laboratory experiment that allows engineering/physics students to integrate a variety of learning insights and technical skills, including using lasers, studying refraction through thin lenses, applying concepts of matrix…

  17. Integrability and generalized monodromy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Lhallabi, T.; Moujib, A.

    2007-09-15

    We construct the generalized monodromy matrix M-circumflex({omega}) of two-dimensional string effective action by introducing the T-duality group properties. The integrability conditions with general solutions depending on spectral parameter are given. This construction is investigated for the exactly solvable Wess, Zumino, Novikov, and Witten model in pp-wave limit when B=0.

  18. Metal Matrix Composites Directionally Solidified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Alicia Esther; Schvezov, Carlos Enrique

    The present work is focus on studying the dendritic solidification of metal matrix composites, MMCs, (using zinc-aluminum, ZA, alloys as matrix and the addition of SiC and Al2O3 particles). The compounds were obtained by as-cast solidification, under continuous stirring and in a second stage were directionally solidified in order to obtain different dendritic growth (columnar, equiaxed and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET)). The results in MMCs were compared with those obtained in directional solidification of ZA alloys, primarily with regard to structural parameters. The size and evolution of microstructure, according to the size of the MMCs particles and the variation of the thermal parameters was analyzing. In general it was found that the size of the microstructure (secondary dendritic spacing) decreases with the increase of particles in the matrix. When cooling rate increases, particle size decreases, and a higher cooling rate causes finer and more homogeneous dendrites Also, the segregation which was found in the matrix of the composites was significantly less than in the case of ZA alloys.

  19. q-Virasoro constraints in matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelin, Anton; Zabzine, Maxim

    2017-03-01

    The Virasoro constraints play the important role in the study of matrix models and in understanding of the relation between matrix models and CFTs. Recently the localization calculations in supersymmetric gauge theories produced new families of matrix models and we have very limited knowledge about these matrix models. We concentrate on elliptic generalization of hermitian matrix model which corresponds to calculation of partition function on S 3 × S 1 for vector multiplet. We derive the q-Virasoro constraints for this matrix model. We also observe some interesting algebraic properties of the q-Virasoro algebra.

  20. High temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on high performance aircraft the need for lightweight, thermal/oxidatively stable materials is growing. Because of their ease of fabrication, high specific strength, and ability to be tailored chemically to produce a variety of mechanical and physical properties, polymers and polymer matrix composites present themselves as attractive materials for a number of aeropropulsion applications. In the early 1970s researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed a highly processable, thermally stable (600 F) polyimide, PMR-15. Since that time, PMR-15 has become commercially available and has found use in military aircraft, in particular, the F-404 engine for the Navy's F/A-18 strike fighter. The NASA Lewis'contributions to high temperature polymer matrix composite research will be discussed as well as current and future directions.

  1. Matrix remodeling during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nathalie; Behonick, Danielle J; Werb, Zena

    2004-02-01

    Endochondral ossification, the process by which most of the skeleton is formed, is a powerful system for studying various aspects of the biological response to degraded extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, the dependence of endochondral ossification upon neovascularization and continuous ECM remodeling provides a good model for studying the role of the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) not only as simple effectors of ECM degradation but also as regulators of active signal-inducers for the initiation of endochondral ossification. The daunting task of elucidating their specific role during endochondral ossification has been facilitated by the development of mice deficient for various members of this family. Here, we discuss the ECM and its remodeling as one level of molecular regulation for the process of endochondral ossification, with special attention to the MMPs.

  2. Scrambling with matrix black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas; Sahakian, Vatche

    2013-08-01

    If black holes are not to be dreaded sinks of information but rather fully described by unitary evolution, they must scramble in-falling data and eventually leak it through Hawking radiation. Sekino and Susskind have conjectured that black holes are fast scramblers; they generate entanglement at a remarkably efficient rate, with the characteristic time scaling logarithmically with the entropy. In this work, we focus on Matrix theory—M-theory in the light-cone frame—and directly probe the conjecture. We develop a concrete test bed for quantum gravity using the fermionic variables of Matrix theory and show that the problem becomes that of chains of qubits with an intricate network of interactions. We demonstrate that the black hole system evolves much like a Brownian quantum circuit, with strong indications that it is indeed a fast scrambler. We also analyze the Berenstein-Maldacena-Nastase model and reach the same tentative conclusion.

  3. Octonions in random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Peter J.

    2017-04-01

    The octonions are one of the four normed division algebras, together with the real, complex and quaternion number systems. The latter three hold a primary place in random matrix theory, where in applications to quantum physics they are determined as the entries of ensembles of Hermitian random matrices by symmetry considerations. Only for N=2 is there an existing analytic theory of Hermitian random matrices with octonion entries. We use a Jordan algebra viewpoint to provide an analytic theory for N=3. We then proceed to consider the matrix structure X†X, when X has random octonion entries. Analytic results are obtained from N=2, but are observed to break down in the 3×3 case.

  4. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  5. Vibrational Density Matrix Renormalization Group.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Alberto; Stein, Christopher J; Barone, Vincenzo; Reiher, Markus

    2017-08-08

    Variational approaches for the calculation of vibrational wave functions and energies are a natural route to obtain highly accurate results with controllable errors. Here, we demonstrate how the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) can be exploited to optimize vibrational wave functions (vDMRG) expressed as matrix product states. We study the convergence of these calculations with respect to the size of the local basis of each mode, the number of renormalized block states, and the number of DMRG sweeps required. We demonstrate the high accuracy achieved by vDMRG for small molecules that were intensively studied in the literature. We then proceed to show that the complete fingerprint region of the sarcosyn-glycin dipeptide can be calculated with vDMRG.

  6. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  7. Tough high performance composite matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a semi-interpentrating polymer network which includes a high performance thermosetting polyimide having a nadic end group acting as a crosslinking site and a high performance linear thermoplastic polyimide. Provided is an improved high temperature matrix resin which is capable of performing in the 200 to 300 C range. This resin has significantly improved toughness and microcracking resistance, excellent processability, mechanical performance, and moisture and solvent resistances.

  8. Myocardial structure and matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Aggeli, C; Pietri, P; Felekos, I; Rautopoulos, L; Toutouzas, K; Tsiamis, E; Stefanadis, C

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes which enhance proteolysis of extracellular matrix proteins. The pathophysiologic and prognostic role of MMPs has been demonstrated in numerous studies. The present review covers a wide a range of topics with regards to MMPs structural and functional properties, as well as their role in myocardial remodeling in several cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the clinical and therapeutic implications from their assessment are highlighted.

  9. Matrix computations on mesh arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the systematic derivation of mesh arrays for matrix computations, in particular realizing the algorithm-specific arrays and mapping algorithms onto class-specific arrays. A data-dependency graph-based transformational method is proposed in a design frame work consisting of two stages, namely algorithm regularization and derivation of arrays. The first stage derives the fully-parallel data-dependency graph (FPG) of an algorithm and transforms this graph into a three-dimensional one with unidirectional nearest-neighbor dependencies (a multi-mesh graph MMG). The second stage transforms the MMG into a two-dimensional G-graph, which is realized as an algorithm-specific array or mapped onto a class-specific array. This stage allows the incorporation of implementation restrictions and the evaluation of tradeoffs in properties of cells, as well as the derivation of arrays for fixed-size data and partitioned problems, while performing optimization of specific performance/cost measures. The proposed method is formalized by presenting a sufficient set of transformations and demonstrating the equivalence of graphs obtained from those transformations. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the MMG representation is always possible, due to the characteristics of the operators. The method has been applied to a collection of matrix algorithms, including matrix multiplication, convolution, matrix decompositions, transitive closure, the Faddeev algorithm, and BBA{sup {minus}1}. The examples show that, in addition to the features listed earlier, this method is easy to apply. Moreover, the method is compared with other techniques, concluding that it is advantageous because it meets evaluation criteria and produces more efficient arrays.

  10. MALDI Matrix Research for Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Matrices are necessary materials for ionizing analytes in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The choice of a matrix appropriate for each analyte controls the analyses. Thus, in some cases, development or improvement of matrices can become a tool for solving problems. This paper reviews MALDI matrix research that the author has conducted in the recent decade. It describes glycopeptide, carbohydrate, or phosphopeptide analyses using 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB), 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium (TMG) salts of p-coumaric acid (CA) (G3CA), 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ)/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) (3-AQ/CHCA) or 3-AQ/CA and gengeral peptide, peptide containing disulfide bonds or hydrophobic peptide analyses using butylamine salt of CHCA (CHCAB), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN), octyl 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (alkylated dihydroxybenzoate, ADHB), or 1-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)octan-1-one (alkylated trihydroxyacetophenone, ATHAP). PMID:26819908

  11. Integrable matrix theory: Level statistics.

    PubMed

    Scaramazza, Jasen A; Shastry, B Sriram; Yuzbashyan, Emil A

    2016-09-01

    We study level statistics in ensembles of integrable N×N matrices linear in a real parameter x. The matrix H(x) is considered integrable if it has a prescribed number n>1 of linearly independent commuting partners H^{i}(x) (integrals of motion) [H(x),H^{i}(x)]=0, [H^{i}(x),H^{j}(x)]=0, for all x. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. E 93, 052114 (2016)2470-004510.1103/PhysRevE.93.052114], we developed a basis-independent construction of H(x) for any n from which we derived the probability density function, thereby determining how to choose a typical integrable matrix from the ensemble. Here, we find that typical integrable matrices have Poisson statistics in the N→∞ limit provided n scales at least as logN; otherwise, they exhibit level repulsion. Exceptions to the Poisson case occur at isolated coupling values x=x_{0} or when correlations are introduced between typically independent matrix parameters. However, level statistics cross over to Poisson at O(N^{-0.5}) deviations from these exceptions, indicating that non-Poissonian statistics characterize only subsets of measure zero in the parameter space. Furthermore, we present strong numerical evidence that ensembles of integrable matrices are stationary and ergodic with respect to nearest-neighbor level statistics.

  12. A randomized controlled phase IIb wound healing trial of cutaneous leishmaniasis ulcers with 0.045% pharmaceutical chlorite (DAC N-055) with and without bipolar high frequency electro-cauterization versus intralesional antimony in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Hans-Christian; Ahmadi, Faridullah; Schleicher, Ulrike; Sauerborn, Rainer; Bermejo, Justo Lorenzo; Amirih, Mohammed Latif; Sakhayee, Ibrahim; Bogdan, Christian; Stahl, Kurt-Wilhelm

    2014-11-25

    A previously published proof of principle phase IIa trial with 113 patients from Kabul showed that bipolar high-frequency (HF) electro-cauterization (EC) of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) ulcers and subsequent moist wound treatment (MWT) closed 85% of all Leishmania (L.) tropica lesions within 60 days. A three-armed phase IIb, randomized and controlled clinical trial was performed in Mazar-e-Sharif. L. tropica- or L. major-infected CL patients received intradermal sodium stibogluconate (SSG) (Group I); HF-EC followed by MWT with 0.045% DAC N-055 (Group II); or MWT with 0.045% DAC N-055 in basic crème alone (Group III). The primary outcome was complete epithelialisation before day 75 after treatment start. 87 patients enrolled in the trial were randomized into group I (n = 24), II (n = 32) and III (n = 31). The per-protocol analysis of 69 (79%) patients revealed complete epithelialisation before day 75 in 15 (of 23; 65%) patients of Group I, in 23 (of 23; 100%) patients of Group II, and in 20 (of 23; 87%) patients of Group III (p = 0.004, Fisher's Exact Test). In the per-protocol analysis, wound closure times were significantly different between all regimens in a pair-wise comparison (p = 0.000039, Log-Rank (Mantel-Cox) test). In the intention-to-treat analysis wound survival times in Group II were significantly different from those in Group I (p = 0.000040, Log-Rank (Mantel-Cox) test). Re-ulcerations occurred in four (17%), three (13%) and seven (30%) patients of Group I, II or III, respectively (p = 0.312, Pearson Chi-Square Test). Treatment of CL ulcers with bipolar HF-EC followed by MWT with 0.045% DAC N-055 or with DAC N-055 alone showed shorter wound closure times than with the standard SSG therapy. The results merit further exploration in larger trials in the light of our current knowledge of in vitro and in vivo activities of chlorite. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT00996463. Registered: 15th October 2009.

  13. Fast polar decomposition of an arbitrary matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The polar decomposition of an m x n matrix A of full rank, where m is greater than or equal to n, can be computed using a quadratically convergent algorithm. The algorithm is based on a Newton iteration involving a matrix inverse. With the use of a preliminary complete orthogonal decomposition the algorithm can be extended to arbitrary A. How to use the algorithm to compute the positive semi-definite square root of a Hermitian positive semi-definite matrix is described. A hybrid algorithm which adaptively switches from the matrix inversion based iteration to a matrix multiplication based iteration due to Kovarik, and to Bjorck and Bowie is formulated. The decision when to switch is made using a condition estimator. This matrix multiplication rich algorithm is shown to be more efficient on machines for which matrix multiplication can be executed 1.5 times faster than matrix inversion.

  14. Metal-matrix composites: Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Applications of metal matrix composites for air frames and jet engine components are discussed. The current state of the art in primary and secondary fabrication is presented. The present and projected costs were analyzed to determine the cost effectiveness of metal matrix composites. The various types of metal matrix composites and their characteristics are described.

  15. Teaching Tip: When a Matrix and Its Inverse Are Stochastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, J.; Rhee, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic matrix is a square matrix with nonnegative entries and row sums 1. The simplest example is a permutation matrix, whose rows permute the rows of an identity matrix. A permutation matrix and its inverse are both stochastic. We prove the converse, that is, if a matrix and its inverse are both stochastic, then it is a permutation matrix.

  16. Teaching Tip: When a Matrix and Its Inverse Are Stochastic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, J.; Rhee, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    A stochastic matrix is a square matrix with nonnegative entries and row sums 1. The simplest example is a permutation matrix, whose rows permute the rows of an identity matrix. A permutation matrix and its inverse are both stochastic. We prove the converse, that is, if a matrix and its inverse are both stochastic, then it is a permutation matrix.

  17. Petrology and structure of greenstone blocks encased in mud-matrix melange of the Franciscan complex near San Simeon, California

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, R.K.; Cloos, M.

    1985-01-01

    Greenstones comprise about 20% of all mappable (>1 m) blocks encased in blueschist-block-bearing mud-matrix melange exposed in a 10 km-length of sea cliffs near San Simeon. Field and petrographic analysis of 25 blocks show they vary from finely crystalline (<1 mm) locally porphyritic or amygdaloidal, volcanics to coarsely crystalline (1 to 5 mm) diabase. Some are in contact with bedded chert and two have relict pillows. However, most blocks are intensely deformed. Pinch-and-swell and boundinage are recognized on scales from cm to about 10 m. Distortion was accommodated by cataclasis to an aggregate of pieces from mm to m across. Generally, m-sized blocks are pervasively cataclastic whereas larger blocks are crosscut by cataclastic zones that emanate from pervasively cataclastic margins or necked regions of boudins. Discontinuous, cm-thick veins and cavities that are lined by quartz and clacite and rarely, laumontite, prehnite and aragonite locally crosscut all other structures. Relict igneous textures show the primary minerals are plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Abundant secondary minerals, particularly in cataclastic zones, are albite, chlorite, pumpellyite (some have high Al), and calcite. The metamorphic parageneses indicate relatively minor greenschist-facies, sea-floor-type alterations under static conditions followed by lower-temperature alterations synchronous with cataclasis and the development of boudinage. If the blocks are fragments of disrupted ophiolites, only the uppermost section of the suite are present within the mud-matrix melange near San Simeon. The simplest explanation for their crystallization, metamorphism and incorporation into the melange is that they are fragments of seamounts dismembered during subduction.

  18. Regenerator matrix physical property data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Among several cellular ceramic structures manufactured by various suppliers for regenerator application in a gas turbine engine, three have the best potential for achieving durability and performance objectives for use in gas turbines, Stirling engines, and waste heat recovery systems: (1) an aluminum-silicate sinusoidal flow passage made from a corrugated wate paper process; (2) an extruded isosceles triangle flow passage; and (3) a second generation matrix incorporating a square flow passage formed by an embossing process. Key physical and thermal property data for these configurations presented include: heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics, compressive strength, tensile strength and elasticity, thermal expansion characteristics, chanical attack, and thermal stability.

  19. Neonatal disorders of germinal matrix.

    PubMed

    Raets, M M A; Dudink, J; Govaert, P

    2015-11-01

    The germinal matrix (GM) is a richly vascularized, transient layer near the ventricles. It produces neurons and glial cells, and is present in the foetal brain between 8 and 36 weeks of gestation. At 25 weeks, it reaches its maximum volume and subsequently withers. The GM is vulnerable to haemorrhage in preterm infants. This selective vulnerability is explained by limited astrocyte end-feet coverage of microvessels, reduced expression of fibronectin and immature tight junctions. Focal lesions in the neonatal period include haemorrhage, germinolysis and stroke. Such lesions in transient layers interrupt normal brain maturation and induce neurodevelopmental sequelae.

  20. Diffusive dynamics on paper matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Kar, Shantimoy; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-11-01

    Writing with ink on a paper and the rapid diagnostics of diseases using paper cartridge, despite their remarkable diversities from application perspective, both involve the motion of a liquid from a source on a porous hydrophilic substrate. Here we bring out a generalization in the pertinent dynamics by appealing to the concerned ensemble-averaged transport with reference to the underlying molecular picture. Our results reveal that notwithstanding the associated complexities and diversities, the resultant liquid transport characteristics on a paper matrix, in a wide variety of applications, resemble universal diffusive dynamics. Agreement with experimental results from diversified applications is generic and validates our unified theory.

  1. Matrix management for aerospace 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The martix management approach to program management is an organized effort for attaining program objectives by defining and structuring all elements so as to form a single system whose parts are united by interaction. The objective of the systems approach is uncompromisingly complete coverage of the program management endeavor. Starting with an analysis of the functions necessary to carry out a given program, a model must be defined; a matrix of responsibility assignment must be prepared; and each operational process must be examined to establish how it is to be carried out and how it relates to all other processes.

  2. Random Matrix Theory and Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenow, Bernd

    2000-03-01

    Random Matrix Theory (RMT) [1] is used in many branches of physics as a ``zero information hypothesis''. It describes generic behavior of different classes of systems, while deviations from its universal predictions allow to identify system specific properties. We use methods of RMT to analyze the cross-correlation matrix C of stock price changes [2] of the largest 1000 US companies. In addition to its scientific interest, the study of correlations between the returns of different stocks is also of practical relevance in quantifying the risk of a given stock portfolio. We find [3,4] that the statistics of most of the eigenvalues of the spectrum of C agree with the predictions of RMT, while there are deviations for some of the largest eigenvalues. We interpret these deviations as a system specific property, e.g. containing genuine information about correlations in the stock market. We demonstrate that C shares universal properties with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. Furthermore, we analyze the eigenvectors of C through their inverse participation ratio and find eigenvectors with large ratios at both edges of the eigenvalue spectrum - a situation reminiscent of localization theory results. This work was done in collaboration with V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E Stanley and is related to recent work of Laloux et al.. 1. T. Guhr, A. Müller Groeling, and H.A. Weidenmüller, ``Random Matrix Theories in Quantum Physics: Common Concepts'', Phys. Rep. 299, 190 (1998). 2. See, e.g. R.N. Mantegna and H.E. Stanley, Econophysics: Correlations and Complexity in Finance (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1999). 3. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Universal and Nonuniversal Properties of Cross Correlations in Financial Time Series'', Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1471 (1999). 4. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Random Matrix Theory

  3. Random matrix theory within superstatistics.

    PubMed

    Abul-Magd, A Y

    2005-12-01

    We propose a generalization of the random matrix theory following the basic prescription of the recently suggested concept of superstatistics. Spectral characteristics of systems with mixed regular-chaotic dynamics are expressed as weighted averages of the corresponding quantities in the standard theory assuming that the mean level spacing itself is a stochastic variable. We illustrate the method by calculating the level density, the nearest-neighbor-spacing distributions, and the two-level correlation functions for systems in transition from order to chaos. The calculated spacing distribution fits the resonance statistics of random binary networks obtained in a recent numerical experiment.

  4. Fiber-matrix interface failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabenberg, Lew; Marcus, Harris L.; Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Brown, Lloyd D.

    1989-01-01

    Interface fractures of aluminum-graphite composites under transverse loading are expected to occur within the graphite fibers, but very near the interface. Residual stresses in aluminum, reinforced with the new high modulus pitch-based fibers, are much lower than would be expected based on simple elasticity calculations. The excess stress may be relaxed by shearing internal to the fibers or at the interface rather than by plastic flow of the matrix. The internal shearing also occurs during repeated thermal cycling of these composites; the fibers are repeatedly intruded, then extruded, during repeated temperature excursions.

  5. The q-Laguerre matrix polynomials.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The Laguerre polynomials have been extended to Laguerre matrix polynomials by means of studying certain second-order matrix differential equation. In this paper, certain second-order matrix q-difference equation is investigated and solved. Its solution gives a generalized of the q-Laguerre polynomials in matrix variable. Four generating functions of this matrix polynomials are investigated. Two slightly different explicit forms are introduced. Three-term recurrence relation, Rodrigues-type formula and the q-orthogonality property are given.

  6. Matrix management in hospitals: testing theories of matrix structure and development.

    PubMed

    Burns, L R

    1989-09-01

    A study of 315 hospitals with matrix management programs was used to test several hypotheses concerning matrix management advanced by earlier theorists. The study verifies that matrix management involves several distinctive elements that can be scaled to form increasingly complex types of lateral coordinative devices. The scalability of these elements is evident only cross-sectionally. The results show that matrix complexity is not an outcome of program age, nor does matrix complexity at the time of implementation appear to influence program survival. Matrix complexity, finally, is not determined by the organization's task diversity and uncertainty. The results suggest several modifications in prevailing theories of matrix organization.

  7. Matrix stiffening promotes a tumor vasculature phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Mason, Brooke N.; Lollis, Emmanuel Macklin; Mazzola, Michael; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Somasegar, Sahana; Califano, Joseph P.; Montague, Christine; LaValley, Danielle J.; Huynh, John; Mencia-Trinchant, Nuria; Negrón Abril, Yashira L.; Hassane, Duane C.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Weiss, Robert S.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor microvasculature tends to be malformed, more permeable, and more tortuous than vessels in healthy tissue, effects that have been largely attributed to up-regulated VEGF expression. However, tumor tissue tends to stiffen during solid tumor progression, and tissue stiffness is known to alter cell behaviors including proliferation, migration, and cell–cell adhesion, which are all requisite for angiogenesis. Using in vitro, in vivo, and ex ovo models, we investigated the effects of matrix stiffness on vessel growth and integrity during angiogenesis. Our data indicate that angiogenic outgrowth, invasion, and neovessel branching increase with matrix cross-linking. These effects are caused by increased matrix stiffness independent of matrix density, because increased matrix density results in decreased angiogenesis. Notably, matrix stiffness up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and inhibiting MMPs significantly reduces angiogenic outgrowth in stiffer cross-linked gels. To investigate the functional significance of altered endothelial cell behavior in response to matrix stiffness, we measured endothelial cell barrier function on substrates mimicking the stiffness of healthy and tumor tissue. Our data indicate that barrier function is impaired and the localization of vascular endothelial cadherin is altered as function of matrix stiffness. These results demonstrate that matrix stiffness, separately from matrix density, can alter vascular growth and integrity, mimicking the changes that exist in tumor vasculature. These data suggest that therapeutically targeting tumor stiffness or the endothelial cell response to tumor stiffening may help restore vessel structure, minimize metastasis, and aid in drug delivery. PMID:28034921

  8. Bone regeneration using a synthetic matrix containing enamel matrix derivate.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David; Weber, Franz E; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Feloutzis, Andreas; Jung, Ronald E

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to test whether the delivery of enamel matrix derivate (EMD) via synthetic polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogels with and without RGD sequences enhances bone formation in vivo. In each of 10 rabbits, four titanium cylinders were placed on the external cortical bones of their calvaria. The following four treatment modalities were randomly allocated: One of the four cylinders was left empty (control), the other three were filled with a combination of PEG matrix with hydroxyapatite/tricalciumphosphate (HA/TCP) granules and EMD in a concentration of 100 μg/ml (test 1) or 500 μg/ml (test 2) or 500 μg/ml and RGD peptide (test 3). After 8 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections were obtained for histological analysis. For statistical analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test was applied (P<0.05). The histomorphometric analysis revealed a statistically larger area fraction of newly formed bone in the EMD 500/RGD group (54.8±14.5%) compared with the control group (28.7±10.3%) and the EMD 500 group (31.2±14.1%) and non-significantly higher area fraction compared with the EMD 100 group (38.2±10.4%). The percentage of mineralized bone showed no statistically significant differences among the four groups. The mean percentage of mineralized bone was 13.6±3.3% in the control group, 14.2±5.8% in the EMD 100 group, 11.69±5.9% in the EMD 500 group and 15.66±5.2% in the EMD 500/RGD group. No statistically significant difference regarding the bone-to-graft contact between the EMD 100 group (23±15.7%), the EMD 500 group (22.2±14.6%) and the EMD 500/RGD group (21.6±8.8%) was observed. The combination of a PEG matrix containing EMD with HA/TCP granules had no effect on the formation of mineralized bone tissue in rabbit calvaria. The addition of RGD peptide to the PEG/EMD 500 combination increased the area fraction of newly formed bone compared with the other treatment groups. Further studies are indicated to study a possible

  9. Link prediction via matrix completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech, Ratha; Hao, Dong; Pan, Liming; Cheng, Hong; Zhou, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Inspired by the practical importance of social networks, economic networks, biological networks and so on, studies on large and complex networks have attracted a surge of attention in the recent years. Link prediction is a fundamental issue to understand the mechanisms by which new links are added to the networks. We introduce the method of robust principal component analysis (robust PCA) into link prediction, and estimate the missing entries of the adjacency matrix. On the one hand, our algorithm is based on the sparse and low-rank property of the matrix, while, on the other hand, it also performs very well when the network is dense. This is because a relatively dense real network is also sparse in comparison to the complete graph. According to extensive experiments on real networks from disparate fields, when the target network is connected and sufficiently dense, whether it is weighted or unweighted, our method is demonstrated to be very effective and with prediction accuracy being considerably improved compared to many state-of-the-art algorithms.

  10. Matrix metalloproteinases in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hopps, E; Caimi, G

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is commonly accompanied by an elevated cardiovascular risk with high morbidity and mortality. The alterations of the arterial vasculature begin with endothelial dysfunction and lead to micro- and macrovascular complications. The remodeling of the endothelial basal membrane, that promotes erosion and thrombosis, has a multifactorial pathogenesis that includes leukocyte activation, increased oxidative stress and also an altered matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression. MMPs are endopeptidases which degrade extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, gelatins, fibronectin and laminin. They can be secreted by several cells within the vascular wall, but macrophages are determinant in the atherosclerotic plaques. Their activity is regulated by tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMPs) and also by other molecules, such as plasmin. MMPs could be implicated in plaque instability predisposing to vascular complications. It has been demonstrated that an impaired MMP or TIMP expression is associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality. A large number of studies evaluated MMPs pattern in obesity, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia, all of which define metabolic syndrome according to several Consensus Statement (i.e. IDF, ATP III, AHA). However, few research have been carried out on subjects with metabolic syndrome. The evidences of an improvement in MMP/TIMP ratio with diet, exercise and medical therapy should encourage further investigations with the intent to contrast the atherosclerotic process and to reduce morbidity and mortality of this kind of patients.

  11. Characterization of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Chun, H. J.; Karalekas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed, adapted, and applied to the characterization of a metal matrix composite system, namely, silicon carbide/aluminim (SCS-2/6061 Al), and its constituents. The silicon carbide fiber was characterized by determining its modulus, strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The aluminum matrix was characterized thermomechanically up to 399 C (750 F) at two strain rates. The unidirectional SiC/Al composite was characterized mechanically under longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear loading up to 399 C (750 F). Isothermal and non-isothermal creep behavior was also measured. The applicability of a proposed set of multifactor thermoviscoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations and a computer code was investigated. Agreement between predictions and experimental results was shown in a few cases. The elastoplastic thermomechanical behavior of the composite was also described by a number of new analytical models developed or adapted for the material system studied. These models include the rule of mixtures, composite cylinder model with various thermoelastoplastic analyses and a model based on average field theory. In most cases satisfactory agreement was demonstrated between analytical predictions and experimental results for the cases of stress-strain behavior and thermal deformation behavior at different temperatures. In addition, some models yielded detailed three-dimensional stress distributions in the constituents within the composite.

  12. Extracellular Matrix and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arriazu, Elena; Ruiz de Galarreta, Marina; Cubero, Francisco Javier; Varela-Rey, Marta; Pérez de Obanos, María Pilar; Leung, Tung Ming; Lopategi, Aritz; Benedicto, Aitor; Abraham-Enachescu, Ioana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic microenvironment that undergoes continuous remodeling, particularly during injury and wound healing. Chronic liver injury of many different etiologies such as viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, drug-induced liver injury, obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic disorders, and autoimmune disease is characterized by excessive deposition of ECM proteins in response to persistent liver damage. Critical Issues: This review describes the main collagenous and noncollagenous components from the ECM that play a significant role in pathological matrix deposition during liver disease. We define how increased myofibroblasts (MF) from different origins are at the forefront of liver fibrosis and how liver cell-specific regulation of the complex scarring process occurs. Recent Advances: Particular attention is paid to the role of cytokines, growth factors, reactive oxygen species, and newly identified matricellular proteins in the regulation of fibrillar type I collagen, a field to which our laboratory has significantly contributed over the years. We compile data from recent literature on the potential mechanisms driving fibrosis resolution such as MF’ apoptosis, senescence, and reversal to quiescence. Future Directions: We conclude with a brief description of how epigenetics, an evolving field, can regulate the behavior of MF and of how new “omics” tools may advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which the fibrogenic response to liver injury occurs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1078–1097. PMID:24219114

  13. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Mark S.; Anselmo, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  14. Automatic Generation of Partitioned Matrix Expressions for Matrix Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabregat-Traver, Diego; Bientinesi, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    We target the automatic generation of formally correct algorithms and routines for linear algebra operations. Given the broad variety of architectures and configurations with which scientists deal, there does not exist one algorithmic variant that is suitable for all scenarios. Therefore, we aim to generate a family of algorithmic variants to attain high-performance for a broad set of scenarios. One of the authors has previously demonstrated that automatic derivation of a family of algorithms is possible when the Partitioned Matrix Expression (PME) of the target operation is available. The PME is a recursive definition that states the relations between submatrices in the input and the output operands. In this paper we describe all the steps involved in the automatic derivation of PMEs, thus making progress towards a fully automated system.

  15. Evaluation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of candidate metal-matrix composite materials for shuttle space radiators mounted to external structure are presented. The evaluation was specifically applicable to considerations of the manufacturing and properties of a potential space radiator. Two candidates, boron/aluminum and graphite/aluminum were obtained or made in various forms and tested in sufficient depth to allow selection of one of the two for future scale-up programs. The effort accomplished on this program verified that aluminum reinforced with boron was within the state-of-the-art in industry and possessed properties usable in the external skin areas available for shuttle radiators where re-entry temperatures will not exceed 800 F. It further demonstrated that graphite/aluminum has an apparently attractive future for space applications but requires extension development prior to scale-up.

  16. Superfund chemical data matrix, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) is a source for factor values and benchmark values applied when evaluating potential National Priorities List (NPL) sites using the Hazard Ranking System. The HRS assigns factor values for toxicity, gas migration potential, gas and ground water mobility, surface water persistence, and bioaccumulation potential based on the physical, chemical, and radiological properties of hazardous substances present at a site. Hazardous substances, as defined for HRS purposes, are CERCLA hazardous substances plus CERCLA pollutants and contaminants. The HRS also assigns extra weight to targets with exposure levels to hazardous substances that are at or above benchmarks. These benchmarks include both risk-based screening concentrations and concentrations specified in regulatory limits for the hazardous substances present at a site for a particular migration pathway.

  17. Applications of matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warp, Richard J.; Godfrey, Devon J.; Dobbins, James T., III

    2000-04-01

    The improved image quality and characteristics of new flat- panel x-ray detectors have renewed interest in advanced algorithms such as tomosynthesis. Digital tomosynthesis is a method of acquiring and reconstructing a three-dimensional data set with limited-angle tube movement. Historically, conventional tomosynthesis reconstruction has suffered contamination of the planes of interest by blurred out-of- plane structures. This paper focuses on a Matrix Inversion Tomosynthesis (MITS) algorithm to remove unwanted blur from adjacent planes. The algorithm uses a set of coupled equations to solve for the blurring function in each reconstructed plane. This paper demonstrates the use of the MITS algorithm in three imaging applications: small animal microscopy, chest radiography, and orthopedics. The results of the MITS reconstruction process demonstrate an improved reduction of blur from out-of-plane structures when compared to conventional tomosynthesis. We conclude that the MITS algorithm holds potential in a variety of applications to improve three-dimensional image reconstruction.

  18. Continuous analogues of matrix factorizations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Alex; Trefethen, Lloyd N.

    2015-01-01

    Analogues of singular value decomposition (SVD), QR, LU and Cholesky factorizations are presented for problems in which the usual discrete matrix is replaced by a ‘quasimatrix’, continuous in one dimension, or a ‘cmatrix’, continuous in both dimensions. Two challenges arise: the generalization of the notions of triangular structure and row and column pivoting to continuous variables (required in all cases except the SVD, and far from obvious), and the convergence of the infinite series that define the cmatrix factorizations. Our generalizations of triangularity and pivoting are based on a new notion of a ‘triangular quasimatrix’. Concerning convergence of the series, we prove theorems asserting convergence provided the functions involved are sufficiently smooth. PMID:25568618

  19. Thermoplastic matrix composite processing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dara, P. H.; Loos, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects the processing parameters pressure, temperature, and time have on the quality of continuous graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites were quantitatively accessed by defining the extent to which intimate contact and bond formation has occurred at successive ply interfaces. Two models are presented predicting the extents to which the ply interfaces have achieved intimate contact and cohesive strength. The models are based on experimental observation of compression molded laminates and neat resin conditions, respectively. Identified as the mechanism explaining the phenomenon by which the plies bond to themselves is the theory of autohesion (or self diffusion). Theoretical predictions from the Reptation Theory between autohesive strength and contact time are used to explain the effects of the processing parameters on the observed experimental strengths. The application of a time-temperature relationship for autohesive strength predictions is evaluated. A viscoelastic compression molding model of a tow was developed to explain the phenomenon by which the prepreg ply interfaces develop intimate contact.

  20. Thermophysical and Electrical Properties of Metal Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    de if necessary and identify by block number) Aluminum matrix composiles, aluminum alloy matrix composites, copper matrix composites, electrical...the various com- posites of aluminum and aluminum alloy mar-tices, copper matrix, lead matrix, magnesium matrix, nickel and nickel alloy matrices...titanium and titanium alloy matrices, tungsten matrix, and zinc matrix. Most of the data are for aluminum DD j JAN 73 1473 EDITION OF I NOV6 S IS

  1. Convex nonnegative matrix factorization with manifold regularization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjun; Choi, Kup-Sze; Wang, Peiliang; Jiang, Yunliang; Wang, Shitong

    2015-03-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been extensively applied in many areas, including computer vision, pattern recognition, text mining, and signal processing. However, nonnegative entries are usually required for the data matrix in NMF, which limits its application. Besides, while the basis and encoding vectors obtained by NMF can represent the original data in low dimension, the representations do not always reflect the intrinsic geometric structure embedded in the data. Motivated by manifold learning and Convex NMF (CNMF), we propose a novel matrix factorization method called Graph Regularized and Convex Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (GCNMF) by introducing a graph regularized term into CNMF. The proposed matrix factorization technique not only inherits the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold structure, but also allows the processing of mixed-sign data matrix. Clustering experiments on nonnegative and mixed-sign real-world data sets are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Eigenvalues properties of terms correspondences matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarchuk, Dmitry; Timofeeva, Galina

    2016-12-01

    Vector model representations of text documents are widely used in the intelligent search. In this approach a collection of documents is represented in the form of the term-document matrix, reflecting the frequency of terms. In the latent semantic analysis the dimension of the vector space is reduced by the singular value decomposition of the term-document matrix. Authors use a matrix of terms correspondences, reflecting the relationship between the terms, to allocate a semantic core and to obtain more simple presentation of the documents. With this approach, reducing the number of terms is based on the orthogonal decomposition of the matrix of terms correspondences. Properties of singular values of the term-document matrix and eigenvalues of the matrix of terms correspondences are studied in the case when documents differ substantially in length.

  3. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Forrest; Carney, Sean; Kiedrowski, Brian; Martin, William

    2014-06-01

    We describe recent experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode fission distribution, the dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode forward and adjoint eigenfunctions of the fission neutron source distribution. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations and to provide basis functions for higher-order perturbation theory. The higher-mode fission sources can be used in MCNP to determine higher-mode forward fluxes and tallies, and work is underway to provide higher-mode adjoint-weighted fluxes and tallies. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. The new fission matrix capabilities provide a significant advance in the state-of-the-art for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  4. Regulation of extracellular matrix biosynthesis by matrix components

    SciTech Connect

    Holderbaum, D.; Ehrhart, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that smooth muscle cells derived from healthy rabbit aortic media synthesize less collagen and fibronectin when grown on culture dishes coated with rabbit plasma fibronectin. In these cultures noncollagen protein synthesis was not affected, suggesting a specific regulatory mechanism. Their current studies expand this observation by examining the ability of proteolytically derived, specific domains of plasma fibronectin to effect decreases in collagen and fibronectin synthesis by cultured arterial smooth muscle. Rabbit plasma fibronectin was digested with bovine ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin by the method of Hahn and Yamada. The resultant proteolytic fragments were separated by their ability to bind to gelatin-agarose. Culture dishes were coated with either (1) cell binding fragment of fibronectin, (2) gelatin binding fragment, (3) intact fibronectin, (4) type I collagen derived from lathyritic rat skin or (5) bovine serum albumin. Preconfluent cultures were labeled with /sup 3/H-Pro for 24 hr. Fibronectin synthesis was determined by immunoprecipitation of /sup 3/H-fibronectin. Collagen synthesis was measured by monitoring /sup 3/H-Hyp formation. Decreased collagen and fibronectin synthesis was evident in cells grown on intact fibronectin, cell binding fragment of fibronectin and type I collagen. Cells plated on gelatin binding fragment synthesized both collagen and fibronectin at levels comparable to cells on albumin coated dishes. They conclude that the regulatory activity of fibronectin on matrix biosynthesis resides on the cell binding domain of the molecule and that type I collagen can exert a similar effect.

  5. Oxytocin prevents cartilage matrix destruction via regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yixin; Wu, Tongyu; Xu, Binbin; Xu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Honggan; Li, Xiyao

    2017-05-06

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix type II Collagen (Col II) induced by proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is an important hallmark of Osteoarthritis (OA). Oxytocin (OT) is a well-known neurohypophysical hormone that is synthesized in the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) of the hypothalamus. In this study, we have found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in human primary chondrocytes, and the expression of which was reduced in chondrocytes from OA patients and in response to TNF-α treatment in a dose dependent manner. Notably, it was shown that TNF-α -induced degradation of Col II was restored by treatment with OT in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, TNF-α treatment (10 ng/mL) highly elevated the expression of MMP-1 and MMP-13 in SW1353 chondrocytes, which were reversed by OT in a dose dependent manner at both gene and protein expression levels. In addition, it was demonstrated that the JAK2/STAT1 pathway was involved in the restoration effects of OT in the degradation of Col II. Lastly, knockdown of OTR abolished the inhibitory effects of OT on the degradation of col II and the induction of MMP-1 and MMP-13 expression, suggesting the involvement of OTR. Our study implied the therapeutic potential of OT for cartilage degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stokes scattering matrix for human skin.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Anak; Stamnes, Snorre; Hamre, Børge; Frette, Oyvind; Stamnes, Knut; Stamnes, Jakob J

    2012-11-01

    We use a layered model of normal human skin based on size distributions of polydisperse spherical particles and their complex refractive indices to compute the Stokes scattering matrix at wavelengths in the visible spectral band. The elements of the Stokes scattering matrix are required in a polarized radiative transfer code for a coupled air-tissue system to compute the polarized reflectance and examine how it is dependent on the vertical structure of the inherent optical properties of skin, including the phase matrix. Thus, the elements of the Stokes scattering matrix can be useful for investigating polarization-dependent light propagation in turbid optical media, such as human skin tissue.

  7. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases in destructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Houghton, A McGarry

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play essential physiologic roles in numerous processes ranging from development to wound repair. Unfortunately, given the broad substrate specificity of the MMP family as a whole, aberrant degradation of extracellular matrix proteins can result in destructive disease. Emphysema, the result of destroyed lung elastin and collagen matrix, is the prototypical example of such a destructive process. More recent data has highlighted that MMPs play much more elaborate physiologic and pathophysiologic roles than simple matrix protein cleavage. Key pathophysiological roles for MMPs in emphysema will be discussed herein.

  10. Reconstituted asbestos matrix for fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbryar, H.

    1975-01-01

    Method is described for reprocessing commercially available asbestos matrix stock to yield greater porosity and bubble pressure (due to increased surface tension), improved homogeneity, and greater uniformity.

  11. Extracellular Matrix: Functions in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Claudia S.; Franco, Santos J.; Müller, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    An astonishing number of extracellular matrix glycoproteins are expressed in dynamic patterns in the developing and adult nervous system. Neural stem cells, neurons, and glia express receptors that mediate interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. Functional studies in vitro and genetic studies in mice have provided evidence that the extracellular matrix affects virtually all aspects of nervous system development and function. Here we will summarize recent findings that have shed light on the specific functions of defined extracellular matrix molecules on such diverse processes as neural stem cell differentiation, neuronal migration, the formation of axonal tracts, and the maturation and function of synapses in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:21123393

  12. Extracellular matrix proteins of dentine.

    PubMed

    Butler, W T; Ritchie, H H; Bronckers, A L

    1997-01-01

    Bone and dentine extracellular matrix proteins are similar, consisting primarily of type I collagen, acidic proteins and proteoglycans. Although collagen forms the lattice for deposition of calcium and phosphate for formation of carbonate apatite, the non-collagenous proteins are believed to control initiation and growth of the crystals. Despite this similarity, dentine contains three unique proteins apparently absent from bone and other tissue: dentine phosphophoryn (DPP), dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentine sialoprotein (DSP). DPP and DMP1 are acidic phosphoproteins probably involved in the control of mineralization processes. DPP may localize in gap regions of collagen and initiate apatite crystal formation by binding large quantities of calcium in a conformation that promotes this process. Extensive studies have been conducted in our laboratory on the nature, biosynthesis, localization and gene structure of DSP. Immunolocalization studies showed that rat DSP, a 53 kDa sialic acid-rich glycoprotein, was synthesized by young and mature odontoblasts, and by dental pulp cells and pre-ameloblasts, but not by ameloblasts, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or other cell types. The cDNA sequence indicated that DSP was a 366-residue protein with several potential N-glycosylation sites, as well as phosphorylation sites, but that the amino acid sequence was dissimilar to that of other known proteins. Northern blot analysis detected several mRNA species near 4.6 and 1.5 kb, indicative of alternative splicing events. Evidence for two DSP genes was obtained, further complicating this picture. Recent in situ hybridization studies utilizing rat and mouse molars and incisors indicated that DSP mRNA was expressed by young odontoblasts and odontoblasts in animals of all ages. Transcripts were also observed in pre-ameloblasts. The expression of DSP mRNA ceased when these cells matured to become secretory ameloblasts. DSP transcripts were not detected in osteoblasts or other cell

  13. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase), released by activated monocytes (and possibly macrophages), in oxidative events within the artery wall. As MPO is released extracellularly, and is highly basic, it might be expected to associate with poly-anionic matrix components thereby localizing damage to these materials. In this study the reaction of the MPO-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl) with extracellular matrix from vascular smooth muscle cells and healthy pig arteries has been examined. HOCl is rapidly consumed by such matrix samples, with the formation of matrix-derived chloramines or chloramides. The yield of these intermediates increases with HOCl dose. These materials undergo a time- and temperature-dependent decay, which parallels the release of sugar and protein components from the treated matrix, consistent with these species being important intermediates. Matrix damage is enhanced by species that increase chloramine/chloramide decomposition, with copper and iron ions being effective catalysts, and decreased by compounds which scavenge chloramines/chloramides, or species derived from them. The effect of such matrix modifications on cellular behaviour is poorly understood, though it is known that changes in matrix materials can have profound effects on cell adhesion, proliferation, growth and phenotype. The observed matrix modifications reported here may therefore modulate cellular behaviour in diseases such as atherosclerosis where MPO-derived oxidants are generated. PMID:12911330

  14. The evolution of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P; Adams, Josephine C

    2010-12-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or "adhesome" also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology.

  15. Channeled partial Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenin, Andrey S.; Tyo, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    In prior work,1,2 we introduced methods to treat channeled systems in a way that is similar to Data Reduction Method (DRM), by focusing attention on the Fourier content of the measurement conditions. Introduction of Q enabled us to more readily extract the performance of the system and thereby optimize it to obtain reconstruction with the least noise. The analysis tools developed for that exercise can be expanded to be applicable to partial Mueller Matrix Polarimeters (pMMPs), which were a topic of prior discussion as well. In this treatment, we combine the principles involved in both of those research trajectories and identify a set of channeled pMMP families. As a result, the measurement structure of such systems is completely known and the design of a channeled pMMP intended for any given task becomes a search over a finite set of possibilities, with the additional channel rotation allowing for a more desirable Mueller element mixing.

  16. Advanced Integration Matrix Education Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul Heather L.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM) will design a ground-based test facility for developing revolutionary integrated systems for joint human-robotic missions in order to study and solve systems-level integration issues for exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This paper describes development plans for educational outreach activities related to technological and operational integration scenarios similar to the challenges that will be encountered through this project. The education outreach activities will provide hands-on, interactive exercises to allow students of all levels to experience design and operational challenges similar to what NASA deals with everyday in performing the integration of complex missions. These experiences will relate to and impact students everyday lives by demonstrating how their interests in science and engineering can develop into future careers, and reinforcing the concepts of teamwork and conflict resolution. Allowing students to experience and contribute to real-world development, research, and scientific studies of ground-based simulations for complex exploration missions will stimulate interest in the space program, and bring NASA's challenges to the student level. By enhancing existing educational programs and developing innovative activities and presentations, AIM will support NASA s endeavor to "inspire the next generation of explorers.. .as only NASA can."

  17. Advanced Integration Matrix Education Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul Heather L.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Integration Matrix (AIM) will design a ground-based test facility for developing revolutionary integrated systems for joint human-robotic missions in order to study and solve systems-level integration issues for exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This paper describes development plans for educational outreach activities related to technological and operational integration scenarios similar to the challenges that will be encountered through this project. The education outreach activities will provide hands-on, interactive exercises to allow students of all levels to experience design and operational challenges similar to what NASA deals with everyday in performing the integration of complex missions. These experiences will relate to and impact students everyday lives by demonstrating how their interests in science and engineering can develop into future careers, and reinforcing the concepts of teamwork and conflict resolution. Allowing students to experience and contribute to real-world development, research, and scientific studies of ground-based simulations for complex exploration missions will stimulate interest in the space program, and bring NASA's challenges to the student level. By enhancing existing educational programs and developing innovative activities and presentations, AIM will support NASA s endeavor to "inspire the next generation of explorers.. .as only NASA can."

  18. The Evolution of Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or “adhesome” also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology. PMID:21160071

  19. Clinical implications of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Malay; Mandal, Amritlal; Das, Sudip; Chakraborti, Tapati; Sajal, Chakraborti

    2003-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of neutral proteinases that are important for normal development, wound healing, and a wide variety of pathological processes, including the spread of metastatic cancer cells, arthritic destruction of joints, atherosclerosis, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema and neuroinflammation. In the central nervous system (CNS), MMPs have been shown to degrade components of the basal lamina, leading to disruption of the blood brain barrier and to contribute to the neuroinflammatory responses in many neurological diseases. Inhibition of MMPs have been shown to prevent progression of these diseases. Currently, certain MMP inhibitors have entered into clinical trials. A goal to the future should be to design selective synthetic inhibitors of MMPs that have minimum side effects. MMP inhibitors are designed in such a way that these can not only bind at the active site of the proteinases but also to have the characteristics to bind to other sites of MMPs which might be a promising route for therapy. To name a few: catechins, a component isolated from green tea; and Novastal, derived from extracts of shark cartilage are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of MMP-mediated diseases.

  20. Introduction to Matrix Sampling for the Practitioner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirotnik, Kenneth A.

    One solution to the problem of obtaining test scores in order to assess multiple outcomes of educational programs is a basically simple technique called matrix sampling. Matrix sampling is the estimation of total test score statistics by administering random subsets of test items to randomly selected students. This chapter lays out the specific…

  1. Multimedia Matrix: A Cognitive Strategy for Designers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherry, Annette C.

    This instructional development project evaluates the effect of a matrix-based strategy to assist multimedia authors in acquiring and applying principles for effective multimedia design. The Multimedia Matrix, based on the Park and Hannafin "Twenty Principles and Implications for Interactive Multimedia" design, displays a condensed…

  2. Finding nonoverlapping substructures of a sparse matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2004-08-09

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices, thus the design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of non overlapping rectangular dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which has not been studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum non overlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm for 2 times 2 blocks that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. We discuss alternatives to rectangular blocks such as diagonal blocks and cross blocks and present complexity analysis and approximation algorithms.

  3. The Molecules of the Cell Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Klaus; Osborn, Mary

    1985-01-01

    Cytoplasmic proteins form a highly structured yet changeable matrix that affects cell shape, division, motion, and transport of vesicles and organelles. Types of microfilaments, research techniques, actin and myosin, tumor cells, and other topics are addressed. Evidence indicates that the cell matrix might have a bearing on metabolism. (DH)

  4. Matrix theory on non-orientable surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwart, Gysbert

    1998-06-01

    We construct the Matrix theory descriptions of M-theory on the Möbius strip and the Klein bottle. In a limit, these provide the matrix string theories for the CHL string and an orbifold of type IIA string theory.

  5. Reduction of the scattering matrix array

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovskyy, I. A.

    2015-09-30

    The scattering matrix approach is widely applied in wave engineering and quantum physics. Usually, a combination of multiple scattering matrices is used. In this article, we consider arbitrary arrays of interconnected scattering matrices and present a formal result for the reduced scattering matrix. We demonstrate this approach in two well-known scattering problems.

  6. Matrix Management: An Organizational Alternative for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    Describes various organizational structures and models, presents matrix management as an alternative to traditional hierarchical structures, and suggests matrix management as an appropriate organizational alternative for academic libraries. Benefits that are discussed include increased flexibility, a higher level of professional independence, and…

  7. A marketing matrix for health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Weaver, F J; Gombeski, W R; Fay, G W; Eversman, J J; Cowan-Gascoigne, C

    1986-06-01

    Irrespective of the formal marketing structure successful marketing for health care organizations requires the input on many people. Detailed here is the Marketing Matrix used at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. This Matrix is both a philosophy and a tool for clarifying and focusing the organization's marketing activities.

  8. The Molecules of the Cell Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Klaus; Osborn, Mary

    1985-01-01

    Cytoplasmic proteins form a highly structured yet changeable matrix that affects cell shape, division, motion, and transport of vesicles and organelles. Types of microfilaments, research techniques, actin and myosin, tumor cells, and other topics are addressed. Evidence indicates that the cell matrix might have a bearing on metabolism. (DH)

  9. Metal matrix composites microfracture: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Caruso, John J.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  10. Metal matrix composites microfracture - Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, S. K.; Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  11. Optimum interface properties for metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch (CTE) between the fiber and the matrix, high residual sresses exist in metal matrix composite systems upon cool down from processing temperature to room temperature. An interface material can be placed between the fiber and the matrix to reduce the high tensile residual stresses in the matrix. A computer program was written to minimize the residual stress in the matrix subject to the interface material properties. The decision variables are the interface modulus, thickness and thermal expansion coefficient. The properties of the interface material are optimized such that the average distortion energy in the matrix and the interface is minimized. As a result, the only active variable is the thermal expansion coefficient. The optimum modulus of the interface is always the minimum allowable value and the interface thickness is always the maximum allowable value, independent of the fiber/matrix system. The optimum interface thermal expansion coefficient is always between the values of the fiber and the matrix. Using this analysis, a survey of materials was conducted for use as fiber coatings in some specific composite systems.

  12. Multipass matrix systems for diode laser spectroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, Semen M.

    1996-02-01

    Several modifications of multipass matrix systems (MMS) with a large relative aperture have been developed to be applied in diode laser spectroscopy. In these systems the images are formed on the field mirrors as compact rectangular matrices with a controlled amount of lines and columns. The number of passes may reach 600-1000 for mirrors with high-reflectivity layers (in three- and four-objective systems, respectively). In four-objective systems the error arising in the position of the previous odd image is compensated each time when images with even numbers are formed in the matrix. Moreover, four-objective systems provide the double superimposition of images in the matrix, resulting in a longer path length. Having a simple construction matrix systems ensure high optical and performance parameters. To improve performance characteristics of a matrix system operating under high vibration conditions (systems installed on aircraft or helicopter, etc.) a new promising variation of a four-objective matrix system was developed. Exit images of this modification are totally insensitive to vibrations. Matrix systems with a large angular aperture were developed for special applications with high resolution IR diode laser spectrometers. In view of their capacities, matrix systems are the new generation multipass systems.

  13. An Independence Matrix for Visually Handicapped Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corn, Anne L.

    1985-01-01

    A matrix organizes skills into a curriculum for independence and includes the following components: travel, reading, writing, speaking, recreation, and planning; and resources, problem solving, self-advocacy, and social skills. The use of the matrix in promoting the independence of a visually handicapped learner is described. (CL)

  14. Matrix model description of baryonic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Murayama, Hitoshi; Roiban, Radu; Tatar, Radu

    2003-03-13

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} + 1 flavors using an extension of the recently proposed relation between gauge theories and matrix models.The impressive agreement between the two sides provides a beautiful confirmation of the extension of the gauge theory-matrix model relation to this case.

  15. Improvements in sparse matrix operations of NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harano, S.

    1980-01-01

    A "nontransmit" packing routine was added to NASTRAN to allow matrix data to be refered to directly from the input/output buffer. Use of the packing routine permits various routines for matrix handling to perform a direct reference to the input/output buffer if data addresses have once been received. The packing routine offers a buffer by buffer backspace feature for efficient backspacing in sequential access. Unlike a conventional backspacing that needs twice back record for a single read of one record (one column), this feature omits overlapping of READ operation and back record. It eliminates the necessity of writing, in decomposition of a symmetric matrix, of a portion of the matrix to its upper triangular matrix from the last to the first columns of the symmetric matrix, thus saving time for generating the upper triangular matrix. Only a lower triangular matrix must be written onto the secondary storage device, bringing 10 to 30% reduction in use of the disk space of the storage device.

  16. Risk Management using Dependency Stucture Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    An efficient method based on dependency structure matrix (DSM) analysis is given for ranking risks in a complex system or process whose entities are mutually dependent. This rank is determined according to the element's values of the unique positive eigenvector which corresponds to the matrix spectral radius modeling the considered engineering system. For demonstration, the risk problem of NASA's robotic spacecraft is analyzed.

  17. Block Hadamard measurement matrix with arbitrary dimension in compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Xu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    As Hadamard measurement matrix cannot be used for compressing signals with dimension of a non-integral power-of-2, this paper proposes a construction method of block Hadamard measurement matrix with arbitrary dimension. According to the dimension N of signals to be measured, firstly, construct a set of Hadamard sub matrixes with different dimensions and make the sum of these dimensions equals to N. Then, arrange the Hadamard sub matrixes in a certain order to form a block diagonal matrix. Finally, take the former M rows of the block diagonal matrix as the measurement matrix. The proposed measurement matrix which retains the orthogonality of Hadamard matrix and sparsity of block diagonal matrix has highly sparse structure, simple hardware implements and general applicability. Simulation results show that the performance of our measurement matrix is better than Gaussian matrix, Logistic chaotic matrix, and Toeplitz matrix.

  18. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  19. Universal portfolios generated by Vandermonde generating matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Choon Peng; Yong, Say Loong

    2017-04-01

    A universal portfolio generated by the one-parameter symmetric positive definite Vandermonde matrix is studied. It is obtained by maximizing the scaled growth rate of the estimated daily wealth return and minimizing the Mahalanobis squared divergence of two portfolio vectors associated with the Vandermonde matrix. The parameter of the Vandermonde matrix is chosen so that the matrix is positive definite. The companion matrices of the three and five-dimensional generating matrices are evaluated to determine the portfolios. Three and five stock-data sets are selected from the local stock exchange in Malaysia and the empirical performance of the portfolios is presented. There is empirical evidence that the use of an appropriate generating Vandermonde matrix may increase the wealth of investors.

  20. The matrix exponential in transient structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1987-01-01

    The primary usefulness of the presented theory is in the ability to represent the effects of high frequency linear response with accuracy, without requiring very small time steps in the analysis of dynamic response. The matrix exponential contains a series approximation to the dynamic model. However, unlike the usual analysis procedure which truncates the high frequency response, the approximation in the exponential matrix solution is in the time domain. By truncating the series solution to the matrix exponential short, the solution is made inaccurate after a certain time. Yet, up to that time the solution is extremely accurate, including all high frequency effects. By taking finite time increments, the exponential matrix solution can compute the response very accurately. Use of the exponential matrix in structural dynamics is demonstrated by simulating the free vibration response of multi degree of freedom models of cantilever beams.

  1. Fiber-matrix interfaces in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, E.R.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanical properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are governed by the relationships between the matrix, the interface material, and the fibers. In non-oxide matrix systems compliant pyrolytic carbon and BN have been demonstrated to be effective interface materials, allowing for absorption of mismatch stresses between fiber and matrix and offering a poorly bonded interface for crack deflection. The resulting materials have demonstrated remarkable strain/damage tolerance together with high strength. Carbon or BN, however, suffer from oxidative loss in many service environments, and thus there is a major search for oxidation resistant alternatives. This paper reviews the issues related to developing a stable and effective interface material for non-oxide matrix CMCs.

  2. Biocompatible 3D Matrix with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ion, Alberto; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Rădulescu, Dragoș; Rădulescu, Marius; Iordache, Florin; Vasile, Bogdan Ștefan; Surdu, Adrian Vasile; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Holban, Alina Maria

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this study was to develop, characterize and assess the biological activity of a new regenerative 3D matrix with antimicrobial properties, based on collagen (COLL), hydroxyapatite (HAp), β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and usnic acid (UA). The prepared 3D matrix was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy (FT-IRM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). In vitro qualitative and quantitative analyses performed on cultured diploid cells demonstrated that the 3D matrix is biocompatible, allowing the normal development and growth of MG-63 osteoblast-like cells and exhibited an antimicrobial effect, especially on the Staphylococcus aureus strain, explained by the particular higher inhibitory activity of usnic acid (UA) against Gram positive bacterial strains. Our data strongly recommend the obtained 3D matrix to be used as a successful alternative for the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) anti-infective regeneration matrix for bone tissue engineering.

  3. Graphical evaluation of relativistic matrix elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K. N.

    1978-01-01

    A graphical representation of angular momentum was used to evaluate relativistic matrix elements between antisymmetrized states of many particle configurations having any number of open shells. The antisymmetrized matrix element was expanded as a sum of semisymmetrized matrix elements. The diagram representing a semisymmetrized matrix element was composed of four diagram blocks; the bra block, the ket block, the spectator block, and the interaction block. The first three blocks indicate the couplings of the two interacting configurations while the last depends on the interaction and is the replaceable component. Interaction blocks for relativistic operators and commonly used potentials were summarized in ready to use forms. A simple step by step procedure was prescribed generally for calculating antisymmetrized matrix elements of one and two particle operators.

  4. [Penile augmentation using acellular dermal matrix].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-ming; Cui, Yong-yan; Pan, Shu-juan; Liang, Wei-qiang; Chen, Xiao-xuan

    2004-11-01

    Penile enhancement was performed using acellular dermal matrix. Multiple layers of acellular dermal matrix were placed underneath the penile skin to enlarge its girth. Since March 2002, penile augmentation has been performed on 12 cases using acellular dermal matrix. Postoperatively all the patients had a 1.3-3.1 cm (2.6 cm in average) increase in penile girth in a flaccid state. The penis had normal appearance and feeling without contour deformities. All patients gained sexual ability 3 months after the operation. One had a delayed wound healing due to tight dressing, which was repaired with a scrotal skin flap. Penile enlargement by implantation of multiple layers of acellular dermal matrix was a safe and effective operation. This method can be performed in an outpatient ambulatory setting. The advantages of the acellular dermal matrix over the autogenous dermal fat grafts are elimination of donor site injury and scar and significant shortening of operation time.

  5. A matrix analysis of conjugate gradient algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, S.F.; Gutknecht, M.H.

    1993-04-01

    This paper explores the relationships between the conjugate gradient algorithms Orthodir, Orthomin, and Orthores. To facilitate this exploration, a matrix formulation for each algorithm is given. It is shown that Orthodir directly computes a Hessenberg matrix H{sub k} at step k. Orthores also computes a Hessenberg matrix, G{sub k}, which is similar to a Hessenberg matrix obtained from H{sub k} by perturbing its last column. (This perturbation vanishes at convergence.) Orthomin, on the other hand, computes a UL and LU factorization of the perturbed H{sub k} and G{sub k}, respectively. The breakdown of Orthomin and Orthores are interpreted in terms of these underlying matrix factorizations. A connection with Lanczos algorithms is also examined, as is the special case of B-normal(1) matrices (for which efficient three-term CG algorithms exist).

  6. MATRIX City: A Multi-Risk Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euchner, F.; Mignan, A.

    2012-04-01

    MATRIX City (the MATRIX Common IT sYstem) is the computational platform that is being developed in the course of the New Multi-Hazard and Multi-Risk Assessment Methods for Europe (MATRIX) project. MATRIX aims to develop multi-type hazard and risk assessment and mitigation tools suited to the European context. The core of MATRIX City is a risk engine of a novel type that is based on a sequential simulation approach, which allows to quantify interactions and other time-dependent processes at the hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk levels. For risk estimation in realistic scenarios, data availability is crucial. To overcome this limitation, MATRIX City provides a component called Virtual City. It is a collection of heuristic databases, which provides a generic approach to quantifying multi-type hazard and risk when data coverage is poor, and for sensitivity analysis. MATRIX City results are intended to provide a "big picture" of the expected impact of multi-type hazard and risk modelling (as opposed to static modelling), thus being a valuable tool for decision support. MATRIX City development uses a modern software engineering approach (test-driven development, continuous integration). The architecture is flexible, so that new perils, new models and large datasets can be accommodated easily. However, it should be noted that hazard computation is not part of MATRIX City. Hazard footprints have to be provided as input data, as well as exposure and vulnerability. The data model used in MATRIX City is an enhancement of the Natural hazards' Risk Markup Language (NRML). An XML serialization of this data model, which is a GML (Geographic Markup Language) application schema, is used for data interchange.

  7. Fabrication method, structure, mechanical, and biological properties of decellularized extracellular matrix for replacement of wide bone tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Anisimova, N Y; Kiselevsky, M V; Sukhorukova, I V; Shvindina, N V; Shtansky, D V

    2015-09-01

    The present paper was focused on the development of a new method of decellularized extracellular matrix (DECM) fabrication via a chemical treatment of a native bone tissue. Particular attention was paid to the influence of chemical treatment on the mechanical properties of native bones, sterility, and biological performance in vivo using the syngeneic heterotopic and orthotopic implantation models. The obtained data indicated that after a chemical decellularization treatment in 4% aqueous sodium chlorite, no noticeable signs of the erosion of compact cortical bone surface or destruction of trabeculae of spongy bone in spinal channel were observed. The histological studies showed that the chemical treatment resulted in the decellularization of both bone and cartilage tissues. The DECM samples demonstrated no signs of chemical and biological degradation in vivo. Thorough structural characterization revealed that after decellularization, the mineral frame retained its integrity with the organic phase; however clotting and destruction of organic molecules and fibers were observed. FTIR studies revealed several structural changes associated with the destruction of organic molecules, although all organic components typical of intact bone were preserved. The decellularization-induced structural changes in the collagen constituent resulted changed the deformation under compression mechanism: from the major fracture by crack propagation throughout the sample to the predominantly brittle fracture. Although the mechanical properties of radius bones subjected to decellularization were observed to degrade, the mechanical properties of ulna bones in compression and humerus bones in bending remained unchanged. The compressive strength of both the intact and decellularized ulna bones was 125-130 MPa and the flexural strength of humerus bones was 156 and 145 MPa for the intact and decellularized samples, respectively. These results open new avenues for the use of DECM samples as

  8. Hierarchical cluster analysis of matrix effects on 110 pesticide residues in 28 tea matrixes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Pang, Guo-Fang; Fan, Chun-Lin; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Matrix effects on 110 pesticides in 28 tea matrixes of different varieties and origins by LC/MS/MS were studied, and most of the pesticides exhibited soft and medium signal suppression. To better understand the influence of the tea varieties and the physicochemical characteristics of pesticides on the matrix effects, the multivariate analysis tool called hierarchical cluster analysis was applied. Tea matrixes were grouped into three clusters: unfermented, fermented, and post-fermented teas. Any type of tea can be chosen from each cluster as a corresponding representative matrix within that cluster to make matrix-matched solutions, which could simplify analysis while guaranteeing its accuracy. Matrix effects on most pesticides were similar despite the physicochemical diversities of the pesticides.

  9. 2-Adic clustering of the PAM matrix.

    PubMed

    Khrennikov, A Yu; Kozyrev, S V

    2009-12-07

    In this paper we demonstrate that the use of the system of 2-adic numbers provides a new insight to some problems of genetics, in particular, degeneracy of the genetic code and the structure of the PAM matrix in bioinformatics. The 2-adic distance is an ultrametric and applications of ultrametric in bioinformatics are not surprising. However, by using the 2-adic numbers we match ultrametric with a number theoretic structure. In this way we find new applications of an ultrametric which differ from known up to now in bioinformatics. We obtain the following results. We show that the PAM matrix A allows the expansion into the sum of the two matrices A=A((2))+A((infinity)), where the matrix A((2)) is 2-adically regular (i.e. matrix elements of this matrix are close to locally constant with respect to the discussed earlier by the authors 2-adic parametrization of the genetic code), and the matrix A((infinity)) is sparse. We discuss the structure of the matrix A((infinity)) in relation to the side chain properties of the corresponding amino acids. We introduce the family of substitution matrices A(alpha,beta)=alpha A((2))+beta A((infinity)), alpha,beta>or=0 which should allow to vary the alignment procedure in order to take into account the different chemical and geometric properties of the amino acids.

  10. Linear and nonlinear projective nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhirong; Oja, Erkki

    2010-05-01

    A variant of nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) which was proposed earlier is analyzed here. It is called projective nonnegative matrix factorization (PNMF). The new method approximately factorizes a projection matrix, minimizing the reconstruction error, into a positive low-rank matrix and its transpose. The dissimilarity between the original data matrix and its approximation can be measured by the Frobenius matrix norm or the modified Kullback-Leibler divergence. Both measures are minimized by multiplicative update rules, whose convergence is proven for the first time. Enforcing orthonormality to the basic objective is shown to lead to an even more efficient update rule, which is also readily extended to nonlinear cases. The formulation of the PNMF objective is shown to be connected to a variety of existing NMF methods and clustering approaches. In addition, the derivation using Lagrangian multipliers reveals the relation between reconstruction and sparseness. For kernel principal component analysis (PCA) with the binary constraint, useful in graph partitioning problems, the nonlinear kernel PNMF provides a good approximation which outperforms an existing discretization approach. Empirical study on three real-world databases shows that PNMF can achieve the best or close to the best in clustering. The proposed algorithm runs more efficiently than the compared NMF methods, especially for high-dimensional data. Moreover, contrary to the basic NMF, the trained projection matrix can be readily used for newly coming samples and demonstrates good generalization.

  11. Chondrule rims and interchondrule matrix in UOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C.; Hutchison, R.; Barber, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Opaque rims around chondrules and clasts were distinguished from opaque, interchondrule matrix apparently unrelated spatially to chondrules and clasts. Microprobe and electron microscope techniques were used. The mean chemical composition for dark rim and matrix in Bishunpur and Tieschitz are similar to the opaque matrix of Huss, et al. However, the mean dark rim compositions in Bishunpur have significantly higher Fe, and lower Na, K, Al and Si than opaque interchondrule matrix. The opaque matrix of Huss, et al, essentially lies between these compositions. In Tieschitz only rim material was observed. In Tieschitz the rims are Si-poor and dominated by normative olivine (Fo50). Again there is an Na, K, Al component but is often nepheline normative rather than albitic. It too is probably present as glass, Ashworth (pers.comm.). In Bishunpur rims as well as the silicate-FeS, FeNi layering described by Allen, et al, discontinuous layering was observed within the silicate portion. This is apparently due to variations in the proportions of the components, particularly in the glassy phase. In Bishunpur there is a strong genetic link between matrix and rims, although rims seem to have formed under different, possibly more oxidizing, conditions. Also the presence of the same component in rims, matrix chondrules, and clasts suggests a common source.

  12. Decellularized bone matrix grafts for calvaria regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Joon; Diachina, Shannon; Lee, Yan Ting; Zhao, Lixing; Zou, Rui; Tang, Na; Han, Han; Chen, Xin; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Decellularization is a promising new method to prepare natural matrices for tissue regeneration. Successful decellularization has been reported using various tissues including skin, tendon, and cartilage, though studies using hard tissue such as bone are lacking. In this study, we aimed to define the optimal experimental parameters to decellularize natural bone matrix using 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate and 0.1% NH4OH. Then, the effects of decellularized bone matrix on rat mesenchymal stem cell proliferation, osteogenic gene expression, and osteogenic differentiations in a two-dimensional culture system were investigated. Decellularized bone was also evaluated with regard to cytotoxicity, biochemical, and mechanical characteristics in vitro. Evidence of complete decellularization was shown through hematoxylin and eosin staining and DNA measurements. Decellularized bone matrix displayed a cytocompatible property, conserved structure, mechanical strength, and mineral content comparable to natural bone. To study new bone formation, implantation of decellularized bone matrix particles seeded with rat mesenchymal stem cells was conducted using an orthotopic in vivo model. After 3 months post-implantation into a critical-sized defect in rat calvaria, new bone was formed around decellularized bone matrix particles and also merged with new bone between decellularized bone matrix particles. New bone formation was analyzed with micro computed tomography, mineral apposition rate, and histomorphometry. Decellularized bone matrix stimulated mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, achieving effective bone regeneration and thereby serving as a promising biological bone graft. PMID:28228929

  13. [Modern polymers in matrix tablets technology].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Łukasz; Kasperek, Regina; Poleszak, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Matrix tablets are the most popular method of oral drug administration, and polymeric materials have been used broadly in matrix formulations to modify and modulate drug release rate. The main goal of the system is to extend drug release profiles to maintain a constant in vivo plasma drug concentration and a consistent pharmacological effect. Polymeric matrix tablets offer a great potential as oral controlled drug delivery systems. Cellulose derivatives, like hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) are often used as matrix formers. However, also other types of polymers can be used for this purpose including: Kollidon SR, acrylic acid polymers such as Eudragits and Carbopols. Nevertheless, polymers of natural origin like: carragens, chitosan and alginates widely used in the food and cosmetics industry are now coming to the fore of pharmaceutical research and are used in matrix tablets technology. Modern polymers allow to obtain matrix tablets by 3D printing, which enables to develop new formulation types. In this paper, the polymers used in matrix tablets technology and examples of their applications were described.

  14. Fabric analysis of Allende matrix using EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Lauren E.; Bland, Phil A.; Prior, Dave J.; Russell, Sara S.

    Fabric analysis of the interstitial matrix material in primitive meteorites offers a novel window on asteroid formation and evolution. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has allowed fabrics in these fine-grained materials to be visualized in detail for the first time. Our data reveal that Allende, a CV3 chondrite, possesses a uniform, planar, short-axis alignment fabric that is pervasive on a broad scale and is probably the result of deformational shortening related to impact or gravitational compaction. Interference between this matrix fabric and the larger, more rigid components, such as dark inclusions (DIs) and calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), has lead to the development of locally oriented and intensified matrix fabrics. In addition, DIs possess fabrics that are conformable with the broader matrix fabric. These results suggest that DIs were in situ prior to the deformational shortening event responsible for these fabrics, thus providing an argument against dark inclusions being fragments from another lithified part of the asteroid (Kojima and Tomeoka 1996; Fruland et al. 1978). Moreover, both DIs and Allende matrix are highly porous (˜25%) (Corrigan et al. 1997). Mobilizing a highly porous DI during impact-induced brecciation without imposing a fabric and incorporating it into a highly porous matrix without significantly compacting these materials is improbable. We favor a model that involves Allende DIs, CAIs, and matrix accreting together and experiencing the same deformation events.

  15. An ESS maximum principle for matrix games.

    PubMed

    Vincent, T L; Cressman, R

    2000-11-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that for games defined by differential or difference equations with a continuum of strategies, there exists a G-function, related to individual fitness, that must take on a maximum with respect to a virtual variable v whenever v is one of the vectors in the coalition of vectors which make up the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). This result, called the ESS maximum principle, is quite useful in determining candidates for an ESS. This principle is reformulated here, so that it may be conveniently applied to matrix games. In particular, we define a matrix game to be one in which fitness is expressed in terms of strategy frequencies and a matrix of expected payoffs. It is shown that the G-function in the matrix game setting must again take on a maximum value at all the strategies which make up the ESS coalition vector. The reformulated maximum principle is applicable to both bilinear and nonlinear matrix games. One advantage in employing this principle to solve the traditional bilinear matrix game is that the same G-function is used to find both pure and mixed strategy solutions by simply specifying an appropriate strategy space. Furthermore we show how the theory may be used to solve matrix games which are not in the usual bilinear form. We examine in detail two nonlinear matrix games: the game between relatives and the sex ratio game. In both of these games an ESS solution is determined. These examples not only illustrate the usefulness of this approach to finding solutions to an expanded class of matrix games, but aids in understanding the nature of the ESS as well.

  16. A new look at the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Hancock, R

    2000-07-01

    The concept of the nuclear matrix, a karyoskeletal structure that serves as a support for the genome and its activities, has stimulated many studies of the association of nuclear components and functions with this structure. However, certain experimental findings are not consistent with the existence of the nuclear matrix in vivo, including our inability to visualise a corresponding structure in intact cells, the demonstrated mobility in vivo of chromatin and messenger ribonucleoprotein particles, which are claimed to be bound to the nuclear matrix, the paradoxical extractability from nuclei in low ionic strength buffers of enzymes that are found in the 2 M NaCl-insoluble matrix, and the extractability, in conditions which reproduce the intranuclear milieu, of regions of DNA (matrix or scaffold attachment regions, MAR/SARs) postulated to be bound to the nuclear matrix in vivo. This review considers the nuclear matrix model in the light of sometimes overlooked evidence that each step in its isolation may cause nuclear components to bind to it by new liaisons that do not exist in vivo. This is illustrated by experiments where nuclear-targeted green fluorescent protein is found in the nuclear matrix, and raises the possibility that MAR/SARs actually bind to DNA-binding proteins or multiprotein complexes, including replicational, transcriptional and processing machinery, and topoisomerases that are incorporated into the nuclear matrix during its preparation. Considering that the nuclear lamina forms a rigid exoskeleton, the necessity for internal skeletal structures is raised; the major roles that macromolecular crowding, phase partitioning, and charge effects are likely to play in organisation of the intranuclear space may provide new models for the compartmentalisation of proteins and functions into different nuclear domains and of chromosomes into territories.

  17. Active Matrix OLED Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, George

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the limited environmental testing of the AMOLED display performed as an engineering evaluation by The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)-specifically. EMI. Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. The AMOLED display is an active-matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) technology. The testing provided an initial understanding of the technology and its suitability for space applications. Relative to light emitting diode (LED) displays or liquid crystal displays (LCDs), AMOLED displays provide a superior viewing experience even though they are much lighter and smaller, produce higher contrast ratio and richer colors, and require less power to operate than LCDs. However, AMOLED technology has not been demonstrated in a space environment. Therefore, some risks with the technology must be addressed before they can be seriously considered for human spaceflight. The environmental tests provided preliminary performance data on the ability of the display technology to handle some of the simulated induced space/spacecraft environments that an AMOLED display will see during a spacecraft certification test program. This engineering evaluation is part of a Space Act Agreement (SM) between The NASA/JSC and Honeywell International (HI) as a collaborative effort to evaluate the potential use of AMOLED technology for future human spaceflight missions- both government-led and commercial. Under this SM, HI is responsible for doing optical performance evaluation, as well as temperature and touch screen studies. The NASA/JSC is responsible for performing environmental testing comprised of EMI, Thermal Vac, and radiation tests. Additionally, as part of the testing, limited optical data was acquired to assess performance as the display was subjected to the induced environments. The NASA will benefit from this engineering evaluation by understanding AMOLED suitability for future use in space as well as becoming a smarter buyer (or developer) of the technology. HI benefits

  18. Embedded systems for controlling LED matrix displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marghescu, Cristina; Drumea, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    LED matrix displays are a common presence in everyday life - they can be found in trains, buses, tramways, office information tables or outdoor media. The structure of the display unit is similar for all these devices, a matrix of light emitting diodes coupled between row and column lines, but there are many options for the display controller that switches these lines. Present paper analyzes different types of embedded systems that can control the LED matrix, based on single board computers, on microcontrollers with different peripheral devices or with programmable logic devices like field programmable gate arrays with implemented soft processor cores. Scalability, easiness of implementation and costs are analyzed for all proposed solutions.

  19. High-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Polymers research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has produced high-temperature, easily processable resin systems, such as PMR-15. In addition, the Polymers Branch has investigated ways to improve the mechanical properties of polymers and the microcracking resistance of polymer matrix composites in response to industry need for new and improved aeropropulsion materials. Current and future research in the Polymers Branch is aimed at advancing the upper use temperature of polymer matrix composites to 700 F and beyond by developing new resins, by examining the use of fiber reinforcements other than graphite, and by developing coatings for polymer matrix composites to increase their oxidation resistance.

  20. Visual Matrix Clustering of Social Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; May, Richard A.

    2013-07-01

    The prevailing choices to graphically represent a social network in today’s literature are a node-link graph layout and an adjacency matrix. Both visualization techniques have unique strengths and weaknesses when applied to different domain applications. In this article, we focus our discussion on adjacency matrix and how to turn the matrix-based visualization technique from merely showing pairwise associations among network actors (or graph nodes) to depicting clusters of a social network. We also use node-link layouts to supplement the discussion.

  1. Bilateral kidney matrix stones: a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Lahyani, Mounir; Rhannam, Yassine; Slaoui, Amine; Touzani, Alae; Karmouni, Tarik; Elkhader, Khalid; Koutani, Abdellatif; Andaloussi, Ahmed Ibn attya

    2016-01-01

    Kedney matrix stones are a rare form of calculi. Flank pain and urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common presentations of matrix calculi. The diagnosis is usually made at surgery, but some preoperative radiographic findings might be suggestive. Open surgery was the method of choice for treatment. However, combination of ureterorenoscopy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) was found to be safe and effective. We report a rare case of renal and ureteral matrix stones that were diagnosed and treated by open surgery. We also describe its clinical, radiological and therapeutic features through a review of the literature. PMID:28292065

  2. Reducibility of Matrix Equations Containing Several Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    AD-AI15 568 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH SCHOO;-ETC EF G 12 1ADA1551 REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING SEVERAL...PARAMETERS.E U)CA E UNCLASSIFIED AFIT/GE/RA/81D-1 N P11111111II soonhh Eu;o I. ’Trm * a, ~t- NMI 4 i’- 00Nt. met r~ REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING...1 REDUCIBILITY OF MATRIX EQUATIONS CONTAINING SEVERAL PARAMETERS THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force

  3. Generic construction of efficient matrix product operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubig, C.; McCulloch, I. P.; Schollwöck, U.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix product operators (MPOs) are at the heart of the second-generation density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm formulated in matrix product state language. We first summarize the widely known facts on MPO arithmetic and representations of single-site operators. Second, we introduce three compression methods (rescaled SVD, deparallelization, and delinearization) for MPOs and show that it is possible to construct efficient representations of arbitrary operators using MPO arithmetic and compression. As examples, we construct powers of a short-ranged spin-chain Hamiltonian, a complicated Hamiltonian of a two-dimensional system and, as proof of principle, the long-range four-body Hamiltonian from quantum chemistry.

  4. Learned fusion operators based on matrix completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risko, Kelly K. D.; Hester, Charles F.

    2011-05-01

    The efficient and timely management of imagery captured in the battlefield requires methods capable of searching the voluminous databases and extracting highly symbolic concepts. When processing images, a semantic and definition gap exists between machine representations and the user's language. Based on matrix completion techniques, we present a fusion operator that fuses imagery and expert knowledge provided by user inputs during post analysis. Specifically, an information matrix is formed from imagery and a class map as labeled by an expert. From this matrix an image operator is derived for the extraction/prediction of information from future imagery. We will present results using this technique on single mode data.

  5. A new kind of symmetric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babarinsa, O.; Kamarulhaili, H.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a new category of symmetric matrix, denoted as Bn×n , which can be considered as obtained from an improper integral {Bn × n} =\\displaystyle \\mathop {\\lim }\\limitsb \\to - ∞ \\displaystyle \\int\\limits_b1 {c{x - 1}dx} ; where c = ij ‑ (i + j). The elements of the matrix are integers and are in sequence. Thus the matrix is singular (except for B 2×2) but nonsingular in its 2 × 2 connected minors. We give some deductions on its properties that other symmetric matrices do not possess.

  6. Extracellular matrix signaling in morphogenesis and repair.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Barker, Thomas H

    2013-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is critically important for many cellular processes including growth, differentiation, survival, and morphogenesis. Cells remodel and reshape the ECM by degrading and reassembling it, playing an active role in sculpting their surrounding environment and directing their own phenotypes. Both mechanical and biochemical molecules influence ECM dynamics in multiple ways; by releasing small bioactive signaling molecules, releasing growth factors stored within the ECM, eliciting structural changes to matrix proteins which expose cryptic sites and by degrading matrix proteins directly. The dynamic reciprocal communication between cells and the ECM plays a fundamental roll in tissue development, homeostasis, and wound healing.

  7. Curvature and gravity actions for matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Steinacker, Harold

    2010-08-01

    We show how gravitational actions, in particular the Einstein-Hilbert action, can be obtained from additional terms in Yang-Mills matrix models. This is consistent with recent results on induced gravitational actions in these matrix models, realizing spacetime as four-dimensional brane solutions. It opens up the possibility for a controlled non-perturbative description of gravity through simple matrix models, with interesting perspectives for the problem of vacuum energy. The relation with UV/IR mixing and non-commutative gauge theory is discussed.

  8. Scattering matrix theory for stochastic scalar fields.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, Olga; Wolf, Emil

    2007-05-01

    We consider scattering of stochastic scalar fields on deterministic as well as on random media, occupying a finite domain. The scattering is characterized by a generalized scattering matrix which transforms the angular correlation function of the incident field into the angular correlation function of the scattered field. Within the accuracy of the first Born approximation this matrix can be expressed in a simple manner in terms of the scattering potential of the scatterer. Apart from determining the angular distribution of the spectral intensity of the scattered field, the scattering matrix makes it possible also to determine the changes in the state of coherence of the field produced on scattering.

  9. A matrix model from string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeze, Syoji

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that a Hermitian matrix model can be derived from level truncated open string field theory with Chan-Paton factors. The Hermitian matrix is coupled with a scalar and U(N) vectors which are responsible for the D-brane at the tachyon vacuum. Effective potential for the scalar is evaluated both for finite and large N. Increase of potential height is observed in both cases. The large N matrix integral is identified with a system of N ZZ branes and a ghost FZZT brane.

  10. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ünsal; Unsal, Yılmaz; Gücüyener, Kıvılcım; Kıvılcım, Gücüyener; Atak, Ayşegül; Ayşegül, Atak; Aral, Arzu; Arzu, Aral; Gürkaş, Esra; Esra, Gürkaş; Demir, Ercan; Ercan, Demir; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe; Ayşe, Serdaroğlu

    2012-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors play a key role in the pathogenesis of adult-onset multiple sclerosis, and were suggested as biomarkers of response to interferon-β, an established treatment in multiple sclerosis. However, data regarding pediatric population are scarce. We determined serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase-7, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in children, and evaluated effects of interferon-β therapy on these measures. Serum samples from 14 children with relapsing, remitting multiple sclerosis at baseline and at month 12, and from 15 controls, were collected. Interferon-β treatment was initiated in eight patients. Mean serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels and matrix metalloproteinase-9/tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 ratio were higher in patients compared with controls, and were reduced significantly in treated patients at month 12, but did not change in untreated patients. Mean matrix metalloproteinase-7 levels were lower in patients compared with controls, and increased significantly in the treated group, but did not change significantly in the untreated group. In pediatric multiple sclerosis, a shift in matrix metalloproteinase-9/tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 balance toward proteolytic activity is evident, and interferon-β therapy demonstrates a beneficial effect on this disturbed balance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  13. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  14. Constrained Nonnegative Matrix Factorization for Image Representation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohui; Li, Xuelong; Cai, Deng; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-07-01

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is a popular technique for finding parts-based, linear representations of nonnegative data. It has been successfully applied in a wide range of applications such as pattern recognition, information retrieval, and computer vision. However, NMF is essentially an unsupervised method and cannot make use of label information. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised matrix decomposition method, called Constrained Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (CNMF), which incorporates the label information as additional constraints. Specifically, we show how explicitly combining label information improves the discriminating power of the resulting matrix decomposition. We explore the proposed CNMF method with two cost function formulations and provide the corresponding update solutions for the optimization problems. Empirical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of our novel algorithm in comparison to the state-of-the-art approaches through a set of evaluations based on real-world applications.

  15. On matrix cracking in fiber reinforced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yih-Cheng; Wang, A. S. D.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1993-07-01

    THISPAPER addresses critical stress at the propagation of a fiber-bridged matrix crack of arbitrary length in fiber-reinforced brittle matrix composites. The formulation of the problem follows the approach adopted earlier by Marshall, Cox and Evans, but a new shear-lag model that accounts for the matrix shear deformation above the slipping region is used here to derive the relationship between the crack opening displacement and the crack surface closure traction. The inclusion of the matrix shear deformation above the slipping region significantly affects the calculated crack tip stress intensity factor and the prediction of the critical stress at the propagation of the crack. Illustrative examples are cited using three available composite systems of SiC-borosilicate, C-borosilicate and Nicalon-lithium-aluminosilicate (LAS).

  16. Software for Fault-Tolerant Matrix Multiplication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Daniel; Tisdale, Edwin; Quintana-Orti, Enrique; Gunnels, John; van de Geijn, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Formal Linear Algebra Recovery Environment is a computer program for high-performance, fault-tolerant matrix multiplication. The program is based on an extension of the prior theory and practice of fault-tolerant matrix matrix multiplication of the form C = AB. This extension provides low-overhead methods for detecting errors, not only in C, but also in A and/or B. These methods enable the detection of all errors as long as, in a given case, only one entry in A, B, or C is corrupted. The program also provides for following a low-overhead rollback approach to correct errors once detected. Results of computational experiments have demonstrated that the methods implemented in this program work well in practice while imposing an acceptably low level of overhead, relative to high-performance matrix-multiplication methods that do not afford fault tolerance.

  17. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  18. Chondrule-matrix relationships in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between chondrules and matrix (fine grained material with a grain size less than 5 micrometers) in chondritic meteorites has been the subject of considerable controversy and no consensus currently exists. The coexistence of these two components in meteorites with bulk compositions that deviate only slightly from CI abundances suggests that cosmochemically their origins are closely linked. Any consideration of the relationship between chondrules and matrix hinges to a large degree on the origin of matrix. The entire spectrum of models exists from matrix as a nebular product to derivation entirely from chondrules. Early models of solar nebular evolution viewed chondrites as a two-component mixture of high- and low-temperature condensates. However, this model has been challenged by the recognition that the nebula was probably not uniformly vaporized.

  19. Supersymmetric SYK model and random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianlin; Liu, Junyu; Xin, Yuan; Zhou, Yehao

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of supersymmetry on the symmetry classification of random matrix theory ensembles. We mainly consider the random matrix behaviors in the N=1 supersymmetric generalization of Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model, a toy model for two-dimensional quantum black hole with supersymmetric constraint. Some analytical arguments and numerical results are given to show that the statistics of the supersymmetric SYK model could be interpreted as random matrix theory ensembles, with a different eight-fold classification from the original SYK model and some new features. The time-dependent evolution of the spectral form factor is also investigated, where predictions from random matrix theory are governing the late time behavior of the chaotic hamiltonian with supersymmetry.

  20. Structural Analysis and Matrix Interpretive System /SAMIS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Structural Analysis and Matrix Interpretive System eliminates high-speed digital computer restrictions of lack of generalization and lack of flexibility. Programming concepts of the system are standardization, modularity, and programming for intermediate-size problems.

  1. Emergent spacetime & quantum entanglement in matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakian, Vatche; Tawabutr, Yossathorn; Yan, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    In the context of the Bank-Fishler-Shenker-Susskind Matrix theory, we analyze a spherical membrane in light-cone M theory along with two asymptotically distant probes. In the appropriate energy regime, we find that the membrane behaves like a smeared Matrix black hole; and the spacetime geometry seen by the probes can become non-commutative even far away from regions of Planckian curvature. This arises from non-linear Matrix interactions where fast matrix modes lift a flat direction in the potential — akin to the Paul trap phenomenon in atomic physics. In the regime where we do have a notion of emergent spacetime, we show that there is non-zero entanglement entropy between supergravity modes on the membrane and the probes. The computation can easily be generalized to other settings, and this can help develop a dictionary between entanglement entropy and local geometry — similar to Ryu-Takayanagi but instead for asymptotically flat backgrounds.

  2. Microstructure of Matrix in UHTC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael I.; Chavez-Garia Jose; Doxtad, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Approaches to controlling the microstructure of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) are described.. One matrix material has been infiltrated into carbon weaves to make composite materials. The microstructure of these composites is described.

  3. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  4. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Simona Roxana; Crăciun, Alexandra Mărioara

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors.

  5. Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) Query - Popup

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site allows you to to easily query the Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) and generate a list of the corresponding Hazardous Ranking System (HRS) factor values, benchmarks, and data elements that you need.

  6. Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) Query

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site allows you to to easily query the Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM) and generate a list of the corresponding Hazard Ranking System (HRS) factor values, benchmarks, and data elements that you need.

  7. Contact matrix in dilute quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-Liang; He, Mingyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Contact has been well established as an important quantity to govern dilute quantum systems, in which the pairwise correlation at short distance traces a broad range of thermodynamic properties. So far, most studies have focused on contact in individual angular momentum channels. Here we point out that, to have a complete description of the pairwise correlation in a general dilute quantum systems, contact should be defined as a matrix. Whereas the diagonal terms of such a matrix include contact of all partial wave scatterings, the off-diagonal terms characterize the coherence of the asymptotic pairwise wave function in the angular momentum space and determine important thermodynamic quantities including the momentum distribution. The contact matrix allows physicists to access unexplored connections between short-range correlations and macroscopic quantum phenomena. As an example, we show the direct connection between the contact matrix and order parameters of a superfluid with mixed partial waves.

  8. Comix, a New Matrix Element Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoche, Stefan; /Durham U., IPPP

    2008-09-03

    We present a new tree-level matrix element generator, based on the color dressed Berends-Giele recursive relations. We discuss two new algorithms for phase space integration, dedicated to be used with large multiplicities and color sampling.

  9. Matrix Models, Emergent Spacetime and Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Harald; Steinacker, Harold; Lizzi, Fedele

    2009-12-15

    We discuss how a matrix model recently shown to describe emergent gravity may contain extra degrees of freedom which reproduce some characteristics of the standard model, in particular the breaking of symmetries and the correct quantum numbers of fermions.

  10. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  11. Amyloid Structures as Biofilm Matrix Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Lasa, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights into bacterial biofilm matrix structures have induced a paradigm shift toward the recognition of amyloid fibers as common building block structures that confer stability to the exopolysaccharide matrix. Here we describe the functional amyloid systems related to biofilm matrix formation in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and recent knowledge regarding the interaction of amyloids with other biofilm matrix components such as extracellular DNA (eDNA) and the host immune system. In addition, we summarize the efforts to identify compounds that target amyloid fibers for therapeutic purposes and recent developments that take advantage of the amyloid structure to engineer amyloid fibers of bacterial biofilm matrices for biotechnological applications. PMID:27185827

  12. Optimal matrix approximants in structural identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, C. A.; Smith, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Problems of model correlation and system identification are central in the design, analysis, and control of large space structures. Of the numerous methods that have been proposed, many are based on finding minimal adjustments to a model matrix sufficient to introduce some desirable quality into that matrix. In this work, several of these methods are reviewed, placed in a modern framework, and linked to other previously known ideas in computational linear algebra and optimization. This new framework provides a point of departure for a number of new methods which are introduced here. Significant among these is a method for stiffness matrix adjustment which preserves the sparsity pattern of an original matrix, requires comparatively modest computational resources, and allows robust handling of noisy modal data. Numerical examples are included to illustrate the methods presented herein.

  13. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  14. Application of Fuzzy Logic to Matrix FMECA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, N. Ravi; Prabhu, B. S.

    2001-04-01

    A methodology combining the benefits of Fuzzy Logic and Matrix FMEA is presented in this paper. The presented methodology extends the risk prioritization beyond the conventional Risk Priority Number (RPN) method. Fuzzy logic is used to calculate the criticality rank. Also the matrix approach is improved further to develop a pictorial representation retaining all relevant qualitative and quantitative information of several FMEA elements relationships. The methodology presented is demonstrated by application to an illustrative example.

  15. Mechanisms balancing skeletal matrix synthesis and degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Zaidi, Mone; Schlesinger, Paul H

    2002-01-01

    Bone is regulated by evolutionarily conserved signals that balance continuous differentiation of bone matrix-producing cells against apoptosis and matrix removal. This is continued from embryogenesis, where the skeleton differentiates as a solid mass and is shaped into separate bones by cell death and proteolysis. The two major tissues of the skeleton are avascular cartilage, with an extracellular matrix based on type II collagen and hydrophilic proteoglycans, and bone, a stronger and lighter material based on oriented type I collagen and hydroxyapatite. Both differentiate from the same mesenchymal stem cells. This differentiation is regulated by a family of related signals centred on bone morphogenic proteins. Fibroblast growth factors, Indian hedgehog and parathyroid hormone-related protein are important in determining the type of matrix and the relation of skeletal and non-skeletal structures. Removal of mineralized matrix involves apoptosis of matrix cells and differentiation of acid-secreting cells (osteoclasts) from macrophage precursors. Key regulators of matrix removal are signals in the tumour-necrosis-factor family. Osteoclasts dissolve bone by isolating a region of the matrix and secreting HCl and proteinases at that site. Successive cycles of removal and replacement allow growth, repair and remodelling. The signals for bone turnover are predominantly cell-membrane-associated, allowing very specific spatial regulation. In addition to its support function, bone is a reservoir of Ca2+, PO3-(4) and OH-. Secondary modulation of mineral secretion and bone degradation are mediated by humoral signals, including parathyroid hormone and vitamin D, as well as the cytokines that also regulate the underlying cell differentiation. PMID:12023876

  16. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  17. Semiclassical matrix elements from periodic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, B.; Fishman, S.; Mueller, K.; Wintgen, D.

    1992-01-01

    An extension of Gutzwiller's (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1990) semiclassical theory for chaotic systems that allows a determination of matrix elements in terms of classical periodic orbits. Associated zeta functions are derived. The semiclassical predictions are found to be in good agreement with Fourier transforms of quantum spectra of hydrogen in a magnetic field. Expressions for off-diagonal matrix elements are derived that are extensions of the Bohr correspondence relations for integrable systems.

  18. Semisupervised kernel matrix learning by kernel propagation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Enliang; Chen, Songcan; Zhang, Daoqiang; Yin, Xuesong

    2010-11-01

    The goal of semisupervised kernel matrix learning (SS-KML) is to learn a kernel matrix on all the given samples on which just a little supervised information, such as class label or pairwise constraint, is provided. Despite extensive research, the performance of SS-KML still leaves some space for improvement in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. For example, a recent pairwise constraints propagation (PCP) algorithm has formulated SS-KML into a semidefinite programming (SDP) problem, but its computation is very expensive, which undoubtedly restricts PCPs scalability in practice. In this paper, a novel algorithm, called kernel propagation (KP), is proposed to improve the comprehensive performance in SS-KML. The main idea of KP is first to learn a small-sized sub-kernel matrix (named seed-kernel matrix) and then propagate it into a larger-sized full-kernel matrix. Specifically, the implementation of KP consists of three stages: 1) separate the supervised sample (sub)set X(l) from the full sample set X; 2) learn a seed-kernel matrix on X(l) through solving a small-scale SDP problem; and 3) propagate the learnt seed-kernel matrix into a full-kernel matrix on X . Furthermore, following the idea in KP, we naturally develop two conveniently realizable out-of-sample extensions for KML: one is batch-style extension, and the other is online-style extension. The experiments demonstrate that KP is encouraging in both effectiveness and efficiency compared with three state-of-the-art algorithms and its related out-of-sample extensions are promising too.

  19. Random Matrix Analysis of Human EEG Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šeba, P.

    2003-11-01

    We use random matrix theory to demonstrate the existence of generic and subject-independent features of the ensemble of correlation matrices extracted from human EEG data. In particular, the spectral density as well as the level spacings was analyzed and shown to be generic and subject independent. We also investigate number variance distributions. In this case we show that when the measured subject is visually stimulated the number variance displays deviations from the random matrix prediction.

  20. Shrinkage approach for EEG covariance matrix estimation.

    PubMed

    Beltrachini, Leandro; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Muravchik, Carlos H

    2010-01-01

    We present a shrinkage estimator for the EEG spatial covariance matrix of the background activity. We show that such an estimator has some advantages over the maximum likelihood and sample covariance estimators when the number of available data to carry out the estimation is low. We find sufficient conditions for the consistency of the shrinkage estimators and results concerning their numerical stability. We compare several shrinkage schemes and show how to improve the estimator by incorporating known structure of the covariance matrix.

  1. Semiclassical matrix elements from periodic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckhardt, B.; Fishman, S.; Mueller, K.; Wintgen, D.

    1992-01-01

    An extension of Gutzwiller's (1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1990) semiclassical theory for chaotic systems that allows a determination of matrix elements in terms of classical periodic orbits. Associated zeta functions are derived. The semiclassical predictions are found to be in good agreement with Fourier transforms of quantum spectra of hydrogen in a magnetic field. Expressions for off-diagonal matrix elements are derived that are extensions of the Bohr correspondence relations for integrable systems.

  2. Fibre-Matrix Interaction in Soft Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zaoyang

    2010-05-21

    Although the mechanical behaviour of soft tissue has been extensively studied, the interaction between the collagen fibres and the ground matrix has not been well understood and is therefore ignored by most constitutive models of soft tissue. In this paper, the human annulus fibrosus is used as an example and the potential fibre-matrix interaction is identified by careful investigation of the experimental results of biaxial and uniaxial testing of the human annulus fibrosus. First, the uniaxial testing result of the HAF along the axial direction is analysed and it is shown that the mechanical behaviour of the ground matrix can be well simulated by the incompressible neo-Hookean model when the collagen fibres are all under contraction. If the collagen fibres are stretched, the response of the ground matrix can still be described by the incompressible neo-Hookean model, but the effective stiffness of the matrix depends on the fibre stretch ratio. This stiffness can be more than 10 times larger than the one obtained with collagen fibres under contraction. This phenomenon can only be explained by the fibre-matrix interaction. Furthermore, we find that the physical interpretation of this interaction includes the inhomogeneity of the soft tissue and the fibre orientation dispersion. The dependence of the tangent stiffness of the matrix on the first invariant of the deformation tensor can also be explained by the fibre orientation dispersion. The significant effect of the fibre-matrix interaction strain energy on mechanical behaviour of the soft tissue is also illustrated by comparing some simulation results.

  3. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G.; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  4. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  5. Fuel cell with electrolyte matrix assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Arthur; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1988-01-01

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell employing a substantially immobilized electrolyte imbedded therein and having a laminated matrix assembly disposed between the electrodes of the cell for holding and distributing the electrolyte. The matrix assembly comprises a non-conducting fibrous material such as silicon carbide whiskers having a relatively large void-fraction and a layer of material having a relatively small void-fraction.

  6. Molten carbonate fuel cell matrix tape

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, R.W.; Schroll, C.R.; Reiser, C.A.

    1986-04-08

    A matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described comprising particles inert to molten carbonate electrolyte having a particle size less than about 1 micron, ceramic particles having a particle size greater than about 25 microns, and an organic polymeric binder material, the binder material being present in an amount at least about 35% by volume, the matrix material being flexible, pliable, and compliant at room temperature.

  7. Cryogenic regenerator including sarancarbon heat conduction matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Britcliffe, Michael J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A saran carbon matrix is employed to conduct heat through the heat storing volume of a cryogenic regenerator. When helium is adsorbed into the saran carbon matrix, the combination exhibits a volumetric specific heat much higher than previously used lead balls. A helium adsorbed saran regenerator should allow much lower refrigerator temperatures than those practically obtainable with lead based regenerators for regenerator type refrigeration systems.

  8. Genetic Relationships Between Chondrules, Rims and Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.; Alexander, C. M. OD.; Palme, H.; Bland, P. A.; Wasson, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    The most primitive chondrites are composed of chondrules and chondrule fragments, various types of inclusions, discrete mineral grains, metal, sulfides, and fine-grained materials that occur as interchondrule matrix and as chondrule/inclusion rims. Understanding how these components are related is essential for understanding how chondrites and their constituents formed and were processed in the solar nebula. For example, were the first generations of chondrules formed by melting of matrix or matrix precursors? Did chondrule formation result in appreciable transfer of chondrule material into the matrix? Here, we consider three types of data: 1) compositional data for bulk chondrites and matrix, 2) mineralogical and textural information, and 3) the abundances and characteristics of presolar materials that reside in the matrix and rims. We use these data to evaluate the roles of evaporation and condensation, chondrule formation, mixing of different nebular components, and secondary processing both in the nebula and on the parent bodies. Our goal is to identify the things that are reasonably well established and to point out the areas that need additional work.

  9. On the Instanton R-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2016-08-01

    A torus action on a symplectic variety allows one to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equations ( R-matrices). For a torus action on cotangent bundles over flag varieties the resulting R-matrices are the standard rational solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation, well known in the theory of quantum integrable systems. The torus action on the instanton moduli space leads to more complicated R-matrices, depending additionally on two equivariant parameters t 1 and t 2. In this paper we derive an explicit expression for the R-matrix associated with the instanton moduli space. We study its matrix elements and its Taylor expansion in the powers of the spectral parameter. Certain matrix elements of this R-matrix give a generating function for the characteristic classes of tautological bundles over the Hilbert schemes in terms of the bosonic cut-and-join operators. In particular we rederive from the R-matrix the well known Lehn's formula for the first Chern class. We explicitly compute the first several coefficients for the power series expansion of the R-matrix in the spectral parameter. These coefficients are represented by simple contour integrals of some symmetrized bosonic fields.

  10. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort.

  11. Pseudomonas biofilm matrix composition and niche biology

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Ethan E.; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are a predominant form of growth for bacteria in the environment and in the clinic. Critical for biofilm development are adherence, proliferation, and dispersion phases. Each of these stages includes reinforcement by, or modulation of, the extracellular matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a model organism for the study of biofilm formation. Additionally, other Pseudomonas species utilize biofilm formation during plant colonization and environmental persistence. Pseudomonads produce several biofilm matrix molecules, including polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Accessory matrix components shown to aid biofilm formation and adaptability under varying conditions are also produced by pseudomonads. Adaptation facilitated by biofilm formation allows for selection of genetic variants with unique and distinguishable colony morphology. Examples include rugose small-colony variants and wrinkly spreaders (WS), which over produce Psl/Pel or cellulose, respectively, and mucoid bacteria that over produce alginate. The well-documented emergence of these variants suggests that pseudomonads take advantage of matrix-building subpopulations conferring specific benefits for the entire population. This review will focus on various polysaccharides as well as additional Pseudomonas biofilm matrix components. Discussions will center on structure–function relationships, regulation, and the role of individual matrix molecules in niche biology. PMID:22212072

  12. Interfaces between a fibre and its matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilholt, H.; Sørensen, B. F.

    2017-07-01

    The interface between a fibre and its matrix represents an important element in the characterization and exploitation of composite materials. Both theoretical models and analyses of experimental data have been presented in the literature since modern composite were developed and many experiments have been performed. A large volume of results for a wide range of composite systems exists, but rather little comparison and potential consistency have been reached for fibres and/or for matrices. Recently a materials mechanics approach has been presented to describe the interface by three parameters, the interfacial energy [J/m2], the interfacial frictional shear stress [MPa] and the mismatch strain [-] between fibre and matrix. The model has been used for the different modes of fibre pull-out and fibre fragmentation. In this paper it is demonstrated that the governing equations for the experimental parameters (applied load, debond length and relative fibre/matrix displacement) are rather similar for these test modes. A simplified analysis allows the direct determination of the three interface parameters from two plots for the experimental data. The complete analysis is demonstrated for steel fibres in polyester matrix. The analysis of existing experimental literature data is demonstrated for steel fibres in epoxy matrix and for tungsten wires in copper matrix. These latter incomplete analyses show that some results can be obtained even if all three experimental parameters are not recorded.

  13. Temperature dependent nonlinear metal matrix laminae behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, D. J.; Buesking, K. W.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical method is described for computing the nonlinear thermal and mechanical response of laminated plates. The material model focuses upon the behavior of metal matrix materials by relating the nonlinear composite response to plasticity effects in the matrix. The foundation of the analysis is the unidirectional material model which is used to compute the instantaneous properties of the lamina based upon the properties of the fibers and matrix. The unidirectional model assumes that the fibers properties are constant with temperature and assumes that the matrix can be modelled as a temperature dependent, bilinear, kinematically hardening material. An incremental approach is used to compute average stresses in the fibers and matrix caused by arbitrary mechanical and thermal loads. The layer model is incorporated in an incremental laminated plate theory to compute the nonlinear response of laminated metal matrix composites of general orientation and stacking sequence. The report includes comparisons of the method with other analytical approaches and compares theoretical calculations with measured experimental material behavior. A section is included which describes the limitations of the material model.

  14. Ionic liquids as matrixes for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, D W; Zhang, L K; He, L; Gross, M L

    2001-08-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquids are useful as solvents for organic synthesis, electrochemical studies, and separations. We wished to examine whether their high solubalizing power, negligible vapor pressure, and broad liquid temperature range are advantageous if they are used as matrixes for UV-MALDI. Several different ionic matrixes were synthesized and tested, using peptides, proteins, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-2000). All ionic liquids tested have excellent solubilizing properties and vacuum stability compared to other commonly used liquid and solid matrixes. However, they varied widely in their ability to produce analyte gas-phase ions. Certain ionic matrixes, however, produce homogeneous solutions of greater vacuum stability, higher ion peak intensity, and equivalent or lower detection limits than currently used solid matrixes. Clearly, ionic liquids and their more amorphous solid analogues merit further investigation as MALDI matrixes.

  15. Modeling the formation of cell-matrix adhesions on a single 3D matrix fiber.

    PubMed

    Escribano, J; Sánchez, M T; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-11-07

    Cell-matrix adhesions are crucial in different biological processes like tissue morphogenesis, cell motility, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These interactions that link cell cytoskeleton and matrix fibers are built through protein clutches, generally known as adhesion complexes. The adhesion formation process has been deeply studied in two-dimensional (2D) cases; however, the knowledge is limited for three-dimensional (3D) cases. In this work, we simulate different local extracellular matrix properties in order to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that regulate the formation of cell-matrix adhesions in 3D. We aim to study the mechanical interaction of these biological structures through a three dimensional discrete approach, reproducing the transmission pattern force between the cytoskeleton and a single extracellular matrix fiber. This numerical model provides a discrete analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of the different phenomena, such as protein clutches unbinding or protein unfolding.

  16. Optical matrix-matrix multiplication method demonstrated by the use of a multifocus hololens.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y Z; Liu, H K

    1984-08-01

    A method of optical matrix-matrix multiplication is presented. The feasibility of the method is also experimentally demonstrated by the use of a dichromated-gelatin multifocus holographic lens (hololens). With the specific values of matrices chosen, the average percentage error between the theoretical and experimental data of the elements of the output matrix of the multiplication of some specific pairs of 3 x 3 matrices is 0.4%, which corresponds to an 8-bit accuracy.

  17. Optical matrix-matrix multiplication method demonstrated by the use of a multifocus hololens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. K.; Liang, Y.-Z.

    1984-01-01

    A method of optical matrix-matrix multiplication is presented. The feasibility of the method is also experimentally demonstrated by the use of a dichromated-gelatin multifocus holographic lens (hololens). With the specific values of matrices chosen, the average percentage error between the theoretical and experimental data of the elements of the output matrix of the multiplication of some specific pairs of 3 x 3 matrices is 0.4 percent, which corresponds to an 8-bit accuracy.

  18. Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2006-03-28

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  19. Modeling for Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Cross-ply Ceramic-Matrix Composites Using Energy Balance Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The matrix multicracking evolution of cross-ply ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated using energy balance approach. The multicracking of cross-ply CMCs was classified into five modes, i.e., (1) mode 1: transverse multicracking; (2) mode 2: transverse multicracking and matrix multicracking with perfect fiber/matrix interface bonding; (3) mode 3: transverse multicracking and matrix multicracking with fiber/matrix interface debonding; (4) mode 4: matrix multicracking with perfect fiber/matrix interface bonding; and (5) mode 5: matrix multicracking with fiber/matrix interface debonding. The stress distributions of four cracking modes, i.e., mode 1, mode 2, mode 3 and mode 5, are analysed using shear-lag model. The matrix multicracking evolution of mode 1, mode 2, mode 3 and mode 5, has been determined using energy balance approach. The effects of ply thickness and fiber volume fraction on matrix multicracking evolution of cross-ply CMCs have been investigated.

  20. INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 16 (FOAM CORE) / CARBON REINFORCED CYANOESTER (CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE - CMC) HOT STRUCTURE, PANEL 884-1: SAMPLE 1