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Sample records for chloroplast microsatellites reveal

  1. Chloroplast and microsatellite DNA diversities reveal the introduction history of Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius) in Florida.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dean A; Overholt, William A; Cuda, James P; Hughes, Colin R

    2005-10-01

    Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius) is a woody perennial that has invaded much of Florida. This native of northeastern Argentina, Paraguay, and Brazil was brought as an ornamental to both the west and east coasts of Florida at the end of the 19th century. It was recorded as an invader of natural areas in the 1950s, and has since extended its range to cover over 280 000 ha. Our goals were to understand the history of this invasion, as one step toward understanding why this exotic was so successful, and ultimately to improve development of biological control agents. We sampled plants from the native and exotic ranges, particularly Florida, and genotyped these individuals at nuclear and chloroplast loci. Nuclear microsatellite and cpDNA loci reveal strong genetic population structure consistent with limited dispersal in the introduced and native ranges. Bayesian clustering of microsatellite data separates the east and west coast plants in Florida into distinct populations. The two chloroplast haplotypes found in Florida are also concordant with this separation: one predominates on the east coast, the other on the west coast. Analysis of samples collected in South America shows that haplotypes as distinct as the two in Florida are unlikely to have come from a single source population. We conclude that the genetic evidence supports two introductions of Brazilian peppertree into Florida and extensive hybridization between them. The west coast genotype likely came from coastal Brazil at about 27 degrees south, whereas the east coast genotype probably originated from another, as yet unidentified site. As a result of hybridization, the Florida population does not exhibit low genetic variation compared to populations in the native range, possibly increasing its ability to adapt to novel environments. Hybridization also has important consequences for the selection of biocontrol agents since it will not be possible to identify closely co-adapted natural enemies in

  2. Range-wide phylogeography and gene zones in Pinus pinaster Ait. revealed by chloroplast microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Gabriele; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Le Provost, Grégoire; Plomion, Christophe; Ribeiro, Maria Margarida; Sebastiani, Federico; Alía, Ricardo; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    Some 1339 trees from 48 Pinus pinaster stands were characterized by five chloroplast microsatellites, detecting a total of 103 distinct haplotypes. Frequencies for the 16 most abundant haplotypes (p(k) > 0.01) were spatially interpolated over a lattice made by 430 grid points. Fitting of spatially interpolated values on raw haplotype frequencies at the same geographical location was tested by regression analysis. A range-wide 'diversity map' based on interpolated haplotype frequencies allowed the identification of one 'hotspot' of diversity in central and southeastern Spain, and two areas of low haplotypic diversity located in the western Iberian peninsula and Morocco. Principal component analysis (PCA) carried out on haplotypes frequency surfaces allowed the construction of a colour-based 'synthetic' map of the first three PC components, enabling the detection of the main range-scale genetic trends and the identification of three main 'gene pools' for the species: (i) a 'southeastern' gene pool, including southeastern France, Italy, Corsica, Sardinia, Pantelleria and northern Africa; (ii) an 'Atlantic' gene pool, including all the western areas of the Iberian peninsula; and (iii) a 'central' gene pool, located in southeastern Spain. Multivariate and AMOVA analyses carried out on interpolated grid point frequency values revealed the existence of eight major clusters ('gene zones'), whose genetic relationships were related with the history of the species. In addition, demographic models showed more ancient expansions in the eastern and southern ranges of maritime pine probably associated to early postglacial recolonization. The delineation of the gene zones provides a baseline for designing conservation areas in this key Mediterranean pine.

  3. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P < 0.05) and relative abundance (R (2) = 0.6, P < 0.05) of cSSRs. In summary, our comparative studies of chloroplast genomes illustrate the variable distribution of microsatellites and revealed that chloroplast genome of smaller plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  4. Chloroplast Microsatellite Diversity in Phaseolus vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, F.; Bitocchi, E.; Bellucci, E.; Rau, D.; Rodriguez, M.; Attene, G.; Papa, R.; Nanni, L.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary studies that are aimed at defining the processes behind the present level and organization of crop genetic diversity represent the fundamental bases for biodiversity conservation and use. A Mesoamerican origin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris was recently suggested through analysis of nucleotide polymorphism at the nuclear level. Here, we have used chloroplast microsatellites to investigate the origin of the common bean, on the basis of the specific characteristics of these markers (no recombination, haploid genome, uniparental inheritance), to validate these recent findings. Indeed, comparisons of the results obtained through analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic DNA should allow the resolution of some of the contrasting information available on the evolutionary processes. The main outcomes of the present study are: (i) confirmation at the chloroplast level of the results obtained through nuclear data, further supporting the Mesoamerican origin of P. vulgaris, with central Mexico representing the cradle of its diversity; (ii) identification of a putative ancestral plastidial genome, which is characteristic of a group of accessions distributed from central Mexico to Peru, but which have not been highlighted beforehand through analyses at the nuclear level. Finally, the present study suggests that when a single species is analyzed, there is the need to take into account the complexity of the relationships between P. vulgaris and its closely related and partially intercrossable species P. coccineus and P. dumosus. Thus, the present study stresses the importance for the investigation of the speciation processes of these taxa through comparisons of both plastidial and nuclear variability. This knowledge will be fundamental not only from an evolutionary point of view, but also to put P. coccineus and P. dumosus germplasm to better use as a source of useful diversity for P. vulgaris breeding. PMID:23346091

  5. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus (A.) altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Methods and Results: 15 simple seque...

  6. Development of nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered conifer Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Kurata, Seikan; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Isagi, Yuji; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Ito, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae), an endangered conifer species in New Caledonia. Methods and Results: Using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) of an RNA-Seq library, 15 polymorphic nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed. When evaluated with 48 individuals, these markers showed genetic variations ranging from two to 15 alleles and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0 to 0.881. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity and structure of remaining wild populations and improving the genetic status of ex situ populations. PMID:26312198

  7. A genomic approach for isolating chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Jessica N. C.; Nazareno, Alison G.; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: In this study, we developed chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae) to investigate the population structure and genetic diversity of this species. Methods and Results: We used Illumina HiSeq data to reconstruct the chloroplast genome of P. kerere by a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly. We then used the chloroplast genome to develop a set of cpSSRs from intergenic regions. Overall, 24 primer pairs were designed, 21 of which amplified successfully and were polymorphic, presenting three to nine alleles per locus. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.207 (Pac28) to 0.817 (Pac04). All but one locus amplified for all other taxa of Pachyptera. Conclusions: The markers reported here will serve as a basis for studies to assess the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of Pachyptera. PMID:27672522

  8. A genomic approach for isolating chloroplast microsatellite markers for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Jessica N. C.; Nazareno, Alison G.; Lohmann, Lúcia G.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: In this study, we developed chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) for Pachyptera kerere (Bignoniaceae) to investigate the population structure and genetic diversity of this species. Methods and Results: We used Illumina HiSeq data to reconstruct the chloroplast genome of P. kerere by a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly. We then used the chloroplast genome to develop a set of cpSSRs from intergenic regions. Overall, 24 primer pairs were designed, 21 of which amplified successfully and were polymorphic, presenting three to nine alleles per locus. The unbiased haploid diversity per locus varied from 0.207 (Pac28) to 0.817 (Pac04). All but one locus amplified for all other taxa of Pachyptera. Conclusions: The markers reported here will serve as a basis for studies to assess the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of Pachyptera.

  9. Development of novel chloroplast microsatellite markers for Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Xu, L A; Cao, F L; Zhang, H J; Yu, F X

    2015-07-13

    Ginkgo biloba is considered to be a living fossil that can be used to understand the ancient evolutionary history of gymnosperms, but little attention has been given to the study of its population genetics, molecular phylogeography, and genetic resources assessment. Chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) markers are powerful tools for genetic studies of plants. In this study, a total of 30 perfect cpSSRs of Ginkgo were identified and characterized, including di-, tri, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotide repeats. Fifteen of 21 designed primer pairs were successfully amplified to yield specific polymerase chain reaction products from 16 Ginkgo cultivars. Polymorphic cpSSRs were further applied to determine the genetic variation of 116 individuals in 5 populations of G. biloba. The results showed that 24 and 76% genetic variation existed within and among populations of this species, respectively. These polymorphic and monomorphic cpSSR markers can be used to trace the origin and evolutionary history of Ginkgo.

  10. Development of chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered Maianthemum bicolor (Asparagaceae s.l.)1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hana; Kim, Changkyun; Lee, You-Mi; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Ten polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers were developed and characterized in an endemic and endangered herb, Maianthemum bicolor (Asparagaceae s.l.), for use in conservation genetics. Methods and Results: Primer sets flanking each of the 10 cpSSR loci in noncoding regions of the chloroplast genome of M. bicolor were designed. These cpSSR markers were tested on a total of 33 adult individuals from three natural populations in South Korea. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to three. The unbiased haplotype diversity per locus ranged from 0.061 to 0.682. All markers were successfully transferred to the congeneric species M. japonicum, M. bifolium, and M. dilatatum with polymorphisms among the species. Conclusions: The developed cpSSR markers will be useful in assessing the genetic diversity and population structure of M. bicolor and will help to infer its molecular identification, thereby providing a basis for conservation.

  11. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences1

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Elliot M.; Laricchia, Kristen M.; Murphy, Matthew; Ragone, Diane; Scheffler, Brian E.; Simpson, Sheron; Williams, Evelyn W.; Zerega, Nyree J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Methods and Results: Fifteen simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified in chloroplast sequences from four Artocarpus transcriptome assemblies. The markers were evaluated using capillary electrophoresis in A. odoratissimus (105 accessions) and A. altilis (73). They were also evaluated in silico in A. altilis (10), A. camansi (6), and A. altilis × A. mariannensis (7) transcriptomes. All loci were polymorphic in at least one species, with all 15 polymorphic in A. camansi. Per species, average alleles per locus ranged between 2.2 and 2.5. Three loci had evidence of fragment-length homoplasy. Conclusions: These markers will complement existing nuclear markers by enabling confident identification of maternal and clone lines, which are often important in vegetatively propagated crops such as breadfruit. PMID:26421253

  12. [Analysis of microsatellite loci of the chloroplast genome in the genus Capsicum (Pepper)].

    PubMed

    Ryzhova, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2004-08-01

    Six plastome microsatellites were examined in 43 accessions of the genus Capsicum. In total, 33 allelic variants were detected. A specific haplotype of chloroplast DNA was identified for each Capsicum species. Species-specific allelic variants were found for most wild Capsicum species. The highest intraspecific variation was observed for the C. baccatum plastome. Low cpDNA polymorphism was characteristic of C. annuum: the cpSSRs were either monomorphic or dimorphic. The vast majority of C. annuum accessions each had alleles of one type. Another allele type was rare and occurred only in wild accessions. The results testified again to genetic conservation of C. annuum and especially its cultivated forms. The phylogenetic relationships established for the Capsicum species on the basis of plastome analysis were similar to those inferred from the morphological traits, isozyme patterns, and molecular analysis of the nuclear genome.

  13. Development of chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered Maianthemum bicolor (Asparagaceae s.l.)1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hana; Kim, Changkyun; Lee, You-Mi; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Ten polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers were developed and characterized in an endemic and endangered herb, Maianthemum bicolor (Asparagaceae s.l.), for use in conservation genetics. Methods and Results: Primer sets flanking each of the 10 cpSSR loci in noncoding regions of the chloroplast genome of M. bicolor were designed. These cpSSR markers were tested on a total of 33 adult individuals from three natural populations in South Korea. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to three. The unbiased haplotype diversity per locus ranged from 0.061 to 0.682. All markers were successfully transferred to the congeneric species M. japonicum, M. bifolium, and M. dilatatum with polymorphisms among the species. Conclusions: The developed cpSSR markers will be useful in assessing the genetic diversity and population structure of M. bicolor and will help to infer its molecular identification, thereby providing a basis for conservation. PMID:27610276

  14. Genetic structure based on nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite loci of Solanum lycocarpum A. St. Hil. (Solanaceae) in Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, K; Chaves, L J; Vencovsky, R; Kageyama, P Y

    2011-04-19

    Solanum lycocarpum (Solanaceae) is a woody species found in the Brazilian Cerrado. The flowers are pollinated by Xylocopa spp bees, and seeds are dispersed by mammals with distinct home range sizes. As a consequence, relative contributions of pollen and seeds to overall gene flow can vary according to different spatial scales. We studied the genetic structure of four natural populations of S. lycocarpum separated by 19 to 128 km, including individuals located along dirt roads that interlink three of the populations. A total of 294 individuals were genotyped with five nuclear and six chloroplast microsatellite markers. Significant spatial genetic structure was found in the total set of individuals; the Sp statistic was 0.0086. Population differentiation based on the six chloroplast microsatellite markers (θ(pC) = 0.042) was small and similar to that based on the five nuclear microsatellite markers (θ(p) = 0.054). For this set of populations, pollen and seed flow did not differ significantly from one another (pollen-to-seed flow ratio = 1.22). Capability for long distance seed dispersion and colonization of anthropogenic sites contributes to the ability of S. lycocarpum to maintain genetic diversity. Seed dispersion along dirt roads may be critical in preserving S. lycocarpum genetic diversity in fragmented landscapes.

  15. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains. PMID:27035434

  16. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  17. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains. PMID:27035434

  18. Development of Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers and Analysis of Chloroplast Diversity in Chinese Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) and Wild Jujube (Ziziphus acidojujuba Mill.)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Chunmei; Yin, Xiao; Liu, Shipeng; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    Ziziphus is an important genus within the family Rhamnaceae. This genus includes several important fruit tree species that are widely planted in China and India, such as the Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.), the wild jujube (Z. acidojujuba), and the Indian jujube (Z. mauritiana). However, information about their domestication based on the chlorotype diversity of Chinese jujube population is lacking. In this study, chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers were developed and used to investigate the genetic relationships between and domestication of jujube cultivars and wild jujube populations. Primer sets flanking each of the 46 cpSSR loci in non-coding regions of the chloroplast genome sequence of Z. jujuba Mill. cv. ‘Junzao’ were designed. In total, 10 markers showed polymorphisms from 15 samples (9 jujube cultivars and 6 wild jujube individuals), of which 8 loci were due to variations in the number of mononucleotide (A/T) repeats and 2 were due to indels. Six cpSSR markers were used in further analyses of 81 additional samples (63 jujube cultivars, 17 wild jujube samples, and 1 Indian jujube). Using these cpSSR markers, the number of alleles per locus ranged from two to four. In general, the Shannon Index (I) for each cpSSR ranged from 0.159 to 0.1747, and the diversity indices (h) and uh were 0.061 to 0.435 and 0.062 to 0.439, respectively. Seven chlorotypes were found; the Indian jujube showed distinct chlorotypes, and both the Chinese and wild jujube had four chlorotypes and shared two chlorotypes. A dominant chlorotype (G) accounted for 53 of 72 jujube cultivars and 13 of 23 wild jujube individuals. All chlorotypes were highly localized along the Yellow River, from the mid- to the lower reaches, suggesting a wide origin of jujube. These cpSSR markers can be applied to population and evolution studies of Chinese jujube and wild jujube. PMID:26406601

  19. Small effect of fragmentation on the genetic diversity of Dalbergia monticola, an endangered tree species of the eastern forest of Madagascar, detected by chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Andrianoelina, O.; Favreau, B.; Ramamonjisoa, L.; Bouvet, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The oriental forest ecosystem in Madagascar has been seriously impacted by fragmentation. The pattern of genetic diversity was analysed on a tree species, Dalbergia monticola, which plays an important economic role in Madagascar and is one of the many endangered tree species in the eastern forest. Methods Leaves from 546 individuals belonging to 18 small populations affected by different levels of fragmentation were genotyped using eight nuclear (nuc) and three chloroplast (cp) microsatellite markers. Key Results For nuclear microsatellites, allelic richness (R) and heterozygosity (He,nuc) differed between types of forest: R = 7·36 and R = 9·55, He,nuc = 0·64 and He,nuc = 0·80 in fragmented and non-fragmented forest, respectively, but the differences were not significant. Only the mean number of alleles (Na,nuc) and the fixation index FIS differed significantly: Na,nuc = 9·41 and Na,nuc = 13·18, FIS = 0·06 and FIS = 0·15 in fragmented and non-fragmented forests, respectively. For chloroplast microsatellites, estimated genetic diversity was higher in non-fragmented forest, but the difference was not significant. No recent bottleneck effect was detected for either population. Overall differentiation was low for nuclear microsatellites (FST,nuc = 0·08) and moderate for chloroplast microsatellites (FST,cp = 0·49). A clear relationship was observed between genetic and geographic distance (r = 0·42 P < 0·01 and r = 0·42 P = 0·03 for nuclear and chloroplast microsatellites, respectively), suggesting a pattern of isolation by distance. Analysis of population structure using the neighbor-joining method or Bayesian models separated southern populations from central and northern populations with nuclear microsatellites, and grouped the population according to regions with chloroplast microsatellites, but did not separate the fragmented populations. Conclusions Residual diversity and genetic structure of populations of D. monticola in

  20. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure: Implications for Conservation of Wild Soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc) Based on Nuclear and Chloroplast Microsatellite Variation

    PubMed Central

    He, Shuilian; Wang, Yunsheng; Volis, Sergei; Li, Dezhu; Yi, Tingshuang

    2012-01-01

    Wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc) is the most important germplasm resource for soybean breeding, and is currently subject to habitat loss, fragmentation and population decline. In order to develop successful conservation strategies, a total of 604 wild soybean accessions from 43 locations sampled across its range in China, Japan and Korea were analyzed using 20 nuclear (nSSRs) and five chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) to reveal its genetic diversity and population structure. Relatively high nSSR diversity was found in wild soybean compared with other self-pollinated species, and the region of middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River (MDRY) was revealed to have the highest genetic diversity. However, cpSSRs suggested that Korea is a center of diversity. High genetic differentiation and low gene flow among populations were detected, which is consistent with the predominant self-pollination of wild soybean. Two main clusters were revealed by MCMC structure reconstruction and phylogenetic dendrogram, one formed by a group of populations from northwestern China (NWC) and north China (NC), and the other including northeastern China (NEC), Japan, Korea, MDRY, south China (SC) and southwestern China (SWC). Contrib analyses showed that southwestern China makes the greatest contribution to the total diversity and allelic richness, and is worthy of being given conservation priority. PMID:23202917

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure: implications for conservation of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc) based on nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite variation.

    PubMed

    He, Shuilian; Wang, Yunsheng; Volis, Sergei; Li, Dezhu; Yi, Tingshuang

    2012-10-03

    Wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc) is the most important germplasm resource for soybean breeding, and is currently subject to habitat loss, fragmentation and population decline. In order to develop successful conservation strategies, a total of 604 wild soybean accessions from 43 locations sampled across its range in China, Japan and Korea were analyzed using 20 nuclear (nSSRs) and five chloroplast microsatellite markers (cpSSRs) to reveal its genetic diversity and population structure. Relatively high nSSR diversity was found in wild soybean compared with other self-pollinated species, and the region of middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River (MDRY) was revealed to have the highest genetic diversity. However, cpSSRs suggested that Korea is a center of diversity. High genetic differentiation and low gene flow among populations were detected, which is consistent with the predominant self-pollination of wild soybean. Two main clusters were revealed by MCMC structure reconstruction and phylogenetic dendrogram, one formed by a group of populations from northwestern China (NWC) and north China (NC), and the other including northeastern China (NEC), Japan, Korea, MDRY, south China (SC) and southwestern China (SWC). Contrib analyses showed that southwestern China makes the greatest contribution to the total diversity and allelic richness, and is worthy of being given conservation priority.

  2. Evidences for multiple maternal lineages of Caryocar brasiliense populations in the Brazilian Cerrado based on the analysis of chloroplast DNA sequences and microsatellite haplotype variation.

    PubMed

    Collevatti, Rosane G; Grattapaglia, Dario; Hay, John D

    2003-01-01

    In this work we report on the phylogeography of the endangered tree species Caryocar brasiliense based on variability in two classes of maternally inherited chloroplast DNA sequences with different rates of molecular evolution. Eleven sequence haplotypes of a noncoding region between the genes trnT and trnF and 21 distinct 10-locus microsatellite haplotypes could be identified in a total of 160 individuals, collected in 10 widespread populations of C. brasiliense. An amova indicated that most of the variation can be attributed to differences among populations, both for DNA sequence (87.51%) and microsatellites (84.38%). Phylogeography based on a median-joining network analysis of the noncoding region showed a sharp difference from the analysis of microsatellite haplotypes. Nevertheless, both analyses indicated that multiple lineages may have contributed to the origin of C. brasiliense populations in Brazilian Cerrado. Incongruences in the microsatellite haplotypes network suggest that homoplasy, which emerged from recurrent and independent mutations, greatly influenced the evolution of the C. brasiliense chloroplast genome. We hypothesize that our results may show the outcome of the restriction of ancient relic populations to moist refugias during extended droughts coinciding with glaciation in the northern hemisphere. The subsequent spread to favourable areas throughout Central Brazil may have caused contact between different lineages during the interglacial periods. The extinction of megafauna dispersers in the last glaciation may have caused a restriction in seed movement and currently, gene flow has been occurring mainly by pollen movement.

  3. Comparative analysis of dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes reveals rRNA and tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Barbrook, Adrian C; Santucci, Nicole; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Hiller, Roger G; Howe, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Background Peridinin-containing dinoflagellates have a highly reduced chloroplast genome, which is unlike that found in other chloroplast containing organisms. Genome reduction appears to be the result of extensive transfer of genes to the nuclear genome. Unusually the genes believed to be remaining in the chloroplast genome are found on small DNA 'minicircles'. In this study we present a comparison of sets of minicircle sequences from three dinoflagellate species. Results PCR was used to amplify several minicircles from Amphidinium carterae so that a homologous set of gene-containing minicircles was available for Amphidinium carterae and Amphidinium operculatum, two apparently closely related peridinin-containing dinoflagellates. We compared the sequences of these minicircles to determine the content and characteristics of their chloroplast genomes. We also made comparisons with minicircles which had been obtained from Heterocapsa triquetra, another peridinin-containing dinoflagellate. These in silico comparisons have revealed several genetic features which were not apparent in single species analyses. The features include further protein coding genes, unusual rRNA genes, which we show are transcribed, and the first examples of tRNA genes from peridinin-containing dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes. Conclusion Comparative analysis of minicircle sequences has allowed us to identify previously unrecognised features of dinoflagellate chloroplast genomes, including additional protein and RNA genes. The chloroplast rRNA gene sequences are radically different from those in other organisms, and in many ways resemble the rRNA genes found in some highly reduced mitochondrial genomes. The retention of certain tRNA genes in the dinoflagellate chloroplast genome has important implications for models of chloroplast-mitochondrion interaction. PMID:17123435

  4. Simple sequence repeats reveal uneven distribution of genetic diversity in chloroplast genomes of Brassica oleracea L. and (n = 9) wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Allender, C J; Allainguillaume, J; Lynn, J; King, G J

    2007-02-01

    Diversity in the chloroplast genome of 171 accessions representing the Brassica 'C' (n = 9) genome, including domesticated and wild B. oleracea and nine inter-fertile related wild species, was investigated using six chloroplast SSR (microsatellite) markers. The lack of diversity detected among 105 cultivated and wild accessions of B. oleracea contrasted starkly with that found within its wild relatives. The vast majority of B. oleracea accessions shared a single haplotype, whereas as many as six haplotypes were detected in two wild species, B. villosa Biv. and B. cretica Lam.. The SSRs proved to be highly polymorphic across haplotypes, with calculated genetic diversity values (H) of 0.23-0.87. In total, 23 different haplotypes were detected in C genome species, with an additional five haplotypes detected in B. rapa L. (A genome n = 10) and another in B. nigra L. (B genome, n = 8). The low chloroplast diversity of B. oleracea is not suggestive of multiple domestication events. The predominant B. oleracea haplotype was also common in B. incana Ten. and present in low frequencies in B. villosa, B. macrocarpa Guss, B. rupestris Raf. and B. cretica. The chloroplast SSRs reveal a wealth of diversity within wild Brassica species that will facilitate further evolutionary and phylogeographic studies of this important crop genus.

  5. Repression of Essential Chloroplast Genes Reveals New Signaling Pathways and Regulatory Feedback Loops in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rahire, Michèle; Schaad, Olivier; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2013-01-01

    Although reverse genetics has been used to elucidate the function of numerous chloroplast proteins, the characterization of essential plastid genes and their role in chloroplast biogenesis and cell survival has not yet been achieved. Therefore, we developed a robust repressible chloroplast gene expression system in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based mainly on a vitamin-repressible riboswitch, and we used this system to study the role of two essential chloroplast genes: ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), encoding a plastid ribosomal protein, and rpoA, encoding the α-subunit of chloroplast bacterial-like RNA polymerase. Repression of either of these two genes leads to the arrest of cell growth, and it induces a response that involves changes in expression of nuclear genes implicated in chloroplast biogenesis, protein turnover, and stress. This response also leads to the overaccumulation of several plastid transcripts and reveals the existence of multiple negative regulatory feedback loops in the chloroplast gene circuitry. PMID:23292734

  6. Nuclear and chloroplast DNA phylogeography reveal two refuge areas with asymmetrical gene flow in a temperate walnut tree from East Asia.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei-Ning; Liao, Wan-Jin; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2010-11-01

    • Recently, there has been a debate about whether the temperate forests of East Asia merged or fragmented during glacial periods in the Pleistocene. Here, we tested these two opposing views through phylogeographical studies of the temperate-deciduous walnut tree, Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae) in northern and northeastern China, as well as Japan and Korea. • We assessed the genetic structure of 33 natural populations using 10 nuclear microsatellite loci and seven chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) fragments. • The cpDNA data showed the complete fixation of two different haplotype lineages in northeastern vs northern populations. This pronounced phylogeographic break was also indicated by nuclear microsatellite data, but there were disparities regarding individual populations. Among those populations fixed for haplotype A (the northeastern group), three were clustered in the northern group and four showed evidence of mixed ancestry based on microsatellite data. • Our results support the hypothesis that two independent refugia were maintained across the range of J. mandshurica in the north of China during the last glacial maximum, contrary to the inference that all temperate forests migrated to the south (25-30°N). The discordance between the patterns revealed by cpDNA and microsatellite data indicate that asymmetrical gene flow has occurred between the two refugia.

  7. Native architecture of the Chlamydomonas chloroplast revealed by in situ cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Kuhn Cuellar, Luis; Villa, Elizabeth; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-13

    Chloroplast function is orchestrated by the organelle's intricate architecture. By combining cryo-focused ion beam milling of vitreous Chlamydomonas cells with cryo-electron tomography, we acquired three-dimensional structures of the chloroplast in its native state within the cell. Chloroplast envelope inner membrane invaginations were frequently found in close association with thylakoid tips, and the tips of multiple thylakoid stacks converged at dynamic sites on the chloroplast envelope, implicating lipid transport in thylakoid biogenesis. Subtomogram averaging and nearest neighbor analysis revealed that RuBisCO complexes were hexagonally packed within the pyrenoid, with ~15 nm between their centers. Thylakoid stacks and the pyrenoid were connected by cylindrical pyrenoid tubules, physically bridging the sites of light-dependent photosynthesis and light-independent carbon fixation. Multiple parallel minitubules were bundled within each pyrenoid tubule, possibly serving as conduits for the targeted one-dimensional diffusion of small molecules such as ATP and sugars between the chloroplast stroma and the pyrenoid matrix.

  8. Phaseolin expression in tobacco chloroplast reveals an autoregulatory mechanism in heterologous protein translation.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Plastid DNA engineering is a well-established research area of plant biotechnology, and plastid transgenes often give high expression levels. However, it is still almost impossible to predict the accumulation rate of heterologous protein in transplastomic plants, and there are many cases of unsuccessful transgene expression. Chloroplasts regulate their proteome at the post-transcriptional level, mainly through translation control. One of the mechanisms to modulate the translation has been described in plant chloroplasts for the chloroplast-encoded subunits of multiprotein complexes, and the autoregulation of the translation initiation of these subunits depends on the availability of their assembly partners [control by epistasy of synthesis (CES)]. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, autoregulation of endogenous proteins recruited in the assembly of functional complexes has also been reported. In this study, we revealed a self-regulation mechanism triggered by the accumulation of a soluble recombinant protein, phaseolin, in the stroma of chloroplast-transformed tobacco plants. Immunoblotting experiments showed that phaseolin could avoid this self-regulation mechanism when targeted to the thylakoids in transplastomic plants. To inhibit the thylakoid-targeted phaseolin translation as well, this protein was expressed in the presence of a nuclear version of the phaseolin gene with a transit peptide. Pulse-chase and polysome analysis revealed that phaseolin mRNA translation on plastid ribosomes was repressed due to the accumulation in the stroma of the same soluble polypeptide imported from the cytosol. We suggest that translation autoregulation in chloroplast is not limited to heteromeric protein subunits but also involves at least some of the foreign soluble recombinant proteins, leading to the inhibition of plastome-encoded transgene expression in chloroplast. PMID:26031839

  9. Microsatellites reveal high genetic diversity within colonies of Camponotus ants.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, P; Pamilo, P; Varvio, S L

    1995-04-01

    In order to characterize the sociogenetic structure of colonies in the carpenter ants Camponotus herculeanus and C. ligniperda, we have developed microsatellite markers. The three loci studied were either fixed for different alleles in the two species or showed different patterns of polymorphisms. Genotyping of workers and males showed that the broods of C. ligniperda include several matrilines, a rare phenomenon in the genus. Five alleles from a locus polymorphic in both species were sequenced from the respective PCR-products. A part of the length variation appeared to be due to changes outside the repeat sequence, and some PCR products of an equal length had a different number of dinucleotide repeats.

  10. Microsatellites reveal high genetic diversity within colonies of Camponotus ants.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, P; Pamilo, P; Varvio, S L

    1995-04-01

    In order to characterize the sociogenetic structure of colonies in the carpenter ants Camponotus herculeanus and C. ligniperda, we have developed microsatellite markers. The three loci studied were either fixed for different alleles in the two species or showed different patterns of polymorphisms. Genotyping of workers and males showed that the broods of C. ligniperda include several matrilines, a rare phenomenon in the genus. Five alleles from a locus polymorphic in both species were sequenced from the respective PCR-products. A part of the length variation appeared to be due to changes outside the repeat sequence, and some PCR products of an equal length had a different number of dinucleotide repeats. PMID:7735528

  11. Microsatellites reveal genetic diversity in Rotylenchulus reniformis populations

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Renée S.; Stetina, Salliana R.; Tonos, Jennifer L.; Scheffler, Jodi A.

    2009-01-01

    Rotylenchulus reniformis is the predominant parasitic nematode of cotton in the Mid South area of the United States. Although variable levels of infection and morphological differences have been reported for this nematode, genetic variability has been more elusive. We developed microsatellite-enriched libraries for R. reniformis, produced 1152 clones, assembled 694 contigs, detected 783 simple sequence repeats (SSR) and designed 192 SSR-markers. The markers were tested on six R. reniformis cultures from four states, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Georgia, in the USA. Based on performance we selected 156 SSR markers for R. reniformis from which 88 were polymorphic across the six reniform nematode populations, showing as the most frequent motif the dinucleotide AG. The polymorphic information content of the markers ranged from 0.00 to 0.82, and the percentage of multiallelic loci of the isolates was between 40.9 and 45.1%. An interesting finding in this study was the genetic variability detected among the three Mississippi isolates, for which 22 SSR markers were polymorphic. We also tested the level of infection of these isolates on six cotton genotypes, where significant differences were found between the Texas and Georgia isolates. Coincidentally, 62 polymorphic markers were able to distinguish these two populations. Further studies will be necessary to establish possible connections, if any, between markers and level of pathogenicity of the nematode. The SSR markers developed here will be useful in the assessment of the genetic diversity of this nematode, could assist in management practices for control of reniform nematode, be used in breeding programs for crop resistance, and help in detecting the origin and spread of this nematode in the United States. PMID:22661788

  12. The Historical Demography and Genetic Variation of the Endangered Cycas multipinnata (Cycadaceae) in the Red River Region, Examined by Chloroplast DNA Sequences and Microsatellite Markers

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Zhan, Qing-Qing; Nguyen, Khang Sinh; Nguyen, Hiep Tien; Wang, Yue-Hua; Gong, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Cycas multipinnata C.J. Chen & S.Y. Yang is a cycad endemic to the Red River drainage region that occurs under evergreen forest on steep limestone slopes in Southwest China and northern Vietnam. It is listed as endangered due to habitat loss and over-collecting for the ornamental plant trade, and only several populations remain. In this study, we assess the genetic variation, population structure, and phylogeography of C. multipinnata populations to help develop strategies for the conservation of the species. 60 individuals from six populations were used for chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequencing and 100 individuals from five populations were genotyped using 17 nuclear microsatellites. High genetic differentiation among populations was detected, suggesting that pollen or seed dispersal was restricted within populations. Two main genetic clusters were observed in both the cpDNA and microsatellite loci, corresponding to Yunnan China and northern Vietnam. These clusters indicated low levels of gene flow between the regions since their divergence in the late Pleistocene, which was inferred from both Bayesian and coalescent analysis. In addition, the result of a Bayesian skyline plot based on cpDNA portrayed a long history of constant population size followed by a decline in the last 50,000 years of C. multipinnata that was perhaps affected by the Quaternary glaciations, a finding that was also supported by the Garza-Williamson index calculated from the microsatellite data. The genetic consequences produced by climatic oscillations and anthropogenic disturbances are considered key pressures on C. multipinnata. To establish a conservation management plan, each population of C. multipinnata should be recognized as a Management Unit (MU). In situ and ex situ actions, such as controlling overexploitation and creating a germplasm bank with high genetic diversity, should be urgently implemented to preserve this species. PMID:25689828

  13. The Genetic Relationship between Leishmania aethiopica and Leishmania tropica Revealed by Comparing Microsatellite Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Krayter, Lena; Schnur, Lionel F.; Schönian, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Background Leishmania (Leishmania) aethiopica and L. (L.) tropica cause cutaneous leishmaniases and appear to be related. L. aethiopica is geographically restricted to Ethiopia and Kenya; L. tropica is widely dispersed from the Eastern Mediterranean, through the Middle East into eastern India and in north, east and south Africa. Their phylogenetic inter-relationship is only partially revealed. Some studies indicate a close relationship. Here, eight strains of L. aethiopica were characterized genetically and compared with 156 strains of L. tropica from most of the latter species' geographical range to discern the closeness. Methodology/Principal Findings Twelve unlinked microsatellite markers previously used to genotype strains of L. tropica were successfully applied to the eight strains of L. aethiopica and their microsatellite profiles were compared to those of 156 strains of L. tropica from various geographical locations that were isolated from human cases of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis, hyraxes and sand fly vectors. All the microsatellite profiles were subjected to various analytical algorithms: Bayesian statistics, distance-based and factorial correspondence analysis, revealing: (i) the species L. aethiopica, though geographically restricted, is genetically very heterogeneous; (ii) the strains of L. aethiopica formed a distinct genetic cluster; and (iii) strains of L. aethiopica are closely related to strains of L. tropica and more so to the African ones, although, by factorial correspondence analysis, clearly separate from them. Conclusions/Significance The successful application of the 12 microsatellite markers, originally considered species-specific for the species L. tropica, to strains of L. aethiopica confirmed the close relationship between these two species. The Bayesian and distance-based methods clustered the strains of L. aethiopica among African strains of L. tropica, while the factorial correspondence analysis indicated a clear separation

  14. Nuclear microsatellite variation in Malagasy baobabs (Adansonia, Bombacoideae, Malvaceae) reveals past hybridization and introgression

    PubMed Central

    Leong Pock Tsy, Jean-Michel; Lumaret, Roselyne; Flaven-Noguier, Elodie; Sauve, Mathieu; Dubois, Marie-Pierre; Danthu, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Adansonia comprises nine species, six of which are endemic to Madagascar. Genetic relationships between the Malagasy species remain unresolved due to conflicting results between nuclear and plastid DNA variation. Morphologically intermediate individuals between distinct species have been identified, indicative of interspecific hybridization. In this paper, microsatellite data are used to identify potential cases of hybridization and to provide insights into the evolutionary history of the genus on Madagascar. Methods Eleven microsatellites amplified with new primers developed for Adansonia rubrostipa were used to analyse 672 individuals collected at 27 sites for the six Malagasy species and morphologically intermediate individuals. Rates of individual admixture were examined using three Bayesian clustering programs, STRUCTURE, BAPS and NewHybrids, with no a priori species assignment. Key Results Population differentiation was coherent, with recognized species boundaries. In the four Malagasy species of section Longitubae, 8·0, 9·0 and 9·5 % of individuals with mixed genotypes were identified by BAPS, NewHybrids and STRUCTURE, respectively. At sites with sympatric populations of A. rubrostipa and A. za, NewHybrids indicated these individuals to be F2 and, predominantly, backcrosses with both parental species. In northern Madagascar, two populations of trees combining A. za and A. perrieri morphology and microsatellite alleles were identified in the current absence of the parental species. Conclusions The clear genetic differentiation observed between the six species may reflect their adaptation to different assortments of climate regimes and habitats during the colonization of the island. Microsatellite variation reveals that hybridization probably occurred in secondary contact between species of section Longitubae. This type of hybridization may also have been involved in the differentiation of a local new stabilized entity showing specific

  15. Microsatellite loci in eelgrass Zostera marina reveal marked polymorphism within and among populations.

    PubMed

    Reusch, T B; Stam, W T; Olsen, J L

    1999-02-01

    Using an enriched genomic library, we developed seven (CT)n/(GA)n microsatellite loci for eelgrass Zostera marina L. Enrichment is described and highly recommended for genomes in which microsatellites are rare, such as in many plants. A test for polymorphism was performed on individuals from three geographically separated populations (N = 15/population) and revealed considerable genetic variation. The number of alleles per locus varied between five and 11 and the observed heterozygosities for single loci ranged from 0.16 to 0.81 within populations. Mean allele lengths were markedly different among populations, indicating that the identified loci will be useful in studying population structure in Z. marina. As the frequency of the most abundant multilocus genotype within populations was always < 1%, these loci have sufficient resolving power to address clone size in predominantly vegetatively reproducing populations.

  16. Chloroplast phylogenomic analyses reveal the deepest-branching lineage of the Chlorophyta, Palmophyllophyceae class. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Leliaert, Frederik; Tronholm, Ana; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique; DePriest, Michael S.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Karol, Kenneth G.; Fredericq, Suzanne; Zechman, Frederick W.; Lopez-Bautista, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The green plants (Viridiplantae) are an ancient group of eukaryotes comprising two main clades: the Chlorophyta, which includes a wide diversity of green algae, and the Streptophyta, which consists of freshwater green algae and the land plants. The early-diverging lineages of the Viridiplantae comprise unicellular algae, and multicellularity has evolved independently in the two clades. Recent molecular data have revealed an unrecognized early-diverging lineage of green plants, the Palmophyllales, with a unique form of multicellularity, and typically found in deep water. The phylogenetic position of this enigmatic group, however, remained uncertain. Here we elucidate the evolutionary affinity of the Palmophyllales using chloroplast genomic, and nuclear rDNA data. Phylogenetic analyses firmly place the palmophyllalean Verdigellas peltata along with species of Prasinococcales (prasinophyte clade VI) in the deepest-branching clade of the Chlorophyta. The small, compact and intronless chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of V. peltata shows striking similarities in gene content and organization with the cpDNAs of Prasinococcales and the streptophyte Mesostigma viride, indicating that cpDNA architecture has been extremely well conserved in these deep-branching lineages of green plants. The phylogenetic distinctness of the Palmophyllales-Prasinococcales clade, characterized by unique ultrastructural features, warrants recognition of a new class of green plants, Palmophyllophyceae class. nov. PMID:27157793

  17. Nuclear and chloroplast DNA phylogeny reveals complex evolutionary history of Elymus pendulinus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chi; Hu, Qianni; Sun, Genlou

    2014-02-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last decade has shown that allopolyploid genomes may undergo complex reticulate evolution. In this study, 13 accessions of tetraploid Elymus pendulinus were analyzed using two low-copy nuclear genes (RPB2 and PepC) and two regions of chloroplast genome (Rps16 and trnD-trnT). Previous studies suggested that Pseudoroegneria (St) and an unknown diploid (Y) were genome donors to E. pendulinus, and that Pseudoroegneria was the maternal donor. Our results revealed an extreme reticulate pattern, with at least four distinct gene lineages coexisting within this species that might be acquired through a possible combination of allotetraploidization and introgression from both within and outside the tribe Hordeeae. Chloroplast DNA data identified two potential maternal genome donors (Pseudoroegneria and an unknown species outside Hordeeae) to E. pendulinus. Nuclear gene data indicated that both Pseudoroegneria and an unknown Y diploid have contributed to the nuclear genome of E. pendulinus, in agreement with cytogenetic data. However, unexpected contributions from Hordeum and unknown aliens from within or outside Hordeeae to E. pendulinus without genome duplication were observed. Elymus pendulinus provides a remarkable instance of the previously unsuspected chimerical nature of some plant genomes and the resulting phylogenetic complexity produced by multiple historical reticulation events. PMID:24702067

  18. Analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence reveals stage specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tejos, Ricardo I; Mercado, Ana V; Meisel, Lee A

    2010-01-01

    The basic body plan of a plant is established early in embryogenesis when cells differentiate, giving rise to the apical and basal regions of the embryo. Using chlorophyll fluorescence as a marker for chloroplasts, we have detected specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells at specific stages of embryogenesis. Non-randomly distributed chloroplast-containing cells are seen as early as the globular stage of embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. In the heart stage of embryogenesis, chloroplast containing cells are detected in epidermal cells as well as a central region of the heart stage embryo, forming a triangular septum of chloroplast-containing cells that divides the embryo into three equal sectors. Torpedo stage embryos have chloroplast-containing epidermal cells and a central band of chloroplast-containing cells in the cortex layer, just below the shoot apical meristem. In the walking-stick stage of embryogenesis, chloroplasts are present in the epidermal, cortex and endodermal cells. The chloroplasts appear reduced or absent from the provascular and columella cells of walking-stick stage embryos. These results suggest that there is a tight regulation of plastid differentiation during embryogenesis that generates specific patterns of chloroplast-containing cells in specific cell layers at specific stages of embryogenesis.

  19. Chloroplast remodeling during state transitions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as revealed by noninvasive techniques in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gergely; Ünnep, Renáta; Zsiros, Ottó; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Takizawa, Kenji; Porcar, Lionel; Moyet, Lucas; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Garab, Győző; Finazzi, Giovanni; Minagawa, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Plants respond to changes in light quality by regulating the absorption capacity of their photosystems. These short-term adaptations use redox-controlled, reversible phosphorylation of the light-harvesting complexes (LHCIIs) to regulate the relative absorption cross-section of the two photosystems (PSs), commonly referred to as state transitions. It is acknowledged that state transitions induce substantial reorganizations of the PSs. However, their consequences on the chloroplast structure are more controversial. Here, we investigate how state transitions affect the chloroplast structure and function using complementary approaches for the living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we found a strong periodicity of the thylakoids in state 1, with characteristic repeat distances of ∼ 200 Å, which was almost completely lost in state 2. As revealed by circular dichroism, changes in the thylakoid periodicity were paralleled by modifications in the long-range order arrangement of the photosynthetic complexes, which was reduced by ∼ 20% in state 2 compared with state 1, but was not abolished. Furthermore, absorption spectroscopy reveals that the enhancement of PSI antenna size during state 1 to state 2 transition (∼ 20%) is not commensurate to the decrease in PSII antenna size (∼ 70%), leading to the possibility that a large part of the phosphorylated LHCIIs do not bind to PSI, but instead form energetically quenched complexes, which were shown to be either associated with PSII supercomplexes or in a free form. Altogether these noninvasive in vivo approaches allow us to present a more likely scenario for state transitions that explains their molecular mechanism and physiological consequences. PMID:24639515

  20. Hierarchical structure of the Sicilian goats revealed by Bayesian analyses of microsatellite information.

    PubMed

    Siwek, M; Finocchiaro, R; Curik, I; Portolano, B

    2011-02-01

    Genetic structure and relationship amongst the main goat populations in Sicily (Girgentana, Derivata di Siria, Maltese and Messinese) were analysed using information from 19 microsatellite markers genotyped on 173 individuals. A posterior Bayesian approach implemented in the program STRUCTURE revealed a hierarchical structure with two clusters at the first level (Girgentana vs. Messinese, Derivata di Siria and Maltese), explaining 4.8% of variation (amovaФ(ST) estimate). Seven clusters nested within these first two clusters (further differentiations of Girgentana, Derivata di Siria and Maltese), explaining 8.5% of variation (amovaФ(SC) estimate). The analyses and methods applied in this study indicate their power to detect subtle population structure.

  1. Evolutionary analysis of Arabidopsis, cyanobacterial, and chloroplast genomes reveals plastid phylogeny and thousands of cyanobacterial genes in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Martin, William; Rujan, Tamas; Richly, Erik; Hansen, Andrea; Cornelsen, Sabine; Lins, Thomas; Leister, Dario; Stoebe, Bettina; Hasegawa, Masami; Penny, David

    2002-09-17

    Chloroplasts were once free-living cyanobacteria that became endosymbionts, but the genomes of contemporary plastids encode only approximately 5-10% as many genes as those of their free-living cousins, indicating that many genes were either lost from plastids or transferred to the nucleus during the course of plant evolution. Previous estimates have suggested that between 800 and perhaps as many as 2,000 genes in the Arabidopsis genome might come from cyanobacteria, but genome-wide phylogenetic surveys that could provide direct estimates of this number are lacking. We compared 24,990 proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis genome to the proteins from three cyanobacterial genomes, 16 other prokaryotic reference genomes, and yeast. Of 9,368 Arabidopsis proteins sufficiently conserved for primary sequence comparison, 866 detected homologues only among cyanobacteria and 834 other branched with cyanobacterial homologues in phylogenetic trees. Extrapolating from these conserved proteins to the whole genome, the data suggest that approximately 4,500 of Arabidopsis protein-coding genes ( approximately 18% of the total) were acquired from the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids. These proteins encompass all functional classes, and the majority of them are targeted to cell compartments other than the chloroplast. Analysis of 15 sequenced chloroplast genomes revealed 117 nuclear-encoded proteins that are also still present in at least one chloroplast genome. A phylogeny of chloroplast genomes inferred from 41 proteins and 8,303 amino acids sites indicates that at least two independent secondary endosymbiotic events have occurred involving red algae and that amino acid composition bias in chloroplast proteins strongly affects plastid genome phylogeny. PMID:12218172

  2. Targeted Gene Knockouts Reveal Overlapping Functions of the Five Physcomitrella patens FtsZ Isoforms in Chloroplast Division, Chloroplast Shaping, Cell Patterning, Plant Development, and Gravity Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Anja; Lang, Daniel; Hanke, Sebastian T.; Mueller, Stefanie J.X.; Sarnighausen, Eric; Vervliet-Scheebaum, Marco; Reski, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts and bacterial cells divide by binary fission. The key protein in this constriction division is FtsZ, a self-assembling GTPase similar to eukaryotic tubulin. In prokaryotes, FtsZ is almost always encoded by a single gene, whereas plants harbor several nuclear-encoded FtsZ homologs. In seed plants, these proteins group in two families and all are exclusively imported into plastids. In contrast, the basal land plant Physcomitrella patens, a moss, encodes a third FtsZ family with one member. This protein is dually targeted to the plastids and to the cytosol. Here, we report on the targeted gene disruption of all ftsZ genes in P. patens. Subsequent analysis of single and double knockout mutants revealed a complex interaction of the different FtsZ isoforms not only in plastid division, but also in chloroplast shaping, cell patterning, plant development, and gravity sensing. These results support the concept of a plastoskeleton and its functional integration into the cytoskeleton, at least in the moss P. patens. PMID:19946616

  3. Genetic heterogeneity of the tropical abalone (Haliotis asinina) revealed by RAPD and microsatellite analyses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sureerat; Popongviwat, Aporn; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Jarayabhand, Padermsak; Menasveta, Piamsak

    2005-03-31

    Genetic heterogeneity of the tropical abalone, Haliotis asinina was examined using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and microsatellite analyses. One hundred and thirteen polymorphic RAPD fragments were generated. The percentage of polymorphic bands of H. asinina across overall primers was 85.20%. The average genetic distance of natural samples within the Gulf of Thailand (HACAME and HASAME) was 0.0219. Larger distance was observed when those samples were compared with HATRAW from the Andaman Sea (0.2309 and 0.2314). Geographic heterogeneity and F(ST) analyses revealed population differentiation between H. asinina from the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea (p < 0.0001). Three microsatellite loci (CUHas1, CUHas4 and CUHas5) indicated relatively high genetic diversity in H. asinina (total number of alleles = 26, 5, 23 and observed heterozygosity = 0.84, 0.42 and 0.33, respectively). Significant population differentiation was also found between samples from different coastal regions (p < 0.0001). Therefore, the gene pool of natural H. asinina in coastal Thai waters can be genetically divided to 2 different populations; the Gulf of Thailand (A) and the Andaman Sea (B).

  4. POLYMORPHIC CHLOROPLAST MICROSATELLITE MARKERS IN THE OCTOPLOID LEPIDIUM MEYENII (BRASSICACEAE) AND CROSS-SPECIES AMPLIFICATION IN LEPIDIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Nabeeh A.; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Quiros, Carlos F.; Tay, C. David; Bailey, C. Donovan

    2013-01-01

    Premise of the study As a crop and medicinal plant, the octoploid Andean endemic Lepidium meyenii suffers from taxonomic uncertainty. Few molecular markers are available to genotype individuals or track gene flow in wild and cultivated material. Methods and Results Using available sequence data, eight cpSSR primer pairs were developed for L. meyenii. Levels of polymorphism checked in 56 individual L. meyenii, including cultivated and wild material, revealed that the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to five, and intrapopulation allele frequencies ranged from 0.071 to 1.0. Polymerase-chain-reaction screens using our cpSSR primers in 27 other Lepidium species and three Coronopus species suggested a high degree of interspecific amplification. Conclusions These polymorphic cpSSR markers should prove useful in characterizing genetic variation among cultivated and wild L. meyenii. Additionally, interspecific amplifications suggest that these markers will be useful for the study of related taxa. PMID:21616787

  5. Microsatellite development for the genus Guibourtia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) reveals diploid and polyploid species1

    PubMed Central

    Tosso, Felicien; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Kaymak, Esra; Daïnou, Kasso; Duminil, Jérôme; Hardy, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nuclear microsatellites (nSSRs) were designed for Guibourtia tessmannii (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae), a highly exploited African timber tree, to study population genetic structure and gene flow. Methods and Results: We developed 16 polymorphic nSSRs from a genomic library tested in three populations of G. tessmannii and two populations of G. coleosperma. These nSSRs display three to 14 alleles per locus (mean 8.94) in G. tessmannii. Cross-amplification tests in nine congeneric species demonstrated that the genus Guibourtia contains diploid and polyploid species. Flow cytometry results combined with nSSR profiles suggest that G. tessmannii is octoploid. Conclusions: nSSRs revealed that African Guibourtia species include both diploid and polyploid species. These markers will provide information on the mating system, patterns of gene flow, and genetic structure of African Guibourtia species. PMID:27437170

  6. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  7. Proteomic comparison reveals the contribution of chloroplast to salt tolerance of a wheat introgression line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjing; Lv, Hongjun; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Yongchao; Qi, Yueying; Peng, Zhenying; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously bred a salt tolerant wheat cv. SR3 with bread wheat cv. JN177 as the parent via asymmetric somatic hybridization, and found that the tolerance is partially attributed to the superior photosynthesis capacity. Here, we compared the proteomes of two cultivars to unravel the basis of superior photosynthesis capacity. In the maps of two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), there were 26 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), including 18 cultivar-based and 8 stress-responsive ones. 21 of 26 DEPs were identified and classified into four categories, including photosynthesis, photosynthesis system stability, linolenic acid metabolism, and protein synthesis in chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of some DEPs confirmed that the identified DEPs function in the chloroplast. The overexpression of a DEP enhanced salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. In line with these data, it is concluded that the contribution of chloroplast to high salinity tolerance of wheat cv. SR3 appears to include higher photosynthesis efficiency by promoting system protection and ROS clearance, stronger production of phytohormone JA by enhancing metabolism activity, and modulating the in chloroplast synthesis of proteins. PMID:27562633

  8. The complete chloroplast genome of Ginkgo biloba reveals the mechanism of inverted repeat contraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Wu, Chung-Shien; Huang, Ya-Yi; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2012-01-01

    We determined the complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo), the only relict of ginkgophytes from the Triassic Period. The cpDNA molecule of ginkgo is quadripartite and circular, with a length of 156,945 bp, which is 6,458 bp shorter than that of Cycas taitungensis. In ginkgo cpDNA, rpl23 becomes pseudo, only one copy of ycf2 is retained, and there are at least five editing sites. We propose that the retained ycf2 is a duplicate of the ancestral ycf2, and the ancestral one has been lost from the inverted repeat A (IR(A)). This loss event should have occurred and led to the contraction of IRs after ginkgos diverged from other gymnosperms. A novel cluster of three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, trnY-AUA, trnC-ACA, and trnSeC-UCA, was predicted to be located between trnC-GCA and rpoB of the large single-copy region. Our phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that the three predicted tRNA genes are duplicates of trnC-GCA. Interestingly, in ginkgo cpDNA, the loss of one ycf2 copy does not significantly elevate the synonymous rate (Ks) of the retained copy, which disagrees with the view of Perry and Wolfe (2002) that one of the two-copy genes is subjected to elevated Ks when its counterpart has been lost. We hypothesize that the loss of one ycf2 is likely recent, and therefore, the acquired Ks of the retained copy is low. Our data reveal that ginkgo possesses several unique features that contribute to our understanding of the cpDNA evolution in seed plants. PMID:22403032

  9. The complete chloroplast genome of Ginkgo biloba reveals the mechanism of inverted repeat contraction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Wu, Chung-Shien; Huang, Ya-Yi; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2012-01-01

    We determined the complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) of Ginkgo biloba (common name: ginkgo), the only relict of ginkgophytes from the Triassic Period. The cpDNA molecule of ginkgo is quadripartite and circular, with a length of 156,945 bp, which is 6,458 bp shorter than that of Cycas taitungensis. In ginkgo cpDNA, rpl23 becomes pseudo, only one copy of ycf2 is retained, and there are at least five editing sites. We propose that the retained ycf2 is a duplicate of the ancestral ycf2, and the ancestral one has been lost from the inverted repeat A (IR(A)). This loss event should have occurred and led to the contraction of IRs after ginkgos diverged from other gymnosperms. A novel cluster of three transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, trnY-AUA, trnC-ACA, and trnSeC-UCA, was predicted to be located between trnC-GCA and rpoB of the large single-copy region. Our phylogenetic analysis strongly suggests that the three predicted tRNA genes are duplicates of trnC-GCA. Interestingly, in ginkgo cpDNA, the loss of one ycf2 copy does not significantly elevate the synonymous rate (Ks) of the retained copy, which disagrees with the view of Perry and Wolfe (2002) that one of the two-copy genes is subjected to elevated Ks when its counterpart has been lost. We hypothesize that the loss of one ycf2 is likely recent, and therefore, the acquired Ks of the retained copy is low. Our data reveal that ginkgo possesses several unique features that contribute to our understanding of the cpDNA evolution in seed plants.

  10. Unexpected Diversity of Chloroplast Noncoding RNAs as Revealed by Deep Sequencing of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Hotto, Amber M; Schmitz, Robert J; Fei, Zhangjun; Ecker, Joseph R; Stern, David B

    2011-12-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) are widely expressed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic ncRNAs are commonly micro- and small-interfering RNAs (18-25 nt) involved in posttranscriptional gene silencing, whereas prokaryotic ncRNAs vary in size and are involved in various aspects of gene regulation. Given the prokaryotic origin of organelles, the presence of ncRNAs might be expected; however, the full spectrum of organellar ncRNAs has not been determined systematically. Here, strand-specific RNA-Seq analysis was used to identify 107 candidate ncRNAs from Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts, primarily encoded opposite protein-coding and tRNA genes. Forty-eight ncRNAs were shown to accumulate by RNA gel blot as discrete transcripts in wild-type (WT) plants and/or the pnp1-1 mutant, which lacks the chloroplast ribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (cpPNPase). Ninety-eight percent of the ncRNAs detected by RNA gel blot had different transcript patterns between WT and pnp1-1, suggesting cpPNPase has a significant role in chloroplast ncRNA biogenesis and accumulation. Analysis of materials deficient for other major chloroplast ribonucleases, RNase R, RNase E, and RNase J, showed differential effects on ncRNA accumulation and/or form, suggesting specificity in RNase-ncRNA interactions. 5' end mapping demonstrates that some ncRNAs are transcribed from dedicated promoters, whereas others result from transcriptional read-through. Finally, correlations between accumulation of some ncRNAs and the symmetrically transcribed sense RNA are consistent with a role in RNA stability. Overall, our data suggest that this extensive population of ncRNAs has the potential to underpin a previously underappreciated regulatory mode in the chloroplast.

  11. Phenotypic, histological and proteomic analyses reveal multiple differences associated with chloroplast development in yellow and variegated variants from Camellia sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chengying; Cao, Junxi; Li, Jianke; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Jinchi; Miao, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    Leaf colour variation is observed in several plants. We obtained two types of branches with yellow and variegated leaves from Camellia sinensis. To reveal the mechanisms that underlie the leaf colour variations, combined morphological, histological, ionomic and proteomic analyses were performed using leaves from abnormal branches (variants) and normal branches (CKs). The measurement of the CIE-Lab coordinates showed that the brightness and yellowness of the variants were more intense than the CKs. When chloroplast profiles were analysed, HY1 (branch with yellow leaves) and HY2 (branch with variegated leaves) displayed abnormal chloroplast structures and a reduced number and size compared with the CKs, indicating that the abnormal chloroplast development might be tightly linked to the leaf colour variations. Moreover, the concentration of elemental minerals was different between the variants and the CKs. Furthermore, DEPs (differentially expressed proteins) were identified in the variants and the CKs by a quantitative proteomics analysis using the label-free approach. The DEPs were significantly involved in photosynthesis and included PSI, PSII, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport, LHC and F-type ATPase. Our results suggested that a decrease in the abundance of photosynthetic proteins might be associated with the changes of leaf colours in tea plants. PMID:27633059

  12. Phenotypic, histological and proteomic analyses reveal multiple differences associated with chloroplast development in yellow and variegated variants from Camellia sinensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chengying; Cao, Junxi; Li, Jianke; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Jinchi; Miao, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    Leaf colour variation is observed in several plants. We obtained two types of branches with yellow and variegated leaves from Camellia sinensis. To reveal the mechanisms that underlie the leaf colour variations, combined morphological, histological, ionomic and proteomic analyses were performed using leaves from abnormal branches (variants) and normal branches (CKs). The measurement of the CIE-Lab coordinates showed that the brightness and yellowness of the variants were more intense than the CKs. When chloroplast profiles were analysed, HY1 (branch with yellow leaves) and HY2 (branch with variegated leaves) displayed abnormal chloroplast structures and a reduced number and size compared with the CKs, indicating that the abnormal chloroplast development might be tightly linked to the leaf colour variations. Moreover, the concentration of elemental minerals was different between the variants and the CKs. Furthermore, DEPs (differentially expressed proteins) were identified in the variants and the CKs by a quantitative proteomics analysis using the label-free approach. The DEPs were significantly involved in photosynthesis and included PSI, PSII, cytochrome b6/f complex, photosynthetic electron transport, LHC and F-type ATPase. Our results suggested that a decrease in the abundance of photosynthetic proteins might be associated with the changes of leaf colours in tea plants. PMID:27633059

  13. Microsatellite markers reveal high genetic diversity in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) germplasm from Sudan.

    PubMed

    Elshibli, Sakina; Korpelainen, Helena

    2008-10-01

    Genetic diversity in date palm germplasm from Sudan representing 37 female and 23 male accessions was investigated using 16 loci of microsatellite (SSR) primers. Eight female accessions from Morocco were included as reference material. The tested SSR markers showed a high level of polymorphism. A total of 343 alleles were detected at the 16 loci. The number of alleles per marker ranged from 14 to 44 with an average of 21.4 per locus. A high level of expected heterozygosity was observed among Sudan cultivars (0.841), Morocco cultivars (0.820) and male accessions (0.799). The results indicate that the genetic groups of the Sudan cultivars and/or males do not follow a clear geographic pattern. However, the morocco group showed significant differentiation in relation to the Sudan groups, as measured by F (ST) values and genetic distances. The effect of the methods of pollination and cultivar selection on the genetic structure was clearly detected by the weak clustering association that was observed for the majority of accessions originating from Sudan and Morocco as well. This suggests the need for further investigation on the genetic diversity of Sudanese date palm germplasm. A deeper insight will be revealed by a detailed analysis of populations originating from different geographic locations.

  14. The genetic structure of Oreochromis spp. (Tilapia) populations in Malaysia as revealed by microsatellite DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bhassu, S; Yusoff, K; Panandam, J M; Embong, W K; Oyyan, S; Tan, S G

    2004-08-01

    The genetic make-up of five populations of Oreochromis spp. was examined by microsatellite analysis. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci showed significant departures from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The mean heterozygosity ranged from 0.6280 to 0.7040 for each population. The genetic distance values showed a clear separation between O. niloticus and O. mossambicus. The differentiation of the O. niloticus populations was then tested with various genetic measures, which are based on both the Infinite Allele and the Stepwise Mutation models. All these measures grouped the populations similarly. PMID:15487586

  15. Empirical evaluation reveals best fit of a logistic mutation model for human Y-chromosomal microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father-son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike's information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion. PMID:21968190

  16. Empirical Evaluation Reveals Best Fit of a Logistic Mutation Model for Human Y-Chromosomal Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father–son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike’s information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion. PMID:21968190

  17. Next generation sequencing and FISH reveal uneven and nonrandom microsatellite distribution in two grasshopper genomes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Cuadrado, Ángeles; Montiel, Eugenia E; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2015-06-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, are one of the prominent DNA sequences shaping the repeated fraction of eukaryotic genomes. In spite of their profuse use as molecular markers for a variety of genetic and evolutionary studies, their genomic location, distribution, and function are not yet well understood. Here we report the first thorough joint analysis of microsatellite motifs at both genomic and chromosomal levels in animal species, by a combination of 454 sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques performed on two grasshopper species. The in silico analysis of the 454 reads suggested that microsatellite expansion is not driving size increase of these genomes, as SSR abundance was higher in the species showing the smallest genome. However, the two species showed the same uneven and nonrandom location of SSRs, with clear predominance of dinucleotide motifs and association with several types of repetitive elements, mostly histone gene spacers, ribosomal DNA intergenic spacers (IGS), and transposable elements (TEs). The FISH analysis showed a dispersed chromosome distribution of microsatellite motifs in euchromatic regions, in coincidence with chromosome location patterns previously observed for many mobile elements in these species. However, some SSR motifs were clustered, especially those located in the histone gene cluster.

  18. Fine spatial structure of Atlantic hake (Merluccius merluccius) stocks revealed by variation at microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana G F; Martinez, Jose L; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Genetic variation at 5 microsatellite loci was analyzed for European hake Merluccius merluccius sampled from 9 different regions in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Significant genetic differentiation was found between samples, suggesting a fine subdivision of Atlantic and Mediterranean hake stocks. These results are discussed in the context of the decline of demersal fish species, probably due to overfishing.

  19. What phylogeny and gene genealogy analyses reveal about homoplasy in citrus microsatellite alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty-five microsatellite alleles from three Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci (cAGG9, CCT01 and GT03) of various Citrus, Fortunella or Poncirus accessions were cloned and sequenced to determine their mode of evolution. This data was used to assess sequence variation by calculating the average numb...

  20. Unexpected Genetic Diversity among and within Populations of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella as Revealed by Nuclear Microsatellite Markers▿

    PubMed Central

    Masseret, Estelle; Grzebyk, Daniel; Nagai, Satoshi; Genovesi, Benjamin; Lasserre, Bernard; Laabir, Mohamed; Collos, Yves; Vaquer, André; Berrebi, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Since 1998, blooms of Alexandrium catenella associated with paralytic shellfish poisoning have been repeatedly reported for Thau Lagoon (French Mediterranean coast). Based on data obtained for rRNA gene markers, it has been suggested that the strains involved could be closely related to the Japanese temperate Asian ribotype of the temperate Asian clade. In order to gain more insight into the origin of these organisms, we carried out a genetic analysis of 61 Mediterranean and 23 Japanese strains using both ribosomal and microsatellite markers. Whereas the phylogeny based on ribosomal markers tended to confirm the previous findings, the analysis of microsatellite sequences revealed an unexpected distinction between the French and Japanese populations. This analysis also highlighted great intraspecific diversity that was not detected with the classical rRNA gene markers. The Japanese strains are divided into two differentiated A. catenella lineages: the Sea of Japan lineage and the east coast lineage, which includes populations from the Inland Sea and the Pacific Ocean. A. catenella strains isolated from Thau Lagoon belong to another lineage. These findings indicate that microsatellite markers are probably better suited to investigations of the population genetics of this species that is distributed worldwide. Finally, application of the population genetics concepts available for macroorganisms could support new paradigms for speciation and migration in phytoplankton assemblages. PMID:19201972

  1. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Rexroad, Caird E; Couch, Charlene R; Cordes, Jan F; Reece, Kimberly S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-04-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetics technologies in striped bass breeding programs, we previously developed nearly 500 microsatellite markers. The objectives of this study were to construct a microsatellite linkage map of striped bass and to examine conserved synteny between striped bass and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Of 480 microsatellite markers screened for polymorphism, 289 informative markers were identified and used to genotype two half-sib mapping families. Twenty-six linkage groups were assembled, and only two markers remain unlinked. The sex-averaged map spans 1,623.8 cM with an average marker density of 5.78 cM per marker. Among 287 striped bass microsatellite markers assigned to linkage groups, 169 (58.9%) showed homology to sequences on stickleback chromosomes or scaffolds. Comparison between the stickleback genome and the striped bass linkage map revealed conserved synteny between these two species. This is the first linkage map for any of the Morone species. This map will be useful for molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes of interest in striped bass breeding programs. The conserved synteny between striped bass and stickleback will facilitate fine mapping of genome regions of interest and will serve as a new resource for comparative mapping with other Perciform fishes such as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), and tilapia (Oreochromis ssp.). PMID:21968826

  2. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Rexroad, Caird E; Couch, Charlene R; Cordes, Jan F; Reece, Kimberly S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-04-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetics technologies in striped bass breeding programs, we previously developed nearly 500 microsatellite markers. The objectives of this study were to construct a microsatellite linkage map of striped bass and to examine conserved synteny between striped bass and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Of 480 microsatellite markers screened for polymorphism, 289 informative markers were identified and used to genotype two half-sib mapping families. Twenty-six linkage groups were assembled, and only two markers remain unlinked. The sex-averaged map spans 1,623.8 cM with an average marker density of 5.78 cM per marker. Among 287 striped bass microsatellite markers assigned to linkage groups, 169 (58.9%) showed homology to sequences on stickleback chromosomes or scaffolds. Comparison between the stickleback genome and the striped bass linkage map revealed conserved synteny between these two species. This is the first linkage map for any of the Morone species. This map will be useful for molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes of interest in striped bass breeding programs. The conserved synteny between striped bass and stickleback will facilitate fine mapping of genome regions of interest and will serve as a new resource for comparative mapping with other Perciform fishes such as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), and tilapia (Oreochromis ssp.).

  3. Comparative genomic analysis reveals species-dependent complexities that explain difficulties with microsatellite marker development in molluscs.

    PubMed

    McInerney, C E; Allcock, A L; Johnson, M P; Bailie, D A; Prodöhl, P A

    2011-01-01

    Reliable population DNA molecular markers are difficult to develop for molluscs, the reasons for which are largely unknown. Identical protocols for microsatellite marker development were implemented in three gastropods. Success rates were lower for Gibbula cineraria compared to Littorina littorea and L. saxatilis. Comparative genomic analysis of 47.2 kb of microsatellite containing sequences (MCS) revealed a high incidence of cryptic repetitive DNA in their flanking regions. The majority of these were novel, and could be grouped into DNA families based upon sequence similarities. Significant inter-specific variation in abundance of cryptic repetitive DNA and DNA families was observed. Repbase scans show that a large proportion of cryptic repetitive DNA was identified as transposable elements (TEs). We argue that a large number of TEs and their transpositional activity may be linked to differential rates of DNA multiplication and recombination. This is likely to be an important factor explaining inter-specific variation in genome stability and hence microsatellite marker development success rates. Gastropods also differed significantly in the type of TEs classes (autonomous vs non-autonomous) observed. We propose that dissimilar transpositional mechanisms differentiate the TE classes in terms of their propensity for transposition, fixation and/or silencing. Consequently, the phylogenetic conservation of non-autonomous TEs, such as CvA, suggests that dispersal of these elements may have behaved as microsatellite-inducing elements. Results seem to indicate that, compared to autonomous, non-autonomous TEs maybe have a more active role in genome rearrangement processes. The implications of the findings for genomic rearrangement, stability and marker development are discussed. PMID:20424639

  4. Comparative genomic analysis reveals species-dependent complexities that explain difficulties with microsatellite marker development in molluscs

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, C E; Allcock, A L; Johnson, M P; Bailie, D A; Prodöhl, P A

    2011-01-01

    Reliable population DNA molecular markers are difficult to develop for molluscs, the reasons for which are largely unknown. Identical protocols for microsatellite marker development were implemented in three gastropods. Success rates were lower for Gibbula cineraria compared to Littorina littorea and L. saxatilis. Comparative genomic analysis of 47.2 kb of microsatellite containing sequences (MCS) revealed a high incidence of cryptic repetitive DNA in their flanking regions. The majority of these were novel, and could be grouped into DNA families based upon sequence similarities. Significant inter-specific variation in abundance of cryptic repetitive DNA and DNA families was observed. Repbase scans show that a large proportion of cryptic repetitive DNA was identified as transposable elements (TEs). We argue that a large number of TEs and their transpositional activity may be linked to differential rates of DNA multiplication and recombination. This is likely to be an important factor explaining inter-specific variation in genome stability and hence microsatellite marker development success rates. Gastropods also differed significantly in the type of TEs classes (autonomous vs non-autonomous) observed. We propose that dissimilar transpositional mechanisms differentiate the TE classes in terms of their propensity for transposition, fixation and/or silencing. Consequently, the phylogenetic conservation of non-autonomous TEs, such as CvA, suggests that dispersal of these elements may have behaved as microsatellite-inducing elements. Results seem to indicate that, compared to autonomous, non-autonomous TEs maybe have a more active role in genome rearrangement processes. The implications of the findings for genomic rearrangement, stability and marker development are discussed. PMID:20424639

  5. Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Reveal Genetic Differentiation between Two Sympatric Types of Galaxea fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Satoh, Noriyuki; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The reef-building, scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis, is classified into soft and hard types, based on nematocyst morphology. This character is correlated with the length of the mitochondrial non-coding region (mt-Long: soft colony type, and nematocysts with wide capsules and long shafts; mt-Short: hard colony type, and nematocysts with thin capsules and short shafts). We isolated and characterized novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for G. fascicularis using next-generation sequencing. Based upon the mitochondrial non-coding region, 53 of the 97 colonies collected were mt-Long (mt-L) and 44 were mt-Short (mt-S). Among the 53 mt-L colonies, 27 loci were identified as amplifiable, polymorphic microsatellite loci, devoid of somatic mutations and free of scoring errors. Eleven of those 27 loci were also amplifiable and polymorphic in the 44 mt-S colonies; these 11 are cross-type microsatellite loci. The other 16 loci were considered useful only for mt-L colonies. These 27 loci identified 10 multilocus lineages (MLLs) among the 53 mt-L colonies (NMLL/N = 0.189), and the 11 cross-type loci identified 7 MLLs in 44 mt-S colonies (NMLL/N = 0.159). Significant genetic differentiation between the two types was detected based on the genetic differentiation index (FST = 0.080, P = 0.001). Bayesian clustering also indicated that these two types are genetically isolated. While nuclear microsatellite genotypes also showed genetic differentiation between mitochondrial types, the mechanism of divergence is not yet clear. These markers will be useful to estimate genetic diversity, differentiation, and connectivity among populations, and to understand evolutionary processes, including divergence of types in G. fascicularis. PMID:26147677

  6. Microsatellite analysis of Rosa damascena Mill. accessions reveals genetic similarity between genotypes used for rose oil production and old Damask rose varieties.

    PubMed

    Rusanov, K; Kovacheva, N; Vosman, B; Zhang, L; Rajapakse, S; Atanassov, A; Atanassov, I

    2005-08-01

    Damask roses are grown in several European and Asiatic countries for rose oil production. Twenty-six oil-bearing Rosa damascena Mill. accessions and 13 garden Damask roses were assayed by molecular markers. Microsatellite genotyping demonstrated that R. damascena Mill. accessions from Bulgaria, Iran, and India and old European Damask rose varieties possess identical microsatellite profiles, suggesting a common origin. At the same time, the data indicated that modern industrial oil rose cultivation is based on a very narrow genepool and that oil rose collections contain many genetically identical accessions. The study of long-term vegetative propagation of the Damask roses also reveals high somatic stability for the microsatellite loci analyzed.

  7. Genetic interactions reveal that specific defects of chloroplast translation are associated with the suppression of var2-mediated leaf variegation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiayan; Zheng, Mengdi; Wang, Rui; Wang, Ruijuan; An, Lijun; Rodermel, Steve R; Yu, Fei

    2013-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana L. yellow variegated (var2) mutant is defective in a chloroplast FtsH family metalloprotease, AtFtsH2/VAR2, and displays an intriguing green and white leaf variegation. This unique var2-mediated leaf variegation offers a simple yet powerful tool for dissecting the genetic regulation of chloroplast development. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new var2 suppressor gene, SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION8 (SVR8), which encodes a putative chloroplast ribosomal large subunit protein, L24. Mutations in SVR8 suppress var2 leaf variegation at ambient temperature and partially suppress the cold-induced chlorosis phenotype of var2. Loss of SVR8 causes unique chloroplast rRNA processing defects, particularly the 23S-4.5S dicistronic precursor. The recovery of the major abnormal processing site in svr8 23S-4.5S precursor indicate that it does not lie in the same position where SVR8/L24 binds on the ribosome. Surprisingly, we found that the loss of a chloroplast ribosomal small subunit protein, S21, results in aberrant chloroplast rRNA processing but not suppression of var2 variegation. These findings suggest that the disruption of specific aspects of chloroplast translation, rather than a general impairment in chloroplast translation, suppress var2 variegation and the existence of complex genetic interactions in chloroplast development. PMID:23721655

  8. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (F ST = 0) and SAMOVA (F ST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding.

  9. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H.

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (FST = 0) and SAMOVA (FST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding. PMID:27076998

  10. Phylogeographical structure revealed by chloroplast DNA variation in Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume).

    PubMed

    Okaura, T; Harada, K

    2002-04-01

    Intraspecific genetic variation in three non-coding chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions (trnT-L and trnL-F spacers, and trnL intron) of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was investigated. This species is a major constituent of the typical cool-temperate deciduous forests in Japan. Twenty-one F. crenata populations from throughout Japan, and four F. japonica populations, a close relative of F. crenata, were examined. Seven haplotypes were distinguishable in F. crenata based on nucleotide substitutions and indels. Pairwise nucleotide diversities among haplotypes ranged from 0.0000 to 0.0042 for F. crenata, including F. japonica. The geographical distribution of cpDNA haplotypes was found to be highly structured in F. crenata. Four haplotypes predominated: haplotypes FC1 and FC4 are prevalent on the Pacific Ocean coast, haplotype FC6 is prevalent on the Japan sea coast from the San-in district to Hokkaido, whilst haplotype FC3 is restricted to northern Kyushu and the western-most part of Honshu. Two haplotypes (FC5 and FC7) are restricted to single populations and one haplotype (FC2) is a derivative of FC1. Each of these haplotypes, except FC2, are thought to be derived from different glacial refugia. Phylogenetic analysis showed that neither F. crenata nor F. japonica was monophyletic for the haplotypes, suggesting either ancestral polymorphism or ancient introgression between the lineages of these two Fagus species.

  11. Loss of Genetic Variation in Laboratory Colonies of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) Revealed by Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yudi; Han, Lanzhi; Hou, Maolin

    2015-02-01

    The Asiatic rice borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is an important insect pest of rice in China. The genetic variation of a set of laboratory colonies of C. suppressalis was compared with their source populations in the wild (laboratory colonies BJCK, BJ1AB, and BJ1AC versus wild population BJW; laboratory colonies FZCK and FZ1CA versus wild population FZW) and was analyzed using eight microsatellite markers and two partial mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions (COI and COII). Results from both analyses revealed similar patterns. Microsatellite DNA analysis showed that the two wild populations (BJW and FZW) harbored more private alleles and had higher levels of gene diversity, and observed and expected heterozygosity, compared with the laboratory colonies. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed that the two wild populations (BJW and FZW) had higher numbers of haplotypes compared with the five laboratory colonies. The three Beijing laboratory-reared colonies (BJ1CK, BJ1AB, and BJ1AC) had one fixed haplotype (H04). Most of the pairwise FST values based on mtDNA were high and all pairwise FST comparisons based on microsatellite DNA were significant, which indicated that the significant differences between these colonies and populations. Genetic drift caused by several factors, such as founder effect, small effective population size, rearing protocols, and inbreeding, can contribute to the rapid loss of genetic variation and affect the distribution of alleles and haplotypes. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the sample size of source populations to prevent the loss of genetic variation and genetic differentiation between different colonies. PMID:26308808

  12. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (F ST = 0) and SAMOVA (F ST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding. PMID:27076998

  13. Patterns of genetic diversity and population structure of the threatened Houbara and Macqueen's bustards as revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Korrida, A; Jadallah, S; Chbel, F; Amin-Alami, A; Ahra, M; Aggrey, S

    2012-01-01

    The Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata) is a threatened avian species that is rapidly declining throughout its range, especially in North Africa, Asia and the Canary Islands. We examined the population structure and genetic variation for the three Houbara subspecies C. undulata undulata, C. u. fuertaventurae and C. u. macqueenii. A total of 266 birds from 10 populations were genotyped using seven polymorphic microsatellite markers. The analysis of microsatellite loci generated 1821 genotypes and 55 different alleles. Estimates of observed and expected heterozygosities were relatively high and ranged from 0.371 to 0.687 and from 0.326 to 0.729, respectively. For the first time, significant phylogeographic structure among Asian Houbara populations was found using neutral nuclear markers. Analysis of molecular variance revealed 12.03% population variability among the subspecies. Population structure and assignment tests inferred using a Bayesian approach revealed two distinct clusters with more than 90% likelihood, one Asian and one North African. A positive correlation between genetic distance and geographic distance was detected among populations (r(2) = 0.302). For conservation purposes, this genetic information will help understand the current genetic status improving management strategies for Houbara bustard breeds and populations. PMID:23079815

  14. Chloroplast transformation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Yin, Wei-Bo; Hu, Zan-Min

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter we briefly review the developmental history and current research status of chloroplast transformation and introduce the merits of chloroplast transformation as compared with the nuclear genome transformation. Furthermore, according to the chloroplast transformation achieved in oilseed rape (Brassica napus), we introduce the preparation of explants, transformation methods, system selection, identification methods of the transplastomic plants, and experimental results. The technical points, the bottleneck, and the further research directions of the chloroplast transformation are discussed in the notes.

  15. Multiple paternity in Littorina obtusata (Gastropoda, Littorinidae) revealed by microsatellite analyses.

    PubMed

    Paterson, I G; Partridge, V; Buckland-Nicks, J

    2001-06-01

    Parental identity for juvenile Littorina obtusata was determined from three egg masses by means of microsatellite DNA markers. Results confirm that the attendant adult female in each case was the dam of the offspring and that at least 4-6 males contributed to each brood. This correlates with our behavioral observations that indicated multiple copulations between the female and several males in each experimental aquarium. A significant number of offspring from each brood were sired by non-sampled males (males that had copulated with females before capture) whose sperm had been stored by the female. This is the first direct evidence of multiple paternity in the Littorinidae. Results are discussed in reference to current theories of sperm competition, male precedence, and cryptic female choice. PMID:11441969

  16. Moroccan Leishmania infantum: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure as Revealed by Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Lemrani, Meryem; Mouna, Idrissi; Mohammed, Hida; Mostafa, Sabri; Rhajaoui, Mohamed; Hamarsheh, Omar; Schönian, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania infantum causes Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco. It predominantly affects children under 5 years with incidence of 150 cases/year. Genetic variability and population structure have been investigated for 33 strains isolated from infected dogs and humans in Morocco. A multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) approach was used in which a MLMtype based on size variation in 14 independent microsatellite markers was compiled for each strain. MLMT profiles of 10 Tunisian, 10 Algerian and 21 European strains which belonged to zymodeme MON-1 and non-MON-1 according to multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) were included for comparison. A Bayesian model-based approach and phylogenetic analysis inferred two L.infantum sub-populations; Sub-population A consists of 13 Moroccan strains grouped with all European strains of MON-1 type; and sub-population B consists of 15 Moroccan strains grouped with the Tunisian and Algerian MON-1 strains. Theses sub-populations were significantly different from each other and from the Tunisian, Algerian and European non MON-1 strains which constructed one separate population. The presence of these two sub-populations co-existing in Moroccan endemics suggests multiple introduction of L. infantum from/to Morocco; (1) Introduction from/to the neighboring North African countries, (2) Introduction from/to the Europe. These scenarios are supported by the presence of sub-population B and sub-population A respectively. Gene flow was noticed between sub-populations A and B. Five strains showed mixed A/B genotypes indicating possible recombination between the two populations. MLMT has proven to be a powerful tool for eco-epidemiological and population genetic investigations of Leishmania. PMID:24147078

  17. Expression of fungal cutinase and swollenin in tobacco chloroplasts reveals novel enzyme functions and/or substrates.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dheeraj; Jin, Shuangxia; Kanagaraj, Anderson; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Daniel, Jaiyanth; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Miller, Michael; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    In order to produce low-cost biomass hydrolyzing enzymes, transplastomic lines were generated that expressed cutinase or swollenin within chloroplasts. While swollenin expressing plants were homoplasmic, cutinase transplastomic lines remained heteroplasmic. Both transplastomic lines showed interesting modifications in their phenotype, chloroplast structure, and functions. Ultrastructural analysis of chloroplasts from cutinase- and swollenin-expressing plants did not show typical lens shape and granal stacks. But, their thylakoid membranes showed unique scroll like structures and chloroplast envelope displayed protrusions, stretching into the cytoplasm. Unusual honeycomb structures typically observed in etioplasts were observed in mature chloroplasts expressing swollenin. Treatment of cotton fiber with chloroplast-derived swollenin showed enlarged segments and the intertwined inner fibers were irreversibly unwound and fully opened up due to expansin activity of swollenin, causing disruption of hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers. Cutinase transplastomic plants showed esterase and lipase activity, while swollenin transplastomic lines lacked such enzyme activities. Higher plants contain two major galactolipids, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), in their chloroplast thylakoid membranes that play distinct roles in their structural organization. Surprisingly, purified cutinase effectively hydrolyzed DGDG to MGDG, showing alpha galactosidase activity. Such hydrolysis resulted in unstacking of granal thylakoids in chloroplasts and other structural changes. These results demonstrate DGDG as novel substrate and function for cutinase. Both MGDG and DGDG were reduced up to 47.7% and 39.7% in cutinase and 68.5% and 67.5% in swollenin expressing plants. Novel properties and functions of both enzymes reported here for the first time should lead to better understanding and enhanced biomass hydrolysis.

  18. Gene-pool variation in caledonian and European Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) revealed by chloroplast simple-sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Provan, J; Soranzo, N; Wilson, N J; McNicol, J W; Forrest, G I; Cottrell, J; Powell, W

    1998-09-22

    We have used polymorphic chloroplast simple-sequence repeats to analyse levels of genetic variation within and between seven native Scottish and eight mainland European populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Diversity levels for the Scottish populations based on haplotype frequency were far in excess of those previously obtained using monoterpenes and isozymes and confirmed lower levels of genetic variation within the derelict population at Glen Falloch. The diversity levels were higher than those reported in similar studies in other Pinus species. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that small (3.24-8.81%) but significant (p < or = 0.001) portions of the variation existed between the populations and that there was no significant difference between the Scottish and the mainland European populations. Evidence of population substructure was found in the Rannoch population, which exhibited two subgroups. Finally, one of the loci studied exhibited an allele distribution uncharacteristic of the stepwise mutation model of evolution of simple-sequence repeats, and sequencing of the PCR products revealed that this was due to a duplication rather than slippage in the repeat region. An examination of the distribution of this mutation suggests that it may have occurred fairly recently in the Wester Ross region or that it may be evidence of a refugial population.

  19. ChloroSeq, an Optimized Chloroplast RNA-Seq Bioinformatic Pipeline, Reveals Remodeling of the Organellar Transcriptome Under Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Castandet, Benoît; Hotto, Amber M.; Strickler, Susan R.; Stern, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Although RNA-Seq has revolutionized transcript analysis, organellar transcriptomes are rarely assessed even when present in published datasets. Here, we describe the development and application of a rapid and convenient method, ChloroSeq, to delineate qualitative and quantitative features of chloroplast RNA metabolism from strand-specific RNA-Seq datasets, including processing, editing, splicing, and relative transcript abundance. The use of a single experiment to analyze systematically chloroplast transcript maturation and abundance is of particular interest due to frequent pleiotropic effects observed in mutants that affect chloroplast gene expression and/or photosynthesis. To illustrate its utility, ChloroSeq was applied to published RNA-Seq datasets derived from Arabidopsis thaliana grown under control and abiotic stress conditions, where the organellar transcriptome had not been examined. The most appreciable effects were found for heat stress, which induces a global reduction in splicing and editing efficiency, and leads to increased abundance of chloroplast transcripts, including genic, intergenic, and antisense transcripts. Moreover, by concomitantly analyzing nuclear transcripts that encode chloroplast gene expression regulators from the same libraries, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving a holistic understanding of the nucleus-organelle system. ChloroSeq thus represents a unique method for streamlining RNA-Seq data interpretation of the chloroplast transcriptome and its regulators. PMID:27402360

  20. ChloroSeq, an Optimized Chloroplast RNA-Seq Bioinformatic Pipeline, Reveals Remodeling of the Organellar Transcriptome Under Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Castandet, Benoît; Hotto, Amber M; Strickler, Susan R; Stern, David B

    2016-01-01

    Although RNA-Seq has revolutionized transcript analysis, organellar transcriptomes are rarely assessed even when present in published datasets. Here, we describe the development and application of a rapid and convenient method, ChloroSeq, to delineate qualitative and quantitative features of chloroplast RNA metabolism from strand-specific RNA-Seq datasets, including processing, editing, splicing, and relative transcript abundance. The use of a single experiment to analyze systematically chloroplast transcript maturation and abundance is of particular interest due to frequent pleiotropic effects observed in mutants that affect chloroplast gene expression and/or photosynthesis. To illustrate its utility, ChloroSeq was applied to published RNA-Seq datasets derived from Arabidopsis thaliana grown under control and abiotic stress conditions, where the organellar transcriptome had not been examined. The most appreciable effects were found for heat stress, which induces a global reduction in splicing and editing efficiency, and leads to increased abundance of chloroplast transcripts, including genic, intergenic, and antisense transcripts. Moreover, by concomitantly analyzing nuclear transcripts that encode chloroplast gene expression regulators from the same libraries, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving a holistic understanding of the nucleus-organelle system. ChloroSeq thus represents a unique method for streamlining RNA-Seq data interpretation of the chloroplast transcriptome and its regulators.

  1. Microsatellite markers reveal spatial genetic structure of Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) populations along a latitudinal gradient in Europe.

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle, Sabine; Hance, Thierry; Migeon, Alain; Baret, Philippe; Cros-Arteil, Sandrine; Navajas, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The genetic structure of populations of the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae was investigated along a south-north European transect spanning from southern France to The Netherlands. Mites were collected on Urtica dioica in 6 sampling zones. Microsatellite variation at 5 loci revealed considerable genetic variation with an average heterozygozity of 0.49. Significant heterozygote deficiency was found in 7 populations out of the 18 samples analyzed and one of them was completely monomorphic. Tetranychus urticae populations show some level of genetic structuring. First, genetic differentiation between localities (F (ST) estimates) was significant for all comparisons. Second, the analysis of molecular variance, AMOVA, indicates that there is an effect, albeit low (9%), of the locality in accounting for allele frequency variance. Geographic distance emerges as a factor responsible for this genetic structure. The results are discussed in relation to the biological features of the species and the known patterns of migration. Related agronomical issues are addressed.

  2. Microsatellite genotyping reveals end-Pleistocene decline in mammoth autosomal genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Veronica; Humphrey, Joanne; Skoglund, Pontus; McKeown, Niall J; Vartanyan, Sergey; Shaw, Paul W; Lidén, Kerstin; Jakobsson, Mattias; Barnes, Ian; Angerbjörn, Anders; Lister, Adrian; Dalén, Love

    2012-07-01

    The last glaciation was a dynamic period with strong impact on the demography of many species and populations. In recent years, mitochondrial DNA sequences retrieved from radiocarbon-dated remains have provided novel insights into the history of Late Pleistocene populations. However, genotyping of loci from the nuclear genome may provide enhanced resolution of population-level changes. Here, we use four autosomal microsatellite DNA markers to investigate the demographic history of woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) in north-eastern Siberia from before 60 000 years ago up until the species' final disappearance c.4000 years ago. We identified two genetic groups, implying a marked temporal genetic differentiation between samples with radiocarbon ages older than 12 thousand radiocarbon years before present (ka) and those younger than 9ka. Simulation-based analysis indicates that this dramatic change in genetic composition, which included a decrease in individual heterozygosity of approximately 30%, was due to a multifold reduction in effective population size. A corresponding reduction in genetic variation was also detected in the mitochondrial DNA, where about 65% of the diversity was lost. We observed no further loss in genetic variation during the Holocene, which suggests a rapid final extinction event.

  3. Microsatellite genotyping reveals end-Pleistocene decline in mammoth autosomal genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Veronica; Humphrey, Joanne; Skoglund, Pontus; McKeown, Niall J; Vartanyan, Sergey; Shaw, Paul W; Lidén, Kerstin; Jakobsson, Mattias; Barnes, Ian; Angerbjörn, Anders; Lister, Adrian; Dalén, Love

    2012-07-01

    The last glaciation was a dynamic period with strong impact on the demography of many species and populations. In recent years, mitochondrial DNA sequences retrieved from radiocarbon-dated remains have provided novel insights into the history of Late Pleistocene populations. However, genotyping of loci from the nuclear genome may provide enhanced resolution of population-level changes. Here, we use four autosomal microsatellite DNA markers to investigate the demographic history of woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius) in north-eastern Siberia from before 60 000 years ago up until the species' final disappearance c.4000 years ago. We identified two genetic groups, implying a marked temporal genetic differentiation between samples with radiocarbon ages older than 12 thousand radiocarbon years before present (ka) and those younger than 9ka. Simulation-based analysis indicates that this dramatic change in genetic composition, which included a decrease in individual heterozygosity of approximately 30%, was due to a multifold reduction in effective population size. A corresponding reduction in genetic variation was also detected in the mitochondrial DNA, where about 65% of the diversity was lost. We observed no further loss in genetic variation during the Holocene, which suggests a rapid final extinction event. PMID:22443459

  4. Gene flow of Acanthaster planci (L.) in relation to ocean currents revealed by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Nina; Nagai, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Masami; Okaji, Ken; Gérard, Karin; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    Population outbreaks of the coral-eating starfish, Acanthaster planci, are hypothesized to spread to many localities in the Indo-Pacific Ocean through dispersal of planktonic larvae. To elucidate the gene flow of A. planci across the Indo-Pacific in relation to ocean currents and to test the larval dispersal hypothesis, the genetic structure among 23 samples over the Indo-Pacific was analysed using seven highly polymorphic microsatellite loci. The F-statistics and genetic admixture analysis detected genetically distinct groups in accordance with ocean current systems, that is, the Southeast African group (Kenya and Mayotte), the Northwestern Pacific group (the Philippines and Japan), Palau, the North Central Pacific group (Majuro and Pohnpei), the Great Barrier Reef, Fiji, and French Polynesia, with a large genetic break between the Indian and Pacific Oceans. A pattern of significant isolation by distance was observed among all samples (P = 0.001, r = 0.88, n = 253, Mantel test), indicating restricted gene flow among the samples in accordance with geographical distances. The data also indicated strong gene flow within the Southeast African, Northwestern Pacific, and Great Barrier Reef groups. These results suggest that the western boundary currents have strong influence on gene flow of this species and may trigger secondary outbreaks. PMID:19302361

  5. Strong population structure in the marine sponge Crambe crambe (Poecilosclerida) as revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Duran, S; Pascual, M; Estoup, A; Turon, X

    2004-03-01

    Different categories of molecular markers have been used so far to study the population structure of sponges. However, these markers often did not have the resolution power to address precisely questions on structuring processes, especially at the intrapopulational level. In this study we show that microsatellites fulfil these expectations, allowing a fine description of population structure at different geographical scales in the marine sponge Crambe crambe. Specimens were collected in 11 locations, representing most of the Atlanto-Mediterranean range of the species, and were analysed at six loci. As expected for a sessile invertebrate with lecitotrophic larvae, high levels of between-population structure were found (FST = 0.18) and a significant isolation-by-distance pattern was observed. A strong genetic structure was also found within sampled sites (FIS = 0.21) that may be explained by several factors including inbreeding, selfing and the Wahlund effect. In spite of a sampling design planned to avoid the sampling of clones, genotypically identical individuals for the six loci were found in some locations. The significance of these potential clones is discussed and their effect on the observed pattern of population structure assessed. Patterns of allelic distribution within populations suggest the possibility of a recent colonization of the Atlantic range from the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Microsatellite Loci Analysis Reveals Post-bottleneck Recovery of Genetic Diversity in the Tibetan Antelope

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yurong; Zou, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yongtao; Guo, Xinyi; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xuze; Su, Mengyu; Ma, Jianbin; Guo, Songchang

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan antelope (chiru, Pantholops hodgsoni) is one of the most endangered mammals native to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The population size has rapidly declined over the last century due to illegal hunting and habitat damage. In the past 10 years, the population has reportedly been expanding due to conservation efforts. Several lines of evidence suggest that the Tibetan antelope has undergone a demographic bottleneck. However, the consequences of the bottleneck on genetic diversity and the post-bottleneck genetic recovery remain unknown. In this study, we investigate the genetic variation of 15 microsatellite loci from two Tibetan antelope populations sampled in 2003 (Pop2003) and 2013 (Pop2013). A higher level of genetic diversity (NA, 13.286; He, 0.840; PIC, 0.813; I, 2.114) was detected in Pop2013, compared to Pop2003 (NA, 12.929; He, 0.818; PIC, 0.789; I, 2.033). We observe that despite passing through the bottleneck, the Tibetan antelope retains high levels of genetic diversity. Furthermore, our results show significant or near significant increases in genetic diversity (He, PIC and I) in Pop2013 compared with Pop2003, which suggests that protection efforts did not arrive too late for the Tibetan antelope. PMID:27739522

  7. Microsatellites loci reveal heterozygosis and population structure in vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Romero-Nava, Claudia; León-Paniagua, Livia; Ortega, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    A limited number of studies have focused on the population genetic structure of vampire bats (Desmous rotundus) in America. This medium-sized bat is distributed in tropical areas of the continent with high prevalence in forested livestock areas. The aim of this work was to characterize the vampire population structure and their genetic differentiation. For this, we followed standard methods by which live vampires (caught by mist-netting) and preserved material from scientific collections, were obtained for a total of 15 different locations, ranging from Chihuahua (North) to Quintana Roo (Southeast). Tissue samples were obtained from both live and collected animals, and the genetic differentiation, within and among localities, was assessed by the use of seven microsatellite loci. Our results showed that all loci were polymorphic and no private alleles were detected. High levels of heterozygosis were detected when the proportion of alleles in each locus were compared. Pairwise (ST) and R(ST) detected significant genetic differentiation among individuals from different localities. Our population structure results indicate the presence of eleven clusters, with a high percentage of assigned individuals to some specific collecting site. PMID:25102648

  8. Microsatellites loci reveal heterozygosis and population structure in vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Romero-Nava, Claudia; León-Paniagua, Livia; Ortega, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    A limited number of studies have focused on the population genetic structure of vampire bats (Desmous rotundus) in America. This medium-sized bat is distributed in tropical areas of the continent with high prevalence in forested livestock areas. The aim of this work was to characterize the vampire population structure and their genetic differentiation. For this, we followed standard methods by which live vampires (caught by mist-netting) and preserved material from scientific collections, were obtained for a total of 15 different locations, ranging from Chihuahua (North) to Quintana Roo (Southeast). Tissue samples were obtained from both live and collected animals, and the genetic differentiation, within and among localities, was assessed by the use of seven microsatellite loci. Our results showed that all loci were polymorphic and no private alleles were detected. High levels of heterozygosis were detected when the proportion of alleles in each locus were compared. Pairwise (ST) and R(ST) detected significant genetic differentiation among individuals from different localities. Our population structure results indicate the presence of eleven clusters, with a high percentage of assigned individuals to some specific collecting site.

  9. Genotypic diversity and differentiation among populations of two benthic freshwater diatoms as revealed by microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Vanormelingen, Pieter; Evans, Katharine M; Mann, David G; Lance, Stacey; Debeer, Ann-Eline; D'Hondt, Sofie; Verstraete, Tine; De Meester, Luc; Vyverman, Wim

    2015-09-01

    Given their large population sizes and presumed high dispersal capacity, protists are expected to exhibit homogeneous population structure over large spatial scales. On the other hand, the fragmented and short-lived nature of the lentic freshwater habitats that many protists inhabit promotes strong population differentiation. We used microsatellites in two benthic freshwater diatoms, Eunotia bilunaris 'robust' and Sellaphora capitata, sampled from within a pond and connected ponds, through isolated ponds from the same region to western Europe to determine the spatial scale at which differentiation appears. Because periods of low genotypic diversity contribute to population differentiation, we also assessed genotypic diversity. While genotypic diversity was very high to maximal in most samples of both species, some had a markedly lower diversity, with up to half (Eunotia) and over 90% (Sellaphora) of the strains having the same multilocus genotype. Population differentiation showed an isolation-by-distance pattern with very low standardized FST values between samples from the same or connected ponds but high values between isolated ponds, even when situated in the same region. Partial rbcL sequences in Eunotia were consistent with this pattern as isolated ponds in the same region could differ widely in haplotype composition. Populations identified by Structure corresponded to the source ponds, confirming that 'pond' is the main factor structuring these populations. We conclude that freshwater benthic diatom populations are highly fragmented on a regional scale, reflecting either less dispersal than is often assumed or reduced establishment success of immigrants, so that dispersal does not translate into gene flow.

  10. Microsatellite analyses reveal fine-scale genetic structure in grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus).

    PubMed

    Fredsted, T; Pertoldi, C; Schierup, M H; Kappeler, P M

    2005-07-01

    Information on genetic structure can be used to complement direct inferences on social systems and behaviour. We studied the genetic structure of the solitary grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a small, nocturnal primate endemic to western Madagascar, with the aim of getting further insight on its breeding structure. Tissue samples from 167 grey mouse lemurs in an area covering 12.3 km2 in Kirindy Forest were obtained from trapping. The capture data indicated a noncontinuous distribution of individuals in the study area. Using 10 microsatellite markers, significant genetic differentiation in the study area was demonstrated and dispersal was found to be significantly male biased. Furthermore, we observed an overall excess of homozygotes in the total population (F(IT) = 0.131), which we interpret as caused by fine-scale structure with breeding occurring in small units. Evidence for a clumped distribution of identical homozygotes was found, supporting the notion that dispersal distance for breeding was shorter than that for foraging, i.e. the breeding neighbourhood size is smaller than the foraging neighbourhood size. In conclusion, we found a more complex population structure than what has been previously reported in studies performed on smaller spatial scales. The noncontinuous distribution of individuals and the effects of social variables on the genetic structure have implications for the interpretation of social organization and the planning of conservation activities that may apply to other solitary and endangered mammals as well.

  11. Microsatellite marker analysis reveals the complex phylogeographic history of Rhododendron ferrugineum (Ericaceae) in the Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Olivia; Dupont, Pierre; Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation within plant species is determined by a number of factors such as reproductive mode, breeding system, life history traits and climatic events. In alpine regions, plants experience heterogenic abiotic conditions that influence the population's genetic structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the subalpine shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum across the Pyrenees and the links between the populations in the Pyrenees, the Alps and Jura Mountains. We used 27 microsatellite markers to genotype 645 samples from 29 Pyrenean populations, three from the Alps and one from the Jura Mountains. These data were used to estimate population genetics statistics such as allelic richness, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, fixation index, inbreeding coefficient and number of migrants. Genetic diversity was found to be higher in the Alps than in the Pyrenees suggesting colonization waves from the Alps to the Pyrenees. Two separate genetic lineages were found in both the Alps and Pyrenees, with a substructure of five genetic clusters in the Pyrenees where a loss of genetic diversity was noted. The strong differentiation among clusters is maintained by low gene flow across populations. Moreover, some populations showed higher genetic diversity than others and presented rare alleles that may indicate the presence of alpine refugia. Two lineages of R. ferrugineum have colonized the Pyrenees from the Alps. Then, during glaciation events R. ferrugineum survived in the Pyrenees in different refugia such as lowland refugia at the eastern part of the chain and nunataks at high elevations leading to a clustered genetic pattern. PMID:24667824

  12. Microsatellite marker analysis reveals the complex phylogeographic history of Rhododendron ferrugineum (Ericaceae) in the Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Olivia; Dupont, Pierre; Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation within plant species is determined by a number of factors such as reproductive mode, breeding system, life history traits and climatic events. In alpine regions, plants experience heterogenic abiotic conditions that influence the population's genetic structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the subalpine shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum across the Pyrenees and the links between the populations in the Pyrenees, the Alps and Jura Mountains. We used 27 microsatellite markers to genotype 645 samples from 29 Pyrenean populations, three from the Alps and one from the Jura Mountains. These data were used to estimate population genetics statistics such as allelic richness, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, fixation index, inbreeding coefficient and number of migrants. Genetic diversity was found to be higher in the Alps than in the Pyrenees suggesting colonization waves from the Alps to the Pyrenees. Two separate genetic lineages were found in both the Alps and Pyrenees, with a substructure of five genetic clusters in the Pyrenees where a loss of genetic diversity was noted. The strong differentiation among clusters is maintained by low gene flow across populations. Moreover, some populations showed higher genetic diversity than others and presented rare alleles that may indicate the presence of alpine refugia. Two lineages of R. ferrugineum have colonized the Pyrenees from the Alps. Then, during glaciation events R. ferrugineum survived in the Pyrenees in different refugia such as lowland refugia at the eastern part of the chain and nunataks at high elevations leading to a clustered genetic pattern.

  13. Genetic diversity and domestication origin of tea plant Camellia taliensis (Theaceae) as revealed by microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world. Many species in the Thea section of the Camellia genus can be processed for drinking and have been domesticated. However, few investigations have focused on the genetic consequence of domestication and geographic origin of landraces on tea plants using credible wild and planted populations of a single species. Here, C. taliensis provides us with a unique opportunity to explore these issues. Results Fourteen nuclear microsatellite loci were employed to determine the genetic diversity and domestication origin of C. taliensis, which were represented by 587 individuals from 25 wild, planted and recently domesticated populations. C. taliensis showed a moderate high level of overall genetic diversity. The greater reduction of genetic diversity and stronger genetic drift were detected in the wild group than in the recently domesticated group, indicating the loss of genetic diversity of wild populations due to overexploitation and habitat fragmentation. Instead of the endangered wild trees, recently domesticated individuals were used to compare with the planted trees for detecting the genetic consequence of domestication. A little and non-significant reduction in genetic diversity was found during domestication. The long life cycle, selection for leaf traits and gene flow between populations will delay the emergence of bottleneck in planted trees. Both phylogenetic and assignment analyses suggested that planted trees may have been domesticated from the adjacent central forest of western Yunnan and dispersed artificially to distant places. Conclusions This study contributes to the knowledge about levels and distribution of genetic diversity of C. taliensis and provides new insights into genetic consequence of domestication and geographic origin of planted trees of this species. As an endemic tea source plant, wild, planted and recently domesticated C. taliensis trees should all be protected for their unique

  14. Genotypic diversity and differentiation among populations of two benthic freshwater diatoms as revealed by microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Vanormelingen, Pieter; Evans, Katharine M; Mann, David G; Lance, Stacey; Debeer, Ann-Eline; D'Hondt, Sofie; Verstraete, Tine; De Meester, Luc; Vyverman, Wim

    2015-09-01

    Given their large population sizes and presumed high dispersal capacity, protists are expected to exhibit homogeneous population structure over large spatial scales. On the other hand, the fragmented and short-lived nature of the lentic freshwater habitats that many protists inhabit promotes strong population differentiation. We used microsatellites in two benthic freshwater diatoms, Eunotia bilunaris 'robust' and Sellaphora capitata, sampled from within a pond and connected ponds, through isolated ponds from the same region to western Europe to determine the spatial scale at which differentiation appears. Because periods of low genotypic diversity contribute to population differentiation, we also assessed genotypic diversity. While genotypic diversity was very high to maximal in most samples of both species, some had a markedly lower diversity, with up to half (Eunotia) and over 90% (Sellaphora) of the strains having the same multilocus genotype. Population differentiation showed an isolation-by-distance pattern with very low standardized FST values between samples from the same or connected ponds but high values between isolated ponds, even when situated in the same region. Partial rbcL sequences in Eunotia were consistent with this pattern as isolated ponds in the same region could differ widely in haplotype composition. Populations identified by Structure corresponded to the source ponds, confirming that 'pond' is the main factor structuring these populations. We conclude that freshwater benthic diatom populations are highly fragmented on a regional scale, reflecting either less dispersal than is often assumed or reduced establishment success of immigrants, so that dispersal does not translate into gene flow. PMID:26227512

  15. Microsatellite Markers Reveal Strong Genetic Structure in the Endemic Chilean Dolphin

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alvarez, María José; Olavarría, Carlos; Moraga, Rodrigo; Baker, C. Scott; Hamner, Rebecca M.; Poulin, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding genetic differentiation and speciation processes in marine species with high dispersal capabilities is challenging. The Chilean dolphin, Cephalorhynchus eutropia, is the only endemic cetacean of Chile and is found in two different coastal habitats: a northern habitat with exposed coastlines, bays and estuaries from Valparaíso (33°02′S) to Chiloé (42°00′S), and a southern habitat with highly fragmented inshore coastline, channels and fjords between Chiloé and Navarino Island (55°14′S). With the aim of evaluating the potential existence of conservation units for this species, we analyzed the genetic diversity and population structure of the Chilean dolphin along its entire range. We genotyped 21 dinucleotide microsatellites for 53 skin samples collected between 1998 and 2012 (swab: n = 8, biopsy: n = 38, entanglement n = 7). Bayesian clustering and spatial model analyses identified two genetically distinct populations corresponding to the northern and southern habitats. Genetic diversity levels were similar in the two populations (He: 0.42 v/s 0.45 for southern and northern populations, respectively), while effective size population was higher in the southern area (Ne: 101 v/s 39). Genetic differentiation between these two populations was high and significant (FST = 0.15 and RST = 0.19), indicating little or no current gene flow. Because of the absence of evident geographical barriers between the northern and southern populations, we propose that genetic differentiation may reflect ecological adaptation to the different habitat conditions and resource uses. Therefore, the two genetic populations of this endemic and Near Threatened species should be considered as different conservation units with independent management strategies. PMID:25898340

  16. Microsatellite Marker Analysis Reveals the Complex Phylogeographic History of Rhododendron ferrugineum (Ericaceae) in the Pyrenees

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Olivia; Dupont, Pierre; Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation within plant species is determined by a number of factors such as reproductive mode, breeding system, life history traits and climatic events. In alpine regions, plants experience heterogenic abiotic conditions that influence the population's genetic structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the subalpine shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum across the Pyrenees and the links between the populations in the Pyrenees, the Alps and Jura Mountains. We used 27 microsatellite markers to genotype 645 samples from 29 Pyrenean populations, three from the Alps and one from the Jura Mountains. These data were used to estimate population genetics statistics such as allelic richness, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, fixation index, inbreeding coefficient and number of migrants. Genetic diversity was found to be higher in the Alps than in the Pyrenees suggesting colonization waves from the Alps to the Pyrenees. Two separate genetic lineages were found in both the Alps and Pyrenees, with a substructure of five genetic clusters in the Pyrenees where a loss of genetic diversity was noted. The strong differentiation among clusters is maintained by low gene flow across populations. Moreover, some populations showed higher genetic diversity than others and presented rare alleles that may indicate the presence of alpine refugia. Two lineages of R. ferrugineum have colonized the Pyrenees from the Alps. Then, during glaciation events R. ferrugineum survived in the Pyrenees in different refugia such as lowland refugia at the eastern part of the chain and nunataks at high elevations leading to a clustered genetic pattern. PMID:24667824

  17. Genetic structure of Pyrenophora teres net and spot populations as revealed by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Leišová-Svobodová, Leona; Minaříková, Věra; Matušinsky, Pavel; Hudcovicová, Martina; Ondreičková, Katarína; Gubiš, Jozef

    2014-02-01

    The population structure of the fungal pathogen Pyrenophora teres, collected mainly from different regions of the Czech and Slovak Republics, was examined using a microsatellite analyses (SSR). Among 305 P. teres f. teres (PTT) and 82 P. teres f. maculata (PTM) isolates that were collected, the overall gene diversity was similar (ĥ = 0.12 and ĥ = 0.13, respectively). A high level of genetic differentiation (FST = 0.46; P < 0.001) indicated the existence of population structure. Nine clusters that were found using a Bayesian approach represent the genetic structure of the studied P. teres populations. Two clusters consisted of PTM populations; PTT populations formed another seven clusters. An exact test of population differentiation confirmed the results that were generated by Structure. There was no difference between naturally infected populations over time, and genetic distance did not correlate with geographical distance. The facts that all individuals had unique multilocus genotypes and that the hypothesis of random mating could not be rejected in several populations or subpopulations serve as evidence that a mixed mating system plays a role in the P. teres life cycle. Despite the fact that the genetic differentiation value between PTT and PTM (FST = 0.30; P < 0.001) is lower than it is between the populations within each form (FST = 0.40 (PTT); FST = 0.35 (PTM); P < 0.001) and that individuals with mixed PTT and PTM genomes were found, the two forms of P. teres form genetically separate populations. Therefore, it can be assumed that these populations have most likely undergone speciation.

  18. Genetic structure of Pyrenophora teres net and spot populations as revealed by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Leišová-Svobodová, Leona; Minaříková, Věra; Matušinsky, Pavel; Hudcovicová, Martina; Ondreičková, Katarína; Gubiš, Jozef

    2014-02-01

    The population structure of the fungal pathogen Pyrenophora teres, collected mainly from different regions of the Czech and Slovak Republics, was examined using a microsatellite analyses (SSR). Among 305 P. teres f. teres (PTT) and 82 P. teres f. maculata (PTM) isolates that were collected, the overall gene diversity was similar (ĥ = 0.12 and ĥ = 0.13, respectively). A high level of genetic differentiation (FST = 0.46; P < 0.001) indicated the existence of population structure. Nine clusters that were found using a Bayesian approach represent the genetic structure of the studied P. teres populations. Two clusters consisted of PTM populations; PTT populations formed another seven clusters. An exact test of population differentiation confirmed the results that were generated by Structure. There was no difference between naturally infected populations over time, and genetic distance did not correlate with geographical distance. The facts that all individuals had unique multilocus genotypes and that the hypothesis of random mating could not be rejected in several populations or subpopulations serve as evidence that a mixed mating system plays a role in the P. teres life cycle. Despite the fact that the genetic differentiation value between PTT and PTM (FST = 0.30; P < 0.001) is lower than it is between the populations within each form (FST = 0.40 (PTT); FST = 0.35 (PTM); P < 0.001) and that individuals with mixed PTT and PTM genomes were found, the two forms of P. teres form genetically separate populations. Therefore, it can be assumed that these populations have most likely undergone speciation. PMID:24528640

  19. Genetic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Impaired in Plastid Lipid Import Reveals a Role of Membrane Lipids in Chloroplast Division

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.

    2011-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes in plants relies largely on lipid import from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and this lipid transport process is mediated by TGD proteins in Arabidopsis. Such a dependency of chloroplast biogenesis on ER-to-plastid lipid transport was recently exemplified by analyzing double mutants between tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 and fad6 mutants. The fad6 mutants are defective in the desaturation of membrane lipids in chloroplasts and therefore dependent on import of polyunsaturated lipid precursors from the ER for constructing a competent thylakoid membrane system. In support of a critical role of TGD proteins in ER-to-plastid lipid trafficking, we showed that the introduction of the tgd mutations into fad6 mutant backgrounds led to drastic reductions in relative amounts of thylakoid lipids. Moreover, the tgd1-1 fad6 and tgd4-3 fad6 double mutants were deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids in chloroplast membrane lipids, and severely compromised in the biogenesis of photosynthetic membrane systems. Here we report that these double mutants are severely impaired in chloroplast division. The possible role of membrane lipids in chloroplast division is discussed.

  20. The Complete Sequence of the Acacia ligulata Chloroplast Genome Reveals a Highly Divergent clpP1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anna V; Boykin, Laura M; Howell, Katharine A; Nevill, Paul G; Small, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are a highly diverse angiosperm family that include many agriculturally important species. To date, 21 complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced from legume crops confined to the Papilionoideae subfamily. Here we report the first chloroplast genome from the Mimosoideae, Acacia ligulata, and compare it to the previously sequenced legume genomes. The A. ligulata chloroplast genome is 174,233 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 38,225 bp and single-copy regions of 92,798 bp and 4,985 bp [corrected]. Acacia ligulata lacks the inversion present in many of the Papilionoideae, but is not otherwise significantly different in terms of gene and repeat content. The key feature is its highly divergent clpP1 gene, normally considered essential in chloroplast genomes. In A. ligulata, although transcribed and spliced, it probably encodes a catalytically inactive protein. This study provides a significant resource for further genetic research into Acacia and the Mimosoideae. The divergent clpP1 gene suggests that Acacia will provide an interesting source of information on the evolution and functional diversity of the chloroplast Clp protease complex.

  1. The Complete Sequence of the Acacia ligulata Chloroplast Genome Reveals a Highly Divergent clpP1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Anna V.; Boykin, Laura M.; Howell, Katharine A.; Nevill, Paul G.; Small, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Legumes are a highly diverse angiosperm family that include many agriculturally important species. To date, 21 complete chloroplast genomes have been sequenced from legume crops confined to the Papilionoideae subfamily. Here we report the first chloroplast genome from the Mimosoideae, Acacia ligulata, and compare it to the previously sequenced legume genomes. The A. ligulata chloroplast genome is 158,724 bp in size, comprising inverted repeats of 25,925 bp and single-copy regions of 88,576 bp and 18,298 bp. Acacia ligulata lacks the inversion present in many of the Papilionoideae, but is not otherwise significantly different in terms of gene and repeat content. The key feature is its highly divergent clpP1 gene, normally considered essential in chloroplast genomes. In A. ligulata, although transcribed and spliced, it probably encodes a catalytically inactive protein. This study provides a significant resource for further genetic research into Acacia and the Mimosoideae. The divergent clpP1 gene suggests that Acacia will provide an interesting source of information on the evolution and functional diversity of the chloroplast Clp protease complex. PMID:25955637

  2. Microsatellite-based genotyping of Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto isolates reveals dominance and persistence of a particular epidemiological clone among neonatal intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Orazio; Delfino, Demetrio; Cascio, Antonio; Lo Passo, Carla; Amorini, Maria; Romeo, Daniela; Pernice, Ida

    2013-01-01

    In this study, using multilocus microsatellite analysis, we report the genetic characterization of 27 Candida parapsilosis isolates recovered in two different periods of time (2007-2009 and 2011-2012) from infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit of a hospital in Messina, Italy. The results revealed the persistence and dominance of a particular infectious genotype among NICU patients and highlight the power of the used microsatellite markers in clarifying epidemiologic associations, detect micro-evolutionary variations and facilitating the recognition of outbreaks.

  3. Population genetic structure and migration patterns of Liriomyza sativae in China: moderate subdivision and no Bridgehead effect revealed by microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Tang, X-T; Ji, Y; Chang, Y-W; Shen, Y; Tian, Z-H; Gong, W-R; Du, Y-Z

    2016-02-01

    While Liriomyza sativae (Diptera: Agromyzidae), an important invasive pest of ornamentals and vegetables has been found in China for the past two decades, few studies have focused on its genetics or route of invasive. In this study, we collected 288 L. sativae individuals across 12 provinces to explore its population genetic structure and migration patterns in China using seven microsatellites. We found relatively low levels of genetic diversity but moderate population genetic structure (0.05 < F ST < 0.15) in L. sativae from China. All populations deviated significantly from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to heterozygote deficiency. Molecular variance analysis revealed that more than 89% of variation was among samples within populations. A UPGMA dendrogram revealed that SH and GXNN populations formed one cluster separate from the other populations, which is in accordance with STRUCTURE and GENELAND analyses. A Mantel test indicated that genetic distance was not correlated to geographic distance (r = -0.0814, P = 0.7610), coupled with high levels of gene flow (M = 40.1-817.7), suggesting a possible anthropogenic influence on the spread of L. sativae in China and on the effect of hosts. The trend of asymmetrical gene flow was from southern to northern populations in general and did not exhibit a Bridgehead effect during the course of invasion, as can be seen by the low genetic diversity of southern populations.

  4. Establishment of monitoring methods for autophagy in rice reveals autophagic recycling of chloroplasts and root plastids during energy limitation.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masanori; Hidema, Jun; Wada, Shinya; Kondo, Eri; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Makino, Amane; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process leading to vacuolar or lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components in eukaryotes. Establishment of proper methods to monitor autophagy was a key step in uncovering its role in organisms, such as yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), mammals, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), in which chloroplastic proteins were found to be recycled by autophagy. Chloroplast recycling has been predicted to function in nutrient remobilization for growing organs or grain filling in cereal crops. Here, to develop our understanding of autophagy in cereals, we established monitoring methods for chloroplast autophagy in rice (Oryza sativa). We generated transgenic rice-expressing fluorescent protein (FP) OsAuTophaGy8 (OsATG8) fusions as autophagy markers. FP-ATG8 signals were delivered into the vacuolar lumen in living cells of roots and leaves mainly as vesicles corresponding to autophagic bodies. This phenomenon was not observed upon the addition of wortmannin, an inhibitor of autophagy, or in an ATG7 knockout mutant. Markers for the chloroplast stroma, stromal FP, and FP-labeled Rubisco were delivered by a type of autophagic body called the Rubisco-containing body (RCB) in the same manner. RCB production in excised leaves was suppressed by supply of external sucrose or light. The release of free FP caused by autophagy-dependent breakdown of FP-labeled Rubisco was induced during accelerated senescence in individually darkened leaves. In roots, nongreen plastids underwent both RCB-mediated and entire organelle types of autophagy. Therefore, our newly developed methods to monitor autophagy directly showed autophagic degradation of leaf chloroplasts and root plastids in rice plants and its induction during energy limitation.

  5. Small RNAs reveal two target sites of the RNA-maturation factor Mbb1 in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Loizeau, Karen; Qu, Yujiao; Depp, Sébastien; Fiechter, Vincent; Ruwe, Hannes; Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Many chloroplast transcripts are protected against exonucleolytic degradation by RNA-binding proteins. Such interactions can lead to the accumulation of short RNAs (sRNAs) that represent footprints of the protein partner. By mining existing data sets of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii small RNAs, we identify chloroplast sRNAs. Two of these correspond to the 5′-ends of the mature psbB and psbH messenger RNAs (mRNAs), which are both stabilized by the nucleus-encoded protein Mbb1, a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family. Accordingly, we find that the two sRNAs are absent from the mbb1 mutant. Using chloroplast transformation and site-directed mutagenesis to survey the psbB 5′ UTR, we identify a cis-acting element that is essential for mRNA accumulation. This sequence is also found in the 5′ UTR of psbH, where it plays a role in RNA processing. The two sRNAs are centered on these cis-acting elements. Furthermore, RNA binding assays in vitro show that Mbb1 associates with the two elements specifically. Taken together, our data identify a conserved cis-acting element at the extremity of the psbH and psbB 5′ UTRs that plays a role in the processing and stability of the respective mRNAs through interactions with the tetratricopeptide repeat protein Mbb1 and leads to the accumulation of protected sRNAs. PMID:24335082

  6. Crystallization of the c[subscript 14]-rotor of the chloroplast ATP synthase reveals that it contains pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Varco-Merth, Benjamin; Fromme, Raimund; Wang, Meitian; Fromme, Petra

    2008-08-27

    The ATP synthase is one of the most important enzymes on earth as it couples the transmembrane electrochemical potential of protons to the synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphage, providing the main ATP source of almost all higher life on earth. During ATP synthesis, stepwise protonation of a conserved carboxylate on each protein subunit of an oligomeric ring of 10--15 c-subunits is commonly thought to drive rotation of the rotor moiety (c{sub 10-14}{gamma}{sup {epsilon}}) relative to stator moiety ({alpha}{sub 3}{beta}{sub 3}{delta}ab{sub 2}). Here we report the isolation and crystallization of the c{sub 14}-ring of subunit c from the spinach chloroplast enzyme diffracting as far as 2.8 {angstrom}. Though ATP synthase was not previously know to contain any pigments, the crystals of the c-subunit possessed a strong yellow color. The pigment analysis revaled that they contain 1 chlorophyll and 2 carotenoids, thereby showing for the first time that the chloroplast ATP synthase contains cofactors, leading to the question of the possible roles of the functions of the pigments in the chloroplast ATP synthase.

  7. Microsatellite primers for Parkia biglobosa (Fabaceae: Mimosoideae) reveal that a single plant sires all seeds per pod1

    PubMed Central

    Lassen, Kristin Marie; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Ouédraogo, Moussa; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for an indigenous fruit tree, Parkia biglobosa, as a tool to study reproductive biology and population structure. Here we use the primers to determine the number of fathers per pod. • Methods and Results: Microsatellite loci were enriched in a genomic sample and isolated using pyrosequencing. Eleven primer pairs were characterized in two populations of P. biglobosa in Burkina Faso (each with 40 trees). The number of alleles per locus ranged from eight to 15, and one locus had null alleles. We genotyped seeds from 24 open-pollinated pods. The genotypic profiles of seeds per pod suggest that all seeds are outcrossed and that only one pollen donor sires all ovules in a single fruit. • Conclusions: Ten microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic. All seeds per pod of P. biglobosa were full siblings. The markers will be useful for reproductive and population genetic studies. PMID:25202634

  8. Genetic diversity and population structure of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) as revealed by mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minmin; Zheng, Jinsong; Wu, Min; Ruan, Rui; Zhao, Qingzhong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Ecological surveys have indicated that the population of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (YFP, Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) is becoming increasingly small and fragmented, and will be at high risk of extinction in the near future. Genetic conservation of this population will be an important component of the long-term conservation effort. We used a 597 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and 11 microsatellite loci to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of the YFP. The analysis of both mtDNA and microsatellite loci suggested that the genetic diversity of the YFP will possibly decrease in the future if the population keeps declining at a rapid rate, even though these two types of markers revealed different levels of genetic diversity. In addition, mtDNA revealed strong genetic differentiation between one local population, Xingchang-Shishou (XCSS), and the other five downstream local populations; furthermore, microsatellite DNA unveiled fine but significant genetic differentiation between three of the local populations (not only XCSS but also Poyang Lake (PY) and Tongling (TL)) and the other local populations. With an increasing number of distribution gaps appearing in the Yangtze main steam, the genetic differentiation of local populations will likely intensify in the future. The YFP is becoming a genetically fragmented population. Therefore, we recommend attention should be paid to the genetic conservation of the YFP. PMID:24968271

  9. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Critically Endangered Yangtze Finless Porpoise (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) as Revealed by Mitochondrial and Microsatellite DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minmin; Zheng, Jinsong; Wu, Min; Ruan, Rui; Zhao, Qingzhong; Wang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Ecological surveys have indicated that the population of the critically endangered Yangtze finless porpoise (YFP, Neophocaena asiaeorientalis asiaeorientalis) is becoming increasingly small and fragmented, and will be at high risk of extinction in the near future. Genetic conservation of this population will be an important component of the long-term conservation effort. We used a 597 base pair mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region and 11 microsatellite loci to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of the YFP. The analysis of both mtDNA and microsatellite loci suggested that the genetic diversity of the YFP will possibly decrease in the future if the population keeps declining at a rapid rate, even though these two types of markers revealed different levels of genetic diversity. In addition, mtDNA revealed strong genetic differentiation between one local population, Xingchang–Shishou (XCSS), and the other five downstream local populations; furthermore, microsatellite DNA unveiled fine but significant genetic differentiation between three of the local populations (not only XCSS but also Poyang Lake (PY) and Tongling (TL)) and the other local populations. With an increasing number of distribution gaps appearing in the Yangtze main steam, the genetic differentiation of local populations will likely intensify in the future. The YFP is becoming a genetically fragmented population. Therefore, we recommend attention should be paid to the genetic conservation of the YFP. PMID:24968271

  10. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the hree-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetic technologies in striped bass breeding programs, nearly 500 microsatellite markers were...

  11. Genetic structuring in a relictual population of screaming hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus vellerosus) in Argentina revealed by a set of novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Maximiliano; Ibáñez, Ezequiel Alejandro; Dobler, Dara; Justy, Fabienne; Delsuc, Frédéric; Abba, Agustín Manuel; Cassini, Marcelo Hernán; Túnez, Juan Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    The screaming hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus vellerosus) is a mammal species containing disjunct and isolated populations. In order to assess the effect of habitat fragmentation and geographic isolation, we developed seven new microsatellite loci isolated from low-coverage genome shotgun sequencing data for this species. Among these loci, six microsatellites were found to be polymorphic with 8-26 alleles per locus detected across 69 samples analyzed from a relictual population of the species located in the northeast of the Buenos Aires Province (Argentina). Mean allelic richness and polymorphic information content were 15 and 0.75, with observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.40 to 0.67 and 0.58 to 0.90, respectively. All loci showed departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The analysis of population structure in this relictual population revealed three groups of individuals that are genetically differentiated. These newly developed microsatellites will constitute a very useful tool for the estimation of genetic diversity and structure, population dynamics, social structure, parentage and mating system in this little-studied armadillo species. Such genetic data will be particularly helpful for the development of conservation strategies for this isolated population and also for the endangered Bolivian populations previously recognized as a distinct species (Chaetophractus nationi). PMID:27406582

  12. Genetic structuring in a relictual population of screaming hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus vellerosus) in Argentina revealed by a set of novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Maximiliano; Ibáñez, Ezequiel Alejandro; Dobler, Dara; Justy, Fabienne; Delsuc, Frédéric; Abba, Agustín Manuel; Cassini, Marcelo Hernán; Túnez, Juan Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    The screaming hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus vellerosus) is a mammal species containing disjunct and isolated populations. In order to assess the effect of habitat fragmentation and geographic isolation, we developed seven new microsatellite loci isolated from low-coverage genome shotgun sequencing data for this species. Among these loci, six microsatellites were found to be polymorphic with 8-26 alleles per locus detected across 69 samples analyzed from a relictual population of the species located in the northeast of the Buenos Aires Province (Argentina). Mean allelic richness and polymorphic information content were 15 and 0.75, with observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.40 to 0.67 and 0.58 to 0.90, respectively. All loci showed departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The analysis of population structure in this relictual population revealed three groups of individuals that are genetically differentiated. These newly developed microsatellites will constitute a very useful tool for the estimation of genetic diversity and structure, population dynamics, social structure, parentage and mating system in this little-studied armadillo species. Such genetic data will be particularly helpful for the development of conservation strategies for this isolated population and also for the endangered Bolivian populations previously recognized as a distinct species (Chaetophractus nationi).

  13. Genetic diversity of Ulva prolifera population in Qingdao coastal water during the green algal blooms revealed by microsatellite.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Huang, Hong-Jia; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng; Yang, Weidong

    2016-10-15

    Green tides have occurred in Qingdao coast in China for seven consecutive years from 2007 to 2013. To provide information on the genetic structure of these blooms, 210 free-floating green algae samples isolated from the green tide in Qingdao coast on June 19, 2013 were identified based on the ITS, rbcL and 5S sequence, and genetic diversity was investigated by microsatellite markers. According to ITS, rbcL and 5S sequence, all the 210 samples belonged to Ulva prolifera. Nei's genetic diversity and Shannon index estimated using eight microsatellite markers indicated that the genetic diversity of U. prolifera population within Qingdao's green bloom in 2013 was low. Taking into account previous reports about life history and physiology of U. prolifera, we proposed that the limited origin area of the free-floating biomass and asexual reproduction of U. prolifera might be responsible for the lower diversity of free floating U. prolifera. PMID:27412412

  14. Genetic structure of Columbia River redband trout populations in the Kootenai River drainage, Montana, revealed by microsatellite and allozyme loci

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, K.-L.; Muhlfeld, C.C.; Sage, G.K.; Leary, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the genetic divergence among 10 populations of redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri from the upper Columbia River drainage. Resident redband trout from two watersheds in the Kootenai River drainage and hatchery stocks of migratory Kamloops redband trout from Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, were analyzed using allele frequency data from microsatellite and allozyme loci. The Kamloops populations have significantly different allele frequencies from those of the Kootenai River drainage. Of the total genetic variation detected in the resident redband trout, 40.7% (microsatellites) and 15.5% (allozymes) were due to differences between populations from the two Kootenai River watersheds. The divergence among populations within each watershed, however, was less than 3.5% with both techniques. Our data indicate that watershed-specific broodstocks of redband trout are needed by fisheries managers for reintroduction or the supplementation of populations at risk of extinction.

  15. Genetic diversity of Ulva prolifera population in Qingdao coastal water during the green algal blooms revealed by microsatellite.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Huang, Hong-Jia; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng; Yang, Weidong

    2016-10-15

    Green tides have occurred in Qingdao coast in China for seven consecutive years from 2007 to 2013. To provide information on the genetic structure of these blooms, 210 free-floating green algae samples isolated from the green tide in Qingdao coast on June 19, 2013 were identified based on the ITS, rbcL and 5S sequence, and genetic diversity was investigated by microsatellite markers. According to ITS, rbcL and 5S sequence, all the 210 samples belonged to Ulva prolifera. Nei's genetic diversity and Shannon index estimated using eight microsatellite markers indicated that the genetic diversity of U. prolifera population within Qingdao's green bloom in 2013 was low. Taking into account previous reports about life history and physiology of U. prolifera, we proposed that the limited origin area of the free-floating biomass and asexual reproduction of U. prolifera might be responsible for the lower diversity of free floating U. prolifera.

  16. Functional Characterization of the GATA Transcription Factors GNC and CGA1 Reveals Their Key Role in Chloroplast Development, Growth, and Division in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Zubo, Yan O.; Tapken, Wiebke; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lavanway, Ann M.; Howard, Louisa; Pilon, Marinus; Kieber, Joseph J.; Schaller, G. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts develop from proplastids in a process that requires the interplay of nuclear and chloroplast genomes, but key steps in this developmental process have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show that the nucleus-localized transcription factors GATA NITRATE-INDUCIBLE CARBON-METABOLISM-INVOLVED (GNC) and CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA1 (CGA1) regulate chloroplast development, growth, and division in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). GNC and CGA1 are highly expressed in green tissues, and the phytohormone cytokinin regulates their expression. A gnc cga1 mutant exhibits a reduction in overall chlorophyll levels as well as in chloroplast size in the hypocotyl. Ectopic overexpression of either GNC or CGA1 promotes chloroplast biogenesis in hypocotyl cortex and root pericycle cells, based on increases in the number and size of the chloroplasts, and also results in expanded zones of chloroplast production into the epidermis of hypocotyls and cotyledons and into the cortex of roots. Ectopic overexpression also promotes the development of etioplasts from proplastids in dark-grown seedlings, subsequently enhancing the deetiolation process. Inducible expression of GNC demonstrates that GNC-mediated chloroplast biogenesis can be regulated postembryonically, notably so for chloroplast production in cotyledon epidermal cells. Analysis of the gnc cga1 loss-of-function and overexpression lines supports a role for these transcription factors in regulating the effects of cytokinin on chloroplast division. These data support a model in which GNC and CGA1 serve as two of the master transcriptional regulators of chloroplast biogenesis, acting downstream of cytokinin and mediating the development of chloroplasts from proplastids and enhancing chloroplast growth and division in specific tissues. PMID:22811435

  17. Pollination in the marine realm: microsatellites reveal high outcrossing rates and multiple paternity in eelgrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Reusch, T B

    2000-11-01

    The mating system was examined in two annual populations of eelgrass (Zostera marina), a marine angiosperm displaying subaqueous pollination. Multilocus genotyping using microsatellite DNA markers allowed the assessment of the pollen source based on single progeny as units of observation. Outcrossing was detectable by the presence of non-maternal alleles at one or more of the loci. In outcrossing cases, three microsatellite alleles were present in unripe seeds, consisting of both maternal alleles and the paternal allele composing the triploid primary endosperm. In ripe seeds, only the diploid embryonal genotype was amplifiable by PCR. Two intertidal populations situated in the German Wadden Sea were almost entirely outcrossing (t +/- SE 0.96 +/- 0.03, N=60 and 0.97 +/- 0.029, N=37). Because of the high polymorphism displayed by the eight chosen microsatellites, representing a total of 69 and 76 alleles, the likelihood of erroneously inferring selfing was small (alpha=0.0026 and 0.0007). In order to study the correlation of paternity, the coefficient of relatedness was determined within sibships. Relatedness (r +/- SE) was calculated as 0.357 +/- 0.059 and 0.343 +/- 0.037, indicating multiple paternities within inflorescences. Small amounts of tissue (< or = 0.1 mg) such as the developing seeds of recently fertilized ovules, were sufficient for PCR-amplification. Hence, PCR-based methods, such as multilocus microsatellite genotyping, allow the detection of pollen origin early in the development of progeny. They will be useful to distinguish postfertilization processes such as selective abortion and germination from other prefertilization determinants of plant mating systems.

  18. Analysis of microsatellite DNA markers reveals no genetic differentiation between wild and hatchery populations of Pacific threadfin in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Yang, Jinzeng

    2010-01-01

    Pacific threadfin, Polydactylus sexfilis, is popular fish in recreational fishing, as well as aquaculture in Hawaii. Its natural population has been continuously declining in the past several decades. Microsatellite DNA markers are useful DNA-based tool for monitoring Pacific threadfin populations. In this study, fifteen Microsatellite (MS) DNA markers were identified from a partial genomic Pacific threadfin DNA library enriched in CA repeats, and six highly-polymorphic microsatellite loci were employed to analyze genetic similarity and differences between the wild population and hatchery population in Oahu Island. A total of 37 alleles were detected at the six MS loci in the two populations. Statistical analysis of fixation index (F(ST)) and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed no genetic differentiation between the wild and hatchery populations (F(ST) = 0.001, CI(95%) = -0.01-0.021). Both high genetic diversity (H(o) = 0.664-0.674 and H(e) = 0.710-0.715) and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in the wild and hatchery populations. Results of genetic bottleneck analysis indicated that the hatchery was founded with sufficient numbers of brooders as inbreeding coefficient is very low (F(IS) = 0.052-0.072) in both wild and hatchery populations. Further studies are needed for comprehensive determinations of genetic varieties of primary founder broodstocks and successive offspring of the hatchery and wild populations with increased number of Pacific threadfin sample collections.

  19. Reverse random amplified microsatellite polymorphism reveals enhanced polymorphisms in the 3' end of simple sequence repeats in the pepper genome.

    PubMed

    Min, Woong-Ki; Han, Jung-Heon; Kang, Won-Hee; Lee, Heung-Ryul; Kim, Byung-Dong

    2008-09-30

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) are widely distributed in eukaryotic genomes and are informative genetic markers. Despite many advantages of SSR markers such as a high degree of allelic polymorphisms, co-dominant inheritance, multi-allelism, and genome-wide coverage in various plant species, they also have shortcomings such as low polymorphic rates between genetically close lines, especially in Capsicum annuum. We developed an alternative technique to SSR by normalizing and alternating anchored primers in random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms (RAMP). This technique, designated reverse random amplified microsatellite polymorphism (rRAMP), allows the detection of nucleotide variation in the 3' region flanking an SSR using normalized anchored and random primer combinations. The reproducibility and frequency of polymorphic loci in rRAMP was vigorously enhanced by translocation of the 5' anchor of repeat sequences to the 3' end position and selective use of moderate arbitrary primers. In our study, the PCR banding pattern of rRAMP was highly dependent on the frequency of repeat motifs and primer combinations with random primers. Linkage analysis showed that rRAMP markers were well scattered on an intra-specific pepper map. Based on these results, we suggest that this technique is useful for studying genetic diversity, molecular fingerprinting, and rapidly constructing molecular maps for diverse plant species. PMID:18483466

  20. Microarray analysis of Etrog citron (Citrus medica L.) reveals changes in chloroplast, cell wall, peroxidase and symporter activities in response to viroid infection.

    PubMed

    Rizza, Serena; Conesa, Ana; Juarez, José; Catara, Antonino; Navarro, Luis; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Ancillo, Gema

    2012-10-01

    Viroids are small (246-401 nucleotides), single-stranded, circular RNA molecules that infect several crop plants and can cause diseases of economic importance. Citrus are the hosts in which the largest number of viroids have been identified. Citrus exocortis viroid (CEVd), the causal agent of citrus exocortis disease, induces considerable losses in citrus crops. Changes in the gene expression profile during the early (pre-symptomatic) and late (post-symptomatic) stages of Etrog citron infected with CEVd were investigated using a citrus cDNA microarray. MaSigPro analysis was performed and, on the basis of gene expression profiles as a function of the time after infection, the differentially expressed genes were classified into five clusters. FatiScan analysis revealed significant enrichment of functional categories for each cluster, indicating that viroid infection triggers important changes in chloroplast, cell wall, peroxidase and symporter activities.

  1. Microsatellite markers isolated in olive ( Olea europaea L.) are suitable for individual fingerprinting and reveal polymorphism within ancient cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, G.; Marrazzo, M. T.; Marconi, R.; Cimato, A.; Testolin, R.

    2002-02-01

    We have isolated and sequenced 52 microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from nearly 60 positive clones obtained from two 'Frantoio' olive genomic libraries enriched in (AC/GT) and (AG/CT) repeats, respectively. The repeat-containing fragments obtained from genomic DNA restricted with Tsp509I were separated using a biotinylated probe bound to streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads. Fragments were then cloned into lambda ZAPII vector and sequenced. Thirty of the 36 primer pairs which gave correct re-amplification in the source genome were used to assay the polymorphism of 12 olive cultivars, namely four well-known cultivars ('Coratina', 'Frantoio', 'Leccino', 'Pendolino') and eight ancient cultivars grown locally near Lake Garda ('Casaliva', 'Favarol', 'Fort', 'Grignan', 'Less', 'Raza', 'Rossanel', 'Trep'). The local cultivars were each re- presented by two to four long-lived individuals. The analysis was carried out using (33)P-labelled primers and 6% polyacrylamide sequencing gels. All except two microsatellites showed polymorphism, the number of alleles varying from 1 to 5. The average genetic diversity ( H) was 0.55. The power of discrimination ( PD) was 0.60. All cultivars, including the local ones, were easily separated from each other. Variations in the SSR pattern were observed among individual plants of the same cultivar in four out of the eight local cultivars analysed. Several primer pairs (17%) amplified more than one locus.

  2. High genetic divergence in miniature breeds of Japanese native chickens compared to Red Junglefowl, as revealed by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Tadano, R; Nishibori, M; Imamura, Y; Matsuzaki, M; Kinoshita, K; Mizutani, M; Namikawa, T; Tsudzuki, M

    2008-02-01

    A wide diversity of domesticated chicken breeds exist due to artificial selection on the basis of human interests. Miniature variants (bantams) are eminently illustrative of the large changes from ancestral junglefowls. In this report, the genetic characterization of seven Japanese miniature chicken breeds and varieties, together with institute-kept Red Junglefowl, was conducted by means of typing 40 microsatellites located on 21 autosomes. We drew focus to genetic differentiation between the miniature chicken breeds and Red Junglefowl in particular. A total of 305 alleles were identified: 27 of these alleles (8.9%) were unique to the Red Junglefowl with high frequencies (>20%). Significantly high genetic differences (F(ST)) were obtained between Red Junglefowl and all other breeds with a range of 0.3901-0.5128. Individual clustering (constructed from combinations of the proportion of shared alleles and the neighbour-joining method) indicated high genetic divergence among breeds including Red Junglefowl. There were also individual assignments on the basis of the Bayesian and distance-based approaches. The microsatellite differences in the miniature chicken breeds compared to the presumed wild ancestor reflected the phenotypic diversity among them, indicating that each of these miniature chicken breeds is a unique gene pool. PMID:18254737

  3. Genetic variability of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) seed stands in Slovenia as revealed by nuclear microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Jarni, Kristjan; De Cuyper, Bart; Brus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to describe the genetic variability of four seed stands of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.). One hundred and thirty one individuals were genotyped at ten nuclear microsatellite loci. Total genetic diversity was high (H(E) = 0.704), while differences between stands were small but significant (F(ST) = 0.053, G'(ST) = 0.234). There was a significant amount of clonal reproduction in one stand, with only 11 genotypes identified among 36 trees. One stand showed a significant excess (F(IS) = -0.044) of heterozygosity, and one showed a deficit (F(IS) = 0.044). Our results demonstrate the importance of taking into account the biological and genetic characteristics of species in forest management, especially when determining a new seed stand. The small genetic differences found between seed stands indicate that a large number of stands are not required. However, they should be carefully selected and should possess adequate genetic variability to ensure low relatedness between seed trees.

  4. Integrative Omics Analysis Reveals Post-Transcriptionally Enhanced Protective Host Response in Colorectal Cancers with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a frequent and clinically relevant molecular phenotype in colorectal cancer. MSI cancers have favorable survival compared with microsatellite stable cancers (MSS), possibly due to the pronounced tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes observed in MSI cancers. Consistent with the strong immune response that MSI cancers trigger in the host, previous transcriptome expression studies have identified mRNA signatures characteristic of immune response in MSI cancers. However, proteomics features of MSI cancers and the extent to which the mRNA signatures are reflected at the protein level remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a comprehensive comparison of global proteomics profiles between MSI and MSS colorectal cancers in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cohort. We found that protein signatures of MSI are also associated with increased immunogenicity. To reliably quantify post-transcription regulation in MSI cancers, we developed a resampling-based regression method by integrative modeling of transcriptomics and proteomics data sets. Compared with the popular simple method, which detects post-transcriptional regulation by either identifying genes differentially expressed at the mRNA level but not at the protein level or vice versa, our method provided a quantitative, more sensitive, and accurate way to identify genes subject to differential post-transcriptional regulation. With this method, we demonstrated that post-transcriptional regulation, coordinating protein expression with key players, initiates de novo and enhances protective host response in MSI cancers. PMID:26680540

  5. Microsatellite development and flow cytometry in the African tree genus Afzelia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) reveal a polyploid complex1

    PubMed Central

    Donkpegan, Armel S. L.; Doucet, Jean-Louis; Dainou, Kasso; Hardy, Olivier J.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellites were developed in the vulnerable African rainforest tree Afzelia bipindensis to investigate gene flow patterns. • Methods and Results: Using 454 GS-FLX technique, 16 primer sets were identified and optimized, leading to 11 polymorphic and readable markers displaying each six to 25 alleles in a population. Up to four alleles per individual were found in each of the loci, without evidence of fixed heterozygosity, suggesting an autotetraploid genome. Cross-amplification succeeded for all loci in the African rainforest species A. pachyloba and A. bella, which appeared tetraploid, and for most loci in the African woodland species A. africana and A. quanzensis, which appeared diploid, but failed in the Asian species A. xylocarpa. Flow cytometry confirmed the suspected differences in ploidy. • Conclusions: African Afzelia species are diploid or tetraploid, a situation rarely documented in tropical trees. These newly developed microsatellites will help in the study of their mating system and gene flow patterns. PMID:25606356

  6. Genetic Variability of Wild Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Seed Stands in Slovenia as Revealed by Nuclear Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Jarni, Kristjan; De Cuyper, Bart; Brus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to describe the genetic variability of four seed stands of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.). One hundred and thirty one individuals were genotyped at ten nuclear microsatellite loci. Total genetic diversity was high (HE = 0.704), while differences between stands were small but significant (FST = 0.053, G′ST = 0.234). There was a significant amount of clonal reproduction in one stand, with only 11 genotypes identified among 36 trees. One stand showed a significant excess (FIS = −0.044) of heterozygosity, and one showed a deficit (FIS = 0.044). Our results demonstrate the importance of taking into account the biological and genetic characteristics of species in forest management, especially when determining a new seed stand. The small genetic differences found between seed stands indicate that a large number of stands are not required. However, they should be carefully selected and should possess adequate genetic variability to ensure low relatedness between seed trees. PMID:22911762

  7. Cross-species amplification of microsatellites reveals incongruence in the molecular variation and taxonomic limits of the Pilosocereus aurisetus group (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Moraes, Evandro M; Perez, Manolo F; Téo, Mariana F; Zappi, Daniela C; Taylor, Nigel P; Machado, Marlon C

    2012-09-01

    The Pilosocereus aurisetus group contains eight cactus species restricted to xeric habitats in eastern and central Brazil that have an archipelago-like distribution. In this study, 5-11 microsatellite markers previously designed for Pilosocereus machrisii were evaluated for cross-amplification and polymorphisms in ten populations from six species of the P. aurisetus group. The genotypic information was subsequently used to investigate the genetic relationships between the individuals, populations, and species analyzed. Only the Pmac101 locus failed to amplify in all of the six analyzed species, resulting in an 88 % success rate. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 12, and the most successfully amplified loci showed at least one population with a larger number of alleles than were reported in the source species. The population relationships revealed clear genetic clustering in a neighbor-joining tree that was partially incongruent with the taxonomic limits between the P. aurisetus and P. machrisii species, a fact which parallels the problematic taxonomy of the P. aurisetus group. A Bayesian clustering analysis of the individual genotypes confirmed the observed taxonomic incongruence. These microsatellite markers provide a valuable resource for facilitating large-scale genetic studies on population structures, systematics and evolutionary history in this group.

  8. Genetic variability, differentiation, and founder effect in golden jackals (Canis aureus) from Serbia as revealed by mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Frank E; Cirovic, Dusko; Kirschning, Julia; Otto, Marthe; Hartl, Günther B; Petersen, Britt; Honnen, Ann-Christin

    2009-04-01

    We analyzed 121 golden jackals (Canis aureus) from six sample sites in Serbia with regard to genetic variability and differentiation as revealed by mitochondrial control region sequences and eight nuclear microsatellite loci. There was no variation at all in the mtDNA sequences, and nuclear variability was very low (average observed and expected heterozygosity of 0.29 and 0.34, respectively). This is in line with the considerable recent range expansion of this species in the Balkans and indicates a strong founder effect in the recently established Serbian population. We did not find evidence of differentiation between the northeastern jackals and those from the plain of Srem or those in between. F-statistics and Bayesian Structure analyses, however, were indicative of a low degree of overall differentiation in the Serbian population. A vagrant Austrian jackal that was also analyzed was genetically indistinguishable from its Serbian conspecifics. PMID:19169806

  9. Genetic variability, differentiation, and founder effect in golden jackals (Canis aureus) from Serbia as revealed by mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Zachos, Frank E; Cirovic, Dusko; Kirschning, Julia; Otto, Marthe; Hartl, Günther B; Petersen, Britt; Honnen, Ann-Christin

    2009-04-01

    We analyzed 121 golden jackals (Canis aureus) from six sample sites in Serbia with regard to genetic variability and differentiation as revealed by mitochondrial control region sequences and eight nuclear microsatellite loci. There was no variation at all in the mtDNA sequences, and nuclear variability was very low (average observed and expected heterozygosity of 0.29 and 0.34, respectively). This is in line with the considerable recent range expansion of this species in the Balkans and indicates a strong founder effect in the recently established Serbian population. We did not find evidence of differentiation between the northeastern jackals and those from the plain of Srem or those in between. F-statistics and Bayesian Structure analyses, however, were indicative of a low degree of overall differentiation in the Serbian population. A vagrant Austrian jackal that was also analyzed was genetically indistinguishable from its Serbian conspecifics.

  10. Natural hybridisation between Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. and Quercus pubescens Willd. within an Italian stand as revealed by microsatellite fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Salvini, D; Bruschi, P; Fineschi, S; Grossoni, P; Kjaer, E D; Vendramin, G G

    2009-09-01

    Interspecific gene flow is frequently reported in the genus Quercus. However, interfertile oak species often seem to remain distinct, even within areas of sympatry. This study employed molecular markers to verify, at a fine scale, the presence of interspecific gene flow in a natural population of Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens. Within a delimited area of 6 ha, all adult trees belonging to the studied oak complex and seeds from a subsample of such trees were collected and analysed using molecular microsatellite markers. A low interspecific genetic differentiation and a high level of interspecific genetic admixture suggested past hybridisation. Paternity inference of seeds allowed the estimation of pollination frequencies from the three groups of pollen donors (Q. petraea, Q. pubescens, intermediate). We also assayed pollen viability and germinability of each species group. We observed natural hybridisation between Q. petraea and Q. pubescens, with a predominant component in the direction Q. petraea --> Q. pubescens: Q. pubescens displayed a higher level of heterospecific pollination by Q. petraea (25.8%) and intermediate morphotypes (14.7%), compared to Q. petraea acting as pollen receptor (with less than 5% heterospecific pollinations). Intermediate 'mother trees' were pollinated in similar proportions by Q. petraea (23.1%), Q. pubescens (37.8%) and intermediate morphotypes (39.1%). The asymmetrical introgression observed for the studied generation may be caused, among other factors, by the relative abundance of trees from each species group in the studied area. PMID:19689784

  11. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship among Tunisian cactus species (Opuntia) as revealed by random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Bendhifi Zarroug, M; Baraket, G; Zourgui, L; Souid, S; Salhi Hannachi, A

    2015-02-13

    Opuntia ficus indica is one of the most economically important species in the Cactaceae family. Increased interest in this crop stems from its potential contribution to agricultural diversification, application in the exploitation of marginal lands, and utility as additional income sources for farmers. In Tunisia, O. ficus indica has been affected by drastic genetic erosion resulting from biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, it is imperative to identify and preserve this germplasm. In this study, we focused on the use of random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms to assess genetic diversity among 25 representatives of Tunisian Opuntia species maintained in the collection of the National Institute of Agronomic Research of Tunisia. Seventy-two DNA markers were screened to discriminate accessions using 16 successful primer combinations. The high percentage of polymorphic band (100%), the resolving power value (5.68), the polymorphic information content (0.94), and the marker index (7.2) demonstrated the efficiency of the primers tested. Therefore, appropriate cluster analysis used in this study illustrated a divergence among the cultivars studied and exhibited continuous variation that occurred independently of geographic origin. O. ficus indica accessions did not cluster separately from the other cactus pear species, indicating that their current taxonomical classifications are not well aligned with their genetic variability or locality of origin.

  12. Genetic diversity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Dinarti, Diny; Susilo, Agung W; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Ji, Kun; Motilal, Lambert A; Mischke, Sue; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia is the third largest cocoa-producing country in the world. Knowledge of genetic diversity and parentage of farmer selections is important for effective selection and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers' fields. We assessed genetic diversity and parentage of 53 farmer selections of cacao in Sulawesi, Indonesia, using 152 international clones as references. Cluster analysis, based on 15 microsatellite markers, showed that these Sulawesi farmer selections are mainly comprised of hybrids derived from Trinitario and two Upper Amazon Forastero groups. Bayesian assignment and likelihood-based parentage analysis further demonstrated that only a small number of germplasm groups, dominantly Trinitario and Parinari, contributed to these farmer selections, in spite of diverse parental clones having been used in the breeding program and seed gardens in Indonesia since the 1950s. The narrow parentage predicts a less durable host resistance to cacao diseases. Limited access of the farmers to diverse planting materials or the strong preference for large pods and large bean size by local farmers, may have affected the selection outcome. Diverse sources of resistance, harbored in different cacao germplasm groups, need to be effectively incorporated to broaden the on-farm diversity and ensure sustainable cacao production in Sulawesi. PMID:26719747

  13. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship among Tunisian cactus species (Opuntia) as revealed by random amplified microsatellite polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Bendhifi Zarroug, M; Baraket, G; Zourgui, L; Souid, S; Salhi Hannachi, A

    2015-01-01

    Opuntia ficus indica is one of the most economically important species in the Cactaceae family. Increased interest in this crop stems from its potential contribution to agricultural diversification, application in the exploitation of marginal lands, and utility as additional income sources for farmers. In Tunisia, O. ficus indica has been affected by drastic genetic erosion resulting from biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, it is imperative to identify and preserve this germplasm. In this study, we focused on the use of random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms to assess genetic diversity among 25 representatives of Tunisian Opuntia species maintained in the collection of the National Institute of Agronomic Research of Tunisia. Seventy-two DNA markers were screened to discriminate accessions using 16 successful primer combinations. The high percentage of polymorphic band (100%), the resolving power value (5.68), the polymorphic information content (0.94), and the marker index (7.2) demonstrated the efficiency of the primers tested. Therefore, appropriate cluster analysis used in this study illustrated a divergence among the cultivars studied and exhibited continuous variation that occurred independently of geographic origin. O. ficus indica accessions did not cluster separately from the other cactus pear species, indicating that their current taxonomical classifications are not well aligned with their genetic variability or locality of origin. PMID:25730081

  14. Microsatellite Analysis of Museum Specimens Reveals Historical Differences in Genetic Diversity between Declining and More Stable Bombus Species

    PubMed Central

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; Ganne, Maarten; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Biesmeijer, Koos; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide most pollinators, e.g. bumblebees, are undergoing global declines. Loss of genetic diversity can play an essential role in these observed declines. In this paper, we investigated the level of genetic diversity of seven declining Bombus species and four more stable species with the use of microsatellite loci. Hereto we genotyped a unique collection of museum specimens. Specimens were collected between 1918 and 1926, in 6 provinces of the Netherlands which allowed us to make interspecific comparisons of genetic diversity. For the stable species B. pascuorum, we also selected populations from two additional time periods: 1949–1955 and 1975–1990. The genetic diversity and population structure in B. pascuorum remained constant over the three time periods. However, populations of declining bumblebee species showed a significantly lower genetic diversity than co-occurring stable species before their major declines. This historical difference indicates that the repeatedly observed reduced genetic diversity in recent populations of declining bumblebee species is not caused solely by the decline itself. The historically low genetic diversity in the declined species may be due to the fact that these species were already rare, making them more vulnerable to the major drivers of bumblebee decline. PMID:26061732

  15. Microsatellite Analysis of Museum Specimens Reveals Historical Differences in Genetic Diversity between Declining and More Stable Bombus Species.

    PubMed

    Maebe, Kevin; Meeus, Ivan; Ganne, Maarten; De Meulemeester, Thibaut; Biesmeijer, Koos; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide most pollinators, e.g. bumblebees, are undergoing global declines. Loss of genetic diversity can play an essential role in these observed declines. In this paper, we investigated the level of genetic diversity of seven declining Bombus species and four more stable species with the use of microsatellite loci. Hereto we genotyped a unique collection of museum specimens. Specimens were collected between 1918 and 1926, in 6 provinces of the Netherlands which allowed us to make interspecific comparisons of genetic diversity. For the stable species B. pascuorum, we also selected populations from two additional time periods: 1949-1955 and 1975-1990. The genetic diversity and population structure in B. pascuorum remained constant over the three time periods. However, populations of declining bumblebee species showed a significantly lower genetic diversity than co-occurring stable species before their major declines. This historical difference indicates that the repeatedly observed reduced genetic diversity in recent populations of declining bumblebee species is not caused solely by the decline itself. The historically low genetic diversity in the declined species may be due to the fact that these species were already rare, making them more vulnerable to the major drivers of bumblebee decline.

  16. Genetic diversity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Dinarti, Diny; Susilo, Agung W.; Meinhardt, Lyndel W.; Ji, Kun; Motilal, Lambert A.; Mischke, Sue; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia is the third largest cocoa-producing country in the world. Knowledge of genetic diversity and parentage of farmer selections is important for effective selection and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers’ fields. We assessed genetic diversity and parentage of 53 farmer selections of cacao in Sulawesi, Indonesia, using 152 international clones as references. Cluster analysis, based on 15 microsatellite markers, showed that these Sulawesi farmer selections are mainly comprised of hybrids derived from Trinitario and two Upper Amazon Forastero groups. Bayesian assignment and likelihood-based parentage analysis further demonstrated that only a small number of germplasm groups, dominantly Trinitario and Parinari, contributed to these farmer selections, in spite of diverse parental clones having been used in the breeding program and seed gardens in Indonesia since the 1950s. The narrow parentage predicts a less durable host resistance to cacao diseases. Limited access of the farmers to diverse planting materials or the strong preference for large pods and large bean size by local farmers, may have affected the selection outcome. Diverse sources of resistance, harbored in different cacao germplasm groups, need to be effectively incorporated to broaden the on-farm diversity and ensure sustainable cacao production in Sulawesi. PMID:26719747

  17. High genetic diversity in gametophyte clones of Undaria pinnatifida from Vladivostok, Dalian and Qingdao revealed using microsatellite analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tifeng; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Feng; Xu, Na; Zhao, Xiaobo; Gao, Suqin

    2012-03-01

    Breeding practice for Undaria pinnatifida (Harvey) Suringar requires the screening of a large number of offspring from gametophyte crossings to obtain an elite variety for large-scale cultivation. To better understand the genetic relationships of different gametophyte cultures isolated from different sources, 20 microsatellite loci were screened and 53 gametophyte clone cultures analyzed for U. pinnatifida isolated from wild sporophytes in Vladivostok, Russia and from cultivated sporophytes from Dalian and Qingdao, China. One locus was abandoned because of poor amplification. At the sex-linked locus of Up-AC-2A8, 3 alleles were detected in 25 female gametophyte clones, with sizes ranging from 307 to 316 bp. At other loci, 3 to 7 alleles were detected with an average of 4.5 alleles per locus. The average number of alleles at each locus was 1.3 and 3.7 for Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones, respectively. The average gene diversity for Russian, Chinese, and for the combined total of gametophyte clones was 0.1, 0.4, and 0.5, respectively. Russian gametophyte clones had unique alleles at 7 out of the 19 loci. In cluster analysis, Russian and Chinese gametophyte clones were separated into two different groups according to genetic distance. Overall, high genetic diversity was detected in gametophyte clones isolated from the two countries. These gametophyte cultures were believed to be appropriate parental materials for conducting breeding programs in the future.

  18. Apicobasal gradient of chloroplast DNA synthesis and distribution in Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Hoursiangou-Neubrun, D; Lüttke, A; Arapis, G; Puiseux-Dao, S; Bonotto, S

    1982-01-01

    Autoradiographic and biochemical experiments have revealed the presence, in vegetative cells of Acetabularia, of an apicobasal gradient of penetration and incorporation of labelled DNA precursors into the chloroplasts. Staining of chloroplasts with the DNA-specific fluorochrome DAPI has shown that the number of chloroplasts without DNA increases from the apex towards the base of the cell. All together, our findings support the existence of an apicobasal gradient of chloroplast DNA synthesis and distribution in Acetabularia.

  19. ChloroplastDB: the Chloroplast Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liying; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Richter, Alexander; Wall, Kerr; Jansen, Robert K; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Makalowska, Izabela; dePamphilis, Claude W

    2006-01-01

    The Chloroplast Genome Database (ChloroplastDB) is an interactive, web-based database for fully sequenced plastid genomes, containing genomic, protein, DNA and RNA sequences, gene locations, RNA-editing sites, putative protein families and alignments (http://chloroplast.cbio.psu.edu/). With recent technical advances, the rate of generating new organelle genomes has increased dramatically. However, the established ontology for chloroplast genes and gene features has not been uniformly applied to all chloroplast genomes available in the sequence databases. For example, annotations for some published genome sequences have not evolved with gene naming conventions. ChloroplastDB provides unified annotations, gene name search, BLAST and download functions for chloroplast encoded genes and genomic sequences. A user can retrieve all orthologous sequences with one search regardless of gene names in GenBank. This feature alone greatly facilitates comparative research on sequence evolution including changes in gene content, codon usage, gene structure and post-transcriptional modifications such as RNA editing. Orthologous protein sets are classified by TribeMCL and each set is assigned a standard gene name. Over the next few years, as the number of sequenced chloroplast genomes increases rapidly, the tools available in ChloroplastDB will allow researchers to easily identify and compile target data for comparative analysis of chloroplast genes and genomes.

  20. The impact of selection on population genetic structure in the clam Meretrix petechialis revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xia; Wang, Hongxia; Li, Yan; Liu, Baozhong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of our work is to evaluate the impact of mass selection on genetic structure in artificially closed populations of the clam Meretrix petechialis. In the present study, we performed mass selection over four generations (from 2004 to 2010) on two clam populations [shell features of purple lines (SP) and black dots (SB)] and analyzed their temporal genetic variation and structure using microsatellite makers. The two closed populations originated from the natural Shandong population (SD); thus, a natural SD population (10SD) was used to detect the current genetic structure after 6 years of natural selection. The results showed that the genetic diversity of the four generations of SB and SP was gradually reduced but remained at relatively high levels (SB, A = 18.9.4-16.8, Ho = 0.7389-0.6971, and He = 0.8897-0.8591; SP, A = 20.0-17.8, Ho = 0.7512-0.7043, and He = 0.8938-0.8625), which has not been reduced compared with that of the 10SD population (A = 17.8, Ho = 0.6803, and He = 0.8302). The Ne estimates for the two populations were almost at the same levels as the actual numbers of parental individuals. In addition, a low inbreeding coefficient was detected in the two populations (SB, 0.00201-0.00639; SP, 0.00176-0.00541). Based on the results, the present mass selection has not made a large impact on the population genetic structure of the closed populations. The present investigation provides important information for the development of management strategies for genetic breeding of the clam.

  1. Fat-tailed gene flow in the dioecious canopy tree species Fraxinus mandshurica var. japonica revealed by microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Goto, S; Shimatani, K; Yoshimaru, H; Takahashi, Y

    2006-09-01

    Pollen flow, seed dispersal and individual reproductive success can be simultaneously estimated from the genotypes of adults and offspring using stochastic models. Using four polymorphic microsatellite loci, gene flow of the wind-pollinated and wind-seed-dispersed dioecious tree species, Fraxinus mandshurica var. japonica, was quantified in a riparian forest, in northern Japan. In a 10.5-ha plot, 74 female adults, 76 male adults and 292 current-year seedlings were mapped and genotyped, together with 200 seeds. To estimate dispersal kernels of pollen and seeds, we applied normal, exponential power, Weibull, bivariate t-distribution kernels, and two-component models consisting of two normal distribution functions, one with a small and one with a large variance. A two-component pollen flow model with a small contribution (26.1%) from short-distance dispersal (sigma = 7.2 m), and the rest from long-distance flow (sigma = 209.9 m), was chosen for the best-fitting model. The average distance that integrated pollen flows inside and outside the study plot was estimated to be 196.8 m. Tree size and flowering intensity affected reproduction, and there appeared to be critical values that distinguished reproductively successful and unsuccessful adults. In contrast, the gene flow model that estimated both pollen and seed dispersal from established seedlings resulted in extensive seed dispersal, and the expected spatial genetic structures did not satisfactorily fit with the observations, even for the selected model. Our results advanced small-scale individual-based parentage analysis for quantifying fat-tailed gene flow in wind-mediated species, but also clarified its limitations and suggested future possibilities for gene flow studies.

  2. Heterogeneous genetic structure in a Fagus crenata population in an old-growth beech forest revealed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Asuka, Y; Tomaru, N; Nisimura, N; Tsumura, Y; Yamamoto, S

    2004-05-01

    The within-population genetic structure of Fagus crenata in a 4-ha plot (200 x 200 m) of an old-growth beech forest was analysed using microsatellite markers. To assess the genetic structure, Moran's I spatial autocorrelation coefficient was calculated. Correlograms of Moran's I showed significant positive values less than 0.100 for short-distance classes, indicating weak genetic structure. The genetic structure within the population is created by limited seed dispersal, and is probably weakened by overlapping seed shadow, secondary seed dispersal, extensive pollen flow and the thinning process. Genetic structure was detected in a western subplot of 50 x 200 m with immature soils and almost no dwarf bamboos (Sasa spp.), where small and intermediate-sized individuals were distributed in aggregations with high density because of successful regeneration. By contrast, genetic structure was not found in an eastern subplot of the same size with mature soils and Sasa cover, where successful regeneration was prevented, and the density of the small and intermediate-sized individuals was low. Moreover, genetic structure of individuals in a small-size class (diameter at breast height < 12 cm) was more obvious than in a large-size class (diameter at breast height >/= 12 cm). The apparent genetic structure detected in the 4-ha plot was therefore probably the result of the structure in the western portion of the plot and in small and intermediate-sized individuals that successfully regenerated under the favourable environment. The heterogeneity in genetic structure presumably reflects variation in the density that should be affected by differences in regeneration dynamics associated with heterogeneity in environmental conditions.

  3. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  4. Compound Evolutionary History of the Rhesus Macaque Mhc Class I B Region Revealed by Microsatellite Analysis and Localization of Retroviral Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Doxiadis, Gaby G. M.; Heijmans, Corrine M. C.; Bonhomme, Maxime; Otting, Nel; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the single polymorphic B locus of the major histocompatibility complex is linked to the microsatellite MIB. In rhesus macaques, however, haplotypes are characterized by the presence of unique combinations of multiple B genes, which may display different levels of polymorphism. The aim of the study was to shed light on the evolutionary history of this highly complex region. First, the robustness of the microsatellite MIB-linked to almost half of the B genes in rhesus macaques (Mamu-B)–for accurate B haplotyping was studied. Based on the physical map of an established haplotype comprising 7 MIB loci, each located next to a certain Mamu-B gene, two MIB loci, MIB1 and MIB6, were investigated in a panel of MHC homozygous monkeys. MIB1 revealed a complex genotyping pattern, whereas MIB6 analysis resulted in the detection of one or no amplicon. Both patterns are specific for a given B haplotype, show Mendelian segregation, and even allow a more precise haplotype definition than do traditional typing methods. Second, a search was performed for retroelements that may have played a role in duplication processes as observed in the macaque B region. This resulted in the description of two types of duplicons. One basic unit comprises an expressed Mamu-B gene, adjacent to an HERV16 copy closely linked to MIB. The second type of duplicon comprises a Mamu-B (pseudo)gene, linked to a truncated HERV16 structure lacking its MIB segment. Such truncation seems to coincide with the loss of B gene transcription. Subsequent to the duplication processes, recombination between MIB and Mamu-B loci appears to have occurred, resulting in a hyperplastic B region. Thus, analysis of MIB in addition to B loci allows deciphering of the compound evolutionary history of the class I B region in Old World monkeys. PMID:19172173

  5. Population structure of North American beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) based on nuclear DNA microsatellite variation and contrasted with the population structure revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation

    PubMed

    Gladden; Ferguson; Friesen; Clayton

    1999-03-01

    Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) in North American waters migrate seasonally between wintering areas in broken pack ice and summering locations in estuaries and other open water areas in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Results from our previous investigation of beluga whale mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed genetic heterogeneity among beluga from different summering locations that was interpreted as representing a high degree of summering site philopatry. However, mtDNA is maternally inherited and does not reflect mating that may occur among beluga from different summering locations in wintering areas or during annual migrations. To test the possibility that breeding occurs among beluga from different summering locations, genetic variability at five nuclear DNA (nDNA) microsatellite loci was examined in the same animals tested in the mtDNA study. Beluga samples (n = 640) were collected between 1984 and 1994 from 24 sites across North America, mostly during the summer. Whales from the various sites were categorized into eight summering locations as identified by mtDNA analysis, as well as four hypothesized wintering areas: Bering Sea, Hudson Strait (Hudson Strait, Labrador Sea, southwest Davis Strait), Baffin Bay (North Water, east Davis Strait), and St Lawrence River. Microsatellite allele frequencies indicated genetic homogeneity among animals from summering sites believed to winter together but differentiation among whales from some of the wintering areas. In particular, beluga from western North America (Bering Sea) were clearly distinguished from beluga from eastern North America (Hudson Strait, Baffin Bay, and St Lawrence River). Based upon the combined data set, the population of North American beluga whales was divided into two evolutionarily significant units. However, the population may be further subdivided into management units to reflect distinct groups of beluga at summering locations. PMID:10199005

  6. Metabolic engineering of the chloroplast genome reveals that the yeast ArDH gene confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Kanwal, Benish; Nazir, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Osmoprotectants stabilize proteins and membranes against the denaturing effect of high concentrations of salts and other harmful solutes. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH) reduces D-ribulose to D-arabitol where D-ribulose is derived by dephosphorylating D-ribulose-5-PO4 in the oxidized pentose pathway. Osmotolerance in plants could be developed through metabolic engineering of chloroplast genome by introducing genes encoding polyols since chloroplasts offer high level transgene expression and containment. Here, we report that ArDH expression in tobacco chloroplasts confers tolerance to NaCl (up to 400 mM). Transgenic plants compared to wild type (WT) survived for only 4–5 weeks on 400 mM NaCl whereas plants remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl. Further, a-week-old seedlings were also challenged with poly ethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6%) in the liquid medium, considering that membranes and proteins are protected under stress conditions due to accumulation of arabitol in chloroplasts. Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ARDH enzyme maintains integrity of membranes in chloroplasts under drought conditions via metabolic engineering. Hence, the gene could be expressed in agronomic plants to withstand abiotic stresses. PMID:26442039

  7. Metabolic engineering of the chloroplast genome reveals that the yeast ArDH gene confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought in plants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sarwar; Kanwal, Benish; Nazir, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Osmoprotectants stabilize proteins and membranes against the denaturing effect of high concentrations of salts and other harmful solutes. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH) reduces D-ribulose to D-arabitol where D-ribulose is derived by dephosphorylating D-ribulose-5-PO4 in the oxidized pentose pathway. Osmotolerance in plants could be developed through metabolic engineering of chloroplast genome by introducing genes encoding polyols since chloroplasts offer high level transgene expression and containment. Here, we report that ArDH expression in tobacco chloroplasts confers tolerance to NaCl (up to 400 mM). Transgenic plants compared to wild type (WT) survived for only 4-5 weeks on 400 mM NaCl whereas plants remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl. Further, a-week-old seedlings were also challenged with poly ethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6%) in the liquid medium, considering that membranes and proteins are protected under stress conditions due to accumulation of arabitol in chloroplasts. Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ARDH enzyme maintains integrity of membranes in chloroplasts under drought conditions via metabolic engineering. Hence, the gene could be expressed in agronomic plants to withstand abiotic stresses. PMID:26442039

  8. RAPDs and noncoding chloroplast DNA reveal a single origin of the cultivated Allium fistulosum from A. altaicum (Alliaceae).

    PubMed

    Friesen, N; Pollner, S; Bachmann, K; Blattner, F R

    1999-04-01

    The origin of the crop species Allium fistulosum (bunching onion) and its relation to its wild relative A. altaicum were surveyed with a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of five noncoding cpDNA regions and with a random amplified polymorhic DNA (RAPD) analysis of nuclear DNA. Sixteen accessions of A. altaicum, 14 accessions of A. fistulosum, representing the morphological variability of the species, and five additional outgroup species from Allium section Cepa were included in this study. The RFLP analysis detected 14 phylogenetically informative character transformations, whereas RAPD revealed 126 polymorphic fragments. Generalized parsimony, neighbor-joining analysis of genetic distances, and a principal co-ordinate analysis were able to distinguish the two species, but only RAPD data allowed clarification of the interrelationship of the two taxa. The main results of this investigation were: (1) A. fistulosum is of monophyletic origin, and (2) A. fistulosum originated from an A. altaicum progenitor, making A. altaicum a paraphyletic species. Compared with A. altaicum the cultivated accessions of the bunching onion show less genetic variability, a phenomenon that often occurs in crop species due to the severe genetic bottleneck of domestication. Allium altaicum and A. fistulosum easily hybridize when grown together, and most garden-grown material is of recent hybrid origin. PMID:10205076

  9. Proteomic analysis of chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in tomato reveals metabolic shifts coupled with disrupted thylakoid biogenesis machinery and elevated energy-production components.

    PubMed

    Barsan, Cristina; Zouine, Mohamed; Maza, Elie; Bian, Wanping; Egea, Isabel; Rossignol, Michel; Bouyssie, David; Pichereaux, Carole; Purgatto, Eduardo; Bouzayen, Mondher; Latché, Alain; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    A comparative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in plastids at three stages of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening (mature-green, breaker, red). Stringent curation and processing of the data from three independent replicates identified 1,932 proteins among which 1,529 were quantified by spectral counting. The quantification procedures have been subsequently validated by immunoblot analysis of six proteins representative of distinct metabolic or regulatory pathways. Among the main features of the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition revealed by the study, chromoplastogenesis appears to be associated with major metabolic shifts: (1) strong decrease in abundance of proteins of light reactions (photosynthesis, Calvin cycle, photorespiration) and carbohydrate metabolism (starch synthesis/degradation), mostly between breaker and red stages and (2) increase in terpenoid biosynthesis (including carotenoids) and stress-response proteins (ascorbate-glutathione cycle, abiotic stress, redox, heat shock). These metabolic shifts are preceded by the accumulation of plastid-encoded acetyl Coenzyme A carboxylase D proteins accounting for the generation of a storage matrix that will accumulate carotenoids. Of particular note is the high abundance of proteins involved in providing energy and in metabolites import. Structural differentiation of the chromoplast is characterized by a sharp and continuous decrease of thylakoid proteins whereas envelope and stroma proteins remain remarkably stable. This is coincident with the disruption of the machinery for thylakoids and photosystem biogenesis (vesicular trafficking, provision of material for thylakoid biosynthesis, photosystems assembly) and the loss of the plastid division machinery. Altogether, the data provide new insights on the chromoplast differentiation process while enriching our knowledge of the plant plastid proteome. PMID:22908117

  10. Proteomic analysis of chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition in tomato reveals metabolic shifts coupled with disrupted thylakoid biogenesis machinery and elevated energy-production components.

    PubMed

    Barsan, Cristina; Zouine, Mohamed; Maza, Elie; Bian, Wanping; Egea, Isabel; Rossignol, Michel; Bouyssie, David; Pichereaux, Carole; Purgatto, Eduardo; Bouzayen, Mondher; Latché, Alain; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    A comparative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in plastids at three stages of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening (mature-green, breaker, red). Stringent curation and processing of the data from three independent replicates identified 1,932 proteins among which 1,529 were quantified by spectral counting. The quantification procedures have been subsequently validated by immunoblot analysis of six proteins representative of distinct metabolic or regulatory pathways. Among the main features of the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition revealed by the study, chromoplastogenesis appears to be associated with major metabolic shifts: (1) strong decrease in abundance of proteins of light reactions (photosynthesis, Calvin cycle, photorespiration) and carbohydrate metabolism (starch synthesis/degradation), mostly between breaker and red stages and (2) increase in terpenoid biosynthesis (including carotenoids) and stress-response proteins (ascorbate-glutathione cycle, abiotic stress, redox, heat shock). These metabolic shifts are preceded by the accumulation of plastid-encoded acetyl Coenzyme A carboxylase D proteins accounting for the generation of a storage matrix that will accumulate carotenoids. Of particular note is the high abundance of proteins involved in providing energy and in metabolites import. Structural differentiation of the chromoplast is characterized by a sharp and continuous decrease of thylakoid proteins whereas envelope and stroma proteins remain remarkably stable. This is coincident with the disruption of the machinery for thylakoids and photosystem biogenesis (vesicular trafficking, provision of material for thylakoid biosynthesis, photosystems assembly) and the loss of the plastid division machinery. Altogether, the data provide new insights on the chromoplast differentiation process while enriching our knowledge of the plant plastid proteome.

  11. Chloroplast-Specific in Vivo Ca2+ Imaging Using Yellow Cameleon Fluorescent Protein Sensors Reveals Organelle-Autonomous Ca2+ Signatures in the Stroma.

    PubMed

    Loro, Giovanna; Wagner, Stephan; Doccula, Fabrizio Gandolfo; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Weinl, Stefan; Kudla, Joerg; Schwarzländer, Markus; Costa, Alex; Zottini, Michela

    2016-08-01

    In eukaryotes, subcellular compartments such as mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and vacuoles have the capacity for Ca(2+) transport across their membranes to modulate the activity of compartmentalized enzymes or to convey specific cellular signaling events. In plants, it has been suggested that chloroplasts also display Ca(2+) regulation. So far, monitoring of stromal Ca(2+) dynamics in vivo has exclusively relied on using the luminescent Ca(2+) probe aequorin. However, this technique is limited in resolution and can only provide a readout averaged over chloroplast populations from different cells and tissues. Here, we present a toolkit of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Ca(2+) sensor lines expressing plastid-targeted FRET-based Yellow Cameleon (YC) sensors. We demonstrate that the probes reliably report in vivo Ca(2+) dynamics in the stroma of root plastids in response to extracellular ATP and of leaf mesophyll and guard cell chloroplasts during light-to-low-intensity blue light illumination transition. Applying YC sensing of stromal Ca(2+) dynamics to single chloroplasts, we confirm findings of gradual, sustained stromal Ca(2+) increases at the tissue level after light-to-low-intensity blue light illumination transitions, but monitor transient Ca(2+) spiking as a distinct and previously unknown component of stromal Ca(2+) signatures. Spiking was dependent on the availability of cytosolic Ca(2+) but not synchronized between the chloroplasts of a cell. In contrast, the gradual sustained Ca(2+) increase occurred independent of cytosolic Ca(2+), suggesting intraorganellar Ca(2+) release. We demonstrate the capacity of the YC sensor toolkit to identify novel, fundamental facets of chloroplast Ca(2+) dynamics and to refine the understanding of plastidial Ca(2+) regulation. PMID:27252306

  12. Insights into chloroplast biogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Barry J; Ganguly, Diep; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2015-09-01

    In recent years many advances have been made to obtain insight into chloroplast biogenesis and development. In plants several plastids types exist such as the proplastid (which is the progenitor of all plastids), leucoplasts (group of colourless plastids important for storage including elaioplasts (lipids), amyloplasts (starch) or proteinoplasts (proteins)), chromoplasts (yellow to orange-coloured due to carotenoids, in flowers or in old leaves as gerontoplasts), and the green chloroplasts. Chloroplasts are indispensable for plant development; not only by performing photosynthesis and thus rendering the plant photoautotrophic, but also for biochemical processes (which in some instances can also take place in other plastids types), such as the synthesis of pigments, lipids, and plant hormones and sensing environmental stimuli. Although we understand many aspects of these processes there are gaps in our understanding of the establishment of functional chloroplasts and their regulation. Why is that so? Even though chloroplast function is comparable in all plants and most of the algae, ferns and moss, detailed analyses have revealed many differences, specifically with respect to its biogenesis. As an update to our prior review on the genetic analysis of chloroplast biogenesis and development [1] herein we will focus on recent advances in Angiosperms (monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants) that provide novel insights and highlight the challenges and prospects for unravelling the regulation of chloroplast biogenesis specifically during the establishment of the young plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast Biogenesis.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Mahonia bealei (Berberidaceae) reveals a significant expansion of the inverted repeat and phylogenetic relationship with other angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Yang, Bingxian; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Lianli; Tian, Jingkui; Wang, Xumin

    2013-10-10

    Mahonia bealei (Berberidaceae) is a frequently-used traditional Chinese medicinal plant with efficient anti-inflammatory ability. This plant is one of the sources of berberine, a new cholesterol-lowering drug with anti-diabetic activity. We have sequenced the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of M. bealei. The complete cp genome of M. bealei is 164,792 bp in length, and has a typical structure with large (LSC 73,052 bp) and small (SSC 18,591 bp) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs 36,501 bp) of large size. The Mahonia cp genome contains 111 unique genes and 39 genes are duplicated in the IR regions. The gene order and content of M. bealei are almost unarranged which is consistent with the hypothesis that large IRs stabilize cp genome and reduce gene loss-and-gain probabilities during evolutionary process. A large IR expansion of over 12 kb has occurred in M. bealei, 15 genes (rps19, rpl22, rps3, rpl16, rpl14, rps8, infA, rpl36, rps11, petD, petB, psbH, psbN, psbT and psbB) have expanded to have an additional copy in the IRs. The IR expansion rearrangement occurred via a double-strand DNA break and subsequence repair, which is different from the ordinary gene conversion mechanism. Repeat analysis identified 39 direct/inverted repeats 30 bp or longer with a sequence identity ≥ 90%. Analysis also revealed 75 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci and almost all are composed of A or T, contributing to a distinct bias in base composition. Comparison of protein-coding sequences with ESTs reveals 9 putative RNA edits and 5 of them resulted in non-synonymous modifications in rpoC1, rps2, rps19 and ycf1. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) was performed on a dataset composed of 65 protein-coding genes from 25 taxa, which yields an identical tree topology as previous plastid-based trees, and provides strong support for the sister relationship between Ranunculaceae and Berberidaceae

  14. Microsatellites reveal origin and genetic diversity of Eurasian invasions by one of the world's most notorious marine invader, Mnemiopsis leidyi (Ctenophora).

    PubMed

    Reusch, Thorsten B H; Bolte, Sören; Sparwel, Maximiliane; Moss, Anthony G; Javidpour, Jamileh

    2010-07-01

    Marine invasions are taking place at an increasing rate. When occurring in blooms, zooplanktivorous comb jellies of the genus Mnemiopsis are able to cause pelagic regime shifts in coastal areas and may cause the collapse of commercially important fish populations. Using microsatellites, developed for the first time in the phylum Ctenophora, we show that Mnemiopsis leidyi has colonized Eurasia from two source regions. Our preliminary data set included four sites within the putative source region (US East Coast and Gulf of Mexico) and 10 invaded locations in Eurasian waters. Bayesian clustering and phylogeographic approaches revealed the origin of earlier invasions of the Black and Caspian Sea in the 1980s/1990s within or close to the Gulf of Mexico, while the 2006 invasion of the North and Baltic Seas can be directly traced to New England (pairwise F(ST) = 0). We found no evidence for mixing among both gene pools in the invaded areas. While the genetic diversity (allelic richness) remained similar in the Baltic Sea compared to the source region New England, it was reduced in the North Sea, supporting the view of an initial invasion of Northern Europe to a Baltic Sea port. In Black and Caspian Sea samples, we found a gradual decline in allelic richness compared to the Gulf of Mexico region, supporting a stepping-stone model of colonization with two sequential genetic founder events. Our data also suggest that current practices of ballast water treatment are insufficient to prevent repeated invasions of gelatinous zooplankton.

  15. Multilocus microsatellite typing reveals a genetic relationship but, also, genetic differences between Indian strains of Leishmania tropica causing cutaneous leishmaniasis and those causing visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leishmaniases are divided into cutaneous (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL). In the Old World, CL is caused by Leishmania (L.) major, L. tropica and L. aethiopica. L. tropica can also visceralize and cause VL. In India, the large epidemics of VL are caused by L. donovani and cases of CL are caused by L. major and L. tropica. However, strains of L. tropica have also been isolated from Indian cases of VL. This study was done to see if Indian strains of L. tropica isolated from human cases of CL are genetically identical to or different from Indian strains of L. tropica isolated from human cases of VL and to see if any genetic differences found correlated with clinical outcome presenting as either CL or VL. Methods Multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT), employing 12 independent genetic markers specific to L. tropica, was used to characterize and identify eight strains of L. tropica isolated from human cases of CL examined in clinics in Bikaner City, Rajasthan State, north-west India. Their microsatellite profiles were compared to those of 156 previously typed strains of L. tropica from various geographical locations that were isolated from human cases of CL and VL, hyraxes and sand fly vectors. Results Bayesian, distance-based and factorial correspondence analyses revealed two confirmed populations: India/Asia and Israel/Palestine that subdivided, respectively, into two and three subpopulations. A third population, Africa/Galilee, as proposed by Bayesian analysis was not supported by the other applied methods. The strains of L. tropica from Bikaner isolated from human cases of CL fell into one of the subpopulations in the population India/Asia together with strains from other Asian foci. Indian strains isolated from human cases of VL fell into the same sub-population but were not genetically identical to the Bikaner strains of L. tropica. Conclusions It seems that the genetic diversity encountered between the two groups of Indian strains is mainly owing

  16. Determination of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences reveals that the largest reported mitochondrial genome in plants contains a significant amount of DNA having a nuclear origin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The melon belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance among vegetable crops is second only to Solanaceae. The melon has a small genome size (454 Mb), which makes it suitable for molecular and genetic studies. Despite similar nuclear and chloroplast genome sizes, cucurbits show great variation when their mitochondrial genomes are compared. The melon possesses the largest plant mitochondrial genome, as much as eight times larger than that of other cucurbits. Results The nucleotide sequences of the melon chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes were determined. The chloroplast genome (156,017 bp) included 132 genes, with 98 single-copy genes dispersed between the small (SSC) and large (LSC) single-copy regions and 17 duplicated genes in the inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb). A comparison of the cucumber and melon chloroplast genomes showed differences in only approximately 5% of nucleotides, mainly due to short indels and SNPs. Additionally, 2.74 Mb of mitochondrial sequence, accounting for 95% of the estimated mitochondrial genome size, were assembled into five scaffolds and four additional unscaffolded contigs. An 84% of the mitochondrial genome is contained in a single scaffold. The gene-coding region accounted for 1.7% (45,926 bp) of the total sequence, including 51 protein-coding genes, 4 conserved ORFs, 3 rRNA genes and 24 tRNA genes. Despite the differences observed in the mitochondrial genome sizes of cucurbit species, Citrullus lanatus (379 kb), Cucurbita pepo (983 kb) and Cucumis melo (2,740 kb) share 120 kb of sequence, including the predicted protein-coding regions. Nevertheless, melon contained a high number of repetitive sequences and a high content of DNA of nuclear origin, which represented 42% and 47% of the total sequence, respectively. Conclusions Whereas the size and gene organisation of chloroplast genomes are similar among the cucurbit species, mitochondrial genomes show a wide variety of sizes, with a non

  17. Genetic differentiation and genetic diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the dominant tree species in Japanese broadleaved evergreen forests, revealed by analysis of EST-associated microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  18. Genetic Differentiation and Genetic Diversity of Castanopsis (Fagaceae), the Dominant Tree Species in Japanese Broadleaved Evergreen Forests, Revealed by Analysis of EST-Associated Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Kyoko; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Kamijo, Takashi; Setoguchi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Noriaki; Kato, Makoto; Tsumura, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The broadleaved evergreen forests of the East Asian warm temperate zone are characterised by their high biodiversity and endemism, and there is therefore a need to extend our understanding of its genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns. Castanopsis (Fagaceae) is one of the dominant tree species in the broadleaved evergreen forests of Japan. In this study we investigate the genetic diversity, genetic structure and leaf epidermal morphology of 63 natural populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata, using 32 Expressed Sequence Tag associated microsatellites. The overall genetic differentiation between populations was low (GST = 0.069 in C. sieboldii and GST = 0.057 in C. cuspidata). Neighbor-joining tree and Bayesian clustering analyses revealed that the populations of C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata were genetically clearly differentiated, a result which is consistent with the morphology of their epidermal cell layers. This suggests that C. sieboldii and C. cuspidata should be treated as independent species, although intermediate morphologies are often observed, especially at sites where the two species coexist. The higher level of genetic diversity observed in the Kyushu region (for both species) and the Ryukyu Islands (for C. sieboldii) is consistent with the available fossil pollen data for Castanopsis-type broadleaved evergreen trees during the Last Glacial Maximum and suggests the existence of refugia for Castanopsis forests in southern Japan. Within the C. sieboldii populations, Bayesian clustering analyses detected three clusters, in the western and eastern parts of the main islands and in the Ryukyu Islands. The west-east genetic differentiation observed for this species in the main islands, a pattern which is also found in several plant and animal species inhabiting Castanopsis forests in Japan, suggests that they have been isolated from each other in the western and eastern populations for an extended period of time, and may imply the

  19. Circadian regulation of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Kelly A; Dodd, Antony N

    2014-10-01

    Circadian rhythms produce a biological measure of time that increases plant performance. The mechanisms that underlie this increase in productivity require investigation to provide information that will underpin future crop improvement. There is a growing body of evidence that a sophisticated signalling network interconnects the circadian oscillator and chloroplasts. We consider this in the context of circadian signalling to chloroplasts and the relationship between retrograde signalling and circadian regulation. We place circadian signalling to chloroplasts by sigma factors within an evolutionary context. We describe selected recent developments in the integration of light and circadian signals that control chloroplast gene expression.

  20. Effects of cyclosis on chloroplast-cytoplasm interactions revealed with localized lighting in Characean cells at rest and after electrical excitation.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Dodonova, Svetlana O

    2011-09-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming in Characean internodes enables rapid intracellular transport and facilitates interactions between spatially remote cell regions. Cyclosis-mediated distant interactions might be particularly noticeable under nonuniform illumination, in the vicinity of light-shade borders where metabolites are transported between functionally distinct cell regions. In support of this notion, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters assessed on a microscopic area of Chara corallina internodal cells (area of inspection, AOI) responded to illumination of nearby regions in asymmetric manner depending on the vector of cytoplasmic streaming. When a beam of white light was applied through a 400-μm optic fiber upstream of AOI with regard to the direction of cytoplasmic streaming, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) developed after a lag period in AOI exposed to moderate intensity light. Conversely, no NPQ was induced in the same cell area when the beam position was shifted to an equal distance downstream of AOI. Light-response curves for the efficiency of photosystem II electron transport in chloroplasts differed markedly depending on the illumination pattern (whole-cell versus small area illumination) but these differences were eliminated after the inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming with cytochalasin B. Localized illumination promoted chloroplast fluorescence responses to electrical plasmalemma excitation at high light intensities, which contrasts to the requirement of low to moderate irradiances for observation of the stimulus-response coupling under whole-cell illumination. The results indicate that different photosynthetic capacities of chloroplasts under general and localized illumination are related to lateral transport of nonevenly distributed cytoplasmic components between the cell parts with dominant photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism.

  1. Phenotype and transcriptome analysis reveals chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis together influenced the leaf color formation in mutants of Anthurium andraeanum ‘Sonate’

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuxia; Chen, Xingxu; Xu, Bin; Li, Yuxia; Ma, Yuehua; Wang, Guangdong

    2015-01-01

    Leaf color is one of the well-sought traits in breeding program for Anthurium andraeanum Lind. Knowledge of mechanisms in anthuriums to produce leaves with different shades of green would help to effectively select desirable traits. In this study, the micro- and ultra-structural and physiological features of leaves on wild type and leaf color mutants (dark green, rubescent, etiolated, albino) in A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ were analyzed. Results show that chloroplasts of leaf color mutants exhibited abnormal morphology and distribution. Using next generation sequencing technology followed by de novo assembly, leaf transcriptomes comprising of 41,017 unigenes with an average sequence length of 768 bp were produced from wild type and rubescent mutant. From the 27,539 (67.1%) unigenes with annotated functions, 858 significantly differently expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, consisting of 446 up-regulated genes and 412 down-regulated genes. Genes that affect chloroplasts development and division, and chlorophyll biosynthesis were included in the down-regulated DEGs. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis validated that the expression level of those genes was significantly lower in the rubescent, etiolated, and albino mutant compared to wild type plants, which concurs with the differences in micro- and ultra-structures and physiological features between these two types of plants. Conclusively, the leaf color formation is greatly affected by the activity of chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis. And the possible formation pathway of leaf color mutant of A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ is deduced based on our results. PMID:25814997

  2. The knockdown of chloroplastic ascorbate peroxidases reveals its regulatory role in the photosynthesis and protection under photo-oxidative stress in rice.

    PubMed

    Caverzan, Andréia; Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Andrade, Claudia M B; Passaia, Gisele; Schünemann, Mariana; Maraschin, Felipe Dos Santos; Martins, Marcio O; Teixeira, Felipe K; Rauber, Rafael; Margis, Rogério; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio Gomes; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2014-01-01

    The inactivation of the chloroplast ascorbate peroxidases (chlAPXs) has been thought to limit the efficiency of the water-water cycle and photo-oxidative protection under stress conditions. In this study, we have generated double knockdown rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants in both OsAPX7 (sAPX) and OsAPX8 (tAPX) genes, which encode chloroplastic APXs (chlAPXs). By employing an integrated approach involving gene expression, proteomics, biochemical and physiological analyses of photosynthesis, we have assessed the role of chlAPXs in the regulation of the protection of the photosystem II (PSII) activity and CO2 assimilation in rice plants exposed to high light (HL) and methyl violagen (MV). The chlAPX knockdown plants were affected more severely than the non-transformed (NT) plants in the activity and structure of PSII and CO2 assimilation in the presence of MV. Although MV induced significant increases in pigment content in the knockdown plants, the increases were apparently not sufficient for protection. Treatment with HL also caused generalized damage in PSII in both types of plants. The knockdown and NT plants exhibited differences in photosynthetic parameters related to efficiency of utilization of light and CO2. The knockdown plants overexpressed other antioxidant enzymes in response to the stresses and increased the GPX activity in the chloroplast-enriched fraction. Our data suggest that a partial deficiency of chlAPX expression modulate the PSII activity and integrity, reflecting the overall photosynthesis when rice plants are subjected to acute oxidative stress. However, under normal growth conditions, the knockdown plants exhibit normal phenotype, biochemical and physiological performance.

  3. Chloroplast DNA diversity reveals the contribution of two wild species to the origin and evolution of diploid safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.).

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Deepmala; Rajpal, Vijay Rani; Raina, Soom Nath

    2008-08-01

    The identity of the wild progenitor of one of the most important oil crop species, Carthamus tinctorius (2n = 2x = 24), commonly known as safflower, has been the subject of numerous studies at morphological, biochemical, cytogenetic, and biosystematic levels, but no definitive conclusions have been made. The nuclear, mitochondrial, and chloroplast genomes of the two botanical varieties of C. tinctorius, C. tinctorius var. tinctorius and C. tinctorius var. inermis, and two wild species, C. palaestinus and C. oxyacantha, were assayed at the nucleotide sequence level and by DNA markers. The nuclear and mitochondrial DNA assays were not helpful in conclusively identifying the diploid ancestor of C. tinctorius. The chloroplast DNA diversity, on the other hand, unambiguously provided new and novel evidence that C. palaestinus and C. oxyacantha contributed their plastomes to the evolution of C. tinctorius var. inermis and C. tinctorius var. tinctorius, respectively. This study, therefore, affirms a startling revelation of a rare event of two wild species contributing to the origin and evolution of safflower, a major world oilseed crop about whose genetics very little is known.

  4. Endogenous nitric oxide generation in protoplast chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Prommer, Judith; Watanabe, Masami

    2013-01-01

    KEY MESSAGE : NO generation is studied in the protoplast chloroplasts. NO, ONOO ( - ) and ROS (O ( 2 ) ( - ) and H ( 2 ) O ( 2 ) ) are generated in chloroplasts. Nitric oxide synthase-like protein appears to be involved in NO generation. Nitric oxide stimulates chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast differentiation. The present study was conducted to better understand the process of NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts. NO, peroxynitrite and superoxide anion were investigated in the protoplasts and isolated chloroplasts using specific dyes, confocal laser scanning and light microscopy. The level of NO was highest after protoplast isolation and subsequently decreased during culture. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of PTIO, suggests that diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA) detected NO. Detection of peroxynitrite, a reaction product of NO and superoxide anion, further suggests NO generation. Moreover, generation of NO and peroxynitrite in the chloroplasts of wild-type Arabidopsis and their absence or weak signals in the leaf-derived protoplasts of Atnoa1 mutants confirmed the reactivity of DAF-2DA and aminophenyl fluorescein to NO and peroxynitrite, respectively. Isolated chloroplasts also showed signal of NO. Suppression of NO signal in the presence of 100 μM nitric oxide synthase inhibitors [L-NNA, Nω-nitro-L-arginine and PBIT, S,S'-1,3-phenylene-bis(1,2-ethanediyl)-bis-isothiourea] revealed that nitric oxide synthase-like system is involved in NO synthesis. Suppression of NO signal in the protoplasts isolated in the presence of cycloheximide suggests de novo synthesis of NO generating protein during the process of protoplast isolation. Furthermore, the lack of inhibition of NO production by sodium tungstate (250 μM) and inhibition by L-NNA, and PBIT suggest involvement NOS-like protein, but not nitrate reductase, in NO generation in the leaf chloroplasts and protoplasts.

  5. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-01-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid. PMID:12228443

  6. In Situ Association of Calvin Cycle Enzymes, Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Activase, Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase, and Nitrite Reductase with Thylakoid and Pyrenoid Membranes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts as Revealed by Immunoelectron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suss, K. H.; Prokhorenko, I.; Adler, K.

    1995-04-01

    The in situ localization of the chloroplast enzymes ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco), Rubisco activase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase was studied by immunoelectron microscopy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Immunogold labeling revealed that, despite Rubisco in the pyrenoid matrix, Calvin cycle enzymes, Rubisco activase, nitrite reductase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, and H+-ATP synthase are associated predominantly with chloroplast thylakoid membranes and the inner surface of the pyrenoid membrane. This is in accord with previous enzyme localization studies in higher plants (K.H. Suss, C. Arkona, R. Manteuffel, K. Adler [1993] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 90: 5514-5518). Pyrenoid tubules do not contain these enzymes. The pyrenoid matrix consists of Rubisco but is devoid of the other photosynthetic enzymes investigated. Evidence for the occurrence of two Rubisco forms differing in their spatial localization has also been obtained: Rubisco form I appears to be membrane associated like other Calvin cycle components, whereas Rubisco form II is confined to the pyrenoid matrix. It is proposed that enzyme form I represents an active Rubisco when assembled into Calvin cycle enzyme complexes, whereas Rubisco form II may be part of a CO2-concentrating mechanism. Pyrenoidal Calvin cycle complexes are thought to be highly active in CO2 fixation and important for the synthesis of starch around the pyrenoid.

  7. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  8. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Holoparasite Cistanche deserticola (Orobanchaceae) Reveals Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer from Its Host Haloxylon ammodendron (Chenopodiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Qin; Ren, Zhumei; Zhao, Jiayuan; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Crabbe, M. James C; Li, Jianqiang; Zhong, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background The central function of chloroplasts is to carry out photosynthesis, and its gene content and structure are highly conserved across land plants. Parasitic plants, which have reduced photosynthetic ability, suffer gene losses from the chloroplast (cp) genome accompanied by the relaxation of selective constraints. Compared with the rapid rise in the number of cp genome sequences of photosynthetic organisms, there are limited data sets from parasitic plants. Principal Findings/Significance Here we report the complete sequence of the cp genome of Cistanche deserticola, a holoparasitic desert species belonging to the family Orobanchaceae. The cp genome of C. deserticola is greatly reduced both in size (102,657 bp) and in gene content, indicating that all genes required for photosynthesis suffer from gene loss and pseudogenization, except for psbM. The striking difference from other holoparasitic plants is that it retains almost a full set of tRNA genes, and it has lower dN/dS for most genes than another close holoparasitic plant, E. virginiana, suggesting that Cistanche deserticola has undergone fewer losses, either due to a reduced level of holoparasitism, or to a recent switch to this life history. We also found that the rpoC2 gene was present in two copies within C. deserticola. Its own copy has much shortened and turned out to be a pseudogene. Another copy, which was not located in its cp genome, was a homolog of the host plant, Haloxylon ammodendron (Chenopodiaceae), suggesting that it was acquired from its host via a horizontal gene transfer. PMID:23554920

  9. Genetic structure of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) in northern Japan and adjacent regions revealed by nuclear microsatellites and mitochondrial gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Mineaki; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Makoto; Kawahara, Takayuki; Sugita, Hisashi; Saito, Hideyuki; Sabirov, Renat N

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) was studied across the natural range of the species, including two small isolated populations in south Sakhalin and Hayachine, by using six microsatellite loci and maternally inherited mitochondrial gene sequences. We also analyzed P. jezoensis, a sympatric spruce in the range. Genetic diversity of P. glehnii was higher in central Hokkaido and the lowest in the Hayachine. Bayesian clustering and principal coordinate analysis by using the microsatellites indicated that the Hayachine was clearly distinct from other populations, implying that it had undergone strong genetic drift since the last glacial period. P. glehnii harbored four mitochondrial haplotypes, two of which were shared with P. jezoensis. One of the two was observed without geographical concentration, suggesting its derivation from ancestral polymorphism. Another was observed in south Sakhalin and in P. jezoensis across Sakhalin. The Bayesian clustering--by using four microsatellite loci, including P. jezoensis populations--indicated unambiguous species delimitation, but with possible admixture of P. jezoensis genes into P. glehnii in south Sakhalin, where P. glehnii is abundantly overwhelmed by P. jezoensis; this might explain the occurrence of introgression of the haplotype of P. jezoensis into P. glehnii.

  10. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei s.l.: Microsatellite markers revealed high level of multiple genotypes in the mid-guts of wild tsetse flies of the Fontem sleeping sickness focus of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Simo, Gustave; Njitchouang, Guy Roger; Njiokou, Flobert; Cuny, Gerard; Asonganyi, Tazoacha

    2011-07-01

    To identify Trypanosoma brucei genotypes which are potentially transmitted in a sleeping sickness focus, microsatellite markers were used to characterize T. brucei found in the mid-guts of wild tsetse flies of the Fontem sleeping sickness focus in Cameroon. For this study, two entomological surveys were performed during which 2685 tsetse flies were collected and 1596 (59.2%) were dissected. Microscopic examination revealed 1.19% (19/1596) mid-gut infections with trypanosomes; the PCR method identified 4.7% (75/1596) infections with T. brucei in the mid-guts. Of these 75 trypanosomes identified in the mid-guts, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense represented 0.81% (13/1596) of them, confirming the circulation of human infective parasite in the Fontem focus. Genetic characterization of the 75 T. brucei samples using five microsatellite markers revealed not only multiple T. brucei genotypes (47%), but also single genotypes (53%) in the mid-guts of the wild tsetse flies. These results show that there is a wide range of trypanosome genotypes circulating in the mid-guts of wild tsetse flies from the Fontem sleeping sickness focus. They open new avenues to undertake investigations on the maturation of multiple infections observed in the tsetse fly mid-guts. Such investigations may allow to understand how the multiple infections evolve from the tsetse flies mid-guts to the salivary glands and also to understand the consequence of these evolutions on the dynamic (which genotype is transmitted to mammals) of trypanosomes transmission.

  12. Microsatellite and mitochondrial markers reveal strong gene flow barriers for Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Archipelago: implications for malaria vector control.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Luke; Cooper, Robert D; Russell, Tanya L; Burkot, Thomas R; Lobo, Neil F; Collins, Frank H; Hii, Jeffrey; Beebe, Nigel W

    2014-03-01

    Anopheles farauti is the primary malaria vector throughout the coastal regions of the Southwest Pacific. A shift in peak biting time from late to early in the night occurred following widespread indoor residue spraying of dichlorodiphenyltrichloro-ethane (DDT) and has persisted in some island populations despite the intervention ending decades ago. We used mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequence data and 12 newly developed microsatellite markers to assess the population genetic structure of this malaria vector in the Solomon Archipelago. With geographically distinct differences in peak A. farauti night biting time observed in the Solomon Archipelago, we tested the hypothesis that strong barriers to gene flow exist in this region. Significant and often large fixation index (FST) values were found between different island populations for the mitochondrial and nuclear markers, suggesting highly restricted gene flow between islands. Some discordance in the location and strength of genetic breaks was observed between the mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. Since early night biting A. farauti individuals occur naturally in all populations, the strong gene flow barriers that we have identified in the Solomon Archipelago lend weight to the hypothesis that the shifts in peak biting time from late to early night have appeared independently in these disconnected island populations. For this reason, we suggest that insecticide impregnated bed nets and indoor residue spraying are unlikely to be effective as control tools against A. farauti occurring elsewhere, and if used, will probably result in peak biting time behavioural shifts similar to that observed in the Solomon Islands.

  13. Genetic differentiation of the pine wilt disease vector Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) over a mountain range - revealed from microsatellite DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Shoda-Kagaya, E

    2007-04-01

    To study the dispersal process of the pine sawyer Monochamus alternatus (Hope) in frontier populations, a microsatellite marker-based genetic analysis was performed on expanding populations at the northern limit of its range in Japan. In Asian countries, M. alternatus is the main vector of pine wilt disease, the most serious forest disease in Japan. Sawyers were collected from nine sites near the frontier of the pine wilt disease damage area. A mountain range divides the population into western and eastern sides. Five microsatellite loci were examined and a total of 188 individuals was genotyped from each locus with the number of alleles ranged from two to nine. The mean observed heterozygosity for all loci varied from 0.282 to 0.480 in the nine sites, with an overall mean of 0.364. None of the populations have experienced a significant bottleneck. Significant differentiation was found across the mountain range, but the genetic composition was similar amongst populations of each side. It is believed that the mountain range acts as a geographical barrier to dispersal and that gene flow without a geographical barrier is high. On the west side of the mountain range, a pattern of isolation by distance was detected. This was likely to be caused by secondary contact of different colonizing routes on a small spatial scale. Based on these data, a process linking genetic structure at local (kilometres) and regional spatial scales (hundreds of kilometres) was proposed.

  14. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups.

  15. Identification of chloroplast genome loci suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic studies of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (Araceae) and closely related taxa.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Matthews, Peter J; Biggs, Patrick J; Naeem, Muhammad; McLenachan, Patricia A; Lockhart, Peter J

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we reported the chloroplast genome-wide association of oligonucleotide repeats, indels and nucleotide substitutions in aroid chloroplast genomes. We hypothesized that the distribution of oligonucleotide repeat sequences in a single representative genome can be used to identify mutational hotspots and loci suitable for population genetic, phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies. Using information on the location of oligonucleotide repeats in the chloroplast genome of taro (Colocasia esculenta), we designed 30 primer pairs to amplify and sequence polymorphic loci. The primers have been tested in a range of intra-specific to intergeneric comparisons, including ten taro samples (Colocasia esculenta) from diverse geographical locations, four other Colocasia species (C. affinis, C. fallax, C. formosana, C. gigantea) and three other aroid genera (represented by Remusatia vivipara, Alocasia brisbanensis and Amorphophallus konjac). Multiple sequence alignments for the intra-specific comparison revealed nucleotide substitutions (point mutations) at all 30 loci and microsatellite polymorphisms at 14 loci. The primer pairs reported here reveal levels of genetic variation suitable for high-resolution phylogeographic and evolutionary studies of taro and other closely related aroids. Our results confirm that information on repeat distribution can be used to identify loci suitable for such studies, and we expect that this approach can be used in other plant groups. PMID:23718317

  16. Intercontinental long-distance dispersal of Canellaceae from the New to the Old World revealed by a nuclear single copy gene and chloroplast loci.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Salomo, Karsten; Salazar, Jackeline; Naumann, Julia; Jaramillo, M Alejandra; Neinhuis, Christoph; Feild, Taylor S; Wanke, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Canellales, a clade consisting of Winteraceae and Canellaceae, represent the smallest order of magnoliid angiosperms. The clade shows a broad distribution throughout the Southern Hemisphere, across a diverse range of dry to wet tropical forests. In contrast to their sister-group, Winteraceae, the phylogenetic relations and biogeography within Canellaceae remain poorly studied. Here we present the phylogenetic relationships of all currently recognized genera of Canellales with a special focus on the Old World Canellaceae using a combined dataset consisting of the chloroplast trnK-matK-trnK-psbA and the nuclear single copy gene mag1 (Maigo 1). Within Canellaceae we found high statistical support for the monophyly of Warburgia and Cinnamosma. However, we also found relationships that differ from previous studies. Cinnamodendron splitted into two clades, a South American clade and a second clade confined to the Antilles and adjacent areas. Cinnamodendron from the Antilles, as well as Capsicodendron, South American Cinnamodendron and Pleodendron were not monophyletic. Consequently, Capsicodendron should be included in the South American Cinnamodendron clade and the genus Pleodendron merged with the Cinnamodendron clade from the Antilles. We also found that Warburgia (restricted to mainland eastern Africa) together with the South American Cinnamodendron and Capsicodendron are sister to the Malagasy genus Cinnamosma. In addition to the unexpected geographical relationships, both biogeographic and molecular clock analyses suggest vicariance, extinction, and at least one intercontinental long-distance-dispersal event. Our dating result contrasts previous work on Winteraceae. Diversification of Winteraceae took place in the Paleocene, predating the Canellaceae diversification by 13 MA in the Eocene. The phylogenetic relationships for Canellaceae supported here offer a solid framework for a future taxonomic revision of the Canellaceae.

  17. Intercontinental long-distance dispersal of Canellaceae from the New to the Old World revealed by a nuclear single copy gene and chloroplast loci.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Salomo, Karsten; Salazar, Jackeline; Naumann, Julia; Jaramillo, M Alejandra; Neinhuis, Christoph; Feild, Taylor S; Wanke, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Canellales, a clade consisting of Winteraceae and Canellaceae, represent the smallest order of magnoliid angiosperms. The clade shows a broad distribution throughout the Southern Hemisphere, across a diverse range of dry to wet tropical forests. In contrast to their sister-group, Winteraceae, the phylogenetic relations and biogeography within Canellaceae remain poorly studied. Here we present the phylogenetic relationships of all currently recognized genera of Canellales with a special focus on the Old World Canellaceae using a combined dataset consisting of the chloroplast trnK-matK-trnK-psbA and the nuclear single copy gene mag1 (Maigo 1). Within Canellaceae we found high statistical support for the monophyly of Warburgia and Cinnamosma. However, we also found relationships that differ from previous studies. Cinnamodendron splitted into two clades, a South American clade and a second clade confined to the Antilles and adjacent areas. Cinnamodendron from the Antilles, as well as Capsicodendron, South American Cinnamodendron and Pleodendron were not monophyletic. Consequently, Capsicodendron should be included in the South American Cinnamodendron clade and the genus Pleodendron merged with the Cinnamodendron clade from the Antilles. We also found that Warburgia (restricted to mainland eastern Africa) together with the South American Cinnamodendron and Capsicodendron are sister to the Malagasy genus Cinnamosma. In addition to the unexpected geographical relationships, both biogeographic and molecular clock analyses suggest vicariance, extinction, and at least one intercontinental long-distance-dispersal event. Our dating result contrasts previous work on Winteraceae. Diversification of Winteraceae took place in the Paleocene, predating the Canellaceae diversification by 13 MA in the Eocene. The phylogenetic relationships for Canellaceae supported here offer a solid framework for a future taxonomic revision of the Canellaceae. PMID:25579657

  18. CLUMPED CHLOROPLASTS 1 is required for plastid separation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Sage, Tammy L; Liu, Yi; Ahmad, Tiara R; Marshall, Wallace F; Shiu, Shin-Han; Froehlich, John E; Imre, Kathleen M; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2011-11-01

    We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, clumped chloroplasts 1 (clmp1), in which disruption of a gene of unknown function causes chloroplasts to cluster instead of being distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The phenotype affects chloroplasts and nongreen plastids in multiple organs and cell types, but is detectable only at certain developmental stages. In young leaf petioles of clmp1, where clustering is prevalent, cells lacking chloroplasts are detected, suggesting impaired chloroplast partitioning during mitosis. Although organelle distribution and partitioning are actin-dependent in plants, the actin cytoskeleton in clmp1 is indistinguishable from that in WT, and peroxisomes and mitochondria are distributed normally. A CLMP1-YFP fusion protein that complements clmp1 localizes to discrete foci in the cytoplasm, most of which colocalize with the cell periphery or with chloroplasts. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that chloroplasts within clmp1 clusters are held together by membranous connections, including thin isthmi characteristic of late-stage chloroplast division. This finding suggests that constriction of dividing chloroplasts proceeds normally in clmp1, but separation is impaired. Consistently, chloroplast size and number, as well as positioning of the plastid division proteins FtsZ and ARC5/DRP5B, are unaffected in clmp1, indicating that loss of CLMP1-mediated chloroplast separation does not prevent otherwise normal division. CLMP1-like sequences are unique to green algae and land plants, and the CLMP1 sequence suggests that it functions through protein-protein interactions. Our studies identify a unique class of proteins required for plastid separation after the constriction stage of plastid division and indicate that CLMP1 activity is also required for plastid distribution and partitioning during cell division.

  19. Chloroplast and Cytoplasmic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise E.; Advani, Vimal R.

    1970-01-01

    Three pea (Pisum sativum) leaf chloroplast enzymes—triose phosphate isomerase, glyceric acid 3-phosphate kinase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase—have been separated from the corresponding cytoplasmic enzymes by isoelectric focusing. These three enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle are therefore distinct proteins, not identical with the analogous enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. PMID:16657347

  20. Microsatellite variation reveals weak genetic structure and retention of genetic variability in threatened Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) within a Snake River watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neville, Helen; Issacs, Frank B.; Thurow, Russel; Dunham, J.B.; Rieman, B.

    2007-01-01

    Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) have been central to the development of management concepts associated with evolutionarily significant units (ESUs), yet there are still relatively few studies of genetic diversity within threatened and endangered ESUs for salmon or other species. We analyzed genetic variation at 10 microsatellite loci to evaluate spatial population structure and genetic variability in indigenous Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) across a large wilderness basin within a Snake River ESU. Despite dramatic 20th century declines in abundance, these populations retained robust levels of genetic variability. No significant genetic bottlenecks were found, although the bottleneck metric (M ratio) was significantly correlated with average population size and variability. Weak but significant genetic structure existed among tributaries despite evidence of high levels of gene flow, with the strongest genetic differentiation mirroring the physical segregation of fish from two sub-basins. Despite the more recent colonization of one sub-basin and differences between sub-basins in the natural level of fragmentation, gene diversity and genetic differentiation were similar between sub-basins. Various factors, such as the (unknown) genetic contribution of precocial males, genetic compensation, lack of hatchery influence, and high levels of current gene flow may have contributed to the persistence of genetic variability in this system in spite of historical declines. This unique study of indigenous Chinook salmon underscores the importance of maintaining natural populations in interconnected and complex habitats to minimize losses of genetic diversity within ESUs.

  1. Temporal changes of genetic population structure and diversity in the endangered Blakiston's fish owl (Bubo blakistoni) on Hokkaido Island, Japan, revealed by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Omote, Keita; Nishida, Chizuko; Takenaka, Takeshi; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2012-05-01

    The Blakiston's fish owl (Bubo blakistoni) population on Hokkaido Island, Japan, decreased to less than one hundred individuals over the last century due to habitat disruption by human activity. Although the ongoing conservation management has slightly restored the population, it remains endangered. In order to assess the genetic variation and population structure of the Blakiston's fish owl in Hokkaido, we genotyped eight microsatellite loci on 120 individuals sampled over the past three decades. The genotype data set showed low levels of genetic variation and gene flow among the geographically isolated five subpopulations. Comparative analysis of past and current populations indicated that some alleles shared by past individuals had been lost, and that genetic variation had declined over the last three decades. The result suggests that the genetic decline may have resulted from inbreeding and/or genetic drift due to bottlenecks in the Hokkaido population. The present study provides invaluable genetic information for the conservation and management of the endangered Blakiston's fish owl in Hokkaido.

  2. Genetic distinctness and variation in the Tsushima Islands population of the Japanese marten, Martes melampus (Carnivora: Mustelidae), revealed by microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Shouko; Moteki, Shusaku; Baba, Minoru; Ochiai, Keiji; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2012-12-01

    A carnivoran mammal endemic to Japan, the Japanese marten (Martes melampus) is native in forested regions on Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu (main islands of Japan), and the Tsushima Islands. The Tsushima population is classified as a different subspecies (M. m. tsuensis) from populations on the main islands (M. m. melampus). To elucidate the genetic structure of the Tsushima population, we genotyped 101 individuals from the Tsushima Islands and 43 individuals from Honshu and Kyushu using 10 microsatellite loci, and performed population genetic analyses on the genotype data. Genetic diversity was lower in the Tsushima population than in three geographic populations on the main islands: heterozygosity was 0.189-0.364 in the former, compared to 0.457-0.747 in the latter. In addition, high pairwise Fst values (0.485-0.682) and Nei's standard distance (0.550-1.183) between the Tsushima and main-island populations indicated a high degree of genetic differentiation. Finally, a Bayesian clustering analysis showed that the Tsushima population is apparently differentiated from the main-island populations and comprises two genetic clusters. A factorial correspondence analysis corroborated these results. Our results suggest that restricted gene flow or inbreeding may have reduced genetic diversity in the Tsushima population, which has been geographically isolated from the main-island populations since the formation of Tsushima Strait.

  3. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  4. Conserved methionines in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Sundby, Cecilia; Härndahl, Ulrika; Gustavsson, Niklas; Ahrman, Emma; Murphy, Denis J

    2005-01-17

    Heat shock proteins counteract heat and oxidative stress. In chloroplasts, a small heat shock protein (Hsp21) contains a set of conserved methionines, which date back to early in the emergence of terrestrial plants. Methionines M49, M52, M55, M59, M62, M67 are located on one side of an amphipathic helix, which may fold back over two other conserved methionines (M97 and M101), to form a binding groove lined with methionines, for sequence-independent recognition of peptides with an overall hydrophobic character. The sHsps protect other proteins from aggregation by binding to their hydrophobic surfaces, which become exposed under stress. Data are presented showing that keeping the conserved methionines in Hsp21 in a reduced form is a prerequisite to maintain such binding. The chloroplast generates reactive oxygen species under both stress and unstressed conditions, but this organelle is also a highly reducing cellular compartment. Chloroplasts contain a specialized isoform of the enzyme, peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, the expression of which is light-induced. Recombinant proteins were used to measure that this reductase can restore Hsp21 methionines after sulfoxidation. This paper also describes how methionine sulfoxidation-reduction can be directly assessed by mass spectrometry, how methionine-to-leucine substitution affects Hsp21, and discusses the possible role for an Hsp21 methionine sulfoxidation-reduction cycle in quenching reactive oxygen species. PMID:15680227

  5. Enclosure of mitochondria by chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H; Rigsby, L L; Akin, D E

    1983-02-01

    In Panicum species of the Laxa group, some of which have characteristics intermediate to C(3) and C(4) photosynthesis species, some mitochondria in leaf bundle sheath cells are surrounded by chloroplasts when viewed in profile. Serial sectioning of leaves of one Laxa species, Panicum schenckii Hack, shows that these mitochondria are enclosed by chloroplasts. Complete enclosure rather than invagination also is indicated by absence of two concentric chloroplast membranes surrounding the mitochondrial profiles.

  6. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghoon; Lee, Hyeon Ju; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Zanthoxylum piperitum, a plant species with useful aromatic oils in family Rutaceae, was generated in this study by de novo assembly with whole-genome sequence data. The chloroplast genome was 158 154 bp in length with a typical quadripartite structure containing a pair of inverted repeats of 27 644 bp, separated by large single copy and small single copy of 85 340 bp and 17 526 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome harbored 112 genes consisting of 78 protein-coding genes 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete chloroplast genome sequences with those of known relatives revealed that Z. piperitum is most closely related to the Citrus species. PMID:26260183

  7. Pb-induced avoidance-like chloroplast movements in fronds of Lemna trisulca L.

    PubMed

    Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Krzeszowiec-Jeleń, Weronika; Bednarski, Waldemar; Jankowski, Artur; Suski, Szymon; Gabryś, Halina; Woźny, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Lead ions are particularly dangerous to the photosynthetic apparatus, but little is known about the effects of trace metals, including Pb, on regulation of chloroplast redistribution. In this study a new effect of lead on chloroplast distribution patterns and movements was demonstrated in mesophyll cells of a small-sized aquatic angiosperm Lemna trisulca L. (star duckweed). An analysis of confocal microscopy images of L. trisulca fronds treated with lead (15 μM Pb2+, 24 h) in darkness or in weak white light revealed an enhanced accumulation of chloroplasts in the profile position along the anticlinal cell walls, in comparison to untreated plants. The rearrangement of chloroplasts in their response to lead ions in darkness was similar to the avoidance response of chloroplasts in plants treated with strong white light. Transmission electron microscopy X-ray microanalysis showed that intracellular chloroplast arrangement was independent of the location of Pb deposits, suggesting that lead causes redistribution of chloroplasts, which looks like a light-induced avoidance response, but is not a real avoidance response to the metal. Furthermore, a similar redistribution of chloroplasts in L. trisulca cells in darkness was observed also under the influence of exogenously applied hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In addition, we detected an enhanced accumulation of endogenous H2O2 after treatment of plants with lead. Interestingly, H2O2-specific scavenger catalase partly abolished the Pb-induced chloroplast response. These results suggest that H2O2 can be involved in the avoidance-like movement of chloroplasts induced by lead. Analysis of photometric measurements revealed also strong inhibition (but not complete) of blue-light-induced chloroplast movements by lead. This inhibition may result from disturbances in the actin cytoskeleton, as we observed fragmentation and disappearance of actin filaments around chloroplasts. Results of this study show that the mechanisms of the toxic

  8. Pb-Induced Avoidance-Like Chloroplast Movements in Fronds of Lemna trisulca L.

    PubMed Central

    Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Krzeszowiec-Jeleń, Weronika; Bednarski, Waldemar; Jankowski, Artur; Suski, Szymon; Gabryś, Halina; Woźny, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Lead ions are particularly dangerous to the photosynthetic apparatus, but little is known about the effects of trace metals, including Pb, on regulation of chloroplast redistribution. In this study a new effect of lead on chloroplast distribution patterns and movements was demonstrated in mesophyll cells of a small-sized aquatic angiosperm Lemna trisulca L. (star duckweed). An analysis of confocal microscopy images of L. trisulca fronds treated with lead (15 μM Pb2+, 24 h) in darkness or in weak white light revealed an enhanced accumulation of chloroplasts in the profile position along the anticlinal cell walls, in comparison to untreated plants. The rearrangement of chloroplasts in their response to lead ions in darkness was similar to the avoidance response of chloroplasts in plants treated with strong white light. Transmission electron microscopy X-ray microanalysis showed that intracellular chloroplast arrangement was independent of the location of Pb deposits, suggesting that lead causes redistribution of chloroplasts, which looks like a light-induced avoidance response, but is not a real avoidance response to the metal. Furthermore, a similar redistribution of chloroplasts in L. trisulca cells in darkness was observed also under the influence of exogenously applied hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In addition, we detected an enhanced accumulation of endogenous H2O2 after treatment of plants with lead. Interestingly, H2O2-specific scavenger catalase partly abolished the Pb-induced chloroplast response. These results suggest that H2O2 can be involved in the avoidance-like movement of chloroplasts induced by lead. Analysis of photometric measurements revealed also strong inhibition (but not complete) of blue-light-induced chloroplast movements by lead. This inhibition may result from disturbances in the actin cytoskeleton, as we observed fragmentation and disappearance of actin filaments around chloroplasts. Results of this study show that the mechanisms of the toxic

  9. WHITE PANICLE1, a Val-tRNA Synthetase Regulating Chloroplast Ribosome Biogenesis in Rice, Is Essential for Early Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunming; Zheng, Ming; Lyu, Jia; Xu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; Niu, Mei; Long, Wuhua; Wang, Di; Wang, Yihua; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria contain their own genomes and transcriptional and translational systems. Establishing these genetic systems is essential for plant growth and development. Here we characterized a mutant form of a Val-tRNA synthetase (OsValRS2) from Oryza sativa that is targeted to both chloroplasts and mitochondria. A single base change in OsValRS2 caused virescent to albino phenotypes in seedlings and white panicles at heading. We therefore named this mutant white panicle 1 (wp1). Chlorophyll autofluorescence observations and transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that wp1 mutants are defective in early chloroplast development. RNA-seq analysis revealed that expression of nuclear-encoded photosynthetic genes is significantly repressed, while expression of many chloroplast-encoded genes also changed significantly in wp1 mutants. Western-blot analyses of chloroplast-encoded proteins showed that chloroplast protein levels were reduced in wp1 mutants, although mRNA levels of some genes were higher in wp1 than in wild type. We found that wp1 was impaired in chloroplast ribosome biogenesis. Taken together, our results show that OsValRS2 plays an essential role in chloroplast development and regulating chloroplast ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26839129

  10. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  11. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  12. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-09-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit.

  13. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  14. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species.

    PubMed

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L; Khan, Abdur R; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  15. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Nicotiana otophora and its Comparison with Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdul L.; Khan, Abdur R.; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Khan, Muhammad A.; Lee, Seok-Min; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Nicotiana otophora is a wild parental species of Nicotiana tabacum, an interspecific hybrid of Nicotiana tomentosiformis and Nicotiana sylvestris. However, N. otophora is least understood as an alternative paternal donor. Here, we compared the fully assembled chloroplast (cp) genome of N. otophora and with those of closely related species. The analysis showed a cp genome size of 156,073 bp and exhibited a typical quadripartite structure, which contains a pair of inverted repeats separated by small and large single copies, containing 163 representative genes, with 165 microsatellites distributed unevenly throughout the genome. Comparative analysis of a gene with known function across Nicotiana species revealed 76 protein-coding sequences, 20 tRNA sequences, and 3 rRNA sequence shared between the cp genomes. The analysis revealed that N. otophora is a sister species to N. tomentosiformis within the Nicotiana genus, and Atropha belladonna and Datura stramonium are their closest relatives. These findings provide a valuable analysis of the complete N. otophora cp genome, which can identify species, elucidate taxonomy, and reconstruct the phylogeny of genus Nicotiana. PMID:27379132

  16. [ On the absence of high-molecular polyphosphates in chloroplasts of Acetabularia mediterranea].

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, P M; Efremovich, N V; Kulaev, I S

    1977-05-01

    High-molecular polyphosphates have been identified in a crude fraction of chloroplasts of Acetabularia mediterranea. However, after a short-term treatment of the fraction with a hypotonic salt solution and centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient it was found possible to completely separate high-molecular polyphosphates from intact chloroplasts. Consequently the chloroplasts themselves contain no high-molecular polyphosphates. It is assumed that the high-molecular polysphates found in a crude fraction of chloroplasts are constitutents of the "metachromatic" granules which can be revealed in the A. mediterranea cytoplasm by cytochemical methods.

  17. Microsatellites for microbiologists.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Michael J; Scriven, Lucinda A; Singleton, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellites are repeating sequences of 2-6base pairs of DNA. Currently, they are used as molecular markers in many organisms, specifically in genetic studies analyzing kinship and population structure. In addition, they can be used to study gene duplication and/or deletion. Although they are used in studies on microorganisms including fungi, bacteria, protists, and archaea, it appears that these genetic markers are not being utilized to their full microbiological potential. Microsatellites have many advantages over other genetic markers currently in use as they are in general species specific, and therefore, cross-contamination by nontarget organisms is rare. Furthermore, microsatellites are suitable for use with fast and cheap DNA extraction methods, with ancient DNA or DNA from hair and fecal samples used in noninvasive sampling, making them widely available as a genetic marker. Microsatellites have already proven to be a useful tool for evolutionary studies of pathogenic microorganisms such as Candida albicans and Helicobacter pylori, and the onset of new sequencing techniques (such as 454, PACBIO, and mini-ion sequencing) means the ability to detect such markers will become less time consuming and cheaper, thus further expanding their potential to answer important microbial ecology questions.

  18. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  19. Genetic Analysis of Chloroplast Translation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Alice

    2005-08-15

    The assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus requires the concerted action of hundreds of genes distributed between the two physically separate genomes in the nucleus and chloroplast. Nuclear genes coordinate this process by controlling the expression of chloroplast genes in response to developmental and environmental cues. However, few regulatory factors have been identified. We used mutant phenotypes to identify nuclear genes in maize that modulate chloroplast translation, a key control point in chloroplast gene expression. This project focused on the nuclear gene crp1, required for the translation of two chloroplast mRNAs. CRP1 is related to fungal proteins involved in the translation of mitochondrial mRNAs, and is the founding member of a large gene family in plants, with {approx}450 members. Members of the CRP1 family are defined by a repeated 35 amino acid motif called a ''PPR'' motif. The PPR motif is closely related to the TPR motif, which mediates protein-protein interactions. We and others have speculated that PPR tracts adopt a structure similar to that of TPR tracts, but with a substrate binding surface adapted to bind RNA instead of protein. To understand how CRP1 influences the translation of specific chloroplast mRNAs, we sought proteins that interact with CRP1, and identified the RNAs associated with CRP1 in vivo. We showed that CRP1 is associated in vivo with the mRNAs whose translation it activates. To explore the functions of PPR proteins more generally, we sought mutations in other PPR-encoding genes: mutations in the maize PPR2 and PPR4 were shown to disrupt chloroplast ribosome biogenesis and chloroplast trans-splicing, respectively. These and other results suggest that the nuclear-encoded PPR family plays a major role in modulating the expression of the chloroplast genome in higher plants.

  20. Dynamics of Chloroplast Translation during Chloroplast Differentiation in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Barkan, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes in land plants contain approximately 100 genes, the majority of which reside in polycistronic transcription units derived from cyanobacterial operons. The expression of chloroplast genes is integrated into developmental programs underlying the differentiation of photosynthetic cells from non-photosynthetic progenitors. In C4 plants, the partitioning of photosynthesis between two cell types, bundle sheath and mesophyll, adds an additional layer of complexity. We used ribosome profiling and RNA-seq to generate a comprehensive description of chloroplast gene expression at four stages of chloroplast differentiation, as displayed along the maize seedling leaf blade. The rate of protein output of most genes increases early in development and declines once the photosynthetic apparatus is mature. The developmental dynamics of protein output fall into several patterns. Programmed changes in mRNA abundance make a strong contribution to the developmental shifts in protein output, but output is further adjusted by changes in translational efficiency. RNAs with prioritized translation early in development are largely involved in chloroplast gene expression, whereas those with prioritized translation in photosynthetic tissues are generally involved in photosynthesis. Differential gene expression in bundle sheath and mesophyll chloroplasts results primarily from differences in mRNA abundance, but differences in translational efficiency amplify mRNA-level effects in some instances. In most cases, rates of protein output approximate steady-state protein stoichiometries, implying a limited role for proteolysis in eliminating unassembled or damaged proteins under non-stress conditions. Tuned protein output results from gene-specific trade-offs between translational efficiency and mRNA abundance, both of which span a large dynamic range. Analysis of ribosome footprints at sites of RNA editing showed that the chloroplast translation machinery does not generally

  1. Controversy on chloroplast origins.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, P J; Penny, D; Hendy, M D; Howe, C J; Beanland, T J; Larkum, A W

    1992-04-20

    Controversy exists over the origins of photosynthetic organelles in that contradictory trees arise from different sequence, biochemical and ultrastructural data sets. We propose a testable hypothesis which explains this inconsistency as a result of the differing GC contents of sequences. We report that current methods of tree reconstruction tend to group sequences with similar GC contents irrespective of whether the similar GC content is due to common ancestry or is independently acquired. Nuclear encoded sequences (high GC) give different trees from chloroplast encoded sequences (low GC). We find that current data is consistent with the hypothesis of multiple origins for photosynthetic organelles and single origins for each type of light harvesting complex. PMID:1568469

  2. Evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Schlötterer, C

    2000-09-01

    Within the past decade microsatellites have developed into one of the most popular genetic markers. Despite the widespread use of microsatellite analysis, an integral picture of the mutational dynamics of microsatellite DNA is just beginning to emerge. Here, I review both generally agreed and controversial results about the mutational dynamics of microsatellite DNA. Microsatellites are short DNA sequence stretches in which a motif of one to six bases is tandemly repeated. It has been known for some time that these sequences can differ in repeat number among individuals. With the advent of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology this property of microsatellite DNA was converted into a highly versatile genetic marker (Litt and Luty 1989; Tautz 1989; Weber and May 1989). Polymerase chain reaction products of different length can be amplified with primers flanking the variable microsatellite region. Due to the availability of high-throughput capillary sequencers or mass spectrography the sizing of alleles is no longer a bottleneck in microsatellite analysis. The almost random distribution of microsatellites and their high level of polymorphism greatly facilitated the construction of genetic maps (Dietrich et al. 1994; Dib et al. 1996) and enabled subsequent positional cloning of several genes. Almost at the same time, microsatellites were established as the marker of choice for the identification of individuals and paternity testing. The high sensitivity of PCR-based microsatellite analysis was not only of great benefit for forensics, but opened completely new research areas, such as the analysis of samples with limited DNA amounts (e.g., many social insects) or degraded DNA (e.g., feces, museum material) (Schlötterer and Pemberton 1998). More recently, microsatellite analysis has also been employed in population genetics (Goldstein and Schlötterer 1999). Compared with allozymes, microsatellites offer the advantage that, in principle, several thousand potentially

  3. Survey and Analysis of Microsatellites in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M. Dharma; Muthulakshmi, M.; Madhu, M.; Archak, Sunil; Mita, K.; Nagaraju, J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied microsatellite frequency and distribution in 21.76-Mb random genomic sequences, 0.67-Mb BAC sequences from the Z chromosome, and 6.3-Mb EST sequences of Bombyx mori. We mined microsatellites of ≥15 bases of mononucleotide repeats and ≥5 repeat units of other classes of repeats. We estimated that microsatellites account for 0.31% of the genome of B. mori. Microsatellite tracts of A, AT, and ATT were the most abundant whereas their number drastically decreased as the length of the repeat motif increased. In general, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were overrepresented in the transcribed sequences except TAA, GTA, and TGA, which were in excess in genomic sequences. The Z chromosome sequences contained shorter repeat types than the rest of the chromosomes in addition to a higher abundance of AT-rich repeats. Our results showed that base composition of the flanking sequence has an influence on the origin and evolution of microsatellites. Transitions/transversions were high in microsatellites of ESTs, whereas the genomic sequence had an equal number of substitutions and indels. The average heterozygosity value for 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci surveyed in 13 diverse silkmoth strains having 2–14 alleles was 0.54. Only 36 (18.2%) of 198 microsatellite loci were polymorphic between the two divergent silkworm populations and 10 (5%) loci revealed null alleles. The microsatellite map generated using these polymorphic markers resulted in 8 linkage groups. B. mori microsatellite loci were the most conserved in its immediate ancestor, B. mandarina, followed by the wild saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea assama. PMID:15371363

  4. Giant chloroplast development in ethylene response1-1 is caused by a second mutation in ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION OF CHLOROPLAST3 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Hee; Kim, Geun-Don; Yoo, Sang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    The higher plants of today array a large number of small chloroplasts in their photosynthetic cells. This array of small chloroplasts results from organelle division via prokaryotic binary fission in a eukaryotic plant cell environment. Functional abnormalities of the tightly coordinated biochemical event of chloroplast division lead to abnormal chloroplast development in plants. Here, we described an abnormal chloroplast phenotype in an ethylene insensitive ethylene response1-1 (etr1-1) of Arabidopsis thaliana. Extensive transgenic and genetic analyses revealed that this organelle abnormality was not linked to etr1-1 or ethylene signaling, but linked to a second mutation in ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION3 (ARC3), which was further verified by genetic complementation analysis. Despite the normal expression of other plastid division-related genes, the loss of ARC3 caused the enlargement of chloroplasts as well as the diminution of a photosynthetic protein Rubisco in etr1-1. Our study has suggested that the increased size of the abnormal chloroplasts may not be able to fully compensate for the loss of a greater array of small chloroplasts in higher plants. PMID:22228186

  5. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Microsatellite markers discriminating accessions within collections of plant genetic resources.

    PubMed

    Kraic, Ján; Gregová, Edita; Jomová, Klaudia; Hudcovicová, Martina

    2002-01-01

    The reliability of microsatellite analyses for discriminating between plant accessions maintained in collections of genetic resources was tested for 53 accessions of barley, 65 of soybean, 49 of chickpea, and 19 of alfalfa. The specific primer pairs used in this study were based on microsatellite DNA sequences surrounded by perfect dinucleotide and imperfect trinucleotide tandem repeat units. The evaluated polymorphic information content, diversity index, and probabilities of identity indicate that there is value in the application of SSR analyses in barley, soybean, and chickpea genetic resource management. Variation between alfalfa genotypes was not revealed at the five analyzed microsatellite loci. PMID:12378234

  7. BIOSYNTHESIS IN ISOLATED ACETABULARIA CHLOROPLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, David C.; Levin, Wendy B.

    1972-01-01

    The ability of chloroplasts isolated from Acetabulana mediterranea to synthesize the protein amino acids has been investigated. When this chloroplast isolate was presented with 14CO2 for periods of 6–8 hr, tracer was found in essentially all amino acid species of their hydrolyzed protein Phenylalanine labeling was not detected, probably due to technical problems, and hydroxyproline labeling was not tested for The incorporation of 14CO2 into the amino acids is driven by light and, as indicated by the amount of radioactivity lost during ninhydrin decarboxylation on the chromatograms, the amino acids appear to be uniformly labeled. The amino acid labeling pattern of the isolate is similar to that found in plastids labeled with 14CO2 in vivo. The chloroplast isolate did not utilize detectable amounts of externally supplied amino acids in light or, with added adenosine triphosphate (ATP), in darkness. It is concluded that these chloroplasts are a tight cytoplasmic compartment that is independent in supplying the amino acids used for its own protein synthesis. These results are discussed in terms of the role of contaminants in the observed synthesis, the "normalcy" of Acetabularia chloroplasts, the synthetic pathways for amino acids in plastids, and the implications of these observations for cell compartmentation and chloroplast autonomy. PMID:4557310

  8. [Aspirin suppresses microsatellite instability].

    PubMed

    Wallinger, S; Dietmaier, W; Beyser, K; Bocker, T; Hofstädter, F; Fishel, R; Rüschoff, J

    1999-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exhibit cancer preventive effects and have been shown to induce regression of adenomas in FAP patients. In order to elucidate the probable underlying mechanism, the effect of NSAIDs on mismatch repair related microsatellite instability was investigated. Six colorectal cancer cell lines all but one deficient for human mismatch repair (MMR) genes were examined for microsatellite instability (MSI) prior and after treatment with Aspirin or Sulindac. For rapid in vitro analysis of MSI a microcloning assay was developed by combining Laser microdissection and random (PEP-) PCR prior to specific MSI-PCR. Effects of NSAIDs on cell cycle and apoptosis were systematically investigated by using flow cytometry and cell-sorting. MSI frequency in cells deficient of MMR genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6) was markedly reduced after long-term (> 10 weeks) NSAID treatment. This effect was reversible, time- and concentration dependent. However, in the hPMS2 deficient endometrial cancer cell line (HEC-1-A) the MSI phenotype kept unchanged. According to cell sorting, non-apoptotic cells were stable and apoptotic cells were unstable. These results suggest that aspirin/sulindac induces a genetic selection for microsatellite stability in a subset of MMR-deficient cells and may thus provide an effective prophylactic therapy for HNPCC related colorectal carcinomas.

  9. Middle-Upper Pleistocene climate changes shaped the divergence and demography of Cycas guizhouensis (Cycadaceae): Evidence from DNA sequences and microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiuyan; Zheng, Ying; Gong, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Climatic oscillations in the Pleistocene have had profound effects on the demography and genetic diversity of many extant species. Cycas guizhouensis Lan & R.F. Zou is an endemic and endangered species in Southwest China that is primarily distributed along the valleys of the Nanpan River. In this study, we used four chloroplast DNAs (cpDNA), three nuclear genes (nDNA) and 13 microsatellite (SSR) loci to investigate the genetic structure, divergence time and demographic history of 11 populations of C. guizhouensis. High genetic diversity and high levels of genetic differentiation among the populations were observed. Two evolutionary units were revealed based on network and Structure analysis. The divergence time estimations suggested that haplotypes of C. guizhouensis were diverged during the Middle-Upper Pleistocene. Additionally, the demographic histories deduced from different DNA sequences were discordant, but overall indicated that C. guizhouensis had experienced a recent population expansion during the post-glacial period. Microsatellite data revealed that there was a contraction in effective population size in the past. These genetic features allow conservation measures to be taken to ensure the protection of this endangered species from extinction. PMID:27270859

  10. Middle-Upper Pleistocene climate changes shaped the divergence and demography of Cycas guizhouensis (Cycadaceae): Evidence from DNA sequences and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiuyan; Zheng, Ying; Gong, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Climatic oscillations in the Pleistocene have had profound effects on the demography and genetic diversity of many extant species. Cycas guizhouensis Lan &R.F. Zou is an endemic and endangered species in Southwest China that is primarily distributed along the valleys of the Nanpan River. In this study, we used four chloroplast DNAs (cpDNA), three nuclear genes (nDNA) and 13 microsatellite (SSR) loci to investigate the genetic structure, divergence time and demographic history of 11 populations of C. guizhouensis. High genetic diversity and high levels of genetic differentiation among the populations were observed. Two evolutionary units were revealed based on network and Structure analysis. The divergence time estimations suggested that haplotypes of C. guizhouensis were diverged during the Middle-Upper Pleistocene. Additionally, the demographic histories deduced from different DNA sequences were discordant, but overall indicated that C. guizhouensis had experienced a recent population expansion during the post-glacial period. Microsatellite data revealed that there was a contraction in effective population size in the past. These genetic features allow conservation measures to be taken to ensure the protection of this endangered species from extinction. PMID:27270859

  11. Red light, Phot1 and JAC1 modulate Phot2-dependent reorganization of chloroplast actin filaments and chloroplast avoidance movement.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Noboru; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Wada, Masamitsu; Kadota, Akeo

    2011-08-01

    The phototropin (phot)-dependent intracellular relocation of chloroplasts is a ubiquitous phenomenon in plants. We have previously revealed the involvement of a short cp-actin (chloroplast actin) filament-based mechanism in this movement. Here, the reorganization of cp-actin filaments during the avoidance movement of chloroplasts was analyzed in higher time resolution under blue GFP (green fluorescent protein) excitation light in an actin filament-visualized line of Arabidopsis thaliana. Under standard background red light of 89 μmol m(-2) s(-1), cp-actin filaments transiently disappeared at approximately 30 s and reappeared in a biased configuration on chloroplasts approximately 70 s after blue excitation light irradiation. The timing of biased cp-actin reappearance was delayed under the background of strong red light or in the absence of red light. Consistently, chloroplast movement was delayed under these conditions. In phot1 mutants, acceleration of both the disappearance and reappearance of cp-actin filaments occurred, indicating an inhibitory action of phot1 on reorganization of cp-actin filaments. Avoidance movements began sooner in phot1 than in wild-type plants. No reorganization of cp-actin filaments was seen in phot2 or phot1phot2 mutants lacking phot2, which is responsible for avoidance movements. Surprisingly, jac1 (j-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1) mutants, lacking the accumulation response, showed no avoidance movements under the whole-cell irradiation condition for GFP observation. Cp-actin filaments in jac1 did not show a biased distribution, with a small or almost no transient decrease in the number. These results indicate a close association between the biased distribution of cp-actin filaments and chloroplast movement. Further, JAC1 is suggested to function in the biased cp-actin filament distribution by regulating their appearance and disappearance.

  12. Towards a Synthetic Chloroplast

    PubMed Central

    Agapakis, Christina M.; Niederholtmeyer, Henrike; Noche, Ramil R.; Lieberman, Tami D.; Megason, Sean G.; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The evolution of eukaryotic cells is widely agreed to have proceeded through a series of endosymbiotic events between larger cells and proteobacteria or cyanobacteria, leading to the formation of mitochondria or chloroplasts, respectively. Engineered endosymbiotic relationships between different species of cells are a valuable tool for synthetic biology, where engineered pathways based on two species could take advantage of the unique abilities of each mutualistic partner. Results We explored the possibility of using the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as a platform for studying evolutionary dynamics and for designing two-species synthetic biological systems. We observed that the cyanobacteria were relatively harmless to eukaryotic host cells compared to Escherichia coli when injected into the embryos of zebrafish, Danio rerio, or taken up by mammalian macrophages. In addition, when engineered with invasin from Yersinia pestis and listeriolysin O from Listeria monocytogenes, S. elongatus was able to invade cultured mammalian cells and divide inside macrophages. Conclusion Our results show that it is possible to engineer photosynthetic bacteria to invade the cytoplasm of mammalian cells for further engineering and applications in synthetic biology. Engineered invasive but non-pathogenic or immunogenic photosynthetic bacteria have great potential as synthetic biological devices. PMID:21533097

  13. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  14. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Donghwan; Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Jung-Ro; Lee, Gi-An; Ro, Na-Young; Jeon, Young-Ah; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Lee, Ho-Sun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We report the complete sequence of the chloroplast genome of Capsicum frutescens (Solanaceae), a species of chili pepper. Methods and Results: Using an Illumina platform, we sequenced the chloroplast genome of C. frutescens. The total length of the genome is 156,817 bp, and the overall GC content is 37.7%. A pair of 25,792-bp inverted repeats is separated by small (17,853 bp) and large (87,380 bp) single-copy regions. The C. frutescens chloroplast genome encodes 132 unique genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Of these, seven genes are duplicated in the inverted repeats and 12 genes contain one or two introns. Comparative analysis with the reference chloroplast genome revealed 125 simple sequence repeat motifs and 34 variants, mostly located in the noncoding regions. Conclusions: The complete chloroplast genome sequence of C. frutescens reported here is a valuable genetic resource for Capsicum species. PMID:27213127

  15. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-01-01

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group. PMID:27558458

  16. Comparison of intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric chloroplast diversity in Cycads.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guo-Feng; Hinsinger, Damien Daniel; Strijk, Joeri Sergej

    2016-08-25

    Cycads are among the most threatened plant species. Increasing the availability of genomic information by adding whole chloroplast data is a fundamental step in supporting phylogenetic studies and conservation efforts. Here, we assemble a dataset encompassing three taxonomic levels in cycads, including ten genera, three species in the genus Cycas and two individuals of C. debaoensis. Repeated sequences, SSRs and variations of the chloroplast were analyzed at the intraspecific, interspecific and intergeneric scale, and using our sequence data, we reconstruct a phylogenomic tree for cycads. The chloroplast was 162,094 bp in length, with 133 genes annotated, including 87 protein-coding, 37 tRNA and 8 rRNA genes. We found 7 repeated sequences and 39 SSRs. Seven loci showed promising levels of variations for application in DNA-barcoding. The chloroplast phylogeny confirmed the division of Cycadales in two suborders, each of them being monophyletic, revealing a contradiction with the current family circumscription and its evolution. Finally, 10 intraspecific SNPs were found. Our results showed that despite the extremely restricted distribution range of C. debaoensis, using complete chloroplast data is useful not only in intraspecific studies, but also to improve our understanding of cycad evolution and in defining conservation strategies for this emblematic group.

  17. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  18. Chloroplast in Plant-Virus Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinping; Zhang, Xian; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the chloroplast is the organelle that conducts photosynthesis. It has been known that chloroplast is involved in virus infection of plants for approximate 70 years. Recently, the subject of chloroplast-virus interplay is getting more and more attention. In this article we discuss the different aspects of chloroplast-virus interaction into three sections: the effect of virus infection on the structure and function of chloroplast, the role of chloroplast in virus infection cycle, and the function of chloroplast in host defense against viruses. In particular, we focus on the characterization of chloroplast protein-viral protein interactions that underlie the interplay between chloroplast and virus. It can be summarized that chloroplast is a common target of plant viruses for viral pathogenesis or propagation; and conversely, chloroplast and its components also can play active roles in plant defense against viruses. Chloroplast photosynthesis-related genes/proteins (CPRGs/CPRPs) are suggested to play a central role during the complex chloroplast-virus interaction. PMID:27757106

  19. Student's Microsatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelentsov, Victor; Kopik, Anatoliy; Karpenko, Stanislav; Mayorova, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays BMSTU Youth space center carries on development of the microsatellite project. The project is based on principles of students direct involvement on all stages of development and maintenance of the satellite. The group of students was organized within the university with purpose of coordination of work at the program. Project current condition The work on creation of an experimental model of the micro satellite is performed. The aim is to define the structure and parameters of on-board devices (mass-overall dimensions characteristics, energy consumption and so on). developed. According to the simplified model an active stabilization system (three orthogonal electro-magnetic coils) and orientation characterization system (sunlight detector and magnitometer) are included in OCS structure. most suitable battery storage, power-supply controlling system. Student micro-satellite program goals 1.Scientific Information gaining in the field of Earth study- using perspective research methods. Studying of new devices behavior in space conditions. 2. Educative a. Students derive real experience of projecting, building of a spacecraft from the point of view of an experimenter, a constructor and a researcher. b. Organization of student's cooperation with key men of aerospace industry and other branches. c. Brainpower and material base preparation for micro-satellite systems' development. d. Attraction of youth interest to the topic, by: - Students' and pupils' groups attraction and involvement in experiments conduction and results processing. - Seminars and lections devoted to Earth study from the space organization - Specific scientific data distribution over World Wide Web. 3. International With purpose of program expansion, the developers' group looks to start of an international project. Within the project new experiments conduction and scientific information exchange are expected. 4. Status Bauman Moscow State Technical University's status improvement in the field

  20. Chloroplast Proteases: Updates on Proteolysis within and across Suborganellar Compartments1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated from the endosymbiosis of ancestral cyanobacteria and maintain transcription and translation machineries for around 100 proteins. Most endosymbiont genes, however, have been transferred to the host nucleus, and the majority of the chloroplast proteome is composed of nucleus-encoded proteins that are biosynthesized in the cytosol and then imported into chloroplasts. How chloroplasts and the nucleus communicate to control the plastid proteome remains an important question. Protein-degrading machineries play key roles in chloroplast proteome biogenesis, remodeling, and maintenance. Research in the past few decades has revealed more than 20 chloroplast proteases, which are localized to specific suborganellar locations. In particular, two energy-dependent processive proteases of bacterial origin, Clp and FtsH, are central to protein homeostasis. Processing endopeptidases such as stromal processing peptidase and thylakoidal processing peptidase are involved in the maturation of precursor proteins imported into chloroplasts by cleaving off the amino-terminal transit peptides. Presequence peptidases and organellar oligopeptidase subsequently degrade the cleaved targeting peptides. Recent findings have indicated that not only intraplastidic but also extraplastidic processive protein-degrading systems participate in the regulation and quality control of protein translocation across the envelopes. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the major chloroplast proteases in terms of type, suborganellar localization, and diversification. We present details of these degradation processes as case studies according to suborganellar compartment (envelope, stroma, and thylakoids). Key questions and future directions in this field are discussed. PMID:27288365

  1. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-09-20

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  2. Isolation of chloroplastic phosphoglycerate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Macioszek, J.; Anderson, L.E. ); Anderson, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    We report here a method for the isolation of high specific activity phosphoglycerate kinase (EC 2.7.2.3) from chloroplasts. The enzyme has been purified over 200-fold from pea (Pisum sativum L.) stromal extracts to apparent homogeneity with 23% recovery. Negative cooperativity is observed with the two enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase/glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.13) couple restored from the purified enzymes when NADPH is the reducing pyridine nucleotide, consistent with earlier results obtained with crude chloroplastic extracts. Michaelis Menten kinetics are observed when 3-phosphoglycerate is held constant and phosphoglycerate kinase is varied, which suggests that phosphoglycerate kinase-bound 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate may be the preferred substrate for glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase in the chloroplast.

  3. Photomorphogenic Regulation of Chloroplast Replication in Euglena

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Usha; Lyman, Harvard

    1980-01-01

    Chloroplast replication in Euglena gracilis is specifically inhibited by ultraviolet light and the effect is photoreactivable. The ability of irradiated cells to be photoreactivated is lost more rapidly if cells are incubated in red light than in darkness. A mutant, Y9ZNa1L, which lacks the red-blue photomorphogenic system regulating chloroplast synthesis does not show the red-light-enhanced loss of photoreactivability. Another mutant, Y11P27ZD which has the red-blue system, but lacks the blue-light system also regulating chloroplast synthesis, shows the red-light effect. The red-light effect is seen in a mutant of photosynthetic electron transport, P4ZUL, which rules out a product of photosynthesis as a mediator of the effect. Inhibitors of protein synthesis on chloroplast ribosomes do not prevent the red-light-enhanced loss of chloroplast DNA. Chloroplast DNA is lost rapidly when UV-irradiated cells are incubated in red light, showing that the loss of photoreactivability is due to the loss of the substrate for photoreactivation, chloroplast DNA. Therefore, the red-blue photomorphogenic system is activating a chloroplast DNA-specific nuclease(s). A model is proposed for a light-mediated mechanism regulating the amount of chloroplast DNA: blue light would promote chloroplast DNA synthesis; red light would promote its degradation. The photomorphogenic systems regulating chloroplast synthesis might work by activating a chloroplast-specific modification-restriction mechanism. PMID:16661425

  4. The kinetic complexity of Acetabularia chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, U; Green, B R

    1978-11-21

    The kinetic complexity of Acetabularia cliftonii chloroplast DNA is 1.52 +/- 0.26 . 10(9) daltons, compared to 0.2 .10(9) daltons for Chlamydomonas chloroplast DNA. There is an average of three genomes per chloroplast. The unusually large size of the Acetabularia genome may reflect the ancient evolutionary history of this organism.

  5. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1992-07-01

    This project is directed toward understanding how the availability of nitrogen affects the accumulation of chloroplast pigments and proteins functioning in energy transduction and carbon metabolism. Molecular analyses performed with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown in a continuous culture system such that ammonium concentration is maintained at a low steady-state concentration so as to limit cell division. As compared to chloroplasts from cells of non-limiting nitrogen provisions, chloroplasts of N-limited cells are profoundly chlorophyll-deficient but still assimilate carbon for deposition of as starch and as storage lipids. Chlorophyll deficiency arises by limiting accumulation of appropriate nuclear-encoded mRNAs of and by depressed rates of translation of chloroplast mRNAs for apoproteins of reaction centers. Chloroplast translational effects can be partially ascribed to diminished rates of chlorophyll biosynthesis in N-limited cells, but pigment levels are not determinants for expression of the nuclear light-harvesting protein genes. Consequently, other signals that are responsive to nitrogen availability mediate transcriptional or post-transcriptional processes for accumulation of the mRNAs for LHC apoproteins and other mRNAs whose abundance is dependent upon high nitrogen levels. Conversely, limited nitrogen availability promotes accumulation of other proteins involved in carbon metabolism and oxidative electron transport in chloroplasts. Hence, thylakoids of N-limited cells exhibit enhanced chlororespiratory activities wherein oxygen serves as the electron acceptor in a pathway that involves plastoquinone and other electron carrier proteins that remain to be thoroughly characterized. Ongoing and future studies are also outlined.

  6. Chloroplast development in Ochromonas danica.

    PubMed

    GIBBS, S P

    1962-11-01

    When dark-grown cells of Ochromonas danica are placed in the light, the amount of chlorophyll a per cell increases 82-fold; the content of carotenoid pigment, 24-fold. Concomitantly with this increase in chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment, the small proplastid of dark-grown cells develops into a large lamellate chloroplast. During the first 12 hours in the light, vesicles appear within the loose clusters of dense chloroplast granules, enlarge, align themselves into rows (plates in three dimensions), and fuse into discs. Double discs may form from the more or less simultaneous fusion of two adjacent plates of vesicles or by the addition of vesicles to an already formed single disc. Three-disc bands arise by the addition of a disc to an already formed two-disc band through the approach and fusion of more vesicles. After 24 hours in the light, most of the chloroplast bands contain three discs, but the chloroplasts are still small. After 48 hours in the light, almost all the cells contain full-sized chloroplasts with a full complement of three-disc bands. However, at this time the amount of chlorophyll a and carotenoid pigment is only one-half of maximum. During the next 3 days in the light, as the number of chlorophyll and carotenoid molecules per chloroplast approximately doubles, there is a compression of the discs in each band (from 180 to 130 A) and a precise alignment of their membranes. Changes also occur in the nucleus when dark-grown cells are placed in the light. There is an increase in the number of small nucleolar bodies, many of which lie directly against the nuclear envelope, and in a few cells a dense mass of granules is seen between the two membranes of the nuclear envelope.

  7. [Study of Chloroplast DNA Polymorphism in the Sunflower (Helianthus L.)].

    PubMed

    Markina, N V; Usatov, A V; Logacheva, M D; Azarin, K V; Gorbachenko, C F; Kornienko, I V; Gavrilova, V A; Tihobaeva, V E

    2015-08-01

    The polymorphism of microsatellite loci of chloroplast genome in six Helianthus species and 46 lines of cultivated sunflower H. annuus (17 CMS lines and 29 Rf-lines) were studied. The differences between species are confined to four SSR loci. Within cultivated forms of the sunflower H. annuus, the polymorphism is absent. A comparative analysis was performed on sequences of the cpDNA inbred line 3629, line 398941 of the wild sunflower, and the American line HA383 H. annuus. As a result, 52 polymorphic loci represented by 27 SSR and 25 SNP were found; they can be used for genotyping of H. annuus samples, including cultural varieties: twelve polymorphic positions, of which eight are SSR and four are SNP. PMID:26601486

  8. [Study of Chloroplast DNA Polymorphism in the Sunflower (Helianthus L.)].

    PubMed

    Markina, N V; Usatov, A V; Logacheva, M D; Azarin, K V; Gorbachenko, C F; Kornienko, I V; Gavrilova, V A; Tihobaeva, V E

    2015-08-01

    The polymorphism of microsatellite loci of chloroplast genome in six Helianthus species and 46 lines of cultivated sunflower H. annuus (17 CMS lines and 29 Rf-lines) were studied. The differences between species are confined to four SSR loci. Within cultivated forms of the sunflower H. annuus, the polymorphism is absent. A comparative analysis was performed on sequences of the cpDNA inbred line 3629, line 398941 of the wild sunflower, and the American line HA383 H. annuus. As a result, 52 polymorphic loci represented by 27 SSR and 25 SNP were found; they can be used for genotyping of H. annuus samples, including cultural varieties: twelve polymorphic positions, of which eight are SSR and four are SNP.

  9. Evolution of chloroplast vesicle transport.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Sabine; Soll, Jürgen; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2003-02-01

    Vesicle traffic plays a central role in eukaryotic transport. The presence of a vesicle transport system inside chloroplasts of spermatophytes raises the question of its phylogenetic origin. To elucidate the evolution of this transport system we analyzed organisms belonging to different lineages that arose from the first photosynthetic eukaryote, i.e. glaucocystophytes, chlorophytes, rhodophytes, and charophytes/embryophytes. Intriguingly, vesicle transport is not apparent in any group other than embryophytes. The transfer of this eukaryotic-type vesicle transport system from the cytosol into the chloroplast thus seems a late evolutionary development that was acquired by land plants in order to adapt to new environmental challenges.

  10. Mini- and microsatellites.

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, C

    1997-01-01

    While the faithful transmission of genetic information requires a fidelity and stability of DNA that is involved in translation into proteins, it has become evident that a large part of noncoding DNA is organized in repeated sequences, which often exhibit a pronounced instability and dynamics. This applies both to longer repeated sequences, minisatellites (about 10-100 base pairs), and microsatellites (mostly 2-4 base pairs). Although these satellite DNAs are abundantly distributed in all kinds of organisms, no clear function has been discerned for them. However, extension of trinucleotide microsatellite sequences has been associated with several severe human disorders, such as Fragile X syndrome and Huntington's disease. Rare alleles of a minisatellite sequence have been reported to be associated with the ras oncogene leading to an increased risk for several human cancers. A dynamic behavior of repeated DNA sequences also applies to telomeres, constituting the ends of the chromosomes. Repeated DNA sequences protect the chromosome ends from losing coding sequences at cell divisions. The telomeres are maintained by the enzyme telomerase. Somatic cells, however, lose telomerase function and gradually die. Cancer cells have activated telomerase and therefore they acquire immortality. PMID:9255562

  11. Disruption of the Rice Plastid Ribosomal Protein S20 Leads to Chloroplast Developmental Defects and Seedling Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaodi; Jiang, Quan; Xu, Jianlong; Zhang, Jianhui; Teng, Sheng; Lin, Dongzhi; Dong, Yanjun

    2013-01-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins (PRPs) are essential for ribosome biogenesis, plastid protein biosynthesis, chloroplast differentiation, and early chloroplast development. This study identifies the first rice PRP mutant, asl1 (albino seedling lethality1), which exhibits an albino lethal phenotype at the seedling stage. This albino phenotype was associated with altered chlorophyll (Chl) content and chloroplast development. Map-based cloning revealed that ASL1 encodes PRP S20 (PRPS20), which localizes to the chloroplast. ASL1 showed tissue-specific expression, as it was highly expressed in plumule and young seedlings but expressed at much lower levels in other tissues. In addition, ASL1 expression was regulated by light. The transcript levels of nuclear genes for Chl biosynthesis and chloroplast development were strongly affected in asl1 mutants; transcripts of some plastid genes for photosynthesis were undetectable. Our findings indicate that nuclear-encoded PRPS20 plays an important role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:23979931

  12. Protein import into chloroplasts requires a chloroplast ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, D.; Blobel, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H/sup +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requires a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors.

  13. The novel protein DELAYED PALE-GREENING1 is required for early chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Weichun; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is one of the most important subjects in plant biology. In this study, an Arabidopsis early chloroplast biogenesis mutant with a delayed pale-greening phenotype (dpg1) was isolated from a T-DNA insertion mutant collection. Both cotyledons and true leaves of dpg1 mutants were initially albino but gradually became pale green as the plant matured. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed a delayed proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. Sequence and transcription analyses showed that AtDPG1 encodes a putatively chloroplast-localized protein containing three predicted transmembrane helices and that its expression depends on both light and developmental status. GUS staining for AtDPG1::GUS transgenic lines showed that this gene was widely expressed throughout the plant and that higher expression levels were predominantly found in green tissues during the early stages of Arabidopsis seedling development. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were substantially down-regulated in the dpg1 mutant. These data indicate that AtDPG1 plays an essential role in early chloroplast biogenesis, and its absence triggers chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signalling, which ultimately down-regulates the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins. PMID:27160321

  14. The novel protein DELAYED PALE-GREENING1 is required for early chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Li, Weichun; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is one of the most important subjects in plant biology. In this study, an Arabidopsis early chloroplast biogenesis mutant with a delayed pale-greening phenotype (dpg1) was isolated from a T-DNA insertion mutant collection. Both cotyledons and true leaves of dpg1 mutants were initially albino but gradually became pale green as the plant matured. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed a delayed proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. Sequence and transcription analyses showed that AtDPG1 encodes a putatively chloroplast-localized protein containing three predicted transmembrane helices and that its expression depends on both light and developmental status. GUS staining for AtDPG1::GUS transgenic lines showed that this gene was widely expressed throughout the plant and that higher expression levels were predominantly found in green tissues during the early stages of Arabidopsis seedling development. Furthermore, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis and chloroplast development were substantially down-regulated in the dpg1 mutant. These data indicate that AtDPG1 plays an essential role in early chloroplast biogenesis, and its absence triggers chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signalling, which ultimately down-regulates the expression of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins.

  15. Mutational dynamics of aroid chloroplast genomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrar; Biggs, Patrick J; Matthews, Peter J; Collins, Lesley J; Hendy, Michael D; Lockhart, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    A characteristic feature of eukaryote and prokaryote genomes is the co-occurrence of nucleotide substitution and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. Although similar observations have also been made for chloroplast DNA, genome-wide associations have not been reported. We determined the chloroplast genome sequences for two morphotypes of taro (Colocasia esculenta; family Araceae) and compared these with four publicly available aroid chloroplast genomes. Here, we report the extent of genome-wide association between direct and inverted repeats, indels, and substitutions in these aroid chloroplast genomes. We suggest that alternative but not mutually exclusive hypotheses explain the mutational dynamics of chloroplast genome evolution. PMID:23204304

  16. Spontaneous capture of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) chloroplasts by wild B. rapa: implications for the use of chloroplast transformation for biocontainment.

    PubMed

    Haider, Nadia; Allainguillaume, Joel; Wilkinson, Mike J

    2009-04-01

    Environmental concerns over the cultivation of Genetically Modified (GM) crops largely centre on the ecological consequences following gene flow to wild relatives. One attractive solution is to deploy biocontainment measures that prevent hybridization. Chloroplast transformation is the most advanced biocontainment method but is compromised by chloroplast capture (hybridization through the maternal lineage). To date, however, there is a paucity of information on the frequency of chloroplast capture in the wild. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus, AACC) frequently hybridises with wild Brassica rapa (AA, as paternal parent) and yields B. rapa-like introgressed individuals after only two generations. In this study we used chloroplast CAPS markers that differentiate between the two species to survey wild and weedy populations of B. rapa for the capture of B. napus chloroplasts. A total of 464 B. rapa plants belonging to 14 populations growing either in close proximity to B. napus (i.e. sympatric <5 m) or else were allopatric from the crop (>1 km) were assessed for chloroplast capture using PCR (trnL-F) and CAPS (trnT-L-Xba I) markers. The screen revealed that two sympatric B. rapa populations included 53 plants that possessed the chloroplast of B. napus. In order to discount these B. rapa plants as F(1) crop-wild hybrids, we used a C-genome-specific marker and found that 45 out of 53 plants lacked the C-genome and so were at least second generation introgressants. The most plausible explanation is that these individuals represent multiple cases of chloroplast capture following introgressive hybridisation through the female germ line from the crop. The abundance of such plants in sympatric sites thereby questions whether the use of chloroplast transformation would provide a sufficient biocontainment for GM oilseed rape in the United Kingdom.

  17. Comparative chromatography of chloroplast pigment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Sherma, J.; Strain, H. H.

    1969-01-01

    Methods for isolation of low concentration pigments of the cocklebur species are described. The methods entail two step chromatography so that the different sorption properties of the various pigments in varying column parameters can be utilized. Columnar and thin layer methods are compared. Many conditions influence separability of the chloroplasts.

  18. The complete chloroplast genome provides insight into the evolution and polymorphism of Panax ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongbing; Yin, Jinlong; Guo, Haiyan; Zhang, Yuyu; Xiao, Wen; Sun, Chen; Wu, Jiayan; Qu, Xiaobo; Yu, Jun; Wang, Xumin; Xiao, Jingfa

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (P. ginseng) is an important medicinal plant and is often used in traditional Chinese medicine. With next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, we determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Chinese P. ginseng strains, which are Damaya (DMY), Ermaya (EMY), Gaolishen (GLS), and Yeshanshen (YSS). The total chloroplast genome sequence length for DMY, EMY, and GLS was 156,354 bp, while that for YSS was 156,355 bp. Comparative genomic analysis of the chloroplast genome sequences indicate that gene content, GC content, and gene order in DMY are quite similar to its relative species, and nucleotide sequence diversity of inverted repeat region (IR) is lower than that of its counterparts, large single copy region (LSC) and small single copy region (SSC). A comparison among these four P. ginseng strains revealed that the chloroplast genome sequences of DMY, EMY, and GLS were identical and YSS had a 1-bp insertion at base 5472. To further study the heterogeneity in chloroplast genome during domestication, high-resolution reads were mapped to the genome sequences to investigate the differences at the minor allele level; 208 minor allele sites with minor allele frequencies (MAF) of ≥0.05 were identified. The polymorphism site numbers per kb of chloroplast genome sequence for DMY, EMY, GLS, and YSS were 0.74, 0.59, 0.97, and 1.23, respectively. All the minor allele sites located in LSC and IR regions, and the four strains showed the same variation types (substitution base or indel) at all identified polymorphism sites. Comparison results of heterogeneity in the chloroplast genome sequences showed that the minor allele sites on the chloroplast genome were undergoing purifying selection to adapt to changing environment during domestication process. A study of P. ginseng chloroplast genome with particular focus on minor allele sites would aid in investigating the dynamics on the chloroplast genomes and different P. ginseng strains

  19. Identification of protein stability determinants in chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Apel, Wiebke; Schulze, Waltraud X; Bock, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Although chloroplast protein stability has long been recognised as a major level of post-translational regulation in photosynthesis and gene expression, the factors determining protein stability in plastids are largely unknown. Here, we have identified stability determinants in vivo by producing plants with transgenic chloroplasts that express a reporter protein whose N- and C-termini were systematically modified. We found that major stability determinants are located in the N-terminus. Moreover, testing of all 20 amino acids in the position after the initiator methionine revealed strong differences in protein stability and indicated an important role of the penultimate N-terminal amino acid residue in determining the protein half life. We propose that the stability of plastid proteins is largely determined by three factors: (i) the action of methionine aminopeptidase (the enzyme that removes the initiator methionine and exposes the penultimate N-terminal amino acid residue), (ii) an N-end rule-like protein degradation pathway, and (iii) additional sequence determinants in the N-terminal region. PMID:20545891

  20. Segregation studies and linkage analysis of Atlantic salmon microsatellites using haploid genetics.

    PubMed

    Slettan, A; Olsaker, I; Lie, O

    1997-06-01

    A genetic marker map of Atlantic salmon would facilitate the identification of loci influencing economically important traits. In the present paper we describe five new Atlantic salmon microsatellites. Segregation studies and linkage analysis of these and previously published microsatellites were carried out in pedigrees consisting of diploid dams and haploid gynogenetic offspring. We confirm earlier reports that salmon microsatellites tend to have a higher number of repeat units than those of mammals. Linkage analysis revealed that three microsatellites belong to a linkage group spanning approximately 50 cM of the genome, whereas the remaining 10 markers seem to be unlinked. PMID:9203354

  1. Increasing tomato fruit quality by enhancing fruit chloroplast function. A double-edged sword?

    PubMed

    Cocaliadis, Maria Florencia; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Pons, Clara; Orzaez, Diego; Granell, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Fruits are generally regarded as photosynthate sinks as they rely on energy provided by sugars transported from leaves to carry out the highly demanding processes of development and ripening; eventually these imported photosynthates also contribute to the fruit organoleptic properties. Three recent reports have revealed, however, that transcriptional factors enhancing chloroplast development in fruit may result in higher contents not only of tomato fruit-specialized metabolites but also of sugars. In addition to suggesting new ways to improve fruit quality by fortifying fruit chloroplasts and plastids, these results prompted us to re-evaluate the importance of the contribution of chloroplasts/photosynthesis to fruit development and ripening.

  2. Microsatellites in Pursuit of Microbial Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdullah F.; Wang, Rongzhi; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites or short sequence repeats are widespread genetic markers which are hypermutable 1–6 bp long short nucleotide motifs. Significantly, their applications in genetics are extensive due to their ceaseless mutational degree, widespread length variations and hypermutability skills. These features make them useful in determining the driving forces of evolution by using powerful molecular techniques. Consequently, revealing important questions, for example, what is the significance of these abundant sequences in DNA, what are their roles in genomic evolution? The answers of these important questions are hidden in the ways these short motifs contributed in altering the microbial genomes since the origin of life. Even though their size ranges from 1 –to- 6 bases, these repeats are becoming one of the most popular genetic probes in determining their associations and phylogenetic relationships in closely related genomes. Currently, they have been widely used in molecular genetics, biotechnology and evolutionary biology. However, due to limited knowledge; there is a significant gap in research and lack of information concerning hypermutational mechanisms. These mechanisms play a key role in microsatellite loci point mutations and phase variations. This review will extend the understandings of impacts and contributions of microsatellite in genomic evolution and their universal applications in microbiology. PMID:26779133

  3. Phototropin encoded by a single-copy gene mediates chloroplast photorelocation movements in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Aino; Terai, Mika; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Tsuboi, Hidenori; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Wada, Masamitsu; Kohchi, Takayuki

    2014-09-01

    Blue-light-induced chloroplast photorelocation movement is observed in most land plants. Chloroplasts move toward weak-light-irradiated areas to efficiently absorb light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong-light-irradiated areas to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). The plant-specific kinase phototropin (phot) is the blue-light receptor for chloroplast movements. Although the molecular mechanisms for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been analyzed, the overall aspects of signal transduction common to land plants are still unknown. Here, we show that the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha exhibits the accumulation and avoidance responses exclusively induced by blue light as well as specific chloroplast positioning in the dark. Moreover, in silico and Southern-blot analyses revealed that the M. polymorpha genome encodes a single PHOT gene, MpPHOT, and its knockout line displayed none of the chloroplast photorelocation movements, indicating that the sole MpPHOT gene mediates all types of movement. Mpphot was localized on the plasma membrane and exhibited blue-light-dependent autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. Heterologous expression of MpPHOT rescued the defects in chloroplast movement of phot mutants in the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the seed plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These results indicate that Mpphot possesses evolutionarily conserved regulatory activities for chloroplast photorelocation movement. M. polymorpha offers a simple and versatile platform for analyzing the fundamental processes of phototropin-mediated chloroplast photorelocation movement common to land plants. PMID:25096976

  4. Differential Synthesis of Photosystem Cores and Light-Harvesting Antenna during Proplastid to Chloroplast Development in Spirodela oligorrhiza.

    PubMed

    McCormac, D J; Greenberg, B M

    1992-03-01

    Proplastids and etioplasts are common starting points for monitoring chloroplast development in higher plants. Although proplastids are the primary precursor of chloroplasts, most proplastid to chloroplast systems are cumbersome to study temporally. Conversely, the etioplast to chloroplast transition is initiated by light and is readily examined as a function of time. Etioplasts, however, are found mostly in plants germinated in the dark and are not an obligatory step in chloroplast development. We have chosen to study chloroplast ontogeny in Spirodela oligorrhiza (Kurtz) Hegelm (a C(3)-monocot) because of its unique ability to grow indefinitely in the dark. Ultrastructural, physiological, and molecular evidence is presented in support of a temporal, light-triggered proplastid to chloroplast transition in Spirodela. The dark-grown plants are devoid of chlorophyll, and upon illumination synchronously green over a 3- to 5-day period. Synthesis of chloroplast proteins involved in photosynthesis is coincident with thylakoid assembly, chlorophyll accumulation, and appearance of CO(2) fixation activity. Interestingly, the developmental sequence in Spirodela was slow enough to reveal that biosynthesis of the D1 photosystem II reaction center protein precedes biosynthesis of the major light-harvesting antenna proteins. This, coupled with the high chlorophyll a/b ratio observed early in development, indicated that reaction center assembly occurred prior to accumulation of the light-harvesting complexes. Thus, with Spirodela one can study proplastid to chloroplast conversions temporally in higher plants and follow the process on a time scale that enables a detailed dissection of plastid maturation processes.

  5. cpDNA microsatellite markers for Lemna minor (Araceae): Phylogeographic implications1

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Gowher A.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Reshi, Zafar A.; Atangana, Alain R.; Khasa, Damase P.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A lack of genetic markers impedes our understanding of the population biology of Lemna minor. Thus, the development of appropriate genetic markers for L. minor promises to be highly useful for population genetic studies and for addressing other life history questions regarding the species. • Methods and Results: For the first time, we characterized nine polymorphic and 24 monomorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers in L. minor using DNA samples of 26 individuals sampled from five populations in Kashmir and of 17 individuals from three populations in Quebec. Initially, we designed 33 primer pairs, which were tested on genomic DNA from natural populations. Nine loci provided markers with two alleles. Based on genotyping of the chloroplast DNA fragments from 43 sampled individuals, we identified one haplotype in Quebec and 11 haplotypes in Kashmir, of which one occurs in 56% of the genotypes, one in 8%, and nine in 4%, respectively. There was a maximum of two alleles per locus. • Conclusions: These new chloroplast microsatellite markers for L. minor and haplotype distribution patterns indicate a complex phylogeographic history that merits further investigation. PMID:25202636

  6. Fatty acid phytyl ester synthesis in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lippold, Felix; vom Dorp, Katharina; Abraham, Marion; Hölzl, Georg; Wewer, Vera; Yilmaz, Jenny Lindberg; Lager, Ida; Montandon, Cyrille; Besagni, Céline; Kessler, Felix; Stymne, Sten; Dörmann, Peter

    2012-05-01

    During stress or senescence, thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts are disintegrated, and chlorophyll and galactolipid are broken down, resulting in the accumulation of toxic intermediates, i.e., tetrapyrroles, free phytol, and free fatty acids. Chlorophyll degradation has been studied in detail, but the catabolic pathways for phytol and fatty acids remain unclear. A large proportion of phytol and fatty acids is converted into fatty acid phytyl esters and triacylglycerol during stress or senescence in chloroplasts. We isolated two genes (PHYTYL ESTER SYNTHASE1 [PES1] and PES2) of the esterase/lipase/thioesterase family of acyltransferases from Arabidopsis thaliana that are involved in fatty acid phytyl ester synthesis in chloroplasts. The two proteins are highly expressed during senescence and nitrogen deprivation. Heterologous expression in yeast revealed that PES1 and PES2 have phytyl ester synthesis and diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities. The enzymes show broad substrate specificities and can employ acyl-CoAs, acyl carrier proteins, and galactolipids as acyl donors. Double mutant plants (pes1 pes2) grow normally but show reduced phytyl ester and triacylglycerol accumulation. These results demonstrate that PES1 and PES2 are involved in the deposition of free phytol and free fatty acids in the form of phytyl esters in chloroplasts, a process involved in maintaining the integrity of the photosynthetic membrane during abiotic stress and senescence.

  7. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  8. Chloroplast avoidance movement is not functional in plants grown under strong sunlight.

    PubMed

    Higa, Takeshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-04-01

    Chloroplast movement in nine climbing plant species was investigated. It is thought that chloroplasts generally escape from strong light to avoid photodamage but accumulate towards weak light to perform photosynthesis effectively. Unexpectedly, however, the leaves of climbing plants grown under strong sunlight showed very low or no chloroplast photorelocation responses to either weak or strong blue light when detected by red light transmittance through leaves. Direct observations of Cayratia japonica leaves, for example, revealed that the average number of chloroplasts in upper periclinal walls of palisade tissue cells was only 1.2 after weak blue-light irradiation and almost all of the chloroplasts remained at the anticlinal wall, the state of chloroplast avoidance response. The leaves grown under strong light have thin and columnar palisade tissue cells comparing with the leaves grown under low light. Depending on our analyses and our schematic model, the thinner cells in a unit leaf area have a wider total plasma membrane area, such that more chloroplasts can exist on the plasma membrane in the thinner cells than in the thicker cells in a unit leaf-area basis. The same strategy might be used in other plant leaves grown under direct sunlight.

  9. Transglutaminases and their substrates in kinetin-stimulated etioplast-to-chloroplast transformation in cucumber cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Sobieszczuk-Nowicka, Ewa; Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Legocka, Jolanta

    2008-11-01

    In the light of our previous work, we know that there is a relationship between bound polyamines and the chloroplast differentiation process. This relationship may represent an important component of the process and be part of the mechanism of kinetin action, which stimulates chloroplast differentiation. To clarify the nature of the binding of polyamines to chloroplast structures, the possible involvement of transglutaminases in kinetin-stimulated chloroplast photodevelopment was investigated. Immunodetection of transglutaminases revealed bands at 77, 50 and 30 kDa both in etioplasts and chloroplasts. The data indicated a positive correlation between enzyme level and activity. It also demonstrated the regulation of transglutaminase protein expression by kinetin. The suborganellar location of transglutaminases by electron microscopy showed that the enzyme is peculiarly localised, mainly in pro-thylakoids and appressed grana thylakoids. The data corroborated that spermidine post-translational modification of certain plastid proteins of 58, 29, 26 and 12 kDa occurred. The results we obtained suggest that transglutaminases take part in the formation of the chloroplast structure via a mechanism whereby polyamines bind to their protein substrates. These findings about the effect of kinetin on conjugation provide a new contribution to the understanding of the mechanism of kinetin action on etioplast-to chloroplast transformation.

  10. A chloroplast protein homologous to the eubacterial topological specificity factor minE plays a role in chloroplast division.

    PubMed

    Itoh, R; Fujiwara, M; Nagata, N; Yoshida, S

    2001-12-01

    We report the identification of a nucleus-encoded minE gene, designated AtMinE1, of Arabidopsis. The encoded AtMinE1 protein possesses both N- and C-terminal extensions, relative to the eubacterial and algal chloroplast-encoded MinE proteins. The N-terminal extension functioned as a chloroplast-targeting transit peptide, as revealed by a transient expression assay using an N terminus:green fluorescent protein fusion. Histochemical beta-glucuronidase staining of transgenic Arabidopsis lines harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::uidA reporter fusion unveiled specific activation of the promoter in green tissues, especially at the shoot apex, which suggests a requirement for cell division-associated AtMinE1 expression for proplastid division in green tissues. In addition, we generated transgenic plants overexpressing a full-length AtMinE1 cDNA and examined the subcellular structures of those plants. Giant heteromorphic chloroplasts were observed in transgenic plants, with a reduced number per cell, whereas mitochondrial morphology remained similar to that of wild-type plants. Taken together, these observations suggest that MinE is the third conserved component involved in chloroplast division.

  11. Characterization of microsatellite DNA libraries from three mealybug species and development of microsatellite markers for Pseudococcus viburni (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Correa, M C G; Zaviezo, T; Le Maguet, J; Herrbach, E; Malausa, T

    2014-04-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are important pests for crops worldwide. Different species, cryptic taxa under the same species name or even populations within a species can differ in biological characteristics, such as phenology, resistance to insecticides, virus transmission and susceptibility to natural enemies. Therefore, their management efficacy depends on their accurate identification. Microsatellite genetic markers are efficient in revealing the fine-scale taxonomic status of insects, both at inter- and intra-specific level. Despite their potential uses, microsatellites have been developed only for one mealybug species so far. Hence, it is unclear whether microsatellites may be useful to assess mealybug population differentiation and structuring. In this work, we tested the feasibility of developing microsatellite markers in mealybugs by: (i) producing and characterizing microsatellite DNA libraries for three species: Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus comstocki and Heliococcus bohemicus, and (ii) by developing and testing markers for Ps. viburni. The obtained libraries contained balanced percentages of dinucleotide (ranging from 15 to 25%) and trinucleotide (from 5 to 17%) motifs. The marker setup for Ps. viburni was successful, although 70% of the primers initially tested were discarded for a lack of polymorphism. Finally, 25 markers were combined in two multiplex polymerase chain reactions with 21 displaying no evidence of deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Ps. viburni markers were tested on one population from France and one from Chile. The markers revealed a significant genetic differentiation between the two populations with an Fst estimate of 0.266.

  12. A Brassica napus Lipase Locates at the Membrane Contact Sites Involved in Chloroplast Development

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaoli; Wang, Qiuye; Tian, Baoxia; Zhang, Henan; Lu, Daoli; Zhou, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatty acids synthesized in chloroplast are transported to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for triacylglycerols (TAGs) resembling. The development of chloroplast also requires lipids trafficking from ER to chloroplast. The membrane contact sites (MCSs) between ER and chloroplast has been demonstrated to be involved for the trafficking of lipids and proteins. Lipids trafficking between ER and chloroplast is often accompanied by lipids interconversion. However, it is rarely known how lipids interconversion happens during their trafficking. Methodology/Principal Findings We cloned a lipase gene from Brassica napus L., designated as BnCLIP1. Green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged BnCLIP1 was shown to locate at the MCSs between ER and chloroplasts in tobacco leaves. Heterogeneous expression of BnCLIP1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pep4) reduced the total amount of fatty acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that the truncated BnCLIP1 had a substrate preference for C16:0 lipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pep4). To probe the physiological function of BnCLIP1, two Brassica napus lines with different oil-content were introduced to investigate the transcript patterns of BnCLIP1 during seed development. Intriguingly, the transcript level of BnCLIP1 was found to be immediately up-regulated during the natural seed senescence of both lines; the transcription response of BnCLIP1 in the high oil-content seeds was faster than the lower ones, suggesting a potential role of BnCLIP1 in affecting seed oil synthesis via regulating chloroplast integrity. Further researches showed that chemical disruption of leaf chloroplast also activated the transcription of BnCLIP1. Conclusions/Significance The findings of this study show that BnCLIP1 encodes a lipase, localizes at the MCSs and involves in chloroplast development. PMID:22046373

  13. Isolation of Chloroplasts from Plant Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Smith, Matthew D; Chuong, Simon D X

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts can be isolated from higher plants directly following homogenization; however, the resulting yield, purity, and intactness are often low, necessitating a large amount of starting material. This protocol is optimized to produce a high yield of pure chloroplasts from isolated Arabidopsis protoplasts. The two-part method is a simple, scaled-down, and low-cost procedure that readily provides healthy mesophyll protoplasts, which are then ruptured to release intact chloroplasts. Chloroplasts isolated using this method are competent for use in biochemical, cellular, and molecular analyses.

  14. Stability and plasticity during chloroplast development.

    PubMed

    Leech, R M

    1986-01-01

    Chloroplast development occurs during cellular development. In non-limiting conditions chloroplast development is a highly conserved process, it is also complex and involves the continuous interaction of both chloroplast and nuclear genomes. In the first part of the paper the sequential and structural changes characteristic of chloroplast division and development in angiosperms are described. The synthesis of the major chloroplast components including chlorophylls a and b, lipids, nucleic acids and the major soluble and membrane proteins are then described. Chloroplast development in biochemical terms is a quantitative accretion of additional functional units. In development from proplastid to fully mature chloroplast the molecular changes are almost exclusively quantitative and the youngest plastids that can be analysed are already photochemically fully competent. In the second part of the paper the dominant role of the nuclear genome in chloroplast development is discussed. Recent work in the author's laboratory on the synthesis and accumulation of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase in the developing chloroplasts of young wheat leaves is cited to illustrate the stable genomic and genotypic differences that can be recognized. In comparisons of wheat species of differing ploidy, in hexaploid cultivars and in artificially processed genetic lines, several genomic and genotypic effects have been detected. The possibilities for future investigation are discussed.

  15. Reinvestigation of the triplet-minus-singlet spectrum of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Jávorfi, T; Garab, G; Naqvi, K R

    2000-01-01

    A comparison of the triplet-minus-singlet (TmS) absorption spectrum of spinach chloroplasts, recorded some thirty years ago, with the more recently published TmS spectrum of isolated Chla/b LHCII (light-harvesting complexes associated with photosystem II of higher plants) shows that the two spectra are very similar, which is to be expected, since only the carotenoid pigments contribute to each spectrum. Be that as it may, the comparison also reveals a dissimilarity: photoexcitation of the sample does, or does not, affect the absorbance in the Qy region (650-700 nm), depending on whether the sample is a suspension of chloroplasts or of isolated LHCII. The Qy-signal in the TmS spectrum of LHCII decays, it should be noted, at the same rate as the rest of the difference spectrum, and its most prominent feature is a negative peak. As the carotenoids do not absorb in the Qy region, the presence of a signal in this region calls for an explanation: van der Vos, Carbonera and Hoff, the first to find as well as fathom the phenomenon, attributed the Qy-signal to a change, in the absorption spectrum of a chlorophyll a (Chla) molecule, brought about by the presence of triplet excitation on a neighbouring carotenoid (Car). The difference in the behaviours of chloroplasts and LHCII, if reproducible, would imply that the Car triplets which give rise to the TmS spectrum of chloroplasts do not influence the absorption spectra of their Chla neighbours. With a view to reaching a firm conclusion about this vexed issue, spinach chloroplasts and thylakoids have been examined with the aid of the same kinetic spectrometer as that used for investigating LHCII; the TmS spectra of both chloroplasts and thylakoids contain prominent bleaching signals centred at 680 nm, and the triplet decay time in each case is comparable to that of the Chla/b LHCII triplets. Results pertaining to other closely related systems are recalled, and it is concluded that, so far as the overall appearance of the Tm

  16. Sequence analysis and protein import studies of an outer chloroplast envelope polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, M; Fischer, K; Flügge, U I; Soll, J

    1990-01-01

    A chloroplast outer envelope membrane protein was cloned and sequenced and from the sequence it was possible to deduce a polypeptide of 6.7 kDa. It has only one membrane-spanning region; the C terminus extends into the cytosol, whereas the N terminus is exposed to the space between the two envelope membranes. The protein was synthesized in an in vitro transcription-translation system to study its routing into isolated chloroplasts. The import studies revealed that the 6.7-kDa protein followed a different and heretofore undescribed translocation pathway in the respect that (i) it does not have a cleavable transit sequence, (ii) it does not require ATP hydrolysis for import, and (iii) protease-sensitive components that are responsible for recognition of precursor proteins destined for the inside of the chloroplasts are not involved in routing the 6.7-kDa polypeptide to the outer chloroplast envelope. Images PMID:2377616

  17. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A; Lewis, Paul O

    2016-06-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in "Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution" (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  18. Comparative analyses of chloroplast genome data representing nine green algae in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Fučíková, Karolina; Lewis, Louise A.; Lewis, Paul O.

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast genomes of green algae are highly variable in their architecture. In this article we summarize gene content across newly obtained and published chloroplast genomes in Chlorophyceae, including new data from nine of species in Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta). We present genome architecture information, including genome synteny analysis across two groups of species. Also, we provide a phylogenetic tree obtained from analysis of gene order data for species in Chlorophyceae with fully sequenced chloroplast genomes. Further analyses and interpretation of the data can be found in “Chloroplast phylogenomic data from the green algal order Sphaeropleales (Chlorophyceae, Chlorophyta) reveal complex patterns of sequence evolution” (Fučíková et al., In review) [1]. PMID:27054159

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of an important medicinal plant Cynanchum wilfordii (Maxim.) Hemsl. (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Kyu-Yeob; Kim, Kyunghee; Lee, Sang-Choon; Lee, Junki; Seong, Rack Seon; Shim, Young Hun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii (Maxim.) Hemsl. is a traditional medicinal herb belonging to the Asclepiadoideae subfamily, whose dried roots have been used as traditional medicine in Asia. The complete chloroplast genome of C. wilfordii was generated by de novo assembly using the small amount of whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of C. wilfordii was 161 241 bp long, composed of large single copy region (91 995 bp), small single copy region (19 930 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (24 658 bp). The overall GC contents of the chloroplast genome was 37.8%. A total of 114 genes were annotated, which included 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that C. wilfordii is most closely related to Asclepias nivea (Caribbean milkweed) and Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed) within the Asclepiadoideae subfamily. PMID:26358391

  20. Contrasts between the phylogeographic patterns of chloroplast and nuclear DNA highlight a role for pollen-mediated gene flow in preventing population divergence in an East Asian temperate tree.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei-Ning; Wang, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Plant phylogeographic studies in East Asia have provided support for the biogeographic hypothesis that the complex landforms and climate of this region have provided substantial opportunities for allopatric speciation. However, most of these studies have been based on maternally inherited chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers and were therefore unable to reveal the role of pollen-mediated gene flow in preventing population divergence. Here, we investigate the phylogeography of the Chinese walnut Juglans cathayensis, a temperate deciduous tree widely distributed across disjunct montane sites in subtropical China. We genotyped 19 populations using seven cpDNA fragments and ten nuclear microsatellite loci and modeled the ecological niche of J. cathayensis. CpDNA analysis identified a total of nine haplotypes, and each of the 19 sampled populations was fixed for a single haplotype, displaying a prominent phylogeographic structure. The results of ecological niche modeling indicated that J. cathayensis populations survived the last glaciation in situ, although they were probably more fragmented than today. In contrast, we detected a much weaker, but nonetheless clear, genetic structure based on nuclear microsatellite data. Our study demonstrates how extensive pollen flow can erase the genetic imprint of long-term refugial isolation in maternal lineages, effectively preventing population differentiation in temperate, particularly wind-pollinated, forest trees in subtropical China. PMID:25196588

  1. Contrasts between the phylogeographic patterns of chloroplast and nuclear DNA highlight a role for pollen-mediated gene flow in preventing population divergence in an East Asian temperate tree.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei-Ning; Wang, Wen-Ting; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Plant phylogeographic studies in East Asia have provided support for the biogeographic hypothesis that the complex landforms and climate of this region have provided substantial opportunities for allopatric speciation. However, most of these studies have been based on maternally inherited chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers and were therefore unable to reveal the role of pollen-mediated gene flow in preventing population divergence. Here, we investigate the phylogeography of the Chinese walnut Juglans cathayensis, a temperate deciduous tree widely distributed across disjunct montane sites in subtropical China. We genotyped 19 populations using seven cpDNA fragments and ten nuclear microsatellite loci and modeled the ecological niche of J. cathayensis. CpDNA analysis identified a total of nine haplotypes, and each of the 19 sampled populations was fixed for a single haplotype, displaying a prominent phylogeographic structure. The results of ecological niche modeling indicated that J. cathayensis populations survived the last glaciation in situ, although they were probably more fragmented than today. In contrast, we detected a much weaker, but nonetheless clear, genetic structure based on nuclear microsatellite data. Our study demonstrates how extensive pollen flow can erase the genetic imprint of long-term refugial isolation in maternal lineages, effectively preventing population differentiation in temperate, particularly wind-pollinated, forest trees in subtropical China.

  2. Albino Leaf 2 is involved in the splicing of chloroplast group I and II introns in rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changhong; Zhu, Haitao; Xing, Yi; Tan, Jianjie; Chen, Xionghui; Zhang, Jianjun; Peng, Haifeng; Xie, Qingjun; Zhang, Zemin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts play an essential role in plant growth and development through manipulating photosynthesis and the production of hormones and metabolites. Although many genes or regulators involved in chloroplast biogenesis and development have been isolated and characterized, identification of novel components is still lacking. We isolated a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant, termed albino leaf 2 (al2), using genetic screening. Phenotypic analysis revealed that the al2 mutation caused obvious albino leaves at the early developmental stage, eventually leading to al2 seedling death. Electron microscopy investigations indicated that the chloroplast structure was disrupted in the al2 mutants at an early developmental stage and subsequently resulted in the breakdown of the entire chloroplast. Molecular cloning illustrated that AL2 encodes a chloroplast group IIA intron splicing facilitator (CRS1) in rice, which was confirmed by a genetic complementation experiment. Moreover, our results demonstrated that AL2 was constitutively expressed in various tissues, including green and non-green tissues. Interestingly, we found that the expression levels of a subset of chloroplast genes that contain group IIA and IIB introns were significantly reduced in the al2 mutant compared to that in the wild type, suggesting that AL2 is a functional CRS1 in rice. Differing from the orthologous CRS1 in maize and Arabidopsis that only regulates splicing of the chloroplast group II intron, our results demonstrated that the AL2 gene is also likely to be involved in the splicing of the chloroplast group I intron. They also showed that disruption of AL2 results in the altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes, including chlorophyll biosynthetic genes, plastid-encoded polymerases and nuclear-encoded chloroplast genes. Taken together, these findings shed new light on the function of nuclear-encoded chloroplast group I and II intron splicing factors in rice. PMID:27543605

  3. CHUP1 mediates actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Usami, Hiroka; Maeda, Takuma; Fujii, Yusuke; Oikawa, Kazusato; Takahashi, Fumio; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. CHUP1 (CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING1) is indispensable for this response in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, involvement of CHUP1 in light-induced chloroplast movement is unknown in other plants. In this study, CHUP1 orthologues were isolated from a moss, Physcomitrella patens, and a fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris, by cDNA library screening and PCR cloning based on the P. patens genome sequence. Functional motifs found in CHUP1 of A. thaliana were conserved among the CHUP1 orthologues. In addition to the putative functional regions, the C-terminal regions (approximately 250 amino acids), which are unique in CHUP1s, were highly conserved. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of P. patens CHUP1s (PpCHUP1A, PpCHUP1B and PpCHUP1C) were transiently expressed in protoplast cells. All GFP fusions were localized on the chloroplasts. Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement of chup1 disruptants of P. patens was examined in the presence of cytoskeletal inhibitors because of the utilization of both microtubules and actin filaments for the movement in P. patens. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the wild type (WT) and all chup1 disruptants showed chloroplast avoidance movement. However, when microtubules were disrupted by Oryzalin, chloroplasts in ∆chup1A and ∆chup1A/B rarely moved and stayed in the strong light-irradiated area. On the other hand, WT, ∆chup1B and ∆chup1C showed chloroplast avoidance movement. These results suggest that PpCHUP1A predominantly mediates the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement. This study reveals that CHUP1 functions on the chloroplasts and is involved in the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in P. patens.

  4. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Kysela, R.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Primers for 15 microsatellite loci were developed for Mountain Plover, a species whose distribution and abundance have been reduced drastically in the past 30 years. In a screen of 126 individuals collected from four breeding locales across the species' range, levels of polymorphism ranged from two to 13 alleles per locus. No two loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci can be used in population genetic studies, ultimately aiding in management efforts for Mountain Plover. Additionally, these markers can potentially be used in studies investigating the mating system of Mountain Plover. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Characterization of 11 new microsatellite loci in taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan; Huang, Xing Fang; Ke, Wei Dong; Ding, Yi

    2009-03-01

    Eleven new microsatellite markers were isolated from taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, a root crop widely distributed all over the world. Forty-eight primer pairs were designed from a microsatellite-enriched genomic library, of which 11 primer pairs have polymorphisms in 30 individuals tested from a population in China, which revealed two to six alleles per locus with the observed and expected heterozygosity levels ranging from 0 to 0.733 and from 0.381 to 0.731, respectively. These new genetic markers will be useful for the study of taro germplasm management and population evolution in the future.

  6. Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers from Zizania latifolia Turcz. (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhiwu; Pan, Lei; Ke, Weidong; Liu, Yiman; Ding, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and identified in Zizania latifolia Turcz. (Poaceae), a perennial aquatic plant widespread in Eastern Asia. The microsatellite-enriched library was constructed using the fast isolation by AFLP of sequences containing repeats method. These markers revealed two to 14 alleles, with an average of 5.6 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.071 to 0.690 and from 0.174 to 0.812, respectively. These markers will be useful for studying of gene flow and evaluating the genetic diversity of the Zizania latifolia population. PMID:21564779

  7. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  8. Characterization of 11 new microsatellite loci in taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan; Huang, Xing Fang; Ke, Wei Dong; Ding, Yi

    2009-03-01

    Eleven new microsatellite markers were isolated from taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, a root crop widely distributed all over the world. Forty-eight primer pairs were designed from a microsatellite-enriched genomic library, of which 11 primer pairs have polymorphisms in 30 individuals tested from a population in China, which revealed two to six alleles per locus with the observed and expected heterozygosity levels ranging from 0 to 0.733 and from 0.381 to 0.731, respectively. These new genetic markers will be useful for the study of taro germplasm management and population evolution in the future. PMID:21564697

  9. Selective retention of chloroplasts by algivorous heliozoa: Fortuitous chloroplast symbiosis?

    PubMed

    Patterson, D J; Dürrschmidt, M

    1987-11-01

    The selective retention of functionally intact chloroplasts by the algivorous centroheliozoa (protists) Acanthocystis serrata, Raphidocystis tubifera and Chlamydaster fimbriatus is documented by ultrastructural accounts of individual cells from natural habitats. The plastids are derived from different algae. The 'plastidoplasm' may be bounded by two or three membranes, in the latter case the outer membrane having been provided by the centroheliozoon. Such symbioses only involve certain species of centroheliozoa, and are short-lived. These appear to be examples of fortuitous symbioses and their study may provide clues as to the mechanisms by which stable symbioses are established.

  10. The conserved endoribonuclease YbeY is required for chloroplast ribosomal RNA processing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinwen; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Guifeng; Yang, Chuanping; Sun, Yi; Wu, Wenjuan; Cao, Shenquan; Wang, Chong; Hai, Guanghui; Wang, Zhifeng; Bock, Ralph; Huang, Jirong; Cheng, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    Maturation of chloroplast ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) comprises several endoribonucleolytic and exoribonucleolytic processing steps. However, little is known about the specific enzymes involved and the cleavage steps they catalyze. Here, we report the functional characterization of the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding a putative YbeY endoribonuclease. AtYbeY null mutants are seedling lethal, indicating that AtYbeY function is essential for plant growth. Knockdown plants display slow growth and show pale-green leaves. Physiological and ultrastructural analyses of atybeY mutants revealed impaired photosynthesis and defective chloroplast development. Fluorescent microcopy analysis showed that, when fused with the green fluorescence protein, AtYbeY is localized in chloroplasts. Immunoblot and RNA gel-blot assays revealed that the levels of chloroplast-encoded subunits of photosynthetic complexes are reduced in atybeY mutants, but the corresponding transcripts accumulate normally. In addition, atybeY mutants display defective maturation of both the 5' and 3' ends of 16S, 23S, and 4.5S rRNAs as well as decreased accumulation of mature transcripts from the transfer RNA genes contained in the chloroplast rRNA operon. Consequently, mutant plants show a severe deficiency in ribosome biogenesis, which, in turn, results in impaired plastid translational activity. Furthermore, biochemical assays show that recombinant AtYbeY is able to cleave chloroplast rRNAs as well as messenger RNAs and transfer RNAs in vitro. Taken together, our findings indicate that AtYbeY is a chloroplast-localized endoribonuclease that is required for chloroplast rRNA processing and thus for normal growth and development.

  11. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of European and African Candida glabrata isolates.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, V; Lo Passo, C; van Diepeningen, A D; Rharmitt, S; Delfino, D; Cascio, A; Nnadi, N E; Cilo, B D; Sampaio, P; Tietz, H-J; Pemán, J; Criseo, G; Romeo, O; Scordino, F

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the genetic relatedness and epidemiology of 127 clinical and environmental Candida glabrata isolates from Europe and Africa using multilocus microsatellite analysis. Each isolate was first identified using phenotypic and molecular methods and subsequently, six unlinked microsatellite loci were analyzed using automated fluorescent genotyping. Genetic relationships were estimated using the minimum-spanning tree (MStree) method. Microsatellite analyses revealed the existence of 47 different genotypes. The fungal population showed an irregular distribution owing to the over-representation of genetically different infectious haplotypes. The most common genotype was MG-9, which was frequently found in both European and African isolates. In conclusion, the data reported here emphasize the role of specific C. glabrata genotypes in human infections for at least some decades and highlight the widespread distribution of some isolates, which seem to be more able to cause disease than others. PMID:26946511

  12. Microsatellite genotyping of individual abalone larvae: parentage assignment in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Selvamani, M J; Degnan, S M; Degnan, B M

    2001-09-01

    In aquaculture, microsatellite DNA markers are used to genotype parental broodstock, to assess fertilization success, and to maintain pedigree information for selective breeding. In this study we genotyped individual Haliotis asinina larvae by analyzing a suit of polymorphic microsatellite loci. At least 10 loci can be analyzed from a single abalone veliger larva. We assayed 5 polymorphic loci to identify the parents of individual larvae produced in 3 separate crosses. In all cases, the parents of an individual veliger could be determined from as few as 3 loci. The microsatellite analysis revealed that, in each of our crosses, a single male fathered most of the veligers, despite efforts to normalize the amount of sperm contributed by competing males. These observations suggest that highly controlled breeding practices may be required to ensure that the genetic diversity of an abalone population produced for aquaculture is maintained at the level of diversity of the original broodstock.

  13. Chloroplast genome sequencing analysis of Heterosigma akashiwo CCMP452 (West Atlantic) and NIES293 (West Pacific) strains

    PubMed Central

    Cattolico, Rose Ann; Jacobs, Michael A; Zhou, Yang; Chang, Jean; Duplessis, Melinda; Lybrand, Terry; McKay, John; Ong, Han Chuan; Sims, Elizabeth; Rocap, Gabrielle

    2008-01-01

    Background Heterokont algae form a monophyletic group within the stramenopile branch of the tree of life. These organisms display wide morphological diversity, ranging from minute unicells to massive, bladed forms. Surprisingly, chloroplast genome sequences are available only for diatoms, representing two (Coscinodiscophyceae and Bacillariophyceae) of approximately 18 classes of algae that comprise this taxonomic cluster. A universal challenge to chloroplast genome sequencing studies is the retrieval of highly purified DNA in quantities sufficient for analytical processing. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a simplified method for sequencing chloroplast genomes, using fosmids selected from a total cellular DNA library. The technique has been used to sequence chloroplast DNA of two Heterosigma akashiwo strains. This raphidophyte has served as a model system for studies of stramenopile chloroplast biogenesis and evolution. Results H. akashiwo strain CCMP452 (West Atlantic) chloroplast DNA is 160,149 bp in size with a 21,822-bp inverted repeat, whereas NIES293 (West Pacific) chloroplast DNA is 159,370 bp in size and has an inverted repeat of 21,665 bp. The fosmid cloning technique reveals that both strains contain an isomeric chloroplast DNA population resulting from an inversion of their single copy domains. Both strains contain multiple small inverted and tandem repeats, non-randomly distributed within the genomes. Although both CCMP452 and NIES293 chloroplast DNAs contains 197 genes, multiple nucleotide polymorphisms are present in both coding and intergenic regions. Several protein-coding genes contain large, in-frame inserts relative to orthologous genes in other plastids. These inserts are maintained in mRNA products. Two genes of interest in H. akashiwo, not previously reported in any chloroplast genome, include tyrC, a tyrosine recombinase, which we hypothesize may be a result of a lateral gene transfer event, and an unidentified 456 amino acid

  14. Diversity of a ribonucleoprotein family in tobacco chloroplasts: two new chloroplast ribonucleoproteins and a phylogenetic tree of ten chloroplast RNA-binding domains.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L H; Li, Y Q; Fukami-Kobayashi, K; Go, M; Konishi, T; Watanabe, A; Sugiura, M

    1991-01-01

    Two new ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) have been identified from a tobacco chloroplast lysate. These two proteins (cp29A and cp29B) are nuclear-encoded and have a less affinity to single-stranded DNA as compared with three other chloroplast RNPs (cp28, cp31 and cp33) previously isolated. DNA sequencing revealed that both contain two consensus sequence-type homologous RNA-binding domains (CS-RBDs) and a very acidic amino-terminal domain but shorter than that of cp28, cp31 and cp33. Comparison of cp29A and cp29B showed a 19 amino acid insertion in the region separating the two CS-RBDs in cp29B. This insertion results in three tandem repeats of a glycine-rich sequence of 10 amino acids, which is a novel feature in RNPs. The two proteins are encoded by different single nuclear genes and no alternatively spliced transcripts could be identified. We constructed a phylogenetic tree for the ten chloroplast CS-RBDs. These results suggest that there is a sizable RNP family in chloroplasts and the diversity was mainly generated through a series of gene duplications rather than through alternative pre-mRNA splicing. The gene for cp29B contains three introns. The first and second introns interrupt the first CS-RBD and the third intron does the second CS-RBD. The position of the first intron site is the same as that in the human hnRNP A1 protein gene. Images PMID:1721701

  15. Estimating microsatellite based genetic diversity in Rhode Island Red chicken.

    PubMed

    Das, A K; Kumar, S; Rahim, A

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate microsatellite based genetic diversity in two lines (the selected RIR(S) and control line RIR(C)) of Rhode Island Red (RIR) chicken. Genomic DNA of 24 randomly selected birds maintained at Central Avian Research Institute (India) and 24 microsatellite markers were used. Microsatellite alleles were determined on 6% urea-PAGE, recorded using GelDoc system and the samples were genotyped. Nei's heterozygosity and Botstein's polymorphic information content (PIC) at each microsatellite locus were estimated. Wright's fixation indices and gene flow were estimated using POPGENE software. All the microsatellite loci were polymorphic and the estimated PIC ranged from 0.3648 (MCW0059) to 0.7819 (ADL0267) in RIR(S) and from 0.2392 (MCW0059) to 0.8620 (ADL0136) in RIR(C). Most of the loci were highly informative (PIC>0.50) in the both lines, except for five loci in RIR(S) and six loci in RIR(C) line. Nei's heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.4800 (MCW0059) to 0.8056 (ADL0267) in RIR(S) and from 0.2778 (MCW0059) to 0.875 (ADL0136) in RIR(C). Out of 24 loci, 15 (62.5%) in RIR(S) and 14 loci (58.33%) in RIR(C) revealed moderate to high negative FIS index indicating heterozygote excess for these loci in corresponding lines, but the rest revealed positive FIS indicating heterozygosity deficiency. A mean FIS across the both lines indicated overall 10.77% heterozygosity deficit and a mean FIT indicated 17.19% inbreeding co-efficient favoring homozygosity over the two lines. The mean FST indicated that 10.18% of the microsatellite variation between the two lines was due to their genetic difference. PMID:27175188

  16. Exploring mechanisms linked to differentiation and function of dimorphic chloroplasts in the single cell C4 species Bienertia sinuspersici

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the model single-cell C4 plant Bienertia sinuspersici, chloroplast- and nuclear-encoded photosynthetic enzymes, characteristically confined to either bundle sheath or mesophyll cells in Kranz-type C4 leaves, all occur together within individual leaf chlorenchyma cells. Intracellular separation of dimorphic chloroplasts and key enzymes within central and peripheral compartments allow for C4 carbon fixation analogous to NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) Kranz type species. Several methods were used to investigate dimorphic chloroplast differentiation in B. sinuspersici. Results Confocal analysis revealed that Rubisco-containing chloroplasts in the central compartment chloroplasts (CCC) contained more photosystem II proteins than the peripheral compartment chloroplasts (PCC) which contain pyruvate,Pi dikinase (PPDK), a pattern analogous to the cell type-specific chloroplasts of many Kranz type NAD-ME species. Transient expression analysis using GFP fusion constructs containing various lengths of a B. sinuspersici Rubisco small subunit (RbcS) gene and the transit peptide of PPDK revealed that their import was not specific to either chloroplast type. Immunolocalization showed the rbcL-specific mRNA binding protein RLSB to be selectively localized to the CCC in B. sinuspersici, and to Rubisco-containing BS chloroplasts in the closely related Kranz species Suaeda taxifolia. Comparative fluorescence analyses were made using redox-sensitive and insensitive GFP forms, as well comparative staining using the peroxidase indicator 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB), which demonstrated differences in stromal redox potential, with the CCC having a more negative potential than the PCC. Conclusions Both CCC RLSB localization and the differential chloroplast redox state are suggested to have a role in post-transcriptional rbcL expression. PMID:24443986

  17. Microsatellite instability in adenocarcinoma of the prostrate

    SciTech Connect

    Terrell, R.B.; Willie, A.H.; Cheville, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Instability of tandem repeat sequences (microsatellites) has been reported to play a major etiologic role in familial colon cancer, as well as a potential role in the carcinogenesis of other sporadic neoplasms. These replication errors are the result of faulty DNA excision/repair function controlled at the gene level. In order to examine this phenomenon in prostate cancer, we screened 40 tumors with di-, tri- and tetranucleotide markers spanning eleven chromosomal loci. Microsatellite instability was observed overall in 3 of the 40 cases (7.5%). All changes were identified solely in tetranucleotide sequences (3 of 11 total markers analyzed). One tumor demonstrated repeat length expansions at two loci, while the other tumors did so at a single locus. Both Type 1 (>4 base pairs) and Type II (4 base pairs) mutations were identified. One of these cases also included metastatic nodal disease. Analysis of the metastatic tumor tissue revealed allelic patterns identical to the normal tissue control. A secondary screening of the mutated tumors demonstrated no repeat length alterations in 16 additional markers. A CAG repeat in the androgen receptor (AR) gene was also studied and demonstrated that 3 of 40 (7.5%) tumors contained mutations within this repeat. We concluded that microsatellite instability is uncommon in prostate adenocarcinoma appearing to occur more often in tetranucleotide repeat sequences and in an AR gene repeat. Additionally, these findings suggest that dysfunctional DNA excision/repair mechanisms, as evidenced by the low frequency of replication errors, are unlikely to play a major role in the natural history of prostate cancer.

  18. Microsatellite-based genetic diversity patterns in disjunct populations of a rare orchid.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Madhav; Richards, Matt; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the patterns of genetic diversity and structure in seven disjunct populations of a rare North American orchid, Cypripedium kentuckiense by including populations that represented the periphery and the center of the its range. Eight nuclear and two chloroplast microsatellites were used. Genetic diversity was low across the sampled populations of C. kentuckiense based on both nuclear (average An = 4.0, Ho = 0.436, He = 0.448) and cpDNA microsatellites (average An = 1.57, Nh = 1.57 and H = 0.133). The number of private alleles ranged from one to four per population with a total of 17 private alleles detected at five nuclear microsatellites. One private allele at one cpDNA microsatellite was also observed. Although the absolute values for nuclear microsatellite based population differentiation were low (Fst = 0.075; ϕPT = 0.24), they were statistically significant. Pairwise Fst values ranged from 0.038 to 0.123 and each comparison was significant. We also detected isolation by distance with nDNA microsatellites based on the Mantel test (r(2) = 0.209, P = 0.05). STRUCTURE analysis and the neighbor joining trees grouped the populations similarly whereby the geographically proximal populations were genetically similar. Our data indicate that the species is genetically depauperate but the diversity is distributed more or less equally across its range. Population differentiation and isolation by distance were detectable, which indicates that genetic isolation is beginning to manifest itself across the range in this rare species.

  19. Mutations in SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION1, a Factor Required for Normal Chloroplast Translation, Suppress var2-Mediated Leaf Variegation in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Liu, Xiayan; Alsheikh, Muath; Park, Sungsoon; Rodermel, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana yellow variegated2 (var2) mutant is variegated due to lack of a chloroplast FtsH-like metalloprotease (FtsH2/VAR2). We have generated suppressors of var2 variegation to gain insight into factors and pathways that interact with VAR2 during chloroplast biogenesis. Here, we describe two such suppressors. Suppression of variegation in the first line, TAG-FN, was caused by disruption of the nuclear gene (SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION1 [SVR1]) for a chloroplast-localized homolog of pseudouridine (Ψ) synthase, which isomerizes uridine to Ψ in noncoding RNAs. svr1 single mutants were epistatic to var2, and they displayed a phenotypic syndrome that included defects in chloroplast rRNA processing, reduced chloroplast translation, reduced chloroplast protein accumulation, and elevated chloroplast mRNA levels. In the second line (TAG-IE), suppression of variegation was caused by a lesion in SVR2, the gene for the ClpR1 subunit of the chloroplast ClpP/R protease. Like svr1, svr2 was epistatic to var2, and clpR1 mutants had a phenotype that resembled svr1. We propose that an impairment of chloroplast translation in TAG-FN and TAG-IE decreased the demand for VAR2 activity during chloroplast biogenesis and that this resulted in the suppression of var2 variegation. Consistent with this hypothesis, var2 variegation was repressed by chemical inhibitors of chloroplast translation. In planta mutagenesis revealed that SVR1 not only played a role in uridine isomerization but that its physical presence was necessary for proper chloroplast rRNA processing. Our data indicate that defects in chloroplast rRNA processing are a common, but not universal, molecular phenotype associated with suppression of var2 variegation. PMID:18599582

  20. Absence of geographical structure of chloroplast DNA variation in sallow, Salix caprea L.

    PubMed

    Palmé, A E; Semerikov, V; Lascoux, M

    2003-11-01

    In the present study, we have used PCR-RFLP markers to investigate the chloroplast DNA variation in 24 European populations of Salix caprea L. A subset of these populations has also been analysed with chloroplast microsatellites. The main feature of both markers is the absence of a clear geographic structure (G(ST(PCR-RFLP))=0.090, G(ST(microsatellites))=-0.017) and high levels of variation within populations. This lack of phylogeographic structure in S. caprea is suggested to be the consequence of the joint action of several factors: (i) presence of intermediate latitude refugia with large population sizes during the last glacial maximum, (ii) a high speed of recolonisation and dispersal ability, (iii) a high mutation rate and (iv) extensive hybridisation with other willow species. In addition to the S. caprea samples, a limited number of individuals from several other Salix species were also analysed with PCR-RFLP: S. cinerea, S. aurita, S. purpurea, S. atrocinerea, S. appendiculata, S. elaeagnos, S. fragilis and S. alba. Many of the haplotypes found in Salix caprea were also detected in S. cinerea, S. aurita, S. purpurea, S. atrocinerea and/ or S. appendiculata but not in S. alba, S. elaeagnos or S. fragilis. Our data suggest that hybridisation and gene flow have occurred within these two groups but not between them.

  1. Genetic engineering of the chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, P B

    2000-01-01

    Transformation of the plastid genome has a number of inherent advantages for the engineering of gene expression in plants. These advantages include: 10-50 times higher transgene expression levels; the absence of gene silencing and position effect variation; the ability to express polycistronic messages from a single promoter; uniparental plastid gene inheritance in most crop plants that prevents pollen transmission of foreign DNA; integration via a homologous recombination process that facilitates targeted gene replacement and precise transgene control; and sequestration of foreign proteins in the organelle which prevents adverse interactions with the cytoplasmic environment. It is now 12 years since the first conclusive demonstration of stable introduction of cloned DNA into the Chlamydomonas chloroplast by the Boynton and Gillham laboratory, and 10 years since the laboratory of Pal Maliga successfully extended these approaches to tobacco. Since then, technical developments in plastid transformation and advances in our understanding of the rules of plastid gene expression have facilitated tremendous progress towards the goal of establishing the chloroplast as a feasible platform for genetic modification of plants.

  2. Chloroplast Activity and 3'phosphadenosine 5'phosphate Signaling Regulate Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Quentin; Mazubert, Christelle; Prunier, Florence; Lugan, Raphaël; Chan, Kai Xun; Phua, Su Yin; Pogson, Barry James; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Delarue, Marianne; Benhamed, Moussa; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5'-3' exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. PMID:26747283

  3. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuuki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Takagi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces "chloroplast de-anchoring", a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast de-anchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high-fluence-rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross-reactive polypeptides of 120-kDa exist in the plasma-membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence-dependent manner. The blue-light-induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calcium-regulated chloroplast de-anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue-light-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria.

  4. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuuki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Akiko; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Takagi, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces "chloroplast de-anchoring", a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast de-anchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high-fluence-rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross-reactive polypeptides of 120-kDa exist in the plasma-membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence-dependent manner. The blue-light-induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calcium-regulated chloroplast de-anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue-light-induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria. PMID:25231366

  5. Rapid Mass Movement of Chloroplasts during Segment Formation of the Calcifying Siphonalean Green Alga, Halimeda macroloba

    PubMed Central

    Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Salih, Anya; Kühl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. Methodology/Principal Findings Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i) the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii) the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3–5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ∼0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. Significance This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity. PMID:21750703

  6. Microsatellites from Conyza canadensis (horseweed)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite loci were identified from Conyza canadensis (horseweed). Primer pairs for 64 loci were developed and of these eight were optimized and screened using genomic DNA from 22 accessions of horseweed from North America. Most loci were polymorphic and the number of alleles per locus ranged ...

  7. Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancers with and without Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Yakir; Pal, Tuya; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John R.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Risch, Harvey A.; Zhang, Shiyu; Ping, Sun; Narod, Steven A.; Schildkraut, Joellen

    2013-01-01

    Objective In a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers, to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability status and: 1) Ovarian cancer risk factors and 2) The distribution of the specific histologic subtypes. Patients and methods Participants were drawn from three population-based studies of primary epithelial ovarian cancer: Tumor DNA was analyzed using five standardized microsatellite markers to assess microsatellite instability (MSI) status. Patients were divided into three groups (MSI-high, MSI-low and MSI-stable) according to NCI criteria. We compared the prevalence of specific known risk and protective factors among the three subgroups, including BMI, smoking history, parity, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, past oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation. Similarly, we compared the distribution of the histologic subtypes among the three subgroups. Results A total of 917 ovarian cancer patients were included. One hundred twenty seven (13.8%) cancers were MSI-high. Subgroup analyses according to smoking, BMI, parity, past oral contraceptive use and past tubal ligation did not reveal any statistically significance differences among the groups. Among the 29 patients with BRCA1 mutations, 20.7% had MSI-high cancers compared with 5.9% among 17 BRCA2-mutation patients. The proportions of different ovarian cancer histologies among the various microsatellite instability subgroups were similar. Conclusions The prevalence of risk and protective factors among ovarian cancer patients is similar for cancers with and without microsatellite instability. The distributions of microsatellite instability do not differ significantly among ovarian cancers with different histologies. Ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations had a 21% rate of MSI-high tumors, compared to 6% among patients with BRCA2 mutations, but this difference was not statistically significant. PMID:23748177

  8. The DnaJ OsDjA7/8 is essential for chloroplast development in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Liang, Sihui; Yin, Junjie; Yuan, Can; Wang, Jing; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Wang, Jichun; Chen, Weilan; Ma, Bingtian; Wang, Yuping; Qin, Peng; Li, Shigui; Chen, Xuewei

    2015-12-10

    DnaJ proteins belong to chaperones of Hsp40 family that ubiquitously participate in various cellular processes. Previous studies have shown chloroplast-targeted DnaJs are involved in the development of chloroplast in some plant species. However, little is known about the function of DnaJs in rice, one of the main staple crops. In this study, we characterized a type I DnaJ protein OsDjA7/8. We found that the gene OsDjA7/8 was expressed in all collected tissues, with a priority in the vigorous growth leaf. Subcellular localization revealed that the protein OsDjA7/8 was mainly distributed in chloroplast. Reduced expression of OsDjA7/8 in rice led to albino lethal at the seedling stage. Transmission electron microscopy observation showed that the chloroplast structures were abnormally developed in the plants silenced for OsDjA7/8. In addition, the transcriptional expression of the genes tightly associated with the development of chloroplast was deeply reduced in the plants silenced for OsDjA7/8. Collectively, our study reveals that OsDjA7/8 encodes a chloroplast-localized protein and is essential for chloroplast development and differentiation in rice.

  9. Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis during Chloroplast Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Heintze, Adolf; Görlach, Jörn; Leuschner, Carola; Hoppe, Petra; Hagelstein, Petra; Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Schultz, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    The chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis of very young leaves is supplied by the plastidic CO2 → pyruvate → acetyl-coenzyme A (C3 → C2) metabolism (D Schulze-Siebert, G Schultz [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1233-1237) and occurs via the plastidic mevalonate pathway. The plastidic C3 → C2 metabolism and/or plastidic mevalonate pathway of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings changes from maximal activity at the leaf base (containing developing chloroplasts with incomplete thylakoid stacking but a considerable rate of photosynthetic CO2-fixation) almost to ineffectivity at the leaf tip (containing mature chloroplasts with maximal photosynthetic activity). The ability to import isopentenyl diphosphate from the extraplastidic space gradually increases to substitute for the loss of endogenous intermediate supply for chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis (change from autonomic to division-of-labor stage). Fatty acid synthesis from NaH14CO3 decreases in the same manner as shown for leaf sections and chloroplasts isolated from these. Evidence has been obtained for a drastic decrease of pyruvate decarboxylase-dehydrogenase activity during chloroplast development compared with other anabolic chloroplast pathways (synthesis of aromatic amino acid and branched chain amino acids). The noncompetition of pyruvate and acetate in isotopic dilution studies indicates that both a pyruvate-derived and an acetate-derived compound are simultaneously needed to form introductory intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, presumably acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:16667567

  10. Photoinduction of cyclosis-mediated interactions between distant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Komarova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Communications between chloroplasts and other organelles based on the exchange of metabolites, including redox active substances, are recognized as a part of intracellular regulation, chlororespiration, and defense against oxidative stress. Similar communications may operate between spatially distant chloroplasts in large cells where photosynthetic and respiratory activities are distributed unevenly under fluctuating patterned illumination. Microfluorometry of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo in internodal cells of the alga Chara corallina revealed that a 30-s pulse of localized light induces a transient increase (~25%) in F' fluorescence of remote cell parts exposed to dim background light at a 1.5-mm distance on the downstream side from the illuminated spot in the plane of unilateral cytoplasmic streaming but has no effect on F' at equal distance on the upstream side. An abrupt arrest of cytoplasmic streaming for about 30s by triggering the action potential extended either the ascending or descending fronts of the F' fluorescence response, depending on the exact moment of streaming cessation. The response of F' fluorescence to localized illumination of a distant cell region was absent in dark-adapted internodes, when the localized light was applied within the first minute after switching on continuous background illumination of the whole cell, but it appeared in full after longer exposures to continuous background light. These results and the elimination of the F' response by methyl viologen known to redirect electron transport pathways beyond photosystem I indicate the importance of photosynthetic induction and the stromal redox state for long-distance communications of chloroplasts in vivo.

  11. Indications for Three Independent Domestication Events for the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) and New Insights into the Origin of Tea Germplasm in China and India Revealed by Nuclear Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Meegahakumbura, M. K.; Wambulwa, M. C.; Thapa, K. K.; Li, M. M.; Möller, M.; Xu, J. C.; Yang, J. B.; Liu, B. Y.; Ranjitkar, S.; Liu, J.; Li, D. Z.; Gao, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tea is the world’s most popular non-alcoholic beverage. China and India are known to be the largest tea producing countries and recognized as the centers for the domestication of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze). However, molecular studies on the origin, domestication and relationships of the main teas, China type, Assam type and Cambod type are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-three nuclear microsatellite markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity, relatedness, and domestication history of cultivated tea in both China and India. Based on a total of 392 samples, high levels of genetic diversity were observed for all tea types in both countries. The cultivars clustered into three distinct genetic groups (i.e. China tea, Chinese Assam tea and Indian Assam tea) based on STRUCTURE, PCoA and UPGMA analyses with significant pairwise genetic differentiation, corresponding well with their geographical distribution. A high proportion (30%) of the studied tea samples were shown to possess genetic admixtures of different tea types suggesting a hybrid origin for these samples, including the Cambod type. Conclusions We demonstrate that Chinese Assam tea is a distinct genetic lineage from Indian Assam tea, and that China tea sampled from India was likely introduced from China directly. Our results further indicate that China type tea, Chinese Assam type tea and Indian Assam type tea are likely the result of three independent domestication events from three separate regions across China and India. Our findings have important implications for the conservation of genetic stocks, as well as future breeding programs. PMID:27218820

  12. Characterization of microsatellite DNA markers for the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii: Primer note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackler, J.C.; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.; Leslie, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Two trinucleotide and seven tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from an alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii. To assess the degree of variability in these nine microsatellite loci, we genotyped 174 individuals collected from eight river drainage basins in the southeastern USA. These markers revealed a moderate degree of allelic diversity (six to 16 alleles per locus) and observed heterozygosity (0.166-0.686). These polymorphic microsatellite loci provide powerful tools for population genetic studies for a species that is afforded some level of conservation protection in every state in which it occurs. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  13. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA.

  14. A novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are researching extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for ``smaller-faster-cheaper`` spacecraft attitude and control systems. The will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses their novel control method to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source. Though still in design infancy, the ``Nervous Net`` controllers described could allow for space missions not currently possible given conventional satellite hardware. Result, prospects and details are presented.

  15. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression. Annual report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  16. Gibberellin indirectly promotes chloroplast biogenesis as a means to maintain the chloroplast population of expanded cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingshan; Li, Heying; Wang, Ting; Peng, Changlian; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Hong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis needs to be well coordinated with cell division and cell expansion during plant growth and development to achieve optimal photosynthesis rates. Previous studies showed that gibberellins (GAs) regulate many important plant developmental processes, including cell division and cell expansion. However, the relationship between chloroplast biogenesis with cell division and cell expansion, and how GA coordinately regulates these processes, remains poorly understood. In this study, we showed that chloroplast division was significantly reduced in the GA-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis (ga1-3) and Oryza sativa (d18-AD), accompanied by the reduced expression of several chloroplast division-related genes. However, the chloroplasts of both mutants exhibited increased grana stacking compared with their respective wild-type plants, suggesting that there might be a compensation mechanism linking chloroplast division and grana stacking. A time-course analysis showed that cell expansion-related genes tended to be upregulated earlier and more significantly than the genes related to chloroplast division and cell division in GA-treated ga1-3 leaves, suggesting the possibility that GA may promote chloroplast division indirectly through impacting leaf mesophyll cell expansion. Furthermore, our cellular and molecular analysis of the GA-response signaling mutants suggest that RGA and GAI are the major repressors regulating GA-induced chloroplast division, but other DELLA proteins (RGL1, RGL2 and RGL3) also play a role in repressing chloroplast division in Arabidopsis. Taken together, our data show that GA plays a critical role in controlling and coordinating cell division, cell expansion and chloroplast biogenesis through influencing the DELLA protein family in both dicot and monocot plant species.

  17. Export of carbon from chloroplasts at night

    SciTech Connect

    Schleucher, J.; Vanderveer, P.J.; Sharkey, T.D.

    1998-12-01

    Hexose export from chloroplasts at night has been inferred in previous studies of mutant and transgenic plants. The authors have tested whether hexose export is the normal route of carbon export from chloroplasts at night. The authors used nuclear magnetic resonance to distinguish glucose (Glc) made from hexose export and Glc made from triose export. Glc synthesized in vitro from fructose-6-phosphate in the presence of deuterium-labeled water had deuterium incorporated at C-2, whereas synthesis from triose phosphates caused C-2 through C-5 to become deuterated. In both tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) and bean (phaseolus vulgaris L.), Glc from sucrose made at night in the presence of deuterium-enriched water was deuterated only in the C-2 position, indicating that >75% of carbon is exported as hexoses at night. In darkness the phosphate in the cytosol was 28 mM, whereas that in the chloroplasts was 5 mW, but hexose phosphates were 10-fold higher in the cytosol than in the chloroplasts. Therefore, hexose phosphates would not move out of chloroplasts without the input of energy. The authors conclude that most carbon leaves chloroplasts at night as Glc, maltose, or higher maltodextrins under normal conditions.

  18. Response of Spirogyra chloroplast to local illumination.

    PubMed

    Ohiwa, T

    1977-01-01

    1. The chloroplast of Spirogyra grows diffusively over its entire length even when irradiated only locally. Illumination of a disconnected chloroplast fragment also enhances the growth of other disconnected, non-illuminated fragments in the same cell. -2. When irradiated locally, the chloroplast becomes deformed to bring a greater part of it into the lighted area. Deformation caused by local illumination occurs only in the vicinity of the light-dark boundary. The chloroplast ribbon in this region shifts toward the lighted area not in parallel with the cell axis but obliquely to it. -3. Only light from the blue region induces the deformation. -4. The ability of the chloroplast to be centrifuged decreases in the illuminated region and increases in the shadowed region close to the light-dark boundary. -5. In a cell in which only the longitudinal half is illuminated, the chloroplast helix deforms to allow a greater part of the green ribbon to come into the illuminated half without changing its helical pitch.

  19. A Model of Chloroplast Growth Regulation in Mesophyll Cells.

    PubMed

    Paton, Kelly M; Anderson, Lisa; Flottat, Pauline; Cytrynbaum, Eric N

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplasts regulate their growth to optimize photosynthesis. Quantitative data show that the ratio of total chloroplast area to mesophyll cell area is constant across different cells within a single species and also across species. Wild-type chloroplasts exhibit little scatter around this trend; highly irregularly shaped mutant chloroplasts exhibit more scatter. Here we propose a model motivated by a bacterial quorum-sensing model consisting of a switch-like signaling network that turns off chloroplast growth. We calculated the dependence of the location of the relevant saddle-node bifurcation on the geometry of the chloroplasts. Our model exhibits a linear trend, with linearly growing scatter dependent on chloroplast shape, consistent with the data. When modeled chloroplasts are of a shape that grows with a constant area-to-volume ratio (disks, cylinders), we find a linear trend with minimal scatter. Chloroplasts with area and volume that do not grow proportionally (spheres) exhibit a linear trend with additional scatter.

  20. Microsatellite allele sizes alone are insufficient to delineate species boundaries in Symbiodinium.

    PubMed

    Howells, E J; Willis, B L; Bay, L K; van Oppen, M J H

    2016-06-01

    Symbiodinium are a diverse group of unicellular dinoflagellates that are important nutritional symbionts of reef-building corals. Symbiodinium putative species ('types') are commonly identified with genetic markers, mostly nuclear and chloroplast encoded ribosomal DNA regions. Population genetic analyses using microsatellite loci have provided insights into Symbiodinium biogeography, connectivity and phenotypic plasticity, but are complicated by: (i) a lack of consensus criteria used to delineate inter- vs. intragenomic variation within species; and (ii) the high density of Symbiodinium in host tissues, which results in single samples comprising thousands of individuals. To address this problem, Wham & LaJeunesse (2016) present a method for identifying cryptic Symbiodinium species from microsatellite data based on correlations between allele size distributions and nongeographic genetic structure. Multilocus genotypes that potentially do not recombine in sympatry are interpreted as secondary 'species' to be discarded from downstream population genetic analyses. However, Symbiodinium species delineations should ideally incorporate multiple physiological, ecological and molecular criteria. This is because recombination tests may be a poor indicator of species boundaries in Symbiodinium due to their predominantly asexual mode of reproduction. Furthermore, discontinuous microsatellite allele sizes in sympatry may be explained by secondary contact between previously isolated populations and by mutations that occur in a nonstepwise manner. Limitations of using microsatellites alone to delineate species are highlighted in earlier studies that demonstrate occasional bimodal distributions of allele sizes within Symbiodinium species and considerable allele size sharing among Symbiodinium species. We outline these issues and discuss the validity of reinterpretations of our previously published microsatellite data from Symbiodinium populations on the Great Barrier Reef

  1. Activation of polyphenol oxidase of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, N E

    1973-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase of leaves is located mainly in chloroplasts isolated by differential or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. This activity is part of the lamellar structure that is not lost on repeated washing of the plastids. The oxidase activity was stable during prolonged storage of the particles at 4 C or -18 C. The Km (dihydroxyphenylalanine) for spinach leaf polyphenol oxidase was 7 mm by a spectrophotometric assay and 2 mm by the manometric assay. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaf peroxisomal fraction, after isopycnic centrifugation on a linear sucrose gradient, did not coincide with the peroxisomal enzymes but was attributed to proplastids at nearly the same specific density.Plants were grouped by the latency properties for polyphenol oxidase in their isolated chloroplasts. In a group including spinach, Swiss chard, and beet leaves the plastids immediately after preparation from fresh leaves required a small amount of light for maximal rates of oxidation of dihydroxyphenylalanine. Polyphenol oxidase activity in the dark or light increased many fold during aging of these chloroplasts for 1 to 5 days. Soluble polyphenol oxidase of the cytoplasm was not so stimulated. Chloroplasts prepared from stored leaves were also much more active than from fresh leaves. Maximum rates of dihydroxyphenylalanine oxidation were 2 to 6 mmoles x mg(-1) chlorophyll x hr(-1). Equal stimulation of latent polyphenol oxidase in fresh or aged chloroplasts in this group was obtained by either light, an aged trypsin digest, 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, or antimycin A. A variety of other treatments did not activate or had little effect on the oxidase, including various peptides, salts, detergents, and other proteolytic enzymes.Activation of latent polyphenol oxidase in spinach chloroplasts by trypsin amounted to as much as 30-fold. The trypsin activation occurred even after the trypsin had been treated with 10% trichloroacetic acid, 1.0 n HCl or boiled for 30

  2. A comparative approach to elucidate chloroplast genome replication

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Neeraja M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2009-01-01

    Background Electron microscopy analyses of replicating chloroplast molecules earlier predicted bidirectional Cairns replication as the prevalent mechanism, perhaps followed by rounds of a rolling circle mechanism. This standard model is being challenged by the recent proposition of homologous recombination-mediated replication in chloroplasts. Results We address this issue in our current study by analyzing nucleotide composition in genome regions between known replication origins, with an aim to reveal any adenine to guanine deamination gradients. These gradual linear gradients typically result from the accumulation of deaminations over the time spent single-stranded by one of the strands of the circular molecule during replication and can, therefore, be used to model the course of replication. Our linear regression analyses on the nucleotide compositions of the non-coding regions and the synonymous third codon position of coding regions, between pairs of replication origins, reveal the existence of significant adenine to guanine deamination gradients in portions overlapping the Small Single Copy (SSC) and the Large Single Copy (LSC) regions between inverted repeats. These gradients increase bi-directionally from the center of each region towards the respective ends, suggesting that both the strands were left single-stranded during replication. Conclusion Single-stranded regions of the genome and gradients in time that these regions are left single-stranded, as revealed by our nucleotide composition analyses, appear to converge with the original bi-directional dual displacement loop model and restore evidence for its existence as the primary mechanism. Other proposed faster modes such as homologous recombination and rolling circle initiation could exist in addition to this primary mechanism to facilitate homoplasmy among the intra-cellular chloroplast population PMID:19457260

  3. REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE genes from Arabidopsis thaliana help to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Robert M.; Stefano, Giovanni; Ruckle, Michael E.; Stavoe, Andrea K.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Brandizzi, Federica; Malmstrom, Carolyn M.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require mechanisms to establish the proportion of cellular volume devoted to particular organelles. These mechanisms are poorly understood. From a screen for plastid-to-nucleus signaling mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana, we cloned a mutant allele of a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function that is homologous to two other Arabidopsis genes of unknown function and to FRIENDLY, which was previously shown to promote the normal distribution of mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In contrast to FRIENDLY, these three homologs of FRIENDLY are found only in photosynthetic organisms. Based on these data, we proposed that FRIENDLY expanded into a small gene family to help regulate the energy metabolism of cells that contain both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Indeed, we found that knocking out these genes caused a number of chloroplast phenotypes, including a reduction in the proportion of cellular volume devoted to chloroplasts to 50% of wild type. Thus, we refer to these genes as REDUCED CHLOROPLAST COVERAGE (REC). The size of the chloroplast compartment was reduced most in rec1 mutants. The REC1 protein accumulated in the cytosol and the nucleus. REC1 was excluded from the nucleus when plants were treated with amitrole, which inhibits cell expansion and chloroplast function. We conclude that REC1 is an extraplastidic protein that helps to establish the size of the chloroplast compartment, and that signals derived from cell expansion or chloroplasts may regulate REC1. PMID:26862170

  4. Translational regulation in chloroplasts for development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zerges, William

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplast genomes encode 100-200 proteins which function in photosynthesis, the organellar genetic system, and other pathways and processes. These proteins are synthesized by a complete translation system within the chloroplast, with bacterial-type ribosomes and translation factors. Here, we review translational regulation in chloroplasts, focusing on changes in translation rates which occur in response to requirements for proteins encoded by the chloroplast genome for development and homeostasis. In addition, we delineate the developmental and physiological contexts and model organisms in which translational regulation in chloroplasts has been studied. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chloroplast biogenesis.

  5. A Microsatellite Genetic Map of the Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Bouza, Carmen; Hermida, Miguel; Pardo, Belén G.; Fernández, Carlos; Fortes, Gloria G.; Castro, Jaime; Sánchez, Laura; Presa, Pablo; Pérez, Montse; Sanjuán, Andrés; de Carlos, Alejandro; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Ezcurra, Susana; Cal, Rosa M.; Piferrer, Francesc; Martínez, Paulino

    2007-01-01

    A consensus microsatellite-based linkage map of the turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) was constructed from two unrelated families. The mapping panel was derived from a gynogenetic family of 96 haploid embryos and a biparental diploid family of 85 full-sib progeny with known linkage phase. A total of 242 microsatellites were mapped in 26 linkage groups, six markers remaining unlinked. The consensus map length was 1343.2 cM, with an average distance between markers of 6.5 ± 0.5 cM. Similar length of female and male maps was evidenced. However, the mean recombination at common intervals throughout the genome revealed significant differences between sexes, ∼1.6 times higher in the female than in the male. The comparison of turbot microsatellite flanking sequences against the Tetraodon nigroviridis genome revealed 55 significant matches, with a mean length of 102 bp and high sequence similarity (81–100%). The comparative mapping revealed significant syntenic regions among fish species. This study represents the first linkage map in the turbot, one of the most important flatfish in European aquaculture. This map will be suitable for QTL identification of productive traits in this species and for further evolutionary studies in fish and vertebrate species. PMID:18073440

  6. Heme content in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Determination of the physiological relevance of this inhibition requires a sensitive measurement which can distinguish regulatory free heme from heme which is an integral part of functional hemoproteins. A preliminary estimate was provided by reconstituting peroxidase activity from apo-peroxidase and the heme contained in broken plastids. However, subsequent experiments have suggested that this initial estimate was too large due to reconstitution of apo-peroxidase with heme from functional hemoproteins (i.e. heme stealing). The authors have now refined the measurement techniques to greatly reduce the extent of this heme stealing. Incubation of broken plastids with apo-peroxidase at 10C resolves the kinetics of reconstitution into two components. A fast component levels off after 100 min, and a slow component increases linearly for up to 6 hours. They believe that the heme which reconstitutes during the fast phase represents free heme, and the linear slow component represents heme stealing. In support of this theory, incubation at 15C increases the rate of both components. However, extrapolation to zero time of the slow components of the 10C and 15C time courses results in equivalent amounts of heme. Based on this kinetic differentiation between free heme and hemoprotein heme, chloroplasts isolated from cucumber cotyledons after 30 h of greening contain substantially greater amounts of free heme than etioplasts.

  7. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Three Veroniceae Species (Plantaginaceae): Comparative Analysis and Highly Divergent Regions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Chung, Myong Gi; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of Veronica and related genera were weakly supported by molecular and paraphyletic taxa. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Veronica nakaiana and the related species Veronica persica and Veronicastrum sibiricum. The chloroplast genome length of V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum ranged from 150,198 bp to 152,930 bp. A total of 112 genes comprising 79 protein coding genes, 29 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes were observed in three chloroplast genomes. The total number of SSRs was 48, 51, and 53 in V. nakaiana, V. persica, and V. sibiricum, respectively. Two SSRs (10 bp of AT and 12 bp of AATA) were observed in the same regions (rpoC2 and ndhD) in three chloroplast genomes. A comparison of coding genes and non-coding regions between V. nakaiana and V. persica revealed divergent sites, with the greatest variation occurring petD-rpoA region. The complete chloroplast genome sequence information regarding the three Veroniceae will be helpful for elucidating Veroniceae phylogenetic relationships. PMID:27047524

  8. S1 domain-containing STF modulates plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Soon Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2012-01-01

    • In this study, we examined the biochemical and physiological functions of Nicotiana benthamiana S1 domain-containing Transcription-Stimulating Factor (STF) using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), cosuppression, and overexpression strategies. • STF : green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein colocalized with sulfite reductase (SiR), a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein also present in the stroma. Full-length STF and its S1 domain preferentially bound to RNA, probably in a sequence-nonspecific manner. • STF silencing by VIGS or cosuppression resulted in severe leaf yellowing caused by disrupted chloroplast development. STF deficiency significantly perturbed plastid-encoded multimeric RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcript accumulation. Chloroplast transcription run-on assays revealed that the transcription rate of PEP-dependent plastid genes was reduced in the STF-silenced leaves. Conversely, the exogenously added recombinant STF protein increased the transcription rate, suggesting a direct role of STF in plastid transcription. Etiolated seedlings of STF cosuppression lines showed defects in the light-triggered transition from etioplasts to chloroplasts, accompanied by reduced light-induced expression of plastid-encoded genes. • These results suggest that STF plays a critical role as an auxiliary factor of the PEP transcription complex in the regulation of plastid transcription and chloroplast biogenesis in higher plants. PMID:22050604

  9. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin

    PubMed Central

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Jian; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length), separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively). The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya). Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species. PMID:27275817

  10. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of the Medicinal Plant Pogostemon cablin.

    PubMed

    He, Yang; Xiao, Hongtao; Deng, Cao; Xiong, Liang; Yang, Jian; Peng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin, the natural source of patchouli alcohol, is an important herb in the Lamiaceae family. Here, we present the entire chloroplast genome of P. cablin. This genome, with 38.24% GC content, is 152,460 bp in length. The genome presents a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats (each 25,417 bp in length), separated by one small and one large single-copy region (17,652 and 83,974 bp in length, respectively). The chloroplast genome encodes 127 genes, of which 107 genes are single-copy, including 79 protein-coding genes, four rRNA genes, and 24 tRNA genes. The genome structure, GC content, and codon usage of this chloroplast genome are similar to those of other species in the family, except that it encodes less protein-coding genes and tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that P. cablin diverged from the Scutellarioideae clade about 29.45 million years ago (Mya). Furthermore, most of the simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are short polyadenine or polythymine repeats that contribute to high AT content in the chloroplast genome. Complete sequences and annotation of P. cablin chloroplast genome will facilitate phylogenic, population and genetic engineering research investigations involving this particular species. PMID:27275817

  11. The tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein slow green1 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Xu, Fan; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Huifang; Huang, Yan; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-03-01

    A new gene, SG1, was identified in a slow-greening mutant (sg1) isolated from an ethylmethanesulphonate-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana. The newly formed leaves of sg1 were initially albino, but gradually became pale green. After 3 weeks, the leaves of the mutant were as green as those of the wild-type plants. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed delayed proplastid to chloroplast transition. The results of map-based cloning showed that SG1 encodes a chloroplast-localized tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR data demonstrated the presence of SG1 gene expression in all tissues, particularly young green tissues. The sg1 mutation disrupted the expression levels of several genes associated with chloroplast development, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The results of genetic analysis indicated that gun1 and gun4 partially restored the expression patterns of the previously detected chloroplast-associated genes, thereby ameliorating the slow-greening phenotype of sg1. Taken together, the results suggest that the newly identified protein, SG1, is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis.

  12. The tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein slow green1 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhihong; Xu, Fan; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    A new gene, SG1, was identified in a slow-greening mutant (sg1) isolated from an ethylmethanesulphonate-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana. The newly formed leaves of sg1 were initially albino, but gradually became pale green. After 3 weeks, the leaves of the mutant were as green as those of the wild-type plants. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed delayed proplastid to chloroplast transition. The results of map-based cloning showed that SG1 encodes a chloroplast-localized tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR data demonstrated the presence of SG1 gene expression in all tissues, particularly young green tissues. The sg1 mutation disrupted the expression levels of several genes associated with chloroplast development, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The results of genetic analysis indicated that gun1 and gun4 partially restored the expression patterns of the previously detected chloroplast-associated genes, thereby ameliorating the slow-greening phenotype of sg1. Taken together, the results suggest that the newly identified protein, SG1, is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. PMID:24420572

  13. Characterization of mango (Mangifera indica L.) transcriptome and chloroplast genome.

    PubMed

    Azim, M Kamran; Khan, Ishtaiq A; Zhang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We characterized mango leaf transcriptome and chloroplast genome using next generation DNA sequencing. The RNA-seq output of mango transcriptome generated >12 million reads (total nucleotides sequenced >1 Gb). De novo transcriptome assembly generated 30,509 unigenes with lengths in the range of 300 to ≥3,000 nt and 67× depth of coverage. Blast searching against nonredundant nucleotide databases and several Viridiplantae genomic datasets annotated 24,593 mango unigenes (80% of total) and identified Citrus sinensis as closest neighbor of mango with 9,141 (37%) matched sequences. The annotation with gene ontology and Clusters of Orthologous Group terms categorized unigene sequences into 57 and 25 classes, respectively. More than 13,500 unigenes were assigned to 293 KEGG pathways. Besides major plant biology related pathways, KEGG based gene annotation pointed out active presence of an array of biochemical pathways involved in (a) biosynthesis of bioactive flavonoids, flavones and flavonols, (b) biosynthesis of terpenoids and lignins and (c) plant hormone signal transduction. The mango transcriptome sequences revealed 235 proteases belonging to five catalytic classes of proteolytic enzymes. The draft genome of mango chloroplast (cp) was obtained by a combination of Sanger and next generation sequencing. The draft mango cp genome size is 151,173 bp with a pair of inverted repeats of 27,093 bp separated by small and large single copy regions, respectively. Out of 139 genes in mango cp genome, 91 found to be protein coding. Sequence analysis revealed cp genome of C. sinensis as closest neighbor of mango. We found 51 short repeats in mango cp genome supposed to be associated with extensive rearrangements. This is the first report of transcriptome and chloroplast genome analysis of any Anacardiaceae family member.

  14. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  15. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Bai, Ge; Wang, Shu; Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  16. A novel method of microsatellite genotyping-by-sequencing using individual combinatorial barcoding.

    PubMed

    Vartia, Salla; Villanueva-Cañas, José L; Finarelli, John; Farrell, Edward D; Collins, Patrick C; Hughes, Graham M; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Gauthier, David T; McGinnity, Philip; Cross, Thomas F; FitzGerald, Richard D; Mirimin, Luca; Crispie, Fiona; Cotter, Paul D; Carlsson, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the potential of next-generation sequencing based 'genotyping-by-sequencing' (GBS) of microsatellite loci for rapid and cost-effective genotyping in large-scale population genetic studies. The recovery of individual genotypes from large sequence pools was achieved by PCR-incorporated combinatorial barcoding using universal primers. Three experimental conditions were employed to explore the possibility of using this approach with existing and novel multiplex marker panels and weighted amplicon mixture. The GBS approach was validated against microsatellite data generated by capillary electrophoresis. GBS allows access to the underlying nucleotide sequences that can reveal homoplasy, even in large datasets and facilitates cross laboratory transfer. GBS of microsatellites, using individual combinatorial barcoding, is potentially faster and cheaper than current microsatellite approaches and offers better and more data. PMID:26909185

  17. Development of 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for Vinca minor (Apocynaceae) via 454 pyrosequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Sina; Wöhrmann, Tina; Huettel, Bruno; Weising, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed in Vinca minor (Apocynaceae) to evaluate the level of clonality, population structure, and genetic diversity of the species within its native and introduced range. Methods and Results: A total of 1371 microsatellites were found in 43,565 reads from 454 pyrosequencing of genomic V. minor DNA. Additional microsatellite loci were mined from publicly available cDNA sequences. After several rounds of screening, 18 primer pairs flanking di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide repeats were identified that revealed high levels of genetic diversity in two native Italian populations, with two to 11 alleles per locus. Clonal growth predominated in two populations from the introduced range in Germany. Five loci successfully cross-amplified in three additional Vinca species. Conclusions: The novel polymorphic microsatellite markers are promising tools for studying clonality and population genetics of V. minor and for assessing the historical origin of Central European populations. PMID:25995978

  18. A novel method of microsatellite genotyping-by-sequencing using individual combinatorial barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Cañas, José L.; Finarelli, John; Farrell, Edward D.; Collins, Patrick C.; Hughes, Graham M.; Carlsson, Jeanette E. L.; Gauthier, David T.; McGinnity, Philip; Cross, Thomas F.; FitzGerald, Richard D.; Mirimin, Luca; Crispie, Fiona; Cotter, Paul D.; Carlsson, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the potential of next-generation sequencing based ‘genotyping-by-sequencing’ (GBS) of microsatellite loci for rapid and cost-effective genotyping in large-scale population genetic studies. The recovery of individual genotypes from large sequence pools was achieved by PCR-incorporated combinatorial barcoding using universal primers. Three experimental conditions were employed to explore the possibility of using this approach with existing and novel multiplex marker panels and weighted amplicon mixture. The GBS approach was validated against microsatellite data generated by capillary electrophoresis. GBS allows access to the underlying nucleotide sequences that can reveal homoplasy, even in large datasets and facilitates cross laboratory transfer. GBS of microsatellites, using individual combinatorial barcoding, is potentially faster and cheaper than current microsatellite approaches and offers better and more data. PMID:26909185

  19. Origin of a chloroplast protein importer.

    PubMed

    Bölter, B; Soll, J; Schulz, A; Hinnah, S; Wagner, R

    1998-12-22

    During evolution, chloroplasts have relinquished the majority of their genes to the nucleus. The products of transferred genes are imported into the organelle with the help of an import machinery that is distributed across the inner and outer plastid membranes. The evolutionary origin of this machinery is puzzling because, in the putative predecessors, the cyanobacteria, the outer two membranes, the plasma membrane, and the lipopolysaccharide layer lack a functionally similar protein import system. A 75-kDa protein-conducting channel in the outer envelope of pea chloroplasts, Toc75, shares approximately 22% amino acid identity to a similarly sized protein, designated SynToc75, encoded in the Synechocystis PCC6803 genome. Here we show that SynToc75 is located in the outer membrane (lipopolysaccharide layer) of Synechocystis PCC6803 and that SynToc75 forms a voltage-gated, high conductance channel with a high affinity for polyamines and peptides in reconstituted liposomes. These findings suggest that a component of the chloroplast protein import system, Toc75, was recruited from a preexisting channel-forming protein of the cyanobacterial outer membrane. Furthermore, the presence of a protein in the chloroplastic outer envelope homologous to a cyanobacterial protein provides support for the prokaryotic nature of this chloroplastic membrane.

  20. Glycolate transporter of the pea chloroplast envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Howitz, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of a glycolate transporter in the pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast envelope is described. Several novel silicone oil centrifugation methods were developed to resolve the initial rate kinetics of (/sup 14/C)glycolate transport by isolated, intact pea chloroplasts. Chloroplast glycolate transport was found to be carrier mediated. Transport rates saturated with increasing glycolate concentration. N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) pretreatment of chloroplasts inhibited transport, an inhibition prevented by glycolate. Glycolate distributed across the envelope in a way which equalized stromal and medium glycolic acid concentrations, limiting possible transport mechanisms to facilitated glycolic acid diffusion, proton symport or hydroxyl antiport. The effects of stomal and medium pH's on the K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ fit the predictions of mobile carrier kinetic models of hydroxyl antiport or proton symport (H/sup +/ binds first). The carrier mediated transport was fast enough to be consistent with in vivo rates of photorespiration. The 2-hydroxymonocarboxylates, glycerate, lactate and glyoxylate are competitive inhibitors of chloroplast glycolate uptake. Glyoxylate, D-lactate and D-glycerate cause glycolate counterflow, indicating that they are also substrates of the glycolate carrier. This finding was confirmed for D-glycerate by studies on glycolate effects on (1-/sup 14/C)D-glycerate transport.

  1. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  2. Vectorial photocurrents and photoconductivity in metalized chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E. )

    1990-08-09

    A novel photobiophysical phenomenon was observed in isolated spinach chloroplasts that were metalized by precipitating colloidal platinum onto the surface of the thylakoid membranes. A two-point irradiation and detection system was constructed in which a continuous-beam helium-neon laser ({lambda} = 632.8 nm) was used to irradiate the platinized chloroplasts at varying perpendicular distances (Figure 1) from a single linear platinum electrode in pressure contact with the platinized chloroplasts. No external voltage bias was applied to the system. The key objective of the experiments reported in this report was to measure the relative photoconductivity of the chloroplast-metal composite matrix. Unlike conventional photosynthetic electrochemical cells, in which irradiated chloroplasts are in close proximity to an electrode or linked to the electrode by an electrode-active mediator, the flow of photocurrent was through the biocomposite material. A sustained steady-state vectorial flow of current in the plane of the entrapped composite from the point of laser irradiation to the wire electrode was measured.

  3. Microsatellite resources for Passeridae species: a predicted microsatellite map of the house sparrow Passer domesticus.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Krupa, Andrew P; Stewart, Ian R K; Skjelseth, Sigrun; Jensen, Henrik; Ball, Alexander D; Spurgin, Lewis G; Mannarelli, Maria-Elena; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Schroeder, Julia; Vangestel, Carl; Hinten, Gavin N; Burke, Terry

    2012-05-01

    We identified microsatellite sequences of potential utility in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) and assigned their predicted genome locations. These sequences included newly isolated house sparrow loci, which we fully characterized. Many of the newly isolated loci were polymorphic in two other species of Passeridae: Berthelot's pipit Anthus berthelotii and zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata. In total, we identified 179 microsatellite markers that were either isolated directly from, or are of known utility in, the house sparrow. Sixty-seven of these markers were designed from unique sequences that we isolated from a house sparrow genomic library. These new markers were combined with 36 house sparrow markers isolated by other studies and 76 markers isolated from other passerine species but known to be polymorphic in the house sparrow. We utilized sequence homology to assign chromosomal locations for these loci in the assembled zebra finch genome. One hundred and thirty-four loci were assigned to 25 different autosomes and eight loci to the Z chromosome. Examination of the genotypes of known-sex house sparrows for 37 of the new loci revealed a W-linked locus and an additional Z-linked locus. Locus Pdoμ2, previously reported as autosomal, was found to be Z-linked. These loci enable the creation of powerful and cost-effective house sparrow multiplex primer sets for population and parentage studies. They can be used to create a house sparrow linkage map and will aid the identification of quantitative trait loci in passerine species. PMID:22321340

  4. Microsatellite primers for red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this note, we document polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 101, nuclear-encoded microsatellites designed and developed from a red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) genomic library. The 101 microsatellites (Genbank Accession Numbers EU015882-EU015982) were amplified successfully and used to...

  5. Chloroplasts in seeds and dark-grown seedlings of lotus.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Amano, Toyoki; Katayama, Masao; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tsuji, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    In most higher plants, mature dry seeds have no chloroplasts but etioplasts. Here we show that in a hydrophyte, lotus (Nelumbo nucifera), young chloroplasts already exist in shoots of mature dry seeds and that they give rise to mature chloroplasts during germination, even in darkness. These shoots contain chlorophyll and chlorophyll-binding proteins CP1 and LHCP. The unique features of chloroplast formation in N. nucifera suggest a unique adaptive strategy for seedling development correlated with the plant's habitat.

  6. Analyses of Charophyte Chloroplast Genomes Help Characterize the Ancestral Chloroplast Genome of Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Civáň, Peter; Foster, Peter G.; Embley, Martin T.; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  7. Analyses of charophyte chloroplast genomes help characterize the ancestral chloroplast genome of land plants.

    PubMed

    Civaň, Peter; Foster, Peter G; Embley, Martin T; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes. PMID:24682153

  8. Analyses of charophyte chloroplast genomes help characterize the ancestral chloroplast genome of land plants.

    PubMed

    Civaň, Peter; Foster, Peter G; Embley, Martin T; Séneca, Ana; Cox, Cymon J

    2014-04-01

    Despite the significance of the relationships between embryophytes and their charophyte algal ancestors in deciphering the origin and evolutionary success of land plants, few chloroplast genomes of the charophyte algae have been reconstructed to date. Here, we present new data for three chloroplast genomes of the freshwater charophytes Klebsormidium flaccidum (Klebsormidiophyceae), Mesotaenium endlicherianum (Zygnematophyceae), and Roya anglica (Zygnematophyceae). The chloroplast genome of Klebsormidium has a quadripartite organization with exceptionally large inverted repeat (IR) regions and, uniquely among streptophytes, has lost the rrn5 and rrn4.5 genes from the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene cluster operon. The chloroplast genome of Roya differs from other zygnematophycean chloroplasts, including the newly sequenced Mesotaenium, by having a quadripartite structure that is typical of other streptophytes. On the basis of the improbability of the novel gain of IR regions, we infer that the quadripartite structure has likely been lost independently in at least three zygnematophycean lineages, although the absence of the usual rRNA operonic synteny in the IR regions of Roya may indicate their de novo origin. Significantly, all zygnematophycean chloroplast genomes have undergone substantial genomic rearrangement, which may be the result of ancient retroelement activity evidenced by the presence of integrase-like and reverse transcriptase-like elements in the Roya chloroplast genome. Our results corroborate the close phylogenetic relationship between Zygnematophyceae and land plants and identify 89 protein-coding genes and 22 introns present in the chloroplast genome at the time of the evolutionary transition of plants to land, all of which can be found in the chloroplast genomes of extant charophytes.

  9. Abiotic stresses affect differently the intron splicing and expression of chloroplast genes in coffee plants (Coffea arabica) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh, Sy; Sai, Than Zaw Tun; Nawaz, Ghazala; Lee, Kwanuk; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-08-20

    Despite the increasing understanding of the regulation of chloroplast gene expression in plants, the importance of intron splicing and processing of chloroplast RNA transcripts under stress conditions is largely unknown. Here, to understand how abiotic stresses affect the intron splicing and expression patterns of chloroplast genes in dicots and monocots, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the intron splicing and expression patterns of chloroplast genes in the coffee plant (Coffea arabica) as a dicot and rice (Oryza sativa) as a monocot under abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, or combined drought and heat stresses. The photosynthetic activity of both coffee plants and rice seedlings was significantly reduced under all stress conditions tested. Analysis of the transcript levels of chloroplast genes revealed that the splicing of tRNAs and mRNAs in coffee plants and rice seedlings were significantly affected by abiotic stresses. Notably, abiotic stresses affected differently the splicing of chloroplast tRNAs and mRNAs in coffee plants and rice seedlings. The transcript levels of most chloroplast genes were markedly downregulated in both coffee plants and rice seedlings upon stress treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that coffee and rice plants respond to abiotic stresses via regulating the intron splicing and expression of different sets of chloroplast genes. PMID:27448724

  10. The Engineered Chloroplast Genome Just Got Smarter.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shuangxia; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts are known to sustain life on earth by providing food, fuel, and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. However, the chloroplast genome has also been smartly engineered to confer valuable agronomic traits and/or serve as bioreactors for the production of industrial enzymes, biopharmaceuticals, bioproducts, or vaccines. The recent breakthrough in hyperexpression of biopharmaceuticals in edible leaves has facilitated progression to clinical studies by major pharmaceutical companies. This review critically evaluates progress in developing new tools to enhance or simplify expression of targeted genes in chloroplasts. These tools hold the promise to further the development of novel fuels and products, enhance the photosynthetic process, and increase our understanding of retrograde signaling and cellular processes. PMID:26440432

  11. Protein methylation reactions in intact pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Post-translational protein methylation was investigated in Pisum sativum chloroplasts. Intact pea chloroplasts were incubated with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine under various conditions. The chloroplasts were then separated into stromal and thylakoid fractions and analyzed for radioactivity transferred to protein. Light enhanced the magnitude of labeling in both fractions. One thylakoid polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa was labeled only in the light. Several other thylakoid and stromal proteins were labeled in both light and dark-labeling conditions. Both base-labile methylation, carboxy-methylesters and base-stable groups, N-methylations were found. Further characterization of the methyl-transfer reactions will be presented.

  12. The chloroplast genome exists in multimeric forms

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xingwang; Wing, R.A.; Gruissem, W. )

    1989-06-01

    Chloroplast DNA conformation was analyzed by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The authors found that spinach leaf chloroplast DNA molecules exist in at least four distinct forms with the apparent molecular weights of monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Two-dimensional gel analysis of DNA after UV nicking and in the presence of ethidium bromide indicates that they are not isomers that differ in superhelical density. DNA gyrase decatenation analysis demonstrates that the majority of the DNA molecules are oligomers rather than catenanes. The relative amounts of monomer, dimer, trimer, and tetramer forms, quantitated by molecular hybridization, are 1, 1/3, 1/9, and 1/27, respectively, and do not change during leaf maturation. The possible mechanisms of chloroplast DNA oligomer formation are discussed.

  13. Engineered Chloroplast Genome just got Smarter

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shuangxia; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplasts are known to sustain life on earth by providing food, fuel and oxygen through the process of photosynthesis. However, the chloroplast genome has also been smartly engineered to confer valuable agronomic traits and/or serve as bioreactors for production of industrial enzymes, biopharmaceuticals, bio-products or vaccines. The recent breakthrough in hyper-expression of biopharmaceuticals in edible leaves has facilitated the advancement to clinical studies by major pharmaceutical companies. This review critically evaluates progress in developing new tools to enhance or simplify expression of targeted genes in chloroplasts. These tools hold the promise to further the development of novel fuels and products, enhance the photosynthetic process, and increase our understanding of retrograde signaling and cellular processes. PMID:26440432

  14. Chloroplasts can move in any direction to avoid strong light.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts migrate in response to different light intensities. Under weak light, chloroplasts gather at an illuminated area to maximize light absorption and photosynthesis rates (the accumulation response). In contrast, chloroplasts escape from strong light to avoid photodamage (the avoidance response). Photoreceptors involved in these phenomena have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and Adiantum capillus-veneris. Chloroplast behavior has been studied in detail during the accumulation response, but not for the avoidance response. Hence, we analyzed the chloroplast avoidance response in detail using dark-adapted Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophyte cells and partial cell irradiation with a microbeam of blue light. Chloroplasts escaped from an irradiated spot. Both duration of this response and the distance of the migrated chloroplasts were proportional to the total fluence irradiated. The speed of movement during the avoidance response was dependent on the fluence rate, but the speed of the accumulation response towards the microbeam from cell periphery was constant irrespective of fluence rate. When a chloroplast was only partially irradiated with a strong microbeam, it moved away towards the non-irradiated region within a few minutes. During this avoidance response two additional microbeam irradiations were applied to different locus of the same chloroplast. Under these conditions the chloroplast changed the moving direction after a lag time of a few minutes without rolling. Taken together, these findings indicate that chloroplasts can move in any direction and never have an intrinsic polarity. Similar phenomenon was observed in chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana palisade cells.

  15. Primary structure of maize chloroplast adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, E; Burger, S; Grafmüller, R; Deppert, W R; Haehnel, W; Wagner, E

    1994-06-15

    This paper describes the sequence of adenylate kinase (Mg-ATP+AMP<-->Mg-ADP+ADP) from maize chloroplasts. This light-inducible enzyme is important for efficient CO2 fixation in the C4 cycle, by removing and recycling AMP produced in the reversible pyruvate phosphate dikinase reaction. The complete sequence was determined by analyzing peptides from cleavages with trypsin, AspN protease and CNBr and subcleavage of a major CNBr peptide with chymotrypsin. N-terminal Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion established the terminal residues. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the final sequence of 222 residues (M(r) = 24867) including one cysteine and one tryptophan. The sequence shows this enzyme to be a long-variant-type adenylate kinase, the nearest relatives being adenylate kinases from Enterobacteriaceae. Alignment of the sequence with the adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli reveals 44% identical residues. Since the E. coli structure has been published recently at 0.19-nm resolution with the inhibitor adenosine(5')pentaphospho(5')adenosine (Ap5A) [Müller, C. W. & Schulz, G. E. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 224, 159-177], catalytically essential residues could be compared and were found to be mostly conserved. Surprisingly, in the nucleotide-binding Gly-rich loop Gly-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly-Lys the middle Gly is replaced by Ala. This is, however, compensated by an Ile-->Val exchange in the nearest spatial neighborhood. A Thr-->Ala exchange explains the unusual tolerance of the enzyme for pyrimidine nucleotides in the acceptor site. PMID:8026505

  16. Development of chloroplast genomic resources for Cynara.

    PubMed

    Curci, Pasquale L; De Paola, Domenico; Sonnante, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    In this study, new chloroplast (cp) resources were developed for the genus Cynara, using whole cp genomes from 20 genotypes, by means of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Our target species included seven globe artichokes, two cultivated cardoons, eight wild artichokes, and three other wild Cynara species (C. baetica, C. cornigera and C. syriaca). One complete cp genome was isolated using short reads from a whole-genome sequencing project, while the others were obtained by means of long-range PCR, for which primer pairs are provided here. A de novo assembly strategy combined with a reference-based assembly allowed us to reconstruct each cp genome. Comparative analyses among the newly sequenced genotypes and two additional Cynara cp genomes ('Brindisino' artichoke and C. humilis) retrieved from public databases revealed 126 parsimony informative characters and 258 singletons in Cynara, for a total of 384 variable characters. Thirty-nine SSR loci and 34 other INDEL events were detected. After data analysis, 37 primer pairs for SSR amplification were designed, and these molecular markers were subsequently validated in our Cynara genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis based on all cp variable characters provided the best resolution when compared to what was observed using only parsimony informative characters, or only short 'variable' cp regions. The evaluation of the molecular resources obtained from this study led us to support the 'super-barcode' theory and consider the total cp sequence of Cynara as a reliable and valuable molecular marker for exploring species diversity and examining variation below the species level. PMID:26354522

  17. Comparative Chloroplast Genomes of Camellia Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Tao; Yang, Jing; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Background Camellia, comprising more than 200 species, is a valuable economic commodity due to its enormously popular commercial products: tea leaves, flowers, and high-quality edible oils. It is the largest and most important genus in the family Theaceae. However, phylogenetic resolution of the species has proven to be difficult. Consequently, the interspecies relationships of the genus Camellia are still hotly debated. Phylogenomics is an attractive avenue that can be used to reconstruct the tree of life, especially at low taxonomic levels. Methodology/Principal Findings Seven complete chloroplast (cp) genomes were sequenced from six species representing different subdivisions of the genus Camellia using Illumina sequencing technology. Four junctions between the single-copy segments and the inverted repeats were confirmed and genome assemblies were validated by PCR-based product sequencing using 123 pairs of primers covering preliminary cp genome assemblies. The length of the Camellia cp genome was found to be about 157kb, which contained 123 unique genes and 23 were duplicated in the IR regions. We determined that the complete Camellia cp genome was relatively well conserved, but contained enough genetic differences to provide useful phylogenetic information. Phylogenetic relationships were analyzed using seven complete cp genomes of six Camellia species. We also identified rapidly evolving regions of the cp genome that have the potential to be used for further species identification and phylogenetic resolution. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we wanted to determine if analyzing completely sequenced cp genomes could help settle these controversies of interspecies relationships in Camellia. The results demonstrate that cp genome data are beneficial in resolving species definition because they indicate that organelle-based “barcodes”, can be established for a species and then used to unmask interspecies phylogenetic relationships. It reveals that

  18. Chloroplast signaling within, between and beyond cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2015-01-01

    The most conspicuous function of plastids is the oxygenic photosynthesis of chloroplasts, yet plastids are super-factories that produce a plethora of compounds that are indispensable for proper plant physiology and development. Given their origins as free-living prokaryotes, it is not surprising that plastids possess their own genomes whose expression is essential to plastid function. This semi-autonomous character of plastids requires the existence of sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that provide reliable communication between them and other cellular compartments. Such intracellular signaling is necessary for coordinating whole-cell responses to constantly varying environmental cues and cellular metabolic needs. This is achieved by plastids acting as receivers and transmitters of specific signals that coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes according to particular needs. In this review we will consider the so-called retrograde signaling occurring between plastids and nuclei, and between plastids and other organelles. Another important role of the plastid we will discuss is the involvement of plastid signaling in biotic and abiotic stress that, in addition to influencing retrograde signaling, has direct effects on several cellular compartments including the cell wall. We will also review recent evidence pointing to an intriguing function of chloroplasts in regulating intercellular symplasmic transport. Finally, we consider an intriguing yet less widely known aspect of plant biology, chloroplast signaling from the perspective of the entire plant. Thus, accumulating evidence highlights that chloroplasts, with their complex signaling pathways, provide a mechanism for exquisite regulation of plant development, metabolism and responses to the environment. As chloroplast processes are targeted for engineering for improved productivity the effect of such modifications on chloroplast signaling will have to be carefully considered in order to avoid

  19. Chloroplasts Are Central Players in Sugar-Induced Leaf Growth.

    PubMed

    Van Dingenen, Judith; De Milde, Liesbeth; Vermeersch, Mattias; Maleux, Katrien; De Rycke, Riet; De Bruyne, Michiel; Storme, Véronique; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Dhondt, Stijn; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Leaves are the plant's powerhouses, providing energy for all organs through sugar production during photosynthesis. However, sugars serve not only as a metabolic energy source for sink tissues but also as signaling molecules, affecting gene expression through conserved signaling pathways to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we describe an in vitro experimental assay, allowing one to alter the sucrose (Suc) availability during early Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf development, with the aim to identify the affected cellular and molecular processes. The transfer of seedlings to Suc-containing medium showed a profound effect on leaf growth by stimulating cell proliferation and postponing the transition to cell expansion. Furthermore, rapidly after transfer to Suc, mesophyll cells contained fewer and smaller plastids, which are irregular in shape and contain fewer starch granules compared with control mesophyll cells. Short-term transcriptional responses after transfer to Suc revealed the repression of well-known sugar-responsive genes and multiple genes encoded by the plastid, on the one hand, and up-regulation of a GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER (GPT2), on the other hand. Mutant gpt2 seedlings showed no stimulation of cell proliferation and no repression of chloroplast-encoded transcripts when transferred to Suc, suggesting that GPT2 plays a critical role in the Suc-mediated effects on early leaf growth. Our findings, therefore, suggest that induction of GPT2 expression by Suc increases the import of glucose-6-phosphate into the plastids that would repress chloroplast-encoded transcripts, restricting chloroplast differentiation. Retrograde signaling from the plastids would then delay the transition to cell expansion and stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:26932234

  20. Photoinduction of cyclosis-mediated interactions between distant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Komarova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Communications between chloroplasts and other organelles based on the exchange of metabolites, including redox active substances, are recognized as a part of intracellular regulation, chlororespiration, and defense against oxidative stress. Similar communications may operate between spatially distant chloroplasts in large cells where photosynthetic and respiratory activities are distributed unevenly under fluctuating patterned illumination. Microfluorometry of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo in internodal cells of the alga Chara corallina revealed that a 30-s pulse of localized light induces a transient increase (~25%) in F' fluorescence of remote cell parts exposed to dim background light at a 1.5-mm distance on the downstream side from the illuminated spot in the plane of unilateral cytoplasmic streaming but has no effect on F' at equal distance on the upstream side. An abrupt arrest of cytoplasmic streaming for about 30s by triggering the action potential extended either the ascending or descending fronts of the F' fluorescence response, depending on the exact moment of streaming cessation. The response of F' fluorescence to localized illumination of a distant cell region was absent in dark-adapted internodes, when the localized light was applied within the first minute after switching on continuous background illumination of the whole cell, but it appeared in full after longer exposures to continuous background light. These results and the elimination of the F' response by methyl viologen known to redirect electron transport pathways beyond photosystem I indicate the importance of photosynthetic induction and the stromal redox state for long-distance communications of chloroplasts in vivo. PMID:25615586

  1. Defining the Core Proteome of the Chloroplast Envelope Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Stefan; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Müller, Bernd; Schorge, Tobias; Karas, Michael; Mirus, Oliver; Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput protein localization studies require multiple strategies. Mass spectrometric analysis of defined cellular fractions is one of the complementary approaches to a diverse array of cell biological methods. In recent years, the protein content of different cellular (sub-)compartments was approached. Despite of all the efforts made, the analysis of membrane fractions remains difficult, in that the dissection of the proteomes of the envelope membranes of chloroplasts or mitochondria is often not reliable because sample purity is not always warranted. Moreover, proteomic studies are often restricted to single (model) species, and therefore limited in respect to differential individual evolution. In this study we analyzed the chloroplast envelope proteomes of different plant species, namely, the individual proteomes of inner and outer envelope (OE) membrane of Pisum sativum and the mixed envelope proteomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago sativa. The analysis of all three species yielded 341 identified proteins in total, 247 of them being unique. 39 proteins were genuine envelope proteins found in at least two species. Based on this and previous envelope studies we defined the core envelope proteome of chloroplasts. Comparing the general overlap of the available six independent studies (including ours) revealed only a number of 27 envelope proteins. Depending on the stringency of applied selection criteria we found 231 envelope proteins, while less stringent criteria increases this number to 649 putative envelope proteins. Based on the latter we provide a map of the outer and inner envelope core proteome, which includes many yet uncharacterized proteins predicted to be involved in transport, signaling, and response. Furthermore, a foundation for the functional characterization of yet unidentified functions of the inner and OE for further analyses is provided. PMID:23390424

  2. Knocking Down of Isoprene Emission Modifies the Lipid Matrix of Thylakoid Membranes and Influences the Chloroplast Ultrastructure in Poplar1

    PubMed Central

    Velikova, Violeta; Müller, Constanze; Ghirardo, Andrea; Rock, Theresa Maria; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprene is a small lipophilic molecule with important functions in plant protection against abiotic stresses. Here, we studied the lipid composition of thylakoid membranes and chloroplast ultrastructure in isoprene-emitting (IE) and nonisoprene-emitting (NE) poplar (Populus × canescens). We demonstrated that the total amount of monogalactosyldiacylglycerols, digalactosyldiacylglycerols, phospholipids, and fatty acids is reduced in chloroplasts when isoprene biosynthesis is blocked. A significantly lower amount of unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linolenic acid in NE chloroplasts, was associated with the reduced fluidity of thylakoid membranes, which in turn negatively affects photosystem II photochemical efficiency. The low photosystem II photochemical efficiency in NE plants was negatively correlated with nonphotochemical quenching and the energy-dependent component of nonphotochemical quenching. Transmission electron microscopy revealed alterations in the chloroplast ultrastructure in NE compared with IE plants. NE chloroplasts were more rounded and contained fewer grana stacks and longer stroma thylakoids, more plastoglobules, and larger associative zones between chloroplasts and mitochondria. These results strongly support the idea that in IE species, the function of this molecule is closely associated with the structural organization and functioning of plastidic membranes. PMID:25975835

  3. Different fates of the chloroplast tufA gene following its transfer to the nucleus in green algae.

    PubMed

    Baldauf, S L; Manhart, J R; Palmer, J D

    1990-07-01

    Previous work suggested that the tufA gene, encoding protein synthesis elongation factor Tu, was transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus within the green algal lineage giving rise to land plants. In this report we investigate the timing and mode of transfer by examining chloroplast and nuclear DNA from the three major classes of green algae, with emphasis on the class Charophyceae, the proposed sister group to land plants. Filter hybridizations reveal a chloroplast tufA gene in all Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae and in some but not all Charophyceae. One charophycean alga, Coleochaete orbicularis, is shown to contain an intact but highly divergent chloroplast tufA gene, whose product is predicted to be non-functional in protein synthesis. We propose that a copy of the tufA gene was functionally transferred from the chloroplast to the nucleus early in the evolution of the Charophyceae, with chloroplast copies of varying function being retained in some but not all of the subsequently diverging lineages. This proposal is supported by the demonstration of multiple tufA-like sequences in Coleochaete nuclear DNA and in nuclear DNA from all other Charophyceae examined.

  4. AT_CHLORO, a Comprehensive Chloroplast Proteome Database with Subplastidial Localization and Curated Information on Envelope Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Myriam; Brugière, Sabine; Salvi, Daniel; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Court, Magali; Moyet, Lucas; Ramus, Claire; Miras, Stéphane; Mellal, Mourad; Le Gall, Sophie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Bruley, Christophe; Garin, Jérôme; Joyard, Jacques; Masselon, Christophe; Rolland, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the proteomics field have allowed a series of high throughput experiments to be conducted on chloroplast samples, and the data are available in several public databases. However, the accurate localization of many chloroplast proteins often remains hypothetical. This is especially true for envelope proteins. We went a step further into the knowledge of the chloroplast proteome by focusing, in the same set of experiments, on the localization of proteins in the stroma, the thylakoids, and envelope membranes. LC-MS/MS-based analyses first allowed building the AT_CHLORO database (http://www.grenoble.prabi.fr/protehome/grenoble-plant-proteomics/), a comprehensive repertoire of the 1323 proteins, identified by 10,654 unique peptide sequences, present in highly purified chloroplasts and their subfractions prepared from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. This database also provides extensive proteomics information (peptide sequences and molecular weight, chromatographic retention times, MS/MS spectra, and spectral count) for a unique chloroplast protein accurate mass and time tag database gathering identified peptides with their respective and precise analytical coordinates, molecular weight, and retention time. We assessed the partitioning of each protein in the three chloroplast compartments by using a semiquantitative proteomics approach (spectral count). These data together with an in-depth investigation of the literature were compiled to provide accurate subplastidial localization of previously known and newly identified proteins. A unique knowledge base containing extensive information on the proteins identified in envelope fractions was thus obtained, allowing new insights into this membrane system to be revealed. Altogether, the data we obtained provide unexpected information about plastidial or subplastidial localization of some proteins that were not suspected to be associated to this membrane system. The spectral counting-based strategy was further

  5. Plastidial transporters KEA1, -2, and -3 are essential for chloroplast osmoregulation, integrity, and pH regulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Hans-Henning; Gierth, Markus; Herdean, Andrei; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kramer, David M.; Spetea, Cornelia; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple K+ transporters and channels and the corresponding mutants have been described and studied in the plasma membrane and organelle membranes of plant cells. However, knowledge about the molecular identity of chloroplast K+ transporters is limited. Potassium transport and a well-balanced K+ homeostasis were suggested to play important roles in chloroplast function. Because no loss-of-function mutants have been identified, the importance of K+ transporters for chloroplast function and photosynthesis remains to be determined. Here, we report single and higher-order loss-of-function mutants in members of the cation/proton antiporters-2 antiporter superfamily KEA1, KEA2, and KEA3. KEA1 and KEA2 proteins are targeted to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts, whereas KEA3 is targeted to the thylakoid membrane. Higher-order but not single mutants showed increasingly impaired photosynthesis along with pale green leaves and severely stunted growth. The pH component of the proton motive force across the thylakoid membrane was significantly decreased in the kea1kea2 mutants, but increased in the kea3 mutant, indicating an altered chloroplast pH homeostasis. Electron microscopy of kea1kea2 leaf cells revealed dramatically swollen chloroplasts with disrupted envelope membranes and reduced thylakoid membrane density. Unexpectedly, exogenous NaCl application reversed the observed phenotypes. Furthermore, the kea1kea2 background enables genetic analyses of the functional significance of other chloroplast transporters as exemplified here in kea1kea2Na+/H+ antiporter1 (nhd1) triple mutants. Taken together, the presented data demonstrate a fundamental role of inner envelope KEA1 and KEA2 and thylakoid KEA3 transporters in chloroplast osmoregulation, integrity, and ion and pH homeostasis. PMID:24794527

  6. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zemin; Tan, Jianjie; Shi, Zhenying; Xie, Qingjun; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-06-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3' untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  7. Long, polymorphic microsatellites in simple organisms.

    PubMed

    Field, D; Wills, C

    1996-02-22

    We have examined the phylogenetic distribution of the longest, perfect microsatellites in GenBank. Despite the large contributions of model higher-eukaryotic organisms to GenBank, the selective cloning of long microsatellites from these organisms as genetic markers, and the relative lack of concentration on the microsatellites in lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes, we found that simple organisms, defined here as slime molds, fungi, protists, prokaryotes, viruses, organelles and plasmids, contributed 78 of the 375 examined sequences. These 78 simple-organism microsatellites are characterized predominantly by trinucleotide repeats, nearly half of which lie in exons, and in general show a bias towards A+T rich motifs. Simple-organism microsatellites represented more than once in GenBank displayed length polymorphisms when independent clones were compared. These facts collectively raise speculation as to the role of these 'junk' sequences in such highly economical genomes, especially when precise changes in long microsatellites are known to regulate critical virulence factors in several prokaryotes. Regardless of their biological significance, simple-organism microsatellites may provide a general source of molecular markers to track disease outbreaks and the evolution of microorganisms in unprecedented detail.

  8. Long, polymorphic microsatellites in simple organisms.

    PubMed

    Field, D; Wills, C

    1996-02-22

    We have examined the phylogenetic distribution of the longest, perfect microsatellites in GenBank. Despite the large contributions of model higher-eukaryotic organisms to GenBank, the selective cloning of long microsatellites from these organisms as genetic markers, and the relative lack of concentration on the microsatellites in lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes, we found that simple organisms, defined here as slime molds, fungi, protists, prokaryotes, viruses, organelles and plasmids, contributed 78 of the 375 examined sequences. These 78 simple-organism microsatellites are characterized predominantly by trinucleotide repeats, nearly half of which lie in exons, and in general show a bias towards A+T rich motifs. Simple-organism microsatellites represented more than once in GenBank displayed length polymorphisms when independent clones were compared. These facts collectively raise speculation as to the role of these 'junk' sequences in such highly economical genomes, especially when precise changes in long microsatellites are known to regulate critical virulence factors in several prokaryotes. Regardless of their biological significance, simple-organism microsatellites may provide a general source of molecular markers to track disease outbreaks and the evolution of microorganisms in unprecedented detail. PMID:8728984

  9. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase Is in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Leaf Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Rayapati, P J; Stewart, C R; Hack, E

    1989-10-01

    Proline accumulation is a well-known response to water deficits in leaves. The primary cause of accumulation is proline synthesis. Delta(1)-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (PCR) catalyzes the final reaction of proline synthesis. To determine the subcellular location of PCR, protoplasts were made from leaves of Pisum sativum L., lysed, and fractionated by differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugation. PCR activity comigrated on the gradient with the activity of the chloroplast stromal marker NADPH-dependent triose phosphate dehydrogenase. We conclude that PCR is located in chloroplasts, and therefore that chloroplasts can synthesize proline. PCR activities from chloroplasts and etiolated shoots were compared. PCR activity from both extracts is stimulated at least twofold by 100 millimolar KCl or 10 millimolar MgCl(2). The pH profiles of PCR activity from both extracts reveal two separate optima at pH 6.5 and 7.5. Native isoelectric focusing gels of sampies from etiolated tissue reveal a single band of PCR activity with a pl of 7.8.

  10. Choline Oxidation by Intact Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Pierre; Lerma, Claudia; Hanson, Andrew D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness (AD Hanson et al. 1985 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 82: 3678-3682). We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers nor the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO2 fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16665893

  11. The academic Chibis-M microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Gurevich, A. V.; Klimov, S. I.; Angarov, V. N.; Batanov, O. V.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Bodnar, L.; Vavilov, D. I.; Vladimirova, G. A.; Garipov, G. K.; Gotlib, V. M.; Dobriyan, M. B.; Dolgonosov, M. S.; Ivlev, N. A.; Kalyuzhnyi, A. V.; Karedin, V. N.; Karpenko, S. O.; Kozlov, V. M.; Kozlov, I. V.; Korepanov, V. E.; Lizunov, A. A.; Ledkov, A. A.; Nazarov, V. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Papkov, A. P.; Rodin, V. G.; Segedi, P.; Svertilov, S. I.; Sukhanov, A. A.; Ferenz, Ch.; Eysmont, N. A.; Yashin, I. V.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the scientific goals and design developments of the Chibis microsatellite platform and the Groza scientific equipment, which are aimed at studying new physical mechanisms of high-altitude electrical discharges in the atmosphere. A description of the Groza scientific equipment is presented, which is a united flying instrument that determines the basic requirements for the Chibis-M microsatellite. The problems of ground training of the space experiment, methods of launching the microsatellite in the ISS infrastructure into orbit, and command and telemetry control in flight, as well as the first scientific results, are presented.

  12. The Chloroplast Genome of Elaeagnus macrophylla and trnH Duplication Event in Elaeagnaceae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Son, O Gyeong; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-01-01

    Elaeagnaceae, which harbor nitrogen-fixing actinomycetes, is a plant family of the Rosales and sister to Rhamnaceae, Barbeyaceae and Dirachmaceae. The results of previous molecular studies have not strongly supported the families of Elaeagnaceae, Rhamnaceae, Barbeyaceae and Dirachmaceae. However, chloroplast genome studies provide valuable phylogenetic information; therefore, we determined the chloroplast genome of Elaeaganus macrophylla and compared it to that of Rosales such as IR junction and infA gene. The chloroplast genome of Elaeagnus macrophylla is 152,224 bp in length and the infA gene of E. macrophylla was psuedogenation. Phylogenetic analyses based on 79 genes in 30 species revealed that Elaeagnus was closely related to Morus. Comparison of the IR junction in six other rosids revealed that the trnH gene contained the LSC region, whereas E. macrophylla contained a trnH gene duplication in the IR region. Comparison of the LSC/IRb (JLB) and the IRa/LSC (JLA) regions of Elaeagnaceae (Elaeagnus and Shephedia) and Rhamnaceae (Rhamnus) showed that trnH gene duplication only occurred in the Elaeagnaceae. The complete chloroplast genome of Elaeagnus macrophylla provides unique characteristics in rosids. The infA gene has been lost or transferred to the nucleus in rosids, while E. macrophylla lost the infA gene. Evaluation of the chloroplast genome of Elaeagnus revealed trnH gene duplication for the first time in rosids. The availability of Elaeagnus cp genomes provides valuable information describing the relationship of Elaeagnaceae, Barbeyaceae and Dirachmaceae, IR junction that will be valuable to future systematics studies. PMID:26394223

  13. Heterogeneous topographic profiles of kinetic and cell cycle regulator microsatellites in atypical (dysplastic) melanocytic nevi.

    PubMed

    Husain, Ehab A; Mein, Charles; Pozo, Lucia; Blanes, Alfredo; Diaz-Cano, Salvador J

    2011-04-01

    Atypical (dysplastic) melanocytic nevi are clinically heterogeneous malignant melanoma precursors, for which no topographic analysis of cell kinetic, cell cycle regulators and microsatellite profile is available. We selected low-grade atypical melanocytic nevi (92), high-grade atypical melanocytic nevi (41), melanocytic nevi (18 junctional, 25 compound) and malignant melanomas (16 radial growth phase and 27 vertical growth phase). TP53, CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CDKN1B microsatellite patterns were topographically studied after microdissection; Ki-67, TP53, CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CDKN1B expressions and DNA fragmentation by in situ end labeling for apoptosis were topographically scored. Results were statistically analyzed. A decreasing junctional-dermal marker expression gradient was observed, directly correlating with atypical melanocytic nevus grading. High-grade atypical melanocytic nevi revealed coexistent TP53-CDKN2A-CDKN1B microsatellite abnormalities, and significantly higher junctional Ki67-TP53 expression (inversely correlated with CDKN1A-CDKN1B expression and in situ end labeling). Malignant melanomas showed coexistent microsatellite abnormalities (CDKN2A-CDKN1B), no topographic gradient, and significantly decreased expression. Melanocytic nevi and low-grade atypical melanocytic nevi revealed sporadic junctional CDKN2A microsatellite abnormalities and no significant topographic kinetic differences. High-grade atypical melanocytic nevi accumulate junctional TP53-CDKN1A-CDKN1B microsatellite abnormalities, being progression TP53-independent and better assessed in the dermis. Melanocytic nevi and low-grade atypical melanocytic nevi show low incidence of microsatellite abnormalities, and kinetic features that make progression unlikely.

  14. Microsatellites as targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2013-02-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich's ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants.

  15. Microsatellite characterization of Cimarron Uruguayo dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia; García, Cristina; Arruga, María Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Various genetic markers, including microsatellites, have been used to analyze the genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in canine breeds. In this work, we used nine microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic variability in Cimarron Uruguayo dogs, the only officially recognized native canine breed in Uruguay. DNA from 30 Cimarron Uruguayo dogs from northeastern and southern Uruguay was analyzed. The allelic frequencies for each microsatellite, the genetic variability and the consanguinity were calculated, as were the polymorphic information content (PIC) and the probability of exclusion (PE). All of the microsatellites studied were polymorphic. FH 2361, FH 2305 and PEZ 03 were the most informative, with PIC values > 0.7, in agreement with results for other canine breeds. The PE values for the markers were within the ranges previously described and were generally greater for microsatellites with higher PIC values. The heterozygosity value (0.649) was considered high since only nine microsatellites were analyzed. Compared with data for other breeds, the results obtained here indicate that Cimarron Uruguayo dogs have high genetic diversity. PMID:21637561

  16. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence 'experiment file' format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut. PMID:16493138

  17. Microsatellite characterization of Cimarron Uruguayo dogs.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia; García, Cristina; Arruga, María Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Various genetic markers, including microsatellites, have been used to analyze the genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in canine breeds. In this work, we used nine microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic variability in Cimarron Uruguayo dogs, the only officially recognized native canine breed in Uruguay. DNA from 30 Cimarron Uruguayo dogs from northeastern and southern Uruguay was analyzed. The allelic frequencies for each microsatellite, the genetic variability and the consanguinity were calculated, as were the polymorphic information content (PIC) and the probability of exclusion (PE). All of the microsatellites studied were polymorphic. FH 2361, FH 2305 and PEZ 03 were the most informative, with PIC values > 0.7, in agreement with results for other canine breeds. The PE values for the markers were within the ranges previously described and were generally greater for microsatellites with higher PIC values. The heterozygosity value (0.649) was considered high since only nine microsatellites were analyzed. Compared with data for other breeds, the results obtained here indicate that Cimarron Uruguayo dogs have high genetic diversity. PMID:21637561

  18. A review of the prevalence, utility, and caveats of using chloroplast simple sequence repeats for studies of plant biology1

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Gregory L.; Dorman, Hanna E.; Buchanan, Alenda; Challagundla, Lavanya; Wallace, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites occur in all plant genomes and provide useful markers for studies of genetic diversity and structure. Chloroplast microsatellites (cpSSRs) are frequently targeted because they are more easily isolated than nuclear microsatellites. Here, we quantified the frequency and uses of cpSSRs based on a literature review of over 400 studies published 1995–2013. These markers are an important and economical tool for plant biologists and continue to be used alongside modern genomics approaches to study genetic diversity and structure, evolutionary history, and hybridization in native and agricultural species. Studies using species-specific primers reported a greater number of polymorphic loci than those employing universal primers. A major disadvantage to cpSSRs is fragment size homoplasy; therefore, we documented its occurrence at several cpSSR loci within and between species of Acmispon (Fabaceae). Based on our empirical data set, we recommend targeted sequencing of a subset of samples combined with fragment genotyping as a cost-efficient, data-rich approach to the use of cpSSRs and as a test of homoplasy. The availability of genomic resources for plants aids in the development of primers for new study systems, thereby enhancing the utility of cpSSRs across plant biology. PMID:25506520

  19. Fatty Acid Phytyl Ester Synthesis in Chloroplasts of Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Lippold, Felix; vom Dorp, Katharina; Abraham, Marion; Hölzl, Georg; Wewer, Vera; Yilmaz, Jenny Lindberg; Lager, Ida; Montandon, Cyrille; Besagni, Céline; Kessler, Felix; Stymne, Sten; Dörmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    During stress or senescence, thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts are disintegrated, and chlorophyll and galactolipid are broken down, resulting in the accumulation of toxic intermediates, i.e., tetrapyrroles, free phytol, and free fatty acids. Chlorophyll degradation has been studied in detail, but the catabolic pathways for phytol and fatty acids remain unclear. A large proportion of phytol and fatty acids is converted into fatty acid phytyl esters and triacylglycerol during stress or senescence in chloroplasts. We isolated two genes (PHYTYL ESTER SYNTHASE1 [PES1] and PES2) of the esterase/lipase/thioesterase family of acyltransferases from Arabidopsis thaliana that are involved in fatty acid phytyl ester synthesis in chloroplasts. The two proteins are highly expressed during senescence and nitrogen deprivation. Heterologous expression in yeast revealed that PES1 and PES2 have phytyl ester synthesis and diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities. The enzymes show broad substrate specificities and can employ acyl-CoAs, acyl carrier proteins, and galactolipids as acyl donors. Double mutant plants (pes1 pes2) grow normally but show reduced phytyl ester and triacylglycerol accumulation. These results demonstrate that PES1 and PES2 are involved in the deposition of free phytol and free fatty acids in the form of phytyl esters in chloroplasts, a process involved in maintaining the integrity of the photosynthetic membrane during abiotic stress and senescence. PMID:22623494

  20. Identification of Two Conserved Residues Involved in Copper Release from Chloroplast PIB-1-ATPases.

    PubMed

    Sautron, Emeline; Giustini, Cécile; Dang, ThuyVan; Moyet, Lucas; Salvi, Daniel; Crouzy, Serge; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2016-09-16

    Copper is an essential transition metal for living organisms. In the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana, half of the copper content is localized in the chloroplast, and as a cofactor of plastocyanin, copper is essential for photosynthesis. Within the chloroplast, copper delivery to plastocyanin involves two transporters of the PIB-1-ATPases subfamily: HMA6 at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 in the thylakoid membranes. Both proteins are high affinity copper transporters but share distinct enzymatic properties. In the present work, the comparison of 140 sequences of PIB-1-ATPases revealed a conserved region unusually rich in histidine and cysteine residues in the TMA-L1 region of eukaryotic chloroplast copper ATPases. To evaluate the role of these residues, we mutated them in HMA6 and HMA8. Mutants of interest were selected from phenotypic tests in yeast and produced in Lactococcus lactis for further biochemical characterizations using phosphorylation assays from ATP and Pi Combining functional and structural data, we highlight the importance of the cysteine and the first histidine of the CX3HX2H motif in the process of copper release from HMA6 and HMA8 and propose a copper pathway through the membrane domain of these transporters. Finally, our work suggests a more general role of the histidine residue in the transport of copper by PIB-1-ATPases. PMID:27493208

  1. Role of membrane glycerolipids in photosynthesis, thylakoid biogenesis and chloroplast development.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The lipid bilayer of the thylakoid membrane in plant chloroplasts and cyanobacterial cells is predominantly composed of four unique lipid classes; monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). MGDG and DGDG are uncharged galactolipids that constitute the bulk of thylakoid membrane lipids and provide a lipid bilayer matrix for photosynthetic complexes as the main constituents. The glycolipid SQDG and phospholipid PG are anionic lipids with a negative charge on their head groups. SQDG and PG substitute for each other to maintain the amount of total anionic lipids in the thylakoid membrane, with PG having indispensable functions in photosynthesis. In addition to biochemical studies, extensive analyses of mutants deficient in thylakoid lipids have revealed important roles of these lipids in photosynthesis and thylakoid membrane biogenesis. Moreover, recent studies of Arabidopsis thaliana suggest that thylakoid lipid biosynthesis triggers the expression of photosynthesis-associated genes in both the nucleus and plastids and activates the formation of photosynthetic machineries and chloroplast development. Meanwhile, galactolipid biosynthesis is regulated in response to chloroplast functionality and lipid metabolism at transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review summarizes the roles of thylakoid lipids with their biosynthetic pathways in plants and discusses the coordinated regulation of thylakoid lipid biosynthesis with the development of photosynthetic machinery during chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:27114097

  2. GIANT CHLOROPLAST 1 is essential for correct plastid division in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maple, Jodi; Fujiwara, Makoto T; Kitahata, Nobutaka; Lawson, Tracy; Baker, Neil R; Yoshida, Shigeo; Møller, Simon Geir

    2004-05-01

    Plastids are vital plant organelles involved in many essential biological processes. Plastids are not created de novo but divide by binary fission mediated by nuclear-encoded proteins of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin. Although several plastid division proteins have been identified in plants, limited information exists regarding possible division control mechanisms. Here, we describe the identification of GIANT CHLOROPLAST 1 (GC1), a new nuclear-encoded protein essential for correct plastid division in Arabidopsis. GC1 is plastid-localized and is anchored to the stromal surface of the chloroplast inner envelope by a C-terminal amphipathic helix. In Arabidopsis, GC1 deficiency results in mesophyll cells harbouring one to two giant chloroplasts, whilst GC1 overexpression has no effect on division. GC1 can form homodimers but does not show any interaction with the Arabidopsis plastid division proteins AtFtsZ1-1, AtFtsZ2-1, AtMinD1, or AtMinE1. Analysis reveals that GC1-deficient giant chloroplasts contain densely packed wild-type-like thylakoid membranes and that GC1-deficient leaves exhibit lower rates of CO(2) assimilation compared to wild-type. Although GC1 shows similarity to a putative cyanobacterial SulA cell division inhibitor, our findings suggest that GC1 does not act as a plastid division inhibitor but, rather, as a positive factor at an early stage of the division process. PMID:15120068

  3. The potato mop-top virus TGB2 protein and viral RNA associate with chloroplasts and viral infection induces inclusions in the plastids

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Graham H.; Roberts, Alison G.; Chapman, Sean N.; Ziegler, Angelika; Savenkov, Eugene I.; Torrance, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    The potato mop-top virus (PMTV) triple gene block 2 (TGB2) movement proteins fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP-TGB2) was expressed under the control of the PMTV subgenomic promoter from a PMTV vector. The subcellular localizations and interactions of mRFP-TGB2 were investigated using confocal imaging [confocal laser-scanning microscope, (CLSM)] and biochemical analysis. The results revealed associations with membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mobile granules, small round structures (1–2 μm in diameter), and chloroplasts. Expression of mRFP-TGB2 in epidermal cells enabled cell-to-cell movement of a TGB2 defective PMTV reporter clone, indicating that the mRFP-TGB2 fusion protein was functional and required for cell-to-cell movement. Protein-lipid interaction assays revealed an association between TGB2 and lipids present in chloroplasts, consistent with microscopical observations where the plastid envelope was labeled later in infection. To further investigate the association of PMTV infection with chloroplasts, ultrastructural studies of thin sections of PMTV-infected potato and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves by electron microscopy revealed abnormal chloroplasts with cytoplasmic inclusions and terminal projections. Viral coat protein (CP), genomic RNA and fluorescently-labeled TGB2 were detected in plastid preparations isolated from the infected leaves, and viral RNA was localized to chloroplasts in infected tissues. The results reveal a novel association of TGB2 and vRNA with chloroplasts, and suggest viral replication is associated with chloroplast membranes, and that TGB2 plays a novel role in targeting the virus to chloroplasts. PMID:23269927

  4. A novel class of heat-responsive small RNAs derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-coding small RNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes in a wide spectrum of eukaryotic organisms. Their responses to abiotic stress have become a popular topic of economic and scientific importance in biological research. Several studies in recent years have reported a small number of non-coding small RNAs that map to chloroplast genomes. However, it remains uncertain whether small RNAs are generated from chloroplast genome and how they respond to environmental stress, such as high temperature. Chinese cabbage is an important vegetable crop, and heat stress usually causes great losses in yields and quality. Under heat stress, the leaves become etiolated due to the disruption and disassembly of chloroplasts. In an attempt to determine the heat-responsive small RNAs in chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage, we carried out deep sequencing, using heat-treated samples, and analysed the proportion of small RNAs that were matched to chloroplast genome. Results Deep sequencing provided evidence that a novel subset of small RNAs were derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage. The chloroplast small RNAs (csRNAs) include those derived from mRNA, rRNA, tRNA and intergenic RNA. The rRNA-derived csRNAs were preferentially located at the 3'-ends of the rRNAs, while the tRNA-derived csRNAs were mainly located at 5'-termini of the tRNAs. After heat treatment, the abundance of csRNAs decreased in seedlings, except those of 24 nt in length. The novel heat-responsive csRNAs and their locations in the chloroplast were verified by Northern blotting. The regulation of some csRNAs to the putative target genes were identified by real-time PCR. Our results reveal that high temperature suppresses the production of some csRNAs, which have potential roles in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions In addition to nucleus, the chloroplast is another important organelle that generates a number of small RNAs. Many members of cs

  5. Direct Chloroplast Sequencing: Comparison of Sequencing Platforms and Analysis Tools for Whole Chloroplast Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis. PMID:25329378

  6. Direct chloroplast sequencing: comparison of sequencing platforms and analysis tools for whole chloroplast barcoding.

    PubMed

    Brozynska, Marta; Furtado, Agnelo; Henry, Robert James

    2014-01-01

    Direct sequencing of total plant DNA using next generation sequencing technologies generates a whole chloroplast genome sequence that has the potential to provide a barcode for use in plant and food identification. Advances in DNA sequencing platforms may make this an attractive approach for routine plant identification. The HiSeq (Illumina) and Ion Torrent (Life Technology) sequencing platforms were used to sequence total DNA from rice to identify polymorphisms in the whole chloroplast genome sequence of a wild rice plant relative to cultivated rice (cv. Nipponbare). Consensus chloroplast sequences were produced by mapping sequence reads to the reference rice chloroplast genome or by de novo assembly and mapping of the resulting contigs to the reference sequence. A total of 122 polymorphisms (SNPs and indels) between the wild and cultivated rice chloroplasts were predicted by these different sequencing and analysis methods. Of these, a total of 102 polymorphisms including 90 SNPs were predicted by both platforms. Indels were more variable with different sequencing methods, with almost all discrepancies found in homopolymers. The Ion Torrent platform gave no apparent false SNP but was less reliable for indels. The methods should be suitable for routine barcoding using appropriate combinations of sequencing platform and data analysis.

  7. Development of microsatellite markers from an enriched genomic library for genetic analysis of melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    Ritschel, Patricia Silva; Lins, Tulio Cesar de Lima; Tristan, Rodrigo Lourenço; Buso, Gláucia Salles Cortopassi; Buso, José Amauri; Ferreira, Márcio Elias

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the great advances in genomic technology observed in several crop species, the availability of molecular tools such as microsatellite markers has been limited in melon (Cucumis melo L.) and cucurbit species. The development of microsatellite markers will have a major impact on genetic analysis and breeding of melon, especially on the generation of marker saturated genetic maps and implementation of marker assisted breeding programs. Genomic microsatellite enriched libraries can be an efficient alternative for marker development in such species. Results Seven hundred clones containing microsatellite sequences from a Tsp-AG/TC microsatellite enriched library were identified and one-hundred and forty-four primer pairs designed and synthesized. When 67 microsatellite markers were tested on a panel of melon and other cucurbit accessions, 65 revealed DNA polymorphisms among the melon accessions. For some cucurbit species, such as Cucumis sativus, up to 50% of the melon microsatellite markers could be readily used for DNA polymophism assessment, representing a significant reduction of marker development costs. A random sample of 25 microsatellite markers was extracted from the new microsatellite marker set and characterized on 40 accessions of melon, generating an allelic frequency database for the species. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.52, varying from 0.45 to 0.70, indicating that a small set of selected markers should be sufficient to solve questions regarding genotype identity and variety protection. Genetic distances based on microsatellite polymorphism were congruent with data obtained from RAPD marker analysis. Mapping analysis was initiated with 55 newly developed markers and most primers showed segregation according to Mendelian expectations. Linkage analysis detected linkage between 56% of the markers, distributed in nine linkage groups. Conclusions Genomic library microsatellite enrichment is an efficient procedure for marker

  8. Sites of synthesis of chloroplast ribosomal proteins in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were pulse-labeled in vivo in the presence of inhibitors of cytoplasmic (anisomycin) or chloroplast (lincomycin) protein synthesis to ascertain the sites of synthesis of chloroplast ribosomal proteins. Fluorographs of the labeled proteins, resolved on two-dimensional (2-D) charge/SDS and one-dimensional (1-D) SDS-urea gradient gels, demonstrated that five to six of the large subunit proteins are products of chloroplast protein synthesis while 26 to 27 of the large subunit proteins are synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Similarly, 14 of 31 small subunit proteins are products of chloroplast protein synthesis, while the remainder are synthesized in the cytoplasm. The 20 ribosomal proteins shown to be made in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas more than double the number of proteins known to be synthesized in the chloroplast of this alga. PMID:6841455

  9. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis. PMID:26815371

  10. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis.

  11. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R. )

    1990-07-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with ({sup 3}H-methyl)-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile ({sup 3}H)methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the ({sup 3}H)methyl group.

  12. Extensive Microsatellite Variation in Rice Induced by Introgression from Wild Rice (Zizania latifolia Griseb.)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhenying; Wang, Hongyan; Dong, Yuzhu; Wang, Yongming; Liu, Wei; Miao, Gaojian; Lin, Xiuyun; Wang, Daqing; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that interspecific hybridization may induce genomic instability in the resultant hybrids. However, few studies have been performed on the genomic analysis of homoploid hybrids and introgression lines. We have reported previously that by introgressive hybridization, a set of introgression lines between rice (Oryza sativa L.) and wild rice (Zizania latifolia Griseb.) was successfully generated, and which have led to the release of several cultivars. Methodology Using 96 microsatellite markers located in the nuclear and organelle genomes of rice, we investigated microsatellite stability in three typical introgression lines. Expression of a set of mismatch repair (MMR) genes and microsatellite-containing genes was also analyzed. Results/Conclusions Compared with the recipient rice cultivar (Matsumae), 55 of the 96 microsatellite loci revealed variation in one or more of the introgression lines, and 58.2% of the altered alleles were shared by at least two lines, indicating that most of the alterations had occurred in the early stages of introgression before their further differentiation. 73.9% of the non-shared variations were detected only in one introgression line, i.e. RZ2. Sequence alignment showed that the variations included substitutions and indels that occurred both within the repeat tracts and in the flanking regions. Interestingly, expression of a set of MMR genes altered dramatically in the introgression lines relative to their rice parent, suggesting participation of the MMR system in the generation of microsatellite variants. Some of the altered microsatellite loci are concordant with changed expression of the genes harboring them, suggesting their possible cis-regulatory roles in controlling gene expression. Because these genes bear meaningful homology to known-functional proteins, we conclude that the introgression-induced extensive variation of microsatellites may have contributed to the novel phenotypes in the

  13. Disruption of microtubules in plants suppresses macroautophagy and triggers starch excess-associated chloroplast autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiyin; Yu, Bingjie; Han, Shaojie; Guo, Jiangbo; Tang, Haiping; Yu, Alice Yunzi L; Deng, Haiteng; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules, the major components of cytoskeleton, are involved in various fundamental biological processes in plants. Recent studies in mammalian cells have revealed the importance of microtubule cytoskeleton in autophagy. However, little is known about the roles of microtubules in plant autophagy. Here, we found that ATG6 interacts with TUB8/β-tubulin 8 and colocalizes with microtubules in Nicotiana benthamiana. Disruption of microtubules by either silencing of tubulin genes or treatment with microtubule-depolymerizing agents in N. benthamiana reduces autophagosome formation during upregulation of nocturnal or oxidation-induced macroautophagy. Furthermore, a blockage of leaf starch degradation occurred in microtubule-disrupted cells and triggered a distinct ATG6-, ATG5- and ATG7-independent autophagic pathway termed starch excess-associated chloroplast autophagy (SEX chlorophagy) for clearance of dysfunctional chloroplasts. Our findings reveal that an intact microtubule network is important for efficient macroautophagy and leaf starch degradation. PMID:26566764

  14. A Large Population of Small Chloroplasts in Tobacco Leaf Cells Allows More Effective Chloroplast Movement Than a Few Enlarged Chloroplasts1

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Won Joong; Park, Youn-Il; Suh, KyeHong; Raven, John A.; Yoo, Ook Joon; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2002-01-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants that contained only one to three enlarged chloroplasts per leaf mesophyll cell by introducing NtFtsZ1-2, a cDNA for plastid division. These plants were used to investigate the advantages of having a large population of small chloroplasts rather than a few enlarged chloroplasts in a leaf mesophyll cell. Despite the similarities in photosynthetic components and ultrastructure of photosynthetic machinery between wild-type and transgenic plants, the overall growth of transgenic plants under low- and high-light conditions was retarded. In wild-type plants, the chloroplasts moved toward the face position under low light and toward the profile position under high-light conditions. However, chloroplast rearrangement in transgenic plants in response to light conditions was not evident. In addition, transgenic plant leaves showed greatly diminished changes in leaf transmittance values under both light conditions, indicating that chloroplast rearrangement was severely retarded. Therefore, under low-light conditions the incomplete face position of the enlarged chloroplasts results in decreased absorbance of light energy. This, in turn, reduces plant growth. Under high-light conditions, the amount of absorbed light exceeds the photosynthetic utilization capacity due to the incomplete profile position of the enlarged chloroplasts, resulting in photodamage to the photosynthetic machinery, and decreased growth. The presence of a large number of small and/or rapidly moving chloroplasts in the cells of higher land plants permits more effective chloroplast phototaxis and, hence, allows more efficient utilization of low-incident photon flux densities. The photosynthetic apparatus is, consequently, protected from damage under high-incident photon flux densities. PMID:12011343

  15. Cadmium accumulation in chloroplasts and its impact on chloroplastic processes in barley and maize.

    PubMed

    Lysenko, Eugene A; Klaus, Alexander A; Pshybytko, Natallia L; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2015-08-01

    Data on cadmium accumulation in chloroplasts of terrestrial plants are scarce and contradictory. We introduced CdSO4 in hydroponic media to the final concentrations 80 and 250 μM and studied the accumulation of Cd in chloroplasts of Hordeum vulgare and Zea mays. Barley accumulated more Cd in the chloroplasts as compared to maize, whereas in the leaves cadmium accumulation was higher in maize. The cadmium content in the chloroplasts of two species varied from 49 to 171 ng Cd/mg chlorophyll, which corresponds to one Cd atom per 728-2,540 chlorophyll molecules. Therefore, Mg(2+) can be substituted by Cd(2+) in a negligible amount of antenna chlorophylls only. The percentage of chloroplastic cadmium can be estimated as 0.21-1.32 % of all the Cd in a leaf. Photochemistry (F v/F m, ΦPSII, qP) was not influenced by Cd. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll-excited state (NPQ) was greatly reduced in barley but not in maize. The decrease in NPQ was due to its fast relaxing component; the slow relaxing component rose slightly. In chloroplasts, Cd did not affect mRNA levels, but content of some photosynthetic proteins was reduced: slightly in the leaves of barley and heavily in the leaves of maize. In all analyzed C3-species, the effect of Cd on the content of photosynthetic proteins was mild or absent. This is most likely the first evidence of severe reduction of photosynthetic proteins in leaves of a Cd-treated C4-plant.

  16. Intraspecific diversification in North American Boechera stricta (= Arabis drummondii), Boechera xdivaricarpa, and Boechera holboellii (Brassicaceae) inferred from nuclear and chloroplast molecular markers--an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Dobes, Christoph; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Koch, Marcus A

    2004-12-01

    We performed a combined evolutionary analysis of North American Boechera stricta, Boechera holboellii, and their hybrid Boechera ×divaricarpa using information on ploidy level estimators, allelic microsatellite variation, noncoding regions of the plastidic genome (cpDNA), and sequences of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS). Somatic ploidy levels of herbarium specimens were estimated based on comparison of pollen size and the number of alleles per locus at seven microsatellites. Results indicate that B. stricta and B. holboellii are genetically distinct from each other, although we also find evidence for occasional introgression between both parental species. Microsatellite patterns for B. stricta from northeastern North America are genetically distinct from western populations, suggesting isolation in glacial refugia along the southeastern margin of the continuous ice shield. Microsatellites supported recent origin of B. ×divaricarpa. Correspondence of nrDNA with cpDNA genetic variation for the majority of diploid B. holboellii accessions suggests a basal, sexual evolutionary unit within a polymorphic B. holboellii group. Hybridization of genetically distinct lineage(s) evidently played an important role in the establishment of polyploid B. holboellii. Frequency of polyploid B. holboellii is substantially higher in the southern United States. This trend corresponds to a southerly distribution of derived chloroplast haplotypes, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of polyploidy and associated apomixis in the colonization of the Sierra Nevada and the Southern Rocky Mountains.

  17. Complex chloroplast RNA metabolism: just debugging the genetic programme?

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe G; Bozarth, Andrew; Funk, Helena T; Zauner, Stefan; Rensing, Stefan A; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Börner, Thomas; Tillich, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background The gene expression system of chloroplasts is far more complex than that of their cyanobacterial progenitor. This gain in complexity affects in particular RNA metabolism, specifically the transcription and maturation of RNA. Mature chloroplast RNA is generated by a plethora of nuclear-encoded proteins acquired or recruited during plant evolution, comprising additional RNA polymerases and sigma factors, and sequence-specific RNA maturation factors promoting RNA splicing, editing, end formation and translatability. Despite years of intensive research, we still lack a comprehensive explanation for this complexity. Results We inspected the available literature and genome databases for information on components of RNA metabolism in land plant chloroplasts. In particular, new inventions of chloroplast-specific mechanisms and the expansion of some gene/protein families detected in land plants lead us to suggest that the primary function of the additional nuclear-encoded components found in chloroplasts is the transgenomic suppression of point mutations, fixation of which occurred due to an enhanced genetic drift exhibited by chloroplast genomes. We further speculate that a fast evolution of transgenomic suppressors occurred after the water-to-land transition of plants. Conclusion Our inspections indicate that several chloroplast-specific mechanisms evolved in land plants to remedy point mutations that occurred after the water-to-land transition. Thus, the complexity of chloroplast gene expression evolved to guarantee the functionality of chloroplast genetic information and may not, with some exceptions, be involved in regulatory functions. PMID:18755031

  18. A simple method for chloroplast transformation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vellupillai M; Bingham, Scott E; Webber, Andrew N

    2011-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) is a multisubunit pigment-protein complex that uses light energy to transfer electrons from plastocyanin to ferredoxin. Application of genetic engineering to photosynthetic reaction center proteins has led to a significant advancement in our understanding of primary electron transfer events and the role of the protein environment in modulating these processes. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provides a system particularly amenable to analyze the structure-function relationship of Photosystem I. C. reinhardtii is also a particularly favorable organism for chloroplast transformation because it contains only a single chloroplast and grows heterotrophically when supplemented with acetate. Chlamydomonas has, therefore, served as a model organism for the development of chloroplast transformation procedures and the study of photosynthetic mutants generated using this method. Exogenous cloned cpDNA can be introduced into the chloroplast by using this biolistic gene gun method. DNA-coated tungsten or gold particles are bombarded onto cells. Upon its entry into chloroplasts, the transforming DNA is released from the particles and integrated into the chloroplast genome through homologous recombination. The most versatile chloroplast selectable marker is aminoglycoside adenyl transferase (aadA), which can be expressed in the chloroplast to confer resistance to spectinomycin or streptomycin. This article describes the procedures for chloroplast transformation.

  19. Fine tuning chloroplast movements through physical interactions between phototropins

    PubMed Central

    Sztatelman, Olga; Łabuz, Justyna; Hermanowicz, Paweł; Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna; Bażant, Aneta; Zgłobicki, Piotr; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Strzałka, Wojciech; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Phototropins are plant photoreceptors which regulate numerous responses to blue light, including chloroplast relocation. Weak blue light induces chloroplast accumulation, whereas strong light leads to an avoidance response. Two Arabidopsis phototropins are characterized by different light sensitivities. Under continuous light, both can elicit chloroplast accumulation, but the avoidance response is controlled solely by phot2. As well as continuous light, brief light pulses also induce chloroplast displacements. Pulses of 0.1s and 0.2s of fluence rate saturating the avoidance response lead to transient chloroplast accumulation. Longer pulses (up to 20s) trigger a biphasic response, namely transient avoidance followed by transient accumulation. This work presents a detailed study of transient chloroplast responses in Arabidopsis. Phototropin mutants display altered chloroplast movements as compared with the wild type: phot1 is characterized by weaker responses, while phot2 exhibits enhanced chloroplast accumulation, especially after 0.1s and 0.2s pulses. To determine the cause of these differences, the abundance and phosphorylation levels of both phototropins, as well as the interactions between phototropin molecules are examined. The formation of phototropin homo- and heterocomplexes is the most plausible explanation of the observed phenomena. The physiological consequences of this interplay are discussed, suggesting the universal character of this mechanism that fine-tunes plant reactions to blue light. Additionally, responses in mutants of different protein phosphatase 2A subunits are examined to assess the role of protein phosphorylation in signaling of chloroplast movements. PMID:27406783

  20. The complete chloroplast genome of Phalaenopsis "Tiny Star".

    PubMed

    Kim, Goon-Bo; Kwon, Youngeun; Yu, Hee-Ju; Lim, Ki-Byung; Seo, Jae-Hwan; Mun, Jeong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete chloroplast DNA sequence of Phalaenopsis "Tiny Star" based on Illumina sequencing. The total length of the chloroplast genome is 148,918 bp long with GC content of 36.7%. It contains 70 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes, and 4 rRNA genes. Comparative analysis with the reported orchid chloroplast sequences identified unique InDel variations in the "Tiny Star" chloroplast genome that have potential as genetic markers to investigate the maternal lineage of Phalaenopsis and Doritaenopsis cultivars.

  1. Uptake and incorporation of iron in sugar beet chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Solti, Adám; Kovács, Krisztina; Basa, Brigitta; Vértes, Attila; Sárvári, Eva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts contain 80-90% of iron taken up by plant cells. Though some iron transport-related envelope proteins were identified recently, the mechanism of iron uptake into chloroplasts remained unresolved. To shed more light on the process of chloroplast iron uptake, trials were performed with isolated intact chloroplasts of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris). Iron uptake was followed by measuring the iron content of chloroplasts in the form of ferrous-bathophenantroline-disulphonate complex after solubilising the chloroplasts in reducing environment. Ferric citrate was preferred to ferrous citrate as substrate for chloroplasts. Strong dependency of ferric citrate uptake on photosynthetic electron transport activity suggests that ferric chelate reductase uses NADPH, and is localised in the inner envelope membrane. The K(m) for iron uptake from ferric-citrate pool was 14.65 ± 3.13 μM Fe((III))-citrate. The relatively fast incorporation of (57)Fe isotope into Fe-S clusters/heme, detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy, showed the efficiency of the biosynthetic machinery of these cofactors in isolated chloroplasts. The negative correlation between the chloroplast iron concentration and the rate of iron uptake refers to a strong feedback regulation of the uptake.

  2. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field. PMID:26793223

  3. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex from Chloroplasts of Pisum sativum L 1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Randall, Douglas D.

    1979-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is associated with intact chloroplasts and mitochondria of 9-day-old Pisum sativum L. seedlings. The ratio of the mitochondrial complex to the chloroplast complex activities is about 3 to 1. Maximal rates observed for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity ranged from 6 to 9 micromoles of NADH produced per milligram of chlorophyll per hour. Osmotic rupture of pea chloroplasts released 88% of the complex activity, indicating that chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is a stromal complex. The pH optimum for chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was between 7.8 and 8.2, whereas the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex had a pH optimum between 7.3 and 7.7. Chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity was specific for pyruvate, dependent upon coenzyme A and NAD and partially dependent upon Mg2+ and thiamine pyrophosphate. Chloroplast-associated pyruvate dehydrogenase complex provides a direct link between pyruvate metabolism and chloroplast fatty acid biosynthesis by providing the substrate, acetyl-CoA, necessary for membrane development in young plants. Images PMID:16661100

  4. Characterization of chloroplast division using the Arabidopsis mutant arc5.

    PubMed

    Robertson, E J; Rutherford, S M; Leech, R M

    1996-09-01

    arc5 is a chloroplast division mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the role of ARC5 in the chloroplast replication process we have followed the changes in arc5 chloroplasts during their perturbed division. ARC5 does not affect proplastid division but functions at a later stage in chloroplast development. Chloroplasts in developing mesophyll cells of arc5 leaves do not increase in number and all of the chloroplasts in mature leaf cells show a central constriction. Young arc5 chloroplasts are capable of initiating the division process but fail to complete daughter-plastid separation. Wild-type plastids increase in number to a mean of 121 after completing the division process, but in the mutant arc5 the approximately 13 plastids per cell are still centrally constricted but much enlarged. As the arc5 chloroplasts expand and elongate without dividing, the internal thylakoid membrane structure becomes flexed into an undulating ribbon. We conclude that the ARC5 gene is necessary for the completion of the last stage of chloroplast division when the narrow isthmus breaks, causing the separation of the daughter plastids.

  5. Actomyosin-based motility of endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplasts in Vallisneria mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Liebe, S; Menzel, D

    1995-01-01

    Intracellular localization and motile behaviour of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), plastids and mitochondria were studied in living mesophyll cells of Vallisneria using the vital fluorochrome 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DIOC6(3)). In quiescent cells, the ER was composed of a three-dimensional network of tubular and lamellar elements. Chloroplasts were distributed evenly throughout the cell periphery and appeared embedded within the ER network. The ER network was relatively stationary, with the exception of rare motile episodes occurring as movement of tubular ER strands and adjacent areas of the polygonal network in localized areas of the cell. During experimental induction of streaming, most of the lamellar ER elements transformed into tubules and together with the chloroplasts they began to translocate to the anticlinal walls to establish the circular streaming around the circumference of the cell. Microwave-accelerated fixation followed by immunofluorescence revealed an hitherto unknown phase of actin reorganization occurring within the cells and most interestingly at the surface of the chloroplasts during streaming induction. Myosin was localized in an ER-like pattern in quiescent as well as in streaming cells, with bright fluorescent label localized on mitochondria and proplastids. In addition, myosin label appeared on the surface of the chloroplasts, preferentially in streaming mesophyll cells. Motile activities were impeded by the actin-depolymerizing drug cytochalasin D (CD), the thioreagent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the ER-Ca(2+)-ATPase. These inhibitors also interfered with the integrity of actin filaments, the intracellular distribution of myosin and calcium-homeostasis, respectively. These effects suggested an obligate association of at least one type of myosin with the membranes of ER and smaller organelles and are consistent with the appearance of another type of myosin on the chloroplast surface upon streaming

  6. Distinction between Cytosol and Chloroplast Fructose-Bisphosphate Aldolases from Pea, Wheat, and Corn Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Krüger, Ingo

    1986-01-01

    A reinvestigation of cytosol and chloroplast fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) aldolases from pea (Pisum sativum L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and corn leaves (Zea mays L.) revealed that the two isoenzymes can be separated by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-cellulose although the separation was often less clear-cut than for the two aldolases from spinach leaves. Definite distinction was achieved by immunoprecipitation of the two isoenzymes with antisera raised against the respective isoenzymes from spinach leaves. The proportion of cytosol aldolase as part of total aldolase activity was 8, 9, 14, and 4.5% in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), pea, wheat, and corn leaves, respectively. For corn leaves we also obtained values of up to 15%. The Km (FBP) values were about 5-fold lower for the cytosol (1.1-2.3 micromolar concentration) than for the chloroplast enzymes (8.0-10.5 micromolar concentration). The respective Km (fructose-1-phosphate, F1P) values were about equal for the cytosol (1.0-2.3 millimolar concentration) and for the chloroplast aldolase (0.6-1.7 millimolar concentration). The ratio V (FIP)/V (FBP) was 0.20 to 0.27 for the cytosol and 0.07 to 0.145 for the chloroplast aldolase. Thus, cytosol and chloroplast aldolases from spinach, pea, wheat, and corn leaves differ quite considerably in the elution pattern from DEAE-cellulose, in immunoprecipitability with antisera against the respective isoenzymes from spinach leaves, and in the affinity to FBP. PMID:16664617

  7. Use of microsatellite and SNP markers to characterize biotypes in Hessian fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exploration of the biotype structure of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), would improve our knowledge regarding variation in virulence phenotypes and difference in genetic background. The objective of this study was to develop and test a panel of 18 microsatellite and 22 SNP markers to reveal...

  8. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, T.N.; Knaus, B.J.; Mullins, T.D.; Haig, S.M.; Cronn, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5M (USD).

  9. Microsatellite DNA markers in Populus tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M H; Dayanandan, S; Rajora, O P

    2000-04-01

    Markers for eight new microsatellite DNA or simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were developed and characterized in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) from a partial genomic library. Informativeness of these microsatellite DNA markers was examined by determining polymorphisms in 38 P. tremuloides individuals. Inheritance of selected markers was tested in progenies of controlled crosses. Six characterized SSR loci were of dinucleotide repeats (two perfect and four imperfect), and one each of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeats. The monomorphic SSR locus (PTR15) was of a compound imperfect dinucleotide repeat. The primers of one highly polymorphic SSR locus (PTR7) amplified two loci, and alleles could not be assigned to a specific locus. At the other six polymorphic loci, 25 alleles were detected in 38 P. tremuloides individuals; the number of alleles ranged from 2 to 7, with an average of 4.2 alleles per locus, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.61, with an average of 0.36 per locus. The two perfect dinucleotide and one trinucleotide microsatellite DNA loci were the most informative. Microsatellite DNA variants of four SSR loci characterized previously followed a single-locus Mendelian inheritance pattern, whereas those of PTR7 from the present study showed a two-locus Mendelian inheritance pattern in controlled crosses. The microsatellite DNA markers developed and reported here could be used for assisting various genetic, breeding, biotechnology, genome mapping, conservation, and sustainable forest management programs in poplars. PMID:10791817

  10. Characterization of ten microsatellite loci in midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus concolor)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Parker, Joshua M.

    2010-01-01

    Primers for 10 microsatellite loci were developed for midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus concolor), a small bodied subspecies of the Western Rattlesnake, which is found in the Colorado Plateau of eastern Utah, western Colorado and southwestern Wyoming. In a screen of 23 individuals from the most northern portion of the subspecies range in southwestern Wyoming, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from 4 to 11 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses, which will ultimately aid in management efforts for this rare subspecies of rattlesnake.

  11. Novel microsatellite markers acquired from Rubus coreanus Miq. and cross-amplification in other Rubus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Song, Jae Young; Choi, Heh-Ran; Chung, Jong-Wook; Jeon, Young-Ah; Lee, Jung-Ro; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2015-04-10

    The Rubus genus consists of more than 600 species that are distributed globally. Only a few Rubus species, including raspberries and blueberries, have been domesticated. Genetic diversity within and between Rubus species is an important resource for breeding programs. We developed genomic microsatellite markers using an SSR-enriched R. coreanus library to study the diversity of the Rubus species. Microsatellite motifs were discovered in 546 of 646 unique clones, and a dinucleotide repeat was the most frequent (75.3%) type of repeat. From 97 microsatellite loci with reproducible amplicons, we acquired 29 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Rubus coreanus collection. The transferability values ranged from 59.8% to 84% across six Rubus species, and Rubus parvifolius had the highest transferability value (84%). The average number of alleles and the polymorphism information content were 5.7 and 0.541, respectively, in the R. coreanus collection. The diversity index of R. coreanus was similar to the values reported for other Rubus species. A phylogenetic dendrogram based on SSR profiles revealed that seven Rubus species could be allocated to three groups, and that R. coreanus was genetically close to Rubus crataegifolius (mountain berry). These new microsatellite markers might prove useful in studies of the genetic diversity, population structure, and evolutionary relationships among Rubus species.

  12. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Triticeae species: abundance, distribution and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pingchuan; Wang, Meng; Feng, Kewei; Cui, Licao; Tong, Wei; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are an important constituent of plant genome and distributed across entire genome. In this study, genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in 8 Triticeae species and 9 model plants revealed that microsatellite characteristics were similar among the Triticeae species. Furthermore, genome-wide microsatellite markers were designed in wheat and then used to analyze the evolutionary relationship of wheat and other Triticeae species. Results displayed that Aegilops tauschii was found to be the closest species to Triticum aestivum, followed by Triticum urartu, Triticum turgidum and Aegilops speltoides, while Triticum monococcum, Aegilops sharonensis and Hordeum vulgare showed a relatively lower PCR amplification effectivity. Additionally, a significantly higher PCR amplification effectivity was found in chromosomes at the same subgenome than its homoeologous when these markers were subjected to search against different chromosomes in wheat. After a rigorous screening process, a total of 20,666 markers showed high amplification and polymorphic potential in wheat and its relatives, which were integrated with the public available wheat markers and then anchored to the genome of wheat (CS). This study not only provided the useful resource for SSR markers development in Triticeae species, but also shed light on the evolution of polyploid wheat from the perspective of microsatellites. PMID:27561724

  13. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Triticeae species: abundance, distribution and evolution.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pingchuan; Wang, Meng; Feng, Kewei; Cui, Licao; Tong, Wei; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are an important constituent of plant genome and distributed across entire genome. In this study, genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in 8 Triticeae species and 9 model plants revealed that microsatellite characteristics were similar among the Triticeae species. Furthermore, genome-wide microsatellite markers were designed in wheat and then used to analyze the evolutionary relationship of wheat and other Triticeae species. Results displayed that Aegilops tauschii was found to be the closest species to Triticum aestivum, followed by Triticum urartu, Triticum turgidum and Aegilops speltoides, while Triticum monococcum, Aegilops sharonensis and Hordeum vulgare showed a relatively lower PCR amplification effectivity. Additionally, a significantly higher PCR amplification effectivity was found in chromosomes at the same subgenome than its homoeologous when these markers were subjected to search against different chromosomes in wheat. After a rigorous screening process, a total of 20,666 markers showed high amplification and polymorphic potential in wheat and its relatives, which were integrated with the public available wheat markers and then anchored to the genome of wheat (CS). This study not only provided the useful resource for SSR markers development in Triticeae species, but also shed light on the evolution of polyploid wheat from the perspective of microsatellites. PMID:27561724

  14. Enhanced thermal tolerance of photosynthesis and altered chloroplast ultrastructure in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in lipid desaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Hugly, S.; Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, deficient in activity of the chloroplast n-6 desaturase, accumulated high levels of C{sub 16:1} and C{sub 18:1} lipids and had correspondingly reduced levels of polyunsaturated lipids. The altered lipid composition of the mutant had pronounced effects on chloroplast ultrastructure, thylakoid membrane protein and chlorophyll content, electron transport rates, and the thermal stability of the photosynthetic membranes. The change in chloroplast ultrastructure was due to a 48% decrease in the amount of appressed membranes that was not compensated for by an increased amount of nonappressed membrane. This resulted in a net loss of 36% of the thylakoid membrane per chloroplast and a corresponding reduction in chlorophyll and protein content. Electrophoretic analysis of the chlorophyll-protein complexes further revealed a small decrease in the amount of light-harvesting complex. Relative levels of whole chain and protosystem II electron transport rates were also reduced in the mutant. In addition, the mutation resulted in enhanced thermal stability of photosynthetic electron transport. These observations suggest a central role of polyunsaturated lipids in determining chloroplast structure and maintaining normal photosynthetic function and demonstrate that lipid unsaturation directly affects the thermal stability of photosynthetic membranes.

  15. A DEAD box protein is required for formation of a hidden break in Arabidopsis chloroplast 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kenji; Ashida, Hiroki; Ogawa, Taro; Yokota, Akiho

    2010-09-01

    In plant chloroplasts, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the large subunit of the ribosome undergoes post-maturation fragmentation processing. This processing consists of site-specific cleavage that generates gapped, discontinuous rRNA molecules. However, the molecular mechanism underlying introduction of the gap structure (the 'hidden break') is poorly understood. Here, we found that the DEAD box protein RH39 plays a key role in introduction of the hidden break into the 23S rRNA in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. Genetic screening for an Arabidopsis plant with a drastically reduced level of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase identified an RH39 mutant. The levels of other chloroplast-encoded photosynthetic proteins were also severely reduced. The reductions were not due to a failure of transcription, but rather inefficiency in translation. RNA gel blotting revealed incomplete fragmentation of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts during maturation. In vitro analysis with recombinant RH39 suggested that the protein binds to the adjacent sequence upstream of the hidden break site to exert its function. We propose a molecular mechanism for the RH39-mediated fragmentation processing of 23S rRNA in chloroplasts.

  16. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b6f (Cytb6f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb6f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb6f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb6f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  17. RAP, the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein in Arabidopsis, is required for chloroplast 16S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht, Laura; Wang, Fei; Stübe, Roland; Philippar, Katrin; Nickelsen, Jörg; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola

    2014-02-01

    The biogenesis and activity of chloroplasts in both vascular plants and algae depends on an intracellular network of nucleus-encoded, trans-acting factors that control almost all aspects of organellar gene expression. Most of these regulatory factors belong to the helical repeat protein superfamily, which includes tetratricopeptide repeat, pentatricopeptide repeat, and the recently identified octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins. Whereas green algae express many different OPR proteins, only a single orthologous OPR protein is encoded in the genomes of most land plants. Here, we report the characterization of the only OPR protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, RAP, which has previously been implicated in plant pathogen defense. Loss of RAP led to a severe defect in processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA resulting in impaired chloroplast translation and photosynthesis. In vitro RNA binding and RNase protection assays revealed that RAP has an intrinsic and specific RNA binding capacity, and the RAP binding site was mapped to the 5' region of the 16S rRNA precursor. Nucleoid localization of RAP was shown by transient green fluorescent protein import assays, implicating the nucleoid as the site of chloroplast rRNA processing. Taken together, our data indicate that the single OPR protein in Arabidopsis is important for a basic process of chloroplast biogenesis.

  18. PBR1 selectively controls biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes by modulating translation of the large chloroplast gene Ycf1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Si-Ting; Li, Ji-Kai; Shen, Hong-Tao; Guo, Fang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The biogenesis of photosystem I (PSI), cytochrome b 6 f (Cytb 6 f) and NADH dehydrogenase (NDH) complexes relies on the spatially and temporally coordinated expression and translation of both nuclear and chloroplast genes. Here we report the identification of photosystem biogenesis regulator 1 (PBR1), a nuclear-encoded chloroplast RNA-binding protein that regulates the concerted biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes. We identified Ycf1, one of the two largest chloroplast genome-encoded open reading frames as the direct downstream target protein of PBR1. Biochemical and molecular analyses reveal that PBR1 regulates Ycf1 translation by directly binding to its mRNA. Surprisingly, we further demonstrate that relocation of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 fused with a plastid-transit sequence to the nucleus bypasses the requirement of PBR1 for Ycf1 translation, which sufficiently complements the defects in biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes in PBR1-deficient plants. Remarkably, the nuclear-encoded PBR1 tightly controls the expression of the chloroplast gene Ycf1 at the translational level, which is sufficient to sustain the coordinated biogenesis of NDH, PSI and Cytb 6 f complexes as a whole. Our findings provide deep insights into better understanding of how a predominant nuclear-encoded factor can act as a migratory mediator and undergoes selective translational regulation of the target plastid gene in controlling biogenesis of photosynthetic complexes. PMID:27462450

  19. Evidence of multiple paternity in Morelet's Crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) in Belize, CA, inferred from microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    McVay, John D; Rodriguez, David; Rainwater, Thomas R; Dever, Jennifer A; Platt, Steven G; McMurry, Scott T; Forstner, Michael R J; Densmore, Llewellyn D

    2008-12-01

    Microsatellite data were generated from hatchlings collected from ten nests of Morelet's Crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) from New River Lagoon and Gold Button Lagoon in Belize to test for evidence of multiple paternity. Nine microsatellite loci were genotyped for 188 individuals from the 10 nests, alongside 42 nonhatchlings from Gold Button Lagoon. Then mitochondrial control region sequences were generated for the nonhatchlings and for one individual from each nest to test for presence of C. acutus-like haplotypes. Analyses of five of the nine microsatellite loci revealed evidence that progeny from five of the ten nests were sired by at least two males. These data suggest the presence of multiple paternity as a mating strategy in the true crocodiles. This information may be useful in the application of conservation and management techniques to the 12 species in this genus, most of which are threatened or endangered. PMID:18831002

  20. Isolation and characterization of 28 microsatellite loci for a Korean endemic, Lespedeza maritima (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Dong-Pil; Cho, Won-Bum; Choi, In-Su; Choi, Byoung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed microsatellite primers for Lespedeza maritima (Fabaceae), a Korean endemic shrub, and conducted cross-amplifications for closely related species. Methods and Results: We produced 28 polymorphic microsatellite markers through reference mapping of 300-bp paired-end reads obtained from Illumina MiSeq data. For 47 individual plants from two populations, the total alleles numbered two to 13, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.067 to 0.867 and from 0.064 to 0.848, respectively. Most of these markers were well amplified in closely related species. Conclusions: In future research, the microsatellite markers described here will help reveal the taxonomic entity of this species. PMID:26819860

  1. Differential positioning of C(4) mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts: recovery of chloroplast positioning requires the actomyosin system.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Mitsutaka; Kawasaki, Michio; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Miyake, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In C(4) plants, bundle sheath (BS) chloroplasts are arranged in the centripetal position or in the centrifugal position, although mesophyll (M) chloroplasts are evenly distributed along cell membranes. To examine the molecular mechanism for the intracellular disposition of these chloroplasts, we observed the distribution of actin filaments in BS and M cells of the C(4) plants finger millet (Eleusine coracana) and maize (Zea mays) using immunofluorescence. Fine actin filaments encircled chloroplasts in both cell types, and an actin network was observed adjacent to plasma membranes. The intracellular disposition of both chloroplasts in finger millet was disrupted by centrifugal force but recovered within 2 h in the dark. Actin filaments remained associated with chloroplasts during recovery. We also examined the effects of inhibitors on the rearrangement of chloroplasts. Inhibitors of actin polymerization, myosin-based activities and cytosolic protein synthesis blocked migration of chloroplasts. In contrast, a microtubule-depolymerizing drug had no effect. These results show that C(4) plants possess a mechanism for keeping chloroplasts in the home position which is dependent on the actomyosin system and cytosolic protein synthesis but not tubulin or light. PMID:19022806

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Glehnia littoralis F.Schmidt ex Miq. (Apiaceae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Choon; Oh Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kyunghee; Kim, Soonok; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Glehnia littoralis F. Schmidt ex Miq is an oriental medicinal herb belonging to Apiaceae family, and its dried roots and rhizomes are known to show various pharmacological effects. The complete chlorplast genome of G. littoralis was generated by de novo assembly using whole genome sequencing data. The chloroplast genome of G. littoralis was 147 467 bp in length and divided into four distinct regions: large single copy region (93 493 bp), small single copy region (17 546 bp) and a pair of inverted repeat regions (18 214 bp). A total of 114 genes including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes were predicted and accounted for 57.1% of the chloroplast genome. Phylogenetic analysis with the reported chloroplast genomes revealed that G. littoralis is an herbal species closely related to Ledebouriella seseloides, an herbal medicinal plant. PMID:26367483

  3. Novel polymorphic microsatellite markers in Odontobutis potamophila.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y B; Li, D; Li, J L; Wang, R Q; Xuan, Y F

    2015-01-01

    We characterized 16 novel polymorphic loci isolated from a partial genomic DNA library of Odontobutis potamophila enriched for CA repeats. We tested the variability of these microsatellites on 51 unrelated individuals collected in China. All loci were polymorphic. The average allele number was 14.6 per locus, ranging from 2 to 27. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.35 to 0.90, with an average of 0.70, whereas the average expected heterozygosity was 0.76. Twelve of the 16 microsatellites conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and were inherited independently. These developed microsatellites will be useful in studies of population genetics and other genetic studies on this important food species.

  4. Microsatellite instability in follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Randerson, J; Cawkwell, L; Jack, A; Child, J A; Lewis, F; Hall, N; Johnson, P; Evans, P; Barrans, S; Morgan, G J

    1996-04-01

    Fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assay 12 microsatellite markers (APC x 2, DCC, P53 x 2, RB1, NM23, WT1, D6S260, D6S262, D6S281 and TNFa) to look for evidence of microsatellite instability in 40 cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma (FCC). Evidence of novel alleles seen in the tumour tissue but not the normal uninvolved tissue was seen in seven cases (17%). In only two of these cases (5%) was more than one locus involved but in these cases multiple affected loci were seen (4/12 and 7/12 respectively). The detection of microsatellite instability indicates a DNA repair defect such as that which would be predicted to occur in cells with mutated mismatch repair genes, a novel finding in FCC lymphoma. PMID:8611453

  5. Plasmodium vivax genetic diversity: microsatellite length matters.

    PubMed

    Russell, Bruce; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Lek-Uthai, Usa

    2006-09-01

    The Plasmodium vivax genome is very diverse but has a relatively low abundance of microsatellites. Leclerc et al. had shown that these di-nucleotide repeats have a low level of polymorphism, suggesting a recent bottleneck event in the evolutionary history of P. vivax. By contrast, in a recent paper, Imwong et al. show that there is a very high level of microsatellite diversity. The difference in these results is probably due to the set array lengths chosen by each group. Longer arrays are more diverse than are shorter ones because slippage mutations become exponentially more common with an increase in array length. These studies highlight the need to consider carefully the application and design of studies involving microsatellites.

  6. A microsatellite linkage map of Drosophila mojavensis

    PubMed Central

    Staten, Regina; Schully, Sheri Dixon; Noor, Mohamed AF

    2004-01-01

    Background Drosophila mojavensis has been a model system for genetic studies of ecological adaptation and speciation. However, despite its use for over half a century, no linkage map has been produced for this species or its close relatives. Results We have developed and mapped 90 microsatellites in D. mojavensis, and we present a detailed recombinational linkage map of 34 of these microsatellites. A slight excess of repetitive sequence was observed on the X-chromosome relative to the autosomes, and the linkage groups have a greater recombinational length than the homologous D. melanogaster chromosome arms. We also confirmed the conservation of Muller's elements in 23 sequences between D. melanogaster and D. mojavensis. Conclusions The microsatellite primer sequences and localizations are presented here and made available to the public. This map will facilitate future quantitative trait locus mapping studies of phenotypes involved in adaptation or reproductive isolation using this species. PMID:15163351

  7. High polymorphism at microsatellite loci in the Chinese donkey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R F; Xie, W M; Zhang, T; Lei, C Z

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds, 415 individuals representing ten breeds were investigated using ten microsatellite markers. The observed number of alleles, mean effective number of alleles (NE), mean expected heterozygosity (HE), and polymorphic information content (PIC) of each breed and polymorphic locus were analyzed. The results showed that seven (HTG7, HTG10, AHT4, HTG6, HMS6, HMS3, and HMS7) of ten microsatellite loci were polymorphic. The mean PIC, HE, and NE of seven polymorphic loci for the ten donkey breeds were 0.7679, 0.8072, and 6.0275, respectively. These results suggest that domestic Chinese donkey breeds possess higher levels of genetic diversity and heterozygosity than foreign donkeys. A neighbor-joining tree based on Nei's standard genetic distance showed that there was close genetic distance among Xinjiang, Qingyang, Xiji, and Guanzhong donkey breeds. In addition, Mongolia and Dezhou donkey breeds were placed in the same category. The phylogenetic tree revealed that the genetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds are consistent with their geographic distribution and breeding history. PMID:27420967

  8. High-throughput sequencing and graph-based cluster analysis facilitate microsatellite development from a highly complex genome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abhijeet B; Schielzeth, Holger; Albersmeier, Andreas; Kalinowski, Joern; Hoffman, Joseph I

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances in high-throughput sequencing, difficulties are often encountered when developing microsatellites for species with large and complex genomes. This probably reflects the close association in many species of microsatellites with cryptic repetitive elements. We therefore developed a novel approach for isolating polymorphic microsatellites from the club-legged grasshopper (Gomphocerus sibiricus), an emerging quantitative genetic and behavioral model system. Whole genome shotgun Illumina MiSeq sequencing was used to generate over three million 300 bp paired-end reads, of which 67.75% were grouped into 40,548 clusters within RepeatExplorer. Annotations of the top 468 clusters, which represent 60.5% of the reads, revealed homology to satellite DNA and a variety of transposable elements. Evaluating 96 primer pairs in eight wild-caught individuals, we found that primers mined from singleton reads were six times more likely to amplify a single polymorphic microsatellite locus than primers mined from clusters. Our study provides experimental evidence in support of the notion that microsatellites associated with repetitive elements are less likely to successfully amplify. It also reveals how advances in high-throughput sequencing and graph-based repetitive DNA analysis can be leveraged to isolate polymorphic microsatellites from complex genomes. PMID:27547349

  9. Control of starch granule numbers in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Crumpton-Taylor, Matilda; Grandison, Scott; Png, Kenneth M Y; Bushby, Andrew J; Smith, Alison M

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate starch granule numbers in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Lack of quantitative information on the extent of genetic, temporal, developmental, and environmental variation in granule numbers is an important limitation in understanding control of starch degradation and the mechanism of granule initiation. Two methods were developed for reliable estimation of numbers of granules per chloroplast. First, direct measurements were made on large series of consecutive sections of mesophyll tissue obtained by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. Second, average numbers were calculated from the starch contents of leaves and chloroplasts and estimates of granule mass based on granule dimensions. Examination of wild-type plants and accumulation and regulation of chloroplast (arc) mutants with few, large chloroplasts provided the following new insights. There is wide variation in chloroplast volumes in cells of wild-type leaves. Granule numbers per chloroplast are correlated with chloroplast volume, i.e. large chloroplasts have more granules than small chloroplasts. Mature leaves of wild-type plants and arc mutants have approximately the same number of granules per unit volume of stroma, regardless of the size and number of chloroplasts per cell. Granule numbers per unit volume of stroma are also relatively constant in immature leaves but are greater than in mature leaves. Granule initiation occurs as chloroplasts divide in immature leaves, but relatively little initiation occurs in mature leaves. Changes in leaf starch content over the diurnal cycle are largely brought about by changes in the volume of a fixed number of granules.

  10. The complete chloroplast genome of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Lukas, Brigitte; Novak, Johannes

    2013-10-10

    Oregano (Origanum vulgare L., Lamiaceae) is a medicinal and aromatic plant maybe best known for flavouring pizza. New applications e.g. as natural antioxidants for food are emerging due to the plants' high antibacterial and antioxidant activity. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Origanum vulgare (GenBank/EBML/DDBJ accession number: JX880022) consists of 151,935 bp and includes a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 25,527 bp separated by one small and one large single copy region (SSC and LSC) of 17,745 and 83,136 bp, respectively. The genome with an overall GC content of 38% hosts 114 genes that covering 63% of the genome of which 8% were introns. The comparison of the Origanum cp genome with the cp genomes of two other core lamiales (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge and Sesamum indicum L.) revealed completely conserved protein-coding regions in the IR region but also in the LSC and SSC regions. Phylogenetic analysis of the lamiids based on 56 protein-coding genes give a hint at the basic structure of the Lamiales. However, further genomes will be necessary to clarify this taxonomically complicated order. The variability of the cp within the genus Origanum, studied exemplarily on 16 different chloroplast DNA regions, demonstrated that in 14 regions analyzed, the variability was extremely low (max. 0.7%), while only two regions showed a moderate variability of up to 2.3%. The cp genome of Origanum vulgare contains 27 perfect mononucleotide repeats (number of repeats>9) consisting exclusively of the nucleotides A or T. 34 perfect repeats (repeat lengths>1 and number of repeats>3) were found, of which 32 were di-, and 2 were trinucleotide repeats.

  11. Origin and evolution of the chloroplast division machinery.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2005-10-01

    Chloroplasts were originally established in eukaryotes by the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium; they then spread through diversification of the eukaryotic hosts and subsequent engulfment of eukaryotic algae by previously nonphotosynthetic eukaryotes. The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of preexisting chloroplasts. Like their ancestors, chloroplasts use a bacterial division system based on the FtsZ ring and some associated factors, all of which are now encoded in the host nuclear genome. The majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and several new factors have been added by the eukaryotic host. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most likely added by the eukaryotic host, and a member of the dynamin family of proteins evolved to regulate chloroplast division. The identification of several additional proteins involved in the division process, along with data from diverse lineages of organisms, our current knowledge of mitochondrial division, and the mining of genomic sequence data have enabled us to begin to understand the universality and evolution of the division system. The principal features of the chloroplast division system thus far identified are conserved across several lineages, including those with secondary chloroplasts, and may reflect primeval features of mitochondrial division. PMID:16143878

  12. Tools for regulated gene expression in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Rochaix, Jean-David; Surzycki, Raymond; Ramundo, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The green unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has emerged as a very attractive model system for chloroplast genetic engineering. Algae can be transformed readily at the chloroplast level through bombardment of cells with a gene gun, and transformants can be selected using antibiotic resistance or phototrophic growth. An inducible chloroplast gene expression system could be very useful for several reasons. First, it could be used to elucidate the function of essential chloroplast genes required for cell growth and survival. Second, it could be very helpful for expressing proteins which are toxic to the algal cells. Third, it would allow for the reversible depletion of photosynthetic complexes thus making it possible to study their biogenesis in a controlled fashion. Fourth, it opens promising possibilities for hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas. Here we describe an inducible/repressible chloroplast gene expression system in Chlamydomonas in which the copper-regulated Cyc6 promoter drives the expression of the nuclear Nac2 gene encoding a protein which is targeted to the chloroplast where it acts specifically on the chloroplast psbD 5'-untranslated region and is required for the stable accumulation of the psbD mRNA and photosystem II. The system can be used for any chloroplast gene or transgene by placing it under the control of the psbD 5'-untranslated region. PMID:24599871

  13. CHLOROPLAST BIOGENESIS genes act cell and noncell autonomously in early chloroplast development.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Nava, María de la Luz; Gillmor, C Stewart; Jiménez, Luis F; Guevara-García, Arturo; León, Patricia

    2004-05-01

    In order to identify nuclear genes required for early chloroplast development, a collection of photosynthetic pigment mutants of Arabidopsis was assembled and screened for lines with extremely low levels of chlorophyll. Nine chloroplast biogenesis (clb) mutants that affect proplastid growth and thylakoid membrane formation and result in an albino seedling phenotype were identified. These mutations identify six new genes as well as a novel allele of cla1. clb mutants have less than 2% of wild-type chlorophyll levels, and little or no expression of nuclear and plastid-encoded genes required for chloroplast development and function. In all but one mutant, proplastids do not differentiate enough to form elongated stroma thylakoid membranes. Analysis of mutants during embryogenesis allows differentiation between CLB genes that act noncell autonomously, where partial maternal complementation of chloroplast development is observed in embryos, and those that act cell autonomously, where complementation during embryogenesis is not observed. Molecular characterization of the noncell autonomous clb4 mutant established that the CLB4 gene encodes for hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS), the next to the last enzyme of the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for the synthesis of plastidic isoprenoids. The noncell autonomous nature of the clb4 mutant suggests that products of the MEP pathway can travel between tissues, and provides in vivo evidence that some movement of MEP intermediates exists from the cytoplasm to the plastid. The isolation and characterization of clb mutants represents the first systematic study of genes required for early chloroplast development in Arabidopsis.

  14. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  15. Membrane heredity and early chloroplast evolution.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2000-04-01

    Membrane heredity was central to the unique symbiogenetic origin from cyanobacteria of chloroplasts in the ancestor of Plantae (green plants, red algae, glaucophytes) and to subsequent lateral transfers of plastids to form even more complex photosynthetic chimeras. Each symbiogenesis integrated disparate genomes and several radically different genetic membranes into a more complex cell. The common ancestor of Plantae evolved transit machinery for plastid protein import. In later secondary symbiogeneses, signal sequences were added to target proteins across host perialgal membranes: independently into green algal plastids (euglenoids, chlorarachneans) and red algal plastids (alveolates, chromists). Conservatism and innovation during early plastid diversification are discussed.

  16. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-01

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  17. Licensed to Kill: Mitochondria, Chloroplasts, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, Olivier; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is crucial in plant organogenesis and survival. In this review the involvement of mitochondria and chloroplasts in PCD execution is critically assessed. Recent findings support a central role for mitochondria in PCD, with newly identified components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC), FOF1 ATP synthase, cardiolipins, and ATPase AtOM66. While chloroplasts received less attention, their contribution to PCD is well supported, suggesting that they possibly contribute by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of light or even contribute through cytochrome f release. Finally we discuss two working models where mitochondria and chloroplasts could cooperatively execute PCD: mitochondria initiate the commitment steps and recruit chloroplasts for swift execution or, alternatively, mitochondria and chloroplasts could operate in parallel.

  18. Non-contact intracellular binding of chloroplasts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Li, Baojun

    2015-06-04

    Non-contact intracellular binding and controllable manipulation of chloroplasts in vivo was demonstrated using an optical fiber probe. Launching a 980-nm laser beam into a fiber, which was placed about 3 μm above the surface of a living plant (Hydrilla verticillata) leaf, enabled stable binding of different numbers of chloroplasts, as well as their arrangement into one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional arrays inside the leaf without damaging the chloroplasts. Additionally, the formed chloroplast chains were controllably transported inside the living cells. The optical force exerted on the chloroplasts was calculated to explain the experimental results. This method provides a flexible method for studying intracellular organelle interaction with highly organized organelle-organelle contact in vivo in a non-contact manner.

  19. C4 photosynthetic machinery: insights from maize chloroplast proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun

    2013-01-01

    C4 plants exhibit much higher CO2 assimilation rates than C{}3 plants under certain conditions. The specialized differentiation of mesophyll cell and bundle sheath cell type chloroplasts is unique to C4 plants and improves photosynthetic efficiency. Maize (Zea mays) is an important crop and model with C4 photosynthetic machinery. 2DE and high-throughput quantitative proteomics approaches (e.g., isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and shotgun proteomics) have been employed to investigate maize chloroplast structure and function. These proteomics studies have provided valuable information on C4 chloroplast protein components, photosynthesis, and other metabolic mechanisms underlying chloroplast biogenesis, stromal, and membrane differentiation, as well as response to salinity, high/low temperature, and light stress. This review presents an overview of proteomics advances in maize chloroplast biology. PMID:23596450

  20. Shedding light on the chloroplast as a remote control of nuclear gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Petrillo, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Plants rely on a sophisticated light sensing and signaling system that allows them to respond to environmental changes. Photosensory protein systems -phytochromes, cryptochromes, phototropins, and ultraviolet (UV)-B photoreceptors- have evolved to let plants monitor light conditions and regulate different levels of gene expression and developmental processes. However, even though photoreceptor proteins are best characterized and deeply studied, it is also known that chloroplasts are able to sense light conditions and communicate the variations to the nucleus that adjust its transcriptome to the changing environment. The redox state of components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain works as a sensor of photosynthetic activity and can affect nuclear gene expression by a retrograde signaling pathway. Recently, our groups showed that a retrograde signaling pathway can modulate the alternative splicing process, revealing a novel layer of gene expression control by chloroplast retrograde signaling. PMID:25482785

  1. Shedding light on the chloroplast as a remote control of nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed

    Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Petrillo, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Plants rely on a sophisticated light sensing and signaling system that allows them to respond to environmental changes. Photosensory protein systems -phytochromes, cryptochromes, phototropins, and ultraviolet (UV)-B photoreceptors- have evolved to let plants monitor light conditions and regulate different levels of gene expression and developmental processes. However, even though photoreceptor proteins are best characterized and deeply studied, it is also known that chloroplasts are able to sense light conditions and communicate the variations to the nucleus that adjust its transcriptome to the changing environment. The redox state of components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain works as a sensor of photosynthetic activity and can affect nuclear gene expression by a retrograde signaling pathway. Recently, our groups showed that a retrograde signaling pathway can modulate the alternative splicing process, revealing a novel layer of gene expression control by chloroplast retrograde signaling.

  2. Preparation of envelope membrane fractions from Arabidopsis chloroplasts for proteomic analysis and other studies.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Daniel; Moyet, Lucas; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Ferro, Myriam; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are semiautonomous organelles restricted to plants and protists. These plastids are surrounded by a double membrane system, or envelope. These envelope membranes contain machineries to import nuclear-encoded proteins, and transporters for ions or metabolites, but are also essential for a range of plastid-specific metabolisms. Targeted semiquantitative proteomic investigations have revealed specific cross-contaminations by other cell or plastid compartments that may occur during chloroplast envelope purification. This article describes procedures developed to recover highly purified envelope fractions starting from Percoll-purified Arabidopsis chloroplasts, gives an overview of possible cross-contaminations, provides some tricks to limit these cross-contaminations, and lists immunological markers and methods that can be used to assess the purity of the envelope fractions.

  3. A chloroplast DNA inversion marks an ancient evolutionary split in the sunflower family (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Robert K.; Palmer, Jeffrey D.

    1987-01-01

    We determined the distribution of a chloroplast DNA inversion among 80 species representing 16 tribes of the Asteraceae and 10 putatively related families. Filter hybridizations using cloned chloroplast DNA restriction fragments of lettuce and petunia revealed that this 22-kilobase-pair inversion is shared by 57 genera, representing all tribes of the Asteraceae, but is absent from the subtribe Barnadesiinae of the tribe Mutisieae, as well as from all families allied to the Asteraceae. The inversion thus defines an ancient evolutionary split within the family and suggests that the Barnadesiinae represents the most primitive lineage in the Asteraceae. These results also indicate that the tribe Mutisieae is not monophyletic, since any common ancestor to its four subtribes is also shared by other tribes in the family. This is the most extensive survey of the systematic distribution of an organelle DNA rearrangement and demonstrates the potential of such mutations for resolving phylogenetic relationships at higher taxonomic levels. Images PMID:16593871

  4. Ten microsatellite loci from Zamia integrifolia (Zamiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten microsatellite loci isolated from Zamia integrifolia are described. All 10 are polymorphic, with three to ten alleles across 36 members of a single population from South Florida. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.067 to 1. Two loci depart significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, and exhibit het...

  5. Habitat Loss other than Fragmentation per se Decreased Nuclear and Chloroplast Genetic Diversity in a Monoecious Tree

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Generally, effect of fragmentation per se on biodiversity has not been separated from the effect of habitat loss. In this paper, using nDNA and cpDNA SSRs, we studied genetic diversity of Castanopsis sclerophylla (Lindl. & Paxton) Schotty populations and decoupled the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation per se. We selected seven nuclear and six cpDNA microsatellite loci and genotyped 460 individuals from mainland and island populations, which were located in the impoundment created in 1959. Number of alleles per locus of populations in larger habitats was significantly higher than that in smaller habitats. There was a significant relationship between the number of alleles per locus and habitat size. Based on this relationship, the predicted genetic diversity of an imaginary population of size equaling the total area of the islands was lower than that of the global population on the islands. Re-sampling demonstrated that low genetic diversity of populations in small habitats was caused by unevenness in sample size. Fisher's α index was similar among habitat types. These results indicate that the decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of populations in smaller habitats was mainly caused by habitat loss. For nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite loci, values of FST were 0.066 and 0.893, respectively, and the calculated pollen/seed dispersal ratio was 162.2. When separated into pre-and post-fragmentation cohorts, pollen/seed ratios were 121.2 and 189.5, respectively. Our results suggest that habitat loss explains the early decrease in genetic diversity, while fragmentation per se may play a major role in inbreeding and differentiation among fragmented populations and later loss of genetic diversity. PMID:22723951

  6. Habitat loss other than fragmentation per se decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity in a monoecious tree.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Shi, Miao-Miao; Shen, Dong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Generally, effect of fragmentation per se on biodiversity has not been separated from the effect of habitat loss. In this paper, using nDNA and cpDNA SSRs, we studied genetic diversity of Castanopsis sclerophylla (Lindl. & Paxton) Schotty populations and decoupled the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation per se. We selected seven nuclear and six cpDNA microsatellite loci and genotyped 460 individuals from mainland and island populations, which were located in the impoundment created in 1959. Number of alleles per locus of populations in larger habitats was significantly higher than that in smaller habitats. There was a significant relationship between the number of alleles per locus and habitat size. Based on this relationship, the predicted genetic diversity of an imaginary population of size equaling the total area of the islands was lower than that of the global population on the islands. Re-sampling demonstrated that low genetic diversity of populations in small habitats was caused by unevenness in sample size. Fisher's α index was similar among habitat types. These results indicate that the decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of populations in smaller habitats was mainly caused by habitat loss. For nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite loci, values of F(ST) were 0.066 and 0.893, respectively, and the calculated pollen/seed dispersal ratio was 162.2. When separated into pre-and post-fragmentation cohorts, pollen/seed ratios were 121.2 and 189.5, respectively. Our results suggest that habitat loss explains the early decrease in genetic diversity, while fragmentation per se may play a major role in inbreeding and differentiation among fragmented populations and later loss of genetic diversity. PMID:22723951

  7. Habitat loss other than fragmentation per se decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity in a monoecious tree.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Shi, Miao-Miao; Shen, Dong-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Generally, effect of fragmentation per se on biodiversity has not been separated from the effect of habitat loss. In this paper, using nDNA and cpDNA SSRs, we studied genetic diversity of Castanopsis sclerophylla (Lindl. & Paxton) Schotty populations and decoupled the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation per se. We selected seven nuclear and six cpDNA microsatellite loci and genotyped 460 individuals from mainland and island populations, which were located in the impoundment created in 1959. Number of alleles per locus of populations in larger habitats was significantly higher than that in smaller habitats. There was a significant relationship between the number of alleles per locus and habitat size. Based on this relationship, the predicted genetic diversity of an imaginary population of size equaling the total area of the islands was lower than that of the global population on the islands. Re-sampling demonstrated that low genetic diversity of populations in small habitats was caused by unevenness in sample size. Fisher's α index was similar among habitat types. These results indicate that the decreased nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of populations in smaller habitats was mainly caused by habitat loss. For nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite loci, values of F(ST) were 0.066 and 0.893, respectively, and the calculated pollen/seed dispersal ratio was 162.2. When separated into pre-and post-fragmentation cohorts, pollen/seed ratios were 121.2 and 189.5, respectively. Our results suggest that habitat loss explains the early decrease in genetic diversity, while fragmentation per se may play a major role in inbreeding and differentiation among fragmented populations and later loss of genetic diversity.

  8. The Chloroplast Genome of Pellia endiviifolia: Gene Content, RNA-Editing Pattern, and the Origin of Chloroplast Editing

    PubMed Central

    Grosche, Christopher; Funk, Helena T.; Maier, Uwe G.; Zauner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that can act upon transcripts from mitochondrial, nuclear, and chloroplast genomes. In chloroplasts, single-nucleotide conversions in mRNAs via RNA editing occur at different frequencies across the plant kingdom. These range from several hundred edited sites in some mosses and ferns to lower frequencies in seed plants and the complete lack of RNA editing in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. Here, we report the sequence and edited sites of the chloroplast genome from the liverwort Pellia endiviifolia. The type and frequency of chloroplast RNA editing display a pattern highly similar to that in seed plants. Analyses of the C to U conversions and the genomic context in which the editing sites are embedded provide evidence in favor of the hypothesis that chloroplast RNA editing evolved to compensate mutations in the first land plants. PMID:23221608

  9. The workflow for quantitative proteome analysis of chloroplast development and differentiation, chloroplast mutants, and protein interactions by spectral counting.

    PubMed

    Friso, Giulia; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter outlines a quantitative proteomics workflow using a label-free spectral counting technique. The workflow has been tested on different aspects of chloroplast biology in maize and Arabidopsis, including chloroplast mutant analysis, cell-type specific chloroplast differentiation, and the proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. The workflow involves one-dimensional SDS-PAGE of the proteomes of leaves or chloroplast subfractions, tryptic digestions, online LC-MS/MS using a mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy and duty cycle, followed by semiautomatic data processing. The bioinformatics analysis can effectively select best gene models and deals with quantification of closely related proteins; the workflow avoids overidentification of proteins and results in more accurate protein quantification. The final output includes pairwise comparative quantitative analysis, as well as hierarchical clustering for discovery of temporal and spatial patterns of protein accumulation. A brief discussion about potential pitfalls, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of spectral counting, is provided.

  10. Ferredoxin-linked chloroplast enzymes. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes research on ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase. One of the primary goals of the original proposal was to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes that are located in spinach chloroplasts and utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, it was proposed that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase be determined. The amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. An aim related to elucidating the binding sites on these enzymes for ferredoxin was to determine whether there is a common site on ferredoxin involved in binding to all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. One additional aim was to characterize thioredoxin binding by FTR and determine whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress has been made on most of these original projects, although work conducted on FTR is still in its preliminary stages.

  11. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Chloroplast Genomic Information of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook with Sibling Species from the Genera Cryptomeria D. Don, Taiwania Hayata, and Calocedrus Kurz.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiwei; Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Shi, Jisen

    2016-01-01

    Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) is an important coniferous tree species for timber production, which accounts for ~40% of log supply from plantations in southern China. Chloroplast genetic engineering is an exciting field to engineer several valuable tree traits. In this study, we revisited the published complete Chinese fir (NC_021437) and four other coniferous species chloroplast genome sequence in Taxodiaceae. Comparison of their chloroplast genomes revealed three unique inversions found in the downstream of the gene clusters and evolutionary divergence were found, although overall the chloroplast genomic structure of the Cupressaceae linage was conserved. We also investigated the phylogenetic position of Chinese fir among conifers by examining gene functions, selection forces, substitution rates, and the full chloroplast genome sequence. Consistent with previous molecular systematics analysis, the results provided a well-supported phylogeny framework for the Cupressaceae that strongly confirms the "basal" position of Cunninghamia lanceolata. The structure of the Cunninghamia lanceolata chloroplast genome showed a partial lack of one IR copy, rearrangements clearly occurred and slight evolutionary divergence appeared among the cp genome of C. lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides, Taiwania flousiana, Calocedrus formosana and Cryptomeria japonica. The information from sequence divergence and length variation of genes could be further considered for bioengineering research. PMID:27399686

  13. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-05-30

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria.

  14. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control[W

    PubMed Central

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-01-01

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria. PMID:24879428

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Chloroplast Genomic Information of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook with Sibling Species from the Genera Cryptomeria D. Don, Taiwania Hayata, and Calocedrus Kurz

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiwei; Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Shi, Jisen

    2016-01-01

    Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) is an important coniferous tree species for timber production, which accounts for ~40% of log supply from plantations in southern China. Chloroplast genetic engineering is an exciting field to engineer several valuable tree traits. In this study, we revisited the published complete Chinese fir (NC_021437) and four other coniferous species chloroplast genome sequence in Taxodiaceae. Comparison of their chloroplast genomes revealed three unique inversions found in the downstream of the gene clusters and evolutionary divergence were found, although overall the chloroplast genomic structure of the Cupressaceae linage was conserved. We also investigated the phylogenetic position of Chinese fir among conifers by examining gene functions, selection forces, substitution rates, and the full chloroplast genome sequence. Consistent with previous molecular systematics analysis, the results provided a well-supported phylogeny framework for the Cupressaceae that strongly confirms the “basal” position of Cunninghamia lanceolata. The structure of the Cunninghamia lanceolata chloroplast genome showed a partial lack of one IR copy, rearrangements clearly occurred and slight evolutionary divergence appeared among the cp genome of C. lanceolata, Taiwania cryptomerioides, Taiwania flousiana, Calocedrus formosana and Cryptomeria japonica. The information from sequence divergence and length variation of genes could be further considered for bioengineering research. PMID:27399686

  16. Conditional Depletion of the Chlamydomonas Chloroplast ClpP Protease Activates Nuclear Genes Involved in Autophagy and Plastid Protein Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Casero, David; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Sommer, Frederik; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Rahire, Michèle; Schroda, Michael; Rusch, Jannette; Goodenough, Ursula; Pellegrini, Matteo; Perez-Perez, Maria Esther; Crespo, José Luis; Schaad, Olivier; Civic, Natacha; Rochaix, Jean David

    2014-05-30

    Plastid protein homeostasis is critical during chloroplast biogenesis and responses to changes in environmental conditions. Proteases and molecular chaperones involved in plastid protein quality control are encoded by the nucleus except for the catalytic subunit of ClpP, an evolutionarily conserved serine protease. Unlike its Escherichia coli ortholog, this chloroplast protease is essential for cell viability. To study its function, we used a recently developed system of repressible chloroplast gene expression in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Using this repressible system, we have shown that a selective gradual depletion of ClpP leads to alteration of chloroplast morphology, causes formation of vesicles, and induces extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is reminiscent of autophagy. Analysis of the transcriptome and proteome during ClpP depletion revealed a set of proteins that are more abundant at the protein level, but not at the RNA level. These proteins may comprise some of the ClpP substrates. Moreover, the specific increase in accumulation, both at the RNA and protein level, of small heat shock proteins, chaperones, proteases, and proteins involved in thylakoid maintenance upon perturbation of plastid protein homeostasis suggests the existence of a chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling pathway involved in organelle quality control. We suggest that this represents a chloroplast unfolded protein response that is conceptually similar to that observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and in mitochondria. PMID:24879428

  17. Polymorphisms of two Y chromosome microsatellites in Chinese cattle

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Chen, Hong; Wang, Shan; Xue, Kai; Lei, Chuzhao

    2006-01-01

    Two Y chromosome specific microsatellites UMN2404 and UMN0103 were genotyped and assessed for polymorphisms in a total of 423 unrelated males from 25 indigenous Chinese cattle breeds. Consistently, both microsatellites displayed specific indicine and taurine alleles in each bull examined. The indicine and taurine alleles were detected in 248 males (58.6%), and 175 males (41.4%), respectively, although these frequencies varied amongst different breeds examined. The indicine alleles dominated in the southern group (92.4%), while the taurine alleles dominated in the northern group (95.5%). Hainan Island was possibly the site for the origin of Chinese zebu, and Tibetan cattle were probably independently domesticated from another strain of Bos primigenius. The geographical distribution of these frequencies reveals a pattern of male indicine introgression and a hybrid zone of indicine and taurine cattle in China. The declining south-to-north and east-to-west gradient of male indicine introgression in China could be explained by historical data, geographical segregation and temperature and weather conditions. PMID:16954044

  18. Photosynthesis-dependent formation of convoluted plasma membrane domains in Chara internodal cells is independent of chloroplast position.

    PubMed

    Foissner, Ilse; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit

    2015-07-01

    The characean green alga Chara australis forms complex plasma membrane convolutions called charasomes when exposed to light. Charasomes are involved in local acidification of the surrounding medium which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. They have hitherto been only described in the internodal cells and in close contact with the stationary chloroplasts. Here, we show that charasomes are not only present in the internodal cells of the main axis, side branches, and branchlets but that the plasma membranes of chloroplast-containing nodal cells, protonemata, and rhizoids are also able to invaginate into complex domains. Removal of chloroplasts by local irradiation with intense light revealed that charasomes can develop at chloroplast-free "windows" and that the resulting pH banding pattern is independent of chloroplast or window position. Charasomes were not detected along cell walls containing functional plasmodesmata. However, charasomes formed next to a smooth wound wall which was deposited onto the plasmodesmata-containing wall when the neighboring cell was damaged. In contrast, charasomes were rarely found at uneven, bulged wound walls which protrude into the streaming endoplasm and which were induced by ligation or puncturing. The results of this study show that charasome formation, although dependent on photosynthesis, does not require intimate contact with chloroplasts. Our data suggest further that the presence of plasmodesmata inhibits charasome formation and/or that exposure to the outer medium is a prerequisite for charasome formation. Finally, we hypothesize that the absence of charasomes at bulged wound walls is due to the disturbance of uniform laminar mass streaming. PMID:25524777

  19. Differential Replication of Two Chloroplast Genome Forms in Heteroplasmic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Gametes Contributes to Alternative Inheritance Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Stern, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Two mechanisms for chloroplast DNA replication have been revealed through the study of an unusual heteroplasmic strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Heteroplasmy is a state in which more than one genome type occurs in a mitochondrion or chloroplast. The Chlamydomonas strain spa19 bears two distinct chloroplast genomes, termed PS+ and PS−. PS+ genomes predominate and are stably maintained in vegetative cells, despite their lack of known replication origins. In sexual crosses with spa19 as the mating type plus parent, however, PS+ genomes are transmitted in only ∼25% of tetrads, whereas the PS− genomes are faithfully inherited in all progeny. In this research, we have explored the mechanism underlying this biased uniparental inheritance. We show that the relative reduction and dilution of PS+ vs. PS− genomes takes place during gametogenesis. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling, followed by immunoprecipitation and PCR, was used to compare replication activities of PS+ and PS− genomes. We found that the replication of PS+ genomes is specifically suppressed during gametogenesis and germination of zygospores, a phenomenon that also was observed when spa19 cells were treated with rifampicin, an inhibitor of the chloroplast RNA polymerase. Furthermore, when bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was compared at 11 sites within the chloroplast genome between vegetative cells, gametes, and rifampicin-treated cells by quantitative PCR, we found that incorporation was often reduced at the same sites in gametes that were also sensitive to rifampicin treatment. We conclude that a transcription-mediated form of DNA replication priming, which may be downregulated during gametogenesis, is indispensable for robust maintenance of PS+ genomes. These results highlight the potential for chloroplast genome copy number regulation through alternative replication strategies. PMID:20519744

  20. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianjie; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3′ untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  1. Regulation of Chloroplast Protein Import by the Ubiquitin E3 Ligase SP1 Is Important for Stress Tolerance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ling, Qihua; Jarvis, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplasts are the organelles responsible for photosynthesis in plants [1, 2]. The chloroplast proteome comprises ∼3,000 different proteins, including components of the photosynthetic apparatus, which are highly abundant. Most chloroplast proteins are nucleus-encoded and imported following synthesis in the cytosol. Such import is mediated by multiprotein complexes in the envelope membranes that surround each organelle [3, 4]. The translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) mediates client protein recognition and early stages of import. The TOC apparatus is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in a process controlled by the envelope-localized ubiquitin E3 ligase SUPPRESSOR OF PPI1 LOCUS1 (SP1) [5, 6]. Previous work showed that SP1-mediated regulation of chloroplast protein import contributes to the organellar proteome changes that occur during plant development (e.g., during de-etiolation). Here, we reveal a critical role for SP1 in plant responses to abiotic stress, which is a major and increasing cause of agricultural yield losses globally [7]. Arabidopsis plants lacking SP1 are hypersensitive to salt, osmotic, and oxidative stresses, whereas plants overexpressing SP1 are considerably more stress tolerant than wild-type. We present evidence that SP1 acts to deplete the TOC apparatus under stress conditions to limit the import of photosynthetic apparatus components, which may attenuate photosynthetic activity and reduce the potential for reactive oxygen species production and photo-oxidative damage. Our results indicate that chloroplast protein import is responsive to environmental cues, enabling dynamic regulation of the organellar proteome, and suggest new approaches for improving stress tolerance in crops.

  2. KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

    2014-06-01

    The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs.

  3. Photosynthesis-dependent formation of convoluted plasma membrane domains in Chara internodal cells is independent of chloroplast position.

    PubMed

    Foissner, Ilse; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit

    2015-07-01

    The characean green alga Chara australis forms complex plasma membrane convolutions called charasomes when exposed to light. Charasomes are involved in local acidification of the surrounding medium which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. They have hitherto been only described in the internodal cells and in close contact with the stationary chloroplasts. Here, we show that charasomes are not only present in the internodal cells of the main axis, side branches, and branchlets but that the plasma membranes of chloroplast-containing nodal cells, protonemata, and rhizoids are also able to invaginate into complex domains. Removal of chloroplasts by local irradiation with intense light revealed that charasomes can develop at chloroplast-free "windows" and that the resulting pH banding pattern is independent of chloroplast or window position. Charasomes were not detected along cell walls containing functional plasmodesmata. However, charasomes formed next to a smooth wound wall which was deposited onto the plasmodesmata-containing wall when the neighboring cell was damaged. In contrast, charasomes were rarely found at uneven, bulged wound walls which protrude into the streaming endoplasm and which were induced by ligation or puncturing. The results of this study show that charasome formation, although dependent on photosynthesis, does not require intimate contact with chloroplasts. Our data suggest further that the presence of plasmodesmata inhibits charasome formation and/or that exposure to the outer medium is a prerequisite for charasome formation. Finally, we hypothesize that the absence of charasomes at bulged wound walls is due to the disturbance of uniform laminar mass streaming.

  4. KNOX genes influence a gradient of fruit chloroplast development through regulation of GOLDEN2-LIKE expression in tomato.

    PubMed

    Nadakuduti, Satya Swathi; Holdsworth, William L; Klein, Chelsey L; Barry, Cornelius S

    2014-06-01

    The chlorophyll content of unripe fleshy fruits is positively correlated with the nutrient content and flavor of ripe fruit. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the uniform ripening (u) locus, which encodes a GOLDEN 2-LIKE transcription factor (SlGLK2), influences a gradient of chloroplast development that extends from the stem end of the fruit surrounding the calyx to the base of the fruit. With the exception of the u locus, the factors that influence the formation of this developmental gradient are unknown. In this study, characterization and positional cloning of the uniform gray-green (ug) locus of tomato reveals a thus far unknown role for the Class I KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX (KNOX) gene, TKN4, in specifying the formation of this chloroplast gradient. The involvement of KNOX in fruit chloroplast development was confirmed through characterization of the Curl (Cu) mutant, a dominant gain-of-function mutation of TKN2, which displays ectopic fruit chloroplast development that resembles SlGLK2 over-expression. TKN2 and TKN4 act upstream of SlGLK2 and the related gene ARABIDOPSIS PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 2-LIKE (SlAPRR2-LIKE) to establish their latitudinal gradient of expression across developing fruit that leads to a gradient of chloroplast development. Class I KNOX genes typically influence plant morphology through maintenance of meristem activity, but this study identifies a role for TKN2 and TKN4 in specifically influencing chloroplast development in fruit but not leaves, suggesting that this fundamental process is differentially regulated in these two organs. PMID:24689783

  5. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  6. Formation kinetics and H2O2 distribution in chloroplasts and protoplasts of photosynthetic leaf cells of higher plants under illumination.

    PubMed

    Naydov, I A; Mubarakshina, M M; Ivanov, B N

    2012-02-01

    The dye H(2)DCF-DA, which forms the fluorescent molecule DCF in the reaction with hydrogen peroxide, H(2)O(2), was used to study light-induced H(2)O(2) production in isolated intact chloroplasts and in protoplasts of mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis, pea, and maize. A technique to follow the kinetics of light-induced H(2)O(2) production in the photosynthesizing cells using this dye has been developed. Distribution of DCF fluorescence in these cells in the light has been investigated. It was found that for the first minutes of illumination the intensity of DCF fluorescence increases linearly after a small lag both in isolated chloroplasts and in chloroplasts inside protoplast. In protoplasts of Arabidopsis mutant vtc2-2 with disturbed biosynthesis of ascorbate, the rate of increase in DCF fluorescence intensity in chloroplasts was considerably higher than in protoplasts of the wild type plant. Illumination of protoplasts also led to an increase in DCF fluorescence intensity in mitochondria. Intensity of DCF fluorescence in chloroplasts increased much more rapidly than in cytoplasm. The cessation of cytoplasmic movement under illumination lowered the rate of DCF fluorescence intensity increase in chloroplasts and sharply accelerated it in the cytoplasm. It was revealed that in response to switching off the light, the intensity of fluorescence of both DCF and fluorescent dye FDA increases in the cytoplasm in the vicinity of chloroplasts, while it decreases in the chloroplasts; the opposite changes occur in response to switching on the light again. It was established that these phenomena are connected with proton transport from chloroplasts in the light. In the presence of nigericin, which prevents the establishment of transmembrane proton gradients, the level of DCF fluorescence in cytoplasm was higher and increased more rapidly than in the chloroplasts from the very beginning of illumination. These results imply the presence of H(2)O(2) export from chloroplasts to

  7. Does Chloroplast Size Influence Photosynthetic Nitrogen Use Efficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Ren, Binbin; Ding, Lei; Shen, Qirong; Peng, Shaobing; Guo, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) supply frequently results in a decreased photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), which indicates a less efficient use of accumulated Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Chloroplasts are the location of Rubisco and the endpoint of CO2 diffusion, and they play a vital important role in photosynthesis. However, the effects of chloroplast development on photosynthesis are poorly explored. In the present study, rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L., cv. ‘Shanyou 63’, and ‘Yangdao 6’) were grown hydroponically with three different N levels, morphological characteristics, photosynthetic variables and chloroplast size were measured. In Shanyou 63, a negative relationship between chloroplast size and PNUE was observed across three different N levels. Here, plants with larger chloroplasts had a decreased ratio of mesophyll conductance (gm) to Rubisco content (gm/Rubisco) and a lower Rubisco specific activity. In Yangdao 6, there was no change in chloroplast size and no decline in PNUE or gm/Rubisco ratio under high N supply. It is suggested that large chloroplasts under high N supply is correlated with the decreased Rubisco specific activity and PNUE. PMID:23620801

  8. Molecular identification of sequestered diatom chloroplasts and kleptoplastidy in foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Loïc; de Vargas, Colomban; Pawlowski, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Kleptoplastidy is the ability of heterotrophic organisms to preserve chloroplasts of algal preys they eat and partially digest. As the sequestered chloroplasts stay functional for months, the "host" becomes photosynthetically active. Although remaining a marginal process, kleptoplastidy was observed in different protist lineages, including foraminifera. Previous studies showed at least eight species of the foraminiferal genera Haynesina and Elphidium grazing on diatoms and husbanding their chloroplasts. In order to characterize more precisely the origin of kleptochloroplasts in these genera, we obtained 1027 chloroplastic 16S rDNA sequences from 13 specimens of two Haynesina and five Elphidium species. We identified the foraminiferal kleptochloroplasts using a reference phylogeny made of 87 chloroplastic sequences of known species of diatoms and brown algae. All the analyzed specimens were performing kleptoplastidy and according to our phylogenetic analyses they seem to retain exclusively chloroplasts of diatom origin. There is no apparent specificity for the type of diatom from which chloroplasts originated, however some foraminiferal species seem to accept a wider range of diatoms than others. Possibly the diversity of kleptochloroplasts depends on the type of diatoms the foraminiferans feed on.

  9. Chloroplasts move towards the nearest anticlinal walls under dark condition.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Wada, Masamitsu

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular positions in response to their light environment. Under darkness, chloroplasts assume special positions that are different from those under light conditions. Here, we analyzed chloroplast dark positioning using Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophyte cells. When chloroplasts were transferred into darkness, during the first 1-5 h, they moved towards the anticlinal cell walls bordering the adjacent cells rather rapidly. Then, they slowed down and accumulated at the anticlinal walls gradually over the following 24-36 h. The chloroplast movements could be roughly classified into two different categories: initial rapid straight movement and later, slow staggering movement. When the chloroplast accumulation response was induced in dark-adapted cells by partial cell irradiation with a microbeam targeted to the center of the cells, chloroplasts moved towards the beam spot from the anticlinal walls. However, when the microbeam was switched off, they moved to the nearest anticlinal walls and not to their original positions if they were not the closest, indicating that they know the direction of the nearest anticlinal wall and do not have particular areas that they migrate to during dark positioning.

  10. Influence of Sugars on Blue Light-Induced Chloroplast Relocations

    PubMed Central

    Banaś, Agnieszka Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sugars on blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Sucrose and glucose inhibited chloroplast responses in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lemna trisulca fronds in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The prolonged exposure necessary for inhibition indicates that sugars may act via altered gene expression. Overexpression of phototropin2, a photoreceptor responsible for the strong blue light response of chloroplasts, counteracted the sugar effect. This may suggest that sugars modify some component(s) of the phototropin2-mediated signal transduction pathway. The expression of PHOT2 was not suppressed by sugars in wild type plants, it was even upregulated by glucose. Impaired chloroplast movements were observed only in mature Arabidopsis plants. The mRNA of SAG12, a late senescence marker, was not detectable in the sugar-incubated leaves. The SAG13 mRNA level and its regulation by sugars were similar in wild type and PHOT2 overexpressor. Thus, the sugar insensitivity of 35S:PHOT2 chloroplast responses was not due to delayed senescence. The sugar-induced transduction pathway involved remains unclear. 3-O-methylglucose did not affect chloroplast movements suggesting the participation of a hexokinase-dependent pathway. Only the amplitude of avoidance response was reduced in gin2-1, a hexokinase1 null mutant. Probably other hexokinases, or glycolysis-associated signals play a role in the suppression of chloroplast responses. PMID:19516992

  11. Mining the soluble chloroplast proteome by affinity chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Csaszar, Edina; Teige, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Chloroplasts are fundamental organelles enabling plant photoautotrophy. Besides their outstanding physiological role in fixation of atmospheric CO2, they harbor many important metabolic processes such as biosynthesis of amino acids, vitamins or hormones. Technical advances in MS allowed the recent identification of most chloroplast proteins. However, for a deeper understanding of chloroplast function it is important to obtain a complete list of constituents, which is so far limited by the detection of low-abundant proteins. Therefore, we developed a two-step strategy for the enrichment of low-abundant soluble chloroplast proteins from Pisum sativum and their subsequent identification by MS. First, chloroplast protein extracts were depleted from the most abundant protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase by SEC or heating. Further purification was carried out by affinity chromatography, using ligands specific for ATP- or metal-binding proteins. By these means, we were able to identify a total of 448 proteins including 43 putative novel chloroplast proteins. Additionally, the chloroplast localization of 13 selected proteins was confirmed using yellow fluorescent protein fusion analyses. The selected proteins included a phosphoglycerate mutase, a cysteine protease, a putative protein kinase and an EF-hand containing substrate carrier protein, which are expected to exhibit important metabolic or regulatory functions. PMID:21365755

  12. Partial Purification of Intact Chloroplasts from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Belknap, W R

    1983-08-01

    Partially purified intact chloroplasts were prepared from batch cultures of both wild type (Wt) and a mutant strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Protoplasts were generated from log phase cultures of Wt (137c) and the phosphoribulokinase-deficient mutant F60 by incubation of the cells in autolysine. These protoplasts were suspended in an osmoticum, cooled, and then subjected to a 40 pounds per square inch pressure shock using a Yeda pressure bomb. The resulting preparation was fractionated on a Percoll step gradient which separated the intact chloroplasts from both broken chloroplasts and protoplasts.The chloroplast preparation was not significantly contaminated with the cytoplasmic enzyme activity phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (>5%), and contained (100%) stromal enzyme activity ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. The chloroplast preparation is significantly contaminated by mitochondria, as determined by succinate dehydrogenase activity. Chloroplasts prepared from Wt cells retained CO(2)-dependent O(2) photoevolution at rates in excess of 60 micromoles per milligram chlorophyll per hour, an activity which is severely inhibited by the addition of 10 millimolar KH(2)PO(4). The chloroplasts are osmotically sensitive as determined by ferricyanide-dependent O(2) photoevolution.

  13. GLK gene pairs regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

    PubMed

    Fitter, David W; Martin, David J; Copley, Martin J; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2002-09-01

    Chloroplast biogenesis is a complex process that requires close co-ordination between two genomes. Many of the proteins that accumulate in the chloroplast are encoded by the nuclear genome, and the developmental transition from proplastid to chloroplast is regulated by nuclear genes. Here we show that a pair of Golden 2-like (GLK) genes regulates chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. The GLK proteins are members of the GARP superfamily of transcription factors, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the maize, rice and Arabidopsis GLK gene pairs comprise a distinct group within the GARP superfamily. Further phylogenetic analysis suggests that the gene pairs arose through separate duplication events in the monocot and dicot lineages. As in rice, AtGLK1 and AtGLK2 are expressed in partially overlapping domains in photosynthetic tissue. Insertion mutants demonstrate that this expression pattern reflects a degree of functional redundancy as single mutants display normal phenotypes in most photosynthetic tissues. However, double mutants are pale green in all photosynthetic tissues and chloroplasts exhibit a reduction in granal thylakoids. Products of several genes involved in light harvesting also accumulate at reduced levels in double mutant chloroplasts. GLK genes therefore regulate chloroplast development in diverse plant species.

  14. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection

    PubMed Central

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that sees some sporadic reports every now and then. The plants have 2 energy generating sub-cellular organelles- mitochondria and chloroplasts unlike animals that just have mitochondria. The presence of chloroplast as an additional energy transducing and ROS generating compartment in a plant cell inclines to advocate the involvement of chloroplasts in PCD execution process. As chloroplasts are supposed to be progenies of unicellular photosynthetic organisms that evolved as a result of endosymbiosis, the possibility of retaining some of the components involved in bacterial PCD by chloroplasts cannot be ruled out. Despite several excellent reviews on PCD in plants, there is a void on an update of information at a place on the regulation of PCD by chloroplast. This review has been written to provide an update on the information supporting the involvement of chloroplast in PCD process and the possible future course of the field. PMID:25760871

  15. Decreased capacity for sodium export out of Arabidopsis chloroplasts impairs salt tolerance, photosynthesis and plant performance.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maria; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schroeder, Julian I; Kemp, Grant; Young, Howard S; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2014-05-01

    Salt stress is a widespread phenomenon, limiting plant performance in large areas around the world. Although various types of plant sodium/proton antiporters have been characterized, the physiological function of NHD1 from Arabidopsis thaliana has not been elucidated in detail so far. Here we report that the NHD1-GFP fusion protein localizes to the chloroplast envelope. Heterologous expression of AtNHD1 was sufficient to complement a salt-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant lacking its endogenous sodium/proton exchangers. Transport competence of NHD1 was confirmed using recombinant, highly purified carrier protein reconstituted into proteoliposomes, proving Na(+) /H(+) antiport. In planta NHD1 expression was found to be highest in mature and senescent leaves but was not induced by sodium chloride application. When compared to wild-type controls, nhd1 T-DNA insertion mutants showed decreased biomasses and lower chlorophyll levels after sodium feeding. Interestingly, if grown on sand and supplemented with high sodium chloride, nhd1 mutants exhibited leaf tissue Na(+) levels similar to those of wild-type plants, but the Na(+) content of chloroplasts increased significantly. These high sodium levels in mutant chloroplasts resulted in markedly impaired photosynthetic performance as revealed by a lower quantum yield of photosystem II and increased non-photochemical quenching. Moreover, high Na(+) levels might hamper activity of the plastidic bile acid/sodium symporter family protein 2 (BASS2). The resulting pyruvate deficiency might cause the observed decreased phenylalanine levels in the nhd1 mutants due to lack of precursors.

  16. The chloroplast genome of the hexaploid Spartina maritima (Poaceae, Chloridoideae): Comparative analyses and molecular dating.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Gueutin, M; Bellot, S; Martin, G E; Boutte, J; Chelaifa, H; Lima, O; Michon-Coudouel, S; Naquin, D; Salmon, A; Ainouche, K; Ainouche, M

    2015-12-01

    The history of many plant lineages is complicated by reticulate evolution with cases of hybridization often followed by genome duplication (allopolyploidy). In such a context, the inference of phylogenetic relationships and biogeographic scenarios based on molecular data is easier using haploid markers like chloroplast genome sequences. Hybridization and polyploidization occurred recurrently in the genus Spartina (Poaceae, Chloridoideae), as illustrated by the recent formation of the invasive allododecaploid S. anglica during the 19th century in Europe. Until now, only a few plastid markers were available to explore the history of this genus and their low variability limited the resolution of species relationships. We sequenced the complete chloroplast genome (plastome) of S. maritima, the native European parent of S. anglica, and compared it to the plastomes of other Poaceae. Our analysis revealed the presence of fast-evolving regions of potential taxonomic, phylogeographic and phylogenetic utility at various levels within the Poaceae family. Using secondary calibrations, we show that the tetraploid and hexaploid lineages of Spartina diverged 6-10 my ago, and that the two parents of the invasive allopolyploid S. anglica separated 2-4 my ago via long distance dispersal of the ancestor of S. maritima over the Atlantic Ocean. Finally, we discuss the meaning of divergence times between chloroplast genomes in the context of reticulate evolution.

  17. HMA6 and HMA8 are two chloroplast Cu+-ATPases with different enzymatic properties

    PubMed Central

    Sautron, Emeline; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Giustini, Cécile; Pro, Danièle; Crouzy, Serge; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Rolland, Norbert; Catty, Patrice; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) plays a key role in the photosynthetic process as cofactor of the plastocyanin (PC), an essential component of the chloroplast photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Encoded by the nuclear genome, PC is translocated in its apo-form into the chloroplast and the lumen of thylakoids where it is processed to its mature form and acquires Cu. In Arabidopsis, Cu delivery into the thylakoids involves two transporters of the PIB-1 ATPases family, heavy metal associated protein 6 (HMA6) located at the chloroplast envelope and HMA8 at the thylakoid membrane. To gain further insight into the way Cu is delivered to PC, we analysed the enzymatic properties of HMA8 and compared them with HMA6 ones using in vitro phosphorylation assays and phenotypic tests in yeast. These experiments reveal that HMA6 and HMA8 display different enzymatic properties: HMA8 has a higher apparent affinity for Cu+ but a slower dephosphorylation kinetics than HMA6. Modelling experiments suggest that these differences could be explained by the electrostatic properties of the Cu+ releasing cavities of the two transporters and/or by the different nature of their cognate Cu+ acceptors (metallochaperone/PC). PMID:26182363

  18. Species delimitation in the Central African herbs Haumania (Marantaceae) using georeferenced nuclear and chloroplastic DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C; Hardy, O J

    2010-11-01

    Species delimitation is a fundamental biological concept which is frequently discussed and altered to integrate new insights. These revealed that speciation is not a one step phenomenon but an ongoing process and morphological characters alone are not sufficient anymore to properly describe the results of this process. Here we want to assess the degree of speciation in two closely related lianescent taxa from the tropical African genus Haumania which display distinct vegetative traits despite a high similarity in reproductive traits and a partial overlap in distribution area which might facilitate gene flow. To this end, we combined phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses using nuclear (nr) and chloroplast (cp) DNA sequences in comparison to morphological species descriptions. The nuclear dataset unambiguously supports the morphological species concept in Haumania. However, the main chloroplastic haplotypes are shared between species and, although a geographic analysis of cpDNA diversity confirms that individuals from the same taxon are more related than individuals from distinct taxa, cp-haplotypes display correlated geographic distributions between species. Hybridization is the most plausible reason for this pattern. A scenario involving speciation in geographic isolation followed by range expansion is outlined. The study highlights the gain of information on the speciation process in Haumania by adding georeferenced molecular data to the morphological characteristics. It also shows that nr and cp sequence data might provide different but complementary information, questioning the reliability of the unique use of chloroplast data for species recognition by DNA barcoding. PMID:20813193

  19. Identification of Orchidaceae species from Northern West of Syria based on chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Haider, N; Nabulsi, I; Kamary, Y

    2010-08-01

    The plant family Orchidaceae has a great economic value (ornamental and medical uses, beside the aromatic features). Traditionally, identification of orchid species has relied heavily on morphological features. These features, however, are either not variable enough between species or too plastic to be used for identification at the species level. DNA-based markers could be the alternative strategy towards an accurate and robust identification of those species. Since the chloroplast DNA has a lower level of evolution compared to the nuclear genome, an attempt was made in this study to investigate polymorphism in the chloroplast DNA among orchid species distributed in North-West region of Syria using Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (CAPS) technique for developing markers for the diagnosis of targeted species. CAPS analysis was carried out on 34 orchid samples that represent all species observed in the region. Universal primers were used to amplify targeted chloroplast regions. Generated PCR products were digested with various restriction enzymes. CAPS results revealed high polymorphism among species examined. This polymorphism was suffiecient for the diagnosis of all of those species apart from five species (Ophrys fuciflora (one sample), Oph. bornmuelleri, Ophrys sp., Oph. scolopax and Oph. argolica). Availability of such species-specific markers would ensure more authentic identification of orchid species compared to morphological characters and can be regarded as a valuable tool to guide in conservation programs of orchid species in Syria. CAPS data generated were converted to an identification key for orchid species studied.

  20. Species delimitation in the Central African herbs Haumania (Marantaceae) using georeferenced nuclear and chloroplastic DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C; Hardy, O J

    2010-11-01

    Species delimitation is a fundamental biological concept which is frequently discussed and altered to integrate new insights. These revealed that speciation is not a one step phenomenon but an ongoing process and morphological characters alone are not sufficient anymore to properly describe the results of this process. Here we want to assess the degree of speciation in two closely related lianescent taxa from the tropical African genus Haumania which display distinct vegetative traits despite a high similarity in reproductive traits and a partial overlap in distribution area which might facilitate gene flow. To this end, we combined phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses using nuclear (nr) and chloroplast (cp) DNA sequences in comparison to morphological species descriptions. The nuclear dataset unambiguously supports the morphological species concept in Haumania. However, the main chloroplastic haplotypes are shared between species and, although a geographic analysis of cpDNA diversity confirms that individuals from the same taxon are more related than individuals from distinct taxa, cp-haplotypes display correlated geographic distributions between species. Hybridization is the most plausible reason for this pattern. A scenario involving speciation in geographic isolation followed by range expansion is outlined. The study highlights the gain of information on the speciation process in Haumania by adding georeferenced molecular data to the morphological characteristics. It also shows that nr and cp sequence data might provide different but complementary information, questioning the reliability of the unique use of chloroplast data for species recognition by DNA barcoding.

  1. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Guadua angustifolia and Comparative Analyses of Neotropical-Paleotropical Bamboos

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaoli; Lan, Siren; Cai, Bangping; Chen, Shipin; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate chloroplast genome evolution within neotropical-paleotropical bamboos, we fully characterized the chloroplast genome of the woody bamboo Guadua angustifolia. This genome is 135,331 bp long and comprises of an 82,839-bp large single-copy (LSC) region, a 12,898-bp small single-copy (SSC) region, and a pair of 19,797-bp inverted repeats (IRs). Comparative analyses revealed marked conservation of gene content and sequence evolutionary rates between neotropical and paleotropical woody bamboos. The neotropical herbaceous bamboo Cryptochloa strictiflora differs from woody bamboos in IR/SSC boundaries in that it exhibits slightly contracted IRs and a faster substitution rate. The G. angustifolia chloroplast genome is similar in size to that of neotropical herbaceous bamboos but is ~3 kb smaller than that of paleotropical woody bamboos. Dissimilarities in genome size are correlated with differences in the lengths of intergenic spacers, which are caused by large-fragment insertion and deletion. Phylogenomic analyses of 62 taxa yielded a tree topology identical to that found in preceding studies. Divergence time estimation suggested that most bamboo genera diverged after the Miocene and that speciation events of extant species occurred during or after the Pliocene. PMID:26630488

  2. Intraspecific and heteroplasmic variations, gene losses and inversions in the chloroplast genome of Astragalus membranaceus

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wanjun; Ni, Dapeng; Wang, Yujun; Shao, Junjie; Wang, Xincun; Yang, Dan; Wang, Jinsheng; Chen, Haimei; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus membranaceus is an important medicinal plant in Asia. Several of its varieties have been used interchangeably as raw materials for commercial production. High resolution genetic markers are in urgent need to distinguish these varieties. Here, we sequenced and analyzed the chloroplast genome of A. membranaceus (Fisch.) Bunge var. mongholicus (Bunge) P.K. Hsiao using the next generation DNA sequencing technology. The genome was assembled using Abyss and then subjected to gene prediction using CPGAVAS and repeat analysis using MISA, Tandem Repeats Finder, and REPuter. Finally, the genome was subjected phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses. The complete genome is 123,582 bp long, containing only one copy of the inverted repeat. Gene prediction revealed 110 genes encoding 76 proteins, 30 tRNAs, and four rRNAs. Five intra-specific hypermutation loci were identified, three of which are heteroplasmic. Furthermore, three gene losses and two large inversions were identified. Comparative genomic analyses demonstrated the dynamic nature of the Papilionoideae chloroplast genomes, which showed occurrence of numerous hypermutation loci, frequent gene losses, and fragment inversions. Results obtained herein elucidate the complex evolutionary history of chloroplast genomes and have laid the foundation for the identification of genetic markers to distinguish A. membranaceus varieties. PMID:26899134

  3. Deficient Photosystem II in Agranal Bundle Sheath Chloroplasts of C4 Plants

    PubMed Central

    Woo, K. C.; Anderson, Jan M.; Boardman, N. K.; Downton, W. J. S.; Osmond, C. B.; Thorne, S. W.

    1970-01-01

    A method is described for separating mesophyll and bundle sheath chloroplasts from the leaves of C4 plants. The agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts are inactive in the Hill reaction, whereas granal bundle sheath and granal mesophyll chloroplasts exhibit normal photosystem II activity. The agranal bundle sheath chloroplasts are deficient in photosystem II; they lack cytochrome b-559 and the fluorescence bands associated with photosystem II. All the chloroplasts exhibit photosystem I activity. PMID:16591853

  4. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals.

  5. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  6. Production of therapeutic proteins in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Flores-Uribe, José; Pérez-España, Víctor Hugo; Salgado-Manjarrez, Edgar; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been used to explore the potential to use it as an inexpensive and easily scalable system for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Diverse proteins, such as bacterial and viral antigens, antibodies and, immunotoxins have been successfully expressed in the chloroplast using endogenous and chimeric promoter sequences. In some cases, proteins have accumulated to high level, demonstrating that this technology could compete with current production platforms. This review focuses on the works that have engineered the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii with the aim of producing recombinant proteins intended for therapeutical use in humans or animals. PMID:25136510

  7. Characterization of cooperative bicarbonate uptake into chloroplast stroma in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takashi; Sato, Emi; Iguchi, Hiro; Fukuda, Yuri; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2015-06-01

    The supply of inorganic carbon (Ci; CO2 and HCO3 (-)) is an environmental rate-limiting factor in aquatic photosynthetic organisms. To overcome the difficulty in acquiring Ci in limiting-CO2 conditions, an active Ci uptake system called the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM) is induced to increase CO2 concentrations in the chloroplast stroma. An ATP-binding cassette transporter, HLA3, and a formate/nitrite transporter homolog, LCIA, are reported to be associated with HCO3 (-