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Sample records for chloroquine resistance transporter

  1. Characterization of the Chloroquine Resistance Transporter Homologue in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Warring, Sally D.; Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein confer resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. PfCRT localizes to the parasite digestive vacuole, the site of chloroquine action, where it mediates resistance by transporting chloroquine out of the digestive vacuole. PfCRT belongs to a family of transporter proteins called the chloroquine resistance transporter family. CRT family proteins are found throughout the Apicomplexa, in some protists, and in plants. Despite the importance of PfCRT in drug resistance, little is known about the evolution or native function of CRT proteins. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii contains one CRT family protein. We demonstrate that T. gondii CRT (TgCRT) colocalizes with markers for the vacuolar (VAC) compartment in these parasites. The TgCRT-containing VAC is a highly dynamic organelle, changing its morphology and protein composition between intracellular and extracellular forms of the parasite. Regulated knockdown of TgCRT expression resulted in modest reduction in parasite fitness and swelling of the VAC, indicating that TgCRT contributes to parasite growth and VAC physiology. Together, our findings provide new information on the role of CRT family proteins in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24859994

  2. Chloroquine-resistant isoforms of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter acidify lysosomal pH in HEK293 cells more than chloroquine-sensitive isoforms.

    PubMed

    Reeves, David C; Liebelt, David A; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Roepe, Paul D; Fidock, David A; Akabas, Myles H

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria imperils the lives of millions of people in Africa, Southeast Asia and South America. Chloroquine resistance is associated with mutations in the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT). We expressed chloroquine-sensitive (HB3) and resistant (Dd2) pfcrt alleles in HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. PfCRT localized to the lysosomal limiting membrane and was not detected in the plasma membrane. We observed significant acidification of lysosomes containing PfCRT HB3 and Dd2, with Dd2 acidifying significantly more than HB3. A mutant HB3 allele expressing the K76T mutation (earlier found to be key for chloroquine resistance) acidified to the same extent as Dd2, whereas the acidification by a Dd2 allele expressing the T76K "back mutation" was significantly less than Dd2. Thus, the amino acid at position 76 is both an important determinant of chloroquine resistance in parasites and of lysosomal acidification following heterologous expression. PfCRT may be capable of modulating the pH of the parasite digestive vacuole, and thus chloroquine availability. Chloroquine accumulation and glycyl-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide-induced release of lysosomal Ca(2+) stores were unaffected by PfCRT expression. Cytoplasmic domain mutations did not alter PfCRT sorting to the lysosomal membrane. This heterologous expression system will be useful to characterize PfCRT protein structure and function, and elucidate its molecular role in chloroquine resistance.

  3. CHLOROQUINE-RESISTANT ISOFORMS OF THE Plasmodium falciparum CHLOROQUINE RESISTANCE TRANSPORTER ACIDIFY LYSOSOMAL pH IN HEK293 CELLS MORE THAN CHLOROQUINE-SENSITIVE ISOFORMS*

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, David C.; Liebelt, David A.; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Roepe, Paul D.; Fidock, David A.; Akabas, Myles H.

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria imperils the lives of millions of people in Africa, Southeast Asia and South America. Chloroquine resistance is associated with mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT). We expressed chloroquine sensitive (HB3) and resistant (Dd2) pfcrt alleles in HEK293 human embryonic kidney cells. PfCRT localized to the lysosomal limiting membrane and was not detected in the plasma membrane. We observed significant acidification of lysosomes containing PfCRT HB3 and Dd2, with Dd2 acidifying significantly more than HB3. A mutant HB3 allele expressing the K76T mutation (earlier found to be key for chloroquine resistance) acidified to the same extent as Dd2, whereas the acidification of a Dd2 allele expressing the T76K “back mutation” was significantly less than Dd2. Thus, the amino acid at position 76 is both an important determinant of chloroquine resistance in parasites and of lysosomal acidification following heterologous expression. PfCRT may be capable of modulating the pH of the parasite digestive vacuole, and thus chloroquine availability. Chloroquine accumulation and glycyl-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide-induced release of lysosomal Ca2+ stores were unaffected by PfCRT expression. Cytoplasmic domain mutations did not alter PfCRT sorting to the lysosomal membrane. This heterologous expression system will be useful to characterize PfCRT protein structure and function, and elucidate its molecular role in chloroquine resistance. PMID:17014918

  4. Short report: polymorphisms in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Lombok, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Yoshinaga, Kazumi; Suryanatha, Aan; Suarsana, Nyoman; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2004-07-01

    The polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) and P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) genes, which are associated with chloroquine resistance, were examined in 48 P. falciparum isolates from uncomplicated malaria patients from the West Lombok District in Indonesia. The point mutation N86Y in pfmdr1 was present in 35.4% of the isolates and mutation K76T in pfcrt was found in all but one of the samples studied. Identified pfcrt haplotypes were mainly identical to the Papua New Guinea type S(agt)VMNT (42 of 48, 87.5%), and a few isolates had the Southeast Asia type CVIET (5 of 48, 10.4%). Moreover, one P. falciparum isolate harbored the K76N mutation, giving rise to the haplotype CVMNN, which was not previously reported in field isolates. Our findings suggest that chloroquine resistance in this area might have the same origin as in Papua New Guinea.

  5. Multiple Drugs Compete for Transport via the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter at Distinct but Interdependent Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Bellanca, Sebastiano; Summers, Robert L.; Meyrath, Max; Dave, Anurag; Nash, Megan N.; Dittmer, Martin; Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Stein, Wilfred D.; Martin, Rowena E.; Lanzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the “chloroquine resistance transporter” (PfCRT) are a major determinant of drug resistance in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have previously shown that mutant PfCRT transports the antimalarial drug chloroquine away from its target, whereas the wild-type form of PfCRT does not. However, little is understood about the transport of other drugs via PfCRT or the mechanism by which PfCRT recognizes different substrates. Here we show that mutant PfCRT also transports quinine, quinidine, and verapamil, indicating that the protein behaves as a multidrug resistance carrier. Detailed kinetic analyses revealed that chloroquine and quinine compete for transport via PfCRT in a manner that is consistent with mixed-type inhibition. Moreover, our analyses suggest that PfCRT accepts chloroquine and quinine at distinct but antagonistically interacting sites. We also found verapamil to be a partial mixed-type inhibitor of chloroquine transport via PfCRT, further supporting the idea that PfCRT possesses multiple substrate-binding sites. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the workings of PfCRT, which could be exploited to design potent inhibitors of this key mediator of drug resistance. PMID:25378409

  6. Molecular epidemiology of malaria in Cameroon. XIV. Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PFCRT) gene sequences of isolates before and after chloroquine treatment.

    PubMed

    Basco, Leonardo K; Ndounga, Mathieu; Ngane, Vincent Foumane; Soula, Georges

    2002-10-01

    Laboratory studies have strongly suggested that the gene coding for Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PFCRT) may play a determinant role in chloroquine resistance. A clinical study in Mali also found evidence for selection of the key PFCRT amino acid substitution, Lys76Thr, in patients who fail to respond to chloroquine treatment. To test the hypothesis that in vivo selection of mutant PFCRT alleles occurs after chloroquine treatment, PFCRT and merozoite surface antigen 2 (msa-2) polymorphisms were compared between 61 pretreatment and posttreatment paired samples from children with either clinical or parasitologic failure. There were six wild-type PFCRT alleles, 44 mutant alleles, and 11 mixed alleles among pretreatment isolates. All posttreatment parasites had mutant PFCRT alleles. Recrudescence accounted for 42 of 61 posttreatment infections, while 19 posttreatment infections were due to new infection (including all isolates with Lys-76 before treatment and Thr-76 after treatment). Seven pretreatment isolates with mixed PFCRT alleles had only Thr-76 on recrudescence, providing a direct evidence for in vivo selection for mutant PFCRT. Although the presence of mutant PFCRT alleles in pretreatment isolates is not predictive of chloroquine treatment failure, our data support the hypothesis that in vivo selection for recrudescent parasites carrying mutant PFCRT alleles occurs. These results may have important implications for the future surveillance of chloroquine resistance by the use of molecular markers.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter is a H+-coupled polyspecific nutrient and drug exporter

    PubMed Central

    Juge, Narinobu; Moriyama, Sawako; Miyaji, Takaaki; Kawakami, Mamiyo; Iwai, Haruka; Fukui, Tomoya; Nelson, Nathan; Omote, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Extrusion of chloroquine (CQ) from digestive vacuoles through the Plasmodium falciparum CQ resistance transporter (PfCRT) is essential to establish CQ resistance of the malaria parasite. However, the physiological relevance of PfCRT and how CQ-resistant PfCRT gains the ability to transport CQ remain unknown. We prepared proteoliposomes containing purified CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant PfCRTs and measured their transport activities. All PfCRTs tested actively took up tetraethylammonium, verapamil, CQ, basic amino acids, polypeptides, and polyamines at the expense of an electrochemical proton gradient. CQ-resistant PfCRT exhibited decreased affinity for CQ, resulting in increased CQ uptake. Furthermore, CQ competitively inhibited amino acid transport. Thus, PfCRT is a H+-coupled polyspecific nutrient and drug exporter. PMID:25733858

  8. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  9. Functional reconstitution of purified chloroquine resistance membrane transporter expressed in yeast.

    PubMed

    Tan, W; Gou, D M; Tai, E; Zhao, Y Z; Chow, L M C

    2006-08-15

    Malaria is one of the major parasitic diseases. Current treatment of malaria is seriously hampered by the emergence of drug resistant cases. A once-effective drug chloroquine (CQ) has been rendered almost useless. The mechanism of CQ resistance is complicated and largely unknown. Recently, a novel transmembrane protein, Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), has fulfilled all the requirements of being the CQ resistance gene. In order to elucidate the mechanism how PfCRT mediates CQ resistance, we have cloned the cDNA from a CQ sensitive parasite (3D7) and tried to express it in Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) but with unsuccessful results due to AT-rich sequences in the malaria genome. We have therefore, based on the codon usage in P. pastoris, chemically synthesized a codon-modified pfcrt with an overall 55% AT content. This codon-modified pfcrt has now been successfully expressed in P. pastoris. The expressed PfCRT has been purified with immuno metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and then reconstituted into proteoliposome. It was found that proteoliposomes have a saturable, concentration and time-dependent CQ transport activity. In addition, we found that proteoliposomes with resistant PfCRT(r) (K76T or K76I) showed an increased CQ transport activity compared to liposomes with lipid alone, or proteoliposomes reconstituted with sensitive PfCRT(s) (K76) protein. This activity could be inhibited by nigericin and decreased with the removal of Cl(-). This work suggests that PfCRT is mediating CQR in P. falciparum by virtue of its changes in CQ transport activity depending on pH gradient and chloride ion in the food vacuole.

  10. Survey of Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1 and chloroquine resistance transporter alleles in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Haiti where chloroquine (CQ) is widely used for malaria treatment, reports of resistance are scarce. However, recent identification of CQ resistance genotypes in one site is suggestive of an emerging problem. Additional studies are needed to evaluate genetic mutations associated with CQ resistance, especially in the Plasmodium falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 gene (pfmdr1) while expanding the already available information on P. falciparum CQ transporter gene (pfcrt) in Haiti. Methods Blood samples were collected on Whatman filter cards (FTA) from eight clinics spread across Haiti. Following the confirmation of P. falciparum in the samples, PCR protocols were used to amplify regions of pfmdr1and pfcrt codons of interest, (86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246) and (72-76), respectively. Sequencing and site-specific restriction enzyme digestions were used to analyse these DNA fragments for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. Results P. falciparum infection was confirmed in160 samples by amplifying a segment of the P. falciparum 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (pfssurrna). The sequence of pfmdr1 in 54 of these samples was determined between codons 86,184 codons 1034, 1042 and 1246. No sequence differences from that of the NF54 clone 3D7 were found among the 54 samples except at codon 184, where a non-silent mutation was found in all samples predicted to alter the amino acid sequence replacing tyrosine with phenylalanine (Y184F). This altered sequence was also confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion. The sequence of pfmdr1 at codons 86, 184, 1034 and 1042 encoded the NFSN haplotype. The sequence of pfcrt codons 72-76 from 79 samples was determined and found to encode CVMNK, consistent with a CQ sensitive genotype. Conclusion The presence of the Y184F mutation in pfmdr1 of P. falciparum parasites in Haiti may have implications for resistance to antimalarial drugs. The absence of

  11. Survey of Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1 and chloroquine resistance transporter alleles in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Elbadry, Maha A; Existe, Alexandre; Victor, Yves S; Memnon, Gladys; Fukuda, Mark; Dame, John B; Yowell, Charles A; Okech, Bernard A

    2013-11-19

    In Haiti where chloroquine (CQ) is widely used for malaria treatment, reports of resistance are scarce. However, recent identification of CQ resistance genotypes in one site is suggestive of an emerging problem. Additional studies are needed to evaluate genetic mutations associated with CQ resistance, especially in the Plasmodium falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 gene (pfmdr1) while expanding the already available information on P. falciparum CQ transporter gene (pfcrt) in Haiti. Blood samples were collected on Whatman filter cards (FTA) from eight clinics spread across Haiti. Following the confirmation of P. falciparum in the samples, PCR protocols were used to amplify regions of pfmdr1and pfcrt codons of interest, (86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246) and (72-76), respectively. Sequencing and site-specific restriction enzyme digestions were used to analyse these DNA fragments for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) known to confer resistance to anti-malarial drugs. P. falciparum infection was confirmed in160 samples by amplifying a segment of the P. falciparum 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (pfssurrna). The sequence of pfmdr1 in 54 of these samples was determined between codons 86,184 codons 1034, 1042 and 1246. No sequence differences from that of the NF54 clone 3D7 were found among the 54 samples except at codon 184, where a non-silent mutation was found in all samples predicted to alter the amino acid sequence replacing tyrosine with phenylalanine (Y184F). This altered sequence was also confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion. The sequence of pfmdr1 at codons 86, 184, 1034 and 1042 encoded the NFSN haplotype. The sequence of pfcrt codons 72-76 from 79 samples was determined and found to encode CVMNK, consistent with a CQ sensitive genotype. The presence of the Y184F mutation in pfmdr1 of P. falciparum parasites in Haiti may have implications for resistance to antimalarial drugs. The absence of mutation in pfcrt at codon 76 among 79

  12. Glutathione Transport: A New Role for PfCRT in Chloroquine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Salcedo-Sora, J. Enrique; Wong, Eleanor H.; Sethia, Sonal; Stocks, Paul A.; Maughan, Spencer C.; Murray, James A.H.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Bray, Patrick G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Chloroquine (CQ) kills Plasmodium falciparum by binding heme, preventing its detoxification to hemozoin in the digestive vacuole (DV) of the parasite. CQ resistance (CQR) is associated with mutations in the DV membrane protein P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), mediating the leakage of CQ from the DV. However, additional factors are thought to contribute to the resistance phenotype. This study tested the hypothesis that there is a link between glutathione (GSH) and CQR. Results: Using isogenic parasite lines carrying wild-type or mutant pfcrt, we reveal lower levels of GSH in the mutant lines and enhanced sensitivity to the GSH synthesis inhibitor l-buthionine sulfoximine, without any alteration in cytosolic de novo GSH synthesis. Incubation with N-acetylcysteine resulted in increased GSH levels in all parasites, but only reduced susceptibility to CQ in PfCRT mutant-expressing lines. In support of a heme destruction mechanism involving GSH in CQR parasites, we also found lower hemozoin levels and reduced CQ binding in the CQR PfCRT-mutant lines. We further demonstrate via expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes that the mutant alleles of Pfcrt in CQR parasites selectively transport GSH. Innovation: We propose a mechanism whereby mutant pfcrt allows enhanced transport of GSH into the parasite's DV. The elevated levels of GSH in the DV reduce the level of free heme available for CQ binding, which mediates the lower susceptibility to CQ in the PfCRT mutant parasites. Conclusion: PfCRT has a dual role in CQR, facilitating both efflux of harmful CQ from the DV and influx of beneficial GSH into the DV. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 683–695. PMID:23256874

  13. Lack of evidence for chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Leogane, Haiti.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, Ami; Zhong, Kathleen; Kain, Kevin C; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Haiti is considered chloroquine susceptible, although resistance transporter alleles associated with chloroquine resistance were recently detected. Among 49 patients with falciparum malaria, we found neither parasites carrying haplotypes associated with chloroquine resistance nor instances of chloroquine treatment failure. Continued vigilance to detect emergence of chloroquine resistance is needed.

  14. Lack of Evidence for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Leogane, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Ami; Zhong, Kathleen; Kain, Kevin C

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Haiti is considered chloroquine susceptible, although resistance transporter alleles associated with chloroquine resistance were recently detected. Among 49 patients with falciparum malaria, we found neither parasites carrying haplotypes associated with chloroquine resistance nor instances of chloroquine treatment failure. Continued vigilance to detect emergence of chloroquine resistance is needed. PMID:22932030

  15. Molecular Mechanisms for Drug Hypersensitivity Induced by the Malaria Parasite’s Chloroquine Resistance Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Eileen S.; Webster, Michael W.; Lehane, Adele M.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Martin, Rowena E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum ‘chloroquine resistance transporter’ (PfCRT) confer resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and related antimalarials by enabling the protein to transport these drugs away from their targets within the parasite’s digestive vacuole (DV). However, CQ resistance-conferring isoforms of PfCRT (PfCRTCQR) also render the parasite hypersensitive to a subset of structurally-diverse pharmacons. Moreover, mutations in PfCRTCQR that suppress the parasite’s hypersensitivity to these molecules simultaneously reinstate its sensitivity to CQ and related drugs. We sought to understand these phenomena by characterizing the functions of PfCRTCQR isoforms that cause the parasite to become hypersensitive to the antimalarial quinine or the antiviral amantadine. We achieved this by measuring the abilities of these proteins to transport CQ, quinine, and amantadine when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and complemented this work with assays that detect the drug transport activity of PfCRT in its native environment within the parasite. Here we describe two mechanistic explanations for PfCRT-induced drug hypersensitivity. First, we show that quinine, which normally accumulates inside the DV and therewithin exerts its antimalarial effect, binds extremely tightly to the substrate-binding site of certain isoforms of PfCRTCQR. By doing so it likely blocks the normal physiological function of the protein, which is essential for the parasite’s survival, and the drug thereby gains an additional killing effect. In the second scenario, we show that although amantadine also sequesters within the DV, the parasite’s hypersensitivity to this drug arises from the PfCRTCQR-mediated transport of amantadine from the DV into the cytosol, where it can better access its antimalarial target. In both cases, the mutations that suppress hypersensitivity also abrogate the ability of PfCRTCQR to transport CQ, thus explaining why rescue from hypersensitivity restores the parasite

  16. Full-length sequence analysis of chloroquine resistance transporter gene in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lii Lian; Lau, Tiek Ying; Timothy, William; Prabakaran, Dhanaraj

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance (CQR) in falciparum malaria was identified to be associated with several mutations in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) that encodes the transmembrane transporter in digestive vacuole membrane of the parasite. This study aimed to investigate the point mutations across the full-length pfcrt in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in Sabah, Malaysia. A total of 31 P. falciparum positive samples collected from Keningau, Kota Kinabalu, and Kudat, Sabah, were analyzed. pfcrt was PCR amplified and cloned prior to sequence analysis. This study showed that all the previously described 10 point mutations associated with CQR at codons 72, 74, 75, 76, 97, 220, 271, 326, 356, and 371 were found with different prevalence. Besides, two novel point mutations, I166V and H273N, were identified with 22.5% and 19.3%, respectively. Three haplotypes, namely, CVMNK (29%), CVIET (3.2%), and SVMNT (67.7%), were identified. High prevalence of SVMNT among P. falciparum isolates from Sabah showed that these isolates are closer to the P. falciparum isolates from Papua New Guinea rather than to the more proximal Southeast Asian CVIET haplotype. Full-length analysis of pfcrt showed that chloroquine resistant P. falciparum in Sabah is still prevalent despite the withdrawal of chloroquine usage since 1979.

  17. Full-Length Sequence Analysis of Chloroquine Resistance Transporter Gene in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Sabah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lii Lian; Lau, Tiek Ying; Timothy, William; Prabakaran, Dhanaraj

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance (CQR) in falciparum malaria was identified to be associated with several mutations in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) that encodes the transmembrane transporter in digestive vacuole membrane of the parasite. This study aimed to investigate the point mutations across the full-length pfcrt in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in Sabah, Malaysia. A total of 31 P. falciparum positive samples collected from Keningau, Kota Kinabalu, and Kudat, Sabah, were analyzed. pfcrt was PCR amplified and cloned prior to sequence analysis. This study showed that all the previously described 10 point mutations associated with CQR at codons 72, 74, 75, 76, 97, 220, 271, 326, 356, and 371 were found with different prevalence. Besides, two novel point mutations, I166V and H273N, were identified with 22.5% and 19.3%, respectively. Three haplotypes, namely, CVMNK (29%), CVIET (3.2%), and SVMNT (67.7%), were identified. High prevalence of SVMNT among P. falciparum isolates from Sabah showed that these isolates are closer to the P. falciparum isolates from Papua New Guinea rather than to the more proximal Southeast Asian CVIET haplotype. Full-length analysis of pfcrt showed that chloroquine resistant P. falciparum in Sabah is still prevalent despite the withdrawal of chloroquine usage since 1979. PMID:25574497

  18. Rapid Selection of Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter Gene and Multidrug Resistance Gene-1 Haplotypes Associated with Past Chloroquine and Present Artemether-Lumefantrine Use in Inhambane District, Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Thomas T.; Madsen, Laura B.; Hansson, Helle H.; Tomás, Elsa V. E.; Charlwood, Derek; Bygbjerg, Ib C.; Alifrangis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) use in Mozambique was stopped in 2002 and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was implemented in 2008. In light of no use of CQ and extensive use of AL, we determined the frequency of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance/tolerance to CQ and AL in persons living in Linga-Linga, an isolated peninsula and in Furvela village, which is located 8 km inland. The P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVMNK wild type increased in frequency from 43.9% in 2009 to 66.4% in 2010 (P ≤ 0.001), and combined P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 N86-184F-D1246 haplotype increased significantly between years (P = 0.039). The combination of P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVMNK and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene NFD increased from 24.3% (2009) to 45.3% in (2010, P = 0.017). The rapid changes observed may largely be caused by decreased use of CQ and large-scale use of AL. In the absence of a clear AL-resistance marker and the (almost) continent-wide use of AL in sub-Saharan Africa, and when considering CQ reintroduction, continued monitoring of these markers is needed. PMID:23382159

  19. Polymorphism of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance and chloroquine resistance transporter genes and in vitro susceptibility to aminoquinolines in isolates from the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Roncal, Norma; Nakazawa, Shusuke; Long, Ton That Ai; Gerena, Lucia; Garcia, Coralith; Solari, Lely; Magill, Alan J; Kanbara, Hiroji

    2004-05-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), mefloquine (MQ) and quinine was investigated in 60 culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum isolates from malaria patients in Padrecocha, a village in the Amazonian Department of Loreto, Peru. All isolates showed resistance to CQ, decreased susceptibility to quinine, and sensitivity to MQ. These isolates were examined for mutations in the P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) and chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) genes previously linked to CQ resistance. The mutations N86Y and D1246Y, two of the five mutations commonly observed in the pfmdr1 gene of CQ-resistant clones, were not found. The pfcrt mutation K76T, associated with CQ resistance, was identified in all the isolates tested. Sequence analysis of codons 72-76 in the pfcrt gene showed the haplotypes SVMNT and CVMNT.

  20. Dynamic of plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene Pfcrt K76T mutation five years after withdrawal of chloroquine in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Sondo, Paul; Derra, Karim; Tarnagda, Zekiba; Nakanabo, Seydou Diallo; Zampa, Odile; Kazienga, Adama; Valea, Innocent; Sorgho, Hermann; Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco; Guiguemde, Tinga Robert; Tinto, Halidou

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the evolution of Pfcrt K76T mutation five years after the withdrawal of chloroquine in Burkina Faso. A total of 675 clinical isolates collected from October 2010 to September 2012 were successfully genotyped. Single nucleotide polymorphism in Pfcrt (codon 76) gene was analyzed. The prevalence of resistant Pfcrt 76T allele was 20.55%. There was a progressive decrease of the proportion of mutant type pfcrt T76 from 2010 to 2012 (X2=5.508 p=0.0189). Our results suggest a progressive return of the wild type Pfcrt K76 in Burkina Faso but the prevalence of the mutants Pfcrt T76 still remains high.

  1. Analysis of Chloroquine Resistance Transporter (CRT) Isoforms and Orthologues in S. cerevisiae Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Baro, Nick; Pooput, Chaya; Roepe, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory optimized MeOH – inducible expression of the P. falciparum malarial parasite transporter PfCRT in P. pastoris yeast. These strains are useful for many experiments, but do not allow for inducible protein expression under ambient growth conditions. We have therefore optimized galactose – inducible expression of PfCRT in S. cerevisiae yeast. We find that expression of PfCRT confers CQ hypersensitivity to growing yeast and that this is due to plasma membrane localization of the transporter. We use quantitative analyses of growth rates to compare hypersensitivity for yeast expressing various PfCRT isoforms. We also report successful high level inducible expression of the P. vivax orthologue, PvCRT, and compare CQ hypersensitivity for PvCRT vs PfCRT expressing yeast. We test the hypothesis that hypersensitivity is due to increased transport of CQ into yeast expressing the transporters via direct 3H – CQ transport experiments, and analyze the effect that membrane potential has on transport. The data suggest important new tools for rapid functional screening of PfCRT and PvCRT isoforms and provide further evidence for a model wherein membrane potential promotes charged CQ transport by PfCRT. Data also support our previous conclusion that wild type PfCRT is capable of CQ transport, and provide a basis for understanding the lack of correspondence between PvCRT mutations and resistance to CQ in the important malarial parasite P. vivax. PMID:21744797

  2. The "pushmi-pullyu" of resistance to chloroquine in malaria.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Ruth; Callaghan, Richard

    2017-02-28

    Malarial infection continues to impart devastating health problems in the developing world. Treatment of malaria has involved chemotherapy since 168 BC, with the most prevalent and successful forms using plant alkaloids. Perhaps the greatest treatment success against malaria was by chloroquine, a synthetic derivative of the quinines found in the Cinchona tree bark. Chloroquine is able to kill parasites by interfering with haem metabolism in the parasite's digestive vacuole. The widespread use of chloroquine predictably resulted in the development of drug-resistant malaria and the most highly implicated resistance mediators are the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) homologue 1 (P-gh1) and Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (PfCRT), which reside on the parasite's digestive vacuole. The presence of PfCRT and P-gh1 on the vacuole membrane is analogous to the two-headed fictional creature known as the "Pushmi-Pullyu". P-gh1 (Pushmi) increases influx of chloroquine into the vacuole, while PfCRT (Pullmi) causes efflux of chloroquine from the vacuole. This review describes how drug-resistant malarial parasites co-ordinate chloroquine distribution through adaptive mutations to promote their survival in the presence of this cytotoxic drug. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Dynamic of plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene Pfcrt K76T mutation five years after withdrawal of chloroquine in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Sondo, Paul; Derra, Karim; Tarnagda, Zekiba; Nakanabo, Seydou Diallo; Zampa, Odile; Kazienga, Adama; Valea, Innocent; Sorgho, Hermann; Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco; Guiguemde, Tinga Robert; Tinto, Halidou

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the evolution of Pfcrt K76T mutation five years after the withdrawal of chloroquine in Burkina Faso. A total of 675 clinical isolates collected from October 2010 to September 2012 were successfully genotyped. Single nucleotide polymorphism in Pfcrt (codon 76) gene was analyzed. The prevalence of resistant Pfcrt 76T allele was 20.55%. There was a progressive decrease of the proportion of mutant type pfcrt T76 from 2010 to 2012 (X2=5.508 p=0.0189). Our results suggest a progressive return of the wild type Pfcrt K76 in Burkina Faso but the prevalence of the mutants Pfcrt T76 still remains high. PMID:26516402

  4. Quinine dimers are potent inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and are active against quinoline-resistant P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hrycyna, Christine A; Summers, Robert L; Lehane, Adele M; Pires, Marcos M; Namanja, Hilda; Bohn, Kelsey; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Ferdig, Michael; Henrich, Philipp P; Fidock, David A; Kirk, Kiaran; Chmielewski, Jean; Martin, Rowena E

    2014-03-21

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is primarily conferred by mutations in the "chloroquine resistance transporter" (PfCRT). The resistance-conferring form of PfCRT (PfCRT(CQR)) mediates CQ resistance by effluxing the drug from the parasite's digestive vacuole, the acidic compartment in which CQ exerts its antiplasmodial effect. PfCRT(CQR) can also decrease the parasite's susceptibility to other quinoline drugs, including the current antimalarials quinine and amodiaquine. Here we describe interactions between PfCRT(CQR) and a series of dimeric quinine molecules using a Xenopus laevis oocyte system for the heterologous expression of PfCRT and using an assay that detects the drug-associated efflux of H(+) ions from the digestive vacuole in parasites that harbor different forms of PfCRT. The antiplasmodial activities of dimers 1 and 6 were also examined in vitro (against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of P. falciparum) and in vivo (against drug-sensitive P. berghei). Our data reveal that the quinine dimers are the most potent inhibitors of PfCRT(CQR) reported to date. Furthermore, the lead compounds (1 and 6) were not effluxed by PfCRT(CQR) from the digestive vacuole but instead accumulated to very high levels within this organelle. Both 1 and 6 exhibited in vitro antiplasmodial activities that were inversely correlated with CQ. Moreover, the additional parasiticidal effect exerted by 1 and 6 in the drug-resistant parasites was attributable, at least in part, to their ability to inhibit PfCRT(CQR). This highlights the potential for devising new antimalarial therapies that exploit inherent weaknesses in a key resistance mechanism of P. falciparum.

  5. Functional Characterization of the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine-Resistance Transporter (PfCRT) in Transformed Dictyostelium discoideum Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Papakrivos, Janni; Sá, Juliana M.; Wellems, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has been a global health catastrophe, yet much about the CQ resistance (CQR) mechanism remains unclear. Hallmarks of the CQR phenotype include reduced accumulation of protonated CQ as a weak base in the digestive vacuole of the erythrocyte-stage parasite, and chemosensitization of CQ-resistant (but not CQ-sensitive) P. falciparum by agents such as verapamil. Mutations in the P. falciparum CQR transporter (PfCRT) confer CQR; particularly important among these mutations is the charge-loss substitution K→T at position 76. Dictyostelium discoideum transformed with mutant PfCRT expresses key features of CQR including reduced drug accumulation and verapamil chemosensitization. Methodology and Findings We describe the isolation and characterization of PfCRT-transformed, hematin-free vesicles from D. discoideum cells. These vesicles permit assessments of drug accumulation, pH, and membrane potential that are difficult or impossible with hematin-containing digestive vacuoles from P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Mutant PfCRT-transformed D. discoideum vesicles show features of the CQR phenotype, and manipulations of vesicle membrane potential by agents including ionophores produce large changes of CQ accumulation that are dissociated from vesicular pH. PfCRT in its native or mutant form blunts the ability of valinomycin to reduce CQ accumulation in transformed vesicles and decreases the ability of K+ to reverse membrane potential hyperpolarization caused by valinomycin treatment. Conclusion Isolated vesicles from mutant-PfCRT-transformed D. discoideum exhibit features of the CQR phenotype, consistent with evidence that the drug resistance mechanism operates at the P. falciparum digestive vacuole membrane in malaria. Membrane potential apart from pH has a major effect on the PfCRT-mediated CQR phenotype of D. discoideum vesicles. These results support a model of PfCRT as an electrochemical potential

  6. Dihydroethanoanthracene Derivatives as In Vitro Malarial Chloroquine Resistance Reversal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Julie; Torrentino-Madamet, Marylin; Alibert, Sandrine; Rogier, Christophe; Santelli-Rouvier, Christiane; Mosnier, Joel; Baret, Eric; Barbe, Jacques; Parzy, Daniel; Pradines, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The ability of four 9,10-dihydroethanoanthracene derivatives (BG920, BG932, BG958, and BG996), as well as verapamil and promethazine, to reverse chloroquine resistance was assessed against 24 chloroquine-resistant and 10 chloroquine-susceptible strains of Plasmodium falciparum from different countries. The 9,10-dihydroethanoanthracene derivatives clearly increase chloroquine susceptibility only in chloroquine-resistant isolates. PMID:15215144

  7. Chloroquine-resistant malaria in Burma.

    PubMed

    Aung-Than-Batu; Htun Nyun, R; Hlaing, N; Tin, F; U, T; Myint, T; Kyi, K K

    1975-08-01

    Two field trials to detect chloroquine-resistant malaria were conducted according to WHO recommendations in a malaria free area near Rangoon. Peripheral blood smears were examined for asexual forms of P. falciparum on day one through to day seven, on day 14, 21, and 28 after a standard dose of 1500 mg. of chloroquine base. Haskins test to detect chloroquine in urine was done on all cases and plasma chloroquine levels were measured in some. Out of 105 patients tested RI resistance was detected in 66, RII in 19 and RIII in three. Subsequent trials with other anti-malarial drugs indicated that the chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum were also resistant to one day therapy with pyrimethamine 50 mg. or sulphamethoxypyridazine 1 G given singly; and resistant to one day therapy with combinations of pyrimethamine 50 mg. plus sulphamethoxy pyridazine 1 G, pyrimethamine 13 mg. plus dapsone 100 mg., and trimethoprim 320 mg. plus sulphamethoxazole 1600 mg. All those tested were sensitive to quinine sulphate, 0-6 G given three times a day for 10 days, and were also sensitive to one day therapy with combinations of trimethoprim 500 mg. plus sulphalene 1 G, and pyrimethamine 50 mg. plus sulphamethoxine 1 G. Pyrimethamine 12-5 mg. plus dapsone 100 mg. in weekly doses was shown to be an effective chemoprophylaxis. Quinine was tested on 38 subjects while other drug schedule were tested on six to eight subjects.

  8. High-Dose Chloroquine for Treatment of Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Ursing, Johan; Rombo, Lars; Bergqvist, Yngve; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2016-04-15

    Due to development of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum new antimalarial therapies are needed. In Guinea-Bissau, routinely used triple standard-dose chloroquine remained effective for decades despite the existence of "chloroquine-resistant" P. falciparum. This study aimed to determine the in vivo efficacy of higher chloroquine concentrations against P. falciparum with resistance-conferring genotypes. Standard or double-dose chloroquine was given to 892 children aged <15 years with uncomplicated malaria during 3 clinical trials (2001-2008) with ≥ 35 days follow-up. The P. falciparum resistance-conferring genotype (pfcrt 76T) and day 7 chloroquine concentrations were determined. Data were divided into age groups (<5, 5-9, and 10-14 years) because concentrations increase with age when chloroquine is prescribed according to body weight. Adequate clinical and parasitological responses were 14%, 38%, and 39% after standard-dose and 66%, 84%, and 91% after double-dose chloroquine in children aged <5, 5-9, and 10-14 years, respectively, and infected with P. falciparum genotypes conferring chloroquine resistance (n = 195, P < .001). In parallel, median chloroquine concentrations were 471, 688, and 809 nmol/L for standard-dose and 1040, 1494, and 1585 nmol/L for double-dose chloroquine. Chloroquine resistance is dose dependent and can be overcome by higher, still well-tolerated doses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Chloroquine

    MedlinePlus

    Chloroquine phosphate is in a class of drugs called antimalarials and amebicides. It is used to prevent and treat ... Chloroquine phosphate comes as a tablet to take by mouth. For prevention of malaria in adults, one dose is ...

  10. Mutant Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter in Hodeidah, Yemen: association with parasitologic indices and treatment-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Farag, Hoda F; Allam, Amal F; Shawky, Sherine M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M

    2013-12-01

    Malaria still represents a major health problem in Yemen, particularly in Hodeidah, despite continuing efforts to eliminate it. With the absence of clinically proven vaccines, chemotherapy with antimalarials is still greatly needed. Chloroquine (CQ) has been popular as the drug of choice for malaria control. However, Plasmodium falciparum resistance to CQ has been one of the main obstacles in malaria control and elimination. Although CQ is no longer the recommended antimalarial chemotherapy, it has remained the number one over-the-counter antimalarial drug in many endemic areas, including Yemen, and is still used for self-medication. In addition, promising reports on CQ efficacy reversal in many African countries brought it again into the scene. This has led to a growing interest in the possibility of its re-introduction, particularly with the concerns raised about the parasite resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the present study aimed at analyzing the CQ-associated pfcrt 76T mutation in P. falciparum isolates from patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Hodeidah, west of Yemen. The association of treatment-seeking behaviors and antimalarial drug use with the pfcrt 76T mutant allele was also studied. It was revealed that there is still a sustained high frequency of this molecular marker among parasite isolates associated with younger age, decreased parasite density and the presence of gametocytes in blood. Delay in seeking treatment and frequent use of antimalarials were the behaviors significantly associated with the presence of the pfcrt 76T mutant allele among patients reporting a history of malaria treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Polymorphism in Plasmodium falciparum Drug Transporter Proteins and Reversal of In Vitro Chloroquine Resistance by a 9,10-Dihydroethanoanthracene Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Julie; Alibert, Sandrine; Torrentino-Madamet, Marylin; Rogier, Christophe; Santelli-Rouvier, Christiane; Bigot, Patricia; Mosnier, Joel; Baret, Eric; Barbe, Jacques; Parzy, Daniel; Pradines, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    BG958 reverses resistance in chloroquine-resistant isolates from different countries. Five mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum crt (pfcrt) gene resulting in the amino acid changes K76T, M74I, N75E, A220S, and R371I are systematically identified in resistance-reversed Asian, African, and Brazilian parasites which possess the pfcrt (CIET) haplotype. In combination with BG958, the activity of chloroquine is increased in parasites with the N86Y mutation in pfmdr1. PMID:15561869

  12. Quantitative genome re-sequencing defines multiple mutations conferring chloroquine resistance in rodent malaria.

    PubMed

    Kinga Modrzynska, Katarzyna; Creasey, Alison; Loewe, Laurence; Cezard, Timothee; Trindade Borges, Sofia; Martinelli, Axel; Rodrigues, Louise; Cravo, Pedro; Blaxter, Mark; Carter, Richard; Hunt, Paul

    2012-03-21

    Drug resistance in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum severely compromises the treatment and control of malaria. A knowledge of the critical mutations conferring resistance to particular drugs is important in understanding modes of drug action and mechanisms of resistances. They are required to design better therapies and limit drug resistance.A mutation in the gene (pfcrt) encoding a membrane transporter has been identified as a principal determinant of chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum, but we lack a full account of higher level chloroquine resistance. Furthermore, the determinants of resistance in the other major human malaria parasite, P. vivax, are not known. To address these questions, we investigated the genetic basis of chloroquine resistance in an isogenic lineage of rodent malaria parasite P. chabaudi in which high level resistance to chloroquine has been progressively selected under laboratory conditions. Loci containing the critical genes were mapped by Linkage Group Selection, using a genetic cross between the high-level chloroquine-resistant mutant and a genetically distinct sensitive strain. A novel high-resolution quantitative whole-genome re-sequencing approach was used to reveal three regions of selection on chr11, chr03 and chr02 that appear progressively at increasing drug doses on three chromosomes. Whole-genome sequencing of the chloroquine-resistant parent identified just four point mutations in different genes on these chromosomes. Three mutations are located at the foci of the selection valleys and are therefore predicted to confer different levels of chloroquine resistance. The critical mutation conferring the first level of chloroquine resistance is found in aat1, a putative aminoacid transporter. Quantitative trait loci conferring selectable phenotypes, such as drug resistance, can be mapped directly using progressive genome-wide linkage group selection. Quantitative genome-wide short-read genome resequencing can be used to

  13. [Chloroquine resistance and malaria control in Ivory Coast].

    PubMed

    Henry, M C; Koné, M; Guillet, P; Mouchet, J

    1998-01-01

    We present here data from the Ivory Coast on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine, obtained since the first chloroquine-resistant strains were discovered in 1987. Susceptibility was assessed using the WHO 7-day field test. Almost all the tests were carried out in the capital, Adidjan, and in the southern forest zone. The frequency of chloroquine resistance was below 30% in most cases, the actual frequency differing between regions. The frequency of R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum was very low. Such resistant parasites were found only on an oil-palm plantation and in the south west of the country, probably due to the free medical care available at both locations. In general, access to health care is limited. Fevers attributed to malaria are generally treated at home using plants or incomplete courses of chloroquine. Our data suggest that R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum strains are selected by repeated high doses of chloroquine, rather than by low doses. Thus, symptomatic treatment of uncomplicated malaria and treatment at home with the "correct" medication may be more effective than systematic medication, for limiting the level of chloroquine resistance in the parasite. Pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. is present in West Africa and this may reduce the short-term effectiveness of impregnated mosquito nets. In the absence of R3 chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, self-medication at home may be a practical and realistic way to treat malaria. However, more knowledge about the effectiveness of anti-malaria drugs, their use in various social, cultural and economic environments and the geographical distribution of insecticide-resistant vectors is required before effective strategies can be designed. However, it would certainly be of value to consistently check the quality of anti-malaria drugs and to try to improve the effectiveness of self-medication at home.

  14. A molecular map of chloroquine resistance in Mali.

    PubMed

    Djimde, Abdoulaye A; Barger, Breanna; Kone, Aminatou; Beavogui, Abdoul H; Tekete, Mamadou; Fofana, Bakary; Dara, Antoine; Maiga, Hamma; Dembele, Demba; Toure, Sekou; Dama, Souleymane; Ouologuem, Dinkorma; Sangare, Cheick Papa Oumar; Dolo, Amagana; Sogoba, Nofomo; Nimaga, Karamoko; Kone, Yacouba; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2010-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR) transporter point mutation (PfCRT 76T) is known to be the key determinant of CQR. Molecular detection of PfCRT 76T in field samples may be used for the surveillance of CQR in malaria-endemic countries. The genotype-resistance index (GRI), which is obtained as the ratio of the prevalence of PfCRT 76T to the incidence of CQR in a clinical trial, was proposed as a simple and practical molecular-based addition to the tools currently available for monitoring CQR in the field. In order to validate the GRI model across populations, time, and resistance patterns, we compiled data from the literature and generated new data from 12 sites across Mali. We found a mean PfCRT 76T mutation prevalence of 84.5% (range 60.9-95.1%) across all sites. CQR rates predicted from the GRI model were extrapolated onto a map of Mali to show the patterns of resistance throughout the participating regions. We present a comprehensive map of CQR in Mali, which strongly supports recent changes in drug policy away from chloroquine.

  15. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurjeet; Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-07-01

    Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman's method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with pfcrt-o can be used as biomarker for chloroquine drug

  16. Molecular epidemiology of malaria in Cameroon. XIII. Analysis of pfcrt mutations and in vitro chloroquine resistance.

    PubMed

    Basco, Leonardo K

    2002-10-01

    The key Lys76Thr amino-acid substitution in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (PfCRT) has been shown to be a reliable marker associated with chloroquine-resistant phenotype in reference clones, but few discordant results have been observed in field isolates. To further examine the relationship between in vitro chloroquine response and pfcrt alleles, the entire exon 2 of the pfcrt gene of 157 Cameroonian isolates was sequenced. All isolates were characterized as having either Cys-72, Met-74, Asn-75, and Lys-76 (wild-type alleles), Cys-72, Ile-74, Glu-75, and Thr-76 (mutant alleles), or mixed alleles. The hypothetical threshold 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) set at 100 nM distinguished between isolates carrying the wild-type alleles and those with mutant alleles in a large majority of cases (135 of 139 isolates with unmixed pfcrt alleles). Isolates presenting discordant results generally had IC50s within an intermediate range. In vitro chloroquine response of isolates with mixed pfcrt alleles was highly variable. Although discordant results between chloroquine-resistant phenotype and pfcrt alleles were not explained by the immediate adjacent codons, the key Lys76Thr codon may prove to be a highly reliable genetic marker for the epidemiologic monitoring of chloroquine resistance by means of molecular techniques.

  17. Association between mutations in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 genes and in vivo amodiaquine resistance in P. falciparum malaria-infected children in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Happi, C T; Gbotosho, G O; Folarin, O A; Bolaji, O M; Sowunmi, A; Kyle, D E; Milhous, W; Wirth, D F; Oduola, A M J

    2006-07-01

    This study investigated the association between Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) T76 and P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (pfmdr1) Y86 alleles and in vivo amodiaquine (AQ) resistance, as well as the clearance of parasites harboring these two alleles in children treated with AQ in southwest Nigeria. One hundred one children with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria infections were treated with the standard dosage of AQ and followed-up for 28 days. Blood samples were collected on filter paper samples at enrollment and during follow-up for identification of parasite genotypes and pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism approaches. Parasitologic assessment of response to treatment showed that 87% and 13% (RI) of patients were cured and failed treatment, respectively. Although infections in patients were polyclonal (as determined by merozoite surface protein 2 genotyping), the presence of both mutants pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles in parasites is associated with in vivo AQ resistance (odds ratio = 7.58, 95% confidence interval = 1.58-36.25, P = 0.006) and is selected by the drug in children who failed AQ treatment. Treatment failure with the combination of mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles as well as the ability of patients to clear these resistant parasites is dependent on age, suggesting a critical role of host immunity in clearing AQ-resistant P. falciparum. The combination of mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles may be useful markers for monitoring the development and spread of AQ resistance, when combining this drug with other antimalarials for treatment of malaria in Africa.

  18. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes: parasite risk factors that affect treatment outcomes for P. falciparum malaria after artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N; Mårtensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J; Guérin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M E; Ménard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Björkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; El-Sayed, Badria B; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-François; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houzé, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-René; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlström; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Somé, A Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P M; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2014-10-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 - 9.78, P < 0.001) and increased pfmdr1 copy number (adjusted hazards ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval = 2.36-17.97, P < 0.001 : were significant independent risk factors for recrudescence in patients treated with AL. AL and ASAQ exerted opposing selective effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of malaria in Cameroon. XII. In vitro drug assays and molecular surveillance of chloroquine and proguanil resistance.

    PubMed

    Basco, Leonardo K

    2002-10-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil combination is one of the options for chemoprophylaxis. The rapid evolution of drug resistance status requires a constant upgrade of epidemiologic data. Due to various difficulties in conducting prospective clinical studies on the prophylactic efficacy of the drug combination, especially in highly chloroquine-resistant zones, in vitro drug sensitivity assays and specific molecular markers for chloroquine (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter, pfcrt) and cycloguanil (a biologically active metabolite of proguanil; dihydrofolate reductase, dhfr) resistance were evaluated as an alternative approach in this study. Of 116 isolates, 62 (53.4%) were doubly resistant in vitro to chloroquine (IC50 > or = 100 nM) and cycloguanil (IC50 > or = 15 nM). Likewise, 62 of 118 isolates (52.5%) carried both the mutant Thr-76 pfcrt allele and at least one dhfr mutant allele (1 with a single Asn-108 allele, 8 with double Arg-59 and Asn-108 mutations, and 53 with triple Ile-51, Arg-59, and Asn-108 mutations). The in vitro drug response corresponded with the presence or absence of key mutation(s) in the pfcrt and dhfr genes. These results suggest the high proportion of P. falciparum isolates in southern Cameroon that may not respond to chloroquine-proguanil combination.

  20. Chloroquine uptake by Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes during in vitro culture and its relationship to chloroquine resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, F; Le Bras, J; Clavier, F; Hatin, I; Blayo, M C

    1985-01-01

    Chloroquine uptake by Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes (RBC) was studied in vitro before and during culture by measuring the chloroquine gradient between the cells and medium (C/M) by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The C/M values were 5.9 +/- 2.7 (n = 23) for uninfected RBC, 13 to 34 for six chloroquine-susceptible isolates (concentration required to inhibit 50% of parasite growth, less than 100 nmol/liter) in partially infected RBC (parasitemia from 0.3 to 5%) (n = 28), and 8.4 to 4.9 for four chloroquine-resistant isolates (concentration required to inhibit 50% of parasite growth, 320 to 1,500 nmol/liter) in partially infected RBC (parasitemia from 0.4 to 5%) (n = 26). Two isolates were studied before and after adaptation to continuous culture. C/M was found to decrease (34.2 to 2.1 and 19.3 to 4.9), whereas the concentration required to inhibit 50% of parasite growth increased (35 to 1,400 and 54 to 1,500 nmol/liter), thus indicating the acquisition of chloroquine resistance. These results demonstrate that chloroquine uptake decreased in RBC in which the infective strain, initially susceptible, became resistant in culture and imply that the drug is bound to ferriprotoporphyrin IX to a lesser extent or that a parasite protein competes with ferriprotoporphyrin IX to a greater extent. We suggest that genotypic modifications in the mechanism of chloroquine uptake might occur in the parasite. PMID:3890728

  1. Effective treatment with a tetrandrine/chloroquine combination for chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria in Aotus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro evidence indicates that tetrandrine (TT) can potentiate the action of chloroquine 40-fold against choloquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The key question emanating from that study is “would tetrandine and chloroquine be highly effective in a live Aotus monkey model with chloroquine-resistant parasites”. This study was designed to closely mimic the pharmacological/anti-malarial activity in man. Methods The Vietnam Smith/RE strain of P. falciparum, which is chloroquine-resistant was used in this study. Previous experimental procedures were followed. Panamanian owl monkeys (Aotus) were inoculated with 5×106 erythrocytes parasitized with the CQ-resistant strain of P. falciparum. Oral drug treatment was with CQ (20 mg/kg) and/or tetrandrine at 15 mg/Kg, 30 mg/Kg or 60 mg/Kg or 25 mg/Kg depending on experimental conditions. Results and Discussion Parasitaemia was cleared rapidly with CQ and TT while CQ treatment alone was ineffective. Recrudescence of malaria occurred after seven days post-infection. However, four animals were treated orally with TT and CQ parasites were cleared. It is likely that monkeys were cured via a combination of both drug and host immune responses. A single Aotus monkey infected with P. falciparum and untreated with drugs, died. No side effects were observed with these drug treatments. Conclusions This combination of chloroquine and tetrandrine forms the basis of a new attack on chloroquine-resistant malaria - one based upon inhibition of the basis of chloroquine resistance, the multiple drug resistance pump. Previous studies demonstrated that the parasite MDR pump was found on parasite membranes using 3H azidopine photoaffinity labelling. Since MDR-based choloroquine resistance is induced by chloroquine, the basis of the action of tetrandrine is the following: 1) tetrandrine inhibits the MDR pump by stimulating MDR ATPase which limits the energy of the pump by depletion of parasite ATP, 2) tetrandrine blocks the

  2. Confirmed Plasmodium vivax Resistance to Chloroquine in Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Vinh; Hong, Nguyen Van; Van, Nguyen Van; Louisa, Melva; Baird, Kevin; Xa, Nguyen Xuan; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Hung, Le Xuan; Duong, Tran Thanh; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Speybroeck, Niko; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax resistance to chloroquine (CQ) is currently reported in almost all countries where P. vivax is endemic. In Vietnam, despite a first report on P. vivax resistance to chloroquine published in the early 2000s, P. vivax was still considered sensitive to CQ. Between May 2009 and December 2011, a 2-year cohort study was conducted in central Vietnam to assess the recommended radical cure regimen based on a 10-day course of primaquine (0.5 mg/kg/day) together with 3 days of CQ (25 mg/kg). Here we report the results of the first 28-day follow-up estimating the cumulative risk of P. vivax recurrences together with the corresponding CQ blood concentrations, among other endpoints. Out of 260 recruited P. vivax patients, 240 completed treatment and were followed up to day 28 according to the WHO guidelines. Eight patients (3.45%) had a recurrent P. vivax infection, at day 14 (n = 2), day 21 (n = 1), and day 28 (n = 5). Chloroquine blood concentrations, available for 3/8 recurrent infections (days 14, 21, and 28), were above the MIC (>100 ng/ml whole blood) in all of these cases. Fever and parasitemia (both sexual and asexual stages) were cleared by day 3. Anemia was common at day 0 (35.8%), especially in children under 10 years (50%), and hemoglobin (Hb) recovery at day 28 was substantial among anemic patients (median change from day 0 to 28, +1.7 g/dl; interquartile range [IQR], +0.7 to +3.2). This report, based on CQ blood levels measured at the time of recurrences, confirms for the first time P. vivax CQ resistance in central Vietnam and calls for further studies using standardized protocols for accurately monitoring the extent and evolution of P. vivax resistance to chloroquine in Vietnam. These results, together with the mounting evidence of artemisinin resistance in central Vietnam, further highlight the increasing threat of antimalarial drug resistance to malaria elimination in Vietnam.

  3. Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax malaria in Debre Zeit, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Teka, Hiwot; Petros, Beyene; Yamuah, Lawrence; Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Elhassan, Ibrahim; Muchohi, Simon; Kokwaro, Gilbert; Aseffa, Abraham; Engers, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax accounts for about 40% of all malaria infection in Ethiopia. Chloroquine (CQ) is the first line treatment for confirmed P. vivax malaria in the country. The first report of CQ treatment failure in P. vivax was from Debre Zeit, which suggested the presence of chloroquine resistance. Methods An in vivo drug efficacy study was conducted in Debre Zeit from June to August 2006. Eighty-seven patients with microscopically confirmed P. vivax malaria, aged between 8 months and 52 years, were recruited and treated under supervision with CQ (25 mg/kg over three days). Clinical and parasitological parameters were assessed during the 28 day follow-up period. CQ and desethylchloroquine (DCQ) blood and serum concentrations were determined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in patients who showed recurrent parasitaemia. Results Of the 87 patients recruited in the study, one was lost to follow-up and three were excluded due to P. falciparum infection during follow-up. A total of 83 (95%) of the study participants completed the follow-up. On enrolment, 39.8% had documented fever and 60.2% had a history of fever. The geometric mean parasite density of the patients was 7045 parasites/μl. Among these, four patients had recurrent parasitaemia on Day 28. The blood CQ plus DCQ concentrations of these four patients were all above the minimal effective concentration (> 100 ng/ml). Conclusion Chloroquine-resistant P. vivax parasites are emerging in Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. A multi-centre national survey is needed to better understand the extent of P. vivax resistance to CQ in Ethiopia. PMID:18959774

  4. Plasmodium falciparum mdr1 mutations and in vivo chloroquine resistance in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Saladín, E; Fryauff, D J; Taylor, W R; Laksana, B S; Susanti, A I; Purnomo; Subianto, B; Richie, T L

    1999-08-01

    Mutations in the Pfmdr1 gene are reported to be associated with chloroquine resistance in some Plasmodium falciparum isolates. A polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism method was used for the detection of Pfmdr1 mutations in chloroquine-resistant field isolates of P. falciparum collected in Irian Jaya. The frequency of Pfmdr1 mutations was significantly higher in chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum parasites than background frequencies observed in the same location. The 7G8 mutation was identified in some parasites although always in a mixed genotype status. Chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum specimens were characterized using the World Health Organization 28-day criteria, supplemented by demonstrating adequate chloroquine absorption and genetic analysis.

  5. Chloroquine-resistant malaria in travelers returning from Haiti after 2010 earthquake.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Myriam; Pillai, Dylan R; Lau, Rachel; Hubert, Véronique; Khairnar, Krishna; Existe, Alexandre; Kendjo, Eric; Dahlström, Sabina; Guérin, Philippe J; Le Bras, Jacques

    2012-08-01

    We investigated chloroquine sensitivity to Plasmodium falciparum in travelers returning to France and Canada from Haiti during a 23-year period. Two of 19 isolates obtained after the 2010 earthquake showed mixed pfcrt 76K+T genotype and high 50% inhibitory concentration. Physicians treating malaria acquired in Haiti should be aware of possible chloroquine resistance.

  6. Polycyclic amines as chloroquine resistance modulating agents in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Kapp, Erika; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J; Malan, Sarel F

    2016-02-15

    Pentacycloundecylamines (PCUs) and adamantane amines, such as NGP1-01 (1) and amantadine, have shown significant channel blocking activities. They are postulated to act as chemosensitizers and circumvent the resistance of the plasmodia parasite against chloroquine (CQ) by inhibiting the p-glycoprotein efflux pump and enabling the accumulation of CQ inside the parasite digestive vacuole. Twelve polycyclic amines containing either a PCU or adamantane amine moiety conjugated to different aromatic functionalities through various tethered linkers were selected based on their channel blocking abilities and evaluated as potential chemosensitizers. Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 10 showed significant voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocking ability (IC50=0.27-35 μM) and were able to alter the CQ IC50 in differing degrees (45-81%) in the multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum Dd2 isolate. Among them, the PCU-dansyl amine compound (4) displayed the best potential to act as a chemosensitizer against the Dd2 strain at a 1 μM concentration (RMI=0.19) while displaying moderate antiplasmodial activity (Dd2 IC50=6.25 μM) and low in vitro cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line (CHO, IC50=119 μM). Compounds 2 and 10 also showed some promising chemosensitizing abilities (RMI=0.36 and 0.35 respectively). A direct correlation was found between the VGCC blocking ability of these polycyclic amines and their capacity to act as CQ resistance modulating agents.

  7. Genetics of chloroquine-resistant malaria: a haplotypic view

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Gauri; Das, Aparup

    2013-01-01

    The development and rapid spread of chloroquine resistance (CQR) in Plasmodium falciparum have triggered the identification of several genetic target(s) in the P. falciparum genome. In particular, mutations in the Pfcrt gene, specifically, K76T and mutations in three other amino acids in the region adjoining K76 (residues 72, 74, 75 and 76), are considered to be highly related to CQR. These various mutations form several different haplotypes and Pfcrt gene polymorphisms and the global distribution of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes in endemic and non-endemic regions of P. falciparum malaria have been the subject of extensive study. Despite the fact that the Pfcrt gene is considered to be the primary CQR gene in P. falciparum , several studies have suggested that this may not be the case. Furthermore, there is a poor correlation between the evolutionary implications of the Pfcrt haplotypes and the inferred migration of CQR P. falciparum based on CQR epidemiological surveillance data. The present paper aims to clarify the existing knowledge on the genetic basis of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes that are prevalent in worldwide populations based on the published literature and to analyse the data to generate hypotheses on the genetics and evolution of CQR malaria. PMID:24402147

  8. Overcoming Chloroquine Resistance in Malaria: Design, Synthesis, and Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Hybrid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Boudhar, Aicha; Ng, Xiao Wei; Loh, Chiew Yee; Chia, Wan Ni; Tan, Zhi Ming; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antimalarial therapies, including artemisinin, has emerged as a significant challenge. Reversal of acquired resistance can be achieved using agents that resensitize resistant parasites to a previously efficacious therapy. Building on our initial work describing novel chemoreversal agents (CRAs) that resensitize resistant parasites to chloroquine (CQ), we herein report new hybrid single agents as an innovative strategy in the battle against resistant malaria. Synthetically linking a CRA scaffold to chloroquine produces hybrid compounds with restored potency toward a range of resistant malaria parasites. A preferred compound, compound 35, showed broad activity and good potency against seven strains resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin. Assessment of aqueous solubility, membrane permeability, and in vitro toxicity in a hepatocyte line and a cardiomyocyte line indicates that compound 35 has a good therapeutic window and favorable drug-like properties. This study provides initial support for CQ-CRA hybrid compounds as a potential treatment for resistant malaria. PMID:26953199

  9. Enhanced combination therapy effect on paclitaxel-resistant carcinoma by chloroquine co-delivery via liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Menghua; Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    A novel composite liposomal system co-encapsulating paclitaxel (PTX) with chloroquine phosphate (CQ) was designed for treating PTX-resistant carcinoma. It was confirmed that liposomal CQ can sensitize PTX by means of autophagy inhibition and competitively binding with multidrug-resistance transporters. Furthermore, according to the in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis assay, real-time observation of cellular uptake, and in vivo tissue distribution study, co-encapsulation of PTX and CQ in liposomes was validated as superior to the mixture of PTX liposome plus CQ liposome due to the simultaneous delivery and synergetic effect of the two drugs. Consequently, this composite liposome achieved significantly stronger anticancer efficacy in vivo than the PTX liposome plus CQ liposome mixture. This study helps to guide and enlighten ongoing and future clinical trials about the optimal administration modes for drug combination therapy. PMID:26543365

  10. Resistance of infection by Plasmodium vivax to chloroquine in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Añez, Arletta; Moscoso, Manuel; Laguna, Ángel; Garnica, Cecilia; Melgar, Viviana; Cuba, Mauren; Gutierrez, Sonia; Ascaso, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) over three days plus primaquine (PQ) for seven days is the treatment of choice of infections by Plasmodium vivax in Bolivia, where 95% of the cases of malaria are attributed to this species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in this setting. Patients in the Amazon region of northern Bolivia, were included in the study from May to November 2011 and the therapeutic efficacy of CQ was evaluated over a 28-day follow-up period. Patients with P. vivax mono-infection received 25 mg/Kg body weight of CQ over three days. The concentrations of CQ + desethylchloroquine (DCQ) in blood were determined at days 7 and 28 of follow up; at follow-up and on the day of treatment failure was administered PQ. One hundred patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, two were lost to follow up and another two were later excluded for protocol violation. Of the 96 patients who completed the follow up 10 showed TF; one presented continued parasitaemia until day 7 of follow up, three on day 21 and six on day 28 of follow up. The geometric mean of CQ + DCQ on day 7 was 321.7 ng/ml (range 197-535 ng/ml). In six patients with TF the CQ + DCQ concentrations in blood on the day of TF were >100 ng/ml. The rate of resistance was 6.5%. The present study demonstrates the presence of resistance to CQ in the treatment of malaria by P. vivax in the Amazon region of Bolivia. New clinical trials are needed to establish alternative treatments against these parasites in this region of South America.

  11. Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax in transmigration settlements of West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fryauff, D J; Tuti, S; Mardi, A; Masbar, S; Patipelohi, R; Leksana, B; Kain, K C; Bangs, M J; Richie, T L; Baird, J K

    1998-10-01

    Malariometric surveys were conducted during July 1996 in native Dayak villages and predominantly Javanese transmigration settlements in Ketapang district of West Kalimantan, Indonesia. Malaria prevalence ranged from 0.9% to 2.7% in Dayak villages and from 1% to 20% in the transmigration settlements. Plasmodium falciparum accounted for 67% of the cases among Dayaks but P. vivax was dominant among transmigrants, accounting for more than 72% of the infections. Chloroquine sensitivity/resistance was assessed by 28-day in vivo testing of uncomplicated malaria infections and measurement of chloroquine blood levels in cases where parasitemias reappeared within the 28-day test period. Resistance was based on the appearance of asexual parasites against chloroquine plus desethylchloroquine levels exceeding the minimally effective whole blood concentrations proposed for sensitive parasite strains (P. vivax, 100 ng/ml; P. falciparum, 200 ng/ml). All parasitemias cleared initially within four days of beginning supervised chloroquine therapy (25 mg base/kg over a 48-hr period), but asexual parasites reappeared within 28 days in 27 of 52 P. vivax and three of 12 P. falciparum cases. Chloroquine blood levels at the time of recurrent parasitemias revealed resistance in 12 of the 27 P. vivax cases and in one of the three P. falciparum cases. Genotypes of nine of the 12 recurrent P. vivax isolates matched with their primary isolates and ruled out reinfection. These findings establish the presence of chloroquine-resistant P. vivax on the island of Borneo. The pattern of malaria and the high frequency of chloroquine resistance by P. vivax at the West Kalimantan location may relate to demographic, ecologic, agricultural, and socioeconomic changes associated with transmigration.

  12. Molecular analysis of chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance-associated alleles in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Soto, Aida Mercedes; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles.

  13. A Whole Cell Pathway Screen Reveals Seven Novel Chemosensitizers to Combat Chloroquine Resistant Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ch'ng, Jun-Hong; Mok, Sachel; Bozdech, Zbynek; Lear, Martin James; Boudhar, Aicha; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, Francois; Tan, Kevin Shyong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Due to the widespread prevalence of resistant parasites, chloroquine (CQ) was removed from front-line antimalarial chemotherapy in the 1990s despite its initial promise of disease eradication. Since then, resistance-conferring mutations have been identified in transporters such as the PfCRT, that allow for the efflux of CQ from its primary site of action, the parasite digestive vacuole. Chemosensitizing/chemoreversing compounds interfere with the function of these transporters thereby sensitizing parasites to CQ once again. However, compounds identified thus far have disappointing in vivo efficacy and screening for alternative candidates is required to revive this strategy. In this study, we propose a simple and direct means to rapidly screen for such compounds using a fluorescent-tagged CQ molecule. When this screen was applied to a small library, seven novel chemosensitizers (octoclothepin, methiothepin, metergoline, loperamide, chlorprothixene, L-703,606 and mibefradil) were quickly elucidated, including two which showed greater potency than the classical chemosensitizers verapamil and desipramine. PMID:23615863

  14. Imported chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax in Singapore: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lim, Poh Lian; Mok, Ying Juan; Lye, David C; Leo, Yee Sin

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax (CRPV) infection is emerging as a clinically significant problem. Detailed travel history is crucial to the management of imported malarial cases. We report a 58-year-old business traveler who returned from Indonesia and experienced relapse due to CRPV. The epidemiology and diagnostic challenges of CRPV for travel medicine clinicians are reviewed.

  15. The return of chloroquine-susceptible Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Mwanza, Sydney; Joshi, Sudhaunshu; Nambozi, Michael; Chileshe, Justin; Malunga, Phidelis; Kabuya, Jean-Bertin Bukasa; Hachizovu, Sebastian; Manyando, Christine; Mulenga, Modest; Laufer, Miriam

    2016-12-05

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to anti-malarial drugs remains a major obstacle to malaria control and elimination. The parasite has developed resistance to every anti-malarial drug introduced for wide-scale treatment. However, the spread of resistance may be reversible. Malawi was the first country to discontinue chloroquine use due to widespread resistance. Within a decade of the removal of drug pressure, the molecular marker of chloroquine-resistant malaria had disappeared and the drug was shown to have excellent clinical efficacy. Many countries have observed decreases in the prevalence of chloroquine resistance with the discontinuation of chloroquine use. In Zambia, chloroquine was used as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria until treatment failures led the Ministry of Health to replace it with artemether-lumefantrine in 2003. Specimens from a recent study were analysed to evaluate prevalence of chloroquine-resistant malaria in Nchelenge district a decade after chloroquine use was discontinued. Parasite DNA was extracted from dried blood spots collected by finger-prick in pregnant women who were enrolling in a clinical trial. The specimens underwent pyrosequencing to determine the genotype of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, the gene that is associated with CQ resistance. Three-hundred and two specimens were successfully analysed. No chloroquine-resistant genotypes were detected. The study found the disappearance of chloroquine-resistant malaria after the removal of chloroquine drug pressure. Chloroquine may have a role for malaria prevention or treatment in Zambia and throughout the region in the future.

  16. Survey of chloroquine-resistant mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes in Hadhramout, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-09-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Yemen. More than 95% of the malaria cases are due to Plasmodium ‎falciparum‎. Recently in Yemen, the antimalarial treatment policy was changed from chloroquine (CQ) to artemisinin combination therapy (ACTs). However, CQ is still available and prescribed in the Yemeni market. The persistence of CQ resistance will be prolonged if the shift to ACT and the simultaneous withdrawal of CQ are not rigorously implemented. The aim of the current survey is to detect chloroquine-resistant mutations in P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (pfmdr1) genes. These data will be important for future monitoring and assessment of antimalarial drug policy in Yemen. Blood specimens were collected from 735 individuals from different districts of the Hadhramout province, Yemen by house-to-house visit. Mutation-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used to investigate the mutations in the pfmdr1(codons 86 and 1246) and pfcrt (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) genes. The overall prevalence of pfcrt mutations at codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 were 50.4%, 58.7%, 54.3% and 44.9%, respectively. All isolates had wild-type pfcrt 356 allele. The majority of pfmdr1 86 alleles (83.3%) and all pfmdr1 1246 alleles were wild type. There was no association between pfcrt mutations and symptomatology, gender and age groups. In conclusion, point mutations in codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 of pfcrt of P. falciparum are high suggesting a sustained high CQ resistance even after 4 years of shifting to ACTs. These findings warrant complete withdrawal of CQ use from the Yemeni market for P. falciparum and careful usage of CQ for treating Plasmodium vivax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vivo resistance to chloroquine by Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum at Nabire, Irian Jaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K; Wiady, I; Fryauff, D J; Sutanihardja, M A; Leksana, B; Widjaya, H; Kysdarmanto; Subianto, B

    1997-06-01

    A survey of resistance to chloroquine by Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum was conducted during May 1995 at three mesoendemic villages 30 km southeast of Nabire, near the central northern coast of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The prevalence of malaria at Urusumu (n = 157), Margajaya (n = 573), and Topo (n = 199) was 18%. 9%, and 9%, respectively, with spleen rates among children of 79%, 10%, and 27%. Infected patients among those screened formed a study population of 64 subjects eligible for a 28-day in vivo test of resistance to chloroquine. Sixty-three patients successfully completed the test; 45 males and 18 females 1-60 years of age, of whom 29 were Javanese transmigrants of five years residence in Irian Jaya and 34 were native to Irian Jaya. The seven-day day cumulative incidence of therapeutic failure for P. vivax and P. falciparum was 15% (n = 34) and 30% (n = 37). The 14- and 28-day estimates of cumulative incidence were 45% and 64% for P. vivax and 58% and 89% for P. falciparum. Almost all recurrences appeared in the face of ordinarily effective levels of chloroquine and its major metabolite, desethylchloroquine, in whole blood (> or = 100 ng/ml). Four infections by P. malariae in subjects enrolled in this study cleared by day 2 and none reappeared within 28 days. Chloroquine no longer provides effective therapy for falciparum or vivax malaria along the northern coast of Irian Jaya, Indonesia.

  18. Discovering Thiamine Transporters as Targets of Chloroquine Using a Novel Functional Genomics Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Zhang, Jianhuai; Chen, Kaifu; Li, Yongxiang; Li, Wei; Quiocho, Florante A.; Pan, Xuewen

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and other quinoline-containing antimalarials are important drugs with many therapeutic benefits as well as adverse effects. However, the molecular targets underlying most such effects are largely unknown. By taking a novel functional genomics strategy, which employs a unique combination of genome-wide drug-gene synthetic lethality (DGSL), gene-gene synthetic lethality (GGSL), and dosage suppression (DS) screens in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is thus termed SL/DS for simplicity, we found that CQ inhibits the thiamine transporters Thi7, Nrt1, and Thi72 in yeast. We first discovered a thi3Δ mutant as hypersensitive to CQ using a genome-wide DGSL analysis. Using genome-wide GGSL and DS screens, we then found that a thi7Δ mutation confers severe growth defect in the thi3Δ mutant and that THI7 overexpression suppresses CQ-hypersensitivity of this mutant. We subsequently showed that CQ inhibits the functions of Thi7 and its homologues Nrt1 and Thi72. In particular, the transporter activity of wild-type Thi7 but not a CQ-resistant mutant (Thi7T287N) was completely inhibited by the drug. Similar effects were also observed with other quinoline-containing antimalarials. In addition, CQ completely inhibited a human thiamine transporter (SLC19A3) expressed in yeast and significantly inhibited thiamine uptake in cultured human cell lines. Therefore, inhibition of thiamine uptake is a conserved mechanism of action of CQ. This study also demonstrated SL/DS as a uniquely effective methodology for discovering drug targets. PMID:23209439

  19. Trends in chloroquine resistance marker, Pfcrt-K76T mutation ten years after chloroquine withdrawal in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum resistance to anti-malarial drugs remains a major obstacle to the control of malaria. In 2001 Tanzania replaced chloroquine (CQ) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as first-line drug, which in turn was replaced by artemisinin combination therapy in 2006. SP has however, continued to be used in intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) despite reports of high levels of resistance to SP due to the lack of alternatives to SP for IPTp. Recent reports have indicated recovery of CQ-susceptibility in Malawi, Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania based on the prevalence of wild types at codon 76 of the Pfcrt gene in indigenous P. falciparum populations. The current prevalence of this Pfcrt-76 CQ resistance marker from six regions of Tanzania mainland is hereby reported. Methods DNA extracted from filter-paper dried blood spots and rapid diagnostics kit strips collected from finger-prick blood were used to genotype the Pfcrt-76 resistance marker using PCR-RFLP. Data from previously published studies were used to generate CQ susceptibility recovery trends using logistic regression model. Results Seven hundred and forty one (741) samples were genotyped. The current frequency of the CQ-susceptible Pfcrt-K76 was above 92% and did not differ between regions in Tanzania (χ2 = 2.37; p = 0.795). The K76 allelic prevalence was between 85.7 and 93% in regions (χ2 = 7.88, p = 0.163). The CQ resistance recovery trends showed regional variability that may be caused by differences in malaria transmission intensity, but overall the trends converge as the susceptibility levels in all regions approach >90%. Conclusions CQ withdrawal in Tanzania has resulted into >90% recovery of susceptibility in ten years of withdrawal. These findings are in support of the search for CQ-based combination drugs as a possible future alternative to SP for IPTp in places where full recovery of CQ-susceptibility will be evident. PMID:24225406

  20. Confirmation of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro resistance to monodesethylamodiaquine and chloroquine in Dakar, Senegal, in 2015.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Silman; Madamet, Marylin; Kounta, Mame Bou; Lo, Gora; Wade, Khalifa Ababacar; Nakoulima, Aminata; Bercion, Raymond; Amalvict, Rémy; Gueye, Mamadou Wague; Fall, Bécaye; Diatta, Bakary; Pradines, Bruno

    2017-03-16

    In response to increasing resistance to anti-malarial drugs, Senegal adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in 2006. However, resistance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to artemisinin derivatives, characterized by delayed parasite clearance after treatment with ACT or artesunate monotherapy, has recently emerged and rapidly spread in Southeast Asia. After 10 years of stability with rates ranging from 5.6 to 11.8%, the prevalence of parasites with reduced susceptibility in vitro to monodesethylamodiaquine, the active metabolite of an ACT partner drug, increased to 30.6% in 2014 in Dakar. Additionally, after a decrease of the in vitro chloroquine resistance in Dakar in 2009-2011, the prevalence of parasites that showed in vitro chloroquine resistance increased again to approximately 50% in Dakar since 2013. The aim of this study was to follow the evolution of the susceptibility to ACT partners and other anti-malarial drugs in 2015 in Dakar. An in vitro test is the only method currently available to provide an early indication of resistance to ACT partners. Thirty-two P. falciparum isolates collected in 2015 in Dakar were analysed using a standard ex vivo assay based on an HRP2 ELISA. The prevalence of P. falciparum parasites with reduced susceptibility in vitro to monodesethylamodiaquine, chloroquine, mefloquine, doxycycline and quinine was 28.1, 46.9, 45.2, 31.2 and 9.7%, respectively. None of the parasites were resistant to lumefantrine, piperaquine, pyronaridine, dihydroartemisinin and artesunate. These results confirm an increase in the reduced susceptibility to monodesethylamodiaquine observed in 2014 in Dakar and the chloroquine resistance observed in 2013. The in vitro resistance seems to be established in Dakar. Additionally, the prevalence of parasites with reduced susceptibility to doxycycline has increased two-fold compared to 2014. The establishment of a reduced susceptibility to

  1. A four-year surveillance program for detection of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Fontecha, Gustavo A; Sanchez, Ana L; Mendoza, Meisy; Banegas, Engels; Mejía-Torres, Rosa E

    2014-07-01

    Countries could use the monitoring of drug resistance in malaria parasites as an effective early warning system to develop the timely response mechanisms that are required to avert the further spread of malaria. Drug resistance surveillance is essential in areas where no drug resistance has been reported, especially if neighbouring countries have previously reported resistance. Here, we present the results of a four-year surveillance program based on the sequencing of the pfcrt gene of Plasmodium falciparum populations from endemic areas of Honduras. All isolates were susceptible to chloroquine, as revealed by the pfcrt "CVMNK" genotype in codons 72-76.

  2. Genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance genes, pfcrt and pfmdr1, in North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Reteng, Patrick; Vrisca, Visia; Sukarno, Inka; Djarkoni, Ilham Habib; Kalangi, Jane Angela; Jacobs, George Eduardo; Runtuwene, Lucky Ronald; Eshita, Yuki; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Mongan, Arthur Elia; Warouw, Sarah Maria; Yamagishi, Junya; Tuda, Josef

    2017-04-04

    Malaria still poses one of the major threats to human health. Development of effective antimalarial drugs has decreased this threat; however, the emergence of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, a cause of Malaria, is disconcerting. The antimalarial drug chloroquine has been effectively used, but resistant parasites have spread worldwide. Interestingly, the withdrawal of the drug reportedly leads to an increased population of susceptible parasites in some cases. We examined the prevalence of genomic polymorphisms in a malaria parasite P. falciparum, associated with resistance to an antimalarial drug chloroquine, after the withdrawal of the drug from Indonesia. Blood samples were collected from 95 malaria patients in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, in 2010. Parasite DNA was extracted and analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for pfcrt and pfmdr1. In parallel, multiplex amplicon sequencing for the same genes was carried out with Illumina MiSeq. Of the 59 cases diagnosed as P. falciparum infection by microscopy, PCR-RFLP analysis clearly identified the genotype 76T in pfcrt in 44 cases. Sequencing analysis validated the identified genotypes in the 44 cases and demonstrated that the haplotype in the surrounding genomic region was exclusively SVMNT. Results of pfmdr1 were successfully obtained for 51 samples, where the genotyping results obtained by the two methods were completely consistent. In pfmdr1, the 86Y mutant genotype was observed in 45 cases (88.2%). Our results suggest that the prevalence of the mutated genotypes remained dominant even 6 years after the withdrawal of chloroquine from this region. Diversified haplotype of the resistance-related locus, potentially involved in fitness costs, unauthorized usage of chloroquine, and/or a short post-withdrawal period may account for the observed high persistence of prevalence.

  3. [Emergence of chloroquine-resistant malaria in West Africa: the case of Sokode (Togo)].

    PubMed

    Gbary, A R; Guiguemdé, T R; Ouedraogo, J B

    1988-06-01

    Within the framework of its surveillance of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine sensitivity in eight West African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'lvoire, Mali, Mauritany, Niger, Senegal, and Togo) the Reference Centre for Chemoresistant Malaria (CRCP) at the Organization for Coordination and Cooperation to Control Major Endemic Diseases (O.C.C.G.E.) conducted an in vivo survey in February, 1987, in Sokodé (Togo). Two groups of 67 children, aged 2 to 9, received, for the first group a single 10 mg/kg dose of chloroquine; for the second group a 3-day 25 mg/kg dose, according to the WHO methodology. Thick and thin blood smears were examined on D0, D2, D3 when necessary, D4 and D7. Within the 23 children who received the 10 mg/kg dose, seven (30.4%) presented a "resistance", of which six were early RI type and 1 was RII type. Out of 44 children who received the standard dose of 25 mg/kg, two (4.6%) were resistant (early RI type resistance). These data show for the first time the appearance of in vivo chloroquine resistance in this country, and call for a withdrawal of the 10 mg/kg dose of chloroquine in the treatment of fever attacks to the benefit of a 25 mg/kg dose. Thorough studies, using in vivo and in vitro techniques, should be undertaken as soon as possible, not only in Togo but in other West African countries too, to take the exact measure of the issue.

  4. In vivo and in vitro analysis of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Senegal.

    PubMed

    Sarr, Ousmane; Myrick, Alissa; Daily, Johanna; Diop, Bernard M; Dieng, Therese; Ndir, Omar; Sow, Pape Salif; Mboup, Souleymane; Wirth, Dyann F

    2005-09-01

    To determine the predictive value of chloroquine (CQ) resistance markers in Senegal, Plasmodium falciparum DNA polymorphisms in pfmdr1and pfcrt were examined in relation to clinical outcome. Despite CQ treatment, 17% of patients had parasitemia after 28 days. Examination of molecular markers of CQ resistance revealed that 64% of all isolates had the T76 resistant allele at the pfcrt locus, while 30% carried the Y86 resistant allele at the pfmdr1 locus. The pfcrt T76 allele was present not only in all in vivo resistant isolates, 89% of in vitro resistant isolates, but also in 35% of in vitro sensitive isolates. The pfmdr1 N86Y polymorphism did not correlate with in vitro or in vivo CQ resistance. Our data suggest that the pfcrt T76 allele alone is required but not a sufficient predictor for in vivo CQ resistance.

  5. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum malaria to chloroquine is widespread in eastern Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Rab, M A; Freeman, T W; Durrani, N; de Poerck, D; Rowland, M W

    2001-01-01

    After two decades of war and conflict in Afghanistan, the public-health system is in disarray and malaria has re-emerged as a major disease, with Plasmodium falciparum malaria becoming increasingly common. The limited healthcare services that are available are mainly delivered by non-governmental organizations in collaboration with the Ministry of Health. Although chloroquine (CQ) remains the official first-line treatment against P. falciparum malaria, there is little information on the severity or distribution of resistance to this drug in Afghanistan. In-vivo surveys, co-ordinated by the Malaria Reference Centre in Jalalabad, were therefore performed to determine the frequency and grades of CQ resistance in the three eastern provinces of Kunar, Nangarhar and Laghman. Of the 142 cases enrolled in the study, only 47 (33%) were sensitive. Most of the cases (55%) showed RI resistance but RII/RIII resistance was not uncommon (11%). The prevalence of resistance appeared similar in children and adults, in males and females, and in each of the three provinces investigated. Gametocyte carriage post-treatment was elevated in the resistant cases. As in neighbouring Pakistan, the resurgence of P. falciparum in Afghanistan is probably associated with the transmission and spread of chloroquine-resistant strains. The first-line therapy used against P. falciparum malaria must be changed in order to reverse this trend.

  6. 4-N, 4-S & 4-O Chloroquine Analogues: Influence of Side Chain Length and Quinolyl Nitrogen pKa on Activity vs. Chloroquine Resistant Malaria+, #

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Jayakumar K.; Alumasa, John; Yearick, Kimberly; Ekoue-Kovi, Kekeli A.; Casabianca, Leah B.; de Dios, Angel C.; Wolf, Christian; Roepe, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Using predictions from heme – quinoline antimalarial complex structures, previous modifications of chloroquine (CQ), and hypotheses for chloroquine resistance (CQR), we synthesize and assay CQ analogues that test structure – function principles. We vary side chain length for both monoethyl and diethyl 4N CQ derivatives. We alter the pKa of the quinolyl N by introducing alkylthio or alkoxy substituents into the 4 position, and vary side chain length for these analogues. We introduce an additional titratable amino group to the side chain of 4O analogues with promising CQR strain selectivity and increase activity while retaining selectivity. We solve atomic resolution structures for complexes formed between representative 4N, 4S and 4O derivatives vs. μ-oxo dimeric heme, measure binding constants for monomeric vs. dimeric heme, and quantify hemozoin (Hz) formation inhibition in vitro. The data provide additional insight for the design of CQ analogues with improved activity vs. CQR malaria. PMID:18512900

  7. Co-delivery of Gefitinib and chloroquine by chitosan nanoparticles for overcoming the drug acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Yang, Guang; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Chang, Jin

    2015-09-22

    Acquired drug resistance is becoming common during cancer chemotherapy and leads to treatment failure in clinic. To conquer acquired drug resistance, nanotechnology has been employed to deliver drug. In this paper, we prepared chitosan nanoparticles (CS NPs) capable of entrapping Gefitinib and chloroquine (CQ) for multiple drugs combinational therapy. The results showed that Gefitinib/CQ-NPs were characterized of small particle size about 80.8 ± 9.7 nm and positive zeta potential about 21.3 ± 1.56 mV, and drug controlled to release slowly on a biphasic pattern. Compared with free Gefitinib and Gefitinib loaded NPs, Gefitinib and CQ co-delivery by CS nanoparticles showed the higher inhibition rates and enhanced cell apoptosis. Through western blot analysis, we found that Gefitinib could promote LC3 expression, which is the marker of autophagosomes. So, the acquired drug resistance may be associated with autophagy. CQ as an inhibitor of autophagolysosomes formation could overcome autophagy in the resistant cells. These findings demonstrated that chitosan nanoparticles entrapping Gefitinib and chloroquine have the potential to overcome acquired resistance and improve cancer treatment efficacy, especially towards resistant strains. Graphical abstract: Cellular distribution of NPs after incubating QGY (a) and QGY/Gefitinib cells (b) with rhodamine B-labeled NPs.

  8. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt

    PubMed Central

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Musset, Lise

    2015-01-01

    In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations can attain 100% prevalence, thereby precluding the return of WT parasites after the complete removal of drug pressure. In French Guiana, despite the fixation of the K76T allele, the prevalence of CQR isolates progressively dropped from >90% to <30% during 17 y after CQ withdrawal in 1995. Using a genome-wide association study with CQ-sensitive (CQS) and CQR isolates, we have identified a single mutation in pfcrt encoding a C350R substitution that is associated with the restoration of CQ susceptibility. Genome editing of the CQR reference strain 7G8 to incorporate PfCRT C350R caused a complete loss of CQR. A retrospective molecular survey on 580 isolates collected from 1997 to 2012 identified all C350R mutant parasites as being CQS. This mutation emerged in 2002 and rapidly spread throughout the P. falciparum population. The C350R allele is also associated with a significant decrease in piperaquine susceptibility in vitro, suggesting that piperaquine pressure in addition to potential fitness costs associated with the 7G8-type CQR pfcrt allele may have selected for this mutation. These findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:26261345

  9. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt.

    PubMed

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L; Dhingra, Satish K; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Volkman, Sarah K; Wirth, Dyann F; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A; Neafsey, Daniel E; Musset, Lise

    2015-09-15

    In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations can attain 100% prevalence, thereby precluding the return of WT parasites after the complete removal of drug pressure. In French Guiana, despite the fixation of the K76T allele, the prevalence of CQR isolates progressively dropped from >90% to <30% during 17 y after CQ withdrawal in 1995. Using a genome-wide association study with CQ-sensitive (CQS) and CQR isolates, we have identified a single mutation in pfcrt encoding a C350R substitution that is associated with the restoration of CQ susceptibility. Genome editing of the CQR reference strain 7G8 to incorporate PfCRT C350R caused a complete loss of CQR. A retrospective molecular survey on 580 isolates collected from 1997 to 2012 identified all C350R mutant parasites as being CQS. This mutation emerged in 2002 and rapidly spread throughout the P. falciparum population. The C350R allele is also associated with a significant decrease in piperaquine susceptibility in vitro, suggesting that piperaquine pressure in addition to potential fitness costs associated with the 7G8-type CQR pfcrt allele may have selected for this mutation. These findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of antimalarial drug resistance.

  10. Comparative Study of Effectiveness and Resistance Profile of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine in Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ayan; Saha, Santanu; Guha, Subhasish Kamal

    2015-05-01

    Malaria is one of the major public health problems of the country. Factors responsible for reemergence of malaria in India was due to emergence and spread of chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains across the country coupled with steady rise in insecticide resistance of the vector mosquitoes. Very little is known about the drug resistance status of P. falciparum in India. As per National Vector Borne Diseases Control Programme (NVBDCP), chloroquine is the drug of choice for uncomplicated P. falciparum cases and the combination of Artesunate and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is being used to treat the documented chloroquine-resistant uncomplicated cases. To evaluate the comparative effectiveness and resistance profile of Chloroquine vis-à-vis Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum cases as the first-line therapy a study was undertaken at the Malaria Clinic of Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine, Kolkata during the period from July 2007 to December 2007 at Kolkata Municipal Corporation, Kolkata. Following WHO protocol 2003, a total of 100 parasitologically confirmed Plasmodium falciparum cases were recruited as per the recruitment criteria. Among them, 50 patients were given Chloroquine and another 50 patients were given SP. Eight patients were excluded or lost to follow-up during the follow-up period because of failure to follow the protocol. It was observed that in the Chloroquine group out of 50 patients, 30 (60%) showed adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR), 15 (30%) had late treatment failure (LTF) and remaining 5 (10%) were lost during the follow up period (LFU). On the other hand in the SP group out of 50 patients, 46 (92%) showed ACPR and only one (2%) had LTF and 3 patients were LFU. The difference of LTF in Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine groups was statistically significant (p value < 0.05). Also there was statistically significant difference of the mean parasite clearance time (PCT

  11. Monitoring Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance in Yunnan Province, China, 1981–2006

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Henglin; Yang, Yaming; Yang, Pinfang; Li, Xingliang; Gao, Baihe; Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Zhaoqing; Cui, Liwang

    2008-01-01

    The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria parasites are an important factor contributing to the global resurgence of malaria, demonstrating the essence of drug resistance surveillance in endemic areas. In the malarious border regions of Yunnan Province, China, we have selected three study sites to monitor in vitro and in vivo resistance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to chloroquine (CQ) from 1981 to 2006. In vitro studies using the microtest clearly showed high-degree of CQ resistance in the early 1980s, when CQ was replaced by artemether monotherapy for falciparum malaria. In subsequent in vitro surveys performed in the early 1990s and 2003–2004, we found reductions in both the concentrations inhibiting 50% parasite growth (IC50s) and the percentage of resistant parasites at all study sites, although the degrees of the reduction varied among sites. Even though amodiaquine has never been used in this area, there were consistently high levels of resistance to this drug, confirming cross resistance between CQ and amodiaquine. In vivo clinical studies were consistent with the results of the in vitro assays. The overall rate of resistant clinical cases decreased from 97% in 1981–1983 to 40% in 2005–2006. Collectively, whereas a general trend of reduction in CQ resistance was observed in Yunnan, variations among sites existed in this relatively small area, probably as the result of both geographical heterogeneity of malaria epidemiology in Yunnan and different levels of CQ resistance in neighboring countries. PMID:18822265

  12. Mutation in pfmdr1 gene in chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum isolates, Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalousian, Fatemeh; Dalimi, Abdolhossein; Samiee, Siamak Mirab; Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh; Soleymanloo, Faramarz; Naghizadeh, Ramin

    2008-11-01

    The main objective of the present study was to detect point mutations at positions 86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246 of the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr1) in blood samples collected from malaria patients in Chabahar, a harbor city located in Southeast Iran. Twenty-six blood samples from patients infected with P. falciparum, who had a chloroquine (CQ) response failure, were collected pre-treatment. Following treatment with CQ, drug susceptibility was assessed using an in vivo test. Molecular detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was carried out using the LightCycler hybridization probe assay. The pfmdr1 N86Y mutation was found in six isolates (23.1%). Mutations at the four other positions were not observed in any isolates. The present study showed no mutation at codon positions 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246 of pfmdr1 in any of the Iranian P. falciparum isolates; thus these alleles cannot serve as markers for CQ resistance in Iran.

  13. Localized permanent epidemics: the genesis of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Verdrager, J

    1995-03-01

    Localized permanent epidemics occur when, for an indefinite period of time, there is a temporary but continuous introduction of unprotected non-immunes into the same locality of a hyperendemic area. The main epidemiological factors involved in the genesis of localized permanent epidemics were encountered in Pailin (Cambodia) the epicenter of drug resistance in Southeast Asia: a very efficient vector, Anopheles dirus, exophilic and of limited distribution with, therefore, adjacent hyperendemic and non-endemic areas; a permanent pole of attraction in the hyperendemic area: Pailin's sapphires and rubies; a temporary but continuous influx of non-immunes into the pole of attraction: continuous influx of non-immunes into the Pailin gem mining area. In the gem-mining Pailin village drug pressure was considerable: mass drug administration, a medicated salt project and permanent self-medication with very high doses, much higher doses being required to cure non-immunes with heavy infections and severe clinical attacks in epidemic situations. It appears, therefore, that the emergence of chloroquine resistance in Southeast Asia was the consequence of the localized permanent epidemics in Païlin. High level resistance was the result of continuous and intensive serial passages of P. falciparum in the non-immune subjects, large numbers of parasites being exposed to a high level of drug pressure at each passage. Similar epidemiological conditions are encountered in some parts of South America where the exophilic vector is An. nuneztovari. In Colombia, whose eastern mountains bordering Venezuela yield the most highly prized emeralds in the world, chloroquine resistance was detected at about the same time as in Southeast Asia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine Are Novel Inhibitors of Human Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1A2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenghao; Zhu, Ling; Chan, Ting; Lu, Xiaoxi; Shen, Weiyong; Madigan, Michele C; Gillies, Mark C; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-02-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are widely used to treat malaria and inflammatory diseases, long-term usage of which often causes severe side effects, especially retinopathy. Solute carrier transporters (SLCs) are important proteins responsible for the cellular uptake of endogenous and exogenous substances. Inhibitors competing with transporter substrates for SLCs often results in unfavorable toxicities and unsatisfactory therapeutic outcomes. We investigated the inhibitory effect of CQ and HCQ on substrate uptake mediated through a range of important SLC transporters in overexpressing human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Our data revealed that both CQ and HCQ potently inhibit the uptake activity of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1A2 (OATP1A2). We recently reported OATP1A2 to be expressed in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), where it mediates cellular uptake of all-trans-retinol (atROL), a key step in the classical visual cycle. In this study, we demonstrate that CQ and HCQ could markedly impair atROL uptake in OATP1A2-expressing HEK293 cells and more importantly, in primary human RPE cells. Our study shows that CQ and HCQ are novel inhibitors of OATP1A2 and significantly impair OATP1A2-mediated substrate uptake, particularly transport of atROL into the RPE. This effect may compromise the function of the classic visual cycle leading to vision impairment and contribute to the retinopathy observed clinically in patients using CQ or HCQ.

  15. The Potential of β Carbolin Alkaloids to Hinder Growth and Reverse Chloroquine Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    IBRAHEEM, Zaid O; ABDUL MAJID, Roslaini; MOHD NOOR, Sabariah; MOHD SIDEK, Hasidah; BASIR, Rusliza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, scourge of malaria as a fatalistic disease has increased due to emergence of drug resistance and tolerance among different strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Emergence of chloroquine (CQ) resistance has worsened the calamity as CQ is still considered the most efficient, safe and cost effective drug among other antimalarials. This urged the scientists to search for other alternatives or sensitizers that may be able to augment CQ action and reverse its resistance. Method: Three β-carbolin derivatives, namely, harmalin, harmol and harmalol were tested for their anti-plasmodial and CQ resistance reversal effects against P. falciparum 3D7 and K1. SYBRE Green-1 based drug sensitivity assay and isobologram analysis were used to screen the mentioned effects respectively. Results: All of them showed moderate anti-plasmodium effect and harmalin was the most effective as compared to the others in reversing CQ resistance and tolerance. Conclusion: The mentioned phytochemicals are not ideal to be used as conventional antimalarials and only harmalin can be suggested to reverse CQ resistance in P. falciparum K1. PMID:26811724

  16. Establishment and application of a novel isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of chloroquine resistance (K76T) in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Chahar, Madhvi; Mishra, Neelima; Anvikar, Anup; Dixit, Rajnikant; Valecha, Neena

    2017-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is determined by the mutations in the chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) gene. The point mutation at codon 76 (K76T), which has been observed in more than 91% of P. falciparum isolates in India, is the major determinant of CQ resistance. To overcome the limitations and challenges of traditional methods, in this investigation we developed an easy to use loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) protocol for rapid detection of the K76T mutation associated with CQ resistance in P. falciparum with naked eye visualization. In- house designed primers were synthesized and optimized to specifically distinguish the CQ resistant mutants of P. falciparum. The LAMP reaction was optimal at 61 °C for 60 min and calcein dye was added prior to amplification to enable visual detection. We demonstrate the detection limit of <2 ng/μl respectively, supporting the high sensitivity of this calcein based LAMP method. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on the establishment of an easy, reliable and cost effective LAMP assay for rapid and specific detection of highly CQ resistance in P. falciparum malaria. PMID:28134241

  17. Chloroquine accumulation by purified plasma membranes from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Laurence M; Smith, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine (CQ) has been associated with a decrease in CQ accumulation by parasitized erythrocytes. This study aimed at investigating the role of parasite plasma membranes (PPM) in the mechanism of CQ accumulation. CQ accumulation capabilities of membranes were determined using tritiated CQ. PPM isolated from chloroquine-sensitive parasites were found to accumulate less CQ than those isolated from chloroquine-resistant parasites. However, CQ accumulation was found to be ATP-independent suggesting that this accumulation results from binding rather than transport.

  18. Degrees of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium – Is the redox system involved?

    PubMed Central

    Lehane, Adele M.; McDevitt, Christopher A.; Kirk, Kiaran; Fidock, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) was once a very effective antimalarial drug that, at its peak, was consumed in the hundreds of millions of doses per year. The drug acts against the Plasmodium parasite during the asexual intra-erythrocytic phase of its lifecycle. Unfortunately, clinical resistance to this drug is now widespread. Questions remain about precisely how CQ kills malaria parasites, and by what means some CQ-resistant (CQR) parasites can withstand much higher concentrations of the drug than others that also fall in the CQR category. In this review we investigate the evidence for and against the proposal that CQ kills parasites by generating oxidative stress. Further, we examine a long-held idea that the glutathione system of malaria parasites plays a role in CQ resistance. We conclude that there is strong evidence that glutathione levels modulate CQ response in the rodent malaria species Plasmodium berghei, but that a role for redox in contributing to the degree of CQ resistance in species infectious to humans has not been firmly established. PMID:22773965

  19. Occurrence of multiple chloroquine-resistant Pfcrt haplotypes and emergence of the S(agt)VMNT type in Cameroonian Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ngassa Mbenda, Huguette Gaelle; Das, Aparup

    2014-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to unravel the distribution of different Pfcrt genotypes in the central, littoral, eastern and southern regions of Cameroon and also in locations bordering Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. This is because (i) the chloroquine-resistant malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum shows a wide occurrence in Cameroon, (ii) mutations in the 72nd to 76th amino acid positions of the Pfcrt gene are known to confer resistance to chloroquine, and (iii) only a single chloroquine-resistant haplotype (C72V73I74E75T76) has so far been reported in Cameroon. We followed a molecular approach with DNA sequencing of the second exon of the Pfcrt gene to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms in 180 P. falciparum field isolates sampled in five different locations in Cameroon. The chloroquine-resistant Pfcrt CVIET haplotype was most abundant, followed by the wild-type CVMNK haplotype. Five hitherto unreported chloroquine-resistant Pfcrt haplotypes were detected for the first time in Cameroonian P. falciparum, including the surprise appearance of the S(agt)VMNT haplotype. The high observed haplotype diversity of the chloroquine-resistant Pfcrt gene and the appearance of the S(agt)VMNT haplotype are daunting and can be attributed to drug pressure and/or the misuse of chloroquine and/or amodiaquine in Cameroon.

  20. Identification of pyrimethamine- and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 1984 and 1998: genotyping of archive blood samples.

    PubMed

    Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Mita, Toshihiro

    2011-12-31

    Understanding the geographical distribution of drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is important for the effective treatment of malaria. Drug resistance has previously been inferred mainly from records of clinical resistance. However, clinical resistance is not always consistent with the parasite's genetic resistance. Thus, molecular identification of the parasite's drug resistance is required. In Africa, clinical resistance to pyrimethamine (Pyr) and chloroquine (CQ) was evident before 1980 but few studies investigating the genetic resistance to these drugs were conducted before the late 1990s. In this study, genotyping of genes involved in resistance to Pyr and CQ was performed using archive blood samples from Africa between 1984 and 1998. Parasite DNA was extracted from P. falciparum-infected blood smears collected from travellers returning to Japan from Africa between 1984 and 1998. Genotypes of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (dhfr) and CQ-resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. Genotyping of dhfr and pfcrt was successful in 59 and 80 samples, respectively. One wild-type and seven mutant dhfr genotypes were identified. Three dhfr genotypes lacking the S108N mutation (NRSI, ICSI, IRSI; amino acids at positions 51, 59, 108, and 164 with mutations underlined) were highly prevalent before 1994 but reduced after 1995, accompanied by an increase in genotypes with the S108N mutation. The dhfr IRNI genotype was first identified in Nigeria in 1991 in the present samples, and its frequency gradually increased. However, two double mutants (ICNI and NRNI), the latter of which was exclusively found in West Africa, were more frequent than the IRNI genotype. Only two pfcrt genotypes were found, the wild-type and a Southeast Asian type (CVIET; amino acids at positions 72-76 with mutations underlined). The CVIET genotype was already present as early as 1984 in Tanzania and Nigeria, and appeared

  1. Identification of pyrimethamine- and chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Africa between 1984 and 1998: genotyping of archive blood samples

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the geographical distribution of drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is important for the effective treatment of malaria. Drug resistance has previously been inferred mainly from records of clinical resistance. However, clinical resistance is not always consistent with the parasite's genetic resistance. Thus, molecular identification of the parasite's drug resistance is required. In Africa, clinical resistance to pyrimethamine (Pyr) and chloroquine (CQ) was evident before 1980 but few studies investigating the genetic resistance to these drugs were conducted before the late 1990s. In this study, genotyping of genes involved in resistance to Pyr and CQ was performed using archive blood samples from Africa between 1984 and 1998. Methods Parasite DNA was extracted from P. falciparum-infected blood smears collected from travellers returning to Japan from Africa between 1984 and 1998. Genotypes of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (dhfr) and CQ-resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. Results Genotyping of dhfr and pfcrt was successful in 59 and 80 samples, respectively. One wild-type and seven mutant dhfr genotypes were identified. Three dhfr genotypes lacking the S108N mutation (NRSI, ICSI, IRSI; amino acids at positions 51, 59, 108, and 164 with mutations underlined) were highly prevalent before 1994 but reduced after 1995, accompanied by an increase in genotypes with the S108N mutation. The dhfr IRNI genotype was first identified in Nigeria in 1991 in the present samples, and its frequency gradually increased. However, two double mutants (ICNI and NRNI), the latter of which was exclusively found in West Africa, were more frequent than the IRNI genotype. Only two pfcrt genotypes were found, the wild-type and a Southeast Asian type (CVIET; amino acids at positions 72-76 with mutations underlined). The CVIET genotype was already present as early as 1984 in Tanzania and

  2. Phenotyping clinical resistance to chloroquine in Plasmodium vivax in northeastern Papua, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Asih, Puji B.S.; Syafruddin, Din; Leake, John; Sorontou, Yohanna; Sadikin, Mohamad; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Vinetz, Joseph; Baird, J. Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax was first documented in 1989 and threatens much of eastern Indonesia, with > 50% of therapeutic failure rates. We screened 2236 subjects for malaria infection through active case detection and identified 232 infected cases with 100 subjects carried P. vivax mono infection. We prospectively evaluated therapeutic responses to CQ in 73 subjects infected by P. vivax in northeastern Papua, Indonesia. We phenotyped these infections as susceptible or resistant to CQ using a 28-day in vivo test format. Eighteen subjects (25%) had persistent or recurrent parasitemia during the test and were provisionally classified as resistant. Among the remainder, 46 (63%) subjects had no persistent or recurrent parasitemia and were classified as having infections sensitive to CQ, 4 were lost to follow up, and 5 dropped out. Among the 18 provisionally resistant cases, 1 subject (6%) had persistent parasitemia at Day 3 and was considered as a direct treatment failure, 2 subjects (11%) had recurrent parasitemia by Day 7 and were considered early treatment failures, and 7 (39%) and 8 (44%) had recurrent parasitemia by Days 14 and 28, respectively. Analysis of blood for CQ+N-desethylchloroquine (DCQ) levels on day of recurrence from 15 of the 18 with treatment failures showed 11 subjects having CQ+DCQ blood levels ⩾ 100 ng/ml and 2 with CQ+DCQ blood levels < 100 ng/ml. The 28-day cumulative incidence of therapeutic failure likely due to parasite resistance was 17.5%. These findings affirm P. vivax resistance to CQ in eastern Indonesia, albeit at lower levels than reported elsewhere. This simple means of phenotyping P. vivax infections could be implemented in other malaria endemic areas of Indonesia. PMID:24533261

  3. Antimalarial Activity and Mechanisms of Action of Two Novel 4-Aminoquinolines against Chloroquine-Resistant Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Anna Caroline Campos; Santos, Raquel de Meneses; Figueiredo, Flávio Júnior Barbosa; Cortopassi, Wilian Augusto; Pimentel, André Silva; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Meneghetti, Mario Roberto; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a cost effective antimalarial drug with a relatively good safety profile (or therapeutic index). However, CQ is no longer used alone to treat patients with Plasmodium falciparum due to the emergence and spread of CQ-resistant strains, also reported for P. vivax. Despite CQ resistance, novel drug candidates based on the structure of CQ continue to be considered, as in the present work. One CQ analog was synthesized as monoquinoline (MAQ) and compared with a previously synthesized bisquinoline (BAQ), both tested against P. falciparum in vitro and against P. berghei in mice, then evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxicity and ability to inhibit hemozoin formation. Their interactions with residues present in the NADH binding site of P falciparum lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated using docking analysis software. Both compounds were active in the nanomolar range evaluated through the HRPII and hypoxanthine tests. MAQ and BAQ derivatives were not toxic, and both compounds significantly inhibited hemozoin formation, in a dose-dependent manner. MAQ had a higher selectivity index than BAQ and both compounds were weak PfLDH inhibitors, a result previously reported also for CQ. Taken together, the two CQ analogues represent promising molecules which seem to act in a crucial point for the parasite, inhibiting hemozoin formation. PMID:22649514

  4. Immunomodulatory proteins FIP-gts and chloroquine induce caspase-independent cell death via autophagy for resensitizing cisplatin-resistant urothelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsin, I-Lun; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Ciou, Tsai-Chun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Hung-Ming; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Chloroquine, a lysosomal inhibitor, is used for malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus erythematosus therapy. In our previous study, FIP-gts, an immunomodulatory protein from Ganoderma tsugae, inhibited cell viability in lung cancer cells and urothelial cancer cells. Urothelial carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer. Cisplatin resistance is an important issue in urothelial carcinoma therapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of combination treatment with FIP-gts and chloroquine on cytotoxicity to resensitize the cisplatin-resistant cells. FIP-gts and chloroquine cytotoxicity were determined by evaluating CCK-8 assay. Cell death pathways, ROS and cell cycle arrested were analysed through flow cytometry and Western blot. ShRNA targeting to autophagy-related genes were tested to evaluate their autophagic cell death for resistant urothelial cells. Using CCK-8 assay, chloroquine increased FIP-gts-induced cytotoxicity in parental and cisplatin-resistant urothelial cancer cell lines. On flow cytometry, chloroquine enhanced FIP-gts-mediated sub-G1 accumulation, annexin V positive signal and mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Caspase-3/PARP cascade and z-VAD-fmk were performed to prove that FIP-gts and chloroquine induced caspase-independent cell death. Using H2DCFDA staining and flow cytometry, FIP-gts and chloroquine did not induce ROS production. N-acetyl cysteine, a ROS scavenger, inhibited the cytotoxicity and LC3-II accumulation in FIP-gts and chloroquine-treated N/P cells. To elucidate the role of autophagy in caspase-independent cell death by FIP-gts and chloroquine, LC3 shRNA were used to inhibit autophagy in N/P cells. The capabilities of FIP-gts and chloroquine to induce cytotoxicity and sub-G1 phase accumulation were abolished in autophagy-defective cells. This is the first study to reveal the novel function of FIP-gts in triggering caspase-independent cell death in cisplatin-resistant urothelial cancer cells. Chloroquine

  5. Sensitization of multidrug-resistant malignant cells by liposomes co-encapsulating doxorubicin and chloroquine through autophagic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Menghua; Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2017-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a key role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) are important proteins in this superfamily which are widely expressed on the membranes of multidrug resistance (MDR) cancer cells. Besides, upregulation of cellular autophagic responses is considered a contributing factor for MDR in cancer cells. We designed a liposome system co-encapsulating a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin hydrochloride, DOX) and a typical autophagy inhibitior (chloroquine phosphate, CQ) at a weight ratio of 1:2 and investigated its drug resistance reversal mechanism. MTT assay showed that the IC50 of DOX/CQ co-encapsulated liposome in DOX-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF7/ADR) was 4.7 ± 0.2 μM, 5.7-fold less than that of free DOX (26.9 ± 1.9  μM), whereas it was 19.5-fold in doxorubicin-resistant human acute myelocytic leukemia cancer cells (HL60/ADR) (DOX/CQ co-encapsulated liposome 1.2 ± 0.1 μM, free DOX 23.4 ± 2.8 μM). The cellular uptake of DOX increased upon addition of free CQ, indicating that CQ may interact with P-gp and MRP1; however, the expressions of P-gp and MRP1 remained unchanged. In contrast, the expression of the autophagy-related protein LC3-II increased remarkably. Therefore, the mechanism of MDR reversal may be closely related to autophagic inhibition. Evaluation of anti-tumor activity was achieved in an MCF-7/ADR multicellular tumor spheroid model and transgenic zebrafish model. DOX/CQ co-encapsulated liposome exerted a better anti-tumor effect in both models than that of liposomal DOX or DOX alone. These findings suggest that encapsulating CQ with DOX in liposomes significantly improves the sensitivity of DOX in DOX-resistant cancer cells.

  6. Differences in trans-stimulated chloroquine efflux kinetics are linked to PfCRT in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Rohrbach, Petra; McLean, Jeremy E.; Fidock, David A.; Stein, Wilfred D.; Lanzer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mechanism underpinning chloroquine drug resistance in the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum has remained controversial. Currently discussed models include a carrier or a channel for chloroquine, the former actively expelling the drug, the latter facilitating its passive diffusion, out of the parasite’s food vacuole, where chloroquine accumulates and inhibits haem detoxification. Here we have challenged both models using an established trans-stimulation efflux protocol. While carriers may demonstrate trans-stimulation, channels do not. Our data reveal that extracellular chloroquine stimulates chloroquine efflux in the presence and absence of metabolic energy in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasites, resulting in a hyperbolic increase in the apparent initial efflux rates as the concentration of external chloroquine increases. In the absence of metabolic energy, the apparent initial efflux rates were comparable in both parasites. Significant differences were only observed in the presence of metabolic energy, where consistently higher apparent initial efflux rates were found in chloroquine-resistant parasites. As trans-stimulation is characteristic of a carrier, and not a channel, we interpret our data in favour of a carrier for chloroquine being present in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasites, however, with different transport modalities. PMID:17493125

  7. Interaction between rifampicin, amodiaquine and artemether in mice infected with chloroquine resistant Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) remains the most effective chemotherapeutic strategy in the management of malaria. However, reports of reduced susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to the ACT justify the need for continued search for alternative anti-malarial drugs. The use of antibiotics with anti-malarial properties represents a potentially valuable chemotherapeutic option for the management of drug resistant infections. Thus, the intrinsic anti-malarial activity of the combination of clinical doses of rifampicin with amodiaquine and artemether was evaluated in an animal model using Plasmodium berghei. Methods A modification of the suppressive tests in vivo was employed. The anti-malarial activity of standard doses of amodiaquine (AQ) with or without artemether (ART) and combined with varying doses of rifampicin (RIF 15 mg/kg or RIF 30 mg/kg body weight) was evaluated in 40 mice sub-divided into eight groups and inoculated intraperitoneally with 1 × 107 red blood cells infected with chloroquine-resistant P. berghei ANKA strain. There were two control groups of animals, one group received amodiaquine alone while the other group received saline. Parasiticidal activity and survival of the animals were assessed over 21 days. Results Parasitaemia in the control animals peaked at 38% on day 9 and all animals died by day 10. The combination of amodiaquine with rifampicin 15 mg/kg body weight was the most effective of all the combinations and more efficacious than amodiaquine alone. The order of superiority of anti-malarial efficacy of the combinations was as follows; AQ + RIF 15 > AQ > AQ + ART + RIF 30 > AQ + ART + RIF 15 > AQ + RIF 30. Conclusion The combination of the clinical dose of rifampicin (15 mg/kg) with amodiaquine represents a potentially valuable treatment option in management of drug resistant malaria. In addition, the role of pharmacokinetic interaction in multiple drug therapy

  8. Fluoxetine Hydrochloride Enhances In Vitro Susceptibility to Chloroquine in Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    chloroquine- (12), ketotifen (1), tetrandrine (20, 21), and cyproheptadine susceptible clone D6 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC 5o], (16). !s3 ng/ml). IC... CYPROHEPTADINE KETOTIFEN N OCN3 HICO N ’IN ~~OCH3 NN H 0 OCH.3 TETRANDRINE FIG. 1. Structures of fluoxetine and other drugs that have been reported to

  9. Plasmodium vivax drug resistance genes; Pvmdr1 and Pvcrt-o polymorphisms in relation to chloroquine sensitivity from a malaria endemic area of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rungsihirunrat, Kanchana; Muhamad, Poonuch; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Kuesap, Jiraporn; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possible molecular markers of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium vivax isolates in Thailand. A total of 30 P. vivax isolates were collected from a malaria endemic area along the Thai-Myanmar border in Mae Sot district of Thailand. Dried blood spot samples were collected for analysis of Pvmdr1 and Pvcrt-o polymorphisms. Blood samples (100 μl) were collected by finger-prick for in vitro chloroquine susceptibility testing by schizont maturation inhibition assay. Based on the cut-off IC50 of 100 nM, 19 (63.3%) isolates were classified as chloroquine resistant P. vivax isolates. Seven non-synonymous mutations and 2 synonymous were identified in Pvmdr1 gene. Y976F and F1076L mutations were detected in 7 (23.3%) and 16 isolates (53.3%), respectively. Analysis of Pvcrt-o gene revealed that all isolates were wild-type. Our results suggest that chloroquine resistance gene is now spreading in this area. Monitoring of chloroquine resistant molecular markers provide a useful tool for future control of P. vivax malaria.

  10. Methylene blue inhibits the asexual development of vivax malaria parasites from a region of increasing chloroquine resistance

    PubMed Central

    Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Russell, Bruce; Ong, Alice; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Chu, Cindy S.; PyaePhyo, Aung; Malleret, Benoit; Nosten, François; Renia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Methylene blue, once discarded due to its unsettling yet mild side effects, has now found a renewed place in the pharmacopoeia of modern medicine. The continued spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum has also led to a recent re-examination of methylene blue's potent antimalarial properties. Here we examine the ex vivo susceptibility profile of Plasmodium spp. isolates to methylene blue; the isolates were from a region on the Thai–Myanmar border where there are increasing rates of failure when treating vivax malaria with chloroquine. Methods To do this we used a newly developed ex vivo susceptibility assay utilizing flow cytometry and a portable flow cytometer with a near-UV laser. Results P. vivax (median methylene blue IC50 3.1 nM, IQR 1.7–4.3 nM) and P. falciparum (median methylene blue IC50 1.8 nM, IQR 1.6–2.3 nM) are susceptible to methylene blue treatment at physiologically relevant levels. Unfortunately, the addition of chloroquine to combination treatments with methylene blue significantly reduces the ex vivo effectiveness of this molecule. Conclusions Our data support further efforts to employ methylene blue as a safe, low-cost antimalarial to treat drug-resistant malaria. PMID:25150147

  11. Methylene blue inhibits the asexual development of vivax malaria parasites from a region of increasing chloroquine resistance.

    PubMed

    Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Russell, Bruce; Ong, Alice; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Chu, Cindy S; PyaePhyo, Aung; Malleret, Benoit; Nosten, François; Renia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, once discarded due to its unsettling yet mild side effects, has now found a renewed place in the pharmacopoeia of modern medicine. The continued spread of drug-resistant Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum has also led to a recent re-examination of methylene blue's potent antimalarial properties. Here we examine the ex vivo susceptibility profile of Plasmodium spp. isolates to methylene blue; the isolates were from a region on the Thai-Myanmar border where there are increasing rates of failure when treating vivax malaria with chloroquine. To do this we used a newly developed ex vivo susceptibility assay utilizing flow cytometry and a portable flow cytometer with a near-UV laser. P. vivax (median methylene blue IC50 3.1 nM, IQR 1.7-4.3 nM) and P. falciparum (median methylene blue IC50 1.8 nM, IQR 1.6-2.3 nM) are susceptible to methylene blue treatment at physiologically relevant levels. Unfortunately, the addition of chloroquine to combination treatments with methylene blue significantly reduces the ex vivo effectiveness of this molecule. Our data support further efforts to employ methylene blue as a safe, low-cost antimalarial to treat drug-resistant malaria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Structural characteristics of chloroquine-bridged ferrocenophane analogues of ferroquine may obviate malaria drug-resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Salas, Paloma F; Herrmann, Christoph; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Nimphius, Corinna; Kenkel, Alexander; Chen, Jessie; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Patrick, Brian O; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2013-02-28

    Five compounds displaying an unprecedented binding mode of chloroquine to ferrocene through the bridging of the cyclopentadienyl rings were studied alongside their monosubstituted ferrocene analogues and organic fragments. The antiplasmodial activity was evaluated against strains of the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum). While the chloroquine-bridged ferrocenyl derivatives were less active than their five monosubstituted ferrocenyl analogues, they retained activity in the drug-resistant strains. The biological and physical properties were correlated to antiplasmodial activity. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding was associated with increased antiplasmodial action, but it is not the determining factor. Instead, balance between lipophilicity and hydrophilicity had a greater influence. It was found that calculated partition coefficient (log P) values of 4.5-5.0 and topological polar surfaces area (tPSA) values of ∼26.0 Å(2) give the best balance. The particular conformation, compact size, and lipophilicity/hydrophilicity balance observed in the bridged compounds provide them with the structural characteristics needed to escape the mechanisms responsible for resistance.

  13. Double mutation in the pfmdr1 gene is associated with emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Das, Sabyasachi; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Tripathy, Satyajit; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Mandal, Debasis; Das, Balaram; Hati, Amiya Kumar; Roy, Somenath

    2014-10-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries, including India. This study elucidates the cause of chloroquine treatment failure (for Plasmodium falciparum infection) before the introduction of artemisinin combination therapy. One hundred twenty-six patients were randomized to chloroquine treatment, and the therapeutic efficacy was monitored from days 1 to 28. An in vitro susceptibility test was performed with all isolates. Parasitic DNA was isolated, followed by PCR and restriction digestion of different codons of the pfcrt gene (codons 72 to 76) and the pfmdr1 gene (N86Y, Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y). Finally, sequencing was done to confirm the mutations. Forty-three (34.13%) early treatment failure cases and 16 (12.69%) late treatment failure cases were observed after chloroquine treatment. In vitro chloroquine resistance was found in 103 isolates (81.75%). Twenty-six (60.47%) early treatment failure cases and 6 (37.5%) late treatment failure cases were associated with the CVMNK-YYSNY allele (the underlined amino acids are those that were mutated). Moreover, the CVIEK-YYSNY allele was found in 8 early treatment failure (18.60%) and 2 late treatment failure (12.5%) cases. The presence of the wild-type pfcrt (CVMNK) and pfmdr1 (YYSNY) double mutant allele in chloroquine-nonresponsive cases was quite uncommon. In vivo chloroquine treatment failure and in vitro chloroquine resistance were strongly correlated with the CVMNK-YYSNY and CVIEK-YYSNY haplotypes (P < 0.01). Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro tests of resistance in patients treated with chloroquine in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, P.; Basco, L. K.

    1999-01-01

    The usefulness of an isotopic in vitro assay in the field was evaluated by comparing its results with the therapeutic response determined by the simplified WHO in vivo test in symptomatic Cameroonian patients treated with chloroquine. Of the 117 enrolled patients, 102 (87%) completed the 14-day follow-up, and 95 isolates obtained from these patients (46 children, 49 adults) yielded an interpretable in vitro test. A total of 57 of 95 patients (60%; 28 children and 29 adults) had an adequate clinical response with negative smears (n = 46) or with an asymptomatic parasitaemia (n = 11) on day 7 and/or day 14. The geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentration of the isolates obtained from these patients was 63.3 nmol/l. Late and early treatment failure was observed in 29 (30.5%) and 9 (9.5%) patients, respectively. The geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentrations of the corresponding isolates were 173 nmol/l and 302 nmol/l. Among the patients responding with late and early treatment failure, five isolates and one isolate, respectively, yielded a discordant result (in vivo resistance and in vitro sensitivity). The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the in vitro test to detect chloroquine-sensitive cases was 67%, 84% and 86%, respectively. There was moderate concordance between the in vitro and in vivo tests (kappa value = 0.48). The in vitro assay agrees relatively well with the therapeutic response and excludes several host factors that influence the results of the in vivo test. However, in view of some discordant results, the in vitro test cannot substitute for in vivo data on therapeutic efficacy. The only reliable definition of "resistance" in malaria parasites is based on clinical and parasitological response in symptomatic patients, and the in vivo test provides the standard method to determine drug sensitivity or resistance as well as to guide national drug policies. PMID:10063659

  15. Nonradioactive heteroduplex tracking assay for the detection of minority-variant chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Jonathan J; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin; Ariey, Frédéric; Mwapasa, Victor; Meshnick, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Background Strains of Plasmodium falciparum genetically resistant to chloroquine (CQ) due to the presence of pfcrt 76T appear to have been recently introduced to the island of Madagascar. The prevalence of such resistant genotypes is reported to be low (< 3%) when evaluated by conventional PCR. However, these methods are insensitive to low levels of mutant parasites present in patients with polyclonal infections. Thus, the current estimates may be an under representation of the prevalence of the CQ-resistant P. falciparum isolates on the island. Previously, minority variant chloroquine resistant parasites were described in Malawian patients using an isotopic heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), which can detect pfcrt 76T-bearing P. falciparum minority variants in individual patients that were undetectable by conventional PCR. However, as this assay required a radiolabeled probe, it could not be used in many resource-limited settings. Methods This study describes a digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled chemiluminescent heteroduplex tracking assay (DIG-HTA) to detect pfcrt 76T-bearing minority variant P. falciparum. This assay was compared to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and to the isotopic HTA for detection of genetically CQ-resistant parasites in clinical samples. Results Thirty one clinical P. falciparum isolates (15 primary isolates and 16 recurrent isolates) from 17 Malagasy children treated with CQ for uncomplicated malaria were genotyped for the pfcrt K76T mutation. Two (11.7%) of 17 patients harboured genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains after therapy as detected by HTA. RFLP analysis failed to detect any pfcrt K76T-bearing isolates. Conclusion These findings indicate that genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum are more common than previously thought in Madagascar even though the fitness of the minority variant pfcrt 76T parasites remains unclear. In addition, HTAs for malaria drug resistance alleles are promising tools for the

  16. Low Prevalence of Pfcrt Resistance Alleles among Patients with Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Niger Six Years after Chloroquine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Salissou, Adamou; Zamanka, Halima; Biyghe Binze, Brigitte; Rivière, Taiana; Tichit, Magalie; Ibrahim, Maman Laminou; Fandeur, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance is widespread in Africa, but few data are available for Niger. Pfcrt haplotypes (aa 56–118) and ex vivo responses to CQ and amodiaquine were characterized for 26 isolates collected in South Niger from children under 15 years of age suffering from uncomplicated falciparum malaria, six years after the introduction of artemisinin-based combinations and the withdrawal of CQ. The wild-type Pfcrt haplotype CVMNK was found in 22 of the 26 isolates, with CVIET sequences observed in only three of the samples. We also describe for the first time a new CVINT haplotype. The ex vivo responses were better for CVMNK than for CVIET parasites. Pfcrt sequence data were compared with those obtained for 26 additional parasitized blood samples collected in Gabon, from an area of CQ resistance used as a control. Our findings suggest that there has been a significant decline in CQ-resistant genotypes since the previous estimates for Niger were obtained. No such decline in molecular resistance to CQ was observed in the subset of samples collected in similar conditions from Gabon. These results have important implications for public health and support the policy implemented in Niger since 2005, which aims to increase the efficacy and availability of antimalarial drugs whilst controlling the spread of resistance. PMID:25506465

  17. Plasmodium vivax trophozoites insensitive to chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Sharrock, Wesley W; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Lek-Uthai, Usa; Edstein, Michael D; Kosaisavee, Varakorn; Travers, Thomas; Jaidee, Anchalee; Sriprawat, Kanlaya; Price, Ric N; Nosten, François; Russell, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of malaria and is still primarily treated with chloroquine. Chloroquine inhibits the polymerization of haem to inert haemozoin. Free haem monomers are thought to catalyze oxidative damage to the Plasmodium spp. trophozoite, the stage when haemoglobin catabolism is maximal. However preliminary in vitro observations on P. vivax clinical isolates suggest that only ring stages (early trophozoites) are sensitive to chloroquine. In this study, the stage specific action of chloroquine was investigated in synchronous cryopreserved isolates of P. vivax. Methods The in vitro chloroquine sensitivity of paired ring and trophozoite stages from 11 cryopreserved P. vivax clinical isolates from Thailand and two Plasmodium falciparum clones (chloroquine resistant K1 and chloroquine sensitive FC27) was measured using a modified WHO microtest method and fluorometric SYBR Green I Assay. The time each stage was exposed to chloroquine treatment was controlled by washing the chloroquine off at 20 hours after the beginning of treatment. Results Plasmodium vivax isolates added to the assay at ring stage had significantly lower median IC50s to chloroquine than the same isolates added at trophozoite stage (median IC50 12 nM vs 415 nM p < 0.01). Although only 36% (4/11) of the SYBR Green I assays for P. vivax were successful, both microscopy and SYBR Green I assays indicated that only P. vivax trophozoites were able to develop to schizonts at chloroquine concentrations above 100 nM. Conclusion Data from this study confirms the diminished sensitivity of P. vivax trophozoites to chloroquine, the stage thought to be the target of this drug. These results raise important questions about the pharmacodynamic action of chloroquine, and highlight a fundamental difference in the activity of chloroquine between P. vivax and P. falciparum. PMID:18505560

  18. [Mutant alleles associated to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethanime resistance in Plasmodium falciparum of the Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia borders].

    PubMed

    Arróspide, Nancy; Hijar-Guerra, Gisely; de Mora, Doménica; Diaz-Cortéz, César Eduardo; Veloz-Perez, Raúl; Gutierrez, Sonia; Cabezas-Sánchez, César

    2014-04-01

    The frequency of mutations in pfCRT and DHFR/DHPS genes of Plasmodium falciparum associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was evaluated in 83 strains from the districts of Esmeralda and Machala, located on the borders of Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia in 2002. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), conventional and its variants, was used. Mutations in the pfCRT gene were found in more than 90% of the samples from Esmeralda and Machala. For the DHFR gene, 90% of the strains were mutant samples from Esmeralda, 3 were double mutations and 1 was a triple mutation. In Machala, 25% were simple mutant forms and 75% mixed mutant forms (wild forms/mutant). In conclusion, resistance to chloroquine has been fixed in strains carrying K76T pfCRT mutation, whereas genetic imprinting for resistance to pyrimethamine is evolving, particularly in the district of Esmeralda.

  19. Chloroquine/Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine for Gambian Children with Malaria: Transmission to Mosquitoes of Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Rachel L; Dunyo, Samuel; Ord, Rosalynn; Jawara, Musa; Pinder, Margaret; Randall, Anna; Alloueche, Ali; Walraven, Gijs; Targett, Geoffrey A. T; Alexander, Neal; Sutherland, Colin J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: In the Gambia, chloroquine (CQ) plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is the first-line antimalarial treatment. Plasmodium falciparum parasites carrying mutations associated with resistance to each of these drugs were present in 2001 but did not cause a significant loss of therapeutic efficacy among children receiving the combination CQ/SP. We measured their effect on parasite transmission to Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. Design: We conducted a single-blind, randomised, controlled trial with follow-up over 28 d. Mosquito feeding experiments were carried out 7, 10, or 14 d after treatment. Setting: The study took place in the town of Farafenni and surrounding villages in the Gambia. Participants: Participants were 500 children aged 6 mo to 10 y with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Interventions: Children were randomised to receive CQ, SP, or CQ/SP. Outcome Measures: Outcomes related to transmission were determined, including posttreatment gametocyte prevalence and density. Infectiousness was assessed by membrane-feeding A. gambiae mosquitoes with blood from 70 gametocyte-positive patients. Mutations at seven loci in four genes associated with drug resistance were measured pre- and posttreatment and in the midguts of infected mosquitoes. Results: After SP treatment, the infectiousness of gametocytes was delayed, compared to the other two treatment groups, despite comparable gametocyte densities. Among bloodmeal gametocytes and the midguts of infected mosquitoes, the presence of the four-locus multidrug-resistant haplotype TYRG (consisting of mutations pfcrt-76T, pfmdr1-86Y, pfdhfr-59R, and pfdhps-437G) was associated with significantly higher oocyst burdens after treatment with the combination CQ/SP. Conclusions: Parasites with a multidrug-resistant genotype had a substantial transmission advantage after CQ/SP treatment but did not have a significant impact on in vivo efficacy of this drug combination. Protocols that include measuring transmission

  20. Discovery of a selective, safe and novel anti-malarial compound with activity against chloroquine resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankita; Paliwal, Sarvesh; Mishra, Ruchi; Sharma, Swapnil; Kumar Dwivedi, Anil; Tripathi, Renu; Gunjan, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the DNA minor groove has attracted much attention for the development of anti-malarial agents. In view of this we have attempted to discover novel DNA minor groove binders through in-silico and in-vitro workflow. A rigorously validated pharmacophore model comprising of two positive ionizable (PI), one hydrophobic (HY) and one ring aromatic (RA) features was used to mine NCI chemical compound database. This led to retrieval of many hits which were screened on the basis of estimated activity, fit value and Lipinski’s violation. Finally two compounds NSC639017 and NSC371488 were evaluated for their in-vitro anti-malarial activities against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (CQ sensitive) and K1 (CQ resistant) strains by SYBR green-I based fluorescence assay. The results revealed that out of two, NSC639017 posses excellent anti-malarial activity particularly against chloroquine resistant strain and moreover NSC639017 also appeared to be safe (CC50 126.04 μg/ml) and selective during cytotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26346444

  1. Multiple Origins of Mutations in the mdr1 Gene—A Putative Marker of Chloroquine Resistance in P. vivax

    PubMed Central

    Schousboe, Mette L.; Ranjitkar, Samir; Rajakaruna, Rupika S.; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H.; Morales, Francisco; Pearce, Richard; Ord, Rosalyn; Leslie, Toby; Rowland, Mark; Gadalla, Nahla B.; Konradsen, Flemming; Bygbjerg, Ib C.; Roper, Cally; Alifrangis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Chloroquine combined with primaquine has been the recommended antimalarial treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria infections for six decades but the efficacy of this treatment regimen is threatened by chloroquine resistance (CQR). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the multidrug resistance gene, Pvmdr1 are putative determinants of CQR but the extent of their emergence at population level remains to be explored. Objective In this study we describe the prevalence of SNPs in the Pvmdr1 among samples collected in seven P. vivax endemic countries and we looked for molecular evidence of drug selection by characterising polymorphism at microsatellite (MS) loci flanking the Pvmdr1 gene. Methods We examined the prevalence of SNPs in the Pvmdr1 gene among 267 samples collected from Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Sudan, São Tomé and Ecuador. We measured and diversity in four microsatellite (MS) markers flanking the Pvmdr1 gene to look evidence of selection on mutant alleles. Results SNP polymorphism in the Pvmdr1 gene was largely confined to codons T958M, Y976F and F1076L. Only 2.4% of samples were wildtype at all three codons (TYF, n = 5), 13.3% (n = 28) of the samples were single mutant MYF, 63.0% of samples (n = 133) were double mutant MYL, and 21.3% (n = 45) were triple mutant MFL. Clear geographic differences in the prevalence of these Pvmdr mutation combinations were observed. Significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) between Pvmdr1 and MS alleles was found in populations sampled in Ecuador, Nepal and Sri Lanka, while significant LD between Pvmdr1 and the combined 4 MS locus haplotype was only seen in Ecuador and Sri Lanka. When combining the 5 loci, high level diversity, measured as expected heterozygosity (He), was seen in the complete sample set (He = 0.99), while He estimates for individual loci ranged from 0.00–0.93. Although Pvmdr1 haplotypes were not consistently associated with specific flanking MS alleles, there was significant

  2. Antiplasmodial activity of certain medicinal plants against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium berghei infected white albino BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, C; Begam, M; Kumar, Dharmendra; Baruah, Indra; Gogoi, H K; Srivastava, R B; Veer, Vijay

    2014-06-01

    In the present study of antimalarial efficacy, aqueous extracts of leaves and unripe fruits of Psidium guajava, leaves of Ocimum sanctum and leaves of Murraya koenigii are evaluated against Plasmodium berghei (chloroquine resistant NK65 strain) infected white albino BALB/c mice. A 7 days oral administration was adopted with different dosage viz., 350 mg, 750 mg and 1,000 mg/kg body weight as treatment schedule along with parasite (Group I) and drug control with Chloroquine, 50 mg/kg body weight (Group II). All the parts were extracted based on the decoction method, which is commonly seen among the villagers/tribes as their usual method of preparation of decoction for most of the ailments. The antimalarial activities were evaluated from the giemsa stained blood smears collected from different treated groups of mice used in this experiment. The antiplasmodial effect that is percent parasitaemia and percent suppression (values in parenthesis) showed by the treated groups of mice at 350 mg/kg b. wt. by the aqueous extracts of P. guajava leaves (Group III) was 19.8 ± 1.22 (73.7 %), P. guajava unripe fruits (Group IV) was 52.7 ± 2.19 (30.0 %), leaves of O. sanctum (Group V) was 64.0 ± 0.73 (15.1 %) and leaves of M. koenigii (Group VI) was 28.9 ± 0.81 (61.6 %) whereas at 750 mg/kg b. wt., it all showed 10.3 ± 0.7 (80.2 %), 26.3 ± 0.52 (65.1 %), 42.0 ± 0.47 (44.2 %) and 14.9 ± 0.46 (71.5 %) whereas at 1,000 mg/kg b. wt. dose, it all showed 9.2 ± 0.39 (85.8 %), 25.6 ± 0.40 (62.0 %), 41.8 ± 0.29 (35.5 %) and 14.0 ± 0.42 (76.9 %) respectively.

  3. Prevalence of the K76T mutation in the pfcrt gene of Plasmodium falciparum among chloroquine responders in India.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Biswas, Sukla; Dev, Vas; Kumar, Ashwani; Ansari, M A; Sharma, Y D

    2003-07-01

    Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum needs to be monitored in the field for effective malaria control strategies. A point mutation K76T in the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) protein has recently been proposed as a molecular marker for the faster detection of chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria in field. We describe here the evaluation of this marker in Indian P. falciparum isolates. A total of 274 Indian P. falciparum isolates were analyzed for the K76T mutation. This mutation was detected in all the clinical isolates obtained from the in vivo chloroquine non-responders. But majority of the clinical isolates from chloroquine responders (71 of 74 patients, i.e. 96%) also harbored this mutation. The K76T mutation was indeed highly prevalent (91%) among 213 clinical isolates. There was a significant association between K76T mutation and the in vitro chloroquine response (P<0.05) but six isolates showed discordant results. In conclusion, the K76T mutation fails to differentiate majority of the chloroquine responders from that of the non-responders and thus will be of limited use in the field in India.

  4. In vitro antimalarial activity of a new organometallic analog, ferrocene-chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Domarle, O; Blampain, G; Agnaniet, H; Nzadiyabi, T; Lebibi, J; Brocard, J; Maciejewski, L; Biot, C; Georges, A J; Millet, P

    1998-03-01

    The in vitro activities of new organometallic chloroquine analogs, based on 4-amino-quinoleine compounds bound to a molecule of ferrocene, were evaluated against chloroquine-susceptible, chloroquine-intermediate, and chloroquine-resistant, culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum lineages by a proliferation test. One of the ferrocene analogs totally restored the activity of chloroquine against chloroquine-resistant parasites. This compound, associated with tartaric acid for better solubility, was highly effective. The role of the ferrocene in reversing chloroquine resistance is discussed, as is its potential use for human therapy.

  5. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of a New Organometallic Analog, Ferrocene-Chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Domarle, O.; Blampain, G.; Agnaniet, H.; Nzadiyabi, T.; Lebibi, J.; Brocard, J.; Maciejewski, L.; Biot, C.; Georges, A. J.; Millet, P.

    1998-01-01

    The in vitro activities of new organometallic chloroquine analogs, based on 4-amino-quinoleine compounds bound to a molecule of ferrocene, were evaluated against chloroquine-susceptible, chloroquine-intermediate, and chloroquine-resistant, culture-adapted Plasmodium falciparum lineages by a proliferation test. One of the ferrocene analogs totally restored the activity of chloroquine against chloroquine-resistant parasites. This compound, associated with tartaric acid for better solubility, was highly effective. The role of the ferrocene in reversing chloroquine resistance is discussed, as is its potential use for human therapy. PMID:9517929

  6. Randomised Trial of Chloroquine/Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine in Gambian Children with Malaria: Impact against Multidrug-Resistant P. falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Dunyo, Samuel; Ord, Rosalynn; Hallett, Rachel; Jawara, Musa; Walraven, Gijs; Mesa, Eduardo; Coleman, Rosalind; Sowe, Maimuna; Alexander, Neal; Targett, Geoffrey A. T; Pinder, Margaret; Sutherland, Colin J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: In the Gambia, the combination of chloroquine (CQ) and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) has replaced CQ monotherapy for treatment of malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. We measured the efficacy of the combination CQ/SP, and the prevalence of parasites carrying alleles associated with resistance to CQ or SP. Design: We conducted a single-blind, randomised, controlled trial to compare the efficacy of CQ/SP to that of SP or CQ alone. Setting: The study took place in the town of Farafenni and surrounding villages in the Gambia. Participants: Participants were children aged 12 mo to 10 y presenting as outpatients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Interventions: 500 children were randomised to receive CQ, SP, or CQ/SP as supervised treatment and actively followed over 28 d. Outcome Measures: Primary outcome was parasitaemia at any time during follow-up. Secondary outcomes were PCR-confirmed recrudescent infections among treatment failures, and clinical failure requiring rescue medication by day 28. Pretreatment parasite isolates from 161 patients were tested for the presence of resistance-associated genetic markers. Results: The prevalence of parasitological failure by day 28 for the CQ group was 60.3%, compared to 17.6% for SP (odds ratio [OR], 0.106; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.057–0.194; p < 0.001) and 13.9% for CQ/SP (OR versus CQ, 0.140; 95% CI, 0.078–0.250; p < 0.001). There was no difference between the SP and CQ/SP groups (OR, 1.324; 95% CI, 0.705–2.50). The projected prevalence of PCR-corrected treatment failure was 30.2, 6.06, and 3.94% in the CQ, SP, and CQ/SP groups, respectively. The pfdhfr-triple mutant and pfdhps-437G mutation were common, with prevalences of 67.4 and 51.2%, respectively. Pretreatment carriage of pfdhps-437G and of multidrug-resistant parasite genotypes was associated with treatment failure in the SP group, but not in the CQ or CQ/SP groups. Conclusions: The combination of CQ/SP was an efficacious

  7. Antiplasmodial activity-aided isolation and identification of quercetin-4'-methyl ether in Chromolaena odorata leaf fraction with high activity against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ezenyi, I C; Salawu, O A; Kulkarni, R; Emeje, M

    2014-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antiplasmodial activity of Chromolaena odorata leaf extract and gradient fractions through in vivo and in vitro tests, aimed at identifying its antiplasmodial constituents. Sub-fractions obtained from the most active gradient fraction were further tested for cytotoxicity against THP-1 cells, chloroquine-sensitive (HB3) and chloroquine-resistant (FCM29) Plasmodium falciparum. Our results showed the dichloromethane gradient fraction was most effective, significantly (P < 0.05) suppressing infection by 99.46% at 100 mg/kg body weight. Amongst its 13 sub-fractions (DF1-DF13), DF11 was highly active, with IC50 of 4.8 and 6.74 μg/ml against P. falciparum HB3 and FCM29, respectively. Cytotoxicity of DF11 was estimated to be above 50 μg/ml, and its separation by column chromatography yielded a flavonoid which was characterized as 3, 5, 7, 3' tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone from its spectroscopic data. It significantly suppressed infection (65.43-81.48%) in mice at 2.5-5 mg/kg doses and compared favourably with the effects of chloroquine and artemisinin. It may therefore serve as a useful phytochemical and antiplasmodial activity marker of C. odorata leaves, which exhibit potential for development as medicine against malaria.

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles are highly toxic to chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, dengue virus (DEN-2), and their mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Wei, Jiang; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Nicoletti, Marcello; Paulpandi, Manickam; Samidoss, Christina Mary; Dinesh, Devakumar; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Paneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Vadivalagan, Chithravel; Wei, Hui; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Jaganathan, Anitha; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Higuchi, Akon; Kumar, Suresh; Aziz, Al Thabiani; Nataraj, Devaraj; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Canale, Angelo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    A main challenge in parasitology is the development of reliable tools to prevent or treat mosquito-borne diseases. We investigated the toxicity of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) produced by Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense (strain MSR-1) on chloroquine-resistant (CQ-r) and sensitive (CQ-s) Plasmodium falciparum, dengue virus (DEN-2), and two of their main vectors, Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti, respectively. MNP were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. They were toxic to larvae and pupae of An. stephensi, LC50 ranged from 2.563 ppm (1st instar larva) to 6.430 ppm (pupa), and Ae. aegypti, LC50 ranged from 3.231 ppm (1st instar larva) to 7.545 ppm (pupa). MNP IC50 on P. falciparum were 83.32 μg ml(-1) (CQ-s) and 87.47 μg ml(-1) (CQ-r). However, the in vivo efficacy of MNP on Plasmodium berghei was low if compared to CQ-based treatments. Moderate cytotoxicity was detected on Vero cells post-treatment with MNP doses lower than 4 μg ml(-1). MNP evaluated at 2-8 μg ml(-1) inhibited DEN-2 replication inhibiting the expression of the envelope (E) protein. In conclusion, our findings represent the first report about the use of MNP in medical and veterinary entomology, proposing them as suitable materials to develop reliable tools to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

  9. Co-delivery of docetaxel and chloroquine via PEO-PPO-PCL/TPGS micelles for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunhuan; Zhang, Zhiqing; Shi, Jiaxing; Wang, Fang; Luan, Yuxia

    2015-11-30

    The combination of two or more drug is a promising strategy to suppress the multidrug resistance (MDR) through different action mechanisms. Co-delivery drugs via polymeric micelle can minimize the amount of each drug and reduce toxic side effects. Here we co-encapsulate anticancer drug docetaxel (DTX) and autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) in complex micelles based on poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(propylene oxide)-block-poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PEO-PPO-PCL) and D-α-tocopheryl poly(ethylene glycol) (TPGS) for enhancing anticancer effects. Two series copolymer with different length of hydrophobic chain were synthesized (PEO68-PPO34-PCL18 and PEO68-PPO34-PCL36) in our lab. The dual-drug micelles possessed nanosize and sustained release profile in vitro. Drug-loaded micelles have low hemolysis rate (<5%), indicating that they are safe for use in vivo. Studies on cellular uptake demonstrate that the micelles can effectively accumulate in cancer cells. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity with different DTX/CQ mass ratio are studied and the sample with a DTX/CQ ratio of 0.8/0.2 is found to have the strongest synergism effect. The co-delivery micelles have obviously higher therapeutic effects against MCF-7 and MCF-7/ADR cells than either free drug or individually DTX-loaded micelles. The IC50 values of DTX/CQ-loaded PEO68-PPO34-PCL18/TPGS and PEO68-PPO34-PCL36/TPGS micelles are 134.16 and 194.74 fold smaller than that of free DTX after 48 h treatment with MCF-7/ADR cells, respectively. Therefore, the as-prepared co-delivery of DTX and CQ based on PEO-PPO-PCL/TPGS micelles can provide a promising combined therapeutic strategy for enhanced antitumor therapy.

  10. The antimalarial activity of Ru-chloroquine complexes against resistant Plasmodium falciparum is related to lipophilicity, basicity, and heme aggregation inhibition ability near water/n-octanol interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alberto; Rajapakse, Chandima S K; Jalloh, Dalanda; Dautriche, Cula; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A

    2009-08-01

    We have measured water/n-octanol partition coefficients, pK(a) values, heme binding constants, and heme aggregation inhibition activity of a series of ruthenium-pi-arene-chloroquine (CQ) complexes recently reported to be active against CQ-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Measurements of heme aggregation inhibition activity of the metal complexes near water/n-octanol interfaces qualitatively predict their superior antiplasmodial action against resistant parasites, in relation to CQ; we conclude that this modified method may be a better predictor of antimalarial potency than standard tests in aqueous acidic buffer. Some interesting tendencies emerge from our data, indicating that the antiplasmodial activity is related to a balance of effects associated with the lipophilicity, basicity, and structural details of the compounds studied.

  11. Downregulation of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 Transport Function by Lysosomotropic Drug Chloroquine: Implication in OATP-Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khondoker; Pahwa, Sonia; Wang, Xueying; Zhang, Pengyue; Ding, Kai; Abuznait, Alaa H; Li, Lang; Yue, Wei

    2016-03-07

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 mediates the hepatic uptake of many drugs including lipid-lowering statins. Decreased OATP1B1 transport activity is often associated with increased systemic exposure of statins and statin-induced myopathy. Antimalarial drug chloroquine (CQ) is also used for long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. CQ is lysosomotropic and inhibits protein degradation in lysosomes. The current studies were designed to determine the effects of CQ on OATP1B1 protein degradation, OATP1B1-mediated transport in OATP1B1-overexpressing cell line, and statin uptake in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). Treatment with lysosome inhibitor CQ increased OATP1B1 total protein levels in HEK293-OATP1B1 cells and in human SCH as determined by OATP1B1 immunoblot. In HEK293-FLAG-tagged OATP1B1 stable cell line, co-immunofluorescence staining indicated that intracellular FLAG-OATP1B1 is colocalized with lysosomal associated membrane glycoprotein (LAMP)-2, a marker protein of late endosome/lysosome. Enlarged LAMP-2-positive vacuoles with FLAG-OATP1B1 protein retained inside were readily detected in CQ-treated cells, consistent with blocking lysosomal degradation of OATP1B1 by CQ. In HEK293-OATP1B1 cells, without pre-incubation, CQ concentrations up to 100 μM did not affect OATP1B1-mediated [(3)H]E217G accumulation. However, pre-incubation with CQ at clinically relevant concentration(s) significantly decreased [(3)H]E217G and [(3)H]pitavastatin accumulation in HEK293-OATP1B1 cells and [(3)H]pitavastatin accumulation in human SCH. CQ pretreatment (25 μM, 2 h) resulted in ∼1.9-fold decrease in Vmax without affecting Km of OATP1B1-mediated [(3)H]E217G transport in HEK293-OATP1B1 cells. Pretreatment with monensin and bafilomycin A1, which also have lysosome inhibition activity, significantly decreased OATP1B1-mediated transport in HEK293-OATP1B1 cells. Pharmacoepidemiologic studies using data from the U.S. Food

  12. Anti-malarial prescriptions in three health care facilities after the emergence of chloroquine resistance in Niakhar, Senegal (1992–2004)

    PubMed Central

    Munier, Aline; Diallo, Aldiouma; Cot, Michel; Ndiaye, Ousmane; Arduin, Pascal; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background In the rural zone of Niakhar in Senegal, the first therapeutic failures for chloroquine (CQ) were observed in 1992. In 2003, the national policy regarding first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria was modified, replacing CQ by a transitory bi-therapy amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP), before the implementation of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2006. The aims of the study were to assess the evolution of anti-malarial prescriptions in three health care facilities between 1992 and 2004, in parallel with increasing CQ resistance in the region. Methods The study was conducted in the area of Niakhar, a demographic surveillance site located in a sahelo-sudanese region of Senegal, with mesoendemic and seasonal malaria transmission. Health records of two public health centres and a private catholic dispensary were collected retrospectively to cover the period 1992–2004. Results Records included 110,093 consultations and 292,965 prescribed treatments. Twenty-five percent of treatments were anti-malarials, prescribed to 49% of patients. They were delivered all year long, but especially during the rainy season, and 20% of patients with no clinical malaria diagnosis received anti-malarials. Chloroquine and quinine represented respectively 55.7% and 34.6% of prescribed anti-malarials. Overall, chloroquine prescriptions rose from 1992 to 2000, in parallel with clinical malaria; then the CQ prescription rate decreased from 2000 and was concomitant with the rise of SP and the persistence of quinine use. AQ and SP were mainly used as bi-therapy after 2003, at the time of national treatment policy change. Conclusion The results show the overall level of anti-malarial prescription in the study area for a considerable number of patients over a large period of time. Even though resistance to CQ rapidly increased from 1992 to 2001, no change in CQ prescription was observed until the early 2000s, possibly due to the absence of an obvious

  13. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  14. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  15. Comparison of mefloquine, chloroquine plus pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine (Fansidar), and chloroquine as malarial prophylaxis in eastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, E F; Pang, L W; Chaikummao, S; Witayarut, C

    1991-06-01

    From July 1983 to March 1984 a randomized double blind prophylactic trial in Thai gem miners working across the border in Cambodia was conducted to determine the prophylactic efficacy of 3 drug regimens against P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria along the Thai-Cambodian border. Gem miners have a high incidence of malaria. Maximum duration of individual participation was 14 weeks. Of 334 participants in this study who were seen every 2 weeks, 145 received mefloquine 500 mg fortnightly, 112 received chloroquine 300 mg base weekly plus Fansidar (1000 mg sulfadoxine and 50 mg pyrimethamine) fortnightly and 77 received chloroquine as 300 mg base weekly. The significant reduction of vivax malaria in study subjects (compared to background incidence) implied good compliance with self administration of chloroquine in the intervening weeks between scheduled appointments. The attack rate in each prophylactic regimen was 2188 cases/1000/year with mefloquine, 8338 cases/1000/year with chloroquine-Fansidar and 10,207 cases/1000/year receiving chloroquine alone. There was a 79% prophylactic efficacy for mefloquine and 18% efficacy for the chloroquine plus Fansidar regimen compared to chloroquine. Using life table analysis, 56% of the mefloquine group, 6% of the chloroquine-Fansidar group and 4% of the chloroquine group were malaria free at the end of the 14 weeks study. The chloroquine plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine regimen prescribed for prophylaxis is no longer effective for multidrug resistant strains of P. falciparum in the study area. This study also seriously questions the efficacy of mefloquine prophylaxis.

  16. Chloroquine Clinical Failures in P. falciparum Malaria Are Associated with Mutant Pfmdr-1, Not Pfcrt in Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Bouchier, Christiane; Tichit, Magali; Jahevitra, Martial; Rabearimanana, Stéphane; Raherinjafy, Rogelin; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Durand, Rémy; Ménard, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Molecular studies have demonstrated that mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt) play a major role in chloroquine resistance, while mutations in P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene (Pfmdr-1) act as modulator. In Madagascar, the high rate of chloroquine treatment failure (44%) appears disconnected from the overall level of in vitro CQ susceptibility (prevalence of CQ-resistant parasites <5%) or Pfcrt mutant isolates (<1%), strongly contrasting with sub-Saharan African countries. Previous studies showed a high frequency of Pfmdr-1 mutant parasites (>60% of isolates), but did not explore their association with P. falciparum chloroquine resistance. To document the association of Pfmdr-1 alleles with chloroquine resistance in Madagascar, 249 P. falciparum samples collected from patients enrolled in a chloroquine in vivo efficacy study were genotyped in Pfcrt/Pfmdr-1 genes as well as the estimation of the Pfmdr-1 copy number. Except 2 isolates, all samples displayed a wild-type Pfcrt allele without Pfmdr-1 amplification. Chloroquine treatment failures were significantly associated with Pfmdr-1 86Y mutant codon (OR = 4.6). The cumulative incidence of recurrence of patients carrying the Pfmdr-1 86Y mutation at day 0 (21 days) was shorter than patients carrying Pfmdr-1 86N wild type codon (28 days). In an independent set of 90 selected isolates, in vitro susceptibility to chloroquine was not associated with Pfmdr-1 polymorphisms. Analysis of two microsatellites flanking Pfmdr-1 allele showed that mutations occurred on multiple genetic backgrounds. In Madagascar, Pfmdr-1 polymorphism is associated with late chloroquine clinical failures and unrelated with in vitro susceptibility or Pfcrt genotype. These results highlight the limits of the current in vitro tests routinely used to monitor CQ drug resistance in this unique context. Gaining insight about the mechanisms that regulate polymorphism in Pfmdr1 remains important

  17. Effective-Loading of Platinum-Chloroquine into PEGylated Neutral and Cationic Liposomes as a Drug Delivery System for Resistant Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shaimaa; Tagami, Tatsuaki; Ozeki, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    The trans platinum-chloroquine diphosphate dichloride (PtCQ) is a new type of antimalarial drug used to fight parasites resistant to traditional drugs. PtCQ is synthesized by mixing platinum and chloroquine diphosphate (CQ). This study examines two efficient methods for forming a nanodrug, PtCQ-loaded liposomes, for use as a potential antimalarial drug-delivery system: the thin drug-lipid film method to incorporate the drug into a liposomal membrane, and a remote-loading method to load the drug into the interior of a cationic liposome. The membranes accordingly comprised PEGylated neutral or cationic liposomes. PtCQ was efficiently loaded into PEGylated neutral and cationic liposomes using the thin drug-lipid film method (encapsulation efficiency, EE: 76.1±6.7% for neutral liposomes, 1 : 14 drug-to-lipid weight ratio; 70.4±9.8% for cationic liposomes, 1 : 14 drug-to-lipid weight ratio). More PtCQ was loaded into PEGylated neutral liposomes using the remote-loading method than by the thin drug-lipid film method and the EE was maximum (96.1±4.5% for neutral liposomes, 1 : 7 (w/w)). PtCQ was encapsulated in PEGylated cationic liposomes comprising various amounts of cationic lipids (0-20 mol%; EE: 96.9-92.3%) using the remote-loading method. PEGylated neutral liposomes and cationic liposomes exhibited minimum leakage of PtCQ after two months' storage at 4°C, and further exhibited little release under in vitro culture conditions at 37°C for 72 h. These results provide a useful framework for the design of future liposome-based in vivo drug delivery systems targeting the malaria parasite.

  18. [Therapeutic response of Plasmodium vivax to chloroquine in Bolivia].

    PubMed

    Añez, Arletta; Navarro-Costa, Dennis; Yucra, Omar; Garnica, Cecilia; Melgar, Viviana; Moscoso, Manuel; Arteaga, Ricardo; Nakao, Gladys

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine for Plasmodium vivax infections improves the capacity for surveillance of anti-malarial drug resistance. The therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine as treatment was evaluated for uncomplicated Plasmodium vivax malaria in Bolivia. An in vivo efficacy study of chloroquine was undertaken in three regions of Bolivia--Riberalta, Guayaramerín and Yacuiba. Two hundred and twenty-three patients (84, 80, and 59 in the three regions, respectively) aged over 5 years old were administered with chloroquine (25 mg/kg/three days) and followed for 28 days. Blood levels of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine were measured on day 2 and on the day of reappearance of parasitemia. The cumulative incidence of treatment failure was calculated using the Kaplan and Meier survival analysis. The mean parasitemias (asexual) on day 0 were 6,147 parasites/μl of blood in the Riberalta population, 4,251 in Guayaramerín and 5,214 in Yacuiba. The average blood concentrations of chloroquine-desethylchloroquine during day 2 were 783, 817, and 815 ng/ml, respectively. No treatment failures were observed in Yacuiba, whereas in Riberalta and Guayaramerín, the frequencies of treatment failures were 6.2% and 10%. Blood levels of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine in patients with treatment failure showed values below 70 ng/ml on the day of reappearance of parasitemia. Resistance of Plasmodium vivax to chloroquine was not demonstrated in three regions of Bolivia.

  19. Differential Stimulation of the Na+/H+ Exchanger Determines Chloroquine Uptake in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wünsch, Stefan; Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Gekle, Michael; Große-Wortmann, Lars; Wiesner, Jochen; Lanzer, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Here we describe the identification and characterization of a physiological marker that is associated with the chloroquine-resistant (CQR) phenotype in the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Single cell in vivo pH measurements revealed that CQR parasites consistently have an elevated cytoplasmic pH compared to that of chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) parasites because of a constitutively activated Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). Together, biochemical and physiological data suggest that chloroquine activates the plasmodial NHE of CQS parasites, resulting in a transitory phase of rapid sodium/hydrogen ion exchange during which chloroquine is taken up by this protein. The constitutively stimulated NHE of CQR parasites are capable of little or no further activation by chloroquine. We propose that the inability of chloroquine to stimulate its own uptake through the constitutively activated NHE of resistant parasites constitutes a minimal and necessary event in the generation of the chloroquine-resistant phenotype. PMID:9442109

  20. A Purine Analog Synergizes with Chloroquine (CQ) by Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90 (PfHsp90)

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Folefoc, Asongna; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Crandall, Ian; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug resistance, absence of an effective vaccine, and inadequate public health measures are major impediments to controlling Plasmodium falciparum malaria worldwide. The development of antimalarials to which resistance is less likely is paramount. To this end, we have exploited the chaperone function of P. falciparum Hsp90 (PfHsp90) that serves to facilitate the expression of resistance determinants. Methods The affinity and activity of a purine analogue Hsp90 inhibitor (PU-H71) on PfHsp90 was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies and an ATPase activity assay, respectively. In vitro, antimalarial activity was quantified using flow cytometry. Interactors of PfHsp90 were determined by LC-MS/MS. In vivo studies were conducted using the Plasmodium berghei infection mouse model. Results PU-H71 exhibited antimalarial activity in the nanomolar range, displayed synergistic activity with chloroquine in vitro. Affinity studies reveal that the PfHsp90 interacts either directly or indirectly with the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) responsible for chloroquine resistance. PU-H71 synergized with chloroquine in the P.berghei mouse model of malaria to reduce parasitemia and improve survival. Conclusions We propose that the interaction of PfHsp90 with PfCRT may account for the observed antimalarial synergy and that PU-H71 is an effective adjunct for combination therapy. PMID:24098696

  1. Efficacy of a 3-day oral regimen of quinine in an area of northern Nigeria with low-grade resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine.

    PubMed

    Adagu, S I; Okoyeh, J N; Lege-Oguntoye, L; Ogala, W N; Ogunrinde, G O; Faji, J T; Sani, A H

    1995-10-01

    The efficacy in vivo of a 3-day oral regimen of quinine (30 mg/kg/day) was assessed in 34 children with falciparum malaria in an area of northern Nigeria with previously documented low-grade parasite resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SDX/PYR). By day 4, all 34 children were free of parasites. Mean parasite clearance time and fever clearance time were 2.7 and 1.7 days, respectively. However, on day 14, 5 (14.7%) children were again parasitaemic and 4 of them were clinically ill. They were again treated successfully with a standard course of oral chloroquine. No adverse drug effects were recorded. Of the 34 children, 9 parasite isolates were successfully cultured in vitro. EC50 and EC99 were 14.0 and 126.0 pmol per well respectively, indicating decreased parasite sensitivity but no resistance in vitro. In conclusion, the 3-day course of quinine was found to be an effective alternative to standard chloroquine treatment in the study area.

  2. Linkage disequilibrium between two distinct loci in chromosomes 5 and 7 of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo chloroquine resistance in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Happi, C T; Gbotosho, G O; Folarin, O A; Sowunmi, A; Bolaji, O M; Fateye, B A; Kyle, D E; Milhous, W; Wirth, D F; Oduola, A M J

    2006-12-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is associated with polymorphisms in loci on pfcrt and pfmdr1 genes. In this study, we determined the association and linkage disequilibrium between in vivo CQ resistance and P. falciparum polymorphisms in pfcrt gene at codon 76 and pfmdr1 gene at codon 86 in isolates obtained from 111 children with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Nigeria. Patients were treated with standard dosage of CQ and followed up for 28 days. Filter paper samples were collected at enrollment and during follow-up for parasites genotypes and identification of pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations. Association and linkage disequilibrium between mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles in pretreatment isolates of P. falciparum was determined. Fifty-five out of the 111 patients (49.5%) failed treatment. Single mutant pfcrtT76 or pfmdr1Y86 alleles were found in 55 out of 111 P. falciparum isolates screened at enrollment. Of these 55 isolates, the mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles were found in 84%. Both mutant pfcrtT76 (p=0.0196) and pfmdr1Y86 (p=0.000042) alleles were associated with in vivo CQ resistance. In addition, the mutant pfcrtT76 (p=0.047) and pfmdr1Y86 (p=0.006) alleles were significantly selected by CQ in patients who failed treatment. Association analysis between paired single alleles at pfcrt and pfmdr1 loci showed a significant association (p=0.0349 and chi(2)=4.45) between the pfcrt T76 allele on chromosome 7 and the pfmdr1Y86 allele on chromosome 5 and that these two mutant alleles were in linkage disequilibrium (p=0.000, D'=0.64, and r(2)=0.28). Considering the high level of CQ resistance and drug use in the study area, the observed linkage disequilibrium between the mutant pfcrtT76 and pfmdr1Y86 alleles is maintained epistatically through directional CQ selective pressure.

  3. Low prevalence of the molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in asymptomatic children in Northern Benin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Benin, very few studies have been done on the genetics of Plasmodium falciparum and the resistance markers of anti-malarial drugs, while malaria treatment policy changed in 2004. Chloroquine (CQ) and sulphadoxine pyrimethamine (SP) have been removed and replaced by artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT). The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of P. falciparum and the prevalence of P. falciparum molecular markers that are associated with resistance to CQ and SP in northern Benin seven years after the new policy was instituted. Methods The study was conducted in northern Benin, a region characterized by a seasonal malaria transmission. Blood samples were collected in 2012 from children presenting with asymptomatic P. falciparum infections. Samples collected in filter paper were genotyped by primary and nested PCR in block 2 of msp-1 and block 3 of msp-2 to analyse the diversity of P. falciparum. The prevalence of critical point mutations in the genes of Pfcrt (codon 76), Pfmdr1 (codon 86), Pfdhfr (codons, 51, 59 and 108) and Pfdhps (codons 437, 540) was examined in parasite isolates by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion. Results Genotyping of 195 isolates from asymptomatic children showed 34 msp-1 and 38 msp-2 genotypes. The multiplicity of infection was 4.51 ± 0.35 for msp-1 and 4.84 ± 0.30 for msp-2. Only the codon 51 of Pfdhfr and codon 437 of Pfdhps showed a high mutation rate: I51: 64.4% (57.3; 71.2); G437: 47.4% (40.2; 54.7), respectively. The prevalence of Pfdhfr triple mutant IRN (I51, R59 and N108) was 1.5% (0.3; 3.9), and Pfdhfr/Pfdhps quadruple mutant IRNG (PfdhfrI51, R59, N108, and PfdhpsG437): 0. 5% (0; 2.5). No mutation was found with codon 540 of Pfdhps. Analysis of mutation according to age (younger or older than ten years) showed similar frequencies in each category without significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions This study showed a high diversity of P. falciparum in

  4. Evidence for a Central Role for PfCRT in Conferring Plasmodium falciparum Resistance to Diverse Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David J.; Fidock, David A.; Mungthin, Mathirut; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Sidhu, Amar Bir Singh; Bray, Patrick G.; Ward, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is primarily conferred by mutations in pfcrt. Parasites resistant to chloroquine can display hypersensitivity to other antimalarials; however, the patterns of cross-resistance are complex, and the genetic basis has remained elusive. We show that stepwise selection for resistance to amantadine or halofantrine produced previously unknown pfcrt mutations (including S163R), which were associated with a loss of verapamil-reversible chloroquine resistance. This was accompanied by restoration of efficient chloroquine binding to hematin in these selected lines. This S163R mutation provides insight into a mechanism by which PfCRT could gate the transport of protonated chloroquine through the digestive vacuole membrane. Evidence for the presence of this mutation in a Southeast Asian isolate supports the argument for a broad role for PfCRT in determining levels of susceptibility to structurally diverse antimalarials. PMID:15383277

  5. [Duodenal ulcers caused by chloroquine-proguanil association].

    PubMed

    Roux, X; Imbert, P; Rivière, F; Méchaï, F; Rapp, C

    2010-12-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil association is recommended for prophylaxis against falciparum malaria in countries with a low prevalence of chloroquine resistance. It is usually well tolerated with mild side effects consisting mainly of transient digestive discomfort and buccal manifestations (mouth sores or ulcers). The purpose of this report is to describe a case of duodenal ulcers presenting as epigastric pain with 10-kg weight-loss in a 32-year-old man taking chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis during a stay in Haiti. No other causes of duodenal ulcers or weight-loss were found. Chloroquine-proguanil prophylaxis was discontinued and replaced by omeprazole for four weeks. Symptoms improved quickly and full recovery was observed within one month. To our knowledge, the occurrence of duodenal ulcers under chloroquine-proguanil association is quite rare, but possibly severe. Upper digestive endoscopy should be performed if a patient under chloroquine-proguanil develops abdominal pain especially in association with weight-loss. If endoscopy reveals duodenal ulcers, chloroquine-proguanil should be discontinued and replaced by another prophylactic regimen.

  6. Chloroquine stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthase in muscle cells through activation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Halaby, Marie-Jo; Kastein, Brandon K; Yang, Da-Qing

    2013-06-14

    Chloroquine is a pharmaceutical agent that has been widely used to treat patients with malaria. Chloroquine has also been reported to have hypoglycemic effects on humans and animal models of diabetes. Despite many previous studies, the mechanism responsible for its hypoglycemic effect is still unclear. Chloroquine was recently reported to be an activator of ATM, the protein deficient in the Ataxia-telagiectasia (A-T) disease. Since ATM is also known as an insulin responsive protein that mediates Akt activation, we tested the effect of chloroquine on the activity of Akt and its downstream targets. In L6 muscle cells treated with insulin and chloroquine, the phosphorylation of Akt and glucose uptake were dramatically increased compared to cells treated with insulin alone, suggesting that chloroquine is a potent activator of Akt and glucose uptake in these cells. We also found that the reduction of insulin-mediated Akt activity in muscle tissues of insulin resistant rats was partially reversed by chloroquine treatment. Moreover, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in L6 cells was greatly enhanced by chloroquine. A substantial decrease in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase was also observed in chloroquine-treated L6 cells, indicating enhanced activity of glycogen synthase. Taken together, our results not only show that chloroquine is a novel activator of Akt that stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthase, but also validate chloroquine as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation) in Yemen: an urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy.

    PubMed

    Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Azazy, Ahmed A; Fong, Mun Yik

    2011-05-27

    Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR) of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates). Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8%) (p = 0.031). The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045). Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001), low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027), no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025) and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs) (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01). Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.

  8. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation) in Yemen: An urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR) of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. Results The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates). Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8%) (p = 0.031). The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045). Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001), low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027), no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025) and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs) (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01). Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. Conclusions The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria. PMID:21619624

  9. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of new chloroquine analogues carrying a multifunctional linear side chain

    PubMed Central

    Iwaniuk, Daniel P.; Whetmore, Eric D.; Rosa, Nicholas; Ekoue-Kovi, Kekeli; Alumasa, John; de Dios, Angel C.; Roepe, Paul D.; Wolf, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We report the synthesis and in vitro antimalarial activity of several new 4-amino-and 4-alkoxy-7-chloroquinolines carrying a linear dibasic side chain. Many of these chloroquine analogues have submicromolar antimalarial activity versus HB3 (chloroquine sensitive) and Dd2 (chloroquine resistant strain of P. falciparum) and low resistance indices were obtained in most cases. Importantly, compounds 11–15 and 24 proved to be more potent against Dd2 than chloroquine. Branching of the side chain structure proved detrimental to the activity against the CQR strain. PMID:19703776

  10. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p<0.05) in presence of 250μg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole.

  11. Efficacy of chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria: revisiting molecular markers in an area of emerging AQ and SP resistance in Mali

    PubMed Central

    Tekete, Mamadou; Djimde, Abdoulaye A; Beavogui, Abdoul H; Maiga, Hamma; Sagara, Issaka; Fofana, Bakary; Ouologuem, Dinkorma; Dama, Souleymane; Kone, Aminatou; Dembele, Demba; Wele, Mamadou; Dicko, Alassane; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2009-01-01

    Background To update the National Malaria Control Programme of Mali on the efficacy of chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Methods During the malaria transmission seasons of 2002 and 2003, 455 children – between six and 59 months of age, with uncomplicated malaria in Kolle, Mali, were randomly assigned to one of three treatment arms. In vivo outcomes were assessed using WHO standard protocols. Genotyping of msp1, msp2 and CA1 polymorphisms were used to distinguish reinfection from recrudescent parasites (molecular correction). Results Day 28 adequate clinical and parasitological responses (ACPR) were 14.1%, 62.3% and 88.9% in 2002 and 18.2%, 60% and 85.2% in 2003 for chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, respectively. After molecular correction, ACPRs (cACPR) were 63.2%, 88.5% and 98.0% in 2002 and 75.5%, 85.2% and 96.6% in 2003 for CQ, AQ and SP, respectively. Amodiaquine was the most effective on fever. Amodiaquine therapy selected molecular markers for chloroquine resistance, while in the sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine arm the level of dhfr triple mutant and dhfr/dhps quadruple mutant increased from 31.5% and 3.8% in 2002 to 42.9% and 8.9% in 2003, respectively. No infection with dhps 540E was found. Conclusion In this study, treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine emerged as the most efficacious on uncomplicated falciparum malaria followed by amodiaquine. The study demonstrated that sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amodiaquine were appropriate partner drugs that could be associated with artemisinin derivatives in an artemisinin-based combination therapy. PMID:19245687

  12. In vitro response of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and mefloquine in southeast Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Kightlinger, M B; Kightlinger, L K

    1988-01-01

    46 isolates of Plasmodium falciparum collected in the Tolagnaro (Fort Dauphin) area of Southeast Madagascar were assessed with WHO in vitro micro-technique test kits to determine their susceptibility to chloroquine and mefloquine. The results of the tests indicated low grade resistance to chloroquine and satisfactory response to mefloquine.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance transfer in transport media.

    PubMed

    George, B A; Fagerberg, D J; Sanem, J A

    1981-09-01

    Five different transport media (buffered glycerol saline, Amies, Cary and Blair, Stuart, and modified Stuart) were tested to determine if antimicrobial resistance transfer could occur among bacteria in the media. Transfer of resistance occurred in all of the media, except buffered glycerol saline, within 2 h of holding both at room temperature and 4 degrees C.

  14. Synthesis of chiral chloroquine and its analogues as antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Manish; Dola, Vasanth R; Soni, Awakash; Agarwal, Pooja; Srivastava, Kumkum; Haq, Wahajul; Puri, Sunil K; Katti, Seturam B

    2014-11-01

    In this investigation, we describe a new approach to chiral synthesis of chloroquine and its analogues. All tested compounds displayed potent activity against chloroquine sensitive as well as chloroquine resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and Plasmodium yoelii in vivo. Compounds S-13 b, S-13c, S-13 d and S-13 i displayed excellent in vitro antimalarial activity with an IC50 value of 56.82, 60.41, 21.82 and 7.94 nM, respectively, in the case of resistant strain. Furthermore, compounds S-13a, S-13c and S-13 d showed in vivo suppression of 100% parasitaemia on day 4 in the mouse model against Plasmodium yoelii when administered orally. These results underscore the application of synthetic methodology and need for further lead optimization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Basis of antimalarial action: non-weak base effects of chloroquine on acid vesicle pH

    SciTech Connect

    Krogstad, D.J.; Schlesinger, P.H.

    1987-03-01

    Biologically active concentrations of chloroquine increase the pH of the parasite's acid vesicles within 3-5 min. This increase in pH results from two mechanisms, one of which is markedly reduced in chloroquine-resistant parasites. Because chloroquine is a weak base, it increases vesicle pH by that mechanism in chloroquine-susceptible and resistant parasites and mammalian cells (based on its two pKs and on the delta pH between the acid vesicle and the extracellular environment). In chloroquine-susceptible parasites, but not resistant parasites or mammalian cells, chloroquine increases the pH of acid vesicles 700- to 800-fold more than can be accounted for by its properties as a weak base. The increase in acid vesicle pH caused by these non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine in susceptible parasites suggests that chloroquine acts by interfering with acid vesicle functions in the parasite such as the endocytosis and proteolysis of hemoglobin, and the intracellular targeting of lysosomal enzymes. The non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine on parasite vesicle pH are also responsible for its safety because these chloroquine concentrations do not affect mammalian cells.

  16. Extrapyramidal syndrome following chloroquine therapy.

    PubMed

    Singhi, S; Singhi, P; Singh, M

    1979-02-01

    Chloroquine is considered essentially nontoxic when used for the chemosuppression of malaria, but gastrointestinal upsets, headache, blurring of vision, pruritus, and uritcaria may occur during chloroquine therapy. Recently, Bhargava et al. and Eronini and Eronini have reported the extrapyramidal syndrome (EPS) following chloroquine therapy in adults. The clinical manifestations included upward rolling of the eyeballs, retraction of neck and back, trismus with marked difficulty in speech, and coarse tremors. Observations of 4 instances of EPS in children following chloroquine therapy for malaria are reported. A 2-1/2 year old girl was admitted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences Hospital with a 4 day history of intermittent high grade pyrexia with chills and rigors. Following treatment with oral chloroquine in the recommended therapeutic dosage, the fever responded, but the child became drowsy and developed paroxysms of involuntary movements of the tongue, torticollis, torsion dystonia of the limbs, and parosysms of tonic muscular spasms. She completely recovered spontaneously within 48 hours. The 2nd case was that of a 12-year old female brought to the hospital with a 15-day history of intermittent high grade fever with chills and rigors. The patient was started on chloroquine sulfate in the recommended therapeutic dose. After an interval of 4 days she developed coarse tremors of the hands, upward rolling of the eyeballs, episodic deviation of the angle of the mouth towards the left, and trismus. These symptoms disappeared spontaneously within 8 hours. A 6-year old girl, the 3rd case, developed episodes of opisthotonous, upward rolling of the eyeballs, protrusions of the tongue, intermittent writhing movements of the upper limbs, and drowsiness following the ingestion of 6 tablets of chloroquine sulfate for suspected diagnosis of malaria. She spontaneously recovered from EPS over a period of about 48 hours. The 4th case, a 7-year old boy, gave a history

  17. In-vitro interaction of tafenoquine and chloroquine in Plasmodium falciparum from northwestern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vollnberg, Anke; Prajakwong, Somsak; Sirichaisinthop, Jeeraphat; Wiedermann, Gerhard; Wernsdorfer, Gunther; Wernsdorfer, Walther H

    2003-01-01

    The blood schizontocidal, pharmacodynamic interaction between tafenoquine (WR 238605--a 5-phenoxyprimaquine derivative--and chloroquine was investigated, using an in-vitro test for the inhibition of schizont maturation, in 15 fresh isolates of Plasmodium falciparum that originated from northwestern Thailand and neighbouring Myanmar. In this area the parasite is highly resistant to chloroquine. The geometric mean cut-off concentrations of schizont maturation for tafenoquine and chloroquine were 5261 nM and 7638 nM, respectively. With a mixture of tafenoquine and chloroquine, the mean cut-off concentration was 5252 nM, corresponding to 389 nM tafenoquine + 4863 nM chloroquine. Further analysis showed that the interaction between tafenoquine and chloroquine was additive within the range of EC20 and EC77. At concentrations higher than the EC77, interaction was moderately synergistic. While tafenoquine did not reverse the resistance to chloroquine to the degree of clinically relevant sensitivity, there was evidence that the blood schizontocidal efficacy of tafenoquine would be enhanced in the presence of chloroquine.

  18. PfCRT Mediated Drug Transport in Malarial Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Roepe, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    A wide range of drug transport studies using intact infected red blood cells, isolated malarial parasites, heterologous expression systems, and purified protein, combined with elegant genetic experiments, have suggested that chloroquine (CQ) transport by the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) is a key aspect of the molecular mechanism of quinoline antimalarial drug resistance. However, many questions remain. This short review summarizes data that has led to drug channel vs drug pump hypotheses for PfCRT and suggests ways in which recent contrasting interpretations might be reconciled. PMID:21142008

  19. Molecular surveillance of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance markers reveals partial recovery of chloroquine susceptibility but sustained sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance at two sites of different malaria transmission intensities in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Kateera, Fredrick; Nsobya, Sam L; Tukwasibwe, Steven; Hakizimana, Emmanuel; Mutesa, Leon; Mens, Petra F; Grobusch, Martin P; van Vugt, Michèle; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-12-01

    Faced with intense levels of chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Rwanda replaced CQ with amodiaquine (AQ)+sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in 2001, and subsequently with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in 2006, as first-line treatments for uncomplicated malaria. Following years of discontinuation of CQ use, re-emergence of CQ-susceptible parasites has been reported in countries including Malawi, Kenya and Tanzania. In contrast, high levels of SP resistant mutant parasites continue to be reported even in countries of presumed reduced SP drug selection pressure. The prevalence and distributions of genetic polymorphisms linked with CQ and SP resistance at two sites of different malaria transmission intensities are described here to better understand drug-related genomic adaptations over time and exposure to varying drug pressures in Rwanda. Using filter paper blood isolates collected from P. falciparum infected patients, DNA was extracted and a nested PCR performed to identify resistance-mediating polymorphisms in the pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps and pfdhfr genes. Amplicons from a total of 399 genotyped samples were analysed by ligase detection reaction fluorescent microsphere assay. CQ susceptible pfcrt 76K and pfmdr1 86N wild-type parasites were found in about 50% and 81% of isolates, respectively. Concurrently, SP susceptible pfdhps double (437G-540E), pfdhfr triple (108N-51I-59R), quintuple pfdhps 437G-540E/pfdhfr 51I-59R-108N and sextuple haplotypes were found in about 84%, 85%, 74% and 18% of isolates, respectively. High-level SP resistance associated pfdhfr 164L and pfdhps 581G mutant prevalences were noted to decline. Mutations pfcrt 76T, pfdhfr 59R and pfdhfr 164L were found differentially distributed between the two study sites with the pfdhfr 164L mutants found only at Ruhuha site, eastern Rwanda. Overall, sustained intense levels of SP resistance mutations and a recovery of CQ susceptible parasites were found in this study following 7 years

  20. Rapid detection of Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 mutations in Plasmodium falciparum isolates by FRET and in vivo response to chloroquine among children from Osogbo, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojurongbe, Olusola; Ogungbamigbe, Titus O; Fagbenro-Beyioku, Adetayo F; Fendel, Rolf; Kremsner, Peter G; Kun, Jürgen FJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ) has been in use in Africa for a long time. Because of misuse, this drug has now lost its efficacy due to the emergence of resistance strains in most parts of Africa. Recently, it was shown that after chloroquine has been withdrawn from the market, chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum re-emerged and chloroquine could again be used successfully as an antimalarial. Surveillance of parasite populations is, therefore, important to decide whether chloroquine could be re-introduced. Methods To estimate the prevalence of the most pivotal polymorphisms, including Pfcrt K76T, Pfmdr1 N86Y and Pfmdr1 Y184F mutations, and their contributions to the outcome of CQ treatment, isolates from Osogbo Western Nigeria were tested using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) method on a real-time PCR instrument. Results 116 children with acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria infections were treated with the standard dosage of CQ and followed-up for 28 days. Blood samples were collected on filter paper at enrollment and during follow-up for identification of parasite carrying the chloroquine resistant transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum-multi drug resistance (pfmdr1) gene mutations. Parasitological assessment of response to treatment showed that 62% of the patients were cured and 38% failed the CQ treatment. The presence of single mutant pfcrt (T76) alleles (P = 0.003) and in combination with mutant pfmdr1 Y86 (P = 0.028) was significantly associated with in vivo CQR. No other mutation on its own or in combinations was significantly associated with treatment outcome. Mutant pfcrt was more prevalent in both pre- and post-treatment isolates. No association was observed between age or initial level of parasitaemia and chloroquine treatment outcome. Conclusion The result established the usefulness and accuracy of real time PCR in pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutation detection and also give further evidence to the reliability of the pfcrt T76 point

  1. Evidence that mutant PfCRT facilitates the transmission to mosquitoes of chloroquine-treated Plasmodium gametocytes.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Andrea; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Sinnis, Photini; Coppens, Isabelle; Fidock, David A

    2011-01-15

    Resistance of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum to the antimalarial drug chloroquine has rapidly spread from several independent origins and is now widely prevalent throughout the majority of malaria-endemic areas. Field studies have suggested that chloroquine-resistant strains might be more infective to mosquito vectors. To test the hypothesis that the primary chloroquine resistance determinant, mutations in PfCRT, facilitates parasite transmission under drug pressure, we have introduced a mutant or wild-type pfcrt allele into the rodent model malarial parasite Plasmodium berghei. Our results show that mutant PfCRT from the chloroquine-resistant 7G8 strain has no effect on asexual blood stage chloroquine susceptibility in vivo or ex vivo but confers a significant selective advantage in competitive mosquito infections in the presence of this drug, by protecting immature gametocytes from its lethal action. Enhanced infectivity to mosquitoes may have been a key factor driving the worldwide spread of mutant pfcrt.

  2. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  3. Chloroquine Has a Cytotoxic Effect on Acanthamoeba Encystation through Modulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Kim, Hyun Ah; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Blocking the encystation process could potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and biocides. During encystation, autophagy is highly stimulated and required for proper encystation of Acanthamoeba. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy-inhibitory drug, was tested in A. castellanii. Chloroquine was able to selectively reduce cell survival during the encystation of A. castellanii. However, A. castellanii trophozoites and mature cysts were resistant to chloroquine. Chloroquine treatment led to an increase in the number and size of lysosomes in encysting cells. Moreover, chloroquine inhibited the degradation of long-lived proteins in the encysting cells. Decreased autophagic flux, indicated by an increased number of lysosomes and decreased degradation of long-lived proteins, may be the mechanism by which cell death is induced by chloroquine in encysting Acanthamoeba. These results suggest a potential novel therapeutic application of chloroquine as an anti-Acanthamoeba drug. Our findings also suggest that targeting autophagy could be a therapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:25114131

  4. Chloroquine has a cytotoxic effect on Acanthamoeba encystation through modulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Kim, Hyun Ah; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2014-10-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Blocking the encystation process could potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and biocides. During encystation, autophagy is highly stimulated and required for proper encystation of Acanthamoeba. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy-inhibitory drug, was tested in A. castellanii. Chloroquine was able to selectively reduce cell survival during the encystation of A. castellanii. However, A. castellanii trophozoites and mature cysts were resistant to chloroquine. Chloroquine treatment led to an increase in the number and size of lysosomes in encysting cells. Moreover, chloroquine inhibited the degradation of long-lived proteins in the encysting cells. Decreased autophagic flux, indicated by an increased number of lysosomes and decreased degradation of long-lived proteins, may be the mechanism by which cell death is induced by chloroquine in encysting Acanthamoeba. These results suggest a potential novel therapeutic application of chloroquine as an anti-Acanthamoeba drug. Our findings also suggest that targeting autophagy could be a therapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infection.

  5. Survey of in vivo sensitivity to chloroquine by Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax in Lombok, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fryauff, D J; Baird, J K; Candradikusuma, D; Masbar, S; Sutamihardja, M A; Leksana, B; Tuti, S; Marwoto, H; Richie, T; Romzan, A

    1997-02-01

    A malariometric survey was conducted in 14 villages of Sekotong district, in Lombok, Indonesia during October 1994. Point prevalence of malaria ranged from 0% to 15% in the surveyed villages, averaging 6% overall, and Plasmodium falciparum accounted for 63% of the infections. Forty-nine patients with uncomplicated malaria and parasite counts ranging from 40 to 10,800 asexual forms/microliter were enrolled in a 28-day in vivo test of chloroquine sensitivity. All subjects received a supervised therapeutic regimen of chloroquine (25 mg base/kg over a 48-hr period) and parasitemia and symptoms were closely monitored for 28 days. Asexual parasites were eliminated within four days in the 29 P. falciparum and 20 P. vivax study patients enrolled. The cumulative incidence of therapeutic failure (recurrent symptomatic parasitemia) among P. falciparum cases at days 7, 14, and 28 was 7%, 10%, and 14% (4 of 29), respectively. However in all four cases, parasitemias recurred against chloroquine blood levels below the minimally effective concentration (MEC) of 200 ng/ml and do not confirm chloroquine resistance. All 20 P. vivax parasitemias were sensitive to chloroquine and the blood remained clear, with the exception of one case in which an asymptomatic parasitemia appeared on day 28. Parasitemias by P. falciparum and P. vivax that were observed before supervised therapy, but in the presence of whole blood chloroquine above normally suppressive MEC levels, suggest resistance to suppressive or prophylactic regimens of chloroquine.

  6. Predicting functional and regulatory divergence of a drug resistance transporter gene in the human malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Siwo, Geoffrey H; Tan, Asako; Button-Simons, Katrina A; Samarakoon, Upeka; Checkley, Lisa A; Pinapati, Richard S; Ferdig, Michael T

    2015-02-22

    The paradigm of resistance evolution to chemotherapeutic agents is that a key coding mutation in a specific gene drives resistance to a particular drug. In the case of resistance to the anti-malarial drug chloroquine (CQ), a specific mutation in the transporter pfcrt is associated with resistance. Here, we apply a series of analytical steps to gene expression data from our lab and leverage 3 independent datasets to identify pfcrt-interacting genes. Resulting networks provide insights into pfcrt's biological functions and regulation, as well as the divergent phenotypic effects of its allelic variants in different genetic backgrounds. To identify pfcrt-interacting genes, we analyze pfcrt co-expression networks in 2 phenotypic states - CQ-resistant (CQR) and CQ-sensitive (CQS) recombinant progeny clones - using a computational approach that prioritizes gene interactions into functional and regulatory relationships. For both phenotypic states, pfcrt co-expressed gene sets are associated with hemoglobin metabolism, consistent with CQ's expected mode of action. To predict the drivers of co-expression divergence, we integrate topological relationships in the co-expression networks with available high confidence protein-protein interaction data. This analysis identifies 3 transcriptional regulators from the ApiAP2 family and histone acetylation as potential mediators of these divergences. We validate the predicted divergences in DNA mismatch repair and histone acetylation by measuring the effects of small molecule inhibitors in recombinant progeny clones combined with quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. This work demonstrates the utility of differential co-expression viewed in a network framework to uncover functional and regulatory divergence in phenotypically distinct parasites. pfcrt-associated co-expression in the CQ resistant progeny highlights CQR-specific gene relationships and possible targeted intervention strategies. The approaches outlined here can be

  7. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and mode-of-action studies of antimalarial reversed chloroquine compounds.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Kelly, Jane X; Shomloo, Shawheen; Wittlin, Sergio; Brun, Reto; Liebmann, Katherine; Peyton, David H

    2010-09-09

    We have previously shown that a "reversed chloroquine (RCQ)" molecule, composed of a chloroquine-like moiety and a resistance reversal-like moiety, can overcome chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum ( Burgess , S. J. ; Selzer , A. ; Kelly , J. X. ; Smilkstein , M. J. ; Riscoe , M. K. ; Peyton , D. H. J. Med. Chem. 2006 , 49 , 5623 . Andrews , S. ; Burgess , S. J. ; Skaalrud , D. ; Kelly , J. X. ; Peyton , D. H. J. Med. Chem. 2010 , 53 , 916 ). Here, we present an investigation into the structure-activity relationship of the RCQ structures, resulting in an orally active molecule with good in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity. We also present evidence of the mode of action, indicating that the RCQ molecules inhibit hemozoin formation in the parasite's digestive vacuole in a manner similar to that of chloroquine.

  8. Magnetic microbead transport during resistive pulse sensing

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, Geoff R.; Fisk, Matthew G.; Eldridge, James

    2013-01-01

    Tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS) experiments have been used to quantitatively study the motion of 1 μm superparamagnetic beads in a variable magnetic field. Closed-form theory has been developed to interpret the experiments, incorporating six particle transport mechanisms which depend on particle position in and near a conical pore. For our experiments, calculations indicate that pressure-driven flow dominates electrophoresis and magnetism by a factor of ∼100 in the narrowest part of the pore, but that magnetic force should dominate further than ∼1 mm from the membrane. As expected, the observed resistive pulse rate falls as the magnet is moved closer to the pore, while the increase in pulse duration suggests that trajectories in the half space adjacent to the pore opening are important. Aggregation was not observed, consistent with the high hydrodynamic shear near the pore constriction and the high magnetization of aggregates. The theoretical approach is also used to calculate the relative importance of transport mechanisms over a range of geometries and experimental conditions extending well beyond our own experiments. TRPS is emerging as a versatile form of resistive pulse sensing, while magnetic beads are widely used in biotechnology and sensing applications. PMID:24396540

  9. Molecular analysis of markers associated with chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites from southeastern Côte-d'Ivoire by the time of Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy adoption in 2005.

    PubMed

    Ako, Berenger Aristide; Offianan, André Toure; Johansson, Marnie; Penali, Louis Koné; Nguetta, Simon-Pierre Assanvo; Sibley, Carol Hopkin

    2012-01-01

    Artemisin-based combination therapies became the recommended therapy in Côte-d'Ivoire in 2005, but both chloroquine (CQ) and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) have been heavily used for many decades. Despite this long history, little is known about the geographical distribution of drug resistance-conferring genotypes outside the capital city of Abidjan. In this work, we compared the prevalence of drug-resistant genotypes in Bonoua, an urban area, and Samo, a rural agricultural area, in southeastern Côte-d'Ivoire, about 59 km from Abidjan. Samples were collected from symptomatic patients in both sites during the rainy season in 2005. Genomic DNA was isolated and codons associated with resistance to CQ and SP were analyzed: pfcrt codons Cys-72-Ser, Val-73-Val, Met-74-Ile, Arg-75-Glu, Lys-76-Thr; pfdhfr codons Ala-16-Val, Arg-51-Ile, Cys-59-Arg, Ser-108-Arg/Thr, and Ile-164-Leu; pfdhps codons Ser-436-Ala, Ala-437-Gly, Lys-540-Glu, Ala-581-Gly, and Ala-613-Thr/Ser. A limited number of genotypes were found in Bonoua compared with Samo. In both sites, the triple-mutant allele CVIET of pfcrt predominated: 100% in Bonoua and 86.2% in Samo. The wild-type allele, NCSI of pfdhfr, was common - 50% in Bonoua and 38.7% in Samo - but the triple-mutant IRNI and double-mutant NRNI were also frequent (IRNI, 32.6% in Bonoua and 19.4% in Samo; NRNI, 15.2% in Bonoua and 9.7% in Samo). In Samo, a wide range of different genotypes of Pfdhps was observed, with alleles carrying the Gly-437 codon fixed in Bonoua and comprising 73% of the isolates in Samo. Although these two sites are only 8 km apart, they belonged to very different ecological environments. The overall prevalence of alleles of single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with resistance to CQ and SP in both locations was among the highest of the region by 2005, although the more rural site showed a more diverse set of alleles and mixed infections. Continued surveillance of these markers will be a useful tool for drug policy, as

  10. Fractions of an antimalarial neem-leaf extract have activities superior to chloroquine, and are gametocytocidal.

    PubMed

    Udeinya, I J; Brown, N; Shu, E N; Udeinya, F I; Quakeyie, I

    2006-01-01

    The antimalarial activities of two fractions (IRDN-A and IRDN-B) of an extract from the leaves of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica) were compared with those of chloroquine, in in-vitro assays against Plasmodium falciparum. The asexual stages of a chloroquine-sensitive clone (ITG2F6) and a chloroquine-resistant isolate (W2) and the gametocytes of the NF 54 (BD-7) isolate of P. falciparum were used as the drug targets. Activity against the asexual stages was generally evaluated as the concentrations inhibiting the parasitaemias recorded in the control cultures, after an incubation of 48-72 h, by 50% (IC50) or 100% (IC100). For the ITG2F6 strain, the IC50 and IC100 (in microg/ml) were, respectively, 10(-5) and 10(-4) for IRDN-A, 10(-3) and 10(-2) for IRDN-B, and 10(-2) and 1.0 for chloroquine. The corresponding values for the W2 strain were 10(-5) and 1.0 for IRDN-A, and 10.0 and >100 for chloroquine (even at 100 microg/ml, chloroquine only inhibited the parasitaemia by 85%). Each of the two neem-leaf fractions lysed 50% and 100% of developing gametocytes, at 10(-3) and 1.0 microg/ml, respectively; and 50% and 100% of mature gametocytes at 10(-3) and 10(2) microg/ml, respectively. If they are found safe and effective in vivo, the neem-leaf fractions may form the basis of new antimalarial drugs that not only cure chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant malaria but also markedly reduce transmission.

  11. Piercing tool, Transportation Accident Resistant Container (TARC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, P.

    1994-08-01

    Transportation Accident Resistant Containers (TARC)s are used for enhanced safety during movement of nuclear weapons. Its design features a tough stainless steel outer skin, redwood for impact mitigation and fire protection and a rugged aluminum inner container. Redwood absorbs impact energy by crushing, similar to the way foam crushes in other containers. Redwood also functions to insulate the weapon from heat and fire. When a TARC is involved in a fire, the redwood will slowly burn forming a good insulating char. The redwood can continue to smolder once the fire is out. To ensure the smolder is extinguished, water can be directed into any accident caused hole in the skin. If no hole exists, it may be necessary to create one. This document discusses tool selection, testing, and a simple but effective method of creating an access hole in the outer skin large enough to apply fire fighting techniques.

  12. In vitro chloroquine susceptibility and PCR analysis of pfcrt and pfmdr1 polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Senegal.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Susan M; Ndir, Omar; Dieng, Therese; Mboup, Souleymane; Wypij, David; Maguire, James H; Wirth, Dyann F

    2002-05-01

    Chloroquine resistance has been linked to mutations in the pfcrt and pfmdr1 genes of Plasmodium falciparum. To estimate the prevalence of the pfcrt K76T, pfmdr1 N86Y, and pfmdr1 D1246Y polymorphisms, isolates of P. falciparum from Senegal, West Africa, were analyzed, and the results were compared to in vitro chloroquine susceptibility. By the in vitro DELI test, 31% of these samples were resistant to chloroquine. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays and confirmatory sequencing demonstrated the pfcrt T76, pfmdr1 Y86, and pfmdr1 Y1246 alleles in 79%, 31%, and 2% of the isolates, respectively. All three mutant alleles were present in both in vitro susceptible and resistant isolates. On the basis of these findings, it appears that these molecular markers are not consistently predictive of in vitro chloroquine resistance in Senegal.

  13. [Chloroquine as a poison in murder. Report of fatalities after criminal or suicidal chloroquine administration].

    PubMed

    Pöhlmann, K; Kijewski, H

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a case of murder by means of chloroquine, committed on a 36-year-old male. The wife of the deceased had confessed to have secretely administered chloroquine-containing tablets to her husband. She was lawfully sentenced to life-imprisonment. The toxicological findings of this case are compared to the results of two chloroquine suicide cases and discussed in the context of the referring literature. An additional case where chloroquine intoxication was doubtful is introduced because of the unusual circumstances under which it occurred.

  14. Convective transport resistance in the vitreous humor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penkova, Anita; Sadhal, Satwindar; Ratanakijsuntorn, Komsan; Moats, Rex; Tang, Yang; Hughes, Patrick; Robinson, Michael; Lee, Susan

    2012-11-01

    It has been established by MRI visualization experiments that the convection of nanoparticles and large molecules with high rate of water flow in the vitreous humor will experience resistance, depending on the respective permeabilities of the injected solute. A set of experiments conducted with Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany) and 30 nm gadolinium-based particles (Gado CELLTrackTM, Biopal, Worcester, MA) as MRI contrast agents showed that the degree of convective transport in this Darcy-type porous medium varies between the two solutes. These experiments consisted of injecting a mixture of the two (a 30 μl solution of 2% Magnevist and 1% nanoparticles) at the middle of the vitreous of an ex vivo whole bovine eye and subjecting the vitreous to water flow rate of 100 μl/min. The water (0.9% saline solution) was injected at the top of the eye, and was allowed to drain through small slits cut at the bottom of the eyeball. After 50 minutes of pumping, MRI images showed that the water flow carried the Gd-DTPA farther than the nanoparticles, even though the two solutes, being mixed, were subjected to the same convective flow conditions. We find that the convected solute lags the water flow, depending on the solute permeability. The usual convection term needs to be adjusted to allow for the filtration effect on the larger particles in the form (1- σ) u . ∇ c with important implications for the modeling of such systems.

  15. [ABC transporter proteins in multidrug resistance of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Balková, K; Gbelská, Y

    2007-08-01

    The ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporter family includes membrane proteins that can transport a wide variety of substrates across biological membranes. These proteins play an essential role in the protection of cells from toxic compounds/metabolites. Their overexpression which leads to the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in pathogens and enables cancer cells to survive chemotherapy is of major concern for human health. Mutations in ABC transporters are implicated in a number of Mendelian disorders such as cystic fibrosis, adrenoleukodystrophy and cholesterol and bile transport defects. In microbial cells, several homologues of human ABC transporters were identified. Their further molecular biological study can contribute to better understanding and treatment of MDR or diseases caused by dysfunction of ABC transporter proteins. A review is presented of the state of the art in ABC transporter proteins in both prokaryotic and eucaryotic cells. The role of microbial ABC transporters in the development of drug resistance is analyzed.

  16. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Jovel, Irina Tatiana; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ursing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, artemether-lumefantrine was introduced in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine have been described. P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, pfmdr1 polymorphisms N86Y and Y184F, and pfmdr1 sequences 1034 to 1246 were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n=1,806) children<15 years of age who had uncomplicated P. falciparum monoinfection and presented at a health center in suburban Bissau (from 2003 to 2012). The pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y frequencies were stable, and seasonal changes were not seen from 2003 to 2007. Since 2007, the mean annual frequencies increased (P<0.001) for pfcrt 76T (24% to 57%), pfmdr1 N86 (72% to 83%), and pfcrt 76+pfmdr1 86 TN (10% to 27%), and pfcrt 76T accumulated during the high transmission season (P=0.001). The pfmdr1 86+184 NF frequency increased from 39% to 66% (from 2003 to 2011; P=0.004). One sample had two pfmdr1 gene copies. pfcrt 76T was associated with a lower parasite density (P<0.001). Following the discontinuation of an effective chloroquine regimen, probably highly artemether-lumefantrine-susceptible P. falciparum (with pfcrt 76T) accumulated, possibly due to suboptimal use of quinine and despite a fitness cost linked to pfcrt 76T. (The studies reported here were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00137514 [PSB-2001-chl-amo], NCT00137566 [PSB-2004-paracetamol], NCT00426439 [PSB-2006-coartem], NCT01157689 [AL-eff 2010], and NCT01704508 [Eurartesim 2012].).

  17. Implications of Glutathione Levels in the Plasmodium berghei Response to Chloroquine and Artemisinin

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Crespo-Lladó, Keila N.; Ortiz, José G.; Ferrer-Rodríguez, Iván; Serrano, Adelfa E.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most devastating parasitic diseases worldwide. Plasmodium drug resistance remains a major challenge to malaria control and has led to the re-emergence of the disease. Chloroquine (CQ) and artemisinin (ART) are thought to exert their anti-malarial activity inducing cytotoxicity in the parasite by blocking heme degradation (for CQ) and increasing oxidative stress. Besides the contribution of the CQ resistance transporter (PfCRT) and the multidrug resistant gene (pfmdr), CQ resistance has also been associated with increased parasite glutathione (GSH) levels. ART resistance was recently shown to be associated with mutations in the K13-propeller protein. To analyze the role of GSH levels in CQ and ART resistance, we generated transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites either deficient in or overexpressing the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene (pbggcs) encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. These lines produce either lower (pbggcs-ko) or higher (pbggcs-oe) levels of GSH than wild type parasites. In addition, GSH levels were determined in P. berghei parasites resistant to CQ and mefloquine (MQ). Increased GSH levels were detected in both, CQ and MQ resistant parasites, when compared to the parental sensitive clone. Sensitivity to CQ and ART remained unaltered in both pgggcs-ko and pbggcs-oe parasites when tested in a 4 days drug suppressive assay. However, recrudescence assays after the parasites have been exposed to a sub-lethal dose of ART showed that parasites with low levels of GSH are more sensitive to ART treatment. These results suggest that GSH levels influence Plasmodium berghei response to ART treatment. PMID:26010448

  18. Therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine against Plasmodium falciparum infection in Somalia.

    PubMed Central

    Warsame, M.; Abdillahi, A.; Duale, O. Nur; Ismail, A. Nur; Hassan, A. M.; Mohamed, A.; Warsame, A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infections in Somalia. METHODS: Patients with clinical malaria in Merca, an area of high transmission of the disease, were treated with the standard regimens of chloroquine (25 mg/kg) or sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (25 mg sulfadoxine and 1.25 mg pyrimethamine per kg). Similar patients in Gabiley, an area of low transmission, received the standard regimen of chloroquine. The clinical and parasitological responses were monitored for 14 days. FINDINGS: Chloroquine treatment resulted in clinical failure in 33% (n = 60) and 51% (n = 49) of the patients in Merca and Gabiley respectively. There were corresponding parasitological failures of 77% RII/RIII and 35% RII/RIII. Patients who experienced clinical failure had significantly higher initial parasitaemia than those in whom there was an adequate clinical response, both in Merca (t = 2.2; P t = 2.8; P n = 50) of the patients achieved an adequate clinical response despite a parasitological failure rate of 76% RII/RIII. CONCLUSION: Chloroquine should no longer be considered adequate for treating clinical falciparum malaria in vulnerable groups in the areas studied. Doubts about the therapeutic life of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine in relation to malaria are raised by the high levels of resistance in the Merca area and underline the need to identify suitable alternatives. PMID:12378287

  19. 1,2-disubstituted ferrocenyl carbohydrate chloroquine conjugates as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christoph; Salas, Paloma F; Patrick, Brian O; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2012-06-07

    This work presents a new family of organometallic antimalarial compounds consisting of ferrocene bearing a chloroquine-derived moiety as well as a 1,2;3,5-diisopropylidene glucofuranose moiety at a cyclopentadienyl scaffold in a 1,2-substitution pattern. The synthetic route proceeds via a stereoselective functionalization of ferrocene carboxaldehyde to the 1,2-disubstituted conjugates. After complete characterization of these new, trifunctional conjugates, they were examined for their cytotoxicity in two cancerous cell lines (MDA-MB-435S and Caco2) and one non-cancerous cell line (MCF-10A), showing that increased cytotoxicity can be observed for the chloroquine ferrocenyl conjugates compared to their carbohydrate-substituted precursors. The antiplasmodial activity of the conjugates in a chloroquine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum (D10) and a chloroquine-resistant strain (Dd2) was determined. Monosubstituted conjugates 13, 14 and 15 exhibit decreasing activity with increasing alkyl chain length between the ferrocene and quinoline moiety, bifunctional conjugates 16, 17, 18 show constant activity, performing better than chloroquine in the Dd2 strain.

  20. In silico attempt for adduct agent(s) against malaria: Combination of chloroquine with alkaloids of Adhatoda vasica.

    PubMed

    Swain, Shasank S; Sahu, Mahesh C; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2015-10-01

    With the aim of controlling drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, a computational attempt of designing novel adduct antimalarial drugs through the molecular docking method of combining chloroquine with five alkaloids, individually is presented. These alkaloids were obtained from the medicinal plant, Adhatoda vasica. From the obtained individual docking values of important derivatives of quinine and chloroquine, as well as, individual alkaloids and adduct agents of chloroquine with Adhatoda alkaloids as ligands, it was discernible that the 'adduct agent-1 with chloroquine and adhatodine' combination had the minimum energy of interaction, as the docking score value of -11.144 kcal/mol against the target protein, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), the key enzyme of glycolytic pathway. Drug resistance of P. falciparum is due to a mutation in the polypeptide of TIM. Moratorium of mutant TIM would disrupt the metabolism during the control of the drug resistant P. falciparum. This in silico work helped to locate the 'adduct agent-1 with chloroquine and adhatodine', which could be taken up by pharmacology for further development of this compound as a new drug against drug resistant Plasmodium.

  1. Chloroquine Interference with Hemoglobin Endocytic Trafficking Suppresses Adaptive Heme and Iron Homeostasis in Macrophages: The Paradox of an Antimalarial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Christian A.; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schaer, Dominik J.

    2013-01-01

    The CD163 scavenger receptor pathway for Hb:Hp complexes is an essential mechanism of protection against the toxicity of extracellular hemoglobin (Hb), which can accumulate in the vasculature and within tissues during hemolysis. Chloroquine is a lysosomotropic agent, which has been extensively used as an antimalarial drug in the past, before parasite resistance started to limit its efficacy in most parts of the world. More recent use of chloroquine is related to its immunomodulatory activity in patients with autoimmune diseases, which may also involve hemolytic disease components. In this study we examined the effects of chloroquine on the human Hb clearance pathway. For this purpose we developed a new mass-spectrometry-based method to specifically quantify intracellular Hb peptides within the endosomal-lysosomal compartment by single reaction monitoring (SRM). We found that chloroquine exposure impairs trafficking of Hb:Hp complexes through the endosomal-lysosomal compartment after internalization by CD163. Relative quantification of intracellular Hb peptides by SRM confirmed that chloroquine blocked cellular Hb:Hp catabolism. This effect suppressed the cellular heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) response and shifted macrophage iron homeostasis towards inappropriately high expression of the transferrin receptor with concurrent inhibition of ferroportin expression. A functional deficiency of Hb detoxification and heme-iron recycling may therefore be an adverse consequence of chloroquine treatment during hemolysis. PMID:23840921

  2. Transport of amphipathic anions by human multidrug resistance protein 3.

    PubMed

    Zeng, H; Liu, G; Rea, P A; Kruh, G D

    2000-09-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT or MRP2) are ATP-binding cassette transporters that confer resistance to some anticancer drugs and efflux glutathione and glucuronate conjugates from the cell. The MRP subfamily of ABC transporters, however, contains at least four other members of which MRP3 (MOAT-D) bears the closest structural resemblance to MRP1. Although transfection studies have established that human MRP3 confers increased resistance to several anticancer agents, neither the substrate selectivity nor physiological functions of this transporter have been determined. Here we report the results of investigations of the in vitro transport properties of cloned human MRP3 using membrane vesicles prepared from MRP3-transfected HEK293 cells. It is shown that the expression of MRP3 is specifically associated with enhancement of the MgATP-dependent transport into membrane vesicles of the glucuronide estradiol 17-beta-D-glucuronide (E(2)17betaG), the glutathione conjugates 2,4-dinitrophenyl S-glutathione (DNP-SG) and leukotriene C4 (LTC4), the antimetabolite methotrexate, and the bile acid glycocholate. DNP-SG, LTC4, and E(2)17betaG are transported at moderate affinity and low capacity with Km and Vmax values of 5.7 +/- 1.7 microM and 3.8 +/- 0.1 pmol/mg/min, 5.3 +/- 2.6 microM and 20.2 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, and 25.6 +/- 5.4 microM and 75.6 +/- 5.9 pmol/mg/min, respectively. Methotrexate and glycocholate are transported at low affinity and high capacity with Km and Vmax values of 776 +/- 319 microM and 288 +/- 54 pmol/mg/min and 248 +/- 113 microM and 183 +/- 34 pmol/mg/min, respectively. On the basis of these findings, the osmotic dependence of the transport measured and its inability to transport taurocholate, MRP3, like MRP1 and cMOAT, is concluded to be competent in the transport of glutathione S-conjugates, glucuronides, and methotrexate, albeit at low to moderate affinity. In

  3. Drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax collected in Honduras, Central America.

    PubMed

    Jovel, Irina T; Mejía, Rosa E; Banegas, Engels; Piedade, Rita; Alger, Jackeline; Fontecha, Gustavo; Ferreira, Pedro E; Veiga, Maria I; Enamorado, Irma G; Bjorkman, Anders; Ursing, Johan

    2011-12-19

    In Honduras, chloroquine and primaquine are recommended and still appear to be effective for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum and P. vivax collected in Honduras. Blood samples were collected from patients seeking medical attention at the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa from 2004 to 2006 as well as three regional hospitals, two health centres and one regional laboratory during 2009. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt), multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1), dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes and in P. vivax multidrug resistance 1 (pvmdr1) and dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr) genes were detected using PCR based methods. Thirty seven P. falciparum and 64 P. vivax samples were collected. All P. falciparum infections acquired in Honduras carried pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps and pfdhfr alleles associated with chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine sensitivity only. One patient with parasites acquired on a Pacific Island had pfcrt 76 T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles. That patient and a patient infected in West Africa had pfdhfr 51I, 59 R and 108 N alleles. Pvmdr1 976 F was found in 7/37 and two copies of pvmdr1 were found in 1/37 samples. Pvdhfr 57 L + 58 R was observed in 2/57 samples. The results indicate that P. falciparum from Honduras remain sensitive to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. This suggests that chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine should be efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria, supporting current national treatment guidelines. However, genetic polymorphisms associated with chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine tolerance were detected in local P. vivax and imported P. falciparum infections. Continuous monitoring of the prevalence of drug resistant/tolerant P

  4. Drug resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax collected in Honduras, Central America

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In Honduras, chloroquine and primaquine are recommended and still appear to be effective for treatment of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of resistance associated genetic polymorphisms in P. falciparum and P. vivax collected in Honduras. Methods Blood samples were collected from patients seeking medical attention at the Hospital Escuela in Tegucigalpa from 2004 to 2006 as well as three regional hospitals, two health centres and one regional laboratory during 2009. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt), multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1), dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes and in P. vivax multidrug resistance 1 (pvmdr1) and dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr) genes were detected using PCR based methods. Results Thirty seven P. falciparum and 64 P. vivax samples were collected. All P. falciparum infections acquired in Honduras carried pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhps and pfdhfr alleles associated with chloroquine, amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine sensitivity only. One patient with parasites acquired on a Pacific Island had pfcrt 76 T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles. That patient and a patient infected in West Africa had pfdhfr 51I, 59 R and 108 N alleles. Pvmdr1 976 F was found in 7/37 and two copies of pvmdr1 were found in 1/37 samples. Pvdhfr 57 L + 58 R was observed in 2/57 samples. Conclusion The results indicate that P. falciparum from Honduras remain sensitive to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. This suggests that chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine should be efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria, supporting current national treatment guidelines. However, genetic polymorphisms associated with chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine tolerance were detected in local P. vivax and imported P. falciparum infections. Continuous monitoring of the prevalence

  5. Edge transport bifurcation in plasma resistive interchange turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, C. K.; Meng, C.; Zhou, A.; Liu, D.

    2017-05-01

    Transport bifurcation and mean E × B shear flow generation in resistive interchange turbulence are explored with self-consistent fluid simulations in a flux-driven system with both closed and open field line regions. The nonlinear evolution of resistive interchange modes shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high mean E × B shear flows. By increasing the heat flux above a threshold, large-amplitude fluctuations are induced in the plasma edge region and a transition to the state of reduced turbulent transport occurs as the Reynolds power exceeds the fluctuation energy input rate for a sufficient time period. The flux-gradient relationship shows a sharp bifurcation in the plasma edge transport.

  6. [Pruritus after taking chloroquine and filariasis].

    PubMed

    Soro, B; Rey, J L; Houdier, R; Coulibaly, A; Saki, Z; Yao, K F; Delolme, H G

    1989-01-01

    A study of relations between pruritus after doses of chloroquine and on the one hand the infection by Mansonella perstans (filariasis frequent in some areas but pathogenic) and on the other hand the infection by Onchocerca volvulus (filariasis frequent in some other areas but not very pathogenic) was carried out in two villages in Ivory Coast. It is not possible to show an obvious relation between the presence of pruritus and the two filariasis.

  7. Flow resistance under conditions of intense gravel transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitlick, John

    1992-01-01

    A study of flow resistance was undertaken in a channelized reach of the North Fork Toutle River, downstream of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Hydraulic and sediment transport data were collected in flows with velocities up to 3 m/s and shear stresses up to 7 times the critical value needed for bed load transport. Details of the flow structure as revealed in vertical velocity profiles indicate that weak bed load transport over a plane gravel bed has little effect on flow resistance. The plane gravel bed persists up to stresses ∼3 times critical, at which point, irregular bed forms appear. Bed forms greatly increase flow resistance and cause velocity profiles to become distorted. The latter arises as an effect of flows becoming depth-limited as bed form amplitude increases. At very high rates of bed load transport, an upper stage plane bed appeared. Velocity profiles measured in these flows match the law of the wall closely, with the equivalent roughness being well represented by ks = 3D84 of the bed load. The effects noted here will be important in very large floods or in rivers that are not free to widen, such as those cut into bedrock.

  8. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms based on biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) literature data: chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine sulfate, and chloroquine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, R K; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Barends, D M

    2005-07-01

    Literature data on the properties of chloroquine phosphate, chloroquine sulfate, and chloroquine hydrochloride related to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) are reviewed. The available information indicates that these chloroquine salts can be classified as highly soluble and highly permeable, i.e., BCS class I. The qualitative composition of immediate release (IR) tablets containing these Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs) with a Marketing Authorization (MA) in Belgium (BE), Germany (DE), Finland (FI), and The Netherlands (NL) is provided. In view of these MA's and the critical therapeutic indication of chloroquine, it is assumed that the registration authorities had evidence that these formulations are bioequivalent to the innovator. It is concluded that IR tablets formulated with these excipients are candidates for a biowaiver.

  9. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M.; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  10. [Chloroquine--miscellaneous properties of the antimalarial drug].

    PubMed

    Jarzyna, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Chloroquine is a drug with over 60 years of safe clinical use in the treatment of malaria. The multiple mechanisms of chloroquine action have appeared to be useful in the therapy of many miscellaneous disorders well beyond its original antimalarial purposes. This paper is focused on the application of chloroquine for the treatment of malaria, porphyria cutanea tarda, rheumatoid arthritis, palindromic rheumatism and lupus. The possibility of the use of chloroquine in the therapy of other disorders such as diabetes mellitus, AIDS, hyperlipidemia, sarcoidosis, hypercalcemia, and melanoma is reviewed. Mechanisms of action of the drug as well as side effects on metabolism are discussed in view of recent discoveries.

  11. Transporters in the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis transcriptome: insights on drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Christiane da Silva; Albuquerque, Flávia Caixeta; Andrade, Rosângela Vieira; Oliveira, Gina Camilo de; Almeida, Mauro Fernandes de; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Maranhão, Andrea Queiroz

    2005-06-30

    In the struggle for life, the capacity of microorganisms to synthesize and secrete toxic compounds (inhibiting competitors) plays an important role in successful survival of these species. This ability must come together with the capability of being unaffected by these same compounds. Several mechanisms are thought to avoid the toxic effects. One of them is toxin extrusion from the intracellular environment to the outside vicinity, using special transmembrane proteins, referred to as transporters. These proteins are also important for other reasons, since most of them are involved in nutrient uptake and cellular excretion. In cancer cells and in pathogens, and particularly in fungi, some of these proteins have been pointed out as responsible for an important phenotype known as multidrug resistance (MDR). In the present study, we tried to identify in the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis transcriptome, transporter-ortholog genes from the two major classes: ATP binding cassette and major facilitator superfamily transporter. We found 22 groups with good similarity with other fungal ATP binding cassette transporters, and four Paracoccidioides brasilienses assembled expressed sequence tags that probably code for major facilitator superfamily proteins. We also focused on fungicide resistance orthologs already characterized in other pathogenic fungi. We were able to find homologs to C. albicans CDR1, CDR2, and MDR1, Saccharomyces cerevisiae PDR5 and Aspergillus AtrF genes, all of them related to azole resistance. As current treatment for paracoccidioidomycosis mainly uses azole derivatives, the presence of these genes can be postulated to play a similar role in P. brasiliensis, warning us for the possibility of resistant isolate emergence.

  12. Abrasion resistance of muscovite in aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Calvin J.; Struble, Alexander; Whitmore, John H.

    2017-02-01

    Complementary aeolian and subaqueous transport experiments showed a trend in muscovite abrasion that may be useful for identifying ancient sandstones as aeolian or subaqueous in origin. We found that our experimental aeolian processes pulverized the micas quickly, while our subaqueous processes did not. In a pair of abrasion resistance experiments conducted with micaceous quartz sand, it was found that large muscovite grains were (1) reduced by aeolian processes to less than 500 μm in just 4 days, and (2) preserved by subaqueous processes to 610 ± 90 μm even after 356 days. At 20 days of aeolian transport no loose micas could be found even under the microscope, but after a year of subaqueous transport loose muscovite grains could still be seen with the naked eye. Thus, the occurrence and character of micas in a sandstone, particularly muscovite, may be helpful in determining the ancient depositional process.

  13. Predictors of the failure of treatment with chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, in children with acute, uncomplicated, Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Sowunmi, A; Fateye, B A; Adedeji, A A; Fehintola, F A; Gbotosho, G O; Happi, T C; Oduola, A M J

    2005-06-01

    Resistance to chloroquine in Plasmodium falciparum can be reversed, both in vitro and in vivo, by chlorpheniramine, a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist. This reversal raises the possibility of using chlorpheniramine to prolong the clinical usefulness of chloroquine in resource-poor communities. The factors that identify children at risk of treatment failure after being given chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine have now been evaluated in 281 children with uncomplicated, P. falciparum malaria. The children, who had taken part in six trials of antimalarial drugs between February 1996 and September 1999, in a hyper-endemic area of south-western Nigeria, were enrolled prospectively for the present study. Following treatment with chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, 13 (5%) of the children failed treatment by day 7 or 14. In a multivariate analysis, an age of < or =3 years (adjusted odds ratio = 11.1; 95% confidence interval = 2.2-55.3; P = 0.003) and a parasitaemia that took >3 days to clear (adjusted odds ratio=7.9; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-49.4; P = 0.027) were found to be independent predictors of treatment failure. In addition, compared with the children who had a lower axillary temperature then, the children who had an axillary temperature of > or =38 degrees C 2 days after commencing treatment were significantly more likely to be treatment failures. In resource-poor communities using chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, the easily identifiable predictors of treatment failure might be used to identify children requiring alternative antimalarial drugs.

  14. Unaltered expression of multidrug resistance transporters in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-resistant rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Payen, L; Courtois, A; Langouët, S; Guillouzo, A; Fardel, O

    2001-01-02

    Rat liver epithelial cells resistant to the chemical carcinogen 3MC, termed F258/3MC cells and generated by long-term exposure of parental F258 cells to the PAH, were characterized, especially with respect to expression of multidrug resistance transporters such as P-glycoprotein, MRP1 and MRP2. F258/3MC cells were found to be cross-resistant to other PAHs such as BP and dimethylbenz(a)anthracene but remained sensitive to known substrates of multidrug resistance efflux pumps such as doxorubicin and vincristine. They did not display either decreased cellular PAH accumulation or increased PAH efflux. In addition, P-glycoprotein and MRP2 mRNA levels were not, or only barely detected, in F258/3MC cells and in their parental counterparts whereas these PAH-resistant and sensitive cells showed closed levels of MRP1 mRNAs and activity. Moreover, P-gp- and MRP1-overexpressing cells were shown to display similar accumulation and efflux of BP than those found in P-gp- and MRP1-negative control cells. These data therefore suggest that multidrug resistance transporters do not contribute to PAH resistance in PAH-selected liver cells.

  15. Inhibition of ABC Transporters Abolishes Antimony Resistance in Leishmania Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee Basu, Jayati; Mookerjee, Ananda; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Saha, Manik; Singh, Subhankar; Naskar, Ksudiram; Tripathy, Gayetri; Sinha, Prabhat K.; Pandey, Krishna; Sundar, Shyam; Bimal, Sanjeev; Das, Pradip K.; Choudhuri, Soumitra K.; Roy, Syamal

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of antimony (Sb) resistance has jeopardized the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in various countries. Previous studies have considered the part played by leishmanial parasites in antimony resistance, but the involvement of host factors in the clinical scenario remained to be investigated. Here we show that unlike infection with Sb-sensitive (Sbs) Leishmania donovani, infection with Sb-resistant (Sbr) L. donovani induces the upregulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) in host cells, resulting in a nonaccumulation of intracellular Sb following treatment with sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) favoring parasite replication. The inhibition of MRP1 and P-gp with resistance-modifying agents such as lovastatin allows Sb accumulation and parasite killing within macrophages and offers protection in an animal model in which infection with Sbr L. donovani is otherwise lethal. The occurrence of a similar scenario in clinical cases is supported by the findings that unlike monocytes from SAG-sensitive kala-azar (KA) patients, monocytes from SAG-unresponsive KA patients overexpress P-gp and MRP1 and fail to accumulate Sb following in vitro SAG treatment unless pretreated with inhibitors of ABC transporters. Thus, the expression status of MRP1 and P-gp in blood monocytes may be used as a diagnostic marker for Sb resistance and the treatment strategy can be designed accordingly. Our results also indicate that lovastatin, which can inhibit both P-gp and MRP1, might be beneficial for reverting Sb resistance in leishmaniasis as well as drug resistance in other clinical situations, including cancer. PMID:18056276

  16. Transport of multidrug resistance substrates by the Streptococcus agalactiae hemolysin transporter.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Birgit; Bröker, Gerd; Kuhn, Melanie; Aymanns, Simone; Gleich-Theurer, Ute; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2006-08-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]) causes neonatal sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis, as well as infections of the bovine udder. The S. agalactiae hemolysin is regarded as an important virulence factor, and hemolysin expression is dependent on the cyl gene cluster. cylA and cylB encode the ATP binding and transmembrane domains of a typical ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. The deduced proteins contain the signature sequence of a multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter, and mutation of the genes results in a nonhemolytic and nonpigmented phenotype. To further elucidate the function of the putative transporter, nonpolar deletion mutants of cylA were constructed. These mutants are nonhemolytic and can be complemented by the transporter genes. Wild-type strain and nonhemolytic cylA and cylK deletion mutants were exposed to known substrates of MDR transporters. Mutation of cylA significantly impaired growth in the presence of daunorubicin, doxorubicin, and rhodamine 6G and resulted in a decreased export of doxorubicin from the cells. The mutation of cylK, a gene of unknown function located downstream from cylA, caused a loss of hemolysis but had no effect on the transport of MDR substrates. Furthermore, the hemolytic activity of the wild-type strain was inhibited by reserpine in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that CylAB closely resembles an ABC-type MDR transporter and propose that the GBS hemolysin molecule represents a natural substrate of the transporter.

  17. Antimuscarinic effects of chloroquine in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Habara, Y.; Williams, J.A.; Hootman, S.R.

    1986-06-13

    Chloroquine inhibited carbachol-induced amylase release in a dose-dependent fashion in rat pancreatic acini; cholecystokinin- and bombesin-induced secretory responses were almost unchanged by the antimalarial drug. The inhibition of carbachol-induced amylase release by chloroquine was competitive in nature with a K/sub i/ of 11.7 ..mu..M. Chloroquine also inhibited (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding to acinar muscarinic receptors. The IC/sub 50/ for chloroquine inhibition of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding was lower than that for carbachol or the other antimalarial drugs, quinine and quinidine. These results demonstrate that chloroquine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist in the exocrine pancreas.

  18. Excretion of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine in human milk.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbona, F A; Onyeji, C O; Bolaji, O O; Torimiro, S E

    1987-01-01

    The excretion of chloroquine and the major metabolite, desethylchloroquine, in breast milk was investigated in eleven lactating mothers following a single oral dose of chloroquine (600 mg base). The average milk to plasma concentration ratio at the 24th hour was 6.6 +/- 2.4 for chloroquine and 1.5 +/- 0.6 for desethylchloroquine in five of the volunteers. In five other volunteers the elimination half-life of chloroquine in milk was 8.8 +/- 4.7 days which was longer than that in saliva (3.9 +/- 1.0 days) from the same volunteers. The maximum daily dose of the drug that the infant can receive from breastfeeding was about 0.7% of the maternal start dose of the drug in malaria chemotherapy. It is, therefore, suggested that it is safe for mothers to breastfeed their infants when undergoing treatment for malaria with chloroquine. PMID:3580253

  19. Excretion of chloroquine and desethylchloroquine in human milk.

    PubMed

    Ogunbona, F A; Onyeji, C O; Bolaji, O O; Torimiro, S E

    1987-04-01

    The excretion of chloroquine and the major metabolite, desethylchloroquine, in breast milk was investigated in eleven lactating mothers following a single oral dose of chloroquine (600 mg base). The average milk to plasma concentration ratio at the 24th hour was 6.6 +/- 2.4 for chloroquine and 1.5 +/- 0.6 for desethylchloroquine in five of the volunteers. In five other volunteers the elimination half-life of chloroquine in milk was 8.8 +/- 4.7 days which was longer than that in saliva (3.9 +/- 1.0 days) from the same volunteers. The maximum daily dose of the drug that the infant can receive from breastfeeding was about 0.7% of the maternal start dose of the drug in malaria chemotherapy. It is, therefore, suggested that it is safe for mothers to breastfeed their infants when undergoing treatment for malaria with chloroquine.

  20. Azithromycin-chloroquine and the intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chico, R Matthew; Pittrof, Rudiger; Greenwood, Brian; Chandramohan, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In the high malaria-transmission settings of sub-Saharan Africa, malaria in pregnancy is an important cause of maternal, perinatal and neonatal morbidity. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) reduces the incidence of low birth-weight, pre-term delivery, intrauterine growth-retardation and maternal anaemia. However, the public health benefits of IPTp are declining due to SP resistance. The combination of azithromycin and chloroquine is a potential alternative to SP for IPTp. This review summarizes key in vitro and in vivo evidence of azithromycin and chloroquine activity against Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, as well as the anticipated secondary benefits that may result from their combined use in IPTp, including the cure and prevention of many sexually transmitted diseases. Drug costs and the necessity for external financing are discussed along with a range of issues related to drug resistance and surveillance. Several scientific and programmatic questions of interest to policymakers and programme managers are also presented that would need to be addressed before azithromycin-chloroquine could be adopted for use in IPTp. PMID:19087267

  1. Effect of chloroquine phosphate and toxic concentrations of lead acetate on Ca2+-ATPase activity in isolates and clones of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, O M; Happi, T C; Oduola, A M J; Babafunmi, E A

    2011-12-20

    The basal activity of Ca2+-ATPase in two isolates (NL56, UNC) and two clones (D6, W2) of P.falciparum was assessed. The effects of various concentrations of chloroquine phosphate and toxic concentrations of lead acetate were also evaluated in the clones and strains of P.falciparum. The Ca2+-ATPase activity was measured by monitoring the rate of release of inorganic phosphate from the gamma-position of ATP on spectrophotometer at 820nm wavelength. The various concentrations of chloroquine (3, 6, 9, 12, 18µg/ml) and lead acetate (5, 10, 20, 30, 40µg/ml) on Ca2+-ATPase activity were measured respectively. Chloroquine phosphate inhibited Ca2+-ATPase activity in both the isolates and the cloned strains of P.falciparum in concentration dependent manner. Median Inhibitory concentration of chloroquine (MIC50) estimated from the plot of activity against chloroquine concentration was found to be 2.6mg/ml at pH 7.4 for both the isolates and cloned strains examined. Lead acetate at concentrations 5-20µg/ml inhibited Ca2+-ATPase activity in concentration dependent manner in clone W2 (Chloroquine resistant strain) while the same range of concentrations of lead acetate stimulated the activity of the enzyme in clone D6 (Chloroquine sensitive strain).The inhibitory effect of lead acetate on the enzyme in clone D6 was observed at concentrations above 20µg/ml. The result also suggests that lead ions could modulate and moderate calcium ion homeostasis in P. falciparum via its effect on Ca2+-ATPase activity. Also sufficient influx of lead ions into P. falciparum may transform the biochemical or bioenergetics nature of chloroquine sensitive strain of P. falciparum (D6) to that similar to chloroquine resistant strain (W2). In conclusion, inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase activity of P.falciparum may be part of the mechanism of action of chloroquine in its use as chemotherapy for malaria. The study implies that populations simultaneously exposed to lead pollution and malaria infection may

  2. Cadmium transport, resistance, and toxicity in bacteria, algae, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T; Stratton, G W; Gadd, G M

    1986-06-01

    probably proteins and (or) polysaccharides. This is followed by a lag period and then a slow, steady intracellular uptake. This latter phase is energy dependent and may involve transport systems used to accumulate other divalent cations, such as Mn2+ and Ca2+. Some data indicate that Cd resistance, and possibly uptake, in algae and cyanobacteria is controlled by a plasmid-encoded gene(s). Although considerable information is available on Cd toxicity to, and uptake in fungi, further work is clearly needed in several areas. There is little information about Cd uptake by filamentous fungi, and even in yeasts, information on the specificity, kinetics, and mechanisms of Cd uptake is limited.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  3. A Study of Transport Airplane Crash-Resistant Fuel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor); Robertson, S. H.; Johnson, N. B.; Hall, D. S.; Rimson, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study, funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), of transport airplane crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS). The report covers the historical studies related to aircraft crash fires and fuel containment concepts undertaken by the FAA, NASA, and the U.S. Army, which ultimately led to the current state of the art in CRFS technology. It describes the basic research, testing, field investigations and production efforts which have led to the highly successful military CRFS, which has saved many lives and reduced costs of accidents. Current CRFS technology used in transport category airplanes is defined and compared to the available state-of-the-art technology. The report provides information to the FAA and other government organizations which can help them plan their efforts to improve the state of crash fire protection in the transport airplane fleet. The report provides guidance to designers looking for information about CRFS design problems, analysis tools to use for product improvement, and a summary of current and proposed regulations for transport category airplane fuel systems.

  4. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  5. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  6. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Cristian; Minelli, Alessandra; Scassellati, Catia; Bortolomasi, Marco; Segala, Matilde; Sartori, Riccardo; Giacopuzzi, Mario; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2010-08-16

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) is a serious mental illness that is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide. In addition, approximately 15% of depression patients are defined treatment-resistant (TRD). Preclinical and genetic studies show that serotonin modulation dysfunction exists in patients with TRD. Some polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis/treatment of MDD; however, no data are available concerning TRD. Therefore, in order to investigate the possible influence of SLC6A4 polymorphisms on the risk of TRD, we genotyped 310 DSM-IV MDD treatment-resistant patients and 284 healthy volunteers. We analysed the most studied polymorphism 5-HTTLPR (L/S) and a single nucleotide substitution, rs25531 (A/G), in relation to different functional haplotype combinations. However the correct mapping of rs25531 is still debated whether it is within or outside the insertion. Our sequencing analysis showed that rs25531 is immediately outside of the 5-HTTLPR segment. Differences in 5-HTTLPR allele (p=0.04) and in L allele carriers (p<0.05) were observed between the two groups. Concerning the estimated haplotype analyses, L(A)L(A) homozygote haplotype was more represented among the control subjects (p=0.01, OR=0.64 95%CI: 0.45-0.91). In conclusion, this study reports a protective effect of the L(A)L(A) haplotype on TRD, supporting the hypothesis that lower serotonin transporter transcription alleles are correlated to a common resistant depression mechanism.

  7. Chloroquine-induced hyperpigmentation of the hard palate.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Catarina da Mota Vasconcelos; Ribeiro, Camila Maria Beder; Fonseca, Deborah Daniella Diniz; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro; Leao, Jair Carneiro

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a rare case of extensive palatal pigmentation secondary to long-term chloroquine treatment. Chloroquine was originally used as an antimalarial agent, but it is now widely used as an adjunct in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Adverse effects of chloroquine usually include skin changes such as bullous pemphigoid, exacerbation of psoriasis, and pigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes as well as retinopathy, gastrointestinal alterations, and neuromuscular disorders. Extensive oral pigmentation is an uncommon feature of an adverse drug effect, and diagnosis should be based on clinicopathological findings.

  8. Transported substrate determines exchange rate in the multidrug resistance transporter EmrE.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Emma A; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A

    2014-03-07

    EmrE, a small multidrug resistance transporter, serves as an ideal model to study coupling between multidrug recognition and protein function. EmrE has a single small binding pocket that must accommodate the full range of diverse substrates recognized by this transporter. We have studied a series of tetrahedral compounds, as well as several planar substrates, to examine multidrug recognition and transport by EmrE. Here we show that even within this limited series, the rate of interconversion between the inward- and outward-facing states of EmrE varies over 3 orders of magnitude. Thus, the identity of the bound substrate controls the rate of this critical step in the transport process. The binding affinity also varies over a similar range and is correlated with substrate hydrophobicity within the tetrahedral substrate series. Substrate identity influences both the ground-state and transition-state energies for the conformational exchange process, highlighting the coupling between substrate binding and transport required for alternating access antiport.

  9. Transported Substrate Determines Exchange Rate in the Multidrug Resistance Transporter EmrE*

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    EmrE, a small multidrug resistance transporter, serves as an ideal model to study coupling between multidrug recognition and protein function. EmrE has a single small binding pocket that must accommodate the full range of diverse substrates recognized by this transporter. We have studied a series of tetrahedral compounds, as well as several planar substrates, to examine multidrug recognition and transport by EmrE. Here we show that even within this limited series, the rate of interconversion between the inward- and outward-facing states of EmrE varies over 3 orders of magnitude. Thus, the identity of the bound substrate controls the rate of this critical step in the transport process. The binding affinity also varies over a similar range and is correlated with substrate hydrophobicity within the tetrahedral substrate series. Substrate identity influences both the ground-state and transition-state energies for the conformational exchange process, highlighting the coupling between substrate binding and transport required for alternating access antiport. PMID:24448799

  10. Molecular Characterization of Resistance-Nodulation-Division Transporters from Solvent- and Drug-Resistant Bacteria in Petroleum-Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Meguro, Norika; Kodama, Yumiko; Gallegos, Maria-Trinidad; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2005-01-01

    PCR assays for analyzing resistance-nodulation-division transporters from solvent- and drug-resistant bacteria in soil were developed. Sequence analysis of amplicons showed that the PCR successfully retrieved transporter gene fragments from soil. Most of the genes retrieved from petroleum-contaminated soils formed a cluster (cluster PCS) that was distantly related to known transporter genes. Competitive PCR showed that the abundance of PCS genes is increased in petroleum-contaminated soil. PMID:15640241

  11. Mefloquine and Psychotomimetics Share Neurotransmitter Receptor and Transporter Interactions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Janowsky, Aaron; Eshleman, Amy J.; Johnson, Robert A.; Wolfrum, Katherine M.; Hinrichs, David J.; Yang, Jongtae; Zabriskie, T. Mark; Smilkstein, Martin J.; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Mefloquine is used for the prevention and treatment of chloroquine-resistant malaria, but its use is associated with nightmares, hallucinations, and exacerbation of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. We hypothesized that potential mechanisms of action for the adverse psychotropic effects of mefloquine resemble those of other known psychotomimetics. Objectives Using in vitro radioligand binding and functional assays, we examined the interaction of (+)- and (−)-mefloquine enantiomers, the non-psychotomimetic anti-malarial agent, chloroquine, and several hallucinogens and psychostimulants with recombinant human neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Results Hallucinogens and mefloquine bound stereoselectively and with relatively high affinity (Ki = 0.71–341 nM) to serotonin (5-HT) 2A but not 5-HT1A or 5-HT2C receptors. Mefloquine but not chloroquine was a partial 5-HT2A agonist and a full 5-HT2C agonist, stimulating inositol phosphate accumulation, with similar potency and efficacy as the hallucinogen dimethyltryptamine (DMT). 5-HT receptor antagonists blocked mefloquine’s effects. Mefloquine had low or no affinity for dopamine D1, D2, D3, and D4.4 receptors, or dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. However, mefloquine was a very low potency antagonist at the D3 receptor and mefloquine but not chloroquine or hallucinogens blocked [3H]5-HT uptake by the 5-HT transporter. Conclusions Mefloquine but not chloroquine shares an in vitro receptor interaction profile with some hallucinogens and this neurochemistry may be relevant to the adverse neuropsychiatric effects associated with mefloquine use by a small percentage of patients. Additionally, evaluating interactions with this panel of receptors and transporters may be useful for characterizing effects of other psychotropic drugs and for avoiding psychotomimetic effects for new pharmacotherapies, including antimalarial quinolines. PMID:24488404

  12. In utero exposure to chloroquine alters sexual development in the male fetal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Clewell, Rebecca A. Pluta, Linda; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-06-15

    Chloroquine (CQ), a drug that has been used extensively for the prevention and treatment of malaria, is currently considered safe for use during pregnancy. However, CQ has been shown to disrupt steroid homeostasis in adult rats and similar compounds, such as quinacrine, inhibit steroid production in the Leydig cell in vitro. To explore the effect of in utero CQ exposure on fetal male sexual development, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a daily dose of either water or chloroquine diphosphate from GD 16-18 by oral gavage. Chloroquine was administered as 200 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16, followed by two maintenance doses of 100 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16 and 18. Three days of CQ treatment resulted in reduced maternal and fetal weight on GD 19 and increased necrosis and steatosis in the maternal liver. Fetal livers also displayed mild lipid accumulation. Maternal serum progesterone was increased after CQ administration. Fetal testes testosterone, however, was significantly decreased. Examination of the fetal testes revealed significant alterations in vascularization and seminiferous tubule development after short-term CQ treatment. Anogenital distance was not altered. Microarray and RT-PCR showed down-regulation of several genes associated with cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis in the fetal testes. This study indicates that CQ inhibits testosterone synthesis and normal testis development in the rat fetus at human relevant doses.

  13. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine versus chloroquine to treat vivax malaria in Afghanistan: an open randomized, non-inferiority, trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Afghanistan's national guidelines recommend chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax infection, the parasite responsible for the majority of its malaria burden. Chloroquine resistance in P. vivax is emerging in Asia. Therapeutic responses across Afghanistan have not been evaluated in detail. Methods Between July 2007 and February 2009, an open-label, randomized controlled trial of chloroquine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in patients aged three months and over with slide-confirmed P. vivax mono-infections was conducted. Consistent with current national guidelines, primaquine was not administered. Subjects were followed up daily during the acute phase of illness (days 0-3) and weekly until day 56. The primary endpoint was the overall cumulative parasitological failure rate at day 56 after the start of treatment, with the hypothesis being that dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine was non-inferior compared to chloroquine (Δ = 5% difference in proportion of failures). Results Of 2,182 individuals with positive blood films for P. vivax, 536 were enrolled in the trial. The day 28 cure rate was 100% in both treatment groups. Parasite clearance was more rapid with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine than chloroquine. At day 56, there were more recurrent infections in the chloroquine arm (8.9%, 95% CI 6.0-13.1%) than the dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine arm (2.8%, 95% CI 1.4-5.8%), a difference in cumulative recurrence rate of 6.1% (2-sided 90%CI +2.6 to +9.7%). The log-rank test comparing the survival curves confirmed the superiority of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine over chloroquine (p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that a lower initial haemoglobin concentration was also independently associated with recurrence. Both regimens were well tolerated and no serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions Chloroquine remains an efficacious treatment for the treatment of vivax malaria in Afghanistan. In a setting where radical therapy cannot be

  14. P-glycoproteins and other multidrug resistance transporters in the pharmacology of anthelmintics: Prospects for reversing transport-dependent anthelmintic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lespine, Anne; Ménez, Cécile; Bourguinat, Catherine; Prichard, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic helminths cause significant disease in animals and humans. In the absence of alternative treatments, anthelmintics remain the principal agents for their control. Resistance extends to the most important class of anthelmintics, the macrocyclic lactone endectocides (MLs), such as ivermectin, and presents serious problems for the livestock industries and threatens to severely limit current parasite control strategies in humans. Understanding drug resistance is important for optimizing and monitoring control, and reducing further selection for resistance. Multidrug resistance (MDR) ABC transporters have been implicated in ML resistance and contribute to resistance to a number of other anthelmintics. MDR transporters, such as P-glycoproteins, are essential for many cellular processes that require the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Being overexpressed in response to chemotherapy in tumour cells and to ML-based treatment in nematodes, they lead to therapy failure by decreasing drug concentration at the target. Several anthelmintics are inhibitors of these efflux pumps and appropriate combinations can result in higher treatment efficacy against parasites and reversal of resistance. However, this needs to be balanced against possible increased toxicity to the host, or the components of the combination selecting on the same genes involved in the resistance. Increased efficacy could result from modifying anthelmintic pharmacokinetics in the host or by blocking parasite transporters involved in resistance. Combination of anthelmintics can be beneficial for delaying selection for resistance. However, it should be based on knowledge of resistance mechanisms and not simply on mode of action classes, and is best started before resistance has been selected to any member of the combination. Increasing knowledge of the MDR transporters involved in anthelmintic resistance in helminths will play an important role in allowing for the identification of markers

  15. Combination cyclosporine and (hydroxy)chloroquine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dijkmans, B A; Landewé, R B; van den Borne, B E; Breedveld, F C

    1999-01-01

    Antimalarials are attractive candidates for combination therapy. In vitro experiments have revealed a synergistic mode of action of cyclosporine and chloroquine which could not, however, be confirmed in a clinical trial.

  16. Influences of interfacial resistances on gas transport through carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Newsome, David A; Sholl, David S

    2006-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have significant promise as gas separation membranes. Gas permeation through nanopores involves mass transfer resistances from molecules entering and leaving pores (so-called surface resistances) and diffusion within the pores. We use molecular simulations to give the first estimates of surface resistances for gas transport through nanotubes. For CH4 transport through (20,0) carbon nanotubes at 300 K, surface resistances are small for nanotubes 5-10 mum in length but can be significant for shorter nanotubes.

  17. A randomized, parallel-group study in Mumbai (Bombay), comparing chloroquine with chloroquine plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in the treatment of adults with acute, uncomplicated, Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, N J; Desai, S; Kadam, V S; Kamtekar, K D; Dalvi, S S; Kshirsagar, N A

    2000-06-01

    A major problem in the control of malaria is the development of resistance, of the parasites to the existing drugs and of the vectors to insecticides. With few new drugs in the pipeline, in an era of declining resources, it is imperative to make judicious use of the existing antimalarials. In the city of Mumbai, resistance exists to chloroquine (CQ) and to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Use of a combination of CQ with SP would theoretically slow down the development of resistance to each of the drugs and increase their useful lives. The effectiveness of this combination in the treatment of adults from Mumbai, who had acute, uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, was compared with that of CQ alone. The combination was found to be significantly more effective, in terms of 28- or 42-day cure rates, and to be more cost-effective.

  18. The Lysosomal Protein Saposin B Binds Chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Huta, Brian P; Mehlenbacher, Matthew R; Nie, Yan; Lai, Xuelei; Zubieta, Chloe; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Doyle, Robert P

    2016-02-04

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been widely used in the treatment of malaria since the 1950s, though toxicity and resistance is increasingly limiting its use in the clinic. More recently, CQ is also becoming recognized as an important therapeutic compound for the treatment of autoimmune disorders and has shown activity as an anticancer agent. However, the full extent of CQ pharmacology in humans is still unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the lysosomal protein saposin B (sapB), critical for select lipid degradation, binds CQ with implications for both CQ function and toxicity. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and fluorescence quenching experiments, CQ was shown to bind to the dimeric form of sapB at both pH 5.5 and pH 7.4 with an average binding affinity of 2.3×10(4)  m(-1). X-ray crystallography confirmed this, and the first complete crystal structure of sapB with a bound small molecule (CQ) is reported. The results suggest that sapB might play a role in mitigating CQ-based toxicity and that sapB might itself be overwhelmed by CQ causing impaired lipid degradation.

  19. Cell wall perturbation sensitizes fungi to the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Islahudin, Farida; Khozoie, Combiz; Bates, Steven; Ting, Kang-Nee; Pleass, Richard J; Avery, Simon V

    2013-08-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been a mainstay of antimalarial drug treatment for several decades. Additional therapeutic actions of CQ have been described, including some reports of fungal inhibition. Here we investigated the action of CQ in fungi, including the yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A genomewide yeast deletion strain collection was screened against CQ, revealing that bck1Δ and slt2Δ mutants of the cell wall integrity pathway are CQ hypersensitive. This phenotype was rescued with sorbitol, consistent with cell wall involvement. The cell wall-targeting agent caffeine caused hypersensitivity to CQ, as did cell wall perturbation by sonication. The phenotypes were not caused by CQ-induced changes to cell wall components. Instead, CQ accumulated to higher levels in cells with perturbed cell walls: CQ uptake was 2- to 3-fold greater in bck1Δ and slt2Δ mutants than in wild-type yeast. CQ toxicity was synergistic with that of the major cell wall-targeting antifungal drug, caspofungin. The MIC of caspofungin against the yeast pathogen Candida albicans was decreased 2-fold by 250 μM CQ and up to 8-fold at higher CQ concentrations. Similar effects were seen in Candida glabrata and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results show that the cell wall is critical for CQ resistance in fungi and suggest that combination treatments with cell wall-targeting drugs could have potential for antifungal treatment.

  20. P type porous silicon resistivity and carrier transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ménard, S.; Fèvre, A.; Billoué, J.; Gautier, G.

    2015-09-14

    The resistivity of p type porous silicon (PS) is reported on a wide range of PS physical properties. Al/PS/Si/Al structures were used and a rigorous experimental protocol was followed. The PS porosity (P{sub %}) was found to be the major contributor to the PS resistivity (ρ{sub PS}). ρ{sub PS} increases exponentially with P{sub %}. Values of ρ{sub PS} as high as 1 × 10{sup 9} Ω cm at room temperature were obtained once P{sub %} exceeds 60%. ρ{sub PS} was found to be thermally activated, in particular, when the temperature increases from 30 to 200 °C, a decrease of three decades is observed on ρ{sub PS}. Based on these results, it was also possible to deduce the carrier transport mechanisms in PS. For P{sub %} lower than 45%, the conduction occurs through band tails and deep levels in the tissue surrounding the crystallites. When P{sub %} overpasses 45%, electrons at energy levels close to the Fermi level allow a hopping conduction from crystallite to crystallite to appear. This study confirms the potential of PS as an insulating material for applications such as power electronic devices.

  1. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Law, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  2. Hair analysis of an unusual case of Chloroquine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Ashiq, Muhammad Zar; Shafi, Humera; Usman, Hafiz Faisal; Wattoo, Sardar Ali; Sarwar, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Ashraf

    2016-03-01

    A dead body of middle aged man was exhumed from 6.5 month earth-grave. Autopsy findings were non-specific as the body was completely putrefied. Deceased's scalp hair and kidney was sent for toxicological analysis. Hair sample (50mg) was incubated with 1M NaOH (2 ml). Chloroquine was detected in hair and kidney during basic drug screen performed on GC/MS. For confirmation and quantitation, chloroquine was extracted using Hypersep verify CX SPE cartridges while mass detector was operated in SIM mode using the ions of m/z 245.0, 290.1, 319.0 for chloroquine while ions of m/z 260 and 455 were monitored for nalorphine (internal standard). Chloroquine was present in high concentration in hair (211 ng/mg) as well as in kidney (37.3mg/kg). Moreover, chloroquine was not detected in the wash solvents, suggesting ingestion of the drug rather than an external contamination of hair. These findings strongly suggested the acute exposure of higher doses of chloroquine to the deceased before death.

  3. Spin-dependent heat transport and thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taehee

    In this thesis, thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations has been studied. In order to make different magnetic configurations, we developed a spin valve structure, which has high MR ratio and low saturation field. The high MR ratio was achieved using Co/Cu multilayer and 21A or 34A thick Cu layer. The low saturation field was obtained by implementing different coercivities of the successive ferromagnetic layers. For this purpose, Co/Cu/Cu tri-layered structure was used with the thicknesses of the Co layers; 15 A and 30 A. For the thermal conductivity measurement, a three-omega method was employed with a thermally isolated microscale rod. We fabricated the microscale rod using optical lithography and MEMS process. Then the rod was wire-bonded to a chip-carver for further electrical measurement. For the thermal conductivity measurement, we built the three-omega measurement system using two lock-in amplifiers and two differential amplifiers. A custom-made electromagnet was added to the system to investigate the impact of magnetic field. We observed titanic thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations of the Co/Cu/Co multilayer. The thermal conductivity change was closely correlated with that of the electric conductivity in terms of the spin orientation, but the thermal conductivity was much more sensitive than that of the electric conductivity. The relative thermal conductivity change was 50% meanwhile that of electric resistivity change was 8.0%. The difference between the two ratios suggests that the scattering mechanism for charge and heat transport in the Co/Cu/Co multilayer is different. The Lorentz number in Weidemann-Franz law is also spin-dependent. Thermal boundary resistance between metal and dielectrics was also studied in this thesis. The thermal boundary resistance becomes critical for heat transport in a nanoscale because the thermal boundary resistance can potentially determine overall heat transport

  4. Autophagy is dispensable for Kmt2a/Mll-Mllt3/Af9 AML maintenance and anti-leukemic effect of chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Clark, Jason; Wunderlich, Mark; Fan, Cuiqing; Davis, Ashley; Chen, Song; Guan, Jun-Lin; Mulloy, James C; Kumar, Ashish; Zheng, Yi

    2017-02-15

    Recently, macroautophagy/autophagy has emerged as a promising target in various types of solid tumor treatment. However, the impact of autophagy on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) maintenance and the validity of autophagy as a viable target in AML therapy remain unclear. Here we show that Kmt2a/Mll-Mllt3/Af9 AML (MA9-AML) cells have high autophagy flux compared with normal bone marrow cells, but autophagy-specific targeting, either through Rb1cc1-disruption to abolish autophagy initiation, or via Atg5-disruption to prevent phagophore (the autophagosome precursor) membrane elongation, does not affect the growth or survival of MA9-AML cells, either in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistically, neither Atg5 nor Rb1cc1 disruption impairs endolysosome formation or survival signaling pathways. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine shows autophagy-independent anti-leukemic effects in vitro but has no efficacy in vivo likely due to limited achievable drug efficacy in blood. Further, vesicular exocytosis appears to mediate chloroquine resistance in AML cells, and exocytotic inhibition significantly enhances the anti-leukemic effect of chloroquine. Thus, chloroquine can induce leukemia cell death in vitro in an autophagy-independent manner but with inadequate efficacy in vivo, and vesicular exocytosis is a possible mechanism of chloroquine resistance in MA9-AML. This study also reveals that autophagy-specific targeting is unlikely to benefit MA9-AML therapy.

  5. Extensive genetic diversity in the Plasmodium falciparum Na+/H+ exchanger 1 transporter protein implicated in quinine resistance.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Upadhyay, Mala; Das, Manoj K; Dev, Vas; Singh, Neeru; Dash, Aditya P; Sharma, Yagya D

    2007-12-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (Pfnhe-1) locus at chromosome 13 and another locus at chromosome 9 have recently been proposed to influence quinine resistance. Here, we sequenced the ms4760 locus of the Pfnhe-1 gene from 244 P. falciparum isolates collected from five different regions of India. A total of 16 different ms4760 alleles (with one to five DNNND repeats) were observed among these isolates. Interestingly, areas with a high prevalence of chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance showed more Pfnhe-1 DNNND repeats compared to low drug resistance areas. The extent of genetic diversity at the ms4760 locus also varied from one region to another, with expected heterozygosity values ranging from 0.47 to 0.88.

  6. PfCRT and its role in antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Andrea; Lehane, Adele M.; Clain, Jérôme; Fidock, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine, the former gold standard antimalarial drug, is mediated primarily by mutant forms of the ‘Chloroquine Resistance Transporter’ (PfCRT). These mutations impart upon PfCRT the ability to efflux chloroquine from the intracellular digestive vacuole, the site of drug action. Recent studies reveal that PfCRT variants can also affect parasite fitness, protect immature gametocytes against chloroquine action, and alter P. falciparum susceptibility to current first-line therapies. These results highlight the need to be vigilant in screening for the appearance of novel pfcrt alleles that could contribute to new multi-drug resistance phenotypes. PMID:23020971

  7. Drug resistance and genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum parasites from suriname.

    PubMed

    Peek, Ron; VAN Gool, Tom; Panchoe, Daynand; Greve, Sophie; Bus, Ellen; Resida, Lesley

    2005-11-01

    Plasmodium falciparum in Suriname was studied for the presence of drug resistance and genetic variation in blood samples of 86 patients with symptomatic malaria. Drug resistance was predicted by determining point mutations in the chloroquine resistance marker of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene (codon 76) and the pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine resistance markers in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) gene (codons 16, 51, 59, 108, and 164) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) gene (codons 436, 437, 540, 581, and 613). Genetic variability was determined by sequence analysis of the polymorphic segments of the merozoite surface protein 2 (msp-2) and glutamate-rich protein (glurp) genes. Mutations in the pfcrt, dhps, and dhfr genes were found in all samples tested, suggesting that resistance to chloroquine and antifolate drugs is present at a high frequency. A low number of alleles was found for the msp-2 and glurp genes. This indicates limited genetic diversity and, based on geographic data, a genetically homogeneous P. falciparum population in Suriname.

  8. The effect of chloroquine on the distribution of newly synthesized and old β-hexosaminidase in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vladutiu, Georgirene D.

    1982-01-01

    Most of the newly synthesized β-N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30; β-hexosaminidase) in normal fibroblast cultures is excreted during 24h incubation with serum-free medium. In this study, this new enzyme only comprises about one-half of the excreted pool as determined by a near total inhibition of [14C]leucine incorporation into the excreted enzyme in the presence of cycloheximide, with only a 46% reduction in enzyme activity. These data indicate that nearly equal fractions of new and old enzyme are normally excreted by fibroblasts. Incubation of normal fibroblast cultures with chloroquine (25 μm) for 24h doubled the amount of extracellular β-hexosaminidase activity from 15% to 37% of total culture activity while reducing the incorporation of [14C]leucine into intra- and extracellular enzyme by 66 and 29% of control, respectively. Therefore, it appears that chloroquine inhibited enzyme synthesis while enhancing the excretion of old as well as newly synthesized enzyme. Chloroquine and cycloheximide together reduced the [14C]leucine incorporation into intracellular enzyme by more than either agent alone, indicating a combined effect on enzyme synthesis and/or degradation. β-Hexosaminidase-deficient fibroblasts that contained endocytosed enzyme spontaneously excreted 10% of their enzyme during 24h incubation with serum-free medium and 18% in the presence of mannose 6-phosphate (2 mm). These results indicated that about one-half of the excreted enzyme still possessed its phosphomannosyl recognition residues and actually re-entered the cells. Chloroquine stimulated the excretion of an addition 15% of the total endocytosed enzyme at 48 and 72h after endocytosis. These data suggest that new, old and endocytosed β-hexosaminidase are all excreted by fibroblasts, that this excretion is enhanced by chloroquine, and that a fraction of the excreted enzyme retains its phosphomannosylated residues needed for re-uptake and transport inside the cells. ImagesFig. 1. PMID

  9. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  10. New quinoline di-Mannich base compounds with greater antimalarial activity than chloroquine, amodiaquine, or pyronaridine.

    PubMed Central

    Kotecka, B M; Barlin, G B; Edstein, M D; Rieckmann, K H

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the ex vivo antimalarial activity of 12 new quinoline di-Mannich base compounds containing the 7-dichloroquinoline or 7-trifluoromethylquinoline nucleus with amodiaquine, chloroquine, and pyronaridine using the Saimiri-bioassay model. Each compound was administered orally (30 mg/kg of body weight) to three or more noninfected Saimiri sciureus monkeys, and serum samples were collected at various times after drug administration and serially diluted with drug-free (control) serum. In vitro activity against the multidrug-resistant K1 isolate of Plasmodium falciparum was determined in serum samples by measuring the maximum inhibitory dilution at which the treated monkey serum inhibited schizont maturation in vitro. Of the 12 Mannich bases tested, 8 were associated with levels of ex vivo antimalarial activity in serum greater than those of amodiaquine, chloroquine, or pyronaridine 1 to 7 days after drug administration. Further studies were carried out with four of these compounds, and the results showed that the areas under the serum drug concentration-time curves for the four compounds were between 7- and 26-fold greater than that obtained for pyronaridine. Activity against four multidrug-resistant strains of P. falciparum was also much greater in serum samples collected from monkeys after administration of these four compounds than in serum samples collected after administration of pyronaridine or chloroquine. These findings suggest that these four quinoline Mannich base compounds possess a very marked and prolonged antimalarial activity and that further studies should be performed to determine their value as antimalarial drugs. PMID:9174201

  11. Effect of chloroquine on the urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ilo, Cajetan E; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Agbakoba, Nneka; Brown, Sinye A; Maduagwuna, Chinonye A; Agbasi, Patrick U; Orisakwe, Orish E; Orisakweph, Orish E

    2008-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an inexpensive antibacterial, whereas chloroquine is an inexpensive antimalarial. The coadministration of chloroquine and ciprofloxacin is easily encountered because both drugs are commonly prescribed to patients in the tropics. Five healthy male volunteers aged 19 to 31 years who were not taking any of the prescribed medications and who had no sensitivity to either ciprofloxacin or chloroquine each received 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally with 250 mL of water, and after a 2-week washout period, 500 mg ciprofloxacin plus 600 mg chloroquine was administered orally with 250 mL of water after providing informed consent. A urine sample (7 mL) was collected just before taking the drug at 8:00 AM representing 0 hour and continued afterward at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours the next day. The samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations by diffusion through agar technique were used for the assay of urine ciprofloxacin. The rate of ciprofloxacin excretion and cumulative urine ciprofloxacin were significantly increased. The coadministration of chloroquine increased the cumulative urinary concentration and excretion rate of ciprofloxacin.

  12. Autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increases sensitivity to cisplatin in QBC939 cholangiocarcinoma cells by mitochondrial ROS

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xianzhi; Sheng, Jiyao; Shen, Luyan; Su, Jing; Xu, Yunjie; Xie, Qi; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Xuewen; Sun, Liankun

    2017-01-01

    The tumor cells have some metabolic characteristics of the original tissues, and the metabolism of the tumor cells is closely related to autophagy. However, the mechanism of autophagy and metabolism in chemotherapeutic drug resistance is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role and mechanism of autophagy and glucose metabolism in chemotherapeutic drug resistance by using cholangiocarcinoma QBC939 cells with primary cisplatin resistance and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. We found that QBC939 cells with cisplatin resistance had a higher capacity for glucose uptake, consumption, and lactic acid generation, and higher activity of the pentose phosphate pathway compared with HepG2 cells, and the activity of PPP was further increased after cisplatin treatment in QBC939 cells. It is suggested that there are some differences in the metabolism of glucose in hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma cells, and the activation of PPP pathway may be related to the drug resistance. Through the detection of autophagy substrates p62 and LC3, found that QBC939 cells have a higher flow of autophagy, autophagy inhibitor chloroquine can significantly increase the sensitivity of cisplatin in cholangiocarcinoma cells compared with hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. The mechanism may be related to the inhibition of QBC939 cells with higher activity of the PPP, the key enzyme G6PDH, which reduces the antioxidant capacity of cells and increases intracellular ROS, especially mitochondrial ROS. Therefore, we hypothesized that autophagy and the oxidative stress resistance mediated by glucose metabolism may be one of the causes of cisplatin resistance in cholangiocarcinoma cells. It is suggested that according to the metabolism characteristics of tumor cells, inhibition of autophagy lysosome pathway with chloroquine may be a new route for therapeutic agents against cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:28301876

  13. Synergism between Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 genes could account for the slow recovery of chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium falciparum strains in Ghana after chloroquine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Asare, Kwame K; Boampong, Johnson N; Duah, Nancy O; Afoakwah, Richmond; Sehgal, Rakesh; Quashie, Neils B

    Unlike other countries, the chloroquine resistant marker Pfcrt T76 mutant has remained fairly stable in Ghana several years after official disuse of chloroquine. Certain mutations in Pfmdr1 may potentiate Pfcrt T76, offering a possible explanation for this observation. To understand the phenomenon, the co-existence of mutations in Pfmdr1 with Pfcrt T76 in Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates was studied. The reported presence of parasites with reduced sensitivity to amodiaquine and quinine in the country was also studied. Blood samples collected from confirmed malaria patients presenting at health facilities in two distinct ecological zones were analyzed. The prevalence of Pfcrt K76T and the five point mutations in Pfmdr1 were determined using nested PCR followed by RFLP analysis. The association between genes was determined by chi square analysis, and synergism between the two genes was ascertained using the Jonckheere-Terptra (J-T) test followed by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS). Nearly fifty-four percent (53.7%) of the P. falciparum isolates examined had the Pfcrt T76 gene, out of which 18.3% had both K76 and T76 alleles. Mutations at codon 86, 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 of the Pfmdr1 gene were detected in 36.0%, 87.9%, 71.0%, 91.6% and 8.4% of the isolates, respectively. The haplotypes of Pfmdr1 present were NFCDD (43.46%), YFCDD (27.57%), NFSDD (7.48%), NYSNY (5.14%) and YFSDD (4.67%). Pfcrt T76 was significantly associated with a double mutation at codon 86 and 184 of Pfmdr1 (YF; χ(2)=18.045, p=0.006). Associations were observed between Pfcrt K76T and Pfmdr1 triple mutation at codons 86, 184 and 1034 (NFC; χ(2)=13.770, p=0.032 and YFC; χ(2)=16.489, p=0.011). The J-T test showed significant synergism between Pfcrt 76 and Pfmdr1 polymorphisms (p<0.0001), which was confirmed by MCS at 99% CI. Synergism between Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 mutant genes could account for the slow recovery of chloroquine sensitive P. falciparum in Ghana. The same phenomenon could explain

  14. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy in Chloroquine-Induced Keratopathy

    PubMed Central

    Paladini, Iacopo; Menchini, Ugo; Mencucci, Rita

    2013-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy is becoming a mandatory examination to study corneal abnormalities such as drug deposits in systemic disease. A female diagnosed with fibromyalgia on systemic chloroquine for 9 months presented for an ophthalmic examination. Confocal microscopy was performed using the Confoscan 4 (Nidek Co. Ltd., Gamagori, Japan) and multiple highly reflective deposits in the epithelial basal cells were found, that were consistent with choloquine. Deposits were also present in the wing cell layer. In the anterior stroma these deposits were rare. Atypically shaped and branched nerves were also present in the anterior stroma. Corneal deposits of chloroquine can be evaluated by confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy provides information on corneal metabolism and physiology. Chloroquine keratopathy can affect the anterior stroma in addition to the epithelium. PMID:23580857

  15. Chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in a Brazilian endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Bianca Ervatti; de Oliveira, Natália K Almeida; Zalis, Mariano G; de Souza, José Maria; Santos, Fátima; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Ferreira-da-Cruz, Maria de Fátima

    2009-01-01

    Background The goal of the present study was the characterization of Plasmodium falciparum genes associated to malaria drug resistance (pfcrt, pfdhfr and pfdhps), in samples from two Brazilian localities. Methods Parasites from 65 P. falciparum samples were genotyped using nested-PCR and direct DNA sequencing. Results Six resistant sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) pfdhfr genotypes and one haplotype associated to SP sensitivity were detected. For pfcrt gene, SVMNT chloroquine (CQ)-resistant genotype was detected as well as the CVMNK CQ-sensitive haplotype in the same sample from Paragominas, that showed a SP-sensitive genotype. Conclusion This study is the first to document the sensitivity of P. falciparum parasites to CQ and SP in Brazilian field samples. The importance of these findings is discussed. PMID:19602248

  16. Seizures following chloroquine treatment of type II lepra reaction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ebenso, B E

    1998-06-01

    A case of tonic-clonic seizures following chloroquine treatment for leprosy reactions in a Nigerian male is reported. Seizures were controlled with phenytoin sodium capsules. A casual relationship between the seizures and chloroquine is suggested. There have been no previous reports of this adverse reaction in leprosy patients receiving chloroquine for treatment of reactions. The author recommends that chloroquine be used with caution especially in patients with seizures.

  17. Efficacy of Chloroquine for the Treatment of Vivax malaria in Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Habtamu Bedimo; Beyene, Melkamu Bedimo; Ebstie, Yehenew Asmamaw; Desalegn, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to anti-malarials is a major challenge for effective malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. This triggered a need for routine monitoring of the efficacy of the antimalarial drugs every two years in all malaria endemic countries. Chloroquine remained the drug of choice for the treatment of vivax malaria in Ethiopia. Though, a strong scientific evidence of chloroquine resistance to P.vivax that could have brought change of treatment regimen is yet to be established in Ethiopia, continuous and regular monitoring of drug’s efficacy is critical for establishing rational anti-malarial drug policies. This study therefore, assessed the therapeutic efficacy of Chloroquine (CQ) for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax infections in Northwestern Ethiopia. Methods An observational, 28- day therapeutic clinical efficacy study was conducted from August to December, 2014, in Northwest Ethiopia. Patients confirmed to have monoinfection of vivax malaria, aged above 6 months were included. All subjects were treated with standard chloroquine dose of 25 mg/kg for three (3) days. Parasitological and clinical outcomes of treated patients were then evaluated on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 during the entire 28-day follow-up period. A portable spectrophotometer (HemoCue Hb 301 System, Sweden) was used to estimate hemoglobin concentration. Results A total of 69 subjects had completed follow up. Some 57/69 (82.6%) had fever at enrolment and the rest 12 patients 48 hours before enrollment. Out of total, 65/69 (94.2%) and 66/69 (95.6%) of the study subjects were free of fever by day 1 and day 2 respectively but fever was cleared in all subjects by day 3. At base line the mean asexual parasitemia was 3540 parasites/μL of blood. Parasite carriage on day 3 was 3%. The overall cure rate (an adequate and clinical parasitological response) was very high (97%) [(95% CI = 93.1–99.4)]. The time to parasite, fever and gametocyte clearance as expressed in mean (SD) was 35 (3

  18. Aminoglycoside-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa deficient in cytochrome d, nitrite reductase, and aerobic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, L E; Kwan, S

    1981-01-01

    Two gentamicin-resistant mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO 503 were selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. Mutant PAO 2403 had significantly increased resistance to aminoglycoside but not to other antibiotics. Mutant PAO 2402 showed a similar spectrum of resistance but of lower magnitude. Both mutants showed no detectable cytochrome d and had a high frequency of reversion to a fully wild-type phenotype. PAO 2403 had a marked decrease and PAO 2402 had a moderate decrease in nitrite reductase activity. Both mutants had reduced uptake of gentamicin and dihydrostreptomycin. Mutant PAO 2403 showed a general decrease in transport rate of cationic compounds, whereas mutant PAO 2402 had only deficient glucose transport. Both mutants showed enhanced rates of glutamine transport and no change in glutamic acid transport. Other components of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were normal. These mutants involve ferrocytochrome C551 oxidoreductase formed only on anaerobic growth but illustrate transport defects in aerobically grown cells. PMID:6791588

  19. Electro-Oculograms in the Early Diagnosis of Chloroquine Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, Marvin S.

    1967-01-01

    Funduscopy, electro-oculography and electroretinography are all valuable in early detection of chloroquine retinopathy, which is reversible if detected early. Simplified instrumentation for electro-oculography was utilized in testing 12 normal controls, one patient with diabetic retinopathy and 15 patients with potential or actual cases of chloroquine retinopathy. Normal controls, and all but one of the patients without clinical evidence of retinopathy, had electro-oculographic ratios above 180. All patients having evidence of retinopathy had ratios below 180. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:6039185

  20. Bacterial glyphosate resistance conferred by overexpression of an E. coli membrane efflux transporter.

    PubMed

    Staub, Jeffrey M; Brand, Leslie; Tran, Minhtien; Kong, Yifei; Rogers, Stephen G

    2012-04-01

    Glyphosate herbicide-resistant crop plants, introduced commercially in 1994, now represent approximately 85% of the land area devoted to transgenic crops. Herbicide resistance in commercial glyphosate-resistant crops is due to expression of a variant form of a bacterial 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase with a significantly decreased binding affinity for glyphosate at the target site of the enzyme. As a result of widespread and recurrent glyphosate use, often as the only herbicide used for weed management, increasing numbers of weedy species have evolved resistance to glyphosate. Weed resistance is most often due to changes in herbicide translocation patterns, presumed to be through the activity of an as yet unidentified membrane transporter in plants. To provide insight into glyphosate resistance mechanisms and identify a potential glyphosate transporter, we screened Escherichia coli genomic DNA for alternate sources of glyphosate resistance genes. Our search identified a single non-target gene that, when overexpressed in E. coli and Pseudomonas, confers high-level glyphosate resistance. The gene, yhhS, encodes a predicted membrane transporter of the major facilitator superfamily involved in drug efflux. We report here that an alternative mode of glyphosate resistance in E. coli is due to reduced accumulation of glyphosate in cells that overexpress this membrane transporter and discuss the implications for potential alternative resistance mechanisms in other organisms such as plants.

  1. Implicating ABC Transporters in Insecticide Resistance: Research Strategies and a Decision Framework.

    PubMed

    Gott, Ryan C; Kunkel, Grace R; Zobel, Emily S; Lovett, Brian R; Hawthorne, David J

    2017-02-28

    Pest insects damage crops, transmit diseases, and are household nuisances. Historically, they have been controlled with insecticides, but overuse often leads to resistance to one or more of these chemicals. Insects gain resistance to insecticides through behavioral, metabolic, genetic, and physical mechanisms. One frequently overlooked strategy is through the use of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ABC transporters, present in all domains of life, perform natural excretory functions, thus the exploitation of these transporters to excrete insecticides and contribute to resistance is highly plausible. Previous work has implicated ABC transporters in some cases of insecticide resistance. Proposed herein is a framework meant as a formal guide for more easily incorporating the analysis of ABC transporters into existing resistance monitoring using suggested simple research methods. This framework functions as a simple decision tree and its utility is demonstrated using case examples. Determining a role for ABC transporters in insecticide resistance would help to shape future resistance management plans and guide the design of new insecticides.

  2. Membrane transporters in self resistance of Cercospora nicotianae to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    PubMed

    Beseli, Aydin; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Herrero, Sonia; Thomas, Elizabeth; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize membrane transporter genes in Cercospora fungi required for autoresistance to the photoactivated, active-oxygen-generating toxin cercosporin they produce for infection of host plants. Previous studies implicated a role for diverse membrane transporters in cercosporin resistance. In this study, transporters identified in a subtractive cDNA library between a Cercospora nicotianae wild type and a cercosporin-sensitive mutant were characterized, including two ABC transporters (CnATR2, CnATR3), an MFS transporter (CnMFS2), a uracil transporter, and a zinc transport protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only CnATR3 clustered with transporters previously characterized to be involved in cercosporin resistance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, however, showed that only CnATR2 was upregulated, thus this gene was selected for further characterization. Transformation and expression of CnATR2 in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa significantly increased cercosporin resistance. Targeted gene disruption of CnATR2 in the wild type C. nicotianae, however, did not decrease resistance. Expression analysis of other transporters in the cnatr2 mutant under conditions of cercosporin toxicity showed significant upregulation of the cercosporin facilitator protein gene (CFP), encoding an MFS transporter previously characterized as playing an important role in cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora species. We conclude that cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora is mediated by multiple genes, and that the fungus compensates for mutations by up-regulation of other resistance genes. CnATR2 may be a useful gene, alone or in addition to other known resistance genes, for engineering Cercospora resistance in crop plants.

  3. ATP-binding cassette transporters in tumor endothelial cells and resistance to metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Maishi, Nako; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-16

    Drug resistance is a major problem in anticancer therapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a role in the multidrug resistance. A new regimen of chemotherapy has been proposed, called "metronomic chemotherapy". Metronomic chemotherapy is the frequent, regular administration of drug doses designed to maintain low, but active, concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs over prolonged periods of time, without causing serious toxicities. Metronomic chemotherapy regimens were developed to optimize the antitumor efficacy of agents that target the tumor vasculature instead of tumor cells, and to reduce toxicity of antineoplastic drugs [1]. Nevertheless, recent studies revealed that ABC transporters are expressed at a higher level in the endothelium in the tumor. To avoid resistance to metronomic anti-angiogenic chemotherapy, ABC transporter inhibition of tumor endothelial cells may be a promising strategy. In this mini-review, we discuss the possible mechanism of resistance to metronomic chemotherapy from the viewpoint of tumor endothelial cell biology, focusing on ABC transporters.

  4. Fosfomycin resistance plasmids do not affect fosfomycin transport into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, J; García-Lobo, J M; Ortiz, J M

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells carrying fosfomycin resistance plasmids were able to take up fosfomycin from the medium to the same extent as plasmid-free bacteria. The antibiotic entered the plasmid-harboring cells by means of the glpT and uhp transport systems, as is the case with susceptible bacteria. Active fosfomycin could be detected in soluble extracts of cells which had previously been incubated in the presence of the antibiotic. Furthermore, fosfomycin resistance plasmids did not confer on E. coli cells resistance to the novel antibiotic FR-31564, which is incorporated by the same transport systems as fosfomycin. We conclude that, in contrast to chromosomal resistance mutants, altered transport does not play a role in the plasmid-encoded fosfomycin resistance mechanism. PMID:7044304

  5. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in cancer: role of ABC multidrug transporters.

    PubMed

    Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Cserepes, Judit; Elkind, N Barry; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2005-01-01

    Recent antitumor drug research has seen the development of a large variety of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) with increasing specificity and selectivity. These are highly promising agents for specific inhibition of malignant cell growth and metastasis. However, their therapeutic potential also depends on access to their intracellular targets, which may be significantly affected by certain ABC membrane transporters. It has been recently shown that several human multidrug transporter ABC proteins interact with specific TKIs, and the ABCG2 transporter has an especially high affinity for some of these kinase inhibitors. These results indicate that multidrug resistance protein modulation by TKIs may be an important factor in the treatment of cancer patients; moreover, the extrusion of TKIs by multidrug transporters may result in tumor cell TKI resistance. Interaction with multidrug resistance ABC transporters may also significantly modify the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of TKIs in patients.

  6. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to use...

  7. Survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. for an extended period of transport.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gwen L; Harris, Anthony D; Morgan, Daniel J; Pineles, Lisa; Belton, Beverly M; Johnson, J Kristie

    2012-07-01

    This study determined the survivability of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) for extended periods of time and temperatures using a standard swab for assessment. Our study showed that transportation in Liquid Amies medium could be performed at room temperature or 4°C for up to 14 days without a decrease in recovery of MRSA or VRE.

  8. Survival of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus spp. for an Extended Period of Transport

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Gwen L.; Harris, Anthony D.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Pineles, Lisa; Belton, Beverly M.

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the survivability of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) for extended periods of time and temperatures using a standard swab for assessment. Our study showed that transportation in Liquid Amies medium could be performed at room temperature or 4°C for up to 14 days without a decrease in recovery of MRSA or VRE. PMID:22535993

  9. Paraquat Resistant1, a Golgi-localized putative transporter protein, is involved in intracellular transport of paraquat.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-05-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops.

  10. Impact of Chloroquine on Viral Load in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Katherine; Kuhn, Louise; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Shutes, Erin; Vwalika, Cheswa; Ghosh, Mrinal; Aldrovandi, Grace; Thea, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The anti-malarial agent chloroquine has activity against HIV. We compared the effect of chloroquine (n = 18) to an anti-malarial agent without known anti-HIV-activity, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (n = 12), on breast milk HIV RNA levels among HIV-infected breastfeeding women in Zambia. After adjusting for CD4 count and plasma viral load, chloroquine was associated with a trend towards lower levels of HIV RNA in breast milk compared with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (P 0.05). Higher breastmilk viral load was also observed among women receiving presumptive treatment = for symptomatic malaria compared with asymptomatic controls and among controls reporting fever in the prior week. Further research is needed to determine the potential role of chloroquine in prevention of HIV transmission through breastfeeding. Impacte de la chloroquine sur la charge virale dans le lait maternelle La chloroquine, agent antimalarique, a une activité contre le VIH. Nous avons comparé l’effet de la chloroquine à celui d’un autre agent antimalarique, la sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, dont l’activité sur le VIH n’est pas connue, en mesurant les taux d’ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel de femmes allaitantes infectées par le VIH en Zambie. Après ajustement pour les taux de CD4 et la charge virale dans le plasma, la chloroquine comparée à la sulfadoxine pyrimethamine était associée à une tendance vers des teneurs plus bas en ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel (P = 0,05). Des charges virales plus élevées dans le lait maternel étaient aussi observées chez des femmes recevant un traitement présomptif pour des symptômes de malaria par rapport aux contrôles asymptomatiques et par rapport à des contrôles rapportant de la fièvre durant la première semaine. Des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer le rôle potentiel de la chloroquine dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH par l’allaitement maternel. mots clésVIH, malaria, allaitement maternel

  11. A novel ABCG-like transporter of Trypanosoma cruzi is involved in natural resistance to benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Zingales, Bianca; Araujo, Rafael Gomes Aquino; Moreno, Margoth; Franco, Jaques; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique Nascimento; Nunes, Solange Lessa; Silva, Marcelo Nunes; Ienne, Susan; Machado, Carlos Renato; Brandão, Adeilton

    2015-05-01

    Benznidazole (BZ) is one of the two drugs used for Chagas disease treatment. Nevertheless therapeutic failures of BZ have been reported, which were mostly attributed to variable drug susceptibility among Trypanosoma cruzi strains. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in a variety of translocation processes and some members have been implicated in drug resistance. Here we report the characterisation of the first T. cruzi ABCG transporter gene, named TcABCG1, which is over-expressed in parasite strains naturally resistant to BZ. Comparison of TcABCG1 gene sequence of two TcI BZ-resistant strains with CL Brener BZ-susceptible strain showed several single nucleotide polymorphisms, which determined 11 amino acid changes. CL Brener transfected with TcI transporter genes showed 40-47% increased resistance to BZ, whereas no statistical significant increment in drug resistance was observed when CL Brener was transfected with the homologous gene. Only in the parasites transfected with TcI genes there was 2-2.6-fold increased abundance of TcABCG1 transporter protein. The analysis in wild type strains also suggests that the level of TcABCG1 transporter is related to BZ natural resistance. The characteristics of untranslated regions of TcABCG1 genes of BZ-susceptible and resistant strains were investigated by computational tools.

  12. The ABC gene family in arthropods: comparative genomics and role in insecticide transport and resistance.

    PubMed

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    About a 100 years ago, the Drosophila white mutant marked the birth of Drosophila genetics. The white gene turned out to encode the first well studied ABC transporter in arthropods. The ABC gene family is now recognized as one of the largest transporter families in all kingdoms of life. The majority of ABC proteins function as primary-active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP while transporting a large diversity of substrates across lipid membranes. Although extremely well studied in vertebrates for their role in drug resistance, less is known about the role of this family in the transport of endogenous and exogenous substances in arthropods. The ABC families of five insect species, a crustacean and a chelicerate have been annotated in some detail. We conducted a thorough phylogenetic analysis of the seven arthropod and human ABC protein subfamilies, to infer orthologous relationships that might suggest conserved function. Most orthologous relationships were found in the ABCB half transporter, ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies, but specific expansions within species and lineages are frequently observed and discussed. We next surveyed the role of ABC transporters in the transport of xenobiotics/plant allelochemicals and their involvement in insecticide resistance. The involvement of ABC transporters in xenobiotic resistance in arthropods is historically not well documented, but an increasing number of studies using unbiased differential gene expression analysis now points to their importance. We give an overview of methods that can be used to link ABC transporters to resistance. ABC proteins have also recently been implicated in the mode of action and resistance to Bt toxins in Lepidoptera. Given the enormous interest in Bt toxicology in transgenic crops, such findings will provide an impetus to further reveal the role of ABC transporters in arthropods.

  13. Effect of chloroquine on feline infectious peritonitis virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Katoh, Yasuichiroh; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a feline coronavirus-induced fatal disease in domestic and wild cats. Several studies have investigated potential treatments for FIP. However, there have been no reports on agents that have exhibited a therapeutic effect. Recently, chloroquine has been reported to antiviral effect. We investigated whether chloroquine can be used to treat FIP in vitro and in vivo. It was demonstrated that chloroquine has inhibitory effect against the replication of FIPV and anti-inflammatory effect in vitro. In vivo study using cats with experimentally induced FIP, the clinical score of chloroquine-treatment groups were better than in chloroquine-untreated group. However, alanine aminotransferase levels increased in the chloroquine-treated groups. It will be necessary to further investigate the possibility of FIP treatment with a combination of chloroquine and other agents.

  14. Mouse ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters Conferring Multi-Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuaizhang; Zhang, Wen; Yin, Xuejiao; Xing, Shilai; Xie, Heidi Qunhui; Cao, Zhengyu; Zhao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter is one of the largest and most ancient protein families with members functioning from protozoa to human. The resistance of cancer and tumor cells to anticancer drugs is due to the over-expression of some ABC transporters, which may finally lead to chemotherapy failure. The mouse ABC transporters are classified into seven subfamilies by phylogenetic analysis. The mouse ABC transporter gene, alias, chromosomal location and function have been determined. Within the ABC super-family, the MDR transporters (Abcb1, Abcc1, Abcg2) in mouse models have been proved to be valuable to investigate the biochemistry and physiological functions. This review concentrates on the multidrug resistance of mouse ABC transporters in cancer and tumor cells.

  15. Mouse ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters Conferring Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed

    Shuaizhang, L I; Zhang, Wen; Yin, Xuejiao; Xing, Shilai; Xie, Qunhui; Cao, Zhengyu; Zhao, Bin

    2015-04-28

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter is one of the largest and most ancient protein families with members functioning from protozoa to human. The resistance of cancer and tumor cells to anticancer drugs is due to the over-expression of some ABC transporters, which may finally lead to chemotherapy failure. The mouse ABC transporters are classified into seven subfamilies by phylogenetic analysis. The mouse ABC transporter gene, alias, chromosomal location and function have been determined. Within the ABC super-family, the MDR transporters (Abcb1, Abcc1, Abcg2) in mouse models have been proved to be valuable to investigate the biochemistry and physiological functions. This review concentrates on the multidrug resistance of mouse ABC transporters in cancer and tumor cells.

  16. A thirteen-year analysis of Plasmodium falciparum populations reveals high conservation of the mutant pfcrt haplotype despite the withdrawal of chloroquine from national treatment guidelines in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Lehners, Nicola; Mayengue, Pembe I; Gabor, Julian; Dal-Bianco, Matthias; Kombila, David U; Ngoma, Ghyslain Mombo; Supan, Christian; Lell, Bertrand; Ntoumi, Francine; Grobusch, Martin P; Dietz, Klaus; Kremsner, Peter G

    2011-10-17

    Chloroquine resistance (CR) decreased after the removal of chloroquine from national treatment guidelines in Malawi, Kenia and Tanzania. In this investigation the prevalence of the chloroquine resistance (CQR) conferring mutant pfcrt allele and its associated chromosomal haplotype were determined before and after the change in Gabonese national treatment guidelines from chloroquine (CQ) to artesunate plus amodiaquine (AQ) in 2003. The prevalence of the wild type pfcrt allele was assessed in 144 isolates from the years 2005 - 07 by PCR fragment restriction digest and direct sequencing. For haplotype analysis of the chromosomal regions flanking the pfcrt locus, microsatellite analysis was done on a total of 145 isolates obtained in 1995/96 (43 isolates), 2002 (47 isolates) and 2005 - 07 (55 isolates). The prevalence of the mutant pfcrt allele decreased from 100% in the years 1995/96 and 2002 to 97% in 2005 - 07. Haplotype analysis showed that in 1995/96 79% of the isolates carried the same microsatellite alleles in a chromosomal fragment spanning 39 kb surrounding the pfcrt locus. In 2002 and 2005 - 07 the prevalence of this haplotype was 62% and 58%, respectively. Pfcrt haplotype analysis showed that all wild type alleles were CVMNK. Four years after the withdrawal of CQ from national treatment guidelines the prevalence of the mutant pfcrt allele remains at 97%. The data suggest that the combination of artesunate plus AQ may result in continued selection for the mutant pfcrt haplotype even after discontinuance of CQ usage.

  17. The role of ABC transporters in drug resistance, metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Glavinas, Hristos; Krajcsi, Péter; Cserepes, Judit; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2004-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters form a special family of membrane proteins, characterized by homologous ATP-binding, and large, multispanning transmembrane domains. Several members of this family are primary active transporters, which significantly modulate the absorption, metabolism, cellular effectivity and toxicity of pharmacological agents. This review provides a general overview of the human ABC transporters, their expression, localization and basic mechanism of action. Then we shortly deal with the human ABC transporters as targets of therapeutic interventions in medicine, including cancer drug resistance, lipid and other metabolic disorders, and even gene therapy applications. We place a special emphasis on the three major groups of ABC transporters involved in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). These are the classical P-glycoprotein (MDR1, ABCB1), the multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs, in the ABCC subfamily), and the ABCG2 protein, an ABC half-transporter. All these proteins catalyze an ATP-dependent active transport of chemically unrelated compounds, including anticancer drugs. MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 preferentially extrude large hydrophobic, positively charged molecules, while the members of the MRP family can extrude both hydrophobic uncharged molecules and water-soluble anionic compounds. Based on the physiological expression and role of these transporters, we provide examples for their role in Absorption-Distribution-Metabolism-Excretion (ADME) and toxicology, and describe several basic assays which can be applied for screening drug interactions with ABC transporters in the course of drug research and development.

  18. Fluoroquinolone resistance protein NorA of Staphylococcus aureus is a multidrug efflux transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Neyfakh, A A; Borsch, C M; Kaatz, G W

    1993-01-01

    The gene of the Staphylococcus aureus fluoroquinolone efflux transporter protein NorA confers resistance to a number of structurally dissimilar drugs, not just to fluoroquinolones, when it is expressed in Bacillus subtilis. NorA provides B. subtilis with resistance to the same drugs and to a similar extent as the B. subtilis multidrug transporter protein Bmr does. NorA and Bmr share 44% sequence similarity. Both the NorA- and Bmr-conferred resistances can be completely reversed by reserpine. PMID:8431010

  19. Water transport in plants: Mechanism of apparent changes in resistance during absorption.

    PubMed

    Boyer, J S

    1974-09-01

    Leaf water potentials were measured at various rates of water absorption in whole plants and detached leaves of well-watered Helianthus annuus L. The experiments were conducted in the steady state, where changes in leaf hydration did not affect the measurements but both the transpiration and growth components of absorption could be observed. Calculations of the total plant resistance to water transport showed that the resistance at low fluxes was about 30 times the resistance at high fluxes. Most of the change took place in the leaves, since similar changes could be demonstrated in detached leaves. The roots accounted for little of the change, since they varied in resistance by a factor of only 2.5 as flow varied.To ascertain whether the protoplasts of the leaves varied in resistance by an amount which could account for the change in resistance to water transport, measurements of rates of water movement in and out of the protoplasm were made when gradients in water potential between the protoplasts and the water source were varied. These showed that water movement did not occur at rates which could account for high rates of transpiration even when large differences in potential drove flow. The high temperature sensitivity of efflux confirmed that the leaf protoplasts limited flow in these experiments. When the edge of the leaf was excised and flow occurred primarily through the vascular system of the leaf, the resistance was much lower than in the protoplasts. It is therefore concluded that the leaf protoplasts represent a high resistance to water transport and that a considerable portion of the water involved in transpiration must bypass them.Calculations based on a model of water transport showed that the protoplast resistance was almost 30 times larger than the resistance of the path leading from the soil to the leaf protoplasts. The decrease in resistance of the leaves with increasing rates of absorption was therefore attributed to a decrease in water movement

  20. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters. PMID:26238402

  1. Inhibition of the peroxidative degradation of haem as the basis of action of chloroquine and other quinoline antimalarials.

    PubMed Central

    Loria, P; Miller, S; Foley, M; Tilley, L

    1999-01-01

    The malaria parasite feeds by degrading haemoglobin in an acidic food vacuole, producing free haem moieties as a by-product. The haem in oxyhaemoglobin is oxidized from the Fe(II) state to the Fe(III) state with the consequent production of an equimolar concentration of H2O2. We have analysed the fate of haem molecules in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes and have found that only about one third of the haem is polymerized to form haemozoin. The remainder appears to be degraded by a non-enzymic process which leads to an accumulation of iron in the parasite. A possible route for degradation of the haem is by reacting with H2O2, and we show that, under conditions designed to resemble those found in the food vacuole, i.e., at pH5.2 in the presence of protein, free haem undergoes rapid peroxidative decomposition. Chloroquine and quinacrine are shown to be efficient inhibitors of the peroxidative destruction of haem, while epiquinine, a quinoline compound with very low antimalarial activity, has little inhibitory effect. We also show that chloroquine enhances the association of haem with membranes, while epiquinine inhibits this association, and that treatment of parasitized erythrocytes with chloroquine leads to a build-up of membrane-associated haem in the parasite. We suggest that chloroquine exerts its antimalarial activity by causing a build-up of toxic membrane-associated haem molecules that eventually destroy the integrity of the malaria parasite. We have further shown that resistance-modulating compounds, such as chlorpromazine, interact with haem and efficiently inhibit its degradation. This may explain the weak antimalarial activities of these compounds. PMID:10191268

  2. Fate and transport of veterinary antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance gene from fields receiving poultry manure during storm events

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobials are used in production agriculture to treat disease and promote animal growth, but the presence of antibiotics in the environment raises concern about widespread antibiotic resistance. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin, tetracycline, enterococci resistant to...

  3. Fluoride resistance and transport by riboswitch-controlled CLC antiporters

    PubMed Central

    Stockbridge, Randy B.; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Otten, Renee; Williams, Carole; Shane, Tania; Weinberg, Zasha; Miller, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    A subclass of bacterial CLC anion-transporting proteins, phylogenetically distant from long-studied CLCs, was recently shown to be specifically up-regulated by F-. We establish here that a set of randomly selected representatives from this “CLCF” clade protect Escherichia coli from F- toxicity, and that the purified proteins catalyze transport of F- in liposomes. Sequence alignments and membrane transport experiments using 19F NMR, osmotic response assays, and planar lipid bilayer recordings reveal four mechanistic traits that set CLCF proteins apart from all other known CLCs. First, CLCFs lack conserved residues that form the anion binding site in canonical CLCs. Second, CLCFs exhibit high anion selectivity for F- over Cl-. Third, at a residue thought to distinguish CLC channels and transporters, CLCFs bear a channel-like valine rather than a transporter-like glutamate, and yet are F-/H+ antiporters. Finally, F-/H+ exchange occurs with 1∶1 stoichiometry, in contrast to the usual value of 2∶1. PMID:22949689

  4. Fluoride resistance and transport by riboswitch-controlled CLC antiporters.

    PubMed

    Stockbridge, Randy B; Lim, Hyun-Ho; Otten, Renee; Williams, Carole; Shane, Tania; Weinberg, Zasha; Miller, Christopher

    2012-09-18

    A subclass of bacterial CLC anion-transporting proteins, phylogenetically distant from long-studied CLCs, was recently shown to be specifically up-regulated by F(-). We establish here that a set of randomly selected representatives from this "CLC(F)" clade protect Escherichia coli from F(-) toxicity, and that the purified proteins catalyze transport of F(-) in liposomes. Sequence alignments and membrane transport experiments using (19)F NMR, osmotic response assays, and planar lipid bilayer recordings reveal four mechanistic traits that set CLC(F) proteins apart from all other known CLCs. First, CLC(F)s lack conserved residues that form the anion binding site in canonical CLCs. Second, CLC(F)s exhibit high anion selectivity for F(-) over Cl(-). Third, at a residue thought to distinguish CLC channels and transporters, CLC(F)s bear a channel-like valine rather than a transporter-like glutamate, and yet are F(-)/H(+) antiporters. Finally, F(-)/H(+) exchange occurs with 1:1 stoichiometry, in contrast to the usual value of 2:1.

  5. Flow cytometry analysis of drug transport mechanisms in Haemonchus contortus susceptible or resistant to anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Kerboeuf, D; Chambrier, P; Le Vern, Y; Aycardi, J

    1999-02-01

    The role of membrane drug-transport mechanisms in resistance to anthelmintics was examined using a flow cytometry method. This method was adapted from assays developed for the study of similar mechanisms in tumor cells. Rhodamine 123, a P-glycoprotein transport probe, associated with the reversal agent verapamil gave a significantly higher level of green fluorescence in Haemonchus contortus-resistant eggs as compared with that of susceptible eggs. In the same way, verapamilbodipy, a new fluorescent probe for the detection of multidrug resistance in cells, showed a significantly higher degree of binding to resistant eggs. The results confirm those obtained with biological drug assays using both anthelmintics and verapamil and provide a quantitative and effective methodology for the functional study of multidrug resistance in nematodes.

  6. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  7. Transport of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in a public rural karst water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroche, Emilie; Petit, Fabienne; Fournier, Matthieu; Pawlak, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    SummaryThe goal of this study was to determine the conditions promoting the transport of antibiotic-resistant faecal bacteria, in a rural karst system providing drinking water (Northwest France). For this purpose, the resistance of the Escherichia coli population (436 isolates) to 17 antibiotics was investigated by analysing water samples from four representative interconnected sites: a creek, a swallow hole, a spring, and a well. The samples were collected during four contrasting hydrologic and grazing periods. The transport of resistant E. coli from the creek to the well appeared to be dominated by run-off and leaching phenomena. Less than 7% of the E. coli isolated during a wet period without grazing or during a dry period with grazing were antibiotic-resistant, whereas, during rainfall events with grazing, between 30% and 55% of the E. coli detected were resistant; 10-23% of these isolates were resistant to two or three antibiotics. The resistance most often found was to either chloramphenicol or tetracycline. To better describe the dynamics of the antibiotic-resistant population of E. coli entering the karst aquifer, the swallow hole was monitored over a 24-h period during a rainfall event (90 isolates). The antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates and the occurrence of class 1 integrons, genetic elements involved multi-resistance, were determined. The origin of this E. coli population was also investigated. This monitoring demonstrated that multi-antibiotic-resistant E. coli, representing 23% of the total population, infiltrated the karst aquifer at the peak of a rainfall event, with some isolates being resistant to up to eight antibiotics. No intI1 gene was detected. The search for the origin of the resistant E. coli isolated during this rainfall event demonstrated that they were of both animal and human origin. This work demonstrates that drinking water resources taken from the groundwater in a rural karst terrain is vulnerable to contamination by

  8. Different working mechanisms for a graphene resistive memory based on oxygen-ion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun

    2017-01-01

    A graphene sheet was used as one of the electrodes of a HfO2 metal-oxide-based resistive random access memory. We find dramatic differences in the device characteristics as voltages with opposite polarities are used to form the resistive memory devices. Using experimental measurements of the switching characteristics and the corresponding low and high resistance state, we compare the two different operating modes of a graphene-electrode-based resistive memory. Using a Raman raster scanning map, we verify that the transport direction of oxygen ions contributes to such dramatic differences in the device's switching characteristics.

  9. Overcoming Drug Resistance to Heme-Targeted Antimalarials by Systematic Side Chain Variation of 7-Chloro-4-aminoquinolines1

    PubMed Central

    Yearick, Kim; Ekoue-Kovi, Kekeli; Iwaniuk, D.; Natarajan, Jayakumar K.; Alumasa, John; de Dios, Angel C.; Roepe, Paul D.; Wolf, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Systematic variation of the branching and basicity of the side chain of chloroquine yielded a series of new 7-chloro-4-aminoquinoline derivatives exhibiting high in vitro activity against 4 different strains of P. falciparum. Many of the compounds tested showed excellent potency against chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains. In particular 4b, 5a, 5b, 5d, 17a, and 17b were found to be significantly more potent than chloroquine against the resistant strains Dd2 and FCB. PMID:18345611

  10. Multidrug resistance protein-mediated transport of chlorambucil and melphalan conjugated to glutathione.

    PubMed Central

    Barnouin, K.; Leier, I.; Jedlitschky, G.; Pourtier-Manzanedo, A.; König, J.; Lehmann, W. D.; Keppler, D.

    1998-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP1) confers resistance of cells to a number of different cytostatic drugs and functions as an export pump for glutathione S-conjugates, glucuronides and other amphiphilic anions. The present study details for the first time MRP1-mediated ATP-dependent transport of various glutathione S-conjugates of the bifunctional alkylating agents chlorambucil and melphalan. In membrane vesicles prepared from cells expressing recombinant MRP1, the conjugates were transported at rates in the following order: monoglutathionyl chlorambucil > bisglutathionyl chlorambucil > monohydroxy monoglutathionyl chlorambucil and monoglutathionyl melphalan > monohydroxy monoglutathionyl melphalan. In addition, we show that membranes from chlorambucil-resistant GST-alpha-overexpressing CHO cells as well as from their parental cells express the hamster homologue of MRP1. With both CHO cell membrane preparations, we observed ATP-dependent transport of monoglutathionyl chlorambucil and of leukotriene C4, a glutathione S-conjugate and high-affinity substrate of MRP1. The transport rates measured in the resistant cells were only two- to three-fold higher than those measured in the control cells. These results together with cytotoxicity assays comparing MRP1-overexpressing cell pairs with the CHO cell pair indicate that, although MRP1-mediated transport is active, it may not be the rate-limiting step in chlorambucil resistance in these cell lines. Images Figure 3 PMID:9460989

  11. Slower phloem transport in gymnosperm trees can be attributed to higher sieve element resistance.

    PubMed

    Liesche, Johannes; Windt, Carel; Bohr, Tomas; Schulz, Alexander; Jensen, Kaare H

    2015-04-01

    In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Angiosperm and gymnosperm trees have a fundamentally different phloem anatomy with respect to cell size, shape and connectivity. Whether these differences have an effect on the physiology of carbohydrate transport, however, is not clear. A meta-analysis of the experimental data on phloem transport speed in trees yielded average speeds of 56 cm h(-1) for angiosperm trees and 22 cm h(-1) for gymnosperm trees. Similar values resulted from theoretical modeling using a simple transport resistance model. Analysis of the model parameters clearly identified sieve element (SE) anatomy as the main factor for the significantly slower carbohydrate transport speed inside the phloem in gymnosperm compared with angiosperm trees. In order to investigate the influence of SE anatomy on the hydraulic resistance, anatomical data on SEs and sieve pores were collected by transmission electron microscopy analysis and from the literature for 18 tree species. Calculations showed that the hydraulic resistance is significantly higher in the gymnosperm than in angiosperm trees. The higher resistance is only partially offset by the considerably longer SEs of gymnosperms.

  12. Resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.D.; Sandberg, S.K.

    2000-04-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of resistivity/induced polarization (IP) monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic loads. Electrical monitoring of saline tracer transport during forced injection has been demonstrated previously. Detection of tracer transport under natural hydraulic loading is difficult because neither the hydraulic load nor the tracer resistivity can be controlled. In one study, the authors identify the electrical response to salt transport in a dynamic beach environment. Resistivity/IP imagine resolved the structure of the saltwater-freshwater interface and evidence for tide-induced groundwater transport. Resistivity increases in the near surface and at depth, upbeach of the high-tide mark, accompanied by tidal transgression. They attribute this to desaturation and decreasing salinity in the near surface and to decreasing salinity at depth, despite tidal transgression. Monitoring of groundwater levels indicates a phase lag between the tide level and groundwater level, supporting the electrical data. IP was insensitive to groundwater salinity variation. In a second study, the authors identify the electrical response to recharge-induced salt transport from a road-sale storage facility. Conductivity and IP models for monitoring lines, located on the basis of an EM31 survey, resolved the subsurface salt distribution, IP modeling resolved the sediment-bedrock interface. Modeling of monthly conductivity differences revealed conductivity increases and decreases at the locations of salt contamination, which correlate with the recharge pattern. They attribute near-surface conductivity increases after heavy rainfall to increasing saturation and ion dissolution. Corresponding conductivity decreases at depth are attributed to flushing of the bedrock with freshwater. Essentially, the opposite response was observed during a quiet monitoring period following heavy recharge. Near-surface IP changes are consistent with this interpretation. Salt

  13. Cell killing by Simian virus 40: protective effect of chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Einck, K H

    1978-12-01

    Treatment of CV-1 cells with chloroquine before infection by simian virus 40 resulted in the accumulation of fewer nonviable, trypan blue-stainable cells at 72 h. The drug did not affect the fraction of infected T-antigen-producing cells or the viral yields. It did diminish the apparent redistribution of lysosomal N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase from a particulate to a soluble cell fraction, and it caused an increase in the size and number of lysosomes.

  14. Cell Killing by Simian Virus 40: Protective Effect of Chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Norkin, Leonard C.; Einck, Katie H.

    1978-01-01

    Treatment of CV-1 cells with chloroquine before infection by simian virus 40 resulted in the accumulation of fewer nonviable, trypan blue-stainable cells at 72 h. The drug did not affect the fraction of infected T-antigen-producing cells or the viral yields. It did diminish the apparent redistribution of lysosomal N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase from a particulate to a soluble cell fraction, and it caused an increase in the size and number of lysosomes. Images PMID:217304

  15. Nanoionic transport and electrochemical reactions in resistively switching silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Tappertzhofen, Stefan; Mündelein, Hans; Valov, Ilia; Waser, Rainer

    2012-05-21

    The mobility of copper ions and redox reactions of Cu at the interface with SiO(2) being directly attributed to the resistive switching effect have been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrode kinetics of the Cu(z+)/Cu redox reactions were analyzed suggesting the formation of both Cu(+) and Cu(2+) species. The ion mobility shows an unexpected strong dependence on the ion concentration indicating ion-ion interactions typical for concentrated solution conditions. Based on the standard reduction potentials for Cu(z+)/Cu we identified partial electrochemical redox reactions during oxidation and reduction. The results contribute to a detailed understanding of the resistive switching effect in Cu/SiO(2)/Pt cells and provide insight into electrochemically assisted diffusion of metal cations in oxides in general.

  16. Modeling acid transport in chemically amplified resist films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Abhijit A.; Doxastakis, Manolis; Stein, Gila E.

    2014-03-01

    The acid-catalyzed deprotection of glassy poly(4-hydroxystyrene-co-tert butyl acrylate) films was studied with infrared absorbance spectroscopy and stochastic simulations. Experimental data were interpreted with a simple description of subdiffusive acid transport coupled to second-order acid loss. This model predicts key attributes of observed deprotection rates, such as fast reaction at short times, slow reaction at long times, and a non-linear dependence on acid loading. The degree of anomalous character is reduced by increasing the post-exposure bake temperature or adding plasticizing agents to the polymer resin. These findings indicate that the acid mobility and overall deprotection kinetics are coupled to glassy matrix dynamics. Furthermore, the acid diffusion lengths were calculated from the anomalous transport model and compared with nanopattern line widths. The consistent scaling between experiments and simulations suggests that the anomalous diffusion model could be further developed into a predictive lithography tool.

  17. Characterization of acquired paclitaxel resistance of breast cancer cells and involvement of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kopperová, Dana; Balušíková, Kamila; Ehrlichová, Marie; Brynychová, Veronika; Václavíková, Radka; Daniel, Petr; Souček, Pavel; Kovář, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Development of taxane resistance has become clinically very important issue. The molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance are still unclear. To address this issue, we established paclitaxel-resistant sublines of the SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines that are capable of long-term proliferation in 100nM and 300nM paclitaxel, respectively. Application of these concentrations leads to cell death in the original counterpart cells. Both sublines are cross-resistant to doxorubicin, indicating the presence of the MDR phenotype. Interestingly, resistance in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines is circumvented by the second-generation taxane SB-T-1216. Moreover, we demonstrated that it was not possible to establish sublines of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cells resistant to this taxane. It means that at least the tested breast cancer cells are unable to develop resistance to some taxanes. Employing mRNA expression profiling of all known human ABC transporters and subsequent Western blot analysis of the expression of selected transporters, we demonstrated that only the ABCB1/PgP and ABCC3/MRP3 proteins were up-regulated in both paclitaxel-resistant sublines. We found up-regulation of ABCG2/BCRP and ABCC4 proteins only in paclitaxel-resistant SK-BR-3 cells. In paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7 cells, ABCB4/MDR3 and ABCC2/MRP2 proteins were up-regulated. Silencing of ABCB1 expression using specific siRNA increased significantly, but did not completely restore full sensitivity to both paclitaxel and doxorubicin. Thus we showed a key, but not exclusive, role for ABCB1 in mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance. It suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in paclitaxel resistance in tested breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human multidrug resistance ABCB and ABCG transporters: participation in a chemoimmunity defense system.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, Balázs; Homolya, László; Szakács, Gergely; Váradi, András

    2006-10-01

    In this review we give an overview of the physiological functions of a group of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, which were discovered, and still referred to, as multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters. Although they indeed play an important role in cancer drug resistance, their major physiological function is to provide general protection against hydrophobic xenobiotics. With a highly conserved structure, membrane topology, and mechanism of action, these essential transporters are preserved throughout all living systems, from bacteria to human. We describe the general structural and mechanistic features of the human MDR-ABC transporters and introduce some of the basic methods that can be applied for the analysis of their expression, function, regulation, and modulation. We treat in detail the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology of the ABCB1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein) and the ABCG2 (MXR/BCRP) proteins and describe emerging information related to additional ABCB- and ABCG-type transporters with a potential role in drug and xenobiotic resistance. Throughout this review we demonstrate and emphasize the general network characteristics of the MDR-ABC transporters, functioning at the cellular and physiological tissue barriers. In addition, we suggest that multidrug transporters are essential parts of an innate defense system, the "chemoimmunity" network, which has a number of features reminiscent of classical immunology.

  19. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  20. [Amsler grid and visual field on screening for chloroquine retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Madalena, Bruno Vargas; Oshima, Akiyoshi; Serracarbassa, Pedro Durães

    2012-01-01

    To compare the modified Amsler grid to the Humphrey(®) 10-2 red visual field in chloroquine users for the detection of early maculopathy, and to correlate with the risk variables. The study included 116 eyes of 58 patients followed at the Department of Ophthalmology of Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, from April, 2006 to April, 2008. All users had normal fundus and more than 2 years of chloroquine therapy. Their clinical data were evaluated and they underwent visual acuity examination, fundus biomicroscopy, visual field and Amsler grid. The incidence of early maculopathy was 7 to 10%, depending on the examination considered. The agreement between the Amsler grid and visual field was low. There was statistical significance with the use of high daily dose, elevated cumulative dose and low visual acuity in patients whose eyes had both abnormal tests; patient age and duration of treatment did not show good correlation in these cases, but their averages (67.4 years and 8.4 years, respectively) were within the range of high risk factors. The study suggests that Amsler can be useful in complementing the information on the visual field for chloroquine retinopathy periodic screening, especially for those patients who present high risk factors well established, selecting better candidates for objective tests, such as HD OCT and mfERG.

  1. Efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Mejia Torres, Rosa Elena; Banegas, Engels Ilich; Mendoza, Meisy; Diaz, Cesar; Bucheli, Sandra Tamara Mancero; Fontecha, Gustavo A; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Goldman, Ira; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Zambrano, Jose Orlinder Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is officially used for the primary treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of CQ for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in the municipality of Puerto Lempira, Gracias a Dios, Honduras was evaluated using the Pan American Health Organization-World Health Organization protocol with a follow-up of 28 days. Sixty-eight patients from 6 months to 60 years of age microscopically diagnosed with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were included in the final analysis. All patients who were treated with CQ (25 mg/kg over 3 days) cleared parasitemia by day 3 and acquired no new P. falciparum infection within 28 days of follow-up. All the parasite samples sequenced for CQ resistance mutations (pfcrt) showed only the CQ-sensitive genotype (CVMNK). This finding shows that CQ remains highly efficacious for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Gracias a Dios, Honduras.

  2. Molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-bao

    2010-01-01

    Millions of new cancer patients are diagnosed each year and over half of these patients die from this devastating disease. Thus, cancer causes a major public health problem worldwide. Chemotherapy remains the principal mode to treat many metastatic cancers. However, occurrence of cellular multidrug resistance (MDR) prevents efficient killing of cancer cells, leading to chemotherapeutic treatment failure. Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and/or multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), confers an acquired MDR due to their capabilities of transporting a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs across the cell membrane barrier. In this review, the molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by MRP1 will be addressed.

  3. What do proton motive force driven multidrug resistance transporters have in common?

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Piotr; Driessen, Arnold J M; Konings, Wil N

    2005-01-01

    The extensive progress of genome sequencing projects in recent years has demonstrated that multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are widely spread among all domains of life. This indicates that they play crucial roles in the survival of organisms. Moreover, antibiotic and chemotherapeutic treatments have revealed that microorganisms and cancer cells may use MDR transporters to fight the cytotoxic action of drugs. Currently, several MDR extrusion systems are being investigated in detail. It is expected that understanding of the molecular basis of multidrug recognition and the transport mechanisms will allow a more rational design of new drugs which either will not be recognized and expelled by or will efficiently inhibit the activity of the MDR transporters. MDR transporters either utilize ATP hydrolysis or an ion motive force as an energy source to drive drugs out of the cell. This review summarizes the recent progress in the field of bacterial proton motive force driven MDR transporters.

  4. Auxin transport in an auxin-resistant mutant of arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.; Benning, C.; Estelle, M.

    1987-04-01

    The authors are studying a group of allelic recessive mutations in Arabidopsis called axr-1. Homozygous axr-1 plants are resistant to exogenously applied auxin. In addition, axr-1 mutations all confer a number of development abnormalities including an apparent reduction in apical dominance, loss of normal geotropic response, and a failure to self-fertilize due to a decrease in stamen elongation. In order to determine whether this pleiotropic phenotype is due to an alteration in auxin transport they have adapted the agar block transport assay for use in Arabidopsis stem segments. Their results indicate that as in other plant species, auxin transport is strongly polar in Arabidopsis stem segments. In addition transport is inhibited by the well characterized auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and the artificial auxin 2,4-D. These results as well as the characterization of transport in axr-1 plants will be presented.

  5. The pharmacokinetics of three multiple dose regimens of chloroquine: implications for malaria chemoprophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Wetsteyn, J C; De Vries, P J; Oosterhuis, B; Van Boxtel, C J

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of chloroquine were studied in healthy volunteers who received one of three different multiple-dose regimens for 3 weeks: once weekly 300 mg, twice weekly 200 mg and once daily 50 mg chloroquine. Plasma concentrations of chloroquine and metabolites were determined by h.p.l.c. with fluorescence detection. The concentration-time course was fitted to a multiple-dose pharmacokinetic model. Volume of distribution, elimination half-life and clearance were not different for the three regimens, ranging from 250-302 l kg-1, 374-479 h and 0.44-0.58 l h-1 kg-1 respectively. After the first week of all dosage regimens, peak and trough concentrations of chloroquine were above 16 micrograms l-1, sufficiently suppressive for chloroquine-sensitive P. falciparum strains. These data suggest that once daily chloroquine could be combined with proguanil in a single tablet and should improve compliance when given for malaria chemoprophylaxis. PMID:7654492

  6. Reversers of the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Stein, Wilfred D

    2002-05-01

    Multidrug resistance can arise from the presence of the membrane-bound pump, P-glycoprotein, in a tumor. Major efforts have been made to develop inhibitors of this pump, and a number of promising blockers have reached late stages of clinical trials. The kinetics of the inhibition of P-glycoprotein is complex, with binding sites that can interact synergistically. Reversers of increased affinity and specificity could, in principle, be developed on the basis of these synergies, and offer some promise in cancer therapeutics.

  7. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic bacterium. PMID:19761586

  8. Inhibitory effect of steroidal alkaloids on drug transport and multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Y; Harel-Orbital, T; Gaffield, W; Liscovitch, M

    2001-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to multiple cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance MDR) is a major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. MDR is often caused by elevated expression of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance protein (MRP). A number of compounds, termed chemosensitizers, have little or no cytotoxic action of their own, but inhibit (P-gp) or MRP-mediated drug export and are capable of sensitizing MDR cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we examined the ability of steroidal alkaloids of plant origin, namely the Veratrum sp. alkaloid cyclopamine and the Lycopersicon sp. alkaloid tomatidine, to act as potent and effective chemosensitizers in multidrug resistant tumor cells. Drug uptake was determined by measuring accumulation of tetramethylrosamine in multidrug resistant NCI AdrR human adenocarcinoma cells. Resistance to adriamycin and vinblastine was determined by utilizing the MTT cell survival assay. Cyclopamine and tomatidine elevate tetramethylrosamine uptake by NCI AdrR cells and sensitize the cells to the cytotoxic action of adriamycin and vinblastine. In both cases these agents are comparable in patency and efficacy to verapamil, a reversal agent commonly used in MDR research. It is concluded that steroidal alkaloids of plant origin act as inhibitors of P-gp-mediated drug transport and multidrug resistance and therefore may serve as chemosensitizers in combination chemotherapy with conventional cytotoxic drugs for treating multidrug resistant cancer.

  9. Transport of isometamidium (Samorin) by drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Trypanosoma congolense.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, I A; Mounsey, A; Holmes, P H

    1992-06-01

    The uptake kinetics of a 14C-labelled trypanocidal compound isometamidium chloride (Samorin, RMB Animal Health Ltd, UK) was measured in drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Trypanosoma congolense. It was established that drug uptake was significantly more rapid and quantitatively greater in drug-sensitive parasites. There was clear evidence that drug uptake in both the resistant and sensitive trypanosomes was by a specific, receptor-mediated process. This specific drug transport was energy-dependent, being sensitive to metabolic inhibition with SHAM/glycerol. Significant differences in drug transport were observed which could be correlated with resistance to isometamidium. The optimal pH for drug accumulation was lowered in the resistant trypanosomes; this finding, along with an observed change in specificity for the related compound homidium bromide, suggested that the specific receptor for isometamidium is altered in the resistant trypanosomes, possibly resulting in a reduction in drug uptake. In addition to these alterations in drug uptake, efflux of isometamidium also appears to occur in the resistant trypanosomes. Both a reduction in incubation temperature and metabolic inhibition increased the level of trypanosome-associated isometamidium in the resistant parasites. This was in contrast to observations using drug-sensitive parasites. Furthermore, the addition of calcium flux-modulating agents to the incubation medium also resulted in an increase in accumulation by the resistant parasites.

  10. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter confers kanamycin resistance to transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Mentewab, Ayalew; Stewart, C Neal

    2005-09-01

    Selectable markers of bacterial origin such as the neomycin phosphotransferase type II gene, which can confer kanamycin resistance to transgenic plants, represent an invaluable tool for plant engineering. However, since all currently used antibiotic-resistance genes are of bacterial origin, there have been concerns about horizontal gene transfer from transgenic plants back to bacteria, which may result in antibiotic resistance. Here we characterize a plant gene, Atwbc19, the gene that encodes an Arabidopsis thaliana ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter and confers antibiotic resistance to transgenic plants. The mechanism of resistance is novel, and the levels of resistance achieved are comparable to those attained through expression of bacterial antibiotic-resistance genes in transgenic tobacco using the CaMV 35S promoter. Because ABC transporters are endogenous to plants, the use of Atwbc19 as a selectable marker in transgenic plants may provide a practical alternative to current bacterial marker genes in terms of the risk for horizontal transfer of resistance genes.

  11. Experimental dissection of oxygen transport resistance in the components of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hwanyeong; Lee, Yoo il; Lee, Guesang; Min, Kyoungdoug; Yi, Jung S.

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen transport resistance is a major obstacle for obtaining high performance in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). To distinguish the major components that inhibit oxygen transport, an experimental method is established to dissect the oxygen transport resistance of the components of the PEMFC, such as the substrate, micro-porous layer (MPL), catalyst layer, and ionomer film. The Knudsen numbers are calculated to determine the types of diffusion mechanisms at each layer by measuring the pore sizes with either mercury porosimetry or BET analysis. At the under-saturated condition where condensation is mostly absent, the molecular diffusion resistance is dissected by changing the type of inert gas, and ionomer film permeation is separated by varying the inlet gas humidity. Moreover, the presence of the MPL and the variability of the substrate thickness allow the oxygen transport resistance at each component of a PEMFC to be dissected. At a low relative humidity of 50% and lower, an ionomer film had the largest resistance, while the contribution of the MPL was largest for the other humidification conditions.

  12. Changes in the Expression of Various Transporters as Influencing Factors of Resistance to Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shuichi; Yasuda, Megumi; Fukushima, Shoji

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the expression of transporters have been reported as factors in resistance to cisplatin (CDDP). This study was designed to clarify whether CDDP-resistant strains isolated from a cell line had the same characteristics, and whether these characteristics could be therapeutic targets. Intracellular platinum levels were determined by the inductively-coupled plasma method. mRNA expression levels were determined using the real-time polymerase chain reaction. Some CDDP-resistant HepG2 cell lines exhibited changes in the expression of copper transporter 1, multidrug resistant protein (MRP)2, and/or MRP3, resulting in decreased intracellular platinum amounts, while others showed no change in platinum accumulation. Expression of these transporters was not necessarily maintained in a constant direction within the cell population isolated from the same origin. These results suggest that the CDDP-resistant tumors caused by a decrease in intracellular platinum content consist of a heterogeneous cell population showing expression changes of several transporters. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. A recently evolved hexose transporter variant confers resistance to multiple pathogens in wheat.

    PubMed

    Moore, John W; Herrera-Foessel, Sybil; Lan, Caixia; Schnippenkoetter, Wendelin; Ayliffe, Michael; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Lillemo, Morten; Viccars, Libby; Milne, Ricky; Periyannan, Sambasivam; Kong, Xiuying; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang; Talbot, Mark; Bariana, Harbans; Patrick, John W; Dodds, Peter; Singh, Ravi; Lagudah, Evans

    2015-12-01

    As there are numerous pathogen species that cause disease and limit yields of crops, such as wheat (Triticum aestivum), single genes that provide resistance to multiple pathogens are valuable in crop improvement. The mechanistic basis of multi-pathogen resistance is largely unknown. Here we use comparative genomics, mutagenesis and transformation to isolate the wheat Lr67 gene, which confers partial resistance to all three wheat rust pathogen species and powdery mildew. The Lr67 resistance gene encodes a predicted hexose transporter (LR67res) that differs from the susceptible form of the same protein (LR67sus) by two amino acids that are conserved in orthologous hexose transporters. Sugar uptake assays show that LR67sus, and related proteins encoded by homeoalleles, function as high-affinity glucose transporters. LR67res exerts a dominant-negative effect through heterodimerization with these functional transporters to reduce glucose uptake. Alterations in hexose transport in infected leaves may explain its ability to reduce the growth of multiple biotrophic pathogen species.

  14. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using 14C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  16. Inhibitory properties of nerve-specific human glutamate dehydrogenase isozyme by chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Min; Kim, Eun-A; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Tae Ue; Cho, Sung-Woo; Yang, Seung-Ju

    2007-11-30

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase exists in hGDH1 (housekeeping isozyme) and in hGDH2 (nerve-specific isozyme), which differ markedly in their allosteric regulation. In the nervous system, GDH is enriched in astrocytes and is important for recycling glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter during neurotransmission. Chloroquine has been known to be a potent inhibitor of house-keeping GDH1 in permeabilized liver and kidney-cortex of rabbit. However, the effects of chloroquine on nerve-specific GDH2 have not been reported yet. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of chloroquine on hGDH2 at various conditions and showed that chloroquine could inhibit the activity of hGDH2 at dose-dependent manner. Studies of the chloroquine inhibition on enzyme activity revealed that hGDH2 was relatively less sensitive to chloroquine inhibition than house-keeping hGDH1. Incubation of hGDH2 was uncompetitive with respect of NADH and non-competitive with respect of 2-oxoglutarate. The inhibitory effect of chloroquine on hGDH2 was abolished, although in part, by the presence of ADP and L-leucine, whereas GTP did not change the sensitivity to chloroquine inhibition. Our results show a possibility that chloroquine may be used in regulating GDH activity and subsequently glutamate concentration in the central nervous system.

  17. An Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter that confers kanamycin resistance in transgenic plants does not endow resistance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Burris, Kellie; Mentewab, Ayalew; Ripp, Steven; Stewart, C Neal

    2008-03-01

    Concerns have been raised about potential horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance markers (ARMs) from transgenic plants to bacteria of medical and environmental importance. All ARMs used in transgenic plants have been bacterial in origin, but it has been recently shown that an Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter, Atwbc19, confers kanamycin resistance when overexpressed in transgenic plants. Atwbc19 was evaluated for its ability to transfer kanamycin resistance to Escherichia coli, a kanamycin-sensitive model bacterium, under simulated HGT, staged by subcloning Atwbc19 under the control of a bacterial promoter, genetically transforming to kanamycin-sensitive bacteria, and assessing if resistance was conferred as compared with bacteria harbouring nptII, the standard kanamycin resistance gene used to produce transgenic plants. NptII provided much greater resistance than Atwbc19 and was significantly different from the no-plasmid control at low concentrations. Atwbc19 was not significantly different from the no-plasmid control at higher concentrations. Even though HGT risks are considered low with nptII, Atwbc19 should have even lower risks, as its encoded protein is possibly mistargeted in bacteria.

  18. SLCO1A2, SLCO1B1 and SLCO2B1 polymorphisms influences chloroquine and primaquine treatment in Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Sortica, Vinicius A; Lindenau, Juliana D; Cunha, Maristela G; O Ohnishi, Maria Deise; R Ventura, Ana Maria; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea Kc; Santos, Sidney Eb; Guimarães, Luciano Sp; Hutz, Mara H

    2017-10-04

    The association of transporters gene polymorphisms with chloroquine/primaquine malaria treatment response was investigated in a Brazilian population. Totally, 164 Plasmodium vivax malaria infected patients were included. Generalized estimating equations were performed to determine gene influences on parasitemia and/or gametocytemia clearance over treatment time. Significant interaction between SLCO2B1 genotypes and treatment over time for parasitemia clearance rate on day 2 were observed (p FDR = 0.002). SLCO1A2 and SLCO1B1 gene treatment over time interactions were associated with gametocytemia clearance rate (p FDR = 0.018 and p FDR = 0.024). ABCB1, ABCC4 and SLCO1B3 were not associated with treatment response. The present work presents the first pharmacogenetic report of an association between chloroquine/primaquine responses with OATP transporters.

  19. The LABCG2 Transporter from the Protozoan Parasite Leishmania Is Involved in Antimony Resistance.

    PubMed

    Perea, Ana; Manzano, José Ignacio; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    Treatment for leishmaniasis, which is caused by Leishmania protozoan parasites, currently relies on a reduced arsenal of drugs. However, the significant increase in the incidence of drug therapeutic failure and the growing resistance to first-line drugs like antimonials in some areas of Northern India and Nepal limit the control of this parasitic disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance in Leishmania is now a matter of urgency to optimize drugs used and to identify novel drug targets to block or reverse resistant mechanisms. Some members of the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in Leishmania have been associated with drug resistance. In this study, we have focused our interest to characterize LABCG2's involvement in drug resistance in Leishmania. Leishmania major parasites overexpressing the ABC protein transporter LABCG2 were generated in order to assess how LABCG2 is involved in drug resistance. Assays of susceptibility to different leishmanicidal agents were carried out. Analysis of the drug resistance profile revealed that Leishmania parasites overexpressing LABCG2 were resistant to antimony, as they demonstrated a reduced accumulation of Sb(III) due to an increase in drug efflux. Additionally, LABCG2 was able to transport thiols in the presence of Sb(III) Biotinylation assays using parasites expressing LABCG2 fused with an N-terminal green fluorescent protein tag revealed that LABCG2 is partially localized in the plasma membrane; this supports data from previous studies which suggested that LABCG2 is localized in intracellular vesicles that fuse with the plasma membrane during exocytosis. In conclusion, Leishmania LABCG2 probably confers antimony resistance by sequestering metal-thiol conjugates within vesicles and through further exocytosis by means of the parasite's flagellar pocket. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Moving out: from sterol transport to drug resistance - the ABCG subfamily of efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Moitra, Karobi; Silverton, Latoya; Limpert, Katy; Im, Kate; Dean, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The ATP binding cassette (ABC) proteins are typically ATP-driven transmembrane pumps that have been evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to humans. In humans these transporters are subdivided into seven subfamilies, ranging from A to G. The ABCG subfamily of transporters is the primary focus of this review. This subfamily of proteins has been conserved throughout evolution and plays a central role in several cellular processes, such as sterol homeostasis and multidrug resistance. Functional polymorphisms/mutations in some of these G-subfamily transporters have clinical consequences in humans.

  1. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, chlorproguanil-dapsone, or chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria in Afghanistan and Pakistan: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Toby; Mayan, M Ismail; Hasan, M Anwar; Safi, M Hanif; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Whitty, Christopher J M; Rowland, Mark

    2007-05-23

    In areas where Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax coexist and treatments for the 2 species differ, misdiagnosis can lead to poor outcomes in either disease. A unified therapy effective against both species would reduce reliance on species-specific diagnosis, which in many areas is difficult to maintain. The antifolates are an important and affordable antimalarial class to which it is often assumed P vivax malaria is intrinsically resistant. To test the relative efficacy and safety of 2 antifolate drugs against P vivax malaria and compare each with chloroquine. An open-label randomized controlled trial comparing chloroquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and chlorproguanil-dapsone for the treatment of P vivax malaria was conducted in eastern Afghanistan and northwestern Pakistan, areas in which P vivax malaria predominates. A total of 20,410 patients older than 3 years were screened; 767 patients (315 in Pakistan and 452 in Afghanistan) with confirmed P vivax malaria were enrolled and followed up daily for 4 days, then weekly for 28 days, between March 2004 and June 2006. Complete clearance of parasites with no recrudescence by day 14. Secondary outcomes included being parasite-free by day 28, clinical failure, and anemia. By day 14, only 1 patient in the sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine group had parasites. By day 28, failure rates were found in 2 of 153 patients (1.3%) in the chloroquine group, 5 of 290 patients (1.7%) in the sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine group, and 27 of 272 patients (9.9%) in the chlorproguanil-dapsone group. Chlorproguanil-dapsone was less effective than sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-17.0; P<.001) and chloroquine (adjusted OR, 8.4; 95% CI, 2.0-36.5; P = .004). Chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine were equivalent in efficacy at day 28 (adjusted OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.3-7.0; P = .73). Chloroquine cleared gametocytes and asexual parasites more rapidly than sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine or

  2. Mathematical model for the transport of fluoroquinolone and its resistant bacteria in aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Ritu; Thatikonda, Shashidhar

    2017-08-05

    Development of antibiotic resistance in environmental bacteria is a direct threat to public health. Therefore, it becomes necessary to understand the fate and transport of antibiotic and its resistant bacteria. This paper presents a mathematical model for spatial and temporal transport of fluoroquinolone and its resistant bacteria in the aquatic environment of the river. The model includes state variables for organic matter, fluoroquinolone, heavy metals, and susceptible and resistant bacteria in the water column and sediment bed. Resistant gene is the factor which makes bacteria resistant to a particular antibiotic and is majorly carried on plasmids. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes are transferable between different bacterial species through conjugation (horizontal resistance transfer). This model includes plasmid dynamics between susceptible and resistant bacteria by considering the rate of horizontal resistance gene transfer among bacteria and the rate of losing resistance (segregation). The model describes processes which comprise of advection, dispersion, degradation, adsorption, diffusion, settling, resuspension, microbial growth, segregation, and transfer of resistance genes. The mathematical equations were solved by using numerical methods (implicit-explicit scheme) with appropriate boundary conditions. The development of the present model was motivated by the fact that the Musi River is heavily impacted by antibiotic pollution which led to the development of antibiotic resistance in its aquatic environment. The model was simulated for hypothetical pollution scenarios to predict the future conditions under various pollution management alternatives. The simulation results of the model for different cases show that the concentration of antibiotic, the concentration of organic matter, segregation rate, and horizontal transfer rate are the governing factors in the variation of population density of resistant bacteria. The treatment of effluents for

  3. Apparent involvement of a multidrug transporter in the fluoroquinolone resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, N N; Neyfakh, A A

    1997-01-01

    A Streptococcus pneumoniae strain selected for resistance to ethidium bromide demonstrated enhanced energy-dependent efflux of this toxic dye. Both the ethidium resistance and the ethidium efflux could be inhibited by the plant alkaloid reserpine. The ethidium-selected cells demonstrated cross-resistance to the fluoroquinolones norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin; this resistance could also be completely reversed by reserpine. Furthermore, reserpine potentiated the susceptibility of wild-type S. pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones and ethidium. The most plausible explanation for these results is that S. pneumoniae, like some other gram-positive bacteria, expresses a reserpine-sensitive multidrug transporter, which may play an important role in both intrinsic and acquired resistances of this pathogen to fluoroquinolone therapy. PMID:9174208

  4. A putative ABC transporter confers durable resistance to multiple fungal pathogens in wheat.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Lagudah, Evans S; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang; Singh, Ravi P; Huerta-Espino, Julio; McFadden, Helen; Bossolini, Eligio; Selter, Liselotte L; Keller, Beat

    2009-03-06

    Agricultural crops benefit from resistance to pathogens that endures over years and generations of both pest and crop. Durable disease resistance, which may be partial or complete, can be controlled by several genes. Some of the most devastating fungal pathogens in wheat are leaf rust, stripe rust, and powdery mildew. The wheat gene Lr34 has supported resistance to these pathogens for more than 50 years. Lr34 is now shared by wheat cultivars around the world. Here, we show that the LR34 protein resembles adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters of the pleiotropic drug resistance subfamily. Alleles of Lr34 conferring resistance or susceptibility differ by three genetic polymorphisms. The Lr34 gene, which functions in the adult plant, stimulates senescence-like processes in the flag leaf tips and edges.

  5. Introducing New Antimalarial Analogues of Chloroquine and Amodiaquine: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Parhizgar, Arezoo Rafiee; Tahghighi, Azar

    2017-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs with the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold such as the important drugs, chloroquine (CQ) and amodiaquine (AQ), have been used to prevent and treat malaria for many years. The importance of these drugs is related to their simple usage, high efficacy, affordability, and cost-effectiveness of their synthesis. In recent years, with the spread of parasite resistance to CQ and cross-resistance to its other analogues have decreased their consumption in many geographical areas. On the other hand, AQ is an effective antimalarial drug which its usage has been restricted due to hepatic and hematological toxicities. The significance of the quinoline ring at quinoline-based antimalarial drugs has prompted research centers and pharmaceutical companies to focus on the design and synthesis of new analogues of these drugs, especially CQ and AQ analogues. Accordingly, various derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo against the resistant strains of the malaria parasite to solve the problem of drug resistance. Also, the pharmacokinetic properties of these compounds have been evaluated to augment their efficacy and diminish their toxicity. Some of these analogues are currently in clinical and preclinical development. Consequently, the recent researches showed yet 4-aminoquinoline scaffold is active moiety in new compounds with antiplasmodial activity. Hence, the aim of this review article is to introduce of the novel synthetic analogues of CQ and AQ, which may constitute the next generation of antimalarial drugs with the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. PMID:28360437

  6. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  7. Overcoming multidrug resistance of small-molecule therapeutics through conjugation with releasable octaarginine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dubikovskaya, Elena A.; Thorne, Steve H.; Pillow, Thomas H.; Contag, Christopher H.; Wender, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Many cancer therapeutic agents elicit resistance that renders them ineffective and often produces cross-resistance to other drugs. One of the most common mechanisms of resistance involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated drug efflux. To address this problem, new agents have been sought that are less prone to inducing resistance and less likely to serve as substrates for Pgp efflux. An alternative to this approach is to deliver established agents as molecular transporter conjugates into cells through a mechanism that circumvents Pgp-mediated efflux and allows for release of free drug only after cell entry. Here we report that the widely used chemotherapeutic agent Taxol, ineffective against Taxol-resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines, can be incorporated into a releasable octaarginine conjugate that is effective against the same Taxol-resistant cell lines. It is significant that the ability of the Taxol conjugates to overcome Taxol resistance is observed both in cell culture and in animal models of ovarian cancer. The generality and mechanistic basis for this effect were also explored with coelenterazine, a Pgp substrate. Although coelenterazine itself does not enter cells because of Pgp efflux, its octaarginine conjugate does so readily. This approach shows generality for overcoming the multidrug resistance elicited by small-molecule cancer chemotherapeutics and could improve the prognosis for many patients with cancer and fundamentally alter search strategies for novel therapeutic agents that are effective against resistant disease. PMID:18713866

  8. 4-Isoxazolyl-1,4-dihydropyridines exhibit binding at the multidrug-resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Hulubei, Victoria; Meikrantz, Scott B; Quincy, David A; Houle, Tina; McKenna, John I; Rogers, Mark E; Steiger, Scott; Natale, N R

    2012-11-15

    The 4-isoxazolyl-dihydropyridines (IDHPs) exhibit inhibition of the multidrug-resistance transporter (MDR-1), and exhibit an SAR distinct from their activity at voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC). Among the four most active IDHPs, three were branched at C-5 of the isoxazole, including the most active analog, 1k.

  9. Chloroquine attenuates paraquat-induced lung injury in mice by altering inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haitao; Wu, Na; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhang, Lichun; Li, Tiegang; Zhao, Min

    2017-05-01

    Paraquat is one of the most extensively used herbicides and has high toxicity for humans and animals. However, there is no effective treatment for paraquat poisoning. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chloroquine on paraquat-induced lung injury in mice. Mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of paraquat and a daily intraperitoneal injection of the indicated dosages of chloroquine or dexamethasone. The histological changes, inflammation and oxidative stress in the lungs were examined at day 3, and the degree of pulmonary fibrosis was examined at day 28. H&E staining showed that chloroquine markedly attenuated lung injury induced by paraquat. In addition, the inflammatory responses induced by paraquat were inhibited after treatment with chloroquine, as indicated by the decreased number of leukocytes, the reduced levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the reduced NO content, and downregulation of iNOS expression in lung tissues. No different effect was found between high-dose chloroquine and dexamethasone. Additionally, the treatment with chloroquine increased the activity of SOD and decreased the level of MDA in the lung tissues. The expressions of the anti-oxidative proteins, Nrf2, HO-1 and NQO1, were also upregulated by chloroquine treatment. The high-dose chloroquine was more effective than dexamethasone in its anti-oxidation ability. Finally, the results of Masson's staining illustrated that chloroquine markedly attenuated fibrosis in the paraquat-exposed lungs. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that the expressions of the pro-fibrotic proteins TGF-β and α-SMA were downregulated after treatment with chloroquine. In conclusion, chloroquine effectively attenuated paraquat-induced lung injury in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrical resistance and transport numbers of ion-exchange membranes used in electrodialytic soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, H.K.; Ottosen, L.M.; Villumsen, A.

    1999-08-01

    Electrodialytic soil remediation is a recently developed method to decontaminate heavy metal polluted soil using ion-exchange membranes. In this method one side of the ion-exchange membrane is in direct contact with the polluted soil. It is of great importance to known if this contact with the soil causes damage to the membrane. This work presents the result of transport number and electrical resistance measurements done on four sets of ion-exchange membranes (Ionics, Inc CR67 HMR412 cation-exchange membranes and Ionics, Inc AR204 SXZR anion-exchange membranes), which have been used in four different electrodialytic soil remediation experiments. The experiments showed that after the use in electrodialytic soil remediation, the ion-exchange membranes had transport numbers in the same magnitude as new membranes. The electrical resistance for six membranes did not differ from that of new membranes, whereas two membranes showed a slightly increased resistance.

  11. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors as modulators of ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Suneet; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are involved in key signaling events/pathways that regulate cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis and metastasis. Deregulated activity of TKs has been implicated in several types of cancers. In recent years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been developed to inhibit specific kinases whose constitutive activity results in specific cancer types. These TKIs have been found to demonstrate effective anticancer activity and some of them have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for clinical use or are in clinical trials. However, these targeted therapeutic agents are also transported by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, resulting in altered pharmacokinetics or development of resistance to these drugs in cancer patients. This review covers the recent findings on the interactions of clinically important TKIs with ABC drug transporters. Future research efforts in the development of novel TKIs with specific targets, seeking improved activity, should consider these underlying causes of resistance to TKIs in cancer cells. PMID:22325423

  12. Reversal of ABC drug transporter-mediated multidrug resistance in cancer cells: Evaluation of current strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Calcagno, Anna Maria; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2008-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters that actively efflux a variety of amphipathic compounds can cause multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells, which is a major obstacle in the success of cancer chemotherapy. The development of synthetic small molecule compounds or the identification of natural products that block ABC transporter-mediated efflux has been the conventional approach used to combat MDR. The strategy of using chemosensitizers, however, has not been successful in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Therefore, alternative approaches to identify or to synthesize compounds that can induce selective toxicity in cancer cells overexpressing one or more ABC transporters have been undertaken. This review summarizes the recent advances in identifying strategies to restore sensitivity to chemotherapeutics in multidrug resistant cancer cells. PMID:19079736

  13. Therapeutic responses of Plasmodium vivax malaria to chloroquine and primaquine treatment in northeastern Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lili; Wang, Ying; Parker, Daniel M; Gupta, Bhavna; Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Huaie; Fan, Qi; Cao, Yaming; Xiao, Yuping; Lee, Ming-chieh; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun; Baird, J Kevin; Cui, Liwang

    2015-02-01

    Chloroquine-primaquine (CQ-PQ) continues to be the frontline therapy for radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria. Emergence of CQ-resistant (CQR) P. vivax parasites requires a shift to artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), which imposes a significant financial, logistical, and safety burden. Monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of CQ is thus important. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of CQ-PQ for P. vivax malaria in northeast Myanmar. We recruited 587 patients with P. vivax monoinfection attending local malaria clinics during 2012 to 2013. These patients received three daily doses of CQ at a total dose of 24 mg of base/kg of body weight and an 8-day PQ treatment (0.375 mg/kg/day) commencing at the same time as the first CQ dose. Of the 401 patients who finished the 28-day follow-up, the cumulative incidence of recurrent parasitemia was 5.20% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.04% to 7.36%). Among 361 (61%) patients finishing a 42-day follow-up, the cumulative incidence of recurrent blood-stage infection reached 7.98% (95% CI, 5.20% to 10.76%). The cumulative risk of gametocyte carriage at days 28 and 42 was 2.21% (95% CI, 0.78% to 3.64%) and 3.93% (95% CI, 1.94% to 5.92%), respectively. Interestingly, for all 15 patients with recurrent gametocytemia, this was associated with concurrent asexual stages. Genotyping of recurrent parasites at the merozoite surface protein 3α gene locus from 12 patients with recurrent parasitemia within 28 days revealed that 10 of these were the same genotype as at day 0, suggesting recrudescence or relapse. Similar studies in 70 patients in the same area in 2007 showed no recurrent parasitemias within 28 days. The sensitivity to chloroquine of P. vivax in northeastern Myanmar may be deteriorating.

  14. A Transporter Interactome Is Essential for the Acquisition of Antimicrobial Resistance to Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Yonatan; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Alon Cudkowicz, Noemie; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has escalated and drug-resistant infections are named among the most urgent problems facing clinicians today. Our experiments here identify a transporter interactome and portray its essential function in acquisition of antimicrobial resistance. By exposing E. coli cells to consecutive increasing concentrations of the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin we generated in the laboratory highly resistant strains that carry multiple mutations, most of them identical to those identified in clinical isolates. With this experimental paradigm, we show that the MDTs function in a coordinated mode to provide an essential first-line defense mechanism, preventing the drug reaching lethal concentrations, until a number of stable efficient alterations occur that allow survival. Single-component efflux transporters remove the toxic compounds from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space where TolC-dependent transporters expel them from the cell. We postulate a close interaction between the two types of transporters to prevent rapid leak of the hydrophobic substrates back into the cell. The findings change the prevalent concept that in Gram-negative bacteria a single multidrug transporter, AcrAB-TolC type, is responsible for the resistance. The concept of a functional interactome, the process of identification of its members, the elucidation of the nature of the interactions and its role in cell physiology will change the existing paradigms in the field. We anticipate that our work will have an impact on the present strategy searching for inhibitors of AcrAB-TolC as adjuvants of existing antibiotics and provide novel targets for this urgent undertaking.

  15. A Transporter Interactome Is Essential for the Acquisition of Antimicrobial Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Yonatan; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Alon Cudkowicz, Noemie; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has escalated and drug-resistant infections are named among the most urgent problems facing clinicians today. Our experiments here identify a transporter interactome and portray its essential function in acquisition of antimicrobial resistance. By exposing E. coli cells to consecutive increasing concentrations of the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin we generated in the laboratory highly resistant strains that carry multiple mutations, most of them identical to those identified in clinical isolates. With this experimental paradigm, we show that the MDTs function in a coordinated mode to provide an essential first-line defense mechanism, preventing the drug reaching lethal concentrations, until a number of stable efficient alterations occur that allow survival. Single-component efflux transporters remove the toxic compounds from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space where TolC-dependent transporters expel them from the cell. We postulate a close interaction between the two types of transporters to prevent rapid leak of the hydrophobic substrates back into the cell. The findings change the prevalent concept that in Gram-negative bacteria a single multidrug transporter, AcrAB-TolC type, is responsible for the resistance. The concept of a functional interactome, the process of identification of its members, the elucidation of the nature of the interactions and its role in cell physiology will change the existing paradigms in the field. We anticipate that our work will have an impact on the present strategy searching for inhibitors of AcrAB-TolC as adjuvants of existing antibiotics and provide novel targets for this urgent undertaking. PMID:27050393

  16. [In vitro evaluation of the sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine using the deli-microtest in region of Dakar, Senegal].

    PubMed

    Dieng, T; Bah, I B; Ndiaye, P M; Diallo, I; Diop, B M; Brasseur, P; Mboup, S; Wirth, D; Ndir, O

    2005-11-01

    This study was carried out between 2000 and 2001 in the peri-urban Pikine area located 15 km from Dakar, Senegal. The purpose was to evaluate the in vitro sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine, which was the recommended first-line drug for uncomplicated malaria treatment in Senegal. Testing was carried out using the double-site enzyme-linked lactate dehydrogenase imnunosorbent (DELI) microtest. The DELI-microtest is an ELISA method using 2 monoclonal antibodies against 2 antigenic sites of the specific P. falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme. The level of LDH is proportional to the extent of parasite growth. P. falciparum isolates were cultured in 96-well plates in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with hypoxanthine and albumax, in the presence of chloroquine sulphate concentrations ranging from 5.6 nM/L to 2870.8 nM/L. Plates were incubated in a candle-jar for 48 hours at 37 degrees C and frozen at -20 degrees C. The DELI-microtest was performed using the supernatant of hemolysed cultures. The amount of pLDH released was evaluated based on optical density. The chloroquine sensitivity of the isolate was estimated based on IC50 with a cut-off of <100 nM/L. Geometric mean IC50 values were 41 nM/L (range: 4.8 nM/L to 1435 nM/L) and 135 nM/L (range: 8.63 nM/L to 2153 nM/L) in 2000 and 2001 respectively. This study demonstrated a dramatic increase in the in vitro resistance of P. falciparum to chloroquine from 30% in 2000 to 59.6% in 2001. These findings suggest that regular surveillance of in vitro drug resistance is important to predict in vivo drug resistance and allow timely changes in public health recommendations.

  17. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  18. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  19. Managing scorpion stings in the tropics: chloroquine as an effective drug.

    PubMed

    Yenli, Edwin M T; Ziem, Juventus B; Hillah, B; Wegdam, Harry H J

    2010-04-01

    We report on a fairly familiar alternative use of injection chloroquine in district hospitals in Ghana. Within a period of three years, pain control among six patients with scorpion sting was achieved successfully on an outpatient department basis with injection chloroquine at the Holy Family Hospital, Techiman, Ghana.

  20. The Effect of Chloroquine on Immune Activation and Interferon Signatures Associated with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Bosinger, Steven E; Kang, Minhee; Belaunzaran-Zamudio, Pablo; Matining, Roy M; Wilson, Cara C; Flexner, Charles; Clagett, Brian; Plants, Jill; Read, Sarah; Purdue, Lynette; Myers, Laurie; Boone, Linda; Tebas, Pablo; Kumar, Princy; Clifford, David; Douek, Daniel; Silvestri, Guido; Landay, Alan L; Lederman, Michael M

    2016-07-01

    Immune activation associated with HIV-1 infection contributes to morbidity and mortality. We studied whether chloroquine, through Toll-like receptor (TLR) antagonist properties, could reduce immune activation thought to be driven by TLR ligands, such as gut-derived bacterial elements and HIV-1 RNAs. AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5258 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 33 HIV-1-infected participants off antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 37 participants on ART. Study participants in each cohort were randomized 1:1 to receive chloroquine 250 mg orally for the first 12 weeks then cross over to placebo for 12 weeks or placebo first and then chloroquine. Combining the periods of chloroquine use in both arms of the on-ART cohort yielded a modest reduction in the proportions of CD8 T cells co-expressing CD38 and DR (median decrease = 3.0%, p = .003). The effect on immune activation in the off-ART cohort was likely confounded by increased plasma HIV-1 RNA during chloroquine administration (median 0.29 log10 increase, p < .001). Transcriptional analyses in the off-ART cohort showed decreased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in 5 of 10 chloroquine-treated participants and modest decreases in CD38 and CCR5 RNAs in all chloroquine-treated participants. Chloroquine modestly reduced immune activation in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Clinical Trials Registry Number: NCT00819390.

  1. A STUDY OF THE PHARMACOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY OF VISION IN THE SOLDIER. 1. CHLOROQUINE AND HYDROXYCHLOROQUINE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A critical evaluation of reports on the toxic effects of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine on vision has revealed a relationship between the dosage...revealed a possible explanation of the retinal toxicity of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine . This phenomenon merits future study because reactions of

  2. Antimalarial activity of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) arene complexes with mono- and bidentate chloroquine analogue ligands.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Glans, Lotta; Cassells, Irwin; Fogeron, Thibault; Govender, Preshendren; Stringer, Tameryn; Chellan, Prinessa; Lisensky, George C; Hersh, William H; Doverbratt, Isa; Lidin, Sven; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Smith, Gregory S; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-11-28

    Eight new ruthenium and five new osmium p-cymene half-sandwich complexes have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for antimalarial activity. All complexes contain ligands that are based on a 4-chloroquinoline framework related to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Ligands HL(1-8) are salicylaldimine derivatives, where HL(1) = N-(2-((2-hydroxyphenyl)methylimino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, and HL(2-8) contain non-hydrogen substituents in the 3-position of the salicylaldimine ring, viz. F, Cl, Br, I, NO2, OMe and (t)Bu for HL(2-8), respectively. Ligand HL(9) is also a salicylaldimine-containing ligand with substitutions in both 3- and 5-positions of the salicylaldimine moiety, i.e. N-(2-((2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)methyl-imino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, while HL(10) is N-(2-((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylamino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine) The half sandwich metal complexes that have been investigated are [Ru(η(6)-cym)(L(1-8))Cl] (Ru-1-Ru-8, cym = p-cymene), [Os(η(6)-cym)(L(1-3,5,7))Cl] (Os-1-Os-3, Os-5, and Os-7), [M(η(6)-cym)(HL(9))Cl2] (M = Ru, Ru-HL(9); M = Os, Os-HL(9)) and [M(η(6)-cym)(L(10))Cl]Cl (M = Ru, Ru-10; M = Os, Os-10). In complexes Ru-1-Ru-8 and Ru-10, Os-1-Os-3, Os-5 and Os-7 and Os-10, the ligands were found to coordinate as bidentate N,O- and N,N-chelates, while in complexes Ru-HL(9) and Os-HL(9), monodentate coordination of the ligands through the quinoline nitrogen was established. The antimalarial activity of the new ligands and complexes was evaluated against chloroquine sensitive (NF54 and D10) and chloroquine resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite strains. Coordination of ruthenium and osmium arene moieties to the ligands resulted in lower antiplasmodial activities relative to the free ligands, but the resistance index is better for the ruthenium complexes compared to chloroquine. Overall, osmium complexes appeared to be less active than the corresponding ruthenium complexes.

  3. Transport properties of Ar+ irradiated resistive switching BiFeO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Shuai, Y.; Ou, X.; Luo, W. B.; Wu, C. G.; Zhang, W. L.; Bürger, D.; Skorupa, I.; You, T.; Du, N.; Schmidt, O. G.; Schmidt, H.

    2015-05-01

    BiFeO3 thin films were irradiated by Ar+ ions with different fluences. The rectifying and resistive switching behaviour were retained on the Au/BiFeO3/Pt stack, and the ON/OFF ratio clearly depends on the Ar+ fluence. It was observed that the transport in high resistance state changes from Poole-Frenkel conduction to space-charge-limited conduction after irradiation. While the conduction of the low resistance state is dominated by both the interface and the bulk thin film in the pristine devices, however, it is only dominated by the interface in the irradiated devices. The observed change of conduction mechanism was explained by additionally created oxygen vacancies (OVs) during irradiation, which also improves the stability of resistive switching.

  4. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. All rights reserved.

  5. Resistance of Citrus Fruit to Mass Transport of Water Vapor and Other Gases 1

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yehoshua, Shimshon; Burg, Stanley P.; Young, Roger

    1985-01-01

    The resistance of oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) to ethylene, O2, CO2, and H2O mass transport was investigated anatomically with scanning electron microscope and physiologically by gas exchange measurements at steady state. The resistance of untreated fruit to water vapor is far less than to ethylene, CO2 and O2. Waxing partially or completely plugs stomatal pores and forms an intermittent cracked layer over the surface of fruit, restricting transport of ethylene, O2, and CO2, but not of water; whereas individual sealing of fruit with high density polyethylene films reduces water transport by 90% without substantially inhibiting gas exchange. Stomata of harvested citrus fruits are essentially closed. However, ethylene, O2 and CO2 still diffuse mainly through the residual stomatal opening where the relative transport resistance (approximately 6,000 seconds per centimeter) depends on the relative diffusivity of each gas in air. Water moves preferentially by a different pathway, probably through a liquid aqueous phase in the cuticle where water conductance is 60-fold greater. Other gases are constrained from using this pathway because their diffusivity in liquid water is 104-fold less than in air. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16664527

  6. Chloroquine Inhibits HMGB1 Inflammatory Signaling and Protects Mice from Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghua; Cao, Lizhi; Xie, Min; Yu, Yan; Kang, Rui; Yang, Liangchun; Zhao, Mingyi; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is caused by an overwhelming immune response to bacterial infection. The discovery of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) as a late mediator of lethal sepsis has prompted investigation into the development of new therapeutics which specifically target this protein. Here, we show that chloroquine, an anti-malarial drug, prevents lethality in mice with established endotoxemia or sepsis. This effect is still observed even if administration of chloroquine is delayed. The protective effects of chloroquine were mediated through inhibition of HMGB1 release in macrophages, monocytes, and endothelial cells, thereby preventing its cytokine-like activities. As an inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine specifically inhibited HMGB1-induced Iκ-B degradation and NF-κB activation. These findings define a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of chloroquine and also suggest a new potential clinical use for this drug in the setting of sepsis. PMID:23707973

  7. Uptake inhibitors but not substrates induce protease resistance in extracellular loop two of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2004-03-01

    Changes in protease sensitivity of extracellular loop two (EL2) of the dopamine transporter (DAT) during inhibitor and substrate binding were examined using trypsin proteolysis and epitope-specific immunoblotting. In control rat striatal membranes, proteolysis of DAT in a restricted region of EL2 was produced by 0.001 to 10 microg/ml trypsin. However, in the presence of the dopamine uptake blockers [2-(diphenylmethoxyl) ethyl]-4-(3phenylpropyl) piperazine (GBR 12909), mazindol, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-flourophenyl)tropane (beta-CFT), nomifensine, benztropine, or (-)-cocaine, 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of trypsin were required to produce comparable levels of proteolysis. Protease resistance induced by ligands was correlated with their affinity for DAT binding, was not observed with Zn2+, (+)-cocaine, or inhibitors of norepinephrine or serotonin transporters, and was not caused by altered catalytic activity of trypsin. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the interaction of uptake inhibitors with DAT induces a protease-resistant conformation in EL2. In contrast, binding of substrates did not induce protease resistance in EL2, suggesting that substrates and inhibitors interact with DAT differently during binding. To assess the effects of EL2 proteolysis on DAT function, the binding and transport properties of trypsin-digested DAT were assayed with [3H]CFT and [3H]dopamine. Digestion decreased the Bmax for binding and the Vmax for uptake in amounts that were proportional to the extent of proteolysis, indicating that the structural integrity of EL2 is required for maintenance of both DAT binding and transport functions. Together this data provides novel information about inhibitor and substrate interactions at EL2, possibly relating the protease resistant DAT conformation to a mechanism of transport inhibition.

  8. Use of pre-packaged chloroquine for the home management of presumed malaria in Malagasy children

    PubMed Central

    Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Millet, Pascal; Soarès, Jean Louis; Rabarijaona, Leon; Rakotoson, Benjamin; Malvy, Denis; Ménard, Didier

    2006-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to assess the quality of home malaria management with pre-packaged chloroquine in two areas in the Moramanga district of Madagascar. The knowledge, attitude and practices of care providers in terms of home treatment options were evaluated and compared. The availability of treatment options by studying retailers and community-based service providers was also investigated. Methods A cross-sectional investigation in two communities, in the hamlets and villages located close to carers, retailers, community-based service providers and primary health centres was carried out. Results Carers in the two districts were equally well aware of the use of pre-packaged chloroquine. Their first response to the onset of fever was to treat children with this antimalarial drug at home. The dose administered and treatment compliance were entirely satisfactory (100%) with pre-packaged chloroquine and rarely satisfactory (1.6% to 4.5%) with non pre-packaged chloroquine. In cases of treatment failure, the carers took patients to health centres. Chloroquine was supplied principally by private pharmacies and travelling salesmen selling unpackaged chloroquine tablets. Non pre-packaged chloroquine was the most common drug used at health centres. The frequency of positive rapid malaria tests (P = 0.01) was significantly higher in children treated with non pre-packaged chloroquine (38%) than in children treated with pre-packaged chloroquine (1.3%). Conclusion Home malaria management should be improved in Madagascar. Efforts should focus on communication, the training of community-based service providers, access to pre-packaged drugs and the gradual withdrawal of pre-packaged chloroquine and its replacement by pre-packaged artemisinin-based combination therapies. PMID:16972985

  9. Identification of a Novel Membrane Transporter Mediating Resistance to Organic Arsenic in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhangqi; Luangtongkum, Taradon; Qiang, Zhiyi; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Although bacterial mechanisms involved in the resistance to inorganic arsenic are well understood, the molecular basis for organic arsenic resistance has not been described. Campylobacter jejuni, a major food-borne pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, is highly prevalent in poultry and is reportedly resistant to the arsenic compound roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid), which has been used as a feed additive in the poultry industry for growth promotion. In this study, we report the identification of a novel membrane transporter (named ArsP) that contributes to organic arsenic resistance in Campylobacter. ArsP is predicted to be a membrane permease containing eight transmembrane helices, distinct from other known arsenic transporters. Analysis of multiple C. jejuni isolates from various animal species revealed that the presence of an intact arsP gene is associated with elevated resistance to roxarsone. In addition, inactivation of arsP in C. jejuni resulted in 4- and 8-fold reductions in the MICs of roxarsone and nitarsone, respectively, compared to that for the wild-type strain. Furthermore, cloning of arsP into a C. jejuni strain lacking a functional arsP gene led to 16- and 64-fold increases in the MICs of roxarsone and nitarsone, respectively. Neither mutation nor overexpression of arsP affected the MICs of inorganic arsenic, including arsenite and arsenate, in Campylobacter. Moreover, acquisition of arsP in NCTC 11168 led to accumulation of less roxarsone than the wild-type strain lacking arsP. Together, these results indicate that ArsP functions as an efflux transporter specific for extrusion of organic arsenic and contributes to the resistance to these compounds in C. jejuni. PMID:24419344

  10. Interaction of gatifloxacin with efflux transporters: a possible mechanism for drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kwatra, Deep; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to screen the interactions of fourth generation fluoroquinolone-gatifloxacin with efflux pumps i.e. P-gp, MRP2 and BCRP. Mechanism of gatifloxacin interaction with efflux transporters may explain its acquired resistance. Such clarification may lead to the development of strategies to overcome efflux and enhance its bioavailability at target site. This process will aid in the reduction of dose volume, further eliminating the chances of systemic toxicity from topical gatifloxacin eye drops. MDCK cell lines transfected with the targeted efflux transporters were used for this study. [14C] Erythromycin was selected as a model substrate for P-gp and MRP2 whereas Hoechst 33342 was employed as a substrate for BCRP. Uptake and transport studies of these substrates were performed in the presence of gatifloxacin to delineate its interaction with efflux transporters. Further the efflux ratio in the presence of gatifloxacin was calculated from bidirectional transport studies. The concentration of [14C] erythromycin and Hoechst 33342 were measured using scintillation counter and fluorescence plate reader respectively. A concentration dependent inhibition effect in the presence of gatifloxacin was revealed on [14C] erythromycin uptake. The efflux ratio (BL-AP/AP-BL) of substrates was found to approach unity at higher gatifloxacin concentrations. Increased concentration of gatifloxacin did not elevate uptake of Hoechst 33342. All these studies were validated with known inhibitors as positive control. Uptake and transport studies support the hypothesis that gatifloxacin is a substrate for P-gp, MRP2 but not for BCRP. Possible interactions of gatifloxacin with P-gp and MRP2 may be a possible mechanism for acquired resistance of gatifloxacin. This information can be further extended to design prodrugs or formulations in order to prevent development of acquired resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy with its reduction in side effects. PMID:20573570

  11. Lysine catabolism, amino acid transport, and systemic acquired resistance: what is the link?.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaiyu; Ludewig, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Lysine is an essential amino acid for human nutrition, which is generally low in cereal diets. Its biosynthesis via the aspartate-pathway and catabolism is controlled by complex feedback mechanisms. Recently, aspartate-derived amino acids were found to be elevated during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis and a lysine catabolite, pipecolic acid, was identified as critical regulator of systemic acquired resistance. Pipecolic acid is mobile in plants, functions as an intensifier of defense responses and mediates systemic acquired resistance establishment via signal amplification. The altered pathogen defense in several mutants with altered homeostasis of aspartate-derived amino acids, such as lysine, had already provided a genetic link with amino acid homeostasis. Furthermore, the modification of amino acid transport and distribution within tissues not only affected the plant growth performance, but also the plant-pathogen interaction. The ectopic overexpression of a gene encoding a high affinity importer with preference to basic amino acids, such as lysine, cationic amino acid transporter1 (CAT1), improved the disease resistance to a hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen in Arabidopsis via a constitutively activated salicylic acid pathway. The importance of Asp-derived amino acid homeostasis for plant systemic acquired resistance and on overall plant growth performance may be relevant to resistance and nutritional quality breeding. Whether nitrogen fertilization has an impact on crop pest control management via amino acid homeostasis is briefly discussed.

  12. New Approaches to Overcome Transport Related Drug Resistance in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Salcedo, Jose A.; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Valverde-Pozo, Javier; Soriano, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania and Trypanosoma are members of the Trypanosomatidae family that cause severe human infections such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite efforts to eradicate them, migrations are expanding these infections to developing countries. There are no vaccines available and current treatments depend only on chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of these diseases given that existing drugs are old and limited, with some having severe side effects. Most resistance mechanisms developed by these parasites are related with a decreased uptake or increased efflux of the drug due to mutations or altered expression of membrane transporters. Different new approaches have been elaborated that can overcome these mechanisms of resistance including the use of inhibitors of efflux pumps and drug carriers for both active and passive targeting. Here we review new formulations that have been successfully applied to circumvent resistance related to drug transporters, opening alternative ways to solve drug resistance in protozoan parasitic diseases. PMID:27733833

  13. ABC-transporters: implications on drug resistance from microorganisms to human cancers.

    PubMed

    Lage, Hermann

    2003-09-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a common clinical problem in patients with infectious diseases as well as in patients with cancer. During treatment of infections or malignant tumors, the drug targets of prokaryotic or eukaryotic microorganisms and neoplastic cells are often found to be refractory to a variety of drugs that have different structures and functions. This phenomenon has been termed multidrug resistance (MDR). The mechanisms leading to MDR are frequently caused by trans-membrane xenobiotic transport molecules belonging to the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. There is an urgent need to understand the structure-function relationships of these efflux pumps that underlie their transport mechanism and drug selectivity. This knowledge may allow the rational design of new drugs that can inhibit or circumvent the activity of these MDR transport molecules. Furthermore, the development of such chemosensitizing agents would help us learn more about the physiological functions and substrates of these pump proteins. This review will discuss the current state of knowledge of the functional and structural similarities among ABC-transporters in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and their impact on MDR.

  14. ABC Transporters and their Role in Nucleoside and Nucleotide Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Yu; Schuetz, John D.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters confer drug resistance against a wide range of chemotherapeutic agents, including nucleoside and nucleotide based drugs. While nucleoside based drugs have been used for many years in the treatment of solid and hematological malignancies as well as viral and autoimmune diseases, the potential contribution of ABC transporters has only recently been recognized. This neglect is likely because activation of nucleoside derivatives require an initial carrier-mediated uptake step followed by phosphorylation by nucleoside kinases, and defects in uptake or kinase activation were considered the primary mechanisms of nucleoside drug resistance. However, recent studies demonstrate that members of the ABCC transporter subfamily reduce the intracellular concentration of monophosphorylated nucleoside drugs. In addition to the ABCC subfamily members, ABCG2 has been shown to transport nucleoside drugs and nucleoside-monophosphate derivatives of clinically relevant nucleoside drugs such as cytarabine, cladribine, and clofarabine to name a few. This review will discuss ABC transporters and how they interact with other processes affecting the efficacy of nucleoside based drugs. PMID:22285911

  15. Dielectric interpretation of Lei-Ting nonlinear force-momentum-balance transport equation for isothermal resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horing, N. J. M.; Lei, X. L.; Cui, H. L.

    1986-05-01

    A dielectric interpretation of the nonlinear Lei-Ting force-momentum-balance transport equation for steady-state dc current flow is developed here in correspondence with standard techniques for calculating fast-particle energy loss to a plasmalike medium. In conjunction with this we interpret the result to be an isothermal resistivity calculated to lowest order in the impurity scattering potentials, isothermal in the sense that all energy dissipated is removed from the system, essentially instantaneously as it is generated, by a heat bath in contact with the system which maintains it at constant temperature throughout the nonlinear dc conduction process. On the basis of its isothermal character, we argue that the Lei-Ting dc resistivity calculated to lowest order in the impurity scattering potentials-whose linear limit is significantly different from the corresponding linear resistivity of an adiabatic character (for a system admitting no drainoff of dissipated energy, developing under a purely mechanical Hamiltonian)-is immune to serious critical objections of the type brought by Argyres and Sigel against similar lowest-order adiabatic linear resistivity calculations some time ago. Moreover, we also show that a dielectric Lei-Ting type formulation of linearized ac resistivity leads to the standard high-frequency linear resistivity formula, and that its zero-frequency limit naturally yields the isothermal dc linear Lei-Ting resistivity.

  16. Emergence of domains and nonlinear transport in the zero-resistance state.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, I A; Khodas, M; Mirlin, A D; Polyakov, D G

    2013-11-15

    We study transport in the domain state, the so-called zero-resistance state, that emerges in a two-dimensional electron system in which the combined action of microwave radiation and magnetic field produces a negative absolute conductivity. We show that the voltage-biased system has a rich phase diagram in the system size and voltage plane, with second- and first-order transitions between the domain and homogeneous states for small and large voltages, respectively. We find the residual negative dissipative resistance in the stable domain state.

  17. ABC transporter activity linked to radiation resistance and molecular subtype in pediatric medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Wendy J; Crowther, Lisa M; Little, Erica B; Freeman, Ruth; Harliwong, Ivon; Veleva, Desi; Hassall, Timothy E; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D; Hallahan, Andrew R

    2013-10-04

    Resistance to radiation treatment remains a major clinical problem for patients with brain cancer. Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, and occurs in the cerebellum. Though radiation treatment has been critical in increasing survival rates in recent decades, the presence of resistant cells in a substantial number of medulloblastoma patients leads to relapse and death. Using the established medulloblastoma cell lines UW228 and Daoy, we developed a novel model system to enrich for and study radiation tolerant cells early after radiation exposure. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, dead cells and cells that had initiated apoptosis were removed, allowing surviving cells to be investigated before extensive proliferation took place. Isolated surviving cells were tumorigenic in vivo and displayed elevated levels of ABCG2, an ABC transporter linked to stem cell behavior and drug resistance. Further investigation showed another family member, ABCA1, was also elevated in surviving cells in these lines, as well as in early passage cultures from pediatric medulloblastoma patients. We discovered that the multi-ABC transporter inhibitors verapamil and reserpine sensitized cells from particular patients to radiation, suggesting that ABC transporters have a functional role in cellular radiation protection. Additionally, verapamil had an intrinsic anti-proliferative effect, with transient exposure in vitro slowing subsequent in vivo tumor formation. When expression of key ABC transporter genes was assessed in medulloblastoma tissue from 34 patients, levels were frequently elevated compared with normal cerebellum. Analysis of microarray data from independent cohorts (n = 428 patients) showed expression of a number of ABC transporters to be strongly correlated with certain medulloblastoma subtypes, which in turn are associated with clinical outcome. ABC transporter inhibitors are already being trialed clinically, with the aim of decreasing

  18. ABC transporter activity linked to radiation resistance and molecular subtype in pediatric medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to radiation treatment remains a major clinical problem for patients with brain cancer. Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, and occurs in the cerebellum. Though radiation treatment has been critical in increasing survival rates in recent decades, the presence of resistant cells in a substantial number of medulloblastoma patients leads to relapse and death. Methods Using the established medulloblastoma cell lines UW228 and Daoy, we developed a novel model system to enrich for and study radiation tolerant cells early after radiation exposure. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, dead cells and cells that had initiated apoptosis were removed, allowing surviving cells to be investigated before extensive proliferation took place. Results Isolated surviving cells were tumorigenic in vivo and displayed elevated levels of ABCG2, an ABC transporter linked to stem cell behavior and drug resistance. Further investigation showed another family member, ABCA1, was also elevated in surviving cells in these lines, as well as in early passage cultures from pediatric medulloblastoma patients. We discovered that the multi-ABC transporter inhibitors verapamil and reserpine sensitized cells from particular patients to radiation, suggesting that ABC transporters have a functional role in cellular radiation protection. Additionally, verapamil had an intrinsic anti-proliferative effect, with transient exposure in vitro slowing subsequent in vivo tumor formation. When expression of key ABC transporter genes was assessed in medulloblastoma tissue from 34 patients, levels were frequently elevated compared with normal cerebellum. Analysis of microarray data from independent cohorts (n = 428 patients) showed expression of a number of ABC transporters to be strongly correlated with certain medulloblastoma subtypes, which in turn are associated with clinical outcome. Conclusions ABC transporter inhibitors are already being

  19. Putative ABC Transporter Responsible for Acetic Acid Resistance in Acetobacter aceti

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the membrane fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins that were produced in response to acetic acid. A 60-kDa protein, named AatA, which was mostly induced by acetic acid, was prepared; aatA was cloned on the basis of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. AatA, consisting of 591 amino acids and containing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) sequences and ABC signature sequences, belonged to the ABC transporter superfamily. The aatA mutation with an insertion of the neomycin resistance gene within the aatA coding region showed reduced resistance to acetic acid, formic acid, propionic acid, and lactic acid, whereas the aatA mutation exerted no effects on resistance to various drugs, growth at low pH (adjusted with HCl), assimilation of acetic acid, or resistance to citric acid. Introduction of plasmid pABC101 containing aatA under the control of the Escherichia coli lac promoter into the aatA mutant restored the defect in acetic acid resistance. In addition, pABC101 conferred acetic acid resistance on E. coli. These findings showed that AatA was a putative ABC transporter conferring acetic acid resistance on the host cell. Southern blot analysis and subsequent nucleotide sequencing predicted the presence of aatA orthologues in a variety of acetic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The fermentation with A. aceti containing aatA on a multicopy plasmid resulted in an increase in the final yield of acetic acid. PMID:16391084

  20. Characterization of a highly hop-resistant Lactobacillus brevis strain lacking hop transport.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Gänzle, Michael G; Vogel, Rudi F

    2006-10-01

    Resistance to hops is a prerequisite for lactic acid bacteria to spoil beer. In this study we analyzed mechanisms of hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis at the metabolism, membrane physiology, and cell wall composition levels. The beer-spoiling organism L. brevis TMW 1.465 was adapted to high concentrations of hop compounds and compared to a nonadapted strain. Upon adaptation to hops the metabolism changed to minimize ethanol stress. Fructose was used predominantly as a carbon source by the nonadapted strain but served as an electron acceptor upon adaptation to hops, with concomitant formation of acetate instead of ethanol. Furthermore, hop adaptation resulted in higher levels of lipoteichoic acids (LTA) incorporated into the cell wall and altered composition and fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The putative transport protein HitA and enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway were overexpressed upon hop adaptation. HorA was not expressed, and the transport of hop compounds from the membrane to the extracellular space did not account for increased resistance to hops upon adaptation. Accordingly, hop resistance is a multifactorial dynamic property, which can develop during adaptation. During hop adaptation, arginine catabolism contributes to energy and generation of the proton motive force until a small fraction of the population has established structural improvements. This acquired hop resistance is energy independent and involves an altered cell wall composition. LTA shields the organism from accompanying stresses and provides a reservoir of divalent cations, which are otherwise scarce as a result of their complexation by hop acids. Some of the mechanisms involved in hop resistance overlap with mechanisms of pH resistance and ethanol tolerance and as a result enable beer spoilage by L. brevis.

  1. Characterization of a Highly Hop-Resistant Lactobacillus brevis Strain Lacking Hop Transport

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Gänzle, Michael G.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to hops is a prerequisite for lactic acid bacteria to spoil beer. In this study we analyzed mechanisms of hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis at the metabolism, membrane physiology, and cell wall composition levels. The beer-spoiling organism L. brevis TMW 1.465 was adapted to high concentrations of hop compounds and compared to a nonadapted strain. Upon adaptation to hops the metabolism changed to minimize ethanol stress. Fructose was used predominantly as a carbon source by the nonadapted strain but served as an electron acceptor upon adaptation to hops, with concomitant formation of acetate instead of ethanol. Furthermore, hop adaptation resulted in higher levels of lipoteichoic acids (LTA) incorporated into the cell wall and altered composition and fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The putative transport protein HitA and enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway were overexpressed upon hop adaptation. HorA was not expressed, and the transport of hop compounds from the membrane to the extracellular space did not account for increased resistance to hops upon adaptation. Accordingly, hop resistance is a multifactorial dynamic property, which can develop during adaptation. During hop adaptation, arginine catabolism contributes to energy and generation of the proton motive force until a small fraction of the population has established structural improvements. This acquired hop resistance is energy independent and involves an altered cell wall composition. LTA shields the organism from accompanying stresses and provides a reservoir of divalent cations, which are otherwise scarce as a result of their complexation by hop acids. Some of the mechanisms involved in hop resistance overlap with mechanisms of pH resistance and ethanol tolerance and as a result enable beer spoilage by L. brevis. PMID:17021196

  2. Molecular epidemiology of malaria in Cameroon. XXI. Baseline therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine, amodiaquine, and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine monotherapies in children before national drug policy change.

    PubMed

    Basco, Leonardo K; Ngane, Vincent Foumane; Ndounga, Mathieu; Same-Ekobo, Albert; Youmba, Jean-Christian; Abodo, Raphael Therese Okalla; Soula, Georges

    2006-09-01

    The availability of epidemiologic data on drug-resistant malaria based on a standardized clinical and parasitological protocol is a prerequisite for a rational therapeutic strategy to control malaria. As part of the surveillance program on the therapeutic efficacy of the first-line (chloroquine and amodiaquine) and second-line (sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine) drugs for the management of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum infections, non-randomized studies were conducted in symptomatic children aged less than 10 years according to the World Health Organization protocol (14-day follow-up period) at 12 sentinel sites in Cameroon between 1999 and 2004. Of 1,407 children enrolled in the studies, 460, 444, and 503 were treated with chloroquine, amodiaquine, or sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, respectively. Chloroquine treatment resulted in high failure rates (proportion of early and late failures, 48.6%). Amodiaquine was effective at all study sites (proportion of failures, 7.3%). Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine therapy was less effective than amodiaquine (P < 0.05), with failures observed in 9.9% of patients. Chloroquine is no longer a viable option and has been withdrawn from the official drug outlets in Cameroon. Amodiaquine and, to a lesser extent, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine monotherapies are still effective in Cameroon, but further development of resistance to these drugs should be delayed by the novel strategy using artemisinin-based combination therapy. Our findings indicate that amodiaquine is the most rational partner for artesunate. Studies on the efficacy of artesunate-amodiaquine combination are currently being undertaken at several sites in the country.

  3. Multiple ATP-binding cassette transporters are involved in insecticide resistance in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Pu, J; Chen, F; Wang, J; Han, Z

    2017-03-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane-bound proteins involved in the movement of various substrates, including drugs and insecticides, across the lipid membrane. Demonstration of the role of human ABC transporters in multidrug resistance has led to speculation that they might be an important mechanism controlling the fate of insecticides in insects. However, the role of ABC transporters in insects remains largely unknown. The small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, has developed resistance to most of the insecticides used for its control. Our goals were to identify the ABC transporters in La. striatellus and to examine their involvement in resistance mechanisms, using related strains resistant to chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin and imidacloprid, compared with the susceptible strain. Based on the transcriptome of La. striatellus, 40 full-length ABC transporters belonging to the ABCA-ABCH subfamilies were identified. Quantitative PCR revealed that over 20% of genes were significantly up-regulated in different resistant strains, and eight genes from the ABCB/C/D/G subfamilies were up-regulated in all three resistant strains, compared with the susceptible strain. Furthermore, synergism studies showed verapamil significantly enhanced insecticide toxicity in various resistant strains but not in the susceptible strain. These results suggest that ABC transporters might be involved in resistance to multiple insecticides in La. striatellus.

  4. Organic cation transporter 6 directly confers resistance to anticancer platinum drugs

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Tetsuya; Kunii, Eiji; Fukuda, Satoshi; Sone, Kazuki; Uemura, Takehiro; Takakuwa, Osamu; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Ohkubo, Hirotsugu; Takemura, Masaya; Maeno, Ken; Ito, Yutaka; Niimi, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Organic cation transporters (OCTs) of the solute carrier family 22 have a critical role in the cellular uptake of anticancer platinum drugs. Recently, we found that a decreased OCT6 expression is associated with a reduced intracellular uptake of cisplatin (CDDP), and concomitant resistance to CDDP. In the present study, we examined whether OCTs directly confer resistance to another platinum drug, oxaliplatin (L-OHP). To address this, we used parental lung cancer cell lines, PC-14 and SBC3; L-OHP-resistant sublines, PC-14/L-OHP and SBC3/L-OHP; and one CDDP-resistant subline PC-14/CDDP, to examine the relationships between the expression of OCTs and intracellular platinum drug concentration or platinum drug resistance. The two L-OHP-resistant sublines showed cross resistance to CDDP and L-OHP, and a decreased expression of OCT6. The intracellular accumulation of L-OHP in PC-14/L-OHP cells was reduced compared with the parental cells. The findings suggested that a reduced OCT6 expression confers platinum drug resistance in the sublines by decreasing the uptake of platinum drugs. Using the PC-14/CDDP cell line engineered to overexpress OCT6, we confirmed that the intracellular L-OHP concentration was increased concomitantly with OCT6 overexpression compared with the parental cell line. Additionally, OCT6 was expressed in a screening panel of lung and colon cancer tissues and matched normal control tissues. Taken together with the previous results, the present findings indicate that OCT6 is directly involved in platinum drug resistance by mediating platinum drug uptake in cancer cells. PMID:27882231

  5. The role of several ABC transporter genes in ivermectin resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ruofeng; Urdaneta-Marquez, Ludmel; Keller, Kathy; James, Catherine E; Davey, Mary W; Prichard, Roger K

    2012-12-21

    The functions of nine ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes, mrp-1, mrp-4, mrp-6, pgp-2, pgp-3, pgp-4, pgp-5, haf-2 and haf-9, in an ivermectin (IVM) resistant strain of Caenorhabditis elegans were screened by comparing transcription levels between the resistant (IVR10) and wild-type (Bristol N2) strains, and by measuring the effects of RNA interference (RNAi) on the IVM resistant strain, on motility, pharyngeal pumping, egg production and death in the presence or varying concentrations of IVM (0-20 ng/ml). mRNA levels of mrp-1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, pgp-1, 2, 4, 12, 14, haf-1, 2 and 3 were significantly increased in IVR10 compared with the N2 strain. At 15 or 20 ng/ml IVM, down regulation of mrp-1, pgp-4, haf-2 and haf-9 significantly increased the effect of IVM to reduce egg production. At low to moderate IVM concentrations, down regulation of mrp-1 and haf-2 reduced the motility of C. elegans. However, at high IVM concentrations motility was increased by down regulation of transcription of pgp-3, pgp-4 and haf-9. Down regulation of expression of mrp-1, pgp-2 and pgp-5 resulted in reduced pharyngeal pumping in the presence of varying concentrations of IVM, while down regulation of mrp-6 and haf-2 increased pharyngeal pumping of the resistant strain irrespective of the IVM concentration used. Although the IVR10 strain was markedly resistant to IVM, compared with the unselected N2 strain, IVM led to the death of the C. elegans in a concentration dependent manner. However, differences in the IVM induced death rate, following RNAi, were not significantly different from the IVR10 strain without RNAi. The study shows that different ABC transporter genes may play a role in modulating the effects of IVM on pharyngeal pumping, motility and egg production, with down regulation of mrp-1 and haf-2 perhaps having the greatest effects. However, down regulation of expression of no individual ABC transporter gene profoundly affected the effect of IVM on mortality in the IVR10

  6. [Occurrence of chloroquine-induced myopathy after low-dose treatment of rheumatoid arthritis for seven years].

    PubMed

    Haberl, A; Fischer, P; Pongratz, D; Sieb, J P

    2005-05-01

    The myotoxicity of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine has been known for decades. Limb-girdle weakness due to a vacuolar myopathy may occur occasionally in a dose-dependent manner during the first 24 months on chloroquine. However, we report on a case in which muscular weakness developed after a daily intake of 250 chloroquine phosphate (= 155 mg chloroquine base) for a period of 7 years. Even after long-term and apparently well-tolerated chloroquine treatment, the occurrence of severe side-effects is possible.

  7. Identification and functional characterization of Penicillium marneffei pleiotropic drug resistance transporters ABC1 and ABC2.

    PubMed

    Panapruksachat, Siribun; Iwatani, Shun; Oura, Takahiro; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch; Chindamporn, Ariya; Niimi, Kyoko; Niimi, Masakazu; Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Penicilliosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is an endemic, AIDS-defining illness and, after tuberculosis and cryptococcosis, the third most common opportunistic infection of AIDS patients in tropical Southeast Asia. Untreated, patients have poor prognosis; however, primary amphotericin B treatment followed by prolonged itraconazole prophylaxis is effective. To identify ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that may play a role in potential multidrug resistance of P. marneffei, we identified and classified all 46 P. marneffei ABC transporters from the genome sequence. PmABC1 and PmABC2 were most similar to the archetype Candida albicans multidrug efflux pump gene CDR1. P. marneffei Abc1p (PmAbc1p) was functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although at rather low levels, and correctly localized to the plasma membrane, causing cells to be fourfold to eightfold more resistant to azoles and many other xenobiotics than untransformed cells. P. marneffei Abc2p (PmAbc2p) was expressed at similarly low levels, but it had no efflux activity and did not properly localize to the plasma membrane. Interestingly, PmAbc1p mislocalized and lost its transport activity when cells were shifted to 37 °C. We conclude that expression of PmAbc1p in S. cerevisiae confers resistance to several xenobiotics indicating that PmAbc1p may be a multidrug efflux pump.

  8. A branched chain amino acid metabolite drives vascular transport of fat and causes insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cholsoon; Oh, Sungwhan F; Wada, Shogo; Rowe, Glenn C; Liu, Laura; Chan, Mun Chun; Rhee, James; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kim, Boa; Ibrahim, Ayon; Baca, Luisa G; Kim, Esl; Ghosh, Chandra C; Parikh, Samir M; Jiang, Aihua; Chu, Qingwei; Forman, Daniel E.; Lecker, Stewart H.; Krishnaiah, Saikumari; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Weljie, Aalim M; Baur, Joseph A; Kasper, Dennis L; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data implicate branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear.1–3 Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from excess accumulation of lipid species4, a process that requires blood-borne lipids to first traverse the blood vessel wall. Little is known, however, of how this trans-endothelial transport occurs or is regulated. Here, we leverage PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator that regulates broad programs of FA consumption, to identify 3-hydroxy-isobutyrate (3-HIB), a catabolic intermediate of the BCAA valine, as a novel paracrine regulator of trans-endothelial fatty acids (FA) transport. 3-HIB is secreted from muscle cells, activates endothelial FA transport, stimulates muscle FA uptake in vivo, and promotes muscle lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in animals. Conversely, inhibiting the synthesis of 3-HIB in muscle cells blocks the promotion of endothelial FA uptake. 3-HIB levels are elevated in muscle from db/db mice and from subjects with diabetes. These data thus unveil a novel mechanism that regulates trans-endothelial flux of FAs, revealing 3-HIB as a new bioactive signaling metabolite that links the regulation of FA flux to BCAA catabolism and provides a mechanistic explanation for how increased BCAA catabolic flux can cause diabetes. PMID:26950361

  9. The Effects of Chloroquine-Resistant and Chloroquine-Sensitive Strains of Berghei on Rodent Hepatic Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-14

    Dipetolllonema M<’I:stomys 42.94 106 58.46 viteolle Schistosollloll mansoni S . I1\\I!lnsoni Fasciola hepatica matalensis Mi ce (SWiss) Mice (Swiss...infected with Fasciola hepatica (Table 4). This may be due to direct residence of the parasites in their host’s liver and severe injury of the liver...vitro drug- metabolizing activity of the hepatic mixed function oxidase system in rats infected experimentally with Fasciola hepatica

  10. Multidrug transporter ABCG2/breast cancer resistance protein secretes riboflavin (vitamin B2) into milk.

    PubMed

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Wagenaar, Els; Merino, Gracia; Jonker, Johan W; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2007-02-01

    The multidrug transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. We here demonstrate that BCRP is responsible for pumping riboflavin (vitamin B(2)) into milk, thus supplying the young with this important nutrient. In Bcrp1(-/-) mice, milk secretion of riboflavin was reduced >60-fold compared to that in wild-type mice. Yet, under laboratory conditions, Bcrp1(-/-) pups showed no riboflavin deficiency due to concomitant milk secretion of its cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide, which was not affected. Thus, two independent secretion mechanisms supply vitamin B(2) equivalents to milk. BCRP is the first active riboflavin efflux transporter identified in mammals and the first transporter shown to concentrate a vitamin into milk. BCRP activity elsewhere in the body protects against xenotoxins by reducing their absorption and mediating their excretion. Indeed, Bcrp1 activity increased excretion of riboflavin into the intestine and decreased its systemic availability in adult mice. Surprisingly, the paradoxical dual utilization of BCRP as a xenotoxin and a riboflavin pump is evolutionarily conserved among mammals as diverse as mice and humans. This study establishes the principle that an ABC transporter can transport a vitamin into milk and raises the possibility that other vitamins and nutrients are likewise secreted into milk by ABC transporters.

  11. Multidrug Transporter ABCG2/Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Secretes Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) into Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    van Herwaarden, Antonius E.; Wagenaar, Els; Merino, Gracia; Jonker, Johan W.; Rosing, Hilde; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schinkel, Alfred H.

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) is strongly induced in the mammary gland during pregnancy and lactation. We here demonstrate that BCRP is responsible for pumping riboflavin (vitamin B2) into milk, thus supplying the young with this important nutrient. In Bcrp1−/− mice, milk secretion of riboflavin was reduced >60-fold compared to that in wild-type mice. Yet, under laboratory conditions, Bcrp1−/− pups showed no riboflavin deficiency due to concomitant milk secretion of its cofactor flavin adenine dinucleotide, which was not affected. Thus, two independent secretion mechanisms supply vitamin B2 equivalents to milk. BCRP is the first active riboflavin efflux transporter identified in mammals and the first transporter shown to concentrate a vitamin into milk. BCRP activity elsewhere in the body protects against xenotoxins by reducing their absorption and mediating their excretion. Indeed, Bcrp1 activity increased excretion of riboflavin into the intestine and decreased its systemic availability in adult mice. Surprisingly, the paradoxical dual utilization of BCRP as a xenotoxin and a riboflavin pump is evolutionarily conserved among mammals as diverse as mice and humans. This study establishes the principle that an ABC transporter can transport a vitamin into milk and raises the possibility that other vitamins and nutrients are likewise secreted into milk by ABC transporters. PMID:17145775

  12. Exploring multiple drug and herbicide resistance in plants--spotlight on transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Conte, Sarah S; Lloyd, Alan M

    2011-02-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) has been extensively studied in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells due to the great clinical significance of this problem. MDR is not well studied in plant systems, although plant genomes contain large numbers of genes encoding putative MDR transporters (MDRTs). Biochemical pathways in the chloroplast are the targets of many herbicides and antibiotics, yet very little data is available regarding mechanisms of drug transport across the chloroplast membrane. MDRTs typically have broad substrate specificities, and may transport essential compounds and metabolites in addition to toxins. Indeed, plant transporters belonging to MDR families have also been implicated in the transport of a wide variety of compounds including auxins, flavonoids, glutathione conjugates, metal chelators, herbicides and antibiotics, although definitive evidence that a single transporter is capable of moving both toxins and metabolites has not yet been provided. Current understanding of plant MDR can be expanded via the characterization of candidate genes, especially MDRTs predicted to localize to the chloroplast, and also via traditional forward genetic approaches. Novel plant MDRTs have the potential to become endogenous selectable markers, aid in phytoremediation strategies, and help us to understand how plants have evolved to cope with toxins in their environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparative study of interactions between chloroquine and chlorpheniramine or promethazine in healthy volunteers: a potential combination-therapy phenomenon for resuscitating chloroquine for malaria treatment in Africa.

    PubMed

    Gbotosho, G O; Happi, C T; Sijuade, A; Ogundahunsi, O A T; Sowunmi, A; Oduola, A M J

    2008-01-01

    Although, in in-vitro and limited in-vivo studies, chlorpheniramine (CP) and promethazine (PR) have each been shown to reverse chloroquine (CQ) resistance, the pharmacokinetic basis of this reversal has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 15 healthy volunteers were randomly allotted to receive standard doses of CQ alone or in combination with CP or PR. Blood samples were collected from each volunteer at 21 time-points, from immediately before to 168 h after the initial dose. These samples were used to follow the changes in the plasma and erythrocytic concentrations of CQ. The ratio between the mean maximum CQ concentration in the erythrocytes and that in the plasma was 4.2 for the volunteers given CQ alone, 7.3 in those given CQ-CP, and 3.2 in those given CQ-PR. CP significantly enhanced the erythrocytic accumulation of CQ, increasing the maximum CQ concentration observed in the erythrocytes by 24% (P = 0.02). The bio-availability of CQ was also significantly increased in the presence of CP, with the mean value for the area under the curve, of erythrocytic concentration v. time, increasing from 99,921 to 214,516 ng/ml.h (P=0.001). The mean half-life of CQ in the erythrocytes also increased when CP was used, from 51 to 100 h, but this change was not statistically significant (P=0.83). In contrast to CP, PR had no statistically significant effect on the disposition of CQ. As CP clearly enhances disposition of CQ, a combination of CQ with CP may be useful in the management of CQ-resistant infections. Detailed toxicological studies are required to understand the full clinical implications of CP's elevation of erythrocytic CQ concentrations.

  14. Galanin antagonist increases insulin resistance by reducing glucose transporter 4 effect in adipocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lili; Shi, Mingyi; Zhang, Ling; Li, Guangzhi; Zhang, Lingxiang; Shao, Hu; Fang, Penghua; Ma, Yingping; Li, Jian; Shi, Qiaojia; Sui, Yumei

    2011-08-01

    Seeing that galanin increases animal body weight on the conditions of inhibiting insulin secretion and animals with metabolic disorder of galanin easily suffer from diabetes, we postulate that endogenous galanin is necessary to reduce insulin resistance in adipocytes. To test this hypothesis, we compared four groups of rats to examine whether an increase in galanin secretion stimulated by swimming may reduce insulin resistance. The rats from sedentary and trained drug groups were injected by M35, a galanin antagonist. The rats from trained control and trained drug groups swam after each injection for four weeks. We found that exercise significantly elevated plasma galanin contents and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) mRNA levels in adipocytes. Meanwhile, M35 treatment reduced GLUT4 and GLUT4 mRNA levels, and glucose infusing rates in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp tests. The ratios of GLUT4 concentrations at plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both drug groups were lower compared with each control group, respectively. These observations suggest that endogenous galanin reduces insulin resistance by increasing GLUT4 contents and promoting GLUT4 transportation from intracellular membranes to plasma membranes in adipocytes. Galanin is an important hormone to reduce insulin resistance in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of resistivity gradient on laser-driven electron transport and ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. H.; Zhou, C. T.; Yu, M. Y.

    2013-09-15

    The effect of resistivity gradient on laser-driven electron transport and ion acceleration is investigated using collisional particle-in-cell simulation. The study is motivated by recent proton acceleration experiments [Gizzi et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 14, 011301 (2011)], which showed significant effect of the resistivity gradient in layered targets on the proton angular spread. This effect is reproduced in the present simulations. It is found that resistivity-gradient generation of magnetic fields and inhibition of electron transport is significantly enhanced when the feedback interaction between the magnetic field and the fast-electron current is included. Filamentation of the laser-generated hot electron jets inside the target, considered as the origin of the nonuniform proton patterns observed in the experiments, is clearly suppressed by the resistive magnetic field. As a result, the electrostatic sheath field at the target back surface acquires a relatively smooth profile, which contributes to the superior quality of the proton beams accelerated off layered targets in the experiments.

  16. Universal linear-temperature resistivity: possible quantum diffusion transport in strongly correlated superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Yinshang; Xiao, Hong; Mu, Gang; Yang, Yi-Feng

    2017-08-25

    The strongly correlated electron fluids in high temperature cuprate superconductors demonstrate an anomalous linear temperature (T) dependent resistivity behavior, which persists to a wide temperature range without exhibiting saturation. As cooling down, those electron fluids lose the resistivity and condense into the superfluid. However, the origin of the linear-T resistivity behavior and its relationship to the strongly correlated superconductivity remain a mystery. Here we report a universal relation [Formula: see text], which bridges the slope of the linear-T-dependent resistivity (dρ/dT) to the London penetration depth λ L at zero temperature among cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and heavy fermion superconductors CeCoIn5, where μ 0 is vacuum permeability, k B is the Boltzmann constant and ħ is the reduced Planck constant. We extend this scaling relation to different systems and found that it holds for other cuprate, pnictide and heavy fermion superconductors as well, regardless of the significant differences in the strength of electronic correlations, transport directions, and doping levels. Our analysis suggests that the scaling relation in strongly correlated superconductors could be described as a hydrodynamic diffusive transport, with the diffusion coefficient (D) approaching the quantum limit D ~ ħ/m*, where m* is the quasi-particle effective mass.

  17. Hydrophobic Organic Hole Transporters for Improved Moisture Resistance in Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Leijtens, Tomas; Giovenzana, Tommaso; Habisreutinger, Severin N; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Noel, Nakita K; Kamino, Brett A; Sadoughi, Golnaz; Sellinger, Alan; Snaith, Henry J

    2016-03-09

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductor materials have recently made rapid improvements in performance, with the best cells performing at over 20% efficiency. With such rapid progress, questions such as cost and solar cell stability are becoming increasingly important to address if this new technology is to reach commercial deployment. The moisture sensitivity of commonly used organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has especially raised concerns. Here, we demonstrate that the hygroscopic lithium salt commonly used as a dopant for the hole transport material in perovskite solar cells makes the top layer of the devices hydrophilic and causes the solar cells to rapidly degrade in the presence of moisture. By using novel, low cost, and hydrophobic hole transporters in conjunction with a doping method incorporating a preoxidized salt of the respective hole transporters, we are able to prepare efficient perovskite solar cells with greatly enhanced water resistance.

  18. The ABC transporter SpTUR2 confers resistance to the antifungal diterpene sclareol.

    PubMed

    van den Brûle, Sybille; Müller, Axel; Fleming, Andrew J; Smart, Cheryl C

    2002-06-01

    PDR5-like proteins represent one group of the ABC superfamily of transporters. Members of this group are present in plants and, due to the function of PDR5-related proteins in fungi in the excretion of xenobiotics (including antifungal agents), it has been proposed that they might play a similar role in plants in the response to and detoxification of herbicides and fungicides. However, until now no functional data has been presented showing an altered plant response to any herbicide or fungicide as a result of manipulating the expression of a PDR5-like gene in plants. In this paper, we show that the plant SpTUR2 PDR5-like ABC transporter is localised to the plasma membrane and that expression of this protein in Arabidopsis leads to the acquisition of resistance to the diterpenoid antifungal agent sclareol. These data both define a possible endogenous substrate for this transporter and highlight the potential of manipulating plant chemical resistance via modulating the expression of specific PDR5-like transporters.

  19. Amodiaquine accumulation in Plasmodium falciparum as a possible explanation for its superior antimalarial activity over chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Hawley, S R; Bray, P G; Park, B K; Ward, S A

    1996-09-01

    Amodiaquine is a 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial whose structure is similar to chloroquine. In contrast to the wealth of information available about chloroquine accumulation and its relationship to activity, little is known about the uptake characteristics of amodiaquine, a drug that is inherently more active against malaria parasites. In this study we have investigated the accumulation of amodiaquine in Plasmodium falciparum in vitro, in order to gain an insight into the mechanisms responsible for its superior activity over chloroquine. The driving force for parasite accumulation of the 4-aminoquinolines is proposed to be a transmembrane proton gradient maintained by a vacuolar ATPase. In the present study, amodiaquine accumulation was greatly reduced, at steady state, in the absence of glucose and at 0 degrees C indicating a clear energy dependence of uptake. Amodiaquine accumulation in Plasmodium falciparum was shown to be 2- to 3-fold greater than chloroquine accumulation. This observation probably accounts for amodiaquine's greater inherent activity but is surprising given that amodiaquine is a weaker base than chloroquine. With this in mind we present evidence for an intraparasitic binding component in the accumulation of the 4-aminoquinolines. Differences in binding affinity of this 'receptor' for amodiaquine and chloroquine may partially explain the greater accumulation and in vitro potency of amodiaquine compared to chloroquine.

  20. Gustatory receptor 22e is essential for sensing chloroquine and strychnine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Seeta; Kim, Yunjung; Gwak, Jun-Seok; Jeong, Sangyun; Lee, Youngseok

    2017-09-01

    Chloroquine, an amino quinolone derivative commonly used as an anti-malarial drug, is known to impart an unpleasant taste. Little research has been done to study chloroquine taste in insects, therefore, we examined both the deterrant properties and mechanisms underlying chloroquine perception in fruit flies. We identified the antifeedant effect of chloroquine by screening 21 gustatory receptor (Grs) mutants through behavioral feeding assays and electrophysiology experiments. We discovered that two molecular sensors, GR22e and GR33a, act as chloroquine receptors, and found that chloroquine-mediated activation of GRNs occurs through S-type sensilla. At the same time, we successfully recapitulated the chloroquine receptor by expressing GR22e in ectopic gustatory receptor neurons. We also found that GR22e forms a part of the strychnine receptor. We suggest that the Drosophila strychnine receptor might have a very complex structure since five different GRs are required for strychnine-induced action potentials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Piperaquine and Lumefantrine resistance in Plasmodium berghei ANKA associated with increased expression of Ca2+/H+ antiporter and glutathione associated enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kiboi, Daniel; Irungu, Beatrice; Orwa, Jennifer; Kamau, Luna; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella; Ngángá, Joseph; Nzila, Alexis

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance of two antimalarial drugs piperaquine (PQ) and lumefantrine (LM) using the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei as a surrogate of the human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. We analyzed the whole coding sequence of Plasmodium berghei chloroquine resistance transporter (Pbcrt) and Plasmodium berghei multidrug resistance gene 1(Pbmdr-1) for polymorphisms. These genes are associated with quinoline resistance in Plasmodium falciparum. No polymorphic changes were detected in the coding sequences of Pbcrt and Pbmdr1 or in the mRNA transcript levels of Pbmdr1. However, our data demonstrated that PQ and LM resistance is achieved by multiple mechanisms that include elevated mRNA transcript levels of V-type H(+) pumping pyrophosphatase (vp2), Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (vcx1), gamma glutamylcysteine synthetase (ggcs) and glutathione-S-transferase (gst) genes, mechanisms also known to contribute to chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and rodent malaria parasites. The increase in ggcs and gst transcript levels was accompanied by high glutathione (GSH) levels and elevated activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Pbcrt and Pbmdr1 are not associated with PQ and LM resistance in P. berghei ANKA, while vp2, vcx1, ggcs and gst may mediate resistance directly or modulate functional mutations in other unknown genes.

  2. Chloroquine-Azithromycin Combination Antimalarial Treatment Decreases Risk of Respiratory- and Gastrointestinal-Tract Infections in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Gilliams, Elizabeth A.; Jumare, Jibreel; Claassen, Cassidy W.; Thesing, Phillip C.; Nyirenda, Osward M.; Dzinjalamala, Fraction K.; Taylor, Terrie; Plowe, Christopher V.; Tracy, LaRee A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chloroquine-azithromycin is being evaluated as combination therapy for malaria. It may provide added benefit in treating or preventing bacterial infections that occur in children with malaria. Objective. We aim to evaluate the effect of treating clinical malaria with chloroquine-azithromycin on the incidence of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections compared to treatment with chloroquine monotherapy. Methods. We compared the incidence density and time to first events of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections among children assigned to receive chloroquine-azithromycin or chloroquine for all symptomatic malaria episodes over the course of 1 year in a randomized longitudinal trial in Blantyre, Malawi. Results. The incidence density ratios of total respiratory-tract infections and gastrointestinal-tract infections comparing chloroquine-azithromycin to chloroquine monotherapy were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], .48, .94) and 0.74 (95% CI, .55, .99), respectively. The time to first lower-respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections were significantly longer in the chloroquine-azithromycin arm compared to the chloroquine arm (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions. Children treated routinely with chloroquine-azithromycin had fewer respiratory and gastrointestinal-tract infections than those treated with chloroquine alone. This antimalarial combination has the potential to reduce the burden of bacterial infections among children in malaria-endemic countries. PMID:24652498

  3. Chloroquine terminates stretch-induced atrial fibrillation more effectively than flecainide in the sheep heart.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; Martins, Raphael P; Mironov, Sergey; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Calvo, Conrado J; Ennis, Steve R; Bandaru, Krishna; Noujaim, Sami F; Kalifa, Jérôme; Berenfeld, Omer; Jalife, José

    2012-06-01

    Blockade of inward-rectifier K+ channels by chloroquine terminates reentry in cholinergic atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unknown whether inward-rectifier K+ channels and reentry are also important in maintaining stretch-induced AF (SAF). We surmised that reentry underlies SAF, and that abolishing reentry with chloroquine terminates SAF more effectively than traditional Na+-channel blockade by flecainide. Thirty Langendorff-perfused sheep hearts were exposed to acute and continuous atrial stretch, and mapped optically and electrically. AF dynamics were studied under control and during perfusion of either chloroquine (4 µmol/L, n=7) or flecainide (2-4 µmol/L, n=5). Chloroquine increased rotor core size and decreased reentry frequency from 10.6±0.7 Hz in control to 6.3±0.7 Hz (P<0.005) just before restoring sinus rhythm (7/7). Flecainide had lesser effects on core size and reentry frequency than chloroquine and did not restore sinus rhythm (0/5). Specific IKr blockade by E-4031 (n=7) did not terminate AF when frequency values were >8 Hz. During pacing (n=11), flecainide reversibly reduced conduction velocity (≈30% at cycle length 300, 250, and 200 ms; P<0.05) to a larger extent than chloroquine (11% to 19%; cycle length, 300, 250, and 200 ms; P<0.05). Significant action potential duration prolongation was demonstrable only for chloroquine at cycle length 300 (12%) and cycle length 250 ms (9%) (P<0.05). Chloroquine is more effective than flecainide in terminating SAF in isolated sheep hearts by significantly increasing core size and decreasing reentry frequency. Chloroquine's effectiveness may be explained by its inward-rectifier K+ channel blockade profile and suggest that reentry is important to maintain acute SAF.

  4. An ABC Transporter Mutation Is Correlated with Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gahan, Linda J.; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt–expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field. PMID:21187898

  5. An ABC transporter mutation is correlated with insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Gahan, Linda J; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G

    2010-12-16

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt-expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field.

  6. Chloroquine: An Old Drug with New Perspective Against Giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Angel A; Almirall, Pedro; Cimerman, Sérgio; Lalle, Marco; Pacheco, Frank; Acanda, Carlos Z; Sánchez, Niurka

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of treatment failures to first-line treatment for giardiasis, one of the most widespread although neglected parasitic disease, has long been recognised. Nowadays, it starts to represent a great challenge to clinicians, especially in endemic countries. This requires the introduction of new drug interventions, but the development of novel drugs is a time and money consuming effort with most of the compounds never reaching the market. Consequently, alternative strategies are needed, especially for the treatment of giardiasis. Chloroquine (CQ), a synthetic drug developed as antimalarial agent, has been shown to also exert antigiardial activity. Here, we present a mini-research summarizing results on the treatment of human clinical cases with CQ, going through in vitro research, case report, and case series to human clinical trials, highlighting the benefits and mentioning possible adverse effects.

  7. Chemotherapeutic efficacy of sulphadimidine, amprolium, halofuginone and chloroquine phosphate in experimental Eimeria bareillyi coccidiosis of buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, P K; Ruprah, N S; Chhabra, M B

    1985-01-01

    Sulphadimidine, amprolium, halofuginone and chloroquine phosphate were administered to buffalo calves 10 days after experimental infection with Eimeria bareillyi. Animals given sulphadimidine or amprolium remained clinically normal and shed only a few oocysts in their faeces. Halofuginone was found partially effective and chloroquine phosphate completely ineffective in preventing faecal oocyst discharge and intestinal lesions. Sulphadimidine and amprolium treated calves gained weight, but chloroquine treated calves suffered progressive weight loss similar to that of infected untreated controls. No significant alterations of haematological values were observed either in the treated calves or in the untreated controls.

  8. Electrical resistivity tomography as monitoring tool for unsaturated zone transport: an example of preferential transport of deicing chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive spatially resolved monitoring techniques may hold the key to observe heterogeneous flow and transport behavior of contaminants in soils. In this study, time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during an infiltration experiment with deicing chemical in a small field lysimeter. Deicing chemicals like potassium formate, which frequently impact soils on airport sites, were infiltrated during snow melt. Chemical composition of seepage water and the electrical response was recorded over the spring period 2010. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs are able to show the infiltration of the melt water loaded with ionic constituents of deicing chemicals and their degradation product hydrogen carbonate. The tomographs indicate early breakthrough behavior in parts of the profile. Groundtruthing with pore fluid conductivity and water content variations shows disagreement between expected and observed bulk conductivity. This was attributed to the different sampling volume of traditional methods and ERT due to a considerable fraction of immobile water in the soil. The results show that ERT can be used as a soil monitoring tool on airport sites if assisted by common soil monitoring techniques.

  9. Antibiotics, Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes: Aerial Transport from Cattle Feed Yards via Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    McEachran, Andrew D.; Blackwell, Brett R.; Hanson, J. Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cox, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. Methods: PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Results: Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Conclusions: Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs. Citation: McEachran AD, Blackwell BR, Hanson JD, Wooten KJ, Mayer GD, Cox SB, Smith PN. 2015. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic

  10. Cholate Resistance in Lactococcus lactis Is Mediated by an ATP-Dependent Multispecific Organic Anion Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Atsushi; Veenstra, Marloes; Kurdi, Peter; van Veen, Hendrik W.; Konings, Wil N.

    2000-01-01

    The cholate-resistant Lactococcus lactis strain C41-2, derived from wild-type L. lactis MG1363 through selection for growth on cholate-containing medium, displayed a reduced accumulation of cholate due to an enhanced active efflux. However, L. lactis C41-2 was not cross resistant to deoxycholate or cationic drugs, such as ethidium and rhodamine 6G, which are typical substrates of the multidrug transporters LmrP and LmrA in L. lactis MG1363. The cholate efflux activity in L. lactis C41-2 was not affected by the presence of valinomycin plus nigericin, which dissipated the proton motive force. In contrast, cholate efflux in L. lactis C41-2 was inhibited by ortho-vanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPases and ATP-binding cassette transporters. Besides ATP-dependent drug extrusion by LmrA, two other ATP-dependent efflux activities have previously been detected in L. lactis, one for the artificial pH probe 2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and 6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) and the other for the artificial pH probe N-(fluorescein thio-ureanyl)-glutamate (FTUG). Surprisingly, the efflux rate of BCECF, but not that of FTUG, was significantly enhanced in L. lactis C41-2. Further experiments with L. lactis C41-2 cells and inside out membrane vesicles revealed that cholate and BCECF inhibit the transport of each other. These data demonstrate the role of an ATP-dependent multispecific organic anion transporter in cholate resistance in L. lactis. PMID:10960105

  11. Expression Patterns of ABC Transporter Genes in Fluconazole-Resistant Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Atefeh Abdollahi; Badali, Hamid; Shokohi, Tahereh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Amirrajab, Nasrin; Moazeni, Maryam

    2017-04-01

    Clinical management of fungal diseases is compromised by the emergence of antifungal drug resistance in fungi, which leads to elimination of available drug classes as treatment options. An understanding of antifungal resistance at molecular level is, therefore, essential for the development of strategies to combat the resistance. This study presents the assessment of molecular mechanisms associated with fluconazole resistance in clinical Candida glabrata isolates originated from Iran. Taking seven distinct fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates, real-time PCRs were performed to evaluate the alternations in the regulation of the genes involved in drug efflux including CgCDR1, CgCDR2, CgSNQ2, and CgERG11. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in CgPDR1 alleles were determined by DNA sequencing. Cross-resistance to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole was observed in 2.5 % of the isolates. In the present study, six amino acid substitutions were identified in CgPdr1, among which W297R, T588A, and F575L were previously reported, whereas D243N, H576Y, and P915R are novel. CgCDR1 overexpression was observed in 57.1 % of resistant isolates. However, CgCDR2 was not co-expressed with CgCDR1. CgSNQ2 was upregulated in 71.4 % of the cases. CgERG11 overexpression does not seem to be associated with azole resistance, except for isolates that exhibited azole cross-resistance. The pattern of efflux pump gene upregulation was associated with GOF mutations observed in CgPDR1. These results showed that drug efflux mediated by adenosine-5-triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporters, especially CgSNQ2 and CgCDR1, is the predominant mechanism of fluconazole resistance in Iranian isolates of C. glabrata. Since some novel GOF mutations were found here, this study also calls for research aimed at investigating other new GOF mutations to reveal the comprehensive understanding about efflux-mediated resistance to azole antifungal agents.

  12. Silver nanoparticles modulate ABC transporter activity and enhance chemotherapy in multidrug resistant cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Dávid; Szőke, Krisztina; Igaz, Nóra; Spengler, Gabriella; Molnár, József; Tóth, Tímea; Madarász, Dániel; Rázga, Zsolt; Kónya, Zoltán; Boros, Imre M; Kiricsi, Mónika

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer phenotypes dramatically attenuates the efficiency of antineoplastic drug treatments often leading to the failure of chemotherapy. Therefore there is an urgent need to engineer new therapeutically useful agents and propose innovative approaches able to defeat resistant cancer cells. Although the remarkable anti-cancer features of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have already been delineated their impact on MDR cancer has never been investigated. Herein, we report that AgNPs have notable anti-proliferative effect and induce apoptosis mediated cell death both in drug sensitive and in MDR cancer cells. Furthermore we show evidence that AgNPs exert an inhibitory action on the efflux activity of MDR cancer cells which feature could be exploited to enhance drug accumulation. We verified synergistic interactions of AgNPs with six different antineoplastic agents on drug resistant cells which emphasizes the excellent potential of AgNPs as combinational partners in the chemotherapy of MDR cancer. The treatment of cancer often fails due to the development of multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells. Hence, novel approaches are being investigated to combat drug resistant cancer cells. One particular method studied here uses silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The authors showed that AgNPs had anti-proliferative effect and ?exerted an inhibitory action on ABC transporter. The findings could suggest the possible use of AgNPs in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of Drug Transfer into Milk Considering Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP)-Mediated Transport.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naoki; Ito, Kousei; Ikebuchi, Yuki; Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Hisaka, Akihiro; Oka, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Drug transfer into milk is of concern due to the unnecessary exposure of infants to drugs. Proposed prediction methods for such transfer assume only passive drug diffusion across the mammary epithelium. This study reorganized data from the literature to assess the contribution of carrier-mediated transport to drug transfer into milk, and to improve the predictability thereof. Milk-to-plasma drug concentration ratios (M/Ps) in humans were exhaustively collected from the literature and converted into observed unbound concentration ratios (M/Punbound,obs). The ratios were also predicted based on passive diffusion across the mammary epithelium (M/Punbound,pred). An in vitro transport assay was performed for selected drugs in breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP)-expressing cell monolayers. M/Punbound,obs and M/Punbound,pred values were compared for 166 drugs. M/Punbound,obs values were 1.5 times or more higher than M/Punbound,pred values for as many as 13 out of 16 known BCRP substrates, reconfirming BCRP as the predominant transporter contributing to secretory transfer of drugs into milk. Predictability of M/P values for selected BCRP substrates and non-substrates was improved by considering in vitro-evaluated BCRP-mediated transport relative to passive diffusion alone. The current analysis improved the predictability of drug transfer into milk, particularly for BCRP substrates, based on an exhaustive data overhaul followed by focused in vitro transport experimentation.

  14. Advances in the molecular detection of ABC transporters involved in multidrug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Gottesman, Michael M

    2011-04-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters are important mediators of multidrug resistance (MDR) in patients with cancer. Although their role in MDR has been extensively studied in vitro, their value in predicting response to chemotherapy has yet to be fully determined. Establishing a molecular diagnostic assay dedicated to the quantitation of ABC transporter genes is therefore critical to investigate their involvement in clinical MDR. In this article, we provide an overview of the methodologies that have been applied to analyze the mRNA expression levels of ABC transporters, by describing the technology, its pros and cons, and the experimental protocols that have been followed. We also discuss recent studies performed in our laboratory that assess the ability of the currently available high-throughput gene expression profiling platforms to discriminate between highly homologous genes. This work led to the conclusion that high-throughput TaqMan-based qRT-PCR platforms provide standardized clinical assays for the molecular detection of ABC transporters and other families of highly homologous MDR-linked genes encoding, for example, the uptake transporters (solute carriers-SLCs) and the phase I and II metabolism enzymes.

  15. The therapeutic potential of targeting ABC transporters to combat multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bugde, Piyush; Biswas, Riya; Merien, Fabrice; Lu, Jun; Liu, Dong-Xu; Chen, Mingwei; Zhou, Shufeng; Li, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Most disseminated cancers remain fatal despite the availability of a variety of conventional and novel treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and biologically targeted therapy. A major factor responsible for the failure of chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). The overexpression of various ABC transporters in cancer cells can efficiently remove the anticancer drug from the cell, thus causing the drug to lose its effect. Areas covered: In this review, we summarised the ongoing research related to the mechanism, function, and regulation of ABC transporters. We integrated our current knowledge at different levels from molecular biology to clinical trials. We also discussed potential therapeutic strategies of targeting ABC transporters to reverse MDR in cancer cells. Expert opinion: Involvement of various ABC transporters to cancer MDR lays the foundation for developing tailored therapies that can overcome MDR. An ideal MDR reversal agent should have broad-spectrum ABC-transporter inhibitory activity, be potent, have good pharmacokinetics, have no trans-stimulation effects, and have low or no toxicity. Alternatively, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems containing both the cytotoxic drug and reversing agent may represent a useful approach to reversing MDR with minimal off-target toxicity.

  16. A carrier transport model in the high-resistance state of lead-methylamine iodide-based resistive memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yongwoo; Park, Nayoung; Cha, Pil-Ryung

    2017-08-01

    Methylamine lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3), which has recently been in the spotlight as a solar cell material, has also recently shown promise for use as an active material in resistive memory cells with ultralow operation voltages, good transparencies, and flexibilities. The material's defects, which govern its properties, differ vastly depending on the fabrication process. However, the defect chemistry is not yet entirely understood. We have therefore established a macroscopic transport model with defect-related model parameters, such as trap density, trap energy level, and Fermi level, in order to estimate these parameters for fabricated samples based on their electrical data. Our model will serve as an efficient way to analyze the properties of the active material.

  17. The multidrug-resistance transporter ABCB5 is expressed in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Volpicelli, Elgida R; Lezcano, Cecilia; Zhan, Qian; Girouard, Sasha D; Kindelberger, David W; Frank, Markus H; Frank, Natasha Y; Crum, Christopher P; Murphy, George F

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in placenta protectively transport drugs and xenobiotics. ABCB5 [subfamily B (MDR/TAP)] is a novel ABC multidrug-resistance transporter that also mediates cell fusion, stem cell function, and vasculogenic plasticity. Immunohistochemistry and double-labeling immunofluorescence staining for ABCB5 and ABCB5/CD200, respectively, was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded placental tissue from 5 first trimester, 5 second trimester, and 5 term pregnancies as well as 5 partial moles, and 5 complete moles. In addition, tumor cells from 5 choriocarcinoma and 5 placental site trophoblastic tumor cases were examined. ABCB5 staining was observed in villous trophoblasts in 100% (5/5) of first trimester placentas (with progressive decrease in term placentas); 100% of partial moles (5/5); and 100% of complete moles (5/5). Notably, reactivity was discretely restricted to the inner trophoblast layer, with no staining of overlying syncytiotrophoblast. Antibody specificity and localization was confirmed further by in situ hybridization. ABCB5 expression was retained in 20% of choriocarcinomas (1/5) and 40% of placental site trophoblastic tumors (2/5). Prior studies have localized expression of multidrug-resistance-1, also known as ABCB1, within the syncytiotrophoblast of early placentas, where it serves a protective function as an efflux transporter. Our results show that ABCB5 is preferentially expressed in the cytotrophoblast layer of placental villi. The expression of this novel biomarker at the maternal-fetal interface raises questions on its role in placental structure and function as well as on its potential contribution to the protective efflux provided by other P-glycoprotein transporters.

  18. A novel strategy for obtaining kanamycin resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana by silencing an endogenous gene encoding a putative chloroplast transporter.

    PubMed

    Aufsatz, Werner; Nehlin, Lilian; Voronin, Viktor; Schmidt, Agnes; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2009-02-01

    The use of bacterial antibiotic resistance markers in transgenic plants raises concerns about horizontal gene transfer to soil bacteria. We report here that kanamycin resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana can be achieved by silencing an endogenous gene encoding a putative chloroplast transporter, which presumably imports kanamycin into chloroplasts to interfere with ribosomal RNA. Homologs of the transporter exist in other plant species, suggesting this strategy may be generally useful for selecting transformed plant cells.

  19. Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing (N^N and N^O) bound chloroquine analogue ligands: synthesis, characterization and antimalarial properties.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Kumar, Kamlesh; Fogeron, Thibault; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Haukka, Matti; Monari, Magda; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2016-03-07

    The synthesis and characterization of twenty new pentamethylcyclopentadienyl-rhodium and iridium complexes containing N^N and N^O-chelating chloroquine analogue ligands are described. The in vitro antimalarial activity of the new ligands as well as the complexes was evaluated against the chloroquine sensitive (CQS) NF54 and the chloroquine resistant (CQR) Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. The antimalarial activity was found to be good to moderate; although all complexes are less active than artesunate, some of the ligands and complexes showed better activity than chloroquine (CQ). In particular, rhodium complexes were found to be considerably more active than iridium complexes against the CQS NF54 strain. Salicylaldimine Schiff base ligands having electron-withdrawing groups (F, Cl, Br, I and NO2) in para position of the salicyl moiety and their rhodium complexes showed good antiplasmodial activity against both the CQS-NF54 and the CQR-Dd2 strains. The crystal structures of (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)} chlororhodium(III) chloride and (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(4-chloro-2-(((2-((7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)phenolate)}chlororhodium(III) chloride are reported. The crystallization of the amino-pyridyl complex (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N(1)-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N(2)-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride in acetone resulted in the formation of the imino-pyridyl derivative (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl){(N1-(7-chloroquinolin-4-yl)-N2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)ethane-1,2-diamine)}chloroiridium(III) chloride, the crystal structure of which is also reported.

  20. Alkyl-Lysophospholipid Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Leishmania tropica and Chemosensitization by a Novel P-Glycoprotein-Like Transporter Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Victoria, José M.; Pérez-Victoria, F. Javier; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Jiménez, Ignacio A.; Ravelo, Angel G.; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    Drug resistance has emerged as a major impediment in the treatment of leishmaniasis. Alkyl-lysophospholipids (ALP), originally developed as anticancer drugs, are considered to be the most promising antileishmanial agents. In order to anticipate probable clinical failure in the near future, we have investigated possible mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Leishmania spp. The results presented here support the involvement of a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily, the Leishmania P-glycoprotein-like transporter, in the resistance to ALP. (i) First, a multidrug resistance (MDR) Leishmania tropica line overexpressing a P-glycoprotein-like transporter displays significant cross-resistance to the ALP miltefosine and edelfosine, with resistant indices of 9.2- and 7.1-fold, respectively. (ii) Reduced expression of P-glycoprotein in the MDR line correlates with a significant decrease in ALP resistance. (iii) The ALP were able to modulate the P-glycoprotein-mediated resistance to daunomycin in the MDR line. (iv) We have found a new inhibitor of this transporter, the sesquiterpene C-3, that completely sensitizes MDR parasites to ALP. (v) Finally, the MDR line exhibits a lower accumulation than the wild-type line of bodipy-C5-PC, a fluorescent analogue of phosphatidylcholine that has a structure resembling that of edelfosine. Also, C-3 significantly increases the accumulation of the fluorescent analogue to levels similar to those of wild-type parasites. The involvement of the Leishmania P-glycoprotein-like transporter in resistance to drugs used in the treatment of leishmaniasis also supports the importance of developing new specific inhibitors of this ABC transporter. PMID:11502516

  1. Resistance of Ag-silicene-Ag junctions: A combined nonequilibrium Green's function and Boltzmann transport study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Fry, J. N.; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2013-09-01

    For several years the electronic structure properties of the two-dimensional system silicene have been studied extensively. Electron transport across metal-silicene junctions, however, remains relatively unexplored. To address this issue, we developed and implemented a theoretical framework that utilizes the tight-binding Fisher-Lee relation to span nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) techniques, the scattering method, and semiclassical Boltzmann transport theory. Within this hybrid quantum-classical, two-scale framework, we calculated transmission and reflection coefficients of monolayer and bilayer Ag-silicene-Ag junctions using the NEGF method in conjunction with density functional theory; derived and calculated the group velocities; and computed resistance using the semiclassical Boltzmann equation. We found that resistances of these junctions are ˜0.08fΩm2 for monolayer silicene junctions and ˜0.3fΩm2 for bilayer ones; factors of ˜8 and ˜2, respectively, smaller than Sharvin resistances estimated via the Landauer formalism.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in public transportation vehicles (buses): another piece to the epidemiologic puzzle.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Jonathan K; van Balen, Joany; Crawford, John Mac; Wilkins, John R; Lee, Jiyoung; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Hoet, Armando E

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the occurrence and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in public transportation in the United States. This research sought to determine the background prevalence and phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of MRSA strains circulating on buses from a large, metropolitan transportation agency. Electrostatic wipes were used to collect 237 surface samples from 40 buses randomly selected from July-October 2010. Six samples were collected from each bus immediately postservice and before any cleaning and disinfection. Positive isolates were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; and potential epidemiologic factors were examined. Of the buses, 68% (27/40) were contaminated with S aureus, and 63% (25/40) were contaminated with MRSA. Seats and seat rails were the surfaces most frequently contaminated, followed by the back door and stanchions. Most (62.9%) of the MRSA isolates were classified as community-associated MRSA clones (SCCmec type IV), and 22.9% were health care-associated MRSA clones (SCCmec type II). Of the MRSA strains, 65% (5/20) were multidrug resistant. MRSA was frequently isolated from commonly touched surfaces in buses serving both hospital and community routes. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis demonstrated that buses may be effective mixing vessels for MRSA strains of both community and health care-associated origin. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. SDS-resistant aggregation of membrane proteins: application to the purification of the vesicular monoamine transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Sagné, C; Isambert, M F; Henry, J P; Gasnier, B

    1996-01-01

    The vesicular monoamine transporter, which catalyses a H+/ monoamine antiport in monoaminergic vesicle membrane, is a very hydrophobic intrinsic membrane protein. After solubilization, this protein was found to have a high tendency to aggregate, as shown by SDS/PAGE, especially when samples were boiled in the classical Laemmli buffer before electrophoresis. This behavior was analysed in some detail. The aggregation was promoted by high temperatures, organic solvents and acidic pH, suggesting that it resulted from the unfolding of structure remaining in SDS. The aggregates were very stable and could be dissociated only by suspension in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid. This SDS-resistant aggregation behaviour was shared by very few intrinsic proteins of the chromaffin granule membrane. Consequently, a purification procedure was based on this property. A detergent extract of chromaffin granule membranes enriched in monoamine transporter was heated and the aggregates were isolated by size-exclusion HPLC in SDS. The aggregates, containing the transporter, were dissociated in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid and analysed on the same HPLC column. This strategy might be of general interest for the purification of membrane proteins that exhibit SDS-resistant aggregation. PMID:8670158

  4. Seasonal Variations in Antibiotic Resistance Gene Transport in the Almendares River, Havana, Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Charles W.; Lima, Lazaro; Olivares-Rieumont, Susana; Bowen, Emma; Werner, David; Graham, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in rivers and streams around the world, and significant relationships have been shown that relate different pollutant outputs and increased local ARG levels. However, most studies have not considered ambient flow conditions, which can vary dramatically especially in tropical countries. Here, ARG were quantified in water column and sediment samples during the dry- and wet-seasons to assess how seasonal and other factors influence ARG transport down the Almendares River (Havana, Cuba). Eight locations were sampled and stream flow estimated during both seasons; qPCR was used to quantify four tetracycline, two erythromycin, and three beta-lactam resistance genes. ARG concentrations were higher in wet-season versus dry-season samples, which combined with higher flows, indicated much greater ARG transport downstream during the wet-season. However, water column ARG levels were more spatially variable in the dry-season than the wet-season, with the proximity of waste outfalls strongly influencing local ARG levels. Results confirm that dry-season sampling provides a useful picture of the impact of individual waste inputs on local stream ARG levels, whereas the majority of ARGs in this tropical river were transported downstream during the wet-season, possibly due to re-entrainment of ARG from sediments. PMID:23189074

  5. Seasonal variations in antibiotic resistance gene transport in the almendares river, havana, cuba.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Charles W; Lima, Lazaro; Olivares-Rieumont, Susana; Bowen, Emma; Werner, David; Graham, David W

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in rivers and streams around the world, and significant relationships have been shown that relate different pollutant outputs and increased local ARG levels. However, most studies have not considered ambient flow conditions, which can vary dramatically especially in tropical countries. Here, ARG were quantified in water column and sediment samples during the dry- and wet-seasons to assess how seasonal and other factors influence ARG transport down the Almendares River (Havana, Cuba). Eight locations were sampled and stream flow estimated during both seasons; qPCR was used to quantify four tetracycline, two erythromycin, and three beta-lactam resistance genes. ARG concentrations were higher in wet-season versus dry-season samples, which combined with higher flows, indicated much greater ARG transport downstream during the wet-season. However, water column ARG levels were more spatially variable in the dry-season than the wet-season, with the proximity of waste outfalls strongly influencing local ARG levels. Results confirm that dry-season sampling provides a useful picture of the impact of individual waste inputs on local stream ARG levels, whereas the majority of ARGs in this tropical river were transported downstream during the wet-season, possibly due to re-entrainment of ARG from sediments.

  6. The role of a basolateral transporter in rosuvastatin transport and its interplay with apical breast cancer resistance protein in polarized cell monolayer systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibin; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yuehua; Hein, Kristin; Hidalgo, Ismael J

    2012-11-01

    Membrane transporters can play a clinically important role in drug absorption and disposition; Caco-2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells are the most widely used in vitro models for studying the functions of these transporters and associated drug interactions. Transport studies using these cell models are mostly focused on apical transporters, whereas basolateral drug transport processes are largely ignored. However, for some hydrophilic drugs, a basolateral uptake transporter may be required for drugs to enter cells before they can interact with apical efflux transporters. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential differences in drug transport across Caco-2 and MDCK basolateral membrane that could cause discrepancy in the identification of efflux transporter substrates and to elucidate the underlying factors that may cause such differences, using rosuvastatin as a model substrate. Bidirectional transport results in Caco-2 and breast cancer resistance protein-MDCK cells demonstrated the necessity of an uptake transporter at the basolateral membrane for rosuvastatin. Kinetic study revealed saturable and nonsaturable processes for rosuvastatin uptake across the Caco-2 basolateral membrane, with the saturable process encompassing >75% of overall rosuvastatin basolateral uptake at concentrations below the K(m) (4.2 μM). Furthermore, rosuvastatin basolateral transport exhibited cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation phenomena, indicating a facilitated diffusion mechanism. This basolateral transporter appeared to be a prerequisite for rosuvastatin and perhaps for other hydrophilic substrates to interact with apical efflux transporters. Deficit of such a basolateral transporter in certain cell models may lead to false-negative results when screening drug interactions with apical efflux transporters.

  7. Effect of Chloroquine on Morphology of Cytoplasmic Granules in Maturing Human Leukocytes—an Ultrastructural Study*

    PubMed Central

    Fedorko, Martha

    1967-01-01

    Bone marrow and peripheral blood from patients who had received chloroquine phosphate were studied to determine the effect of this drug on the ultrastructure of cytoplasmic granules in leukocytes. Neutrophils from approximately one-half of the patients who were treated developed abnormal cytoplasmic granules. Vacuolar, lamellar, and particulate components within abnormal, large granules were present in myelocytes from certain patients who received chloroquine therapy. Mature neutrophils and lymphocytes from these patients showed variable numbers of large, membrane-bounded structures containing myelin figures. Cytoplasmic granules in eosinophilic myelocytes from patients treated with chloroquine did not contain the usual crystalloid structure, but instead contained small whorls of osmiophilic material. The granules in abnormal mature eosinophils were replaced by large vacuoles which contained amorphous material. The abnormal granules seen in these various white cells after chloroquine therapy may either reflect defective granule formation or autophagy. Images PMID:6073998

  8. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P; Monteiro, Fábio L; Loiola, Erick C; Dias, André A; Silva, Fábio J M; Aliota, Matthew T; Caine, Elizabeth A; Osorio, Jorge E; Bellio, Maria; O'Connor, David H; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-11-29

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  9. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M.; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P.; Monteiro, Fábio L.; Loiola, Erick C.; Dias, André A.; Silva, Fábio J. M.; Aliota, Matthew T.; Caine, Elizabeth A.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Bellio, Maria; O’Connor, David H.; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres. PMID:27916837

  10. Fate and transport of tylosin and macrolide-resistance genes following manure applications in tile-drained landscapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of antibiotics in swine production leads to antibiotic-resistance in gastrointestinal bacteria. Application of swine manure to drained agricultural fields introduces elevated levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and residual antibiotics. The persistence and transport of these agents are g...

  11. ABCC transporters mediate insect resistance to multiple Bt toxins revealed by bulk segregant analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively recent evidence indicates that ABCC2 transporters play a main role in the mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A-type proteins. Mapping of major Cry1A resistance genes has linked resistance to the ABCC2 locus in Heliothis virescens, Plutella xylostella, Trichoplusia ni and Bombyx mori, and mutations in this gene have been found in three of these Bt-resistant strains. Results We have used a colony of Spodoptera exigua (Xen-R) highly resistant to a Bt commercial bioinsecticide to identify regions in the S. exigua genome containing loci for major resistance genes by using bulk segregant analysis (BSA). Results reveal a region containing three genes from the ABCC family (ABBC1, ABBC2 and ABBC3) and a mutation in one of them (ABBC2) as responsible for the resistance of S. exigua to the Bt commercial product and to its key Spodoptera-active ingredients, Cry1Ca. In contrast to all previously described mutations in ABCC2 genes that directly or indirectly affect the extracellular domains of the membrane protein, the ABCC2 mutation found in S. exigua affects an intracellular domain involved in ATP binding. Functional analyses of ABBC2 and ABBC3 support the role of both proteins in the mode of action of Bt toxins in S. exigua. Partial silencing of these genes with dsRNA decreased the susceptibility of wild type larvae to both Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca. In addition, reduction of ABBC2 and ABBC3 expression negatively affected some fitness components and induced up-regulation of arylphorin and repat5, genes that respond to Bt intoxication and that are found constitutively up-regulated in the Xen-R strain. Conclusions The current results show the involvement of different members of the ABCC family in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis proteins and expand the role of the ABCC2 transporter in B. thuringiensis resistance beyond the Cry1A family of proteins to include Cry1Ca. PMID:24912445

  12. ABCC transporters mediate insect resistance to multiple Bt toxins revealed by bulk segregant analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; González-Martínez, Rosa M; Navarro-Cerrillo, Gloria; Chakroun, Maissa; Kim, Yonggyun; Ziarsolo, Pello; Blanca, Jose; Cañizares, Joaquin; Ferré, Juan; Herrero, Salvador

    2014-06-09

    Relatively recent evidence indicates that ABCC2 transporters play a main role in the mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A-type proteins. Mapping of major Cry1A resistance genes has linked resistance to the ABCC2 locus in Heliothis virescens, Plutella xylostella, Trichoplusia ni and Bombyx mori, and mutations in this gene have been found in three of these Bt-resistant strains. We have used a colony of Spodoptera exigua (Xen-R) highly resistant to a Bt commercial bioinsecticide to identify regions in the S. exigua genome containing loci for major resistance genes by using bulk segregant analysis (BSA). Results reveal a region containing three genes from the ABCC family (ABBC1, ABBC2 and ABBC3) and a mutation in one of them (ABBC2) as responsible for the resistance of S. exigua to the Bt commercial product and to its key Spodoptera-active ingredients, Cry1Ca. In contrast to all previously described mutations in ABCC2 genes that directly or indirectly affect the extracellular domains of the membrane protein, the ABCC2 mutation found in S. exigua affects an intracellular domain involved in ATP binding. Functional analyses of ABBC2 and ABBC3 support the role of both proteins in the mode of action of Bt toxins in S. exigua. Partial silencing of these genes with dsRNA decreased the susceptibility of wild type larvae to both Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca. In addition, reduction of ABBC2 and ABBC3 expression negatively affected some fitness components and induced up-regulation of arylphorin and repat5, genes that respond to Bt intoxication and that are found constitutively up-regulated in the Xen-R strain. The current results show the involvement of different members of the ABCC family in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis proteins and expand the role of the ABCC2 transporter in B. thuringiensis resistance beyond the Cry1A family of proteins to include Cry1Ca.

  13. Chloroquine synergizes sunitinib cytotoxicity via modulating autophagic, apoptotic and angiogenic machineries.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Amal Kamal; Shouman, Samia; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Elgendy, Mohamed; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2014-06-25

    Tyrosine kinases play a pivotal role in oncogenesis. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors as sunitinib malate are used in cancer therapy, emerging studies report compromised cytotoxicity when used as monotherapy and thus combinations with other anti-cancer agents is recommended. Chloroquine is a clinically available anti-malarial agent which has been shown to exhibit anti-cancer activity. In the current study, we questioned whether chloroquine can modulate sunitinib cytotoxicity. We found that chloroquine synergistically augmented sunitinib cytotoxicity on human breast (MCF-7 and T-47D), cervical (Hela), colorectal (Caco-2 and HCT116), hepatocellular (HepG2), laryngeal (HEp-2) and prostate (PC3) cancer cell lines as indicated by combination and concentration reduction indices. These results were also consistent with that of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) Swiss albino mice models as confirmed by tumor volume, weight, histopathological examination and PCNA expression. Sunitinib induced autophagy via upregulating beclin-1 expression which was blocked by chloroquine as evidenced by accumulated SQTSM1/p62 level. Furthermore, chloroquine augmented sunitinib-induced apoptosis by decreasing survivin level and increasing caspase 3 activity. Chloroquine also enhanced the antiangiogenic capacity of sunitinib as indicated by decreased CD34 expression and peritoneal/skin angiogenesis. Sunitinib when combined with chloroquine also increased reactive nitrogen species production via increasing inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide level whilst reduced reactive oxygen species production by increasing GSH level, activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase and reducing lipid peroxides compared to sunitinib-only treated group. Taken together, these findings suggest that chloroquine enhanced sunitinib cytotoxicity in a synergistic manner via inducing apoptosis while switching off autophagic and angiogenic machineries. Nevertheless, further studies are

  14. Effect of chloroquine on biosynthesis, processing and secretion of proteins from PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmalkar, M.; Kuhn, L.J.; Sabban, E.L.

    1986-05-01

    Chloroquine is a lysomotropic agent that can raise intraorganelle pH, and has been proposed to divert secretion from a regulated to a constitutive pathway. The authors examined the effect of chloroquine on biosynthesis of dopamine ..beta..-hydroxylase (DBH) in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. DBH is normally present as a 77,000-Mr and a 73,000-Mr subunit form in near equal amounts. The 77K membrane-bound form is a precursor of the 73K soluble form, which can be secreted with norepinephrine. Pretreatment for 1 hr with 50 ..mu..M -1 mM chloroquine and labelling in its presence for 4 hrs inhibited protein synthesis by approx. 50% with 200 ..mu..M and approx. 90% with 1 mM chloroquine. The overall profile of proteins synthesized was unaltered. However, in the presence of 200 ..mu..M chloroquine, the 73K form of DBH predominated. Thus, chloroquine enhanced the post-translational processing of the 77K to the 73K form. Endoglycosidase H digestion of the 73K form from chloroquine-treated or untreated cells yielded a 67.3 K product. Treatment with 200 ..mu..M and 1 mM chloroquine essentially prevented the release of (/sup 35/S)Met-labeled proteins which normally accompany the release of norepinephrine, and allowed the stimulated release of a new set of proteins (<68,000 daltons). The results are very similar to those obtained with monensin. Thus, elevation in intraorganelle pH appears to enhance processing of DBH and impede the secretory process.

  15. The Effect of Chloroquine on Immune Activation and Interferon Signatures Associated with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Bosinger, Steven E.; Kang, Minhee; Belaunzaran-Zamudio, Pablo; Matining, Roy M.; Wilson, Cara C.; Flexner, Charles; Clagett, Brian; Plants, Jill; Read, Sarah; Purdue, Lynette; Myers, Laurie; Boone, Linda; Tebas, Pablo; Kumar, Princy; Clifford, David; Douek, Daniel; Silvestri, Guido; Landay, Alan L.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immune activation associated with HIV-1 infection contributes to morbidity and mortality. We studied whether chloroquine, through Toll-like receptor (TLR) antagonist properties, could reduce immune activation thought to be driven by TLR ligands, such as gut-derived bacterial elements and HIV-1 RNAs. AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5258 was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 33 HIV-1-infected participants off antiretroviral therapy (ART) and 37 participants on ART. Study participants in each cohort were randomized 1:1 to receive chloroquine 250 mg orally for the first 12 weeks then cross over to placebo for 12 weeks or placebo first and then chloroquine. Combining the periods of chloroquine use in both arms of the on-ART cohort yielded a modest reduction in the proportions of CD8 T cells co-expressing CD38 and DR (median decrease = 3.0%, p = .003). The effect on immune activation in the off-ART cohort was likely confounded by increased plasma HIV-1 RNA during chloroquine administration (median 0.29 log10 increase, p < .001). Transcriptional analyses in the off-ART cohort showed decreased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in 5 of 10 chloroquine-treated participants and modest decreases in CD38 and CCR5 RNAs in all chloroquine-treated participants. Chloroquine modestly reduced immune activation in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Clinical Trials Registry Number: NCT00819390. PMID:26935044

  16. A new homolog of FocA transporters identified in cadmium-resistant Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomenie, Claudine; Foti, Emilie; Floch, Enora; Diderot, Vimala; Porquet, Dominique; Dupuy, Corinne; Bonaly, Jacqueline . E-mail: Jacqueline.bonaly@u-psud.fr

    2007-06-29

    To better understand the cellular mechanism of stress resistance to various pollutants (cadmium, pentachlorophenol), we undertook a survey of the Euglena gracilis transcriptome by mRNA differential display and cDNA cloning. We performed a real-time RT-PCR analysis upon four selected genes. One of them significantly changed its expression level in response to stress treatments: B25 gene was overexpressed in Cd-resistant cells whereas it was down-regulated in PCP-adapted cells. By Race assays we obtained for B25 a 1093 bp cDNA. The deduced protein was identified as a bacterial formate/nitrite transporter (FocA) homolog and the gene was named EgFth. From all the data, we concluded that EgFth overexpression was related to chronic exposure to cadmium.

  17. Synthesis, Antiplasmodial Activity, and β-Hematin Inhibition of Hydroxypyridone–Chloroquine Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A series of noncytotoxic 4-aminoquinoline-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one hybrids were synthesized on the basis of a synergistic in vitro combination of a precursor N-alkyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one with chloroquine (CQ) and tested in vitro against CQ resistant (K1 and W2) and sensitive (3D7) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of the precursors was negated by blocking the chelator moiety via complexation with gallium(III) or benzyl protection. None of the precursors inhibited β-hematin formation. Most hybrids were more potent inhibitors of β-hematin formation than CQ, and a correlation between antiplasmodial activity and inhibition of β-hematin formation was observed. Potent hybrids against K1, 3D7, and W2, respectively, were 8c (0.13, 0.004, and 0.1 μM); 8d (0.08, 0.01, and 0.02 μM); and 7g (0.07, 0.03, and 0.08 μM). PMID:24900724

  18. Resistance to Water Transport in Shoots of Vitis vinifera L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Hans R.; Matthews, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    Apparent resistances to water transport in the liquid phase were determined from measurements of soil, root, basal shoot internode, shoot apex, and leaf water potentials and water flux in Vitis vinifera (cv White Riesling) during soil drying. Predawn water potential differences (ΔΨ) in the shoots accounted for 20% of the total ΔΨ between the soil and the shoot apex when plants were well-watered but increased to about 90% when shoot growth ceased. The ΔΨ from soil to root was essentially constant during this period. At low water potential, the ΔΨ in the shoot was persistent when transpiration was low (predawn) or completely prevented (plant bagging). The apparent hydraulic resistance between the basal shoot internode and most rapidly expanding leaf (or shoot apex) increased several-fold when water was withheld. Leaf and internode expansion both exhibited high sensitivity to increasing hydraulic resistance. Measurements of pneumatic resistance to air flow through frozen internode segments indicated progressive vapor-filling of vessels as soil drying progressed. From these observations and others in the literature, it was suggested that embolization may be a common occurrence and play an important role in the inhibition of shoot growth at moderate water deficits. PMID:16666373

  19. Effect of multidrug-efflux transporter genes on dipeptide resistance and overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikiro; Tabata, Kazuhiko; Yagasaki, Makoto; Yonetani, Yoshiyuki

    2010-03-01

    L-Alanyl-L-glutamine (Ala-Gln) is a clinically and nutritionally important dipeptide. We have already shown a novel method for the fermentative production of Ala-Gln using an Escherichia coli strain expressing L-amino acid alpha-ligase (Lal), which catalyzes the formation of dipeptides by combining two amino acids. In the course of Ala-Gln-producing strain development, it was revealed that Lal expression caused growth inhibition. We also found that the addition of some dipeptides, including Ala-Gln, inhibited the growth of a multiple peptidase-deficient strain. To further increase the productivity by overcoming the inhibitory effect of dipeptides, we focused on dipeptide transport systems. The four genes (bcr, norE, ydeE and yeeO) were selected from 34 genes encoding a multidrug-efflux transporter of E. coli as those conferring resistance to growth inhibitory dipeptides. Intracellular concentration of Ala-Gln was reduced by overexpressing these genes in a multiple peptidase-deficient strain. Furthermore, overexpression of each gene in the dipeptide-producing strains resulted in the increase of Ala-Gln and L-alanyl-L-branched chain amino acids titers. These results indicate that some multidrug-efflux transporters of E. coli can transport dipeptides and that enhancement of their activities is effective for fermentative production of dipeptides.

  20. Harnessing Drug Resistance: Using ABC Transporter Proteins To Target Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Heather M.; Kachadourian, Remy; Day, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) class of proteins is one of the most functionally diverse transporter families found in biological systems. Although the abundance of ABC proteins varies between species, they are highly conserved in sequence and often demonstrate similar functions across prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Beginning with a brief summary of the events leading to our present day knowledge of ABC transporters, the purpose of this review is to discuss the potential for utilizing ABC transporters as a means for cellular glutathione (GSH) modulation. GSH is one of the most abundant thiol antioxidants in cells. It is involved in cellular division, protein and DNA synthesis, maintenance of cellular redox status and xenobiotic metabolism. Cellular GSH levels are often altered in many disease states including cancer. Over the past two decades there has been considerable emphasis on methods to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and ionization radiation therapy by GSH depletion. We contend that ABC transporters, particularly multi-drug resistant proteins (MRPs), may be used as therapeutic targets for applications aimed at modulation of GSH levels. This review will emphasize MRP-mediated modulation of intracellular GSH levels as a potential alternative and adjunctive approach for cancer therapy. PMID:17585883

  1. Comparison of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine with and without chloroquine for uncomplicated malaria in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Pitmang, Simon L; Thacher, Tom D; Madaki, J K A; Egah, Daniel Z; Fischer, Philip R

    2005-03-01

    While resistance to older antimalarials is increasingly common, newer antimalarials are still not widely available or affordable in much of Africa. Older antimalarials used in combination might be adequately effective in treating uncomplicated malaria. The objective of this study was to determine whether the combination of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) is superior to SP alone in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nigerian patients. We recruited subjects with malaria, defined as the presence of fever and parasitemia > 2,000/microL, from the outpatient department of a Nigerian teaching hospital. We alternately assigned 280 subjects to receive SP with or without CQ. We assessed clinical and parasitologic responses on days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14. A total of 114 in the SP + CQ group and 116 in the SP group completed the study. By day 3, 97 (75%) in the SP + CQ group and 52 (42%) in the SP group had cleared their parasitemia (P < 0.001); by day 14, 112 (98%) and 67 (58%), respectively, had cleared their parasitemia (P < 0.001). By day 3, 82 (63%) in the SP + CQ group and 20 (16%) in the SP group were symptom free (P < 0.001). When a modified World Health Organization clinical classification system was used, adequate clinical response occurred in 99 (87%) and 61 (53%) of those in the SP + CQ and SP groups, respectively. RI, RII, and RIII resistance to SP + CQ was 7.9%, 3.5%, and 1.8%, respectively, whereas resistance to SP was 23%, 17%, and 5%, respectively. Combined SP + CQ is superior to SP alone for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Nigerian patients and may prolong the usefulness of these readily available and affordable drugs.

  2. A New ABC Half-Transporter in Leishmania major Is Involved in Resistance to Antimony

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, J. I.; García-Hernández, R.; Castanys, S.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of ABCI4, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter in Leishmania major, is described. We show that ABCI4 is involved in heavy metal export, thereby conferring resistance to Pentostam, to Sb(III), and to As(III) and Cd(II). Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 showed a lower mitochondrial toxic effect of antimony by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and maintained higher values of both the mitochondrial electrochemical potential and total ATP levels with respect to controls. The ABCI4 half-transporter forms homodimers as determined by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. A combination of subcellular localization studies under a confocal microscope and a surface biotinylation assay using parasites expressing green fluorescent protein- and FLAG-tagged ABCI4 suggests that the transporter presents a dual localization in both mitochondria and the plasma membrane. Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 present an increased replication in mouse peritoneal macrophages. We have determined that porphyrins are substrates for ABCI4. Consequently, the overexpression of ABCI4 confers resistance to some toxic porphyrins, such as zinc-protoporphyrin, due to the lower accumulation resulting from a significant efflux, as determined using the fluorescent zinc-mesoporphyrin, a validated heme analog. In addition, ABCI4 has a significant ability to efflux thiol after Sb(III) incubation, thus meaning that ABCI4 could be considered to be a potential thiol-X-pump that is able to recognize metal-conjugated thiols. In summary, we have shown that this new ABC transporter is involved in drug sensitivity to antimony and other compounds by efflux as conjugated thiol complexes. PMID:23716044

  3. A new ABC half-transporter in Leishmania major is involved in resistance to antimony.

    PubMed

    Manzano, J I; García-Hernández, R; Castanys, S; Gamarro, F

    2013-08-01

    The characterization of ABCI4, a new intracellular ATP-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporter in Leishmania major, is described. We show that ABCI4 is involved in heavy metal export, thereby conferring resistance to Pentostam, to Sb(III), and to As(III) and Cd(II). Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 showed a lower mitochondrial toxic effect of antimony by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and maintained higher values of both the mitochondrial electrochemical potential and total ATP levels with respect to controls. The ABCI4 half-transporter forms homodimers as determined by a coimmunoprecipitation assay. A combination of subcellular localization studies under a confocal microscope and a surface biotinylation assay using parasites expressing green fluorescent protein- and FLAG-tagged ABCI4 suggests that the transporter presents a dual localization in both mitochondria and the plasma membrane. Parasites overexpressing ABCI4 present an increased replication in mouse peritoneal macrophages. We have determined that porphyrins are substrates for ABCI4. Consequently, the overexpression of ABCI4 confers resistance to some toxic porphyrins, such as zinc-protoporphyrin, due to the lower accumulation resulting from a significant efflux, as determined using the fluorescent zinc-mesoporphyrin, a validated heme analog. In addition, ABCI4 has a significant ability to efflux thiol after Sb(III) incubation, thus meaning that ABCI4 could be considered to be a potential thiol-X-pump that is able to recognize metal-conjugated thiols. In summary, we have shown that this new ABC transporter is involved in drug sensitivity to antimony and other compounds by efflux as conjugated thiol complexes.

  4. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography of Preclinical Chloroquine Maculopathy in Egyptian Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Riham S. H. M.; Abd-Elmohsen, Mai N.; Khafagy, Mohamed M.; Raafat, Karim A.; Sheta, Sherif M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in early detection of Chloroquine maculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods. 40 left eyes of 40 female rheumatoid arthritis patients who received treatment chloroquine for more than one year were recruited in the study. All patients had no symptoms or signs of Chloroquine retinopathy. They were evaluated using SD-OCT, where the Central Foveal Thickness (CFT), parafoveal thickness and perifoveal thickness, average Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) thickness, and Ganglion Cell Complex (GCC) measurements were measured and compared to 40 left eyes of 40 normal females. Results. The mean CFT was found to be thinner in the Chloroquine group (238.15 µm ± 22.49) than the normal controls (248.2 µm ± 19.04), which was statistically significant (p value = 0.034). The mean parafoveal thickness was lesser in the Chloroquine group than the control group in all quadrants (p value <0.05). The perifoveal thickness in both groups showed no statistically significant difference (p value >0.05) in all quadrants. No significant difference was detected between the two groups regarding RNFL, GCC, or IS/OS junction. Conclusions. Preclinical Chloroquine toxicity can lead to early thinning in the central fovea as well as the parafoveal regions that is detected by SD-OCT. PMID:26301102

  5. Mesoscopic current transport in two-dimensional materials with grain boundaries: Four-point probe resistance and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Mikkel R.; Boll, Mads; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Hansen, Ole; Petersen, Dirch H.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the behavior of micro four-point probe (M4PP) measurements on two-dimensional (2D) sheets composed of grains of varying size and grain boundary resistivity by Monte Carlo based finite element (FE) modelling. The 2D sheet of the FE model was constructed using Voronoi tessellation to emulate a polycrystalline sheet, and a square sample was cut from the tessellated surface. Four-point resistances and Hall effect signals were calculated for a probe placed in the center of the square sample as a function of grain density n and grain boundary resistivity ρ GB . We find that the dual configuration sheet resistance as well as the resistance measured between opposing edges of the square sample have a simple unique dependency on the dimension-less parameter √{ n } ρ GB G 0 , where G0 is the sheet conductance of a grain. The value of the ratio R A / R B between resistances measured in A- and B-configurations depends on the dimensionality of the current transport (i.e., one- or two-dimensional). At low grain density or low grain boundary resistivity, two-dimensional transport is observed. In contrast, at moderate grain density and high grain resistivity, one-dimensional transport is seen. Ultimately, this affects how measurements on defective systems should be interpreted in order to extract relevant sample parameters. The Hall effect response in all M4PP configurations was only significant for moderate grain densities and fairly large grain boundary resistivity.

  6. Relationship between Microstructure and Electrical Transport in Resistance Switching Oxide Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aquila, Kenneth F.

    Understanding the microscopic origin of resistance switching in metal/oxide/metal heterostructures is a crucial step for controlling the fundamental behavior and for enabling applications in non-volatile memory. The formation of nanoscale conducting filaments that bridge across the oxide layer has become a well-accepted model for resistance switching, but the composition of the filaments, their formation mechanism, and the dependence of the filament formation on the as-deposited microstructure and composition is still being explored in different material systems. In this work, we have examined the resistance switching mechanism in a variety of transition metal oxide-based heterostructures including Pt/CuO/Pt, Pt/NiO/Pt, Pt/WOx/W, Pt/TiO2/Pt, and W/HfO2/TiN. For each material system, the microstructural and compositional changes caused by the initial electroforming process and the subsequent resistance switching have been correlated with electrical transport properties using in-situ TEM biasing, hard x-ray nanoprobe analysis, and conductance AFM techniques. In multiple systems, we found that electroforming produces conducting filaments composed of partially-reduced oxide instead of metal, a result that has not been widely reported for oxides such as NiO that don't have sub-oxides under standard conditions. However, we also found significant variability in the electroforming and switching behavior for all the material systems studied. Improved control of the uniformity of initial microstructure and composition will be necessary to identify the microscopic origins of resistance switching using the methods described in this thesis.

  7. Cell-Penetrating, Guanidinium-Rich Molecular Transporters for Overcoming Efflux-Mediated Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of chemotherapy failure in the clinic. Drugs that were once effective against naïve disease subsequently prove ineffective against recurrent disease, which often exhibits an MDR phenotype. MDR can be attributed to many factors; often dominating among these is the ability of a cell to suppress or block drug entry through upregulation of membrane-bound drug efflux pumps. Efflux pumps exhibit polyspecificity, recognizing and exporting many different types of drugs, especially those whose lipophilic nature contributes to residence in the membrane. We have developed a general strategy to overcome efflux-based resistance. This strategy involves conjugating a known drug that succumbs to efflux-mediated resistance to a cell-penetrating molecular transporter, specifically, the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), d-octaarginine. The resultant conjugates are discrete single entities (not particle mixtures) and highly water-soluble. They rapidly enter cells, are not substrates for efflux pumps, and release the free drug only after cellular entry at a rate controlled by linker design and favored by target cell chemistry. This general strategy can be applied to many classes of drugs and allows for an exceptionally rapid advance to clinical testing, especially of drugs that succumb to resistance. The efficacy of this strategy has been successfully demonstrated with Taxol in cellular and animal models of resistant cancer and with ex vivo samples from patients with ovarian cancer. Next generation efforts in this area will involve the extension of this strategy to other chemotherapeutics and other MDR-susceptible diseases. PMID:24798708

  8. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  9. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  10. Short-Chain Chromate Ion Transporter Proteins from Bacillus subtilis Confer Chromate Resistance in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Aguilar-Barajas, Esther; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I.; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Vargas, Eréndira; Cervantes, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Tandem paired genes encoding putative short-chain monodomain protein members of the chromate ion transporter (CHR) superfamily (ywrB and ywrA) were cloned from genomic DNA of Bacillus subtilis strain 168. The transcription of the paired genes, renamed chr3N and chr3C, respectively, was shown to occur via a bicistronic mRNA generated from a promoter upstream of the chr3N gene. The chr3N and chr3C genes conferred chromate resistance when expressed in Escherichia coli strain W3110. The cloned chr3N gene alone did not confer chromate resistance on E. coli, suggesting that both chr3N and chr3C genes are required for function. E. coli cells expressing paired chr3N and chr3C genes demonstrated diminished uptake of chromate compared to that by a vector-only control strain. These results suggest that short-chain CHR proteins form heterodimer transporters which efflux chromate ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:19581367

  11. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 {mu}g per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  12. Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery following lethal low dose- rate radiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang, Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hr. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hrs and 4 hrs before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retro orbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methyl cellulose colony forming assay of whole bone marrow cells as well as FACS analysis of lineage depleted cells was used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results Mice pretreated with chloroquine prior to radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate compared to mice treated with radiation alone (80 vs.31 percent, p=0.0026). Chloroquine administration prior to radiation did not impact the survival of ATM null mice (p=0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after the transplantation (4.2 percent vs. 0.4 percent, p=0.015). Conclusion Chloroquine administration prior to radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect like the in vitro effect is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection against the

  13. PARAQUAT RESISTANT1, a Golgi-Localized Putative Transporter Protein, Is Involved in Intracellular Transport of Paraquat1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianyong; Mu, Jinye; Bai, Jiaoteng; Fu, Fuyou; Zou, Tingting; An, Fengying; Zhang, Jian; Jing, Hongwei; Wang, Qing; Li, Zhen; Yang, Shuhua; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-01-01

    Paraquat is one of the most widely used herbicides worldwide. In green plants, paraquat targets the chloroplast by transferring electrons from photosystem I to molecular oxygen to generate toxic reactive oxygen species, which efficiently induce membrane damage and cell death. A number of paraquat-resistant biotypes of weeds and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants have been identified. The herbicide resistance in Arabidopsis is partly attributed to a reduced uptake of paraquat through plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the biochemical mechanism of paraquat resistance remains poorly understood. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an Arabidopsis paraquat resistant1 (par1) mutant that shows strong resistance to the herbicide without detectable developmental abnormalities. PAR1 encodes a putative l-type amino acid transporter protein localized to the Golgi apparatus. Compared with the wild-type plants, the par1 mutant plants show similar efficiency of paraquat uptake, suggesting that PAR1 is not directly responsible for the intercellular uptake of paraquat. However, the par1 mutation caused a reduction in the accumulation of paraquat in the chloroplast, suggesting that PAR1 is involved in the intracellular transport of paraquat into the chloroplast. We identified a PAR1-like gene, OsPAR1, in rice (Oryza sativa). Whereas the overexpression of OsPAR1 resulted in hypersensitivity to paraquat, the knockdown of its expression using RNA interference conferred paraquat resistance on the transgenic rice plants. These findings reveal a unique mechanism by which paraquat is actively transported into the chloroplast and also provide a practical approach for genetic manipulations of paraquat resistance in crops. PMID:23471133

  14. Epigenetic modulation of the biophysical properties of drug-resistant cell lipids to restore drug transport and endocytic functions.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Lu, Shan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2012-09-04

    In our recent studies exploring the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids, and the role they play in drug transport, we demonstrated the difference of drug-resistant breast cancer cells from drug-sensitive cells in lipid composition and biophysical properties, suggesting that cancer cells acquire a drug-resistant phenotype through the alteration of lipid synthesis to inhibit intracellular drug transport to protect from cytotoxic effect. In cancer cells, epigenetic changes (e.g., DNA hypermethylation) are essential to maintain this drug-resistant phenotype. Thus, altered lipid synthesis may be linked to epigenetic mechanisms of drug resistance. We hypothesize that reversing DNA hypermethylation in resistant cells with an epigenetic drug could alter lipid synthesis, changing the cell membrane's biophysical properties to facilitate drug delivery to overcome drug resistance. Herein we show that treating drug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR) with the epigenetic drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) significantly alters cell lipid composition and biophysical properties, causing the resistant cells to acquire biophysical characteristics similar to those of sensitive cell (MCF-7) lipids. Following decitabine treatment, resistant cells demonstrated increased sphingomyelinase activity, resulting in a decreased sphingomyelin level that influenced lipid domain structures, increased membrane fluidity, and reduced P-glycoprotein expression. Changes in the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids facilitated doxorubicin transport and restored endocytic function for drug delivery with a lipid-encapsulated form of doxorubicin, enhancing the drug efficacy. In conclusion, we have established a new mechanism for efficacy of an epigenetic drug, mediated through changes in lipid composition and biophysical properties, in reversing cancer drug resistance.

  15. Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine Increase Retinal Pigment Epithelial Layer Permeability.

    PubMed

    Korthagen, Nicoline M; Bastiaans, Jeroen; van Meurs, Jan C; van Bilsen, Kiki; van Hagen, P Martin; Dik, Willem A

    2015-07-01

    Antimalarials chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) are widely used as antiinflammatory drugs, but side effects include retinopathy and vision loss. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of CQ and HCQ on the barrier integrity of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell monolayers in vitro. Permeability of ARPE-19 cell monolayers was determined using Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled dextran. The influence of CQ and HCQ on cell death and the expression tight junction molecules was examined. CQ and HCQ significantly increased ARPE-19 monolayer permeability after 3 and 18 h, respectively, and enhanced mRNA levels for claudin-1 and occludin. Cytotoxicity was only observed after 18 h exposure. Thus, CQ and HCQ rapidly enhance RPE barrier permeability in vitro, independent of cytotoxicity or loss of zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and occludin expression. Our findings suggest that CQ/HCQ-induced permeability of the RPE layer may contribute to blood-retinal barrier breakdown in case of CQ/HCQ-induced retinopathy.

  16. The ABC-Type Multidrug Resistance Transporter LmrCD Is Responsible for an Extrusion-Based Mechanism of Bile Acid Resistance in Lactococcus lactis▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Arsalan Haseeb; Bakkes, Patrick J.; Lubelski, Jacek; Agustiandari, Herfita; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Upon prolonged exposure to cholate and other toxic compounds, Lactococcus lactis develops a multidrug resistance phenotype that has been attributed to an elevated expression of the heterodimeric ABC-type multidrug transporter LmrCD. To investigate the molecular basis of bile acid resistance in L. lactis and to evaluate the contribution of efflux-based mechanisms in this process, the drug-sensitive L. lactis NZ9000 ΔlmrCD strain was challenged with cholate. A resistant strain was obtained that, compared to the parental strain, showed (i) significantly improved resistance toward several bile acids but not to drugs, (ii) morphological changes, and (iii) an altered susceptibility to antimicrobial peptides. Transcriptome and transport analyses suggest that the acquired resistance is unrelated to elevated transport activity but, instead, results from a multitude of stress responses, changes to the cell envelope, and metabolic changes. In contrast, wild-type cells induce the expression of lmrCD upon exposure to cholate, whereupon the cholate is actively extruded from the cells. Together, these data suggest a central role for an efflux-based mechanism in bile acid resistance and implicate LmrCD as the main system responsible in L. lactis. PMID:18790870

  17. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes: aerial transport from cattle feed yards via particulate matter.

    PubMed

    McEachran, Andrew D; Blackwell, Brett R; Hanson, J Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J; Mayer, Gregory D; Cox, Stephen B; Smith, Philip N

    2015-04-01

    Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs.

  18. The Role of Transport Mechanisms in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Drug Resistance and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sarathy, Jansy Passiflora; Dartois, Véronique; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2012-01-01

    In the fight against tuberculosis, cell wall permeation of chemotherapeutic agents remains a critical but largely unsolved question. Here we review the major mechanisms of small molecule penetration into and efflux from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, and outline how these mechanisms may contribute to the development of phenotypic drug tolerance and induction of drug resistance. M. tuberculosis is intrinsically recalcitrant to small molecule permeation thanks to its thick lipid-rich cell wall. Passive diffusion appears to account for only a fraction of total drug permeation. As in other bacterial species, influx of hydrophilic compounds is facilitated by water-filled open channels, or porins, spanning the cell wall. However, the diversity and density of M. tuberculosis porins appears lower than in enterobacteria. Besides, physiological adaptations brought about by unfavorable conditions are thought to reduce the efficacy of porins. While intracellular accumulation of selected drug classes supports the existence of hypothesized active drug influx transporters, efflux pumps contribute to the drug resistant phenotype through their natural abundance and diversity, as well as their highly inducible expression. Modulation of efflux transporter expression has been observed in phagocytosed, non-replicating persistent and multi-drug resistant bacilli. Altogether, M. tuberculosis has evolved both intrinsic properties and acquired mechanisms to increase its level of tolerance towards xenobiotic substances, by preventing or minimizing their entry. Understanding these adaptation mechanisms is critical to counteract the natural mechanisms of defense against toxic compounds and develop new classes of chemotherapeutic agents that positively exploit the influx and efflux pathways of mycobacteria. PMID:24281307

  19. Dam-break flows with resistance as agents of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmett, M.; Moodie, T. B.

    2008-08-01

    When a semi-infinite body of fluid initially at rest behind a vertical retaining wall is suddenly released by the removal of the barrier, the resulting flow over either a horizontal or a sloping bed is referred to as a dam-break flow. When resistance to the flow is neglected, the exact solution in the case of a horizontal bed with or without "tail water" may be obtained on the basis of shallow-water theory via the method of characteristics, and the results are well known. The inclusion of the effects of resistance in the form of basal friction that are needed in order to bring the mathematical solutions into closer harmony with the experimental results modifies the wave speed and flow profile near the head of the wave significantly and the simple exact solution of the shallow-water equations can no longer be employed as a reasonable description of the flow field. It is our intention here to study dam-break flows as agents of sediment transport taking into account basal friction and the attendant changes in depth profiles near the head, as well as the effects of particle concentrations on the flow dynamics including both erosion and deposition of particles arising through the interaction of the flow with the bed material. We shall consider shallow flows over dry beds and investigate the effects of changes in the depositional and erosional models employed as well as in the nature of the drag acting on the flow. These models offer some insight into the transport of sediment in the worst case scenario of complete and instantaneous collapse of a dam. They are also anticipated to provide information on other sheet flow events where particle transport plays a significant role in the flow dynamics.

  20. Resistance of Francisella Novicida to Fosmidomycin Associated with Mutations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Ryan S.; McKenney, Elizabeth S.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2012-01-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway is essential in most prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells, and is a validated target for antimicrobial drug development. The formation of MEP is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR). MEP pathway genes have been identified in many category A and B biothreat agents, including Francisella tularensis, which causes the zoonosis tularemia. Fosmidomycin (Fos) inhibits purified Francisella DXR. This compound also inhibits the growth of F. tularensis NIH B38, F. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS bacteria. Related compounds such as FR900098 and the lipophilic prodrug of FR900098 (compound 1) have been developed to improve the bioavailability of these DXR inhibitors. In performing disk-inhibition assays with these compounds, we observed breakthrough colonies of F. novicida in the presence of Fos, suggesting spontaneous development of Fos resistance (FosR). FosR bacteria had decreased sensitivity to both Fos and FR900098. The two most likely targets for the development of mutants would be the DXR enzyme itself or the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) that allows entry of Fos into the bacteria. Sensitivity of FosR F. novicida bacteria to compound 1 was not abated suggesting that spontaneous resistance is not due to mutation of DXR. We thus predicted that the glpT transporter may be mutated leading to this resistant phenotype. Supporting this, transposon insertion mutants at the glpT locus were also found to be resistant to Fos. DNA sequencing of four different spontaneous FosR colonies demonstrated a variety of deletions in the glpT coding region. The overall frequency of FosR mutations in F. novicida was determined to be 6.3 × 10−8. Thus we conclude that one mechanism of resistance of F. novicida to Fos is caused by mutations in GlpT. This is the first description of spontaneous mutations in Francisella leading to FosR. PMID:22905031

  1. Energy budgets and resistances to energy transport in sparsely vegetated rangeland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    Partitioning available energy between plants and bare soil in sparsely vegetated rangelands will allow hydrologists and others to gain a greater understanding of water use by native vegetation, especially phreatophytes. Standard methods of conducting energy budget studies result in measurements of latent and sensible heat fluxes above the plant canopy which therefore include the energy fluxes from both the canopy and the soil. One-dimensional theoretical numerical models have been proposed recently for the partitioning of energy in sparse crops. Bowen ratio and other micrometeorological data collected over phreatophytes growing in areas of shallow ground water in central Nevada were used to evaluate the feasibility of using these models, which are based on surface and within-canopy aerodynamic resistances, to determine heat and water vapor transport in sparsely vegetated rangelands. The models appear to provide reasonably good estimates of sensible heat flux from the soil and latent heat flux from the canopy. Estimates of latent heat flux from the soil were less satisfactory. Sensible heat flux from the canopy was not well predicted by the present resistance formulations. Also, estimates of total above-canopy fluxes were not satisfactory when using a single value for above-canopy bulk aerodynamic resistance. ?? 1992.

  2. Separating the roles of acropetal and basipetal auxin transport on gravitropism with mutations in two Arabidopsis multidrug resistance-like ABC transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel R; Miller, Nathan D; Splitt, Bessie L; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P

    2007-06-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90 degrees reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation.

  3. Separating the Roles of Acropetal and Basipetal Auxin Transport on Gravitropism with Mutations in Two Arabidopsis Multidrug Resistance-Like ABC Transporter Genes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Miller, Nathan D.; Splitt, Bessie L.; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P.

    2007-01-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90° reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation. PMID:17557805

  4. Characterization of multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein transport function with an organotechnetium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Vallabhaneni, V.R.; Kronauge, J.F.

    1995-09-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells and tumors is associated with overexpression of an {approximately}170 integral membrane efflux transporter, the MDR1 P-glycoprotein. Hexakis(2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) technetium(I) (Tc-SESTAMIBI), a {gamma}-emitting lipophilic cationic metallopharmaceutical, has recently been shown to be a P-glycoprotein transport substrate. Exploiting the negligible lipid membrane adsorption properties of this organometallic substrate, we studied the transport kinetics, pharmacology, drug binding, and modulation of P-glycoprotein in cell preparations derived from a variety of species and selection strategies, including SW-1573, V79, Alex, and CHO drug-sensitive cells and in 77A, LZ-8, and Alex/A.5 MDR cells. Rapid cell accumulation (T{sub 1/2} {approx} 6 min) of the agent to a steady state was observed which was inversely proportional to immunodetectable levels of P-glycoprotein. Many MDR cytotoxic agents inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated Tc-SESTAMIBI efflux, thereby enhancing organometallic cation accumulation. 70 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo studies of electron transport in resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjaković, D.; Petrović, Z. Lj; White, R. D.; Dujko, S.

    2014-10-01

    A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique are used to investigate electron transport in Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments at CERN and elsewhere. Using cross sections for electron scattering in C2H2F4, iso-C4H10 and SF6 as an input in our Boltzmann and Monte Carlo codes, we have calculated data for electron transport as a function of reduced electric field E/N in various C2H2F4/iso-C4H10/SF6 gas mixtures used in RPCs in the ALICE, CMS and ATLAS experiments. Emphasis is placed upon the explicit and implicit effects of non-conservative collisions (e.g. electron attachment and/or ionization) on the drift and diffusion. Among many interesting and atypical phenomena induced by the explicit effects of non-conservative collisions, we note the existence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component in the ALICE timing RPC system. We systematically study the origin and mechanisms for such phenomena as well as the possible physical implications which arise from their explicit inclusion into models of RPCs. Spatially-resolved electron transport properties are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique in order to understand these phenomena.

  6. Dissolved gas exsolution to enhance gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2015-05-01

    Condensation of volatile organic compounds in colder zones can be detrimental to the performance of an in situ thermal treatment application for the remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones. A novel method to increase gas production and limit convective heat loss in more permeable, potentially colder, zones involves the injection and liberation of dissolved gas from solution during heating. Bench-scale electrical resistance heating experiments were performed with a dissolved carbon dioxide and sodium chloride solution to investigate exsolved gas saturations and transport regimes at elevated, but sub-boiling, temperatures. At sub-boiling temperatures, maximum exsolved gas saturations of Sg = 0.12 were attained, and could be sustained when the carbon dioxide solution was injected during heating rather than emplaced prior to heating. This gas saturation was estimated to decrease groundwater relative permeability to krw = 0.64. Discontinuous gas transport was observed above saturations of Sg = 0.07, demonstrating the potential of exsolved CO2 to bridge vertical gas transport through colder zones.

  7. Measurement of multiple drug resistance transporter activity in putative cancer stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Donnenberg, Vera S; Meyer, E Michael; Donnenberg, Albert D

    2009-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance, mediated by the expression and activity of ABC-transporters, is a major obstacle to antineoplastic therapy. Normal tissue stem cells and their malignant counterparts share MDR transporter activity as a major mechanism of self-protection. Although MDR activity is upregulated in response to substrate chemotherapeutic agents, it is also constitutively expressed on both normal tissue stem cells and a subset of tumor cells prior to the initiation of therapy, representing a built-in obstacle to therapeutic ratio. Constitutive and induced MDR activity can be detected in cellular subsets of disaggregated tissues, using the fluorescent substrates Rhodamine 123 and Hoechst 33342 for ABCB1 (also known as P-gp and MDR1) and ABCG2 (BCRP1). In this chapter, we will describe the complete procedure for the detection of MDR activity, including: (1) Preparing single-cell suspensions from tumor and normal tissue specimens; (2) An efficient method to perform cell surface marker staining on large numbers of cells; (3) Flow cytometer setup and controls; (4) Simultaneous measurement of Hoechst 33342 and Rhodamine123 transport; and (5) Data acquisition and analysis.

  8. Chloroquine modulates HIV-1-induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell alpha interferon: implication for T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Jeffrey A; Montoya, Carlos J; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L; Desai, Seema N

    2010-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-alpha levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-alpha could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-alpha production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-alpha production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-alpha synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-alpha by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection.

  9. Chloroquine Modulates HIV-1-Induced Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Alpha Interferon: Implication for T-Cell Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Montoya, Carlos J.; Usuga, Xiomara; Ronquillo, Rollie; Landay, Alan L.; Desai, Seema N.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) contribute to antiviral immunity mainly through recognition of microbial products and viruses via intracellular Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) or TLR9, resulting in the production of type I interferons (IFNs). Although interferons reduce the viral burden in the acute phase of infection, their role in the chronic phase is unclear. The presence of elevated plasma IFN-α levels in advanced HIV disease and its association with microbial translocation in chronic HIV infection lead us to hypothesize that IFN-α could contribute to immune activation. Blocking of IFN-α production using chloroquine, an endosomal inhibitor, was tested in a novel in vitro model system with the aim of characterizing the effects of chloroquine on HIV-1-mediated TLR signaling, IFN-α production, and T-cell activation. Our results indicate that chloroquine blocks TLR-mediated activation of pDC and MyD88 signaling, as shown by decreases in the levels of the downstream signaling molecules IRAK-4 and IRF-7 and by inhibition of IFN-α synthesis. Chloroquine decreased CD8 T-cell activation induced by aldrithiol-2-treated HIV-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In addition to blocking pDC activation, chloroquine also blocked negative modulators of the T-cell response, such as indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1). Our results indicate that TLR stimulation and production of IFN-α by pDC contribute to immune activation and that blocking of these pathways using chloroquine may interfere with events contributing to HIV pathogenesis. Our results suggests that a safe, well-tolerated drug such as chloroquine can be proposed as an adjuvant therapeutic candidate along with highly active antiretroviral therapy to control immune activation in HIV-1 infection. PMID:19949061

  10. Influence of the microporous substratum and hydrodynamics on resistances to drug transport in cell culture systems: calculation of intrinsic transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Sinko, P J

    1997-12-01

    Although cell culture models are increasingly used to study drug transport and metabolism, the influence of the substratum on the transport properties of the cell monolayer has not been studied in great detail. Furthermore, the use of effective (or apparent) permeabilities (Peff) assumes that the contribution of the microporous filter substratum and the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) to transport are negligible or are at least constant for a series of drugs. In the present study, the permeabilities of the substratum, ABL, and monolayer were obtained for a series of compounds at variable flow rates in side-by-side diffusion chambers. Comparisons of transport properties were made between cell monolayers grown on substrata made of polycarbonate (PC) and polyester (PE). All paracellular markers demonstrated a reduction in permeability and a corresponding increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) through PE-grown monolayers. The permeabilities of two carrier-mediated compounds, phenylalanine and proline, were 55% higher and 48% lower through PE-grown monolayers than through the PC-grown monolayers, respectively. The resistance to progesterone transport attributed to the PE and PC filters was large (71% and 27% of total resistance, respectively) at a flow rate of 20 mL/min, indicating that the monolayer was not the rate-limiting transport barrier. Therefore, for highly permeable compounds, reporting Peff has limited value since it is an indicator of the transport properties of the substratum rather than of the monolayer. These results demonstrate that substratum properties (e.g., membrane composition, pore size, etc.) significantly affect the barrier properties of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The most probable mechanism is by the modulation of the functional expression of nutrient and ion transporters resulting in variable transcellular and paracellular transport properties. These results further demonstrate the importance of calculating intrinsic membrane

  11. Expression, detergent solubilization, and purification of a membrane transporter, the MexB multidrug resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Forum H; Jeffery, Constance J

    2010-12-03

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the ability of a cancer cell or pathogen to be resistant to a wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics, is a current serious problem in public health. This multidrug resistance is largely due to energy-dependent drug efflux pumps. The pumps expel anti-cancer drugs or antibiotics into the external medium, lowering their intracellular concentration below a toxic threshold. We are studying multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes infections in patients with many types of injuries or illness, for example, burns or cystic fibrosis, and also in immuno-compromised cancer, dialysis, and transplantation patients. The major MDR efflux pumps in P. aeruginosa are tripartite complexes comprised of an inner membrane proton-drug antiporter (RND), an outer membrane channel (OMF), and a periplasmic linker protein (MFP). The RND and OMF proteins are transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins make up more than 30% of all proteins and are 65% of current drug targets. The hydrophobic transmembrane domains make the proteins insoluble in aqueous buffer. Before a transmembrane protein can be purified, it is necessary to find buffer conditions containing a mild detergent that enable the protein to be solubilized as a protein detergent complex (PDC). In this example, we use an RND protein, the P. aeruginosa MexB transmembrane transporter, to demonstrate how to express a recombinant form of a transmembrane protein, solubilize it using detergents, and then purify the protein detergent complexes. This general method can be applied to the expression, purification, and solubilization of many other recombinantly expressed membrane proteins. The protein detergent complexes can later be used for biochemical or biophysical characterization including X-ray crystal structure determination or crosslinking studies.

  12. Characterization of Escherichia coli d-Cycloserine Transport and Resistant Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Baisa, Gary; Stabo, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    d-Cycloserine (DCS) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that inhibits d-alanine ligase and alanine racemase activity. When Escherichia coli K-12 or CFT073 is grown in minimal glucose or glycerol medium, CycA transports DCS into the cell. E. coli K-12 cycA and CFT073 cycA mutant strains display increased DCS resistance when grown in minimal medium. However, the cycA mutants exhibit no change in DCS sensitivity compared to their parental strains when grown in LB (CFT073 and K-12) or human urine (CFT073 only). These data suggest that cycA does not participate in DCS sensitivity when strains are grown in a non-minimal medium. The small RNA GvcB acts as a negative regulator of E. coli K-12 cycA expression when grown in LB. Three E. coli K-12 gcvB mutant strains failed to demonstrate a change in DCS sensitivity when grown in LB. This further suggests a limited role for cycA in DCS sensitivity. To aid in the identification of E. coli genes involved in DCS sensitivity when grown on complex media, the Keio K-12 mutant collection was screened for DCS-resistant strains. dadA, pnp, ubiE, ubiF, ubiG, ubiH, and ubiX mutant strains showed elevated DCS resistance. The phenotypes associated with these mutants were used to further define three previously characterized E. coli DCS-resistant strains (χ316, χ444, and χ453) isolated by Curtiss and colleagues (R. Curtiss, III, L. J. Charamella, C. M. Berg, and P. E. Harris, J. Bacteriol. 90:1238–1250, 1965). A dadA mutation was identified in both χ444 and χ453. In addition, results are presented that indicate for the first time that DCS can antagonize d-amino acid dehydrogenase (DadA) activity. PMID:23316042

  13. Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Associations with Body Composition, Peritoneal Transport, and Peritoneal Glucose Absorption.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Ana Paula; Oliveira, Jose C; Santos, Olivia; Carvalho, Maria J; Cabrita, Antonio; Rodrigues, Anabela

    2015-12-07

    Insulin resistance has been associated with cardiovascular disease in peritoneal dialysis patients. Few studies have addressed the impact of fast transport status or dialysis prescription on insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to test whether insulin resistance is associated with obesity parameters, peritoneal transport rate, and glucose absorption. Insulin resistance was evaluated with homeostasis model assessment method (HOMA-IR), additionally corrected by adiponectin (HOMA-AD). Enrolled patients were prevalent nondiabetics attending at Santo António Hospital Peritoneal Dialysis Unit, who were free of hospitalization or infectious events in the previous 3 months (51 patients aged 50.4 ± 15.9 years, 59% women). Leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), and daily glucose absorption were also measured. Lean tissue index, fat tissue index (FTI), and relative fat mass (rel.FM) were assessed using multifrequency bioimpedance. Patients were categorized according to dialysate to plasma creatinine ratio at 4 hours, 3.86% peritoneal equilibration test, and obesity parameters. Obesity was present in 49% of patients according to rel.FM. HOMA-IR correlated better with FTI than with body mass index. Significant correlations were found in obese, but not in nonobese patients, between HOMA-IR and leptin, leptin/adiponectin ratio (LAR), and IGFBP-1. HOMA-IR correlated with HOMA-AD, but did not correlate with glucose absorption or transport rate. There were no significant differences in insulin resistance indices, glucose absorption, and body composition parameters between fast and nonfast transporters. A total of 18 patients (35.3%) who had insulin resistance presented with higher LAR and rel.FM (7.3 [12.3, interquartile range] versus 0.7 [1.4, interquartile range], P<0.001, and 39.4 ± 10.1% versus 27.2 ± 11.5%, P=0.002, respectively), lower IGFBP-1 (8.2 ± 7.2 versus 21.0 ± 16.3 ng/ml, P=0.002), but similar glucose absorption and

  14. Molecular surveillance as monitoring tool for drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Adhin, Malti R; Labadie-Bracho, Mergiory; Bretas, Gustavo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this translational study was to show the use of molecular surveillance for polymorphisms and copy number as a monitoring tool to track the emergence and dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance. A molecular baseline for Suriname was established in 2005, with P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance (pfmdr1) markers and copy number in 40 samples. The baseline results revealed the existence of a uniformly distributed mutated genotype corresponding with the fully mefloquine-sensitive 7G8-like genotype (Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y) and a fixed pfmdr1 N86 haplotype. All samples harbored the pivotal pfcrtK76T mutation, showing that chloroquine reintroduction should not yet be contemplated in Suriname. After 5 years, 40 samples were assessed to trace temporal changes in the status of pfmdr1 polymorphisms and copy number and showed minor genetic alterations in the pfmdr1 gene and no significant changes in copy number, thus providing scientific support for prolongation of the current drug policy in Suriname.

  15. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance. PMID:25268163

  16. Chloroquine derivatives block the translocation pores and inhibit cellular entry of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin and Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin.

    PubMed

    Kreidler, Anna-Maria; Benz, Roland; Barth, Holger

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce the binary protein toxins C2 and lethal toxin (LT), respectively. These toxins consist of a binding/transport (B7) component that delivers the separate enzyme (A) component into the cytosol of target cells where it modifies its specific substrate and causes cell death. The B7 components of C2 toxin and LT, C2IIa and PA63, respectively, are ring-shaped heptamers that bind to their cellular receptors and form complexes with their A components C2I and lethal factor (LF), respectively. After receptor-mediated endocytosis of the toxin complexes, C2IIa and PA63 insert into the membranes of acidified endosomes and form trans-membrane pores through which C2I and LF translocate across endosomal membranes into the cytosol. C2IIa and PA63 also form channels in planar bilayer membranes, and we used this approach earlier to identify chloroquine as a potent blocker of C2IIa and PA63 pores. Here, a series of chloroquine derivatives was investigated to identify more efficient toxin inhibitors with less toxic side effects. Chloroquine, primaquine, quinacrine, and fluphenazine blocked C2IIa and PA63 pores in planar lipid bilayers and in membranes of living epithelial cells and macrophages, thereby preventing the pH-dependent membrane transport of the A components into the cytosol and protecting cells from intoxication with C2 toxin and LT. These potent inhibitors of toxin entry underline the central role of the translocation pores for cellular uptake of binary bacterial toxins and as relevant drug targets, and might be lead compounds for novel pharmacological strategies against severe enteric diseases and anthrax.

  17. Malaria epidemic and drug resistance, Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno; Bogreau, H; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Kamil, Mohamed-Ali; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected before, during, and after a 1999 malaria epidemic in Djibouti shows that, despite a high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the epidemic cannot be attributed to a sudden increase in drug resistance of local parasite populations.

  18. ABT-737, a Bcl-2 Selective Inhibitor, and Chloroquine Synergistically Kill Renal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Pei; Jia, Jinpeng; Li, Jijun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yiyan; Chen, Fengkun

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common malignancy in the kidney in the world, and the 5-year overall survival for patients remains poor due to the lack of effective treatment strategies. Although ABT-737, as a Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor, has recently emerged as a novel cancer therapeutic reagent, apoptosis induced by ABT-737 is often blocked in several types of cancer cells. This study investigated whether the combination of the small-molecule BH3 mimetic ABT-737 and the lysosome inhibitor chloroquine was an effective strategy for treating renal cancer cells. We found that the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine synergistically decreased cell viability when compared to treatment with either single reagent. Cell apoptosis induced by a combined treatment was markedly inhibited by the caspase inhibitors z-DEVD-FMK and z-VAD-FMK. It was also inhibited by cathepsin inhibitor E-64 and CTSI (cathepsin inhibitor), which suggested that apoptosis was dependent on the cascade of caspase activation and cathepsins released from lysosomes. Furthermore, we found that ABT-737 could increase the cell level of ROS, which triggers cathepsin-mediated cell death and augments the role of chloroquine in cell death. So the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine was an effective strategy for the treatment of renal cancer cells, and this combined strategy may widen the therapeutic window of ABT-737 and chloroquine as well as enhance the clinical efficacy of synergistic drug combinations.

  19. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ratikan, Josephine Anna; Sayre, James William

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy.

  20. Whole blood chloroquine concentrations with Plasmodium vivax infection in Irian Jaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K; Leksana, B; Masbar, S; Suradi; Sutanihardja, M A; Fryauff, D J; Subianto, B

    1997-06-01

    Whole blood concentrations of self-administered chloroquine (CQ) and its metabolite desethylchloroquine (DCQ) were measured in 168 patients with microscopically confirmed infection by Plasmodium vivax in northeastern Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The study consisted of both survey and passive case detection in four separate villages between 1992 and 1994. The subjects were Javanese people 4-51 years old who had lived in the Arso region for up to two years. The sum of CQ and DCQ ranged from 0 to 8,342 ng/ml of whole blood, and 122 subjects (73%) had > or = 100 ng/ml of CQ plus DCQ, the estimated minimally effective concentration (MEC) in whole blood against chloroquine-sensitive P. vivax. Among 56 subjects reporting to a clinic with symptoms of malaria, 53 (95%) had ordinarily effective levels of chloroquine in blood. Among 109 largely asymptomatic malaria patients found by survey case detection, 69 (63%) had chloroquine blood levels greater than the MEC. Virtually all clinical and most subclinical vivax malaria in this region occurs despite ordinarily effective levels of chloroquine in blood.

  1. Soy-dairy protein blend and whey protein ingestion after resistance exercise increases amino acid transport and transporter expression in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Reidy, P T; Walker, D K; Dickinson, J M; Gundermann, D M; Drummond, M J; Timmerman, K L; Cope, M B; Mukherjea, R; Jennings, K; Volpi, E; Rasmussen, B B

    2014-06-01

    Increasing amino acid availability (via infusion or ingestion) at rest or postexercise enhances amino acid transport into human skeletal muscle. It is unknown whether alterations in amino acid availability, from ingesting different dietary proteins, can enhance amino acid transport rates and amino acid transporter (AAT) mRNA expression. We hypothesized that the prolonged hyperaminoacidemia from ingesting a blend of proteins with different digestion rates postexercise would enhance amino acid transport into muscle and AAT expression compared with the ingestion of a rapidly digested protein. In a double-blind, randomized clinical trial, we studied 16 young adults at rest and after acute resistance exercise coupled with postexercise (1 h) ingestion of either a (soy-dairy) protein blend or whey protein. Phenylalanine net balance and transport rate into skeletal muscle were measured using stable isotopic methods in combination with femoral arteriovenous blood sampling and muscle biopsies obtained at rest and 3 and 5 h postexercise. Phenylalanine transport into muscle and mRNA expression of select AATs [system L amino acid transporter 1/solute-linked carrier (SLC) 7A5, CD98/SLC3A2, system A amino acid transporter 2/SLC38A2, proton-assisted amino acid transporter 1/SLC36A1, cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1] increased to a similar extent in both groups (P < 0.05). However, the ingestion of the protein blend resulted in a prolonged and positive net phenylalanine balance during postexercise recovery compared with whey protein (P < 0.05). Postexercise myofibrillar protein synthesis increased similarly between groups. We conclude that, while both protein sources enhanced postexercise AAT expression, transport into muscle, and myofibrillar protein synthesis, postexercise ingestion of a protein blend results in a slightly prolonged net amino acid balance across the leg compared with whey protein.

  2. A Computational Approach towards the Understanding of Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Saumya K.; Prasanth Kumar, Sivakumar; Highland, Hyacinth N.; Jasrai, Yogesh T.; Pandya, Himanshu A.; Desai, Ketaki R.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum tremendously affected the chemotherapy worldwide while the intense distribution of chloroquine-resistant strains in most of the endemic areas added more complications in the treatment of malaria. The situation has even worsened by the lack of molecular mechanism to understand the resistance conferred by Plasmodia species. Recent studies have suggested the association of antimalarial resistance with P. falciparum multidrug resistance protein 1 (PfMDR1), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and a homologue of human P-glycoprotein 1 (P-gp1). The present study deals about the development of PfMDR1 computational model and the model of substrate transport across PfMDR1 with insights derived from conformations relative to inward- and outward-facing topologies that switch on/off the transportation system. Comparison of ATP docked positions and its structural motif binding properties were found to be similar among other ATPases, and thereby contributes to NBD domains dimerization, a unique structural agreement noticed in Mus musculus Pgp and Escherichia coli MDR transporter homolog (MsbA). The interaction of leading antimalarials and phytochemicals within the active pocket of both wild-type and mutant-type PfMDR1 demonstrated the mode of binding and provided insights of less binding affinity thereby contributing to parasite's resistance mechanism. PMID:25937947

  3. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of phosphorene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistance behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Ajanta; Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Kibey, Aniruddha; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Kanhere, Dilip G.

    2016-08-01

    Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of two different types of phosphorene nanoribbons are calculated within the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function formalisms. Armchair nanoribbons turn out to be semiconductors at all widths considered. Zigzag nanoribbons are metallic in their layer-terminated structure, but undergo Peierls-like transition at the edges. Armchair nanoribbons have smaller Young's modulus compared to a monolayer, while zigzag nanoribbons have larger Young's modulus. Edge reconstruction further increases the Young's modulus of zigzag nanoribbons. A two-terminal device made of zigzag nanoribbons show negative differential resistance behavior that is robust with respect to edge reconstruction. We have also calculated the I -V characteristics for two nonzero gate voltages. The results show that the zigzag nanoribbons display strong p -type character.

  4. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Effect of Prostaglandin E2 on Multidrug Resistance Transporters In Human Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gene T.; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  6. Effect of prostaglandin E2 on multidrug resistance transporters in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, Clifford W; Lee, Gene T; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P

    2014-12-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Associated Metabolic Perturbations in Haploinsufficient Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Nadia; Carneiro, Lionel; Favrod, Céline; Preitner, Frédéric; Thorens, Bernard; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Dix, Laure; Pralong, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 or SLC16A1) is a carrier of short-chain fatty acids, ketone bodies, and lactate in several tissues. Genetically modified C57BL/6J mice were produced by targeted disruption of the mct1 gene in order to understand the role of this transporter in energy homeostasis. Null mutation was embryonically lethal, but MCT1+/− mice developed normally. However, when fed high fat diet (HFD), MCT1+/− mice displayed resistance to development of diet-induced obesity (24.8% lower body weight after 16 weeks of HFD), as well as less insulin resistance and no hepatic steatosis as compared to littermate MCT1+/+ mice used as controls. Body composition analysis revealed that reduced weight gain in MCT1+/− mice was due to decreased fat accumulation (50.0% less after 9 months of HFD) notably in liver and white adipose tissue. This phenotype was associated with reduced food intake under HFD (12.3% less over 10 weeks) and decreased intestinal energy absorption (9.6% higher stool energy content). Indirect calorimetry measurements showed ∼ 15% increase in O2 consumption and CO2 production during the resting phase, without any changes in physical activity. Determination of plasma concentrations for various metabolites and hormones did not reveal significant changes in lactate and ketone bodies levels between the two genotypes, but both insulin and leptin levels, which were elevated in MCT1+/+ mice when fed HFD, were reduced in MCT1+/− mice under HFD. Interestingly, the enhancement in expression of several genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver of MCT1+/+ mice under high fat diet was prevented in the liver of MCT1+/− mice under the same diet, thus likely contributing to the observed phenotype. These findings uncover the critical role of MCT1 in the regulation of energy balance when animals are exposed to an obesogenic diet. PMID:24367518

  8. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  9. Xanthines Down-Regulate the Drug Transporter ABCG2 and Reverse Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Rui; Shi, Jia; Pabon, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    ABCG2 is an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter that confers multidrug resistance (MDR) to tumor cells by extruding a broad variety of chemotherapeutic agents, ultimately leading to failure of cancer therapy. Thus, the down-regulation of ABCG2 expression and/or function has been proposed as part of a regimen to improve cancer therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we found that a group of xanthines including caffeine, theophylline, and dyphylline can dramatically decrease ABCG2 protein in cells that have either moderate (BeWo, a placental choriocarcinoma cell line) or high (MCF-7/MX100, a breast cancer drug-resistant cell subline) levels of ABCG2 expression. This down-regulation is time-dependent, dose-dependent, and reversible. Using lysosomal inhibitors, we found that xanthines decreased ABCG2 by inducing its rapid internalization and lysosome-mediated degradation. As a consequence, caffeine treatment significantly increased the retention of an established ABCG2 substrate in MCF-7/MX100 cells but not in parental MCF-7 cells and sensitized the MDR cells to the chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone (MX); combination treatment with MX and caffeine decreased the IC50 of MX ∼10-fold and induced a greater degree of apoptotic cell death than MX treatment alone. Taken together, our results describe a novel function for this large class of therapeutically relevant compounds and suggest that a subset of xanthines could be developed as combination therapy to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs that are ABCG2 substrates. PMID:22113078

  10. Glucose transporter isoform-3-null heterozygous mutation causes sexually dimorphic adiposity with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Amit; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2008-06-01

    We examined male and female glucose transporter isoform-3 (GLUT3; placenta)-null heterozygous(+/-) mutation-carrying mice and compared them with age- and sex-matched wild-type(+/+) littermates. No difference in postnatal (1-2 days, 6-7 days, 12-13 days, 20-21 days), postsuckling (1-2 mo), and adult (3-6 mo) growth pattern was seen except for an increase in body weight of 9- to 11-mo-old male but not female GLUT3(+/-) mice. This change in male mutant mice was associated with increased total body fat mass, perirenal and epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and hepatic lipid infiltration. These minimally glucose-intolerant male mutant mice demonstrated no change in caloric intake but a decline in basal metabolic rate and insulin resistance. No perturbation in basal circulating glucose concentrations but an increase in insulin concentrations, triglycerides, and total cholesterol was observed in GLUT3(+/-) male mice. Tissue analysis in males and females demonstrated diminished GLUT3 protein in GLUT3(+/-) brain and skeletal muscle with no change in brain and adipose tissue GLUT1 protein concentrations. Furthermore, the male GLUT3(+/-) mice expressed decreased insulin-responsive GLUT4 in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle sarcolemma. We conclude that the GLUT3(+/-) male mice develop adult-onset adiposity with insulin resistance.

  11. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-10-07

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10(-4) S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36-1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 10(4) S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed.

  12. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10−4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed. PMID:27713527

  13. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10‑4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed.

  14. The secure, transportable, autonomous reactor (STAR): a small proliferation-resistant reactor system for developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N W; Hassberger, J A; Smith, C F

    1999-05-27

    The Secure, Transportable, Autonomous Reactor (STAR), is an integrated concept for a small, proliferation-resistant nuclear power system capable of meeting the growing power demands of many regions of the developing world. The STAR approach builds on earlier work investigating the features required for implementation of such a system. The STAR approach includes establishing overall system requirements, conducting research into issues common to four reactor concepts (gas, liquid metal, light water and molten salt), and defining and performing the down-selection to a preferred concept that will serve as the basis for continued development leading to an eventual prototype. The paper indicates that a number of unique and distinguishing innovations are needed to both meet the energy demands of most of the world's developing regions and address growing nuclear proliferation concerns. These technical innovations form much of the basis underlying the STAR concept and include: eliminating on-site refueling and fuel access; incorporating a systems approach to nuclear energy supply and infrastructure design, with all aspects of equipment life, fuel and waste cycles included; small unit size enabling transportability; replaceable standardized modular design; resilient and robust design concepts leading to large safety margins, high reliability and reduced maintenance; simplicity in operation with reliance on autonomous control and remote monitoring; and waste minimization and waste form optimization.

  15. A silent ABC transporter isolated from Streptomyces rochei F20 induces multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Moreno, M A; Carbó, L; Cuesta, T; Vallín, C; Malpartida, F

    1998-08-01

    In the search for heterologous activators for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces lividans, 3.4 kb of DNA from Streptomyces rochei F20 (a streptothricin producer) were characterized. Subcloning experiments showed that the minimal DNA fragment required for activation was 0.4 kb in size. The activation is mediated by increasing the levels of transcription of the actII-ORF4 gene. Sequencing of the minimal activating fragment did not reveal any clues about its mechanism; nevertheless, it was shown to overlap the 3' end of two convergent genes, one of whose translated products (ORF2) strongly resembles that of other genes belonging to the ABC transporter superfamily. Computer-assisted analysis of the 3.4-kb DNA sequence showed the 3' terminus of an open reading frame (ORF), i.e., ORFA, and three complete ORFs (ORF1, ORF2, and ORFB). Searches in the databases with their respective gene products revealed similarities for ORF1 and ORF2 with ATP-binding proteins and transmembrane proteins, respectively, which are found in members of the ABC transporter superfamily. No similarities for ORFA and ORFB were found in the databases. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2, their transcription analysis, and their cloning in heterologous hosts suggested that these genes were not expressed under our experimental conditions; however, cloning of ORF1 and ORF2 together (but not separately) under the control of an expressing promoter induced resistance to several chemically different drugs: oleandomycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, doxorubicin, and tetracycline. Thus, this genetic system, named msr, is a new bacterial multidrug ABC transporter.

  16. A Silent ABC Transporter Isolated from Streptomyces rochei F20 Induces Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Carbó, Lázaro; Cuesta, Trinidad; Vallín, Carlos; Malpartida, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    In the search for heterologous activators for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces lividans, 3.4 kb of DNA from Streptomyces rochei F20 (a streptothricin producer) were characterized. Subcloning experiments showed that the minimal DNA fragment required for activation was 0.4 kb in size. The activation is mediated by increasing the levels of transcription of the actII-ORF4 gene. Sequencing of the minimal activating fragment did not reveal any clues about its mechanism; nevertheless, it was shown to overlap the 3′ end of two convergent genes, one of whose translated products (ORF2) strongly resembles that of other genes belonging to the ABC transporter superfamily. Computer-assisted analysis of the 3.4-kb DNA sequence showed the 3′ terminus of an open reading frame (ORF), i.e., ORFA, and three complete ORFs (ORF1, ORF2, and ORFB). Searches in the databases with their respective gene products revealed similarities for ORF1 and ORF2 with ATP-binding proteins and transmembrane proteins, respectively, which are found in members of the ABC transporter superfamily. No similarities for ORFA and ORFB were found in the databases. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2, their transcription analysis, and their cloning in heterologous hosts suggested that these genes were not expressed under our experimental conditions; however, cloning of ORF1 and ORF2 together (but not separately) under the control of an expressing promoter induced resistance to several chemically different drugs: oleandomycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, doxorubicin, and tetracycline. Thus, this genetic system, named msr, is a new bacterial multidrug ABC transporter. PMID:9696745

  17. Transport of bile acids in multidrug-resistance-protein 3-overexpressing cells co-transfected with the ileal Na+-dependent bile-acid transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Noam; Saeki, Tohru; Bot, Ilse; Kuil, Annemieke; Borst, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Many of the transporters involved in the transport of bile acids in the enterohepatic circulation have been characterized. The basolateral bile-acid transporter of ileocytes and cholangiocytes remains an exception. It has been suggested that rat multidrug resistance protein 3 (Mrp3) fulfills this function. Here we analyse bile-salt transport by human MRP3. Membrane vesicles from insect ( Spodoptera frugiperda ) cells expressing MRP3 show time-dependent uptake of glycocholate and taurocholate. Furthermore, sulphated bile salts were high-affinity competitive inhibitors of etoposide glucuronide transport by MRP3 (IC50 approximately 10 microM). Taurochenodeoxycholate, taurocholate and glycocholate inhibited transport at higher concentrations (IC50 approximately 100, 250 and 500 microM respectively). We used mouse fibroblast-like cell lines derived from mice with disrupted Mdr1a, Mdr1b and Mrp1 genes to generate transfectants that express the murine apical Na+-dependent bile-salt transporter (Asbt) and MRP3. Uptake of glycocholate by these cells is Na+-dependent, with a K(m) and V(max) of 29+/-7 microM and 660 +/- 63 pmol/min per mg of protein respectively and is inhibited by several organic-aniontransport inhibitors. Expression of MRP3 in these cells limits the accumulation of glycocholate and increases the efflux from cells preloaded with taurocholate or glycocholate. In conclusion, we find that MRP3 transports both taurocholate and glycocholate, albeit with low affinity, in contrast with the high-affinity transport by rat Mrp3. Our results suggest that MRP3 is unlikely to be the principal basolateral bile-acid transporter of ileocytes and cholangiocytes, but that it may have a role in the removal of bile acids from the liver in cholestasis. PMID:12220224

  18. Metabolic and structural consequences of ethanol and chloroquin administration during gestation on the developing fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.; Rawat, A.K.

    1987-05-01

    In the present study the effects of ethanol and chloroquin administration during gestation have been investigated on the developing rat fetus. Ethanol was given in liquid Sustacal diet as 30% of calories and controls were fed isocaloric sucrose-diet. Chloroquin was given intragastrically corresponding controls received saline. Chloroquin resulted in prenatal growth retardation leading to maximum decrease of 46% in body weight of the fetus. It also resulted in 30% higher incidence of hepatomegaly; 15% higher incidence of liquification of visceral organs; 34% decrease in the ossification of sternum; 9% higher defects of cleft palate, wrist drop, clubbed foot and brain liquification compared to the corresponding controls. Ethanol resulted in pre and post-natal growth retardation, cleft palate, still births and lowered brain weights. Fetuses from the ethanol-fed group also showed inhibited protein synthesis, RNA and DNA synthesis in the brain compared to the controls.

  19. Optimal antimalarial dose regimens for chloroquine in pregnancy based on population pharmacokinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sam; Baiwog, Francesca; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Kose, Kay; Karunajeewa, Harin A; Mueller, Ivo; Rogerson, Stephen J; Siba, Peter M; Ilett, Kenneth F; Davis, Timothy M E

    2017-10-01

    Despite extensive use and accumulated evidence of safety, there have been few pharmacokinetic studies from which appropriate chloroquine (CQ) dosing regimens could be developed specifically for pregnant women. Such optimised CQ-based regimens, used as treatment for acute malaria or as intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp), may have a valuable role if parasite CQ sensitivity returns following reduced drug pressure. In this study, population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling was used to simultaneously analyse plasma concentration-time data for CQ and its active metabolite desethylchloroquine (DCQ) in 44 non-pregnant and 45 pregnant Papua New Guinean women treated with CQ and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine or azithromycin (AZM). Pregnancy was associated with 16% and 49% increases in CQ and DCQ clearance, respectively, as well as a 24% reduction in CQ relative bioavailability. Clearance of DCQ was 22% lower in those who received AZM in both groups. Simulations based on the final multicompartmental model demonstrated that a 33% CQ dose increase may be suitable for acute treatment for malaria in pregnancy as it resulted in equivalent exposure to that in non-pregnant women receiving recommended doses, whilst a double dose would likely be required for an effective duration of post-treatment prophylaxis when used as IPTp especially in areas of CQ resistance. The impact of co-administered AZM was clinically insignificant in simulations. The results of past/ongoing trials employing recommended adult doses of CQ-based regimens in pregnant women should be interpreted in light of these findings, and consideration should be given to using increased doses in future trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in Candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca2+ did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport. PMID:26220356

  1. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca(2+) did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingos