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Sample records for chloroquine resistance transporter

  1. 3-Halo Chloroquine Derivatives Overcome Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter-Mediated Drug Resistance in P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Edaye, Sonia; Tazoo, Dagobert; Bohle, D Scott; Georges, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) was shown to cause chloroquine resistance. In this report, we examined the antimalarial potential of novel 3-halo chloroquine derivatives (3-chloro, 3-bromo, and 3-iodo) against chloroquine-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. All three derivatives inhibited the proliferation of P. falciparum; with 3-iodo chloroquine being most effective. Moreover, 3-iodo chloroquine was highly effective at potentiating and reversing chloroquine toxicity of drug-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum.

  2. Characterization of the Chloroquine Resistance Transporter Homologue in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Warring, Sally D.; Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein confer resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. PfCRT localizes to the parasite digestive vacuole, the site of chloroquine action, where it mediates resistance by transporting chloroquine out of the digestive vacuole. PfCRT belongs to a family of transporter proteins called the chloroquine resistance transporter family. CRT family proteins are found throughout the Apicomplexa, in some protists, and in plants. Despite the importance of PfCRT in drug resistance, little is known about the evolution or native function of CRT proteins. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii contains one CRT family protein. We demonstrate that T. gondii CRT (TgCRT) colocalizes with markers for the vacuolar (VAC) compartment in these parasites. The TgCRT-containing VAC is a highly dynamic organelle, changing its morphology and protein composition between intracellular and extracellular forms of the parasite. Regulated knockdown of TgCRT expression resulted in modest reduction in parasite fitness and swelling of the VAC, indicating that TgCRT contributes to parasite growth and VAC physiology. Together, our findings provide new information on the role of CRT family proteins in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:24859994

  3. Characterization of the chloroquine resistance transporter homologue in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Warring, Sally D; Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B; McFadden, Geoffrey I; van Dooren, Giel G

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein confer resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. PfCRT localizes to the parasite digestive vacuole, the site of chloroquine action, where it mediates resistance by transporting chloroquine out of the digestive vacuole. PfCRT belongs to a family of transporter proteins called the chloroquine resistance transporter family. CRT family proteins are found throughout the Apicomplexa, in some protists, and in plants. Despite the importance of PfCRT in drug resistance, little is known about the evolution or native function of CRT proteins. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii contains one CRT family protein. We demonstrate that T. gondii CRT (TgCRT) colocalizes with markers for the vacuolar (VAC) compartment in these parasites. The TgCRT-containing VAC is a highly dynamic organelle, changing its morphology and protein composition between intracellular and extracellular forms of the parasite. Regulated knockdown of TgCRT expression resulted in modest reduction in parasite fitness and swelling of the VAC, indicating that TgCRT contributes to parasite growth and VAC physiology. Together, our findings provide new information on the role of CRT family proteins in apicomplexan parasites.

  4. Diverse mutational pathways converge on saturable chloroquine transport via the malaria parasite’s chloroquine resistance transporter

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Robert L.; Dave, Anurag; Dolstra, Tegan J.; Bellanca, Sebastiano; Marchetti, Rosa V.; Nash, Megan N.; Richards, Sashika N.; Goh, Valerie; Schenk, Robyn L.; Stein, Wilfred D.; Kirk, Kiaran; Sanchez, Cecilia P.; Lanzer, Michael; Martin, Rowena E.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) are the primary determinant of chloroquine (CQ) resistance in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. A number of distinct PfCRT haplotypes, containing between 4 and 10 mutations, have given rise to CQ resistance in different parts of the world. Here we present a detailed molecular analysis of the number of mutations (and the order of addition) required to confer CQ transport activity upon the PfCRT as well as a kinetic characterization of diverse forms of PfCRT. We measured the ability of more than 100 variants of PfCRT to transport CQ when expressed at the surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes. Multiple mutational pathways led to saturable CQ transport via PfCRT, but these could be separated into two main lineages. Moreover, the attainment of full activity followed a rigid process in which mutations had to be added in a specific order to avoid reductions in CQ transport activity. A minimum of two mutations sufficed for (low) CQ transport activity, and as few as four conferred full activity. The finding that diverse PfCRT variants are all limited in their capacity to transport CQ suggests that resistance could be overcome by reoptimizing the CQ dosage. PMID:24728833

  5. Factors associated with regional bias of pfcrt (plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter) haplotypes in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Megha Raj; Imwong, Mallika; Petmitr, Songsak; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Joshi, Anand B; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2011-01-01

    Evidences of reappearance of chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium falciparum haplotypes after cessation of chloroquine in many countries provide a rationale for the search of chloroquine sensitive haplotypes in P. falciparum isolates in Nepal where the use of chloroquine for falciparum malaria treatment has been ceased since 1988. P. falciparum chloroquine resistant transporter gene (pfcrt) haplotypes were determined and the factors associated with pfcrt haplotypes in the Eastern and Central regions of Nepal were identified. Blood samples from 106 microscopy-positive falciparum malaria patients (62 from the Eastern and 44 from the Central region) were collected on filter paper. Pfcrt region covering codons 72-76 was amplified by PCR and sequenced. SVMNT haplotype was predominant in the Central region, whereas CVIET haplotype significantly more common in the Eastern region. In multivariable analysis of factors associated with CVIET haplotype, the Eastern region and parasite isolates from patients visiting India within one month are significant at 5% level of significance. These findings suggest that antimalarial pressure is different between Eastern and Central regions of Nepal and there is a need of an effective malaria control program in the border areas between India and Nepal.

  6. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-09-30

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs.

  7. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Johnston, Geoffrey L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E.; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp H.; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M.; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  8. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  9. Investigation of the Plasmodium falciparum food vacuole through inducible expression of the chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT).

    PubMed

    Ehlgen, Florian; Pham, James S; de Koning-Ward, Tania; Cowman, Alan F; Ralph, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Haemoglobin degradation during the erythrocytic life stages is the major function of the food vacuole (FV) of Plasmodium falciparum and the target of several anti-malarial drugs that interfere with this metabolic pathway, killing the parasite. Two multi-spanning food vacuole membrane proteins are known, the multidrug resistance protein 1 (PfMDR1) and Chloroquine Resistance Transporter (PfCRT). Both modulate resistance to drugs that act in the food vacuole. To investigate the formation and behaviour of the food vacuole membrane we have generated inducible GFP fusions of chloroquine sensitive and resistant forms of the PfCRT protein. The inducible expression system allowed us to follow newly-induced fusion proteins, and corroborated a previous report of a direct trafficking route from the ER/Golgi to the food vacuole membrane. These parasites also allowed the definition of a food vacuole compartment in ring stage parasites well before haemozoin crystals were apparent, as well as the elucidation of secondary PfCRT-labelled compartments adjacent to the food vacuole in late stage parasites. We demonstrated that in addition to previously demonstrated Brefeldin A sensitivity, the trafficking of PfCRT is disrupted by Dynasore, a non competitive inhibitor of dynamin-mediated vesicle formation. Chloroquine sensitivity was not altered in parasites over-expressing chloroquine resistant or sensitive forms of the PfCRT fused to GFP, suggesting that the PfCRT does not mediate chloroquine transport as a GFP fusion protein.

  10. Photoaffinity Labeling of the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter with a Novel Perfluorophenylazido Chloroquine†

    PubMed Central

    Lekostaj, Jacqueline K.; Natarajan, Jayakumar K.; Paguio, Michelle F.; Wolf, Christian; Roepe, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Several models describing how amino acid substitutions in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) confer resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and other antimalarial drugs have been proposed. Further progress requires molecular analysis of interactions between purified reconstituted PfCRT protein and these drugs. We have thus designed and synthesized several perfluorophenyl azido (pfpa) CQ analogues for PfCRT photolabeling studies. One particularly useful probe (AzBCQ) places the pfpa group at the terminal aliphatic N of CQ via a flexible four-carbon ester linker and includes a convenient biotin tag. This probe photolabels PfCRT in situ with high specificity. Using reconstituted proteoliposomes harboring partially purified recombinant PfCRT, we analyze AzBCQ photolabeling versus competition with CQ and other drugs to probe the nature of the CQ binding site. We also inspect how pH, the chemoreversal agent verapamil (VPL), and various amino acid mutations in PfCRT that cause CQ resistance (CQR) affect the efficiency of AzBCQ photolabeling. Upon gel isolation of AzBCQ-labeled PfCRT followed by trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry analysis, we are able to define a single AzBCQ covalent attachment site lying within the digestive vacuolar-disposed loop between putative helices 9 and 10 of PfCRT. Taken together, the data provide important new insight into PfCRT function and, along with previous results, allow us to propose a model for a single CQ binding site in the PfCRT protein. PMID:18767816

  11. Molecular Mechanisms for Drug Hypersensitivity Induced by the Malaria Parasite’s Chloroquine Resistance Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Eileen S.; Webster, Michael W.; Lehane, Adele M.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Martin, Rowena E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum ‘chloroquine resistance transporter’ (PfCRT) confer resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and related antimalarials by enabling the protein to transport these drugs away from their targets within the parasite’s digestive vacuole (DV). However, CQ resistance-conferring isoforms of PfCRT (PfCRTCQR) also render the parasite hypersensitive to a subset of structurally-diverse pharmacons. Moreover, mutations in PfCRTCQR that suppress the parasite’s hypersensitivity to these molecules simultaneously reinstate its sensitivity to CQ and related drugs. We sought to understand these phenomena by characterizing the functions of PfCRTCQR isoforms that cause the parasite to become hypersensitive to the antimalarial quinine or the antiviral amantadine. We achieved this by measuring the abilities of these proteins to transport CQ, quinine, and amantadine when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and complemented this work with assays that detect the drug transport activity of PfCRT in its native environment within the parasite. Here we describe two mechanistic explanations for PfCRT-induced drug hypersensitivity. First, we show that quinine, which normally accumulates inside the DV and therewithin exerts its antimalarial effect, binds extremely tightly to the substrate-binding site of certain isoforms of PfCRTCQR. By doing so it likely blocks the normal physiological function of the protein, which is essential for the parasite’s survival, and the drug thereby gains an additional killing effect. In the second scenario, we show that although amantadine also sequesters within the DV, the parasite’s hypersensitivity to this drug arises from the PfCRTCQR-mediated transport of amantadine from the DV into the cytosol, where it can better access its antimalarial target. In both cases, the mutations that suppress hypersensitivity also abrogate the ability of PfCRTCQR to transport CQ, thus explaining why rescue from hypersensitivity restores the parasite

  12. Full-length sequence analysis of chloroquine resistance transporter gene in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lii Lian; Lau, Tiek Ying; Timothy, William; Prabakaran, Dhanaraj

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance (CQR) in falciparum malaria was identified to be associated with several mutations in the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) that encodes the transmembrane transporter in digestive vacuole membrane of the parasite. This study aimed to investigate the point mutations across the full-length pfcrt in Plasmodium falciparum isolates in Sabah, Malaysia. A total of 31 P. falciparum positive samples collected from Keningau, Kota Kinabalu, and Kudat, Sabah, were analyzed. pfcrt was PCR amplified and cloned prior to sequence analysis. This study showed that all the previously described 10 point mutations associated with CQR at codons 72, 74, 75, 76, 97, 220, 271, 326, 356, and 371 were found with different prevalence. Besides, two novel point mutations, I166V and H273N, were identified with 22.5% and 19.3%, respectively. Three haplotypes, namely, CVMNK (29%), CVIET (3.2%), and SVMNT (67.7%), were identified. High prevalence of SVMNT among P. falciparum isolates from Sabah showed that these isolates are closer to the P. falciparum isolates from Papua New Guinea rather than to the more proximal Southeast Asian CVIET haplotype. Full-length analysis of pfcrt showed that chloroquine resistant P. falciparum in Sabah is still prevalent despite the withdrawal of chloroquine usage since 1979. PMID:25574497

  13. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite’s food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M.; Lee, Andrew H.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M.; Daley, Daniel A.; Hoke, Matthew J.; Altenhofen, Lindsey M.; Painter, Heather J.; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J. P.; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E.; Fidock, David A.; Cooper, Roland A.; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs. PMID:26420308

  14. Functional Comparison of 45 Naturally Occurring Isoforms of the Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter (PfCRT).

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Paul S; Hassett, Matthew R; Roepe, Paul D

    2015-08-18

    At least 53 distinct isoforms of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein are expressed in strains or isolates of P. falciparum malarial parasites from around the globe. These parasites exhibit a range of sensitivities to chloroquine (CQ) and other drugs. Mutant PfCRT is believed to confer cytostatic CQ resistance (CQR(CS)) by transporting CQ away from its DV target (free heme released upon hemoglobin digestion). One theory is that variable CQ transport catalyzed by these different PfCRT isoforms is responsible for the range of CQ sensitivities now found for P. falciparum. Alternatively, additional mutations in drug-selected parasites, or additional functions of PfCRT, might complement PfCRT-mediated CQ transport in conferring the range of observed resistance phenotypes. To distinguish between these possibilities, we recently optimized a convenient method for measuring PfCRT-mediated CQ transport, involving heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we use this method to quantify drug transport activity for 45 of 53 of the naturally occurring PfCRT isoforms. Data show that variable levels of CQR likely depend upon either additional PfCRT functions or additional genetic events, including perhaps changes that influence DV membrane potential. The data also suggest that the common K76T PfCRT mutation that is often used to distinguish a P. falciparum CQR phenotype is not, in and of itself, a fully reliable indicator of CQR status.

  15. Molecular interaction of selected phytochemicals under the charged environment of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) model.

    PubMed

    Patel, Saumya K; Khedkar, Vijay M; Jha, Prakash C; Jasrai, Yogesh T; Pandya, Himanshu A; George, Linz-Buoy; Highland, Hyacinth N; Skelton, Adam A

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals of Catharanthus roseus Linn. and Tylophora indica have been known for their inhibition of malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture. Resistance to chloroquine (CQ), a widely used antimalarial drug, is due to the CQ resistance transporter (CRT) system. The present study deals with computational modeling of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) protein and development of charged environment to mimic a condition of resistance. The model of PfCRT was developed using Protein homology/analogy engine (PHYRE ver 0.2) and was validated based on the results obtained using PSI-PRED. Subsequently, molecular interactions of selected phytochemicals extracted from C. roseus Linn. and T. indica were studied using multiple-iterated genetic algorithm-based docking protocol in order to investigate the translocation of these legends across the PfCRT protein. Further, molecular dynamics studies exhibiting interaction energy estimates of these compounds within the active site of the protein showed that compounds are more selective toward PfCRT. Clusters of conformations with the free energy of binding were estimated which clearly demonstrated the potential channel and by this means the translocation across the PfCRT is anticipated.

  16. Identification of a chloroquine importer in Plasmodium falciparum. Differences in import kinetics are genetically linked with the chloroquine-resistant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C P; Wünsch, S; Lanzer, M

    1997-01-31

    We demonstrate that uptake of the antimalarial drug chloroquine is temperature-dependent, saturable, and inhibitable in Plasmodium falciparum. These features are indicative of carrier-mediated transport and suggest that a P. falciparum-encoded protein facilitates chloroquine import. Although both chloroquine-resistant and susceptible parasite isolates exhibit facilitated chloroquine uptake, the kinetics differ. Chloroquine-resistant parasite isolates consistently have an import mechanism with a lower transport activity and a reduced affinity for chloroquine. These differences in uptake kinetics are linked with chloroquine resistance in a genetic cross. These data suggest that changes in chloroquine import kinetics constitute a minimal and necessary event in the generation of the resistant phenotype. Competitive inhibition of chloroquine uptake by amiloride derivatives further suggests that chloroquine import is mediated by a plasmodial Na+/H+ exchanger.

  17. Association of Plasmodium falciparum isolates encoding the p. Falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene K76T polymorphism with anemia and splenomegaly, but not with multiple infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Inas Z; Oster, Nadja; Stich, August; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Guigemdé, Wendyam A; Wickert, Hannes; Andrews, Kathy T; Kouyaté, Bocar; Lanzer, Michael

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether infections with Plasmodium falciparum isolates encoding the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene K76T polymorphism, a molecular marker for chloroquine resistance, are associated with multiple infections, age, or clinical signs of malaria in a semi-immune population in a holoendemic area of Burkina Faso. The parameters of interest were investigated in 210 P. falciparum-positive inhabitants. Logistic regression analysis showed that pfcrt K76T-carrying isolates are significantly more likely to cause anemia and splenomegaly. Furthermore, we found that infections with P. falciparum isolates encoding pfcrt K76T are dependent on age rather than multiple infections. Our findings suggest that pfcrt K76T might serve as a valuable marker for assessing the long-term clinical effect of chronic infections with chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum isolates in populations, without the need of drug efficacy trials.

  18. Analysis of chloroquine resistance transporter (CRT) isoforms and orthologues in S. cerevisiae yeast.

    PubMed

    Baro, Nicholas K; Pooput, Chaya; Roepe, Paul D

    2011-08-01

    Previous work from our laboratory optimized MeOH-inducible expression of the P. falciparum malarial parasite transporter PfCRT in P. pastoris yeast. These strains are useful for many experiments but do not allow for inducible protein expression under ambient growth conditions. We have therefore optimized galactose-inducible expression of PfCRT in S. cerevisiae yeast. We find that expression of PfCRT confers CQ hypersensitivity to growing yeast and that this is due to plasma membrane localization of the transporter. We use quantitative analyses of growth rates to compare hypersensitivity for yeast expressing various PfCRT isoforms. We also report successful high level inducible expression of the P. vivax orthologue, PvCRT, and compare CQ hypersensitivity for PvCRT vs PfCRT expressing yeast. We test the hypothesis that hypersensitivity is due to increased transport of CQ into yeast expressing the transporters via direct (3)H-CQ transport experiments and analyze the effect that membrane potential has on transport. The data suggest important new tools for rapid functional screening of PfCRT and PvCRT isoforms and provide further evidence for a model wherein membrane potential promotes charged CQ transport by PfCRT. Data also support our previous conclusion that wild type PfCRT is capable of CQ transport and provide a basis for understanding the lack of correspondence between PvCRT mutations and resistance to CQ in the important malarial parasite P. vivax.

  19. Quinine dimers are potent inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and are active against quinoline-resistant P. falciparum.

    PubMed

    Hrycyna, Christine A; Summers, Robert L; Lehane, Adele M; Pires, Marcos M; Namanja, Hilda; Bohn, Kelsey; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Ferdig, Michael; Henrich, Philipp P; Fidock, David A; Kirk, Kiaran; Chmielewski, Jean; Martin, Rowena E

    2014-03-21

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is primarily conferred by mutations in the "chloroquine resistance transporter" (PfCRT). The resistance-conferring form of PfCRT (PfCRT(CQR)) mediates CQ resistance by effluxing the drug from the parasite's digestive vacuole, the acidic compartment in which CQ exerts its antiplasmodial effect. PfCRT(CQR) can also decrease the parasite's susceptibility to other quinoline drugs, including the current antimalarials quinine and amodiaquine. Here we describe interactions between PfCRT(CQR) and a series of dimeric quinine molecules using a Xenopus laevis oocyte system for the heterologous expression of PfCRT and using an assay that detects the drug-associated efflux of H(+) ions from the digestive vacuole in parasites that harbor different forms of PfCRT. The antiplasmodial activities of dimers 1 and 6 were also examined in vitro (against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of P. falciparum) and in vivo (against drug-sensitive P. berghei). Our data reveal that the quinine dimers are the most potent inhibitors of PfCRT(CQR) reported to date. Furthermore, the lead compounds (1 and 6) were not effluxed by PfCRT(CQR) from the digestive vacuole but instead accumulated to very high levels within this organelle. Both 1 and 6 exhibited in vitro antiplasmodial activities that were inversely correlated with CQ. Moreover, the additional parasiticidal effect exerted by 1 and 6 in the drug-resistant parasites was attributable, at least in part, to their ability to inhibit PfCRT(CQR). This highlights the potential for devising new antimalarial therapies that exploit inherent weaknesses in a key resistance mechanism of P. falciparum.

  20. Chloroquine resistance of Plasmodium berghei: biochemical basis and countermeasures*

    PubMed Central

    Salganik, R. I.; Pankova, T. G.; Chekhonadskikh, T. V.; Igonina, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Microsomal monooxygenases, enzymes that metabolize xenobiotics, may be responsible for the chloroquine resistance of malarial parasites. Plasmodium cells contain cytochrome P-450 and exhibit aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and aminopyrine N-dimethylase activity, two monooxygenases that inactivate chloroquine. The activities of these monooxygenases are considerably higher in chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium berghei than in the chloroquine-sensitive strain of the parasite. Inhibitors of microsomal monooxygenases have the potential to overcome the chloroquine resistance of Plasmodium spp., and, of those inhibitors tested, the copper-lysine complex, copper(lysine)2, was the most effective. PMID:3117393

  1. Mutant Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter in Hodeidah, Yemen: association with parasitologic indices and treatment-seeking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Farag, Hoda F; Allam, Amal F; Shawky, Sherine M; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M

    2013-12-01

    Malaria still represents a major health problem in Yemen, particularly in Hodeidah, despite continuing efforts to eliminate it. With the absence of clinically proven vaccines, chemotherapy with antimalarials is still greatly needed. Chloroquine (CQ) has been popular as the drug of choice for malaria control. However, Plasmodium falciparum resistance to CQ has been one of the main obstacles in malaria control and elimination. Although CQ is no longer the recommended antimalarial chemotherapy, it has remained the number one over-the-counter antimalarial drug in many endemic areas, including Yemen, and is still used for self-medication. In addition, promising reports on CQ efficacy reversal in many African countries brought it again into the scene. This has led to a growing interest in the possibility of its re-introduction, particularly with the concerns raised about the parasite resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the present study aimed at analyzing the CQ-associated pfcrt 76T mutation in P. falciparum isolates from patients with uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Hodeidah, west of Yemen. The association of treatment-seeking behaviors and antimalarial drug use with the pfcrt 76T mutant allele was also studied. It was revealed that there is still a sustained high frequency of this molecular marker among parasite isolates associated with younger age, decreased parasite density and the presence of gametocytes in blood. Delay in seeking treatment and frequent use of antimalarials were the behaviors significantly associated with the presence of the pfcrt 76T mutant allele among patients reporting a history of malaria treatment.

  2. Interaction between chloroquine and diverse pharmacological agents in chloroquine resistant Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Puri, S K

    2000-11-01

    The effect of a number of pharmacological agents on the enhancement of antimalarial activity of chloroquine was evaluated against chloroquine resistant line of Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis (N-67). The response after combination therapy was monitored on the basis of alteration in the course of parasitaemia, the extension of mean survival time and the percent cure rate in different groups. The study was designed to compare the in vivo efficacy of a number of resistance modulating agents found effective in several in vitro studies against chloroquine resistant P. falciparum isolates. Based on their efficacy in this rodent model, the response of combination of chloroquine with agents representing diverse chemical moieties has been categorised as curative, moderately active and inactive. Out of the 22 agents evaluated, only cyproheptadine-chloroquine combination produced curative response. Ketotifen, azatadine, pheniramine, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, verapamil, penfluridol and trifluoperazine demonstrated moderate activity while loratadine, terfenadine, promethazine, ranitidine, nifedipine, diltiazem, chlorpromazine, amiodarone, tamoxifen, dipyridamol, propranolol, acyclovir and amantidine were inactive. The study advocates the suitability of proposed rodent model to shortlist potential resistance reversal agents. PMID:11080509

  3. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  4. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  5. Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter and multidrug resistance 1 genes: parasite risk factors that affect treatment outcomes for P. falciparum malaria after artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N; Mårtensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J; Guérin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M E; Ménard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Björkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; El-Sayed, Badria B; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-François; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houzé, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-René; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlström; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Somé, A Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P M; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2014-10-01

    Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 - 9.78, P < 0.001) and increased pfmdr1 copy number (adjusted hazards ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval = 2.36-17.97, P < 0.001 : were significant independent risk factors for recrudescence in patients treated with AL. AL and ASAQ exerted opposing selective effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine.

  6. Chloroquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is associated with severity of disease in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Olumese, P E; Amodu, O K; Björkman, A; Adeyemo, A A; Gbadegesin, R A; Walker, O

    2002-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro was significantly higher in isolates from patients with severe malaria than those with uncomplicated disease. This association may be due to either progression of uncomplicated to severe disease following chloroquine failure or increased virulence of chloroquine-resistant parasites. The implication of this for antimalarial treatment policy is discussed. PMID:12497979

  7. Activities of Various 4-Aminoquinolines Against Infections with Chloroquine-Resistant Strains of Plasmodium falciparum1

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, L. H.; Vaughan, Dennis; Mueller, Donna; Crosby, Ruth; Hamilton, Rebecca

    1977-01-01

    The studies reported here stemmed from a personal report by Geiman on the capacity of the 4-aminoquinoline amodiaquin to inhibit in vitro maturation of ring stages of the chloroquine-resistant Monterey strain of Plasmodium falciparum. This observation, confirmed in owl monkeys infected with this strain, led to a comparison of the activities of chloroquine, amodiaquin, amopyroquin, and dichlorquinazine (12,278 RP) against infections with various chloroquine-susceptible and chloroquine-resistant strains. The results showed that: (i) these 4-aminoquinolines were essentially equally active against infections with chloroquine-susceptible strains and (ii) the activities of amodiaquin, amopyroquin, and dichlorquinazine were reduced significantly in the face of chloroquine resistance, but (iii) well-tolerated doses of these compounds would cure infections with strains that fully resisted treatment with maximally tolerated doses of chloroquine. Two other 4-aminoquinolines, SN-8137 and SN-9584, which also exhibited activity against chloroquine-resistant parasites in vitro, displayed curative activity in monkeys infected with a chloroquine-resistant strain. These observations show that there is cross-resistance among the 4-aminoquinolines, confirming earlier findings, but indicate that the dimensions of this phenomenon are sufficiently limited so that some derivatives are therapeutically effective against infections refractory to maximally tolerated doses of chloroquine. PMID:406829

  8. [Ca++ ion transport blockers as reversants of the drug resistance of malarial parasites. 2. The effect of praziquantel on the resistance to chloroquine and compound R-70-Zh of Plasmodium berghei].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V S; Rabinovich, S A; Bukhtin, B A; Dadasheva, N R; Maksakovskaia, E V

    1998-01-01

    The reversing action of anthelminthic praziquantel (P) on the effect of chloroquine (C) and compound R-70-Zh (styrylquinazoline) was revealed on a Plasmodium berghei model (white inbred mice), using a LNK65 isolate with naturally reduced sensitivity to chloroquine and its polyresistant line LNK65CHLFR with acquired resistance to chloroquine/fansidar (selected in our laboratory). P (125 mg/kg) in combination with C showed a potentiating effect not only on the LNK65 isolate, but also on the LNK65CHLFR line, while investigated separately on this line, both drugs were not effective in tested doses. Moreover, the similar effect of C on the LNK65CHLFR line was achieved in the dose that was 4 times higher than that of P/C combination. P in a standard dose on the LNK65 isolate showed a more marked activation of compound R-70-Zh that on C. The potentiating effect was manifested in combination with R-70-Zh in the dose half as high as that of C; this phenomenon was also reflected by the efficiency index (5.0 against the 4.0) accepted in our laboratory and may be associated with the higher sensitivity of the LNK65 isolate to R-70-Zh. P showed some antimalarial action which manifested itself only by morphological changes on P. berghei parasites similar to those observed under the action of some dihydropholate reductase inhibitors, such as pyrimethamine. PMID:9608206

  9. Confirmed Plasmodium vivax Resistance to Chloroquine in Central Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nguyen Van; Van, Nguyen Van; Louisa, Melva; Baird, Kevin; Xa, Nguyen Xuan; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Hung, Le Xuan; Duong, Tran Thanh; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Speybroeck, Niko; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax resistance to chloroquine (CQ) is currently reported in almost all countries where P. vivax is endemic. In Vietnam, despite a first report on P. vivax resistance to chloroquine published in the early 2000s, P. vivax was still considered sensitive to CQ. Between May 2009 and December 2011, a 2-year cohort study was conducted in central Vietnam to assess the recommended radical cure regimen based on a 10-day course of primaquine (0.5 mg/kg/day) together with 3 days of CQ (25 mg/kg). Here we report the results of the first 28-day follow-up estimating the cumulative risk of P. vivax recurrences together with the corresponding CQ blood concentrations, among other endpoints. Out of 260 recruited P. vivax patients, 240 completed treatment and were followed up to day 28 according to the WHO guidelines. Eight patients (3.45%) had a recurrent P. vivax infection, at day 14 (n = 2), day 21 (n = 1), and day 28 (n = 5). Chloroquine blood concentrations, available for 3/8 recurrent infections (days 14, 21, and 28), were above the MIC (>100 ng/ml whole blood) in all of these cases. Fever and parasitemia (both sexual and asexual stages) were cleared by day 3. Anemia was common at day 0 (35.8%), especially in children under 10 years (50%), and hemoglobin (Hb) recovery at day 28 was substantial among anemic patients (median change from day 0 to 28, +1.7 g/dl; interquartile range [IQR], +0.7 to +3.2). This report, based on CQ blood levels measured at the time of recurrences, confirms for the first time P. vivax CQ resistance in central Vietnam and calls for further studies using standardized protocols for accurately monitoring the extent and evolution of P. vivax resistance to chloroquine in Vietnam. These results, together with the mounting evidence of artemisinin resistance in central Vietnam, further highlight the increasing threat of antimalarial drug resistance to malaria elimination in Vietnam. PMID:26392501

  10. Confirmed Plasmodium vivax Resistance to Chloroquine in Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Vinh; Hong, Nguyen Van; Van, Nguyen Van; Louisa, Melva; Baird, Kevin; Xa, Nguyen Xuan; Peeters Grietens, Koen; Hung, Le Xuan; Duong, Tran Thanh; Rosanas-Urgell, Anna; Speybroeck, Niko; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2015-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax resistance to chloroquine (CQ) is currently reported in almost all countries where P. vivax is endemic. In Vietnam, despite a first report on P. vivax resistance to chloroquine published in the early 2000s, P. vivax was still considered sensitive to CQ. Between May 2009 and December 2011, a 2-year cohort study was conducted in central Vietnam to assess the recommended radical cure regimen based on a 10-day course of primaquine (0.5 mg/kg/day) together with 3 days of CQ (25 mg/kg). Here we report the results of the first 28-day follow-up estimating the cumulative risk of P. vivax recurrences together with the corresponding CQ blood concentrations, among other endpoints. Out of 260 recruited P. vivax patients, 240 completed treatment and were followed up to day 28 according to the WHO guidelines. Eight patients (3.45%) had a recurrent P. vivax infection, at day 14 (n = 2), day 21 (n = 1), and day 28 (n = 5). Chloroquine blood concentrations, available for 3/8 recurrent infections (days 14, 21, and 28), were above the MIC (>100 ng/ml whole blood) in all of these cases. Fever and parasitemia (both sexual and asexual stages) were cleared by day 3. Anemia was common at day 0 (35.8%), especially in children under 10 years (50%), and hemoglobin (Hb) recovery at day 28 was substantial among anemic patients (median change from day 0 to 28, +1.7 g/dl; interquartile range [IQR], +0.7 to +3.2). This report, based on CQ blood levels measured at the time of recurrences, confirms for the first time P. vivax CQ resistance in central Vietnam and calls for further studies using standardized protocols for accurately monitoring the extent and evolution of P. vivax resistance to chloroquine in Vietnam. These results, together with the mounting evidence of artemisinin resistance in central Vietnam, further highlight the increasing threat of antimalarial drug resistance to malaria elimination in Vietnam.

  11. Synergistic activity of chloroquine with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant isolates of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Li, Yali; Wan, Zhe; Liu, Wei; Li, Ruoyu

    2015-02-01

    The in vitro activity of chloroquine and the interactions of chloroquine combined with fluconazole against 37 Candida isolates were tested using the broth microdilution, disk diffusion, and Etest susceptibility tests. Synergistic effect was detected with 6 of 9 fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates, with Candida krusei ATCC 6258, and with all 12 fluconazole-resistant Candida tropicalis isolates.

  12. Synergistic Activity of Chloroquine with Fluconazole against Fluconazole-Resistant Isolates of Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yali; Wan, Zhe; Li, Ruoyu

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro activity of chloroquine and the interactions of chloroquine combined with fluconazole against 37 Candida isolates were tested using the broth microdilution, disk diffusion, and Etest susceptibility tests. Synergistic effect was detected with 6 of 9 fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates, with Candida krusei ATCC 6258, and with all 12 fluconazole-resistant Candida tropicalis isolates. PMID:25512426

  13. Overcoming chloroquine resistance in malaria: Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel chemoreversal agents.

    PubMed

    Boudhar, Aicha; Ng, Xiao Wei; Loh, Chiew Yee; Chia, Wan Ni; Tan, Zhi Ming; Nosten, Francois; Dymock, Brian W; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-08-25

    Malaria remains a significant infectious disease with even artemisinin-based therapies now facing resistance in the field. Development of new therapies is urgently needed, either by finding new compounds with unique modes of action, or by reversing resistance towards known drugs with 'chemosensitizers' or 'chemoreversal' agents (CRA). Concerning the latter, we have focused on the resistance mechanisms developed against chloroquine (CQ). We have synthesized a series of compounds related to previously identified CRAs, and found promising novel compounds. These compounds show encouraging results in a coumarin labeled chloroquine uptake assay, exhibiting a dose response in resensitising parasites to the antimalarial effects of chloroquine. Selected compounds show consistent potency across a panel of chloroquine and artemisinin sensitive and resistant parasites, and a wide therapeutic window. This data supports further study of CRAs in the treatment of malaria and, ultimately, their use in chloroquine-based combination therapies. PMID:27173385

  14. Chloroquine-resistant malaria in travelers returning from Haiti after 2010 earthquake.

    PubMed

    Gharbi, Myriam; Pillai, Dylan R; Lau, Rachel; Hubert, Véronique; Khairnar, Krishna; Existe, Alexandre; Kendjo, Eric; Dahlström, Sabina; Guérin, Philippe J; Le Bras, Jacques

    2012-08-01

    We investigated chloroquine sensitivity to Plasmodium falciparum in travelers returning to France and Canada from Haiti during a 23-year period. Two of 19 isolates obtained after the 2010 earthquake showed mixed pfcrt 76K+T genotype and high 50% inhibitory concentration. Physicians treating malaria acquired in Haiti should be aware of possible chloroquine resistance.

  15. Polycyclic amines as chloroquine resistance modulating agents in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Kapp, Erika; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J; Malan, Sarel F

    2016-02-15

    Pentacycloundecylamines (PCUs) and adamantane amines, such as NGP1-01 (1) and amantadine, have shown significant channel blocking activities. They are postulated to act as chemosensitizers and circumvent the resistance of the plasmodia parasite against chloroquine (CQ) by inhibiting the p-glycoprotein efflux pump and enabling the accumulation of CQ inside the parasite digestive vacuole. Twelve polycyclic amines containing either a PCU or adamantane amine moiety conjugated to different aromatic functionalities through various tethered linkers were selected based on their channel blocking abilities and evaluated as potential chemosensitizers. Compounds 2, 4, 5 and 10 showed significant voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocking ability (IC50=0.27-35 μM) and were able to alter the CQ IC50 in differing degrees (45-81%) in the multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum Dd2 isolate. Among them, the PCU-dansyl amine compound (4) displayed the best potential to act as a chemosensitizer against the Dd2 strain at a 1 μM concentration (RMI=0.19) while displaying moderate antiplasmodial activity (Dd2 IC50=6.25 μM) and low in vitro cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line (CHO, IC50=119 μM). Compounds 2 and 10 also showed some promising chemosensitizing abilities (RMI=0.36 and 0.35 respectively). A direct correlation was found between the VGCC blocking ability of these polycyclic amines and their capacity to act as CQ resistance modulating agents.

  16. Overcoming Chloroquine Resistance in Malaria: Design, Synthesis, and Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Hybrid Compounds.

    PubMed

    Boudhar, Aicha; Ng, Xiao Wei; Loh, Chiew Yee; Chia, Wan Ni; Tan, Zhi Ming; Nosten, Francois; Dymock, Brian W; Tan, Kevin S W

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to antimalarial therapies, including artemisinin, has emerged as a significant challenge. Reversal of acquired resistance can be achieved using agents that resensitize resistant parasites to a previously efficacious therapy. Building on our initial work describing novel chemoreversal agents (CRAs) that resensitize resistant parasites to chloroquine (CQ), we herein report new hybrid single agents as an innovative strategy in the battle against resistant malaria. Synthetically linking a CRA scaffold to chloroquine produces hybrid compounds with restored potency toward a range of resistant malaria parasites. A preferred compound, compound 35, showed broad activity and good potency against seven strains resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin. Assessment of aqueous solubility, membrane permeability, and in vitro toxicity in a hepatocyte line and a cardiomyocyte line indicates that compound 35 has a good therapeutic window and favorable drug-like properties. This study provides initial support for CQ-CRA hybrid compounds as a potential treatment for resistant malaria.

  17. Overcoming Chloroquine Resistance in Malaria: Design, Synthesis, and Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Hybrid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Boudhar, Aicha; Ng, Xiao Wei; Loh, Chiew Yee; Chia, Wan Ni; Tan, Zhi Ming; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antimalarial therapies, including artemisinin, has emerged as a significant challenge. Reversal of acquired resistance can be achieved using agents that resensitize resistant parasites to a previously efficacious therapy. Building on our initial work describing novel chemoreversal agents (CRAs) that resensitize resistant parasites to chloroquine (CQ), we herein report new hybrid single agents as an innovative strategy in the battle against resistant malaria. Synthetically linking a CRA scaffold to chloroquine produces hybrid compounds with restored potency toward a range of resistant malaria parasites. A preferred compound, compound 35, showed broad activity and good potency against seven strains resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin. Assessment of aqueous solubility, membrane permeability, and in vitro toxicity in a hepatocyte line and a cardiomyocyte line indicates that compound 35 has a good therapeutic window and favorable drug-like properties. This study provides initial support for CQ-CRA hybrid compounds as a potential treatment for resistant malaria. PMID:26953199

  18. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-06-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  19. Bisbenzylisoquinolines as modulators of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, F; Jossang, A; Soudon, J; Calvo, F; Rasoanaivo, P; Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Saez, J; Schrevel, J; Grellier, P

    1996-01-01

    Ten naturally occurring bisbenzylisoquinolines (BBIQ) and two dihydro derivatives belonging to five BBIQ subgroups were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum growth and, in drug combination, to reverse the resistance to chloroquine of strain FcB1. The same alkaloids were also assessed in vitro for their potentiating activity against vinblastine with the multidrug-resistant clone CCRF-CEM/VLB, established from lymphoblastic acute leukemia. Three of the BBIQ tested had 50% inhibitory concentrations of less than 1 microM. The most potent antimalarial agent was cocsoline (50% inhibitory concentration, 0.22 microM). Regarding the chloroquine-potentiating effect, fangchinoline exhibited the highest biological activity whereas the remaining compounds displayed either antagonistic or slight synergistic effects. Against the multidrug-resistant cancer cell line, fangchinoline was also by far the most active compound. Although there were clear differences between the activities of tested alkaloids, no relevant structure-activity relationship could be established. Nevertheless, fangchinoline appears to be a new biochemical tool able to help in the comprehension of the mechanism of both chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and multidrug resistance in tumor cells. PMID:8726022

  20. Enhanced combination therapy effect on paclitaxel-resistant carcinoma by chloroquine co-delivery via liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Menghua; Xu, Yuzhen; Qiu, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    A novel composite liposomal system co-encapsulating paclitaxel (PTX) with chloroquine phosphate (CQ) was designed for treating PTX-resistant carcinoma. It was confirmed that liposomal CQ can sensitize PTX by means of autophagy inhibition and competitively binding with multidrug-resistance transporters. Furthermore, according to the in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis assay, real-time observation of cellular uptake, and in vivo tissue distribution study, co-encapsulation of PTX and CQ in liposomes was validated as superior to the mixture of PTX liposome plus CQ liposome due to the simultaneous delivery and synergetic effect of the two drugs. Consequently, this composite liposome achieved significantly stronger anticancer efficacy in vivo than the PTX liposome plus CQ liposome mixture. This study helps to guide and enlighten ongoing and future clinical trials about the optimal administration modes for drug combination therapy. PMID:26543365

  1. In vitro response of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum to mefloquine.

    PubMed

    López Antuñano, F J; Wernsdorfer, W H

    1979-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the application of the in vitro microtechnique system in determining the response of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum to mefloquine.Using isolates of P. falciparum from Boa Vista, Brazil, and Villavicencio, Colombia, mefloquine was more than 7.7, 7.1, 7.1, and 6.4 times more effective than chloroquine in vitro at the ED(90), ED(95), ED(99), and ED(99.9) levels, respectively.

  2. Genotyping of chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum in wild caught Anopheles minimus mosquitoes in a malaria endemic area of Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Sarma, D K; Mohapatra, P K; Bhattacharyya, D R; Mahanta, J; Prakash, A

    2014-09-01

    We validated the feasibility of using Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, DNA present in wild caught vector mosquitoes for the characterization of chloroquine resistance status. House frequenting mosquitoes belonging to Anopheles minimus complex were collected from human dwellings in a malaria endemic area of Assam, Northeast India and DNA was extracted from the head-thorax region of individual mosquitoes. Anopheles minimus complex mosquitoes were identified to species level and screened for the presence of Plasmodium sp. using molecular tools. Nested PCR-RFLP method was used for genotyping of P. falciparum based on K76T mutation in the chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene. Three of the 27 wild caught An. minimus mosquitoes were harbouring P. falciparum sporozoites (positivity 11.1%) and all 3 were had 76T mutation in the pfcrt gene, indicating chloroquine resistance. The approach of characterizing antimalarial resistance of malaria parasite in vector mosquitoes can potentially be used as a surveillance tool for monitoring transmission of antimalarial drug resistant parasite strains in the community.

  3. Sontochin as a Guide to the Development of Drugs against Chloroquine-Resistant Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Pou, Sovitj; Winter, Rolf W.; Nilsen, Aaron; Kelly, Jane Xu; Li, Yuexin; Doggett, J. Stone; Riscoe, Erin W.; Wegmann, Keith W.; Hinrichs, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Sontochin was the original chloroquine replacement drug, arising from research by Hans Andersag 2 years after chloroquine (known as “resochin” at the time) had been shelved due to the mistaken perception that it was too toxic for human use. We were surprised to find that sontochin, i.e., 3-methyl-chloroquine, retains significant activity against chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. We prepared derivatives of sontochin, “pharmachins,” with alkyl or aryl substituents at the 3 position and with alterations to the 4-position side chain to enhance activity against drug-resistant strains. Modified with an aryl substituent in the 3 position of the 7-chloro-quinoline ring, Pharmachin 203 (PH-203) exhibits low-nanomolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) against drug-sensitive and multidrug-resistant strains and in vivo efficacy against patent infections of Plasmodium yoelii in mice that is superior to chloroquine. Our findings suggest that novel 3-position aryl pharmachin derivatives have the potential for use in treating drug resistant malaria. PMID:22508305

  4. Chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is not reversed by BIBW-22, a compound reversing the multidrug resistance phenotype in mammalian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann-Schuppert, A; Bamberger, U; Schwarz, R T

    1993-10-19

    The pteridine derivative BIBW-22 (4-[N-(2-hydroxy-2-methyl-propyl)-ethanolamino]-2,7-bis(cis-2,6-di methyl-morpholino)-6-phenylpteridine), which had been developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant cancer and binds to P-glycoprotein, was tested against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains in culture. Based on the result that BIBW-22 enhanced rather than lowered chloroquine resistance in vitro, it is concluded that chloroquine resistance in malaria parasites may not be mechanistically linked to the multidrug-resistant phenotype of chloroquine resistant P. falciparum. PMID:8240391

  5. Menhaden-fish oil in a vitamin E-deficient diet: protection against chloroquine-resistant malaria in mice.

    PubMed

    Levander, O A; Ager, A L; Morris, V C; May, R G

    1989-12-01

    Feeding a vitamin E-deficient diet containing 5% menhaden oil to mice affords significant protection against both a chloroquine-sensitive and a chloroquine-resistant line of the malarial parasite. Nutritional manipulation may offer a new approach to the problem of drug-resistant malaria, a rapidly emerging global threat to public health. PMID:2688393

  6. Inhibition of cyanide-resistant respiration in pea cotyledon mitochondria by chloroquine.

    PubMed

    James, T W; Spencer, M S

    1982-05-01

    The action on mitochondrial respiration of a ubiquinone analog, chloroquine, has been studied using purified mitochondria from the cotyledons of germinating peas (Pisum sativum L. var. Homesteader). Chloroquine at 3 millimolar did not inhibit malate or succinate oxidation at pH 7.2, but it did inhibit malate (but not succinate) oxidation at pH 8.2. Cyanide-resistant respiration was also inhibited.The implications of these experiments on the role of ubiquinone in the cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway and on the location of the alternate oxidase are discussed.

  7. Inhibition of Cyanide-Resistant Respiration in Pea Cotyledon Mitochondria by Chloroquine 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Terrance W.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1982-01-01

    The action on mitochondrial respiration of a ubiquinone analog, chloroquine, has been studied using purified mitochondria from the cotyledons of germinating peas (Pisum sativum L. var. Homesteader). Chloroquine at 3 millimolar did not inhibit malate or succinate oxidation at pH 7.2, but it did inhibit malate (but not succinate) oxidation at pH 8.2. Cyanide-resistant respiration was also inhibited. The implications of these experiments on the role of ubiquinone in the cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway and on the location of the alternate oxidase are discussed. PMID:16662353

  8. Chloroquine resistance and Plasmodium falciparum in Punjab, Pakistan during 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    Rana, Muhammad Saleem; Tanveer, Akhtar

    2004-06-01

    During the years 2000-2001, the rural populations of 5 districts in Punjab were examined for malarial parasites. The incidence of Plasmodium falciparum was more than double (8.98%) that of P. vivax (4.06%). The incidence was higher among male subjects (53.5%) than females (46.9%). The largest number of infected male subjects was found in Sheikhupura district (77.78%). Chloroquine resistance was only checked in the subjects harboring P. falciparum, using in vivo techniques. Overall chloroquine sensitivity was 63.8%. Overall frequency of chloroquine resistance in the 5 Punjabi districts was 35%, with 30.6% RI and 4.4% RII. It is important that RIII was not found in the present study. Among the five districts, maximum RI (35.1%) and RII (5.4%) were noted in Multan. By age, maximum chloroquine resistance was noted in the 1-5 year age group (ie RI, 41%; RII 8%). A similar RI value (41%) was noted for the 6-14 age group, but with a low RII (3%) value. Although, the present finding is an outcome of a survey conducted in only 5 districts of Punjab, it reflects an alarming situation, as not only RI and RII resistance against chloroquine is increasing, but at the same time the incidence of P. falciparum is increasing two-fold that of P. vivax. The findings warrant that top priority be given to determining the exact status of chloroquine resistance among P. falciparum in this region, which is now hosting a heavy influx of refugees from Afghanistan, a country endemic for P. falciparum. PMID:15691126

  9. Molecular Analysis of Chloroquine and Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine Resistance-Associated Alleles in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Mercedes Soto, Aida; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles. PMID:24615126

  10. Molecular analysis of chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance-associated alleles in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Sridaran, Sankar; Rodriguez, Betzabe; Soto, Aida Mercedes; Macedo De Oliveira, Alexandre; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2014-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is used as a first-line therapy for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Nicaragua. We investigated the prevalence of molecular markers associated with CQ and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in P. falciparum isolates obtained from the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua. Blood spots for this study were made available from a CQ and SP drug efficacy trial conducted in 2005 and also from a surveillance study performed in 2011. Polymorphisms in P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter, dihydrofolate reductase, and dihydropteroate synthase gene loci that are associated with resistance to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine, respectively, were detected by DNA sequencing. In the 2005 dataset, only 2 of 53 isolates had a CQ resistance allele (CVIET), 2 of 52 had a pyrimethamine resistance allele, and 1 of 49 had a sulfadoxine resistance allele. In the 2011 dataset, none of 45 isolates analyzed had CQ or SP resistance alleles.

  11. Synthesis of New 4-Aminoquinolines and Evaluation of Their In Vitro Activity against Chloroquine-Sensitive and Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Chandima S K; Lisai, Maryna; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Sinou, Véronique; Latour, Christine; Roy, Dipankar; Schrével, Joseph; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chloroquine, once the drug of choice in the fight against Plasmodium falciparum, is now severely limited due to widespread resistance. Amodiaquine is one of the most potent antimalarial 4-aminoquinolines known and remains effective against chloroquine-resistant parasites, but toxicity issues linked to a quinone-imine metabolite limit its clinical use. In search of new compounds able to retain the antimalarial activity of amodiaquine while circumventing quinone-imine metabolite toxicity, we have synthesized five 4-aminoquinolines that feature rings lacking hydroxyl groups in the side chain of the molecules and are thus incapable of generating toxic quinone-imines. The new compounds displayed high in vitro potency (low nanomolar IC50), markedly superior to chloroquine and comparable to amodiaquine, against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum, accompanied by low toxicity to L6 rat fibroblasts and MRC5 human lung cells, and metabolic stability comparable or higher than that of amodiaquine. Computational studies indicate a unique mode of binding of compound 4 to heme through the HOMO located on a biphenyl moeity, which may partly explain the high antiplasmodial activity observed for this compound. PMID:26473363

  12. Contrasting ex vivo efficacies of "reversed chloroquine" compounds in chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax isolates.

    PubMed

    Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F; Chalfein, Ferryanto; Prayoga; Handayuni, Irene; Noviyanti, Rintis; Kenangalem, Enny; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Burgess, Steven J; Peyton, David H; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2015-09-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been the mainstay of malaria treatment for more than 60 years. However, the emergence and spread of CQ resistance now restrict its use to only a few areas where malaria is endemic. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a novel combination of a CQ-like moiety and an imipramine-like pharmacophore can reverse CQ resistance ex vivo. Between March to October 2011 and January to September 2013, two "reversed chloroquine" (RCQ) compounds (PL69 and PL106) were tested against multidrug-resistant field isolates of Plasmodium falciparum (n = 41) and Plasmodium vivax (n = 45) in Papua, Indonesia, using a modified ex vivo schizont maturation assay. The RCQ compounds showed high efficacy against both CQ-resistant P. falciparum and P. vivax field isolates. For P. falciparum, the median 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were 23.2 nM for PL69 and 26.6 nM for PL106, compared to 79.4 nM for unmodified CQ (P < 0.001 and P = 0.036, respectively). The corresponding values for P. vivax were 19.0, 60.0, and 60.9 nM (P < 0.001 and P = 0.018, respectively). There was a significant correlation between IC50s of CQ and PL69 (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient [r s] = 0.727, P < 0.001) and PL106 (rs = 0.830, P < 0.001) in P. vivax but not in P. falciparum. Both RCQs were equally active against the ring and trophozoite stages of P. falciparum, but in P. vivax, PL69 and PL106 showed less potent activity against trophozoite stages (median IC50s, 130.2 and 172.5 nM) compared to ring stages (median IC50s, 17.6 and 91.3 nM). RCQ compounds have enhanced ex vivo activity against CQ-resistant clinical isolates of P. falciparum and P. vivax, suggesting the potential use of reversal agents in antimalarial drug development. Interspecies differences in RCQ compound activity may indicate differences in CQ pharmacokinetics between the two Plasmodium species.

  13. Chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Osogbo Nigeria: efficacy of amodiaquine + sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and chloroquine + chlorpheniramine for treatment.

    PubMed

    Ogungbamigbe, T O; Ojurongbe, O; Ogunro, P S; Okanlawon, B M; Kolawole, S O

    2008-02-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum contributes to increasing malaria-attributable morbidity and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. Despite a change in drug policy, continued prescription of CQ did not abate. Therefore the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in uncomplicated falciparum malaria patients was assessed in a standard 28-day protocol in 116 children aged between six and 120 months in Osogbo, Southwest Nigeria. Parasitological and clinical assessments of response to treatment showed that 72 (62.1%) of the patients were cured and 44 (37.9%) failed the CQ treatment. High initial parasite density and young age were independent predictors for early treatment failure. Out of the 44 patients that failed CQ, 24 received amodiaquine + sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (AQ+SP) and 20 received chlorpheniramine + chloroquine (CH+CQ) combinations. Mean fever clearance time in those treated with AQ+SP was not significantly different from those treated with CH+CQ (p = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean parasite density of the two groups. The cure rate for AQ+SP group was 92% while those of CH+CQ was 85%. There was a significant difference in parasite clearance time (p = 0.01) between the two groups. The 38% treatment failure for CQ reported in this study is higher than the 10% recommended by World Health Organization in other to effect change in antimalarial treatment policy. Hence we conclude that CQ can no more be solely relied upon for the treatment of falciparum malaria in Osogbo, Nigeria. AQ+SP and CH+CQ are effective in the treatment of acute uncomplicated malaria and may be considered as useful alternative drugs in the absence of artemisinin-based combination therapies.

  14. Imported chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax in Singapore: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lim, Poh Lian; Mok, Ying Juan; Lye, David C; Leo, Yee Sin

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax (CRPV) infection is emerging as a clinically significant problem. Detailed travel history is crucial to the management of imported malarial cases. We report a 58-year-old business traveler who returned from Indonesia and experienced relapse due to CRPV. The epidemiology and diagnostic challenges of CRPV for travel medicine clinicians are reviewed. PMID:20074103

  15. Survey of chloroquine-resistant mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes in Hadhramout, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Bamaga, Omar A A; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-09-01

    Malaria is still a major public health problem in Yemen. More than 95% of the malaria cases are due to Plasmodium ‎falciparum‎. Recently in Yemen, the antimalarial treatment policy was changed from chloroquine (CQ) to artemisinin combination therapy (ACTs). However, CQ is still available and prescribed in the Yemeni market. The persistence of CQ resistance will be prolonged if the shift to ACT and the simultaneous withdrawal of CQ are not rigorously implemented. The aim of the current survey is to detect chloroquine-resistant mutations in P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (pfmdr1) genes. These data will be important for future monitoring and assessment of antimalarial drug policy in Yemen. Blood specimens were collected from 735 individuals from different districts of the Hadhramout province, Yemen by house-to-house visit. Mutation-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods were used to investigate the mutations in the pfmdr1(codons 86 and 1246) and pfcrt (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) genes. The overall prevalence of pfcrt mutations at codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 were 50.4%, 58.7%, 54.3% and 44.9%, respectively. All isolates had wild-type pfcrt 356 allele. The majority of pfmdr1 86 alleles (83.3%) and all pfmdr1 1246 alleles were wild type. There was no association between pfcrt mutations and symptomatology, gender and age groups. In conclusion, point mutations in codons 76, 271, 326 and 371 of pfcrt of P. falciparum are high suggesting a sustained high CQ resistance even after 4 years of shifting to ACTs. These findings warrant complete withdrawal of CQ use from the Yemeni market for P. falciparum and careful usage of CQ for treating Plasmodium vivax.

  16. A four-year surveillance program for detection of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Fontecha, Gustavo A; Sanchez, Ana L; Mendoza, Meisy; Banegas, Engels; Mejía-Torres, Rosa E

    2014-07-01

    Countries could use the monitoring of drug resistance in malaria parasites as an effective early warning system to develop the timely response mechanisms that are required to avert the further spread of malaria. Drug resistance surveillance is essential in areas where no drug resistance has been reported, especially if neighbouring countries have previously reported resistance. Here, we present the results of a four-year surveillance program based on the sequencing of the pfcrt gene of Plasmodium falciparum populations from endemic areas of Honduras. All isolates were susceptible to chloroquine, as revealed by the pfcrt "CVMNK" genotype in codons 72-76.

  17. Investigating the activity of quinine analogues vs. chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Dinio, Theresa; Gorka, Alexander P.; McGinniss, Andrew; Roepe, Paul D.; Morgan, Jeremy B.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malarial parasite species, has developed resistance against nearly all man-made antimalarial drugs within the past century. However, quinine (QN), the first antimalarial drug, remains efficacious worldwide. Some chloroquine resistant (CQR) P. falciparum strains or isolates show mild cross resistance to QN, but many do not. Further optimization of QN may provide well-tolerated therapy with improved activity vs. CQR malaria. Thus, using the Heck reaction, we have pursued a structure-activity relationship study, including vinyl group modifications of QN. Certain derivatives show good antiplasmodial activity in QN-resistant and QN-sensitive strains, with lower IC50 values relative to QN. PMID:22512909

  18. Discovering thiamine transporters as targets of chloroquine using a novel functional genomics strategy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Zhang, Jianhuai; Chen, Kaifu; Li, Yongxiang; Li, Wei; Quiocho, Florante A; Pan, Xuewen

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and other quinoline-containing antimalarials are important drugs with many therapeutic benefits as well as adverse effects. However, the molecular targets underlying most such effects are largely unknown. By taking a novel functional genomics strategy, which employs a unique combination of genome-wide drug-gene synthetic lethality (DGSL), gene-gene synthetic lethality (GGSL), and dosage suppression (DS) screens in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is thus termed SL/DS for simplicity, we found that CQ inhibits the thiamine transporters Thi7, Nrt1, and Thi72 in yeast. We first discovered a thi3Δ mutant as hypersensitive to CQ using a genome-wide DGSL analysis. Using genome-wide GGSL and DS screens, we then found that a thi7Δ mutation confers severe growth defect in the thi3Δ mutant and that THI7 overexpression suppresses CQ-hypersensitivity of this mutant. We subsequently showed that CQ inhibits the functions of Thi7 and its homologues Nrt1 and Thi72. In particular, the transporter activity of wild-type Thi7 but not a CQ-resistant mutant (Thi7(T287N)) was completely inhibited by the drug. Similar effects were also observed with other quinoline-containing antimalarials. In addition, CQ completely inhibited a human thiamine transporter (SLC19A3) expressed in yeast and significantly inhibited thiamine uptake in cultured human cell lines. Therefore, inhibition of thiamine uptake is a conserved mechanism of action of CQ. This study also demonstrated SL/DS as a uniquely effective methodology for discovering drug targets.

  19. Discovering Thiamine Transporters as Targets of Chloroquine Using a Novel Functional Genomics Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Zhang, Jianhuai; Chen, Kaifu; Li, Yongxiang; Li, Wei; Quiocho, Florante A.; Pan, Xuewen

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) and other quinoline-containing antimalarials are important drugs with many therapeutic benefits as well as adverse effects. However, the molecular targets underlying most such effects are largely unknown. By taking a novel functional genomics strategy, which employs a unique combination of genome-wide drug-gene synthetic lethality (DGSL), gene-gene synthetic lethality (GGSL), and dosage suppression (DS) screens in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is thus termed SL/DS for simplicity, we found that CQ inhibits the thiamine transporters Thi7, Nrt1, and Thi72 in yeast. We first discovered a thi3Δ mutant as hypersensitive to CQ using a genome-wide DGSL analysis. Using genome-wide GGSL and DS screens, we then found that a thi7Δ mutation confers severe growth defect in the thi3Δ mutant and that THI7 overexpression suppresses CQ-hypersensitivity of this mutant. We subsequently showed that CQ inhibits the functions of Thi7 and its homologues Nrt1 and Thi72. In particular, the transporter activity of wild-type Thi7 but not a CQ-resistant mutant (Thi7T287N) was completely inhibited by the drug. Similar effects were also observed with other quinoline-containing antimalarials. In addition, CQ completely inhibited a human thiamine transporter (SLC19A3) expressed in yeast and significantly inhibited thiamine uptake in cultured human cell lines. Therefore, inhibition of thiamine uptake is a conserved mechanism of action of CQ. This study also demonstrated SL/DS as a uniquely effective methodology for discovering drug targets. PMID:23209439

  20. The detection of pfcrt and pfmdr1 point mutations as molecular markers of chloroquine drug resistance, Pahang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria is still a public health problem in Malaysia with chloroquine (CQ) being the first-line drug in the treatment policy of uncomplicated malaria. There is a scarcity in information about the magnitude of Plasmodium falciparum CQ resistance. This study aims to investigate the presence of single point mutations in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371 and in P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 gene (pfmdr1) at codons 86 and 1246, as molecular markers of CQ resistance. Methods A total of 75 P. falciparum blood samples were collected from different districts of Pahang state, Malaysia. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt gene (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) and pfmdr1 gene (codons 86 and 1246) were analysed by using mutation-specific nested PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Results Mutations of pfcrt K76T and pfcrt R371I were the most prevalent among pfcrt gene mutations reported by this study; 52% and 77%, respectively. Other codons of the pfcrt gene and the positions 86 and 1246 of the pfmdr1 gene were found mostly of wild type. Significant associations of pfcrt K76T, pfcrt N326S and pfcrt I356T mutations with parasitaemia were also reported. Conclusion The high existence of mutant pfcrt T76 may indicate the low susceptibility of P. falciparum isolates to CQ in Peninsular Malaysia. The findings of this study establish baseline data on the molecular markers of P. falciparum CQ resistance, which may help in the surveillance of drug resistance in Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:22853645

  1. Genetic diversity of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax parasites from the western Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Lizcano, Omaira Vera; Resende, Sarah Stela; Chehuan, Yonne F; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Brito, Cristiana F A; Zalis, Mariano G

    2014-11-01

    The molecular basis of Plasmodium vivax chloroquine (CQ) resistance is still unknown. Elucidating the molecular background of parasites that are sensitive or resistant to CQ will help to identify and monitor the spread of resistance. By genotyping a panel of molecular markers, we demonstrate a similar genetic variability between in vitro CQ-resistant and sensitive phenotypes of P. vivax parasites. However, our studies identified two loci (MS8 and MSP1-B10) that could be used to discriminate between both CQ-susceptible phenotypes among P. vivax isolates in vitro. These preliminary data suggest that microsatellites may be used to identify and to monitor the spread of P. vivax-resistance around the world. PMID:25411001

  2. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt

    PubMed Central

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Musset, Lise

    2015-01-01

    In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations can attain 100% prevalence, thereby precluding the return of WT parasites after the complete removal of drug pressure. In French Guiana, despite the fixation of the K76T allele, the prevalence of CQR isolates progressively dropped from >90% to <30% during 17 y after CQ withdrawal in 1995. Using a genome-wide association study with CQ-sensitive (CQS) and CQR isolates, we have identified a single mutation in pfcrt encoding a C350R substitution that is associated with the restoration of CQ susceptibility. Genome editing of the CQR reference strain 7G8 to incorporate PfCRT C350R caused a complete loss of CQR. A retrospective molecular survey on 580 isolates collected from 1997 to 2012 identified all C350R mutant parasites as being CQS. This mutation emerged in 2002 and rapidly spread throughout the P. falciparum population. The C350R allele is also associated with a significant decrease in piperaquine susceptibility in vitro, suggesting that piperaquine pressure in addition to potential fitness costs associated with the 7G8-type CQR pfcrt allele may have selected for this mutation. These findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:26261345

  3. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt.

    PubMed

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L; Dhingra, Satish K; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Volkman, Sarah K; Wirth, Dyann F; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A; Neafsey, Daniel E; Musset, Lise

    2015-09-15

    In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations can attain 100% prevalence, thereby precluding the return of WT parasites after the complete removal of drug pressure. In French Guiana, despite the fixation of the K76T allele, the prevalence of CQR isolates progressively dropped from >90% to <30% during 17 y after CQ withdrawal in 1995. Using a genome-wide association study with CQ-sensitive (CQS) and CQR isolates, we have identified a single mutation in pfcrt encoding a C350R substitution that is associated with the restoration of CQ susceptibility. Genome editing of the CQR reference strain 7G8 to incorporate PfCRT C350R caused a complete loss of CQR. A retrospective molecular survey on 580 isolates collected from 1997 to 2012 identified all C350R mutant parasites as being CQS. This mutation emerged in 2002 and rapidly spread throughout the P. falciparum population. The C350R allele is also associated with a significant decrease in piperaquine susceptibility in vitro, suggesting that piperaquine pressure in addition to potential fitness costs associated with the 7G8-type CQR pfcrt allele may have selected for this mutation. These findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:26261345

  4. Adaptive evolution of malaria parasites in French Guiana: Reversal of chloroquine resistance by acquisition of a mutation in pfcrt.

    PubMed

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Moss, Eli L; Dhingra, Satish K; Volney, Béatrice; Casteras, Jessica; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Volkman, Sarah K; Wirth, Dyann F; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A; Neafsey, Daniel E; Musset, Lise

    2015-09-15

    In regions with high malaria endemicity, the withdrawal of chloroquine (CQ) as first-line treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections has typically led to the restoration of CQ susceptibility through the reexpansion of the wild-type (WT) allele K76 of the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at the expense of less fit mutant alleles carrying the CQ resistance (CQR) marker K76T. In low-transmission settings, such as South America, drug resistance mutations can attain 100% prevalence, thereby precluding the return of WT parasites after the complete removal of drug pressure. In French Guiana, despite the fixation of the K76T allele, the prevalence of CQR isolates progressively dropped from >90% to <30% during 17 y after CQ withdrawal in 1995. Using a genome-wide association study with CQ-sensitive (CQS) and CQR isolates, we have identified a single mutation in pfcrt encoding a C350R substitution that is associated with the restoration of CQ susceptibility. Genome editing of the CQR reference strain 7G8 to incorporate PfCRT C350R caused a complete loss of CQR. A retrospective molecular survey on 580 isolates collected from 1997 to 2012 identified all C350R mutant parasites as being CQS. This mutation emerged in 2002 and rapidly spread throughout the P. falciparum population. The C350R allele is also associated with a significant decrease in piperaquine susceptibility in vitro, suggesting that piperaquine pressure in addition to potential fitness costs associated with the 7G8-type CQR pfcrt allele may have selected for this mutation. These findings have important implications for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of antimalarial drug resistance.

  5. A focus of high degree chloroquine resistant P. falciparum in Mandla district (M.P.).

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Shukla, M M; Sharma, V P; Saxena, B N

    1989-03-01

    A study on the bioenvironmental control of malaria was launched in Bizadandi block (Mandla district, M.P.) in May 1986. Besides intervention, using environmental management methods and larvivorous fishes, weekly surveillance and chloroquine administration at 25 mg/kg body weight was practiced. Studies during 1987 revealed that a large number of P. falciparum cases did not respond to the standard anti-malarial treatment. Therefore, systematic 28 day in vivo studies were taken up on the follow-up of P. falciparum cases after administration of 3 day course of 25 mg/kg body weight as per the WHO procedure. Results revealed a high proportion of drug resistant cases belonging to RI (237), RII and RIII (182) category. In vivo studies on the sensitivity to metakelfin showed that some cases were resistant to this drug. There is an urgent need to eradicate this focus before it starts spreading to other areas. PMID:2680635

  6. Localized permanent epidemics: the genesis of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Verdrager, J

    1995-03-01

    Localized permanent epidemics occur when, for an indefinite period of time, there is a temporary but continuous introduction of unprotected non-immunes into the same locality of a hyperendemic area. The main epidemiological factors involved in the genesis of localized permanent epidemics were encountered in Pailin (Cambodia) the epicenter of drug resistance in Southeast Asia: a very efficient vector, Anopheles dirus, exophilic and of limited distribution with, therefore, adjacent hyperendemic and non-endemic areas; a permanent pole of attraction in the hyperendemic area: Pailin's sapphires and rubies; a temporary but continuous influx of non-immunes into the pole of attraction: continuous influx of non-immunes into the Pailin gem mining area. In the gem-mining Pailin village drug pressure was considerable: mass drug administration, a medicated salt project and permanent self-medication with very high doses, much higher doses being required to cure non-immunes with heavy infections and severe clinical attacks in epidemic situations. It appears, therefore, that the emergence of chloroquine resistance in Southeast Asia was the consequence of the localized permanent epidemics in Païlin. High level resistance was the result of continuous and intensive serial passages of P. falciparum in the non-immune subjects, large numbers of parasites being exposed to a high level of drug pressure at each passage. Similar epidemiological conditions are encountered in some parts of South America where the exophilic vector is An. nuneztovari. In Colombia, whose eastern mountains bordering Venezuela yield the most highly prized emeralds in the world, chloroquine resistance was detected at about the same time as in Southeast Asia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Localized permanent epidemics: the genesis of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Verdrager, J

    1995-03-01

    Localized permanent epidemics occur when, for an indefinite period of time, there is a temporary but continuous introduction of unprotected non-immunes into the same locality of a hyperendemic area. The main epidemiological factors involved in the genesis of localized permanent epidemics were encountered in Pailin (Cambodia) the epicenter of drug resistance in Southeast Asia: a very efficient vector, Anopheles dirus, exophilic and of limited distribution with, therefore, adjacent hyperendemic and non-endemic areas; a permanent pole of attraction in the hyperendemic area: Pailin's sapphires and rubies; a temporary but continuous influx of non-immunes into the pole of attraction: continuous influx of non-immunes into the Pailin gem mining area. In the gem-mining Pailin village drug pressure was considerable: mass drug administration, a medicated salt project and permanent self-medication with very high doses, much higher doses being required to cure non-immunes with heavy infections and severe clinical attacks in epidemic situations. It appears, therefore, that the emergence of chloroquine resistance in Southeast Asia was the consequence of the localized permanent epidemics in Païlin. High level resistance was the result of continuous and intensive serial passages of P. falciparum in the non-immune subjects, large numbers of parasites being exposed to a high level of drug pressure at each passage. Similar epidemiological conditions are encountered in some parts of South America where the exophilic vector is An. nuneztovari. In Colombia, whose eastern mountains bordering Venezuela yield the most highly prized emeralds in the world, chloroquine resistance was detected at about the same time as in Southeast Asia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8525414

  8. Comparison of protein expression pattern between the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-resistant RKL9 and chloroquine-sensitive MRC2 strains

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Pathak, Vrushali; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the protein expression patterns of Plasmodium falciparum extracellular and intracellular proteins separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) from the chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) MRC2 strain and chloroquine-resistant (CQR) RKL9 strain. Materials and Methods: Both the extracellular protein (ECP) and intracellular protein (ICP) were extracted and solubilized. The proteins were separated by 2-DE, first based on their charges using isoelectric focusing and then their sizes by electrophoresis. The separated protein spots were detected by silver staining, and further, the protein spot density was analyzed by an image analysis software. Results: 2-DE separated the proteins extracted from the CQS and CQR strains based on their differentially expressed protein patterns. Extracellular Protein Analysis: A total of 109 and 77 protein spots were detected by image analysis of ECP extracted from MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. There was a marked reduction in protein expression pattern in the CQR strain when compared with the CQS strain. Interestingly, 50 and 18 protein spots were uniquely expressed in MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. When MRC2 strain-expressed proteins were taken as the control, 12 upregulated and 14 downregulated protein spots were observed in the RKL9 strain-extracted proteins. Intracellular Protein Analysis: ICP extracted from MRC2 and RKL9 strains showed 187 and 199 protein spots by an image analysis software, and a small enhancement of protein expression was measured when comparing the CQR strain with CQS strain. There were 67 and 79 unique protein spots detected in MRC2 and RKL9 strains, respectively. A total of 120 protein spots were similar when MRC2 proteins were taken as the control; among these protein spots, 40 upregulated and 22 downregulated protein spots were detected in RKL9 strain-expressed protein. Conclusions: Both these unique and matched protein spots might be molecularly

  9. Low level genotypic chloroquine resistance near Malawi's northern border with Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Daniel J; Molyneux, Malcolm; Nkhoma, Standwell

    2009-09-01

    We conducted a prevalence study of mutations in Plasmodium falciparum that are associated with antimalarial drug resistance at a rural site in Karonga near Malawi's northern border with Tanzania. We found a higher prevalence of the key chloroquine resistance-conferring mutation in the pfcrt gene (K76T) at this site in comparison with the prevalence in Blantyre, a city in the south of Malawi, far from an international border (9%vs. 0%; P < 0.0005). In contrast we found a lower prevalence of the quintuple dhfr/dhps mutation, which is highly predictive of SP treatment failure, at the Karonga site compared to Blantyre (76%vs. 88%; P < 0.005). The prevalence of the K76T pfcrt mutation at two Tanzanian sites close to the border with Malawi was recently reported to be over 50%. Our findings suggest a considerable 'leakage' of parasite antimalarial drug resistance across the border between two countries with different national malaria control policies and with different levels of resistance. Neighbouring countries should consider implementing common regional rather than national malaria treatment policies to prevent the spread of antimalarial drug resistance alleles across their borders.

  10. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study observation period. The only in

  11. pfmdr1 amplification and fixation of pfcrt chloroquine resistance alleles in Plasmodium falciparum in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Griffing, Sean; Syphard, Luke; Sridaran, Sankar; McCollum, Andrea M; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Vinayak, Sumiti; Villegas, Leopoldo; Barnwell, John W; Escalante, Ananias A; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2010-04-01

    Molecular tools are valuable for determining evolutionary history and the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites. These tools have helped to predict decreased sensitivity to antimalarials and fixation of multidrug resistance genotypes in some regions. In order to assess how historical drug policies impacted Plasmodium falciparum in Venezuela, we examined molecular changes in genes associated with drug resistance. We examined pfmdr1 and pfcrt in samples from Sifontes, Venezuela, and integrated our findings with earlier work describing dhfr and dhps in these samples. We characterized pfmdr1 genotypes and copy number variation, pfcrt genotypes, and proximal microsatellites in 93 samples originating from surveillance from 2003 to 2004. Multicopy pfmdr1 was found in 12% of the samples. Two pfmdr1 alleles, Y184F/N1042D/D1246Y (37%) and Y184F/S1034C/N1042D/D1246Y (63%), were found. These alleles share ancestry, and no evidence of strong selective pressure on mutations was found. pfcrt chloroquine resistance alleles are fixed with two alleles: S(tct)VMNT (91%) and S(agt)VMNT (9%). These alleles are associated with strong selection. There was also an association between pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr, and dhps genotypes/haplotypes. Duplication of pfmdr1 suggests a potential shift in mefloquine sensitivity in this region, which warrants further study. A bottleneck occurred in P. falciparum in Sifontes, Venezuela, and multidrug resistance genotypes are present. This population could be targeted for malaria elimination programs to prevent the possible spread of multidrug-resistant parasites.

  12. Gene encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme is mutated in artesunate- and chloroquine-resistant rodent malaria parasites§

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Paul; Afonso, Ana; Creasey, Alison; Culleton, Richard; Sidhu, Amar Bir Singh; Logan, John; Valderramos, Stephanie G; McNae, Iain; Cheesman, Sandra; do Rosario, Virgilio; Carter, Richard; Fidock, David A; Cravo, Pedro

    2007-01-01

    Artemisinin- and artesunate-resistant Plasmodium chabaudi mutants, AS-ART and AS-ATN, were previously selected from chloroquine-resistant clones AS-30CQ and AS-15CQ respectively. Now, a genetic cross between AS-ART and the artemisinin-sensitive clone AJ has been analysed by Linkage Group Selection. A genetic linkage group on chromosome 2 was selected under artemisinin treatment. Within this locus, we identified two different mutations in a gene encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme. A distinct mutation occurred in each of the clones AS-30CQ and AS-ATN, relative to their respective progenitors in the AS lineage. The mutations occurred independently in different clones under drug selection with chloroquine (high concentration) or artesunate. Each mutation maps to a critical residue in a homologous human deubiquitinating protein structure. Although one mutation could theoretically account for the resistance of AS-ATN to artemisinin derivates, the other cannot account solely for the resistance of AS-ART, relative to the responses of its sensitive progenitor AS-30CQ. Two lines of Plasmodium falciparum with decreased susceptibility to artemisinin were also selected. Their drug-response phenotype was not genetically stable. No mutations in the UBP-1 gene encoding the P. falciparum orthologue of the deubiquitinating enzyme were observed. The possible significance of these mutations in parasite responses to chloroquine or artemisinin is discussed. PMID:17581118

  13. Arguments against Chemoprophylaxis in Areas at Low Risk for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Armengaud

    1995-03-01

    Chemoprophylaxis of malaria prevents the disease not the infection (suppressive chemoprophylaxis) with "high levels of confusion and low levels of compliance." The magnitude of danger of contracting malaria for travelers varies in several endemic zones. In West Africa, without prophylaxis, malaria is estimated to have an incidence of 1.4% per person per month. In South and Central America, the incidence is 0.05 and 0.01% per month, respectively. In Asia, the transmission and percentage of infection due to Plasmodium falciparum is much lower. The dangers of chemoprophylaxis in an area at low risk for chloroquine resistant P. falciparum are a reality. Incompletely active drugs change clinical manifestations, and changes in clinical manifestations delay the establishment of a correct diagnosis. The rate of adverse events is 15-20%, and hospitalization due to side effects of prophylaxis occurs in one in 10,000 travelers. Neuropsychiatric side effects have been reported with both mefloquine and chloroquine. A false sense of security can hinder a physician practicing in a nonendemic area from thinking of malaria when a traveler returns with fever. To complicate the picture, in many countries, there is an emerging drug resistance in P. falciparum as well as an emerging chloroquine resistance in P. vivax strains (20% in New Guinea and Irian Jaya). In short, no available chemoprophylaxis is free from toxicity, and its efficacy is never 100%. Alternatives to conventional chemoprophylaxis are encouraged in areas of low morbidity of malaria. In areas where P. vivax occurs primarily, and when the risk of serious side effects from chemoprophylaxis outweighs the risk of life threatening P. falciparum infection, there are four alternative strategies.2,3 The first strategy is that the traveler avoid mosquito bites. With a compulsive attitude, a high degree of protection can be realized with the proper use of pyrethrum-impregnated mosquito netting, topical DEET-containing insect

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of Chloroquine-Sensitive and Chloroquine-Resistant Strains of Plasmodium falciparum: Toward Malaria Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Global Health.

    PubMed

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Pathak, Vrushali; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Bhattacherjee, Amrita

    2016-07-01

    Increasing drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is an important global health burden because it reverses the malarial control achieved so far. Hence, understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance is the epicenter of the development agenda for novel diagnostic and therapeutic (drugs/vaccines) targets for malaria. In this study, we report global comparative transcriptome profiling (RNA-Seq) to characterize the difference in the transcriptome between 48-h intraerythrocytic stage of chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum (3D7 and Dd2) strains. The two P. falciparum 3D7 and Dd2 strains have distant geographical origin, the Netherlands and Indochina, respectively. The strains were cultured by an in vitro method and harvested at the 48-h intraerythrocytic stage having 5% parasitemia. The whole transcriptome sequencing was performed using Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform with paired-end reads. The reads were aligned with the reference P. falciparum genome. The alignment percentages for 3D7, Dd2, and Dd2 w/CQ strains were 85.40%, 89.13%, and 84%, respectively. Nearly 40% of the transcripts had known gene function, whereas the remaining genes (about 60%) had unknown function. The genes involved in immune evasion showed a significant difference between the strains. The differential gene expression between the sensitive and resistant strains was measured using the cuffdiff program with the p-value cutoff ≤0.05. Collectively, this study identified differentially expressed genes between 3D7 and Dd2 strains, where we found 89 genes to be upregulated and 227 to be downregulated. On the contrary, for 3D7 and Dd2 w/CQ strains, 45 genes were upregulated and 409 were downregulated. These differentially regulated genes code, by and large, for surface antigens involved in invasion, pathogenesis, and host-parasite interactions, among others. The exhibition of transcriptional differences between these strains of P. falciparum contributes to our

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis of Chloroquine-Sensitive and Chloroquine-Resistant Strains of Plasmodium falciparum: Toward Malaria Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Global Health.

    PubMed

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Pathak, Vrushali; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Bhattacherjee, Amrita

    2016-07-01

    Increasing drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum is an important global health burden because it reverses the malarial control achieved so far. Hence, understanding the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance is the epicenter of the development agenda for novel diagnostic and therapeutic (drugs/vaccines) targets for malaria. In this study, we report global comparative transcriptome profiling (RNA-Seq) to characterize the difference in the transcriptome between 48-h intraerythrocytic stage of chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum (3D7 and Dd2) strains. The two P. falciparum 3D7 and Dd2 strains have distant geographical origin, the Netherlands and Indochina, respectively. The strains were cultured by an in vitro method and harvested at the 48-h intraerythrocytic stage having 5% parasitemia. The whole transcriptome sequencing was performed using Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform with paired-end reads. The reads were aligned with the reference P. falciparum genome. The alignment percentages for 3D7, Dd2, and Dd2 w/CQ strains were 85.40%, 89.13%, and 84%, respectively. Nearly 40% of the transcripts had known gene function, whereas the remaining genes (about 60%) had unknown function. The genes involved in immune evasion showed a significant difference between the strains. The differential gene expression between the sensitive and resistant strains was measured using the cuffdiff program with the p-value cutoff ≤0.05. Collectively, this study identified differentially expressed genes between 3D7 and Dd2 strains, where we found 89 genes to be upregulated and 227 to be downregulated. On the contrary, for 3D7 and Dd2 w/CQ strains, 45 genes were upregulated and 409 were downregulated. These differentially regulated genes code, by and large, for surface antigens involved in invasion, pathogenesis, and host-parasite interactions, among others. The exhibition of transcriptional differences between these strains of P. falciparum contributes to our

  16. Replication of Plasmodium in reticulocytes can occur without hemozoin formation, resulting in chloroquine resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing-wen; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Schwarzer, Evelin; Sajid, Mohammed; Annoura, Takeshi; Deroost, Katrien; Ravelli, Raimond B.G.; Aime, Elena; Capuccini, Barbara; Mommaas-Kienhuis, Anna M.; O’Toole, Tom; Prins, Frans; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M.D.; Ramesar, Jai; Chevalley-Maurel, Séverine; Kroeze, Hans; Koster, Abraham J.; Tanke, Hans J.; Crisanti, Andrea; Langhorne, Jean; Arese, Paolo; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Janse, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on malaria-parasite digestion of hemoglobin (Hb) have been performed using P. falciparum maintained in mature erythrocytes, in vitro. In this study, we examine Plasmodium Hb degradation in vivo in mice, using the parasite P. berghei, and show that it is possible to create mutant parasites lacking enzymes involved in the initial steps of Hb proteolysis. These mutants only complete development in reticulocytes and mature into both schizonts and gametocytes. Hb degradation is severely impaired and large amounts of undigested Hb remains in the reticulocyte cytoplasm and in vesicles in the parasite. The mutants produce little or no hemozoin (Hz), the detoxification by-product of Hb degradation. Further, they are resistant to chloroquine, an antimalarial drug that interferes with Hz formation, but their sensitivity to artesunate, also thought to be dependent on Hb degradation, is retained. Survival in reticulocytes with reduced or absent Hb digestion may imply a novel mechanism of drug resistance. These findings have implications for drug development against human-malaria parasites, such as P. vivax and P. ovale, which develop inside reticulocytes. PMID:25941254

  17. Chloroquine Enhances Gefitinib Cytotoxicity in Gefitinib-Resistant Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mei-Chuan; Wu, Mei-Yi; Hwang, Ming-Hung; Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Hui-Ju; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), including gefitinib, are effective for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutations. However, these patients eventually develop resistance to EGFR-TKI. The goal of the present study was to investigate the involvement of autophagy in gefitinib resistance. We developed gefitinib-resistant cells (PC-9/gef) from PC-9 cells (containing exon 19 deletion EGFR) after long-term exposure in gefitinib. PC-9/gef cells (B4 and E3) were 200-fold more resistant to gefitinib than PC-9/wt cells. Compared with PC-9/wt cells, both PC-9/gefB4 and PC-9/gefE3 cells demonstrated higher basal LC3-II levels which were inhibited by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor) and potentiated by chloroquine (CQ, an inhibitor of autophagolysosomes formation), indicating elevated autophagy in PC-9/gef cells. 3-MA and CQ concentration-dependently inhibited cell survival of both PC-9wt and PC-9/gef cells, suggesting that autophagy may be pro-survival. Furthermore, gefitinib increased LC3-II levels and autolysosome formation in both PC-9/wt cells and PC-9/gef cells. In PC-9/wt cells, CQ potentiated the cytotoxicity by low gefitinib (3nM). Moreover, CQ overcame the acquired gefitinib resistance in PC-9/gef cells by enhancing gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity, activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Using an in vivo model xenografting with PC-9/wt and PC-9/gefB4 cells, oral administration of gefitinib (50 mg/kg) completely inhibited the tumor growth of PC-9/wt but not PC-9/gefB4cells. Combination of CQ (75 mg/kg, i.p.) and gefitinib was more effective than gefitinib alone in reducing the tumor growth of PC-9/gefB4. Our data suggest that inhibition of autophagy may be a therapeutic strategy to overcome acquired resistance of gefitinib in EGFR mutation NSCLC patients. PMID:25807554

  18. Chloroquine enhances gefitinib cytotoxicity in gefitinib-resistant nonsmall cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mei-Chuan; Wu, Mei-Yi; Hwang, Ming-Hung; Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, Hui-Ju; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), including gefitinib, are effective for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutations. However, these patients eventually develop resistance to EGFR-TKI. The goal of the present study was to investigate the involvement of autophagy in gefitinib resistance. We developed gefitinib-resistant cells (PC-9/gef) from PC-9 cells (containing exon 19 deletion EGFR) after long-term exposure in gefitinib. PC-9/gef cells (B4 and E3) were 200-fold more resistant to gefitinib than PC-9/wt cells. Compared with PC-9/wt cells, both PC-9/gefB4 and PC-9/gefE3 cells demonstrated higher basal LC3-II levels which were inhibited by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor) and potentiated by chloroquine (CQ, an inhibitor of autophagolysosomes formation), indicating elevated autophagy in PC-9/gef cells. 3-MA and CQ concentration-dependently inhibited cell survival of both PC-9wt and PC-9/gef cells, suggesting that autophagy may be pro-survival. Furthermore, gefitinib increased LC3-II levels and autolysosome formation in both PC-9/wt cells and PC-9/gef cells. In PC-9/wt cells, CQ potentiated the cytotoxicity by low gefitinib (3 nM). Moreover, CQ overcame the acquired gefitinib resistance in PC-9/gef cells by enhancing gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity, activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Using an in vivo model xenografting with PC-9/wt and PC-9/gefB4 cells, oral administration of gefitinib (50 mg/kg) completely inhibited the tumor growth of PC-9/wt but not PC-9/gefB4cells. Combination of CQ (75 mg/kg, i.p.) and gefitinib was more effective than gefitinib alone in reducing the tumor growth of PC-9/gefB4. Our data suggest that inhibition of autophagy may be a therapeutic strategy to overcome acquired resistance of gefitinib in EGFR mutation NSCLC patients. PMID:25807554

  19. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, David C.; Craig, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  20. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance.

    PubMed

    Warhurst, David C; Craig, John C; Raheem, K Saki

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  1. Detection of chloroquine and artemisinin resistance molecular markers in Plasmodium falciparum: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, S; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Mandal, Jharna; Hamide, Abdoul; Bhat, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Emergence of chloroquine (CQ) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum has increased the morbidity and mortality of falciparum malaria worldwide. Artemisinin-based combination therapies are now recommended by the World Health Organization as the first line treatment for falciparum malaria. Numerous molecular markers have been implicated in the CQ and artemisinin resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 26 confirmed cases of falciparum malaria (by giemsa stained thick and thin smear, quantitative buffy coat, immunochromatographic test, or polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) were included in the study. About 5 ml of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood sample was collected and stored at −20°C till use. Plasmodium DNA was extracted using QIAamp whole blood DNA extraction kit. PCR was done to amplify pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfserca, and pfmrp1 genes and the amplicons obtained were sequenced by Macrogen, Inc., Korea. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was done using Bio-Edit Sequence Alignment Editor. Results: Out of the four genes targeted, we noted a SNP in the pfcrt gene alone. This SNP (G > T) was noted in the 658th position of the gene, which was seen in 13 patients. The pfmdr1 and pfserca genes were present in 9 and 14 patients respectively. But we could not find any SNPs in these genes. This SNP in pfcrt gene was not significantly associated with any adverse outcome and neither altered disease progression. Conclusion: Presence of a single SNP may not be associated with any adverse clinical outcome. As the sample size was small, we may have not been able to detect any other known or unknown polymorphisms. PMID:26998436

  2. Plasmodium vivax drug resistance genes; Pvmdr1 and Pvcrt-o polymorphisms in relation to chloroquine sensitivity from a malaria endemic area of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rungsihirunrat, Kanchana; Muhamad, Poonuch; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Kuesap, Jiraporn; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possible molecular markers of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium vivax isolates in Thailand. A total of 30 P. vivax isolates were collected from a malaria endemic area along the Thai-Myanmar border in Mae Sot district of Thailand. Dried blood spot samples were collected for analysis of Pvmdr1 and Pvcrt-o polymorphisms. Blood samples (100 μl) were collected by finger-prick for in vitro chloroquine susceptibility testing by schizont maturation inhibition assay. Based on the cut-off IC50 of 100 nM, 19 (63.3%) isolates were classified as chloroquine resistant P. vivax isolates. Seven non-synonymous mutations and 2 synonymous were identified in Pvmdr1 gene. Y976F and F1076L mutations were detected in 7 (23.3%) and 16 isolates (53.3%), respectively. Analysis of Pvcrt-o gene revealed that all isolates were wild-type. Our results suggest that chloroquine resistance gene is now spreading in this area. Monitoring of chloroquine resistant molecular markers provide a useful tool for future control of P. vivax malaria.

  3. Double mutation in the pfmdr1 gene is associated with emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Das, Sabyasachi; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Tripathy, Satyajit; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Mandal, Debasis; Das, Balaram; Hati, Amiya Kumar; Roy, Somenath

    2014-10-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries, including India. This study elucidates the cause of chloroquine treatment failure (for Plasmodium falciparum infection) before the introduction of artemisinin combination therapy. One hundred twenty-six patients were randomized to chloroquine treatment, and the therapeutic efficacy was monitored from days 1 to 28. An in vitro susceptibility test was performed with all isolates. Parasitic DNA was isolated, followed by PCR and restriction digestion of different codons of the pfcrt gene (codons 72 to 76) and the pfmdr1 gene (N86Y, Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y). Finally, sequencing was done to confirm the mutations. Forty-three (34.13%) early treatment failure cases and 16 (12.69%) late treatment failure cases were observed after chloroquine treatment. In vitro chloroquine resistance was found in 103 isolates (81.75%). Twenty-six (60.47%) early treatment failure cases and 6 (37.5%) late treatment failure cases were associated with the CVMNK-YYSNY allele (the underlined amino acids are those that were mutated). Moreover, the CVIEK-YYSNY allele was found in 8 early treatment failure (18.60%) and 2 late treatment failure (12.5%) cases. The presence of the wild-type pfcrt (CVMNK) and pfmdr1 (YYSNY) double mutant allele in chloroquine-nonresponsive cases was quite uncommon. In vivo chloroquine treatment failure and in vitro chloroquine resistance were strongly correlated with the CVMNK-YYSNY and CVIEK-YYSNY haplotypes (P < 0.01).

  4. Structural characteristics of chloroquine-bridged ferrocenophane analogues of ferroquine may obviate malaria drug-resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Salas, Paloma F; Herrmann, Christoph; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Nimphius, Corinna; Kenkel, Alexander; Chen, Jessie; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Patrick, Brian O; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2013-02-28

    Five compounds displaying an unprecedented binding mode of chloroquine to ferrocene through the bridging of the cyclopentadienyl rings were studied alongside their monosubstituted ferrocene analogues and organic fragments. The antiplasmodial activity was evaluated against strains of the malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum). While the chloroquine-bridged ferrocenyl derivatives were less active than their five monosubstituted ferrocenyl analogues, they retained activity in the drug-resistant strains. The biological and physical properties were correlated to antiplasmodial activity. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding was associated with increased antiplasmodial action, but it is not the determining factor. Instead, balance between lipophilicity and hydrophilicity had a greater influence. It was found that calculated partition coefficient (log P) values of 4.5-5.0 and topological polar surfaces area (tPSA) values of ∼26.0 Å(2) give the best balance. The particular conformation, compact size, and lipophilicity/hydrophilicity balance observed in the bridged compounds provide them with the structural characteristics needed to escape the mechanisms responsible for resistance.

  5. Importation of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum by Guatemalan peacekeepers returning from the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria elimination is being pursued in five of seven Central American countries. Military personnel returning from peacekeeping missions in sub-Saharan Africa could import chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, posing a threat to elimination and to the continued efficacy of first-line chloroquine (CQ) treatment in these countries. This report describes the importation of P. falciparum from among 150 Guatemalan army special forces and support staff who spent ten months on a United Nations’ peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2010. Methods Investigators reviewed patients’ medical charts and interviewed members of the contingent to identify malaria cases and risk factors for malaria acquisition. Clinical specimens were tested for malaria; isolated parasites were characterized molecularly for CQ resistance. Results Investigators identified 12 cases (8%) of laboratory-confirmed P. falciparum infection within the contingent; one case was from a soldier infected with a CQ-resistant pfcrt genotype resulting in his death. None of the contingent used an insecticide-treated bed net (ITN) or completely adhered to malaria chemoprophylaxis while in the DRC. Conclusion This report highlights the need to promote use of malaria prevention measures, in particular ITNs and chemoprophylaxis, among peacekeepers stationed in malaria-endemic areas. Countries attempting to eliminate malaria should consider appropriate methods to screen peacekeepers returning from endemic areas for malaria infections. Cases of malaria in travellers, immigrants and soldiers returning to Central America from countries with CQ-resistant malaria should be assumed to be carry resistant parasites and receive appropriate anti-malarial therapy to prevent severe disease and death. PMID:24060234

  6. Comparison of in vivo and in vitro tests of resistance in patients treated with chloroquine in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, P.; Basco, L. K.

    1999-01-01

    The usefulness of an isotopic in vitro assay in the field was evaluated by comparing its results with the therapeutic response determined by the simplified WHO in vivo test in symptomatic Cameroonian patients treated with chloroquine. Of the 117 enrolled patients, 102 (87%) completed the 14-day follow-up, and 95 isolates obtained from these patients (46 children, 49 adults) yielded an interpretable in vitro test. A total of 57 of 95 patients (60%; 28 children and 29 adults) had an adequate clinical response with negative smears (n = 46) or with an asymptomatic parasitaemia (n = 11) on day 7 and/or day 14. The geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentration of the isolates obtained from these patients was 63.3 nmol/l. Late and early treatment failure was observed in 29 (30.5%) and 9 (9.5%) patients, respectively. The geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentrations of the corresponding isolates were 173 nmol/l and 302 nmol/l. Among the patients responding with late and early treatment failure, five isolates and one isolate, respectively, yielded a discordant result (in vivo resistance and in vitro sensitivity). The sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the in vitro test to detect chloroquine-sensitive cases was 67%, 84% and 86%, respectively. There was moderate concordance between the in vitro and in vivo tests (kappa value = 0.48). The in vitro assay agrees relatively well with the therapeutic response and excludes several host factors that influence the results of the in vivo test. However, in view of some discordant results, the in vitro test cannot substitute for in vivo data on therapeutic efficacy. The only reliable definition of "resistance" in malaria parasites is based on clinical and parasitological response in symptomatic patients, and the in vivo test provides the standard method to determine drug sensitivity or resistance as well as to guide national drug policies. PMID:10063659

  7. In Vivo and In Vitro Antimalarial Properties of Azithromycin-Chloroquine Combinations That Include the Resistance Reversal Agent Amlodipine ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marcus R.; Henrich, Philipp P.; Sidhu, Amar bir Singh; Johnson, David; Hardink, Joel; Van Deusen, Jeffrey; Lin, Jian; Gore, Katrina; O'Brien, Connor; Wele, Mamadou; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Chandra, Richa; Fidock, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of emerging Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies, documented in western Cambodia, underscores the continuing need to identify new antimalarial combinations. Given recent reports of the resurgence of chloroquine-sensitive P. falciparum parasites in Malawi, after the enforced and prolonged withdrawal of this drug, and indications of a possible synergistic interaction with the macrolide azithromycin, we sought to further characterize chloroquine-azithromycin combinations for their in vitro and in vivo antimalarial properties. In vitro 96-h susceptibility testing of chloroquine-azithromycin combinations showed mostly additive interactions against freshly cultured P. falciparum field isolates obtained from Mali. Some evidence of synergy, however, was apparent at the fractional 90% inhibitory concentration level. Additional in vitro testing highlighted the resistance reversal properties of amlodipine for both chloroquine and quinine. In vivo experiments, using the Peters 4-day suppressive test in a P. yoelii mouse model, revealed up to 99.9% suppression of parasitemia following treatment with chloroquine-azithromycin plus the R enantiomer of amlodipine. This enantiomer was chosen because it does not manifest the cardiac toxicities observed with the racemic mixture. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses in this rodent model and subsequent extrapolation to a 65-kg adult led to the estimation that 1.8 g daily of R-amlodipine would be required to achieve similar efficacy in humans, for whom this is likely an unsafe dose. While these data discount amlodipine as an additional partner for chloroquine-based combination therapy, our studies continue to support azithromycin as a safe and effective addition to antimalarial combination therapies. PMID:21464242

  8. The Association of K76T Mutation in Pfcrt Gene and Chloroquine Treatment Failure in Uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in a Cohort of Nigerian Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, R. A.; Hassan, S. W.; Ladan, M. J.; Nma Jiya, M.; Abubakar, M. K.; Nata`Ala, U.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of K76T mutation in Pfcrt gene and chloroquine treatment failure following reports that the efficacy of chloroquine in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Africa is seriously compromised by high levels of drug resistance. The occurrence of mutation on codon 76 of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) gene has been associated with development of resistance to chloroquine. We investigated the association of K76T mutation in Pfcrt gene in malaria-infected blood samples from a cohort of Nigerian children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria treated with chloroquine and its association with clinical (in vivo) resistance. The Pfcrt T76 allele was very significantly associated with resistance to chloroquine (Fischer exact test: p = 0.0001). We conclude that K76T mutation in Pfcrt gene is significantly associated with chloroquine resistance and that it could be used as a population marker for chloroquine resistance in this part of the country

  9. [Mutant alleles associated to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethanime resistance in Plasmodium falciparum of the Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia borders].

    PubMed

    Arróspide, Nancy; Hijar-Guerra, Gisely; de Mora, Doménica; Diaz-Cortéz, César Eduardo; Veloz-Perez, Raúl; Gutierrez, Sonia; Cabezas-Sánchez, César

    2014-04-01

    The frequency of mutations in pfCRT and DHFR/DHPS genes of Plasmodium falciparum associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was evaluated in 83 strains from the districts of Esmeralda and Machala, located on the borders of Ecuador-Peru and Ecuador-Colombia in 2002. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), conventional and its variants, was used. Mutations in the pfCRT gene were found in more than 90% of the samples from Esmeralda and Machala. For the DHFR gene, 90% of the strains were mutant samples from Esmeralda, 3 were double mutations and 1 was a triple mutation. In Machala, 25% were simple mutant forms and 75% mixed mutant forms (wild forms/mutant). In conclusion, resistance to chloroquine has been fixed in strains carrying K76T pfCRT mutation, whereas genetic imprinting for resistance to pyrimethamine is evolving, particularly in the district of Esmeralda.

  10. Monitoring of malaria parasite resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in the Solomon Islands by DNA microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little information is available on resistance to anti-malarial drugs in the Solomon Islands (SI). The analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in drug resistance associated parasite genes is a potential alternative to classical time- and resource-consuming in vivo studies to monitor drug resistance. Mutations in pfmdr1 and pfcrt were shown to indicate chloroquine (CQ) resistance, mutations in pfdhfr and pfdhps indicate sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance, and mutations in pfATPase6 indicate resistance to artemisinin derivatives. Methods The relationship between the rate of treatment failure among 25 symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum-infected patients presenting at the clinic and the pattern of resistance-associated SNPs in P. falciparum infecting 76 asymptomatic individuals from the surrounding population was investigated. The study was conducted in the SI in 2004. Patients presenting at a local clinic with microscopically confirmed P. falciparum malaria were recruited and treated with CQ+SP. Rates of treatment failure were estimated during a 28-day follow-up period. In parallel, a DNA microarray technology was used to analyse mutations associated with CQ, SP, and artemisinin derivative resistance among samples from the asymptomatic community. Mutation and haplotype frequencies were determined, as well as the multiplicity of infection. Results The in vivo study showed an efficacy of 88% for CQ+SP to treat P. falciparum infections. DNA microarray analyses indicated a low diversity in the parasite population with one major haplotype present in 98.7% of the cases. It was composed of fixed mutations at position 86 in pfmdr1, positions 72, 75, 76, 220, 326 and 356 in pfcrt, and positions 59 and 108 in pfdhfr. No mutation was observed in pfdhps or in pfATPase6. The mean multiplicity of infection was 1.39. Conclusion This work provides the first insight into drug resistance markers of P. falciparum in the SI. The obtained results indicated the

  11. Multiple Origins of Mutations in the mdr1 Gene—A Putative Marker of Chloroquine Resistance in P. vivax

    PubMed Central

    Schousboe, Mette L.; Ranjitkar, Samir; Rajakaruna, Rupika S.; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H.; Morales, Francisco; Pearce, Richard; Ord, Rosalyn; Leslie, Toby; Rowland, Mark; Gadalla, Nahla B.; Konradsen, Flemming; Bygbjerg, Ib C.; Roper, Cally; Alifrangis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Chloroquine combined with primaquine has been the recommended antimalarial treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria infections for six decades but the efficacy of this treatment regimen is threatened by chloroquine resistance (CQR). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the multidrug resistance gene, Pvmdr1 are putative determinants of CQR but the extent of their emergence at population level remains to be explored. Objective In this study we describe the prevalence of SNPs in the Pvmdr1 among samples collected in seven P. vivax endemic countries and we looked for molecular evidence of drug selection by characterising polymorphism at microsatellite (MS) loci flanking the Pvmdr1 gene. Methods We examined the prevalence of SNPs in the Pvmdr1 gene among 267 samples collected from Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Sudan, São Tomé and Ecuador. We measured and diversity in four microsatellite (MS) markers flanking the Pvmdr1 gene to look evidence of selection on mutant alleles. Results SNP polymorphism in the Pvmdr1 gene was largely confined to codons T958M, Y976F and F1076L. Only 2.4% of samples were wildtype at all three codons (TYF, n = 5), 13.3% (n = 28) of the samples were single mutant MYF, 63.0% of samples (n = 133) were double mutant MYL, and 21.3% (n = 45) were triple mutant MFL. Clear geographic differences in the prevalence of these Pvmdr mutation combinations were observed. Significant linkage disequilibrium (LD) between Pvmdr1 and MS alleles was found in populations sampled in Ecuador, Nepal and Sri Lanka, while significant LD between Pvmdr1 and the combined 4 MS locus haplotype was only seen in Ecuador and Sri Lanka. When combining the 5 loci, high level diversity, measured as expected heterozygosity (He), was seen in the complete sample set (He = 0.99), while He estimates for individual loci ranged from 0.00–0.93. Although Pvmdr1 haplotypes were not consistently associated with specific flanking MS alleles, there was significant

  12. Antiplasmodial properties of kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside isolated from the leaves of Schima wallichii against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    BARLIANA, MELISA I.; SURADJI, EKA W.; ABDULAH, RIZKY; DIANTINI, AJENG; HATABU, TOSHIMITSU; NAKAJIMA-SHIMADA, JUNKO; SUBARNAS, ANAS; KOYAMA, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    Previous intervention studies have shown that the most effective agents used in the treatment of malaria were isolated from natural sources. Plants consumed by non-human primates serve as potential drug sources for human disease management due to the similarities in anatomy, physiology and disease characteristics. The present study investigated the antiplasmodial properties of the primate-consumed plant, Schima wallichii (S. wallichii) Korth. (family Theaceae), which has already been reported to have several biological activities. The ethanol extract of S. wallichii was fractionated based on polarity using n-hexane, ethyl acetate and water. The antiplasmodial activity was tested in vitro against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) at 100 μg/ml for 72 h. The major compound of the most active ethyl acetate fraction was subsequently isolated using column chromatography and identified by nuclear magnetic resonance. The characterized compound was also tested against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum in culture to evaluate its antiplasmodial activity. The ethanol extract of S. wallichii at 100 μg/ml exhibited a significant parasite shrinkage after 24 h of treatment. The ethyl acetate fraction at 100 μg/ml was the most active fraction against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum. Based on the structural characterization, the major compound isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction was kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside, which showed promising antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum with an IC50 of 106 μM after 24 h of treatment. The present study has provided a basis for the further investigation of kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside as an active compound for potential antimalarial therapeutics. PMID:24944812

  13. Antiplasmodial activity of certain medicinal plants against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium berghei infected white albino BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, C; Begam, M; Kumar, Dharmendra; Baruah, Indra; Gogoi, H K; Srivastava, R B; Veer, Vijay

    2014-06-01

    In the present study of antimalarial efficacy, aqueous extracts of leaves and unripe fruits of Psidium guajava, leaves of Ocimum sanctum and leaves of Murraya koenigii are evaluated against Plasmodium berghei (chloroquine resistant NK65 strain) infected white albino BALB/c mice. A 7 days oral administration was adopted with different dosage viz., 350 mg, 750 mg and 1,000 mg/kg body weight as treatment schedule along with parasite (Group I) and drug control with Chloroquine, 50 mg/kg body weight (Group II). All the parts were extracted based on the decoction method, which is commonly seen among the villagers/tribes as their usual method of preparation of decoction for most of the ailments. The antimalarial activities were evaluated from the giemsa stained blood smears collected from different treated groups of mice used in this experiment. The antiplasmodial effect that is percent parasitaemia and percent suppression (values in parenthesis) showed by the treated groups of mice at 350 mg/kg b. wt. by the aqueous extracts of P. guajava leaves (Group III) was 19.8 ± 1.22 (73.7 %), P. guajava unripe fruits (Group IV) was 52.7 ± 2.19 (30.0 %), leaves of O. sanctum (Group V) was 64.0 ± 0.73 (15.1 %) and leaves of M. koenigii (Group VI) was 28.9 ± 0.81 (61.6 %) whereas at 750 mg/kg b. wt., it all showed 10.3 ± 0.7 (80.2 %), 26.3 ± 0.52 (65.1 %), 42.0 ± 0.47 (44.2 %) and 14.9 ± 0.46 (71.5 %) whereas at 1,000 mg/kg b. wt. dose, it all showed 9.2 ± 0.39 (85.8 %), 25.6 ± 0.40 (62.0 %), 41.8 ± 0.29 (35.5 %) and 14.0 ± 0.42 (76.9 %) respectively.

  14. Antiplasmodial activity of certain medicinal plants against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium berghei infected white albino BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, C; Begam, M; Kumar, Dharmendra; Baruah, Indra; Gogoi, H K; Srivastava, R B; Veer, Vijay

    2014-06-01

    In the present study of antimalarial efficacy, aqueous extracts of leaves and unripe fruits of Psidium guajava, leaves of Ocimum sanctum and leaves of Murraya koenigii are evaluated against Plasmodium berghei (chloroquine resistant NK65 strain) infected white albino BALB/c mice. A 7 days oral administration was adopted with different dosage viz., 350 mg, 750 mg and 1,000 mg/kg body weight as treatment schedule along with parasite (Group I) and drug control with Chloroquine, 50 mg/kg body weight (Group II). All the parts were extracted based on the decoction method, which is commonly seen among the villagers/tribes as their usual method of preparation of decoction for most of the ailments. The antimalarial activities were evaluated from the giemsa stained blood smears collected from different treated groups of mice used in this experiment. The antiplasmodial effect that is percent parasitaemia and percent suppression (values in parenthesis) showed by the treated groups of mice at 350 mg/kg b. wt. by the aqueous extracts of P. guajava leaves (Group III) was 19.8 ± 1.22 (73.7 %), P. guajava unripe fruits (Group IV) was 52.7 ± 2.19 (30.0 %), leaves of O. sanctum (Group V) was 64.0 ± 0.73 (15.1 %) and leaves of M. koenigii (Group VI) was 28.9 ± 0.81 (61.6 %) whereas at 750 mg/kg b. wt., it all showed 10.3 ± 0.7 (80.2 %), 26.3 ± 0.52 (65.1 %), 42.0 ± 0.47 (44.2 %) and 14.9 ± 0.46 (71.5 %) whereas at 1,000 mg/kg b. wt. dose, it all showed 9.2 ± 0.39 (85.8 %), 25.6 ± 0.40 (62.0 %), 41.8 ± 0.29 (35.5 %) and 14.0 ± 0.42 (76.9 %) respectively. PMID:24808642

  15. Anti-malarial Drugs Primaquine and Chloroquine Have Different Sensitization Effects with Anti-mitotic Drugs in Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Ju-Hwa; Woo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, Hyung Sik; Yoon, Sungpil

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that would increase the sensitivity of drug-resistant cancer cells. Previously, two anti-malarial drugs, chloroquine (CHL) and primaquine (PRI), showed different sensitization effects for vinblastine (VIB)-resistant cancer cells. Herein, we tested co-treatment of cells with CHL or PRI and other microtubule-targeting cancer drugs, namely, vinorelbine (VIO), paclitaxel (PAC), docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VIC), or halaven (HAL). We found that PRI sensitized P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing drug-resistant KBV20C cells to all six anti-mitotic drugs to a similar extent. CHL had a similar sensitization effect only for co-treatment with PAC, DOC, VIC, and HAL, while the sensitization effect was less marked for co-treatment with VIB or VIO. FACS analysis and western blot analysis revealed that G2arrest and apoptosis showed only a slight increase on co-treatment with VIB or VIO and CHL. We also found that phospho-histone H3 and pRb were markedly increased only by PRI-VIB co-treatment, but not by CHL-VIB co-treatment. This suggests that reduction in the expression of these proteins correlates with decreased G2arrest in CHL-VIB co-treatment. We further compared the effect of another anti-malarial drug, mefloquine (MEF), in combination with the six anti-mitotic drugs. We found that MEF and PRI had similar sensitization effects in co-treatment with these anti-mitotic drugs. PRI and MEF had generally similar sensitization effects in co-treatment with anti-mitotic drugs, suggesting that they do not have any preferred anti-mitotic drug partner in co-treatment. This indicates that only CHL shows specificity in co-treatment with anti-mitotic drugs in resistant cancer cells. Our results may contribute to the choice of anti-mitotic drugs to be used in co-treatment of resistant cancer cells with the anti-malarial drugs, CHL, PRI, and MEF. PMID:27069141

  16. Antiplasmodial activity-aided isolation and identification of quercetin-4'-methyl ether in Chromolaena odorata leaf fraction with high activity against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ezenyi, I C; Salawu, O A; Kulkarni, R; Emeje, M

    2014-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antiplasmodial activity of Chromolaena odorata leaf extract and gradient fractions through in vivo and in vitro tests, aimed at identifying its antiplasmodial constituents. Sub-fractions obtained from the most active gradient fraction were further tested for cytotoxicity against THP-1 cells, chloroquine-sensitive (HB3) and chloroquine-resistant (FCM29) Plasmodium falciparum. Our results showed the dichloromethane gradient fraction was most effective, significantly (P < 0.05) suppressing infection by 99.46% at 100 mg/kg body weight. Amongst its 13 sub-fractions (DF1-DF13), DF11 was highly active, with IC50 of 4.8 and 6.74 μg/ml against P. falciparum HB3 and FCM29, respectively. Cytotoxicity of DF11 was estimated to be above 50 μg/ml, and its separation by column chromatography yielded a flavonoid which was characterized as 3, 5, 7, 3' tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone from its spectroscopic data. It significantly suppressed infection (65.43-81.48%) in mice at 2.5-5 mg/kg doses and compared favourably with the effects of chloroquine and artemisinin. It may therefore serve as a useful phytochemical and antiplasmodial activity marker of C. odorata leaves, which exhibit potential for development as medicine against malaria.

  17. The anti-malarial chloroquine overcomes Primary resistance and restores sensitivity to Trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy may control the de novo refractoriness of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). Tumor cells originally obtained from a patient who rapidly progressed on trastuzumab ab initio display increased cellular levels of the LC3-II protein—a finding that correlates with increased numbers of autophagosomes—and decreased levels of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1, a protein selectively degraded by autophagy. Trastuzumab-refractory cells are in a state of “autophagy addiction” because genetic ablation of autophagy-specific genes (ATG8, ATG5, ATG12) notably reduces intrinsic refractoriness to trastuzumab. When the anti-malarial lysosomotropic drug chloroquine impedes autophagic resolution of the accumulation of autophagolysosomes formed in the presence of trastuzumab, cells commit to die by apoptosis. Accordingly, combination treatment with trastuzumab and chloroquine radically suppresses tumor growth by > 90% in a tumor xenograft completely refractory to trastuzumab. Adding chloroquine to trastuzumab-based regimens may therefore improve outcomes among women with autophagy-addicted HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23965851

  18. The anti-malarial chloroquine overcomes primary resistance and restores sensitivity to trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy may control the de novo refractoriness of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). Tumor cells originally obtained from a patient who rapidly progressed on trastuzumab ab initio display increased cellular levels of the LC3-II protein--a finding that correlates with increased numbers of autophagosomes--and decreased levels of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1, a protein selectively degraded by autophagy. Trastuzumab-refractory cells are in a state of "autophagy addiction" because genetic ablation of autophagy-specific genes (ATG8, ATG5, ATG12) notably reduces intrinsic refractoriness to trastuzumab. When the anti-malarial lysosomotropic drug chloroquine impedes autophagic resolution of the accumulation of autophagolysosomes formed in the presence of trastuzumab, cells commit to die by apoptosis. Accordingly, combination treatment with trastuzumab and chloroquine radically suppresses tumor growth by > 90% in a tumor xenograft completely refractory to trastuzumab. Adding chloroquine to trastuzumab-based regimens may therefore improve outcomes among women with autophagy-addicted HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23965851

  19. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  20. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  1. Therapeutic response of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in southern Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, A; Siswantoro, H; Kenangalem, E; Wuwung, M; Brockman, A; Edstein, M D; Laihad, F; Ebsworth, E P; Anstey, N M; Tjitra, E; Price, R N

    2007-04-01

    To determine the level of antimalarial drug resistance in southern Papua, Indonesia, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (CQ+SP) for Plasmodium falciparum infections as well as CQ monotherapy for P. vivax infections. Patients with P. falciparum failing therapy were re-treated with unsupervised quinine+/-doxycycline therapy and those with P. vivax with either unsupervised quinine+/-doxycycline or amodiaquine. In total, 143 patients were enrolled in the study (103 treated with CQ+SP and 40 with CQ). Early treatment failures occurred in four patients (4%) with P. falciparum and six patients (15%) with P. vivax. The failure rate by Day 28 for P. vivax was 65% (95% CI 49-81). After PCR correction for re-infections, the Day 42 recrudescence rate for P. falciparum infections was 48% (95% CI 31-65). Re-treatment with unsupervised quinine+/-doxycycline resulted in further recurrence of malaria in 48% (95% CI 31-65) of P. falciparum infections and 70% (95% CI 37-100) of P. vivax infections. Eleven patients with recurrent P. vivax were re-treated with amodiaquine; there were no early or late treatment failures. In southern Papua, a high prevalence of drug resistance of P. falciparum and P. vivax exists both to first- and second-line therapies. Preliminary data indicate that amodiaquine retains superior efficacy compared with CQ for CQ-resistant P. vivax.

  2. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya.

  3. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  4. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  5. Resistance of colon cancer to 5-fluorouracil may be overcome by combination with chloroquine, an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Tsuno, Nelson H; Sunami, Eiji; Kawai, Kazushige; Hongo, Kumiko; Hiyoshi, Masaya; Kaneko, Manabu; Murono, Koji; Tada, Noriko; Nirei, Takako; Takahashi, Koki; Kitayama, Joji

    2012-08-01

    Autophagy is a complex of adaptive cellular response that enhances cancer cell survival in the face of cellular stresses such as chemotherapy. Recently, chloroquine diphosphate (CQ), a widely used antimalarial drug, has been studied as a potential inhibitor of autophagy. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CQ in potentiating the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice for the treatment of colorectal cancer, in an animal model of colon cancer. The mouse colon cancer cell line colon26 was used. For the in-vivo study, colon26 cells were injected subcutaneously into BALB/c mice, which were treated with saline as a control, CQ (50 mg/kg/day), 5-FU (30 mg/kg/day), or the combination therapy (CQ plus 5-FU). The tumor volume ratio and body weight were monitored. After the sacrifice, tumor tissue protein extracts and tumor sections were prepared and subjected to immunoblotting for the analysis of autophagy-related and apoptosis-related proteins, and the terminal transferase uridyl end labeling assay. The combination of CQ resulted in the inhibition of 5-FU-induced autophagy and a significant enhancement in the 5-FU-induced inhibition of tumor growth. Furthermore, the combination treatment of CQ and 5-FU resulted in a significant increase in the ratio of apoptotic cells compared with other treatments. The expression levels of the proapoptotic proteins, namely Bad and Bax, were increased by the CQ treatment in the protein extracts from tumors. Our findings suggest that the combination therapy of CQ and 5-FU should be considered as an effective strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22561420

  6. Effects of long-term resistance exercise training on autophagy in rat skeletal muscle of chloroquine-induced sporadic inclusion body myositis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Insu; Lee, Youngil; Cosio-Lima, Ludmila M.; Cho, Joon-Yong; Yeom, Dong-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether resistance exercise training restores impaired autophagy functions caused by Chloroquine (CQ)-induced Sporadic Inclusion Body Myositis (sIBM) in rat skeletal muscle. Methods Male wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups: Sham (n = 6), CQ (n = 6), and CQ + Exercise (CE, n = 6). To create a rat model of sIBM, rats in the CQ and CE group were intraperitoneally injected with CQ 5 days a week for 16 weeks. Rats in the CE group performed resistance exercise training 3 times a week for 8 weeks in conjunction with CQ starting from week 9 to week 16. During the training period, maximal carrying load, body weight, muscle weight, and relative muscle weight were measured. Autophagy responses were examined by measuring specific markers. Results While maximal carrying capacity for resistance exercise training was dramatically increased in the CE group, no significant changes occurred in the skeletal muscle weight as well as in the relative muscle weight of CE compared to the other groups. CQ treatment caused significant increases in the levels of Beclin-1 and p62, and decreases in the levels of LAMP-2 proteins. Interestingly, no significant differences in the LC3-II/I ratio or the LC3-II protein levels were observed. Although CQ-treatment groups suppressed the levels of the potent autophagy inducer, BNIP3, p62 levels were decreased in only the CE group. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that sIBM induced by CQ treatment results in muscle degeneration via impaired autophagy and that resistance exercise training improves movable loading activity. Finally, regular exercise training may provide protection against sIBM by enhancing the autophagy flux through p62 protein. PMID:26525066

  7. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine overcomes the innate resistance to erlotinib of non-small cell lung cancer cells with wild-type EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yiyu; Ling, Yi-He; Sironi, Juan; Schwartz, Edward L.; Perez-Soler, Roman; Piperdi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The EGFR inhibitor erlotinib is much less effective in NSCLC tumors with wild-type EGFR than in tumors with activating EGFR mutations. Autophagy is a tightly regulated lysosomal self-digestion process that may alternatively promote cell survival or type II cell death. This study assessed the role of autophagy in erlotinib-mediated cytotoxicity. Methods We used wild-type EGFR erlotinib-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cell lines to determine if inhibiting autophagy by a therapeutic agent potentiated the antitumor activity of erlotinib in vitro and in vivo. Results Erlotinib at a clinically relevant concentration (2 μM) induced autophagy in NSCLC cells with wild type EGFR, and the degree of induction was greater in resistant than in sensitive cells, suggesting that autophagy is cytoprotective. This was confirmed by knockdown of the autophagy-related gene Atg-5 and by using the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ), both of which increased the cytotoxicity of erlotinib. The synergistic activity of CQ was not due to the potentiation of erlotinib’s effects on autophagy, cell cycle arrest, inhibition of EGF receptor, or the inhibition of signaling downstream of the EGFR. Rather CQ markedly activated apoptosis in the cells. The ability of CQ to potentiate the antitumor activity of erlotinib was also seen in mice bearing NSCLC tumor xenografts. Conclusions The ability to adapt to anti-EGFR therapy by triggering autophagy may be a key determinant of resistance to erlotinib in wild-type EGFR NSCLC. Inhibition of autophagy by CQ represents a novel strategy to broaden the spectrum of erlotinib efficacy in wild-type EGFR NSCLC tumors. PMID:23575415

  8. Chloroquine treatment of severe malaria in children. Pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and new dosage recommendations.

    PubMed

    White, N J; Miller, K D; Churchill, F C; Berry, C; Brown, J; Williams, S B; Greenwood, B M

    1988-12-01

    Although empirical regimens of parenteral chloroquine have been used extensively to treat severe malaria for 40 years, recent recommendations state that parenteral chloroquine should no longer be used because of potential toxicity. We studied prospectively the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of seven chloroquine regimens in 58 Gambian children with severe chloroquine-sensitive falciparum malaria. In all regimens the total cumulative dose was 25 mg of chloroquine base per kilogram of body weight. Chloroquine was rapidly absorbed after either intramuscular or subcutaneous administration (5 mg of base per kilogram every 12 hours), producing high peak blood concentrations but transient hypotension in 5 of 18 patients (28 percent). Intermittent intravenous infusion (5 mg of base per kilogram over 4 hours, repeated every 12 hours) also produced wide fluctuations in chloroquine levels, suggesting incomplete distribution from a small central compartment. Continuous infusion (0.83 mg of base per kilogram per hour for 30 hours) and smaller, more frequent intramuscular or subcutaneous injections of chloroquine (3.5 mg of base per kilogram every 6 hours) produced smoother blood-concentration profiles with lower early peak levels and no adverse cardiovascular or neurologic effects. Chloroquine given by nasogastric tube (initial dose, 10 mg of base per kilogram) was absorbed well, even in comatose children. We conclude that simple alterations in dosage and frequency of administration can give parenteral chloroquine an acceptable therapeutic ratio and reinstate it as the treatment of choice for severe malaria in areas where chloroquine resistance is not a major problem.

  9. [Duodenal ulcers caused by chloroquine-proguanil association].

    PubMed

    Roux, X; Imbert, P; Rivière, F; Méchaï, F; Rapp, C

    2010-12-01

    Chloroquine-proguanil association is recommended for prophylaxis against falciparum malaria in countries with a low prevalence of chloroquine resistance. It is usually well tolerated with mild side effects consisting mainly of transient digestive discomfort and buccal manifestations (mouth sores or ulcers). The purpose of this report is to describe a case of duodenal ulcers presenting as epigastric pain with 10-kg weight-loss in a 32-year-old man taking chloroquine-proguanil for malaria prophylaxis during a stay in Haiti. No other causes of duodenal ulcers or weight-loss were found. Chloroquine-proguanil prophylaxis was discontinued and replaced by omeprazole for four weeks. Symptoms improved quickly and full recovery was observed within one month. To our knowledge, the occurrence of duodenal ulcers under chloroquine-proguanil association is quite rare, but possibly severe. Upper digestive endoscopy should be performed if a patient under chloroquine-proguanil develops abdominal pain especially in association with weight-loss. If endoscopy reveals duodenal ulcers, chloroquine-proguanil should be discontinued and replaced by another prophylactic regimen.

  10. Efficacy of Artesunate-mefloquine for Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax Malaria in Malaysia: An Open-label, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, Matthew J.; William, Timothy; Menon, Jayaram; Barber, Bridget E.; Wilkes, Christopher S.; Rajahram, Giri S.; Edstein, Michael D.; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is increasingly reported throughout southeast Asia. The efficacy of CQ and alternative artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) for vivax malaria in Malaysia is unknown. Methods. A randomized, controlled trial of CQ vs artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) for uncomplicated vivax malaria was conducted in 3 district hospitals in Sabah, Malaysia. Primaquine was administered on day 28. The primary outcome was the cumulative risk of treatment failure by day 28 by Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results. From 2012 to 2014, 103 adults and children were enrolled. Treatment failure by day 28 was 61.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 46.8–75.6) after CQ and 0% (95% CI, 0–.08) following AS-MQ (P < .001), of which 8.2% (95% CI, 2.5–9.6) were early treatment failures. All patients with treatment failure had therapeutic plasma CQ concentrations at day 7. Compared with CQ, AS-MQ was associated with faster parasite clearance (normalized clearance slope, 0.311 vs 0.127; P < .001) and fever clearance (mean, 19.0 vs 37.7 hours; P = .001) and with lower risk of anemia at day 28 (odds ratio = 3.7; 95% CI, 1.5–9.3; P = .005). Gametocytes were present at day 28 in 23.8% (10/42) of patients following CQ vs none with AS-MQ (P < .001). AS-MQ resulted in lower bed occupancy: 4037 vs 6510 days/1000 patients (incidence rate ratio 0.62; 95% CI, .60–.65; P < .001). One patient developed severe anemia not regarded as related to their AS-MQ treatment. Conclusions. High-grade CQ-resistant P. vivax is prevalent in eastern Malaysia. AS-MQ is an efficacious ACT for all malaria species. Wider CQ-efficacy surveillance is needed in vivax-endemic regions with earlier replacement with ACT when treatment failure is detected. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01708876. PMID:27107287

  11. Experimental chloroquine retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, M; Ohkuma, M; Tsukahara, I

    1986-01-01

    Chloroquine retinopathy was produced experimentally in the eye of the albino corydoras (one of the tropical fish) by daily administration of chloroquine (0.1 mg per os). The enucleated eyes were examined from the 14th day to 3 months after the beginning of drug administration under light and electron microscopy. The first change of retina was the appearance of membraneous cytoplasmic body (MCB) in the cytoplasm of ganglion, amacrine, bipolar and horizontal cells. MCB might be degenerated lysosome. They showed lamellar figures or crystalline lattice-like structures. Secondarily, these MCB appeared in the inner segments of photoreceptor cells. The outer segments of rod cells disappeared, and then those of cone cells. Although photoreceptor cells were diminished in number in advanced degeneration, the cells of inner nuclear layer and ganglion cells were maintained in number. The presence of MCB dose not mean death of cells. The retinal pigment epithelial cells contained MCB in its cytoplasm only in severe degenerative cases, and did not show other remarkable changes. MCB also appeared in the cytoplasm of pericytes of retinal vessels. Chloroquine is considered to damage directly photoreceptor cells most severely. PMID:3018650

  12. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p<0.05) in presence of 250μg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole. PMID:23602464

  13. Role of copper transporters in platinum resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Guancial, Elizabeth; Kim, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents are effective in the treatment of many solid malignancies. However, their efficacy is limited by toxicity and drug resistance. Reduced intracellular Pt accumulation has been consistently shown to correlate with resistance in tumors. Proteins involved in copper homeostasis have been identified as Pt transporters. In particular, copper transporter receptor 1 (CTR1), the major copper influx transporter, has been shown to play a significant role in Pt resistance. Clinical studies demonstrated that expression of CTR1 correlated with intratumoral Pt concentration and outcomes following Pt-based therapy. Other CTRs such as CTR2, ATP7A and ATP7B, may also play a role in Pt resistance. Recent clinical studies attempting to modulate CTR1 to overcome Pt resistance may provide novel strategies. This review discusses the role of CTR1 as a potential predictive biomarker of Pt sensitivity and a therapeutic target for overcoming Pt resistance. PMID:26862494

  14. Basis of antimalarial action: non-weak base effects of chloroquine on acid vesicle pH

    SciTech Connect

    Krogstad, D.J.; Schlesinger, P.H.

    1987-03-01

    Biologically active concentrations of chloroquine increase the pH of the parasite's acid vesicles within 3-5 min. This increase in pH results from two mechanisms, one of which is markedly reduced in chloroquine-resistant parasites. Because chloroquine is a weak base, it increases vesicle pH by that mechanism in chloroquine-susceptible and resistant parasites and mammalian cells (based on its two pKs and on the delta pH between the acid vesicle and the extracellular environment). In chloroquine-susceptible parasites, but not resistant parasites or mammalian cells, chloroquine increases the pH of acid vesicles 700- to 800-fold more than can be accounted for by its properties as a weak base. The increase in acid vesicle pH caused by these non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine in susceptible parasites suggests that chloroquine acts by interfering with acid vesicle functions in the parasite such as the endocytosis and proteolysis of hemoglobin, and the intracellular targeting of lysosomal enzymes. The non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine on parasite vesicle pH are also responsible for its safety because these chloroquine concentrations do not affect mammalian cells.

  15. Chloroquine Has a Cytotoxic Effect on Acanthamoeba Encystation through Modulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Kim, Hyun Ah; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Blocking the encystation process could potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and biocides. During encystation, autophagy is highly stimulated and required for proper encystation of Acanthamoeba. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy-inhibitory drug, was tested in A. castellanii. Chloroquine was able to selectively reduce cell survival during the encystation of A. castellanii. However, A. castellanii trophozoites and mature cysts were resistant to chloroquine. Chloroquine treatment led to an increase in the number and size of lysosomes in encysting cells. Moreover, chloroquine inhibited the degradation of long-lived proteins in the encysting cells. Decreased autophagic flux, indicated by an increased number of lysosomes and decreased degradation of long-lived proteins, may be the mechanism by which cell death is induced by chloroquine in encysting Acanthamoeba. These results suggest a potential novel therapeutic application of chloroquine as an anti-Acanthamoeba drug. Our findings also suggest that targeting autophagy could be a therapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:25114131

  16. Chloroquine has a cytotoxic effect on Acanthamoeba encystation through modulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Kim, Hyun Ah; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2014-10-01

    Encystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii is associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Blocking the encystation process could potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and biocides. During encystation, autophagy is highly stimulated and required for proper encystation of Acanthamoeba. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of chloroquine, a well-known autophagy-inhibitory drug, was tested in A. castellanii. Chloroquine was able to selectively reduce cell survival during the encystation of A. castellanii. However, A. castellanii trophozoites and mature cysts were resistant to chloroquine. Chloroquine treatment led to an increase in the number and size of lysosomes in encysting cells. Moreover, chloroquine inhibited the degradation of long-lived proteins in the encysting cells. Decreased autophagic flux, indicated by an increased number of lysosomes and decreased degradation of long-lived proteins, may be the mechanism by which cell death is induced by chloroquine in encysting Acanthamoeba. These results suggest a potential novel therapeutic application of chloroquine as an anti-Acanthamoeba drug. Our findings also suggest that targeting autophagy could be a therapeutic strategy against Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:25114131

  17. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  18. Magnetic microbead transport during resistive pulse sensing

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, Geoff R.; Fisk, Matthew G.; Eldridge, James

    2013-01-01

    Tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS) experiments have been used to quantitatively study the motion of 1 μm superparamagnetic beads in a variable magnetic field. Closed-form theory has been developed to interpret the experiments, incorporating six particle transport mechanisms which depend on particle position in and near a conical pore. For our experiments, calculations indicate that pressure-driven flow dominates electrophoresis and magnetism by a factor of ∼100 in the narrowest part of the pore, but that magnetic force should dominate further than ∼1 mm from the membrane. As expected, the observed resistive pulse rate falls as the magnet is moved closer to the pore, while the increase in pulse duration suggests that trajectories in the half space adjacent to the pore opening are important. Aggregation was not observed, consistent with the high hydrodynamic shear near the pore constriction and the high magnetization of aggregates. The theoretical approach is also used to calculate the relative importance of transport mechanisms over a range of geometries and experimental conditions extending well beyond our own experiments. TRPS is emerging as a versatile form of resistive pulse sensing, while magnetic beads are widely used in biotechnology and sensing applications. PMID:24396540

  19. Resistive Plate Chambers: electron transport and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjaković, D.; Petrović, Z. Lj; Dujko, S.

    2014-12-01

    We study the electron transport in gas mixtures used by Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in high energy physics experiments at CERN. Calculations are performed using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation. We identify the effects induced by non-conservative nature of electron attachment, including attachment heating of electrons and negative differential conductivity (NDC). NDC was observed only in the bulk component of drift velocity. Using our Monte Carlo technique, we calculate the spatially resolved transport properties in order to investigate the origin of these effects. We also present our microscopic approach to modeling of RPCs which is based on Monte Carlo method. Calculated results for a timing RPC show good agreement with an analytical model and experimental data. Different cross section sets for electron scattering in C2H2F4 are used for comparison and analysis.

  20. Time to use a dose of Chloroquine as an adjuvant to anti-cancer chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Steve

    2016-01-15

    Chloroquine, a drug used for over 80 years to treat and prevent malaria and, more recently, to treat autoimmune diseases, is very safe but has a plethora of dose-dependent effects. By increasing pH in acidic compartments it inhibits for example lysosomal enzymes. In the context of cancer, Chloroquine was found to have direct effects on different types of malignancies that could potentiate chemotherapies. For example, the anti-malaria drug may inhibit both the multidrug-resistance pump and autophagy (mechanisms that tumor cells may use to resist chemotherapies), intercalate in DNA and enhance the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in cells or solid cancer tissues. However, these activities were mostly demonstrated at high doses of Chloroquine (higher than 10mg/kg or 10mg/l i.e. ca. 31μM). Nevertheless, it was reported that daily uptake of clinically acceptable doses (less than 10mg/kg) of Chloroquine in addition to chemo-radio-therapy increases the survival of glioblastoma patients (Sotelo et al., 2006; Briceno et al., 2007). However, the optimal dose and schedule of this multi-active drug with respect to chemotherapy has never been experimentally determined. The present article reviews the several known direct and indirect effects of different doses of Chloroquine on cancer and how those effects may indicate that a fine tuning of the dose/schedule of Chloroquine administration versus chemotherapy may be critical to obtain an adjuvant effect of Chloroquine in anti-cancer treatments. We anticipate that the appropriate (time and dose) addition of Chloroquine to the standard of care may greatly and safely potentiate current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:26687632

  1. In vitro antimalarial activity and chloroquine potentiating action of two bisbenzylisoquinoline enantiomer alkaloids isolated from Strychnopsis thouarsii and Spirospermum penduliflorum.

    PubMed

    Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Rasoanaivo, P; Ramiaramanana, L; Milijaona, R; Rafatro, H; Verdier, F; Rakoto-Ratsimamanga, A; Le Bras, J

    1992-12-01

    The bisbenzylisoquinolines 7-O-demethyltetrandrine and limacine, respectively, isolated from Strychnopsis thouarsii Baill. and Spirospermum penduliflorum Thou. were evaluated for their intrinsic antimalarial activity in vitro and chloroquine potentiating action against the chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum FCM 29 originating from Cameroon. They both showed significant antiplasmodial potency in vitro with very similar IC50 values of respectively, 740 nM and 789 nM (IC50 = 214 nM for chloroquine used as standard drug), which demonstrated that the stereochemistry of the C-1 and C-1' configuration likely plays a role in the chloroquine potentiating effect of these drugs. If confirmed in vivo, these results may account for the traditional use of the two plants as antimalarials and adjuvant to chloroquine in Madagascan folklore remedies. PMID:1484894

  2. Piercing tool, Transportation Accident Resistant Container (TARC)

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, P.

    1994-08-01

    Transportation Accident Resistant Containers (TARC)s are used for enhanced safety during movement of nuclear weapons. Its design features a tough stainless steel outer skin, redwood for impact mitigation and fire protection and a rugged aluminum inner container. Redwood absorbs impact energy by crushing, similar to the way foam crushes in other containers. Redwood also functions to insulate the weapon from heat and fire. When a TARC is involved in a fire, the redwood will slowly burn forming a good insulating char. The redwood can continue to smolder once the fire is out. To ensure the smolder is extinguished, water can be directed into any accident caused hole in the skin. If no hole exists, it may be necessary to create one. This document discusses tool selection, testing, and a simple but effective method of creating an access hole in the outer skin large enough to apply fire fighting techniques.

  3. Simulation of kinetic data on the influx and efflux of chloroquine by erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Evidence for a drug-importer in chloroquine-sensitive strains.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, V; Cutler, D J

    1991-12-11

    Literature data on influx and efflux kinetics of chloroquine (CQ) with erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum were simulated using a four-compartment model with first-order exchange between the compartments. The four compartments represent (1) the buffer surrounding the infected erythrocyte; (2) the cytosol of the host erythrocyte; (3) the parasite cytosol; and (4) the food vacuole. Simulations showed that basal membrane transport of CQ, estimated from data on influx of CQ into uninfected red cells, largely accounts for uptake and release of CQ by erythrocytes infected with two different CQ-resistant (CQ-R) parasite strains. In contrast, the rate of uptake of CQ by erythrocytes infected with a CQ-sensitive (CQ-S) strain is substantially higher than predicted by uptake with membrane transfer by basal diffusion of CQ. Simulations also indicate that the difference in kinetics of CQ uptake by erythrocytes infected with the CQ-S and CQ-R strains can be explained by a net increase in the inward permeability coefficient at the host erythrocyte membrane, the composite membrane surrounding the parasite or the food vacuole membrane. The results are consistent with the presence of a drug-importer for CQ in erythrocytes infected with sensitive strains, which is absent in those infected with resistant strains. They are not consistent with the hypothesis that CQ resistance is attributable to a drug-exporter in resistant cells which is lacking in sensitive cells.

  4. Determination of chloroquine and monodesethylchloroquine in hair.

    PubMed

    Viala, A; Deturmeny, E; Aubert, C; Estadieu, M; Durand, A; Cano, J P; Delmont, J

    1983-10-01

    Using thin-layer and gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, chloroquine and its major metabolite (monodesethylchloroquine) were identified in hair samples of numerous patients who received this antimalarial drug for several months. In two patients the amounts of chloroquine were, respectively, 310 and 145 mg/kg hair and those of the monodesethylchloroquine 23 and 11 mg/kg. The respective proportions (93 and 7%) are the same in the two subjects. The chloroquine percentage was near those in the spleen or stomach wall after poisoning. Other metabolites in hair are being identified. Hair analysis may provide a good toxicologic and forensic science complement to the blood, urine, and tissues. It may be useful for the control of chloroquine therapy. PMID:6631371

  5. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Jovel, Irina Tatiana; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ursing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, artemether-lumefantrine was introduced in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine have been described. P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, pfmdr1 polymorphisms N86Y and Y184F, and pfmdr1 sequences 1034 to 1246 were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n=1,806) children<15 years of age who had uncomplicated P. falciparum monoinfection and presented at a health center in suburban Bissau (from 2003 to 2012). The pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y frequencies were stable, and seasonal changes were not seen from 2003 to 2007. Since 2007, the mean annual frequencies increased (P<0.001) for pfcrt 76T (24% to 57%), pfmdr1 N86 (72% to 83%), and pfcrt 76+pfmdr1 86 TN (10% to 27%), and pfcrt 76T accumulated during the high transmission season (P=0.001). The pfmdr1 86+184 NF frequency increased from 39% to 66% (from 2003 to 2011; P=0.004). One sample had two pfmdr1 gene copies. pfcrt 76T was associated with a lower parasite density (P<0.001). Following the discontinuation of an effective chloroquine regimen, probably highly artemether-lumefantrine-susceptible P. falciparum (with pfcrt 76T) accumulated, possibly due to suboptimal use of quinine and despite a fitness cost linked to pfcrt 76T. (The studies reported here were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00137514 [PSB-2001-chl-amo], NCT00137566 [PSB-2004-paracetamol], NCT00426439 [PSB-2006-coartem], NCT01157689 [AL-eff 2010], and NCT01704508 [Eurartesim 2012].).

  6. Temporal and Seasonal Changes of Genetic Polymorphisms Associated with Altered Drug Susceptibility to Chloroquine, Lumefantrine, and Quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ursing, Johan

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, artemether-lumefantrine was introduced in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine have been described. P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, pfmdr1 polymorphisms N86Y and Y184F, and pfmdr1 sequences 1034 to 1246 were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n = 1,806) children <15 years of age who had uncomplicated P. falciparum monoinfection and presented at a health center in suburban Bissau (from 2003 to 2012). The pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y frequencies were stable, and seasonal changes were not seen from 2003 to 2007. Since 2007, the mean annual frequencies increased (P < 0.001) for pfcrt 76T (24% to 57%), pfmdr1 N86 (72% to 83%), and pfcrt 76 + pfmdr1 86 TN (10% to 27%), and pfcrt 76T accumulated during the high transmission season (P = 0.001). The pfmdr1 86 + 184 NF frequency increased from 39% to 66% (from 2003 to 2011; P = 0.004). One sample had two pfmdr1 gene copies. pfcrt 76T was associated with a lower parasite density (P < 0.001). Following the discontinuation of an effective chloroquine regimen, probably highly artemether-lumefantrine-susceptible P. falciparum (with pfcrt 76T) accumulated, possibly due to suboptimal use of quinine and despite a fitness cost linked to pfcrt 76T. (The studies reported here were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00137514 [PSB-2001-chl-amo], NCT00137566 [PSB-2004-paracetamol], NCT00426439 [PSB-2006-coartem], NCT01157689 [AL-eff 2010], and NCT01704508 [Eurartesim 2012].) PMID:25421474

  7. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine in Guinea-Bissau between 2003 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Jovel, Irina Tatiana; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Rombo, Lars; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Ursing, Johan

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, artemether-lumefantrine was introduced in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, but quinine has also been commonly prescribed for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. An efficacious high-dose chloroquine treatment regimen was used previously. Temporal and seasonal changes of genetic polymorphisms associated with altered drug susceptibility to chloroquine, lumefantrine, and quinine have been described. P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) K76T, pfmdr1 gene copy numbers, pfmdr1 polymorphisms N86Y and Y184F, and pfmdr1 sequences 1034 to 1246 were determined using PCR-based methods. Blood samples came from virtually all (n=1,806) children<15 years of age who had uncomplicated P. falciparum monoinfection and presented at a health center in suburban Bissau (from 2003 to 2012). The pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y frequencies were stable, and seasonal changes were not seen from 2003 to 2007. Since 2007, the mean annual frequencies increased (P<0.001) for pfcrt 76T (24% to 57%), pfmdr1 N86 (72% to 83%), and pfcrt 76+pfmdr1 86 TN (10% to 27%), and pfcrt 76T accumulated during the high transmission season (P=0.001). The pfmdr1 86+184 NF frequency increased from 39% to 66% (from 2003 to 2011; P=0.004). One sample had two pfmdr1 gene copies. pfcrt 76T was associated with a lower parasite density (P<0.001). Following the discontinuation of an effective chloroquine regimen, probably highly artemether-lumefantrine-susceptible P. falciparum (with pfcrt 76T) accumulated, possibly due to suboptimal use of quinine and despite a fitness cost linked to pfcrt 76T. (The studies reported here were registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00137514 [PSB-2001-chl-amo], NCT00137566 [PSB-2004-paracetamol], NCT00426439 [PSB-2006-coartem], NCT01157689 [AL-eff 2010], and NCT01704508 [Eurartesim 2012].). PMID:25421474

  8. Implications of Glutathione Levels in the Plasmodium berghei Response to Chloroquine and Artemisinin

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Crespo-Lladó, Keila N.; Ortiz, José G.; Ferrer-Rodríguez, Iván; Serrano, Adelfa E.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most devastating parasitic diseases worldwide. Plasmodium drug resistance remains a major challenge to malaria control and has led to the re-emergence of the disease. Chloroquine (CQ) and artemisinin (ART) are thought to exert their anti-malarial activity inducing cytotoxicity in the parasite by blocking heme degradation (for CQ) and increasing oxidative stress. Besides the contribution of the CQ resistance transporter (PfCRT) and the multidrug resistant gene (pfmdr), CQ resistance has also been associated with increased parasite glutathione (GSH) levels. ART resistance was recently shown to be associated with mutations in the K13-propeller protein. To analyze the role of GSH levels in CQ and ART resistance, we generated transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasites either deficient in or overexpressing the gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene (pbggcs) encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH biosynthesis. These lines produce either lower (pbggcs-ko) or higher (pbggcs-oe) levels of GSH than wild type parasites. In addition, GSH levels were determined in P. berghei parasites resistant to CQ and mefloquine (MQ). Increased GSH levels were detected in both, CQ and MQ resistant parasites, when compared to the parental sensitive clone. Sensitivity to CQ and ART remained unaltered in both pgggcs-ko and pbggcs-oe parasites when tested in a 4 days drug suppressive assay. However, recrudescence assays after the parasites have been exposed to a sub-lethal dose of ART showed that parasites with low levels of GSH are more sensitive to ART treatment. These results suggest that GSH levels influence Plasmodium berghei response to ART treatment. PMID:26010448

  9. Chloroquine cardiomyopathy: beyond ocular adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ruiz, Nilson; Uribe, Carlos Esteban

    2014-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman who had received long-term treatment with chloroquine for systemic lupus erythematosus developed a third degree atrioventricular block and required a permanent pacemaker. Notably, left ventricular thickening and mild systolic dysfunction were noticed on echocardiography as well as on cardiac MRI. As there was no clear explanation for myocardial findings, the patient underwent an endomyocardial biopsy that demonstrated vacuolar degeneration of myocytes on light microscopy and curvilinear bodies on electron microscopy, both findings consistent with chloroquine toxicity. The drug was withheld and treatment with candesartan and carvedilol was prescribed. At 2-year follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic and left ventricular systolic function had improved. Physicians who prescribe antimalarial drugs for rheumatic diseases should be aware of the potentially life-threatening effects of chloroquine on the heart. PMID:25225192

  10. In silico attempt for adduct agent(s) against malaria: Combination of chloroquine with alkaloids of Adhatoda vasica.

    PubMed

    Swain, Shasank S; Sahu, Mahesh C; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2015-10-01

    With the aim of controlling drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, a computational attempt of designing novel adduct antimalarial drugs through the molecular docking method of combining chloroquine with five alkaloids, individually is presented. These alkaloids were obtained from the medicinal plant, Adhatoda vasica. From the obtained individual docking values of important derivatives of quinine and chloroquine, as well as, individual alkaloids and adduct agents of chloroquine with Adhatoda alkaloids as ligands, it was discernible that the 'adduct agent-1 with chloroquine and adhatodine' combination had the minimum energy of interaction, as the docking score value of -11.144 kcal/mol against the target protein, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), the key enzyme of glycolytic pathway. Drug resistance of P. falciparum is due to a mutation in the polypeptide of TIM. Moratorium of mutant TIM would disrupt the metabolism during the control of the drug resistant P. falciparum. This in silico work helped to locate the 'adduct agent-1 with chloroquine and adhatodine', which could be taken up by pharmacology for further development of this compound as a new drug against drug resistant Plasmodium.

  11. [Monitoring delagil (chloroquine) efficacy against imported Plasmodium vivax strains].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, S A; Tokmalaev, A K; Kukina, I V; Morozov, E N; Maksakovskaia, E V; Sadykova, V D; Burchik, M A; Ivanova, T N; Sergiev, V P

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of P. vivax malaria treatment with delagil (chloroquine) was evaluated in 122 patients, including 82 cases in Moscow and the Moscow region. The origin of the cases was malaria endemic areas in Asia, Africa, the Pacific Region, South America, and Transcaucasia. Forty other cases were imported malaria cases (secondary to imported ones), detected in Moscow and the Moscow region. Standard treatment with delagil (2.5 g) resulted in clinical improvement during 3 days in the majority of cases. Initial signs of degradation of asexual stages of P. vivax--kernels of nucleus, refinement of cytoplasm and its vacuolization, aggregation of pigment in isolated instances, its pushing out from cytoplasm--were observed after 1-2 hours after administration of delagil. Thereafter, parasite degradation was increasing, and it disappeared within 48 hours. Disappearance of fever slowed down in a few cases. However, degradation of parasites occurred during the same period among the rest of cases. It can not be excluded that fever was determined by the pyrogenic effect of remnants of degraded parasites and by the products of destroyed infected erythrocytes. It is probable that the findings of gametocytes, not completely degraded after disappearance of asexual forms in conjunction with prolonged fever, could result in a wrong conclusion of drug resistance. Negative results of microscopy and nested PCR on the last day of treatment, as well as in the following 10 days and absence of complains during 45 days, suggest the absence of resistance to delagil in P. vivax strains imported from different regions of the world. It is also probable that the literature on P. vivax resistance to chloroquine is limited to sporadic cases. PMID:21395044

  12. Identification of a Mutant PfCRT-Mediated Chloroquine Tolerance Phenotype in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Valderramos, Stephanie G.; Valderramos, Juan-Carlos; Musset, Lise; Purcell, Lisa A.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Legrand, Eric; Fidock, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutant forms of the Plasmodium falciparum transporter PfCRT constitute the key determinant of parasite resistance to chloroquine (CQ), the former first-line antimalarial, and are ubiquitous to infections that fail CQ treatment. However, treatment can often be successful in individuals harboring mutant pfcrt alleles, raising questions about the role of host immunity or pharmacokinetics vs. the parasite genetic background in contributing to treatment outcomes. To examine whether the parasite genetic background dictates the degree of mutant pfcrt-mediated CQ resistance, we replaced the wild type pfcrt allele in three CQ-sensitive strains with mutant pfcrt of the 7G8 allelic type prevalent in South America, the Oceanic region and India. Recombinant clones exhibited strain-dependent CQ responses that ranged from high-level resistance to an incremental shift that did not meet CQ resistance criteria. Nonetheless, even in the most susceptible clones, 7G8 mutant pfcrt enabled parasites to tolerate CQ pressure and recrudesce in vitro after treatment with high concentrations of CQ. 7G8 mutant pfcrt was found to significantly impact parasite responses to other antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapies, in a strain-dependent manner. We also report clinical isolates from French Guiana that harbor mutant pfcrt, identical or related to the 7G8 haplotype, and manifest a CQ tolerance phenotype. One isolate, H209, harbored a novel PfCRT C350R mutation and demonstrated reduced quinine and artemisinin susceptibility. Our data: 1) suggest that high-level CQR is a complex biological process dependent on the presence of mutant pfcrt; 2) implicate a role for variant pfcrt alleles in modulating parasite susceptibility to other clinically important antimalarials; and 3) uncover the existence of a phenotype of CQ tolerance in some strains harboring mutant pfcrt. PMID:20485514

  13. Physicochemical equivalence of chloroquine phosphate tablets.

    PubMed

    Bamiro, O A; Odeniyi, M A; Idowu, O B; Jaiyeoba, K T

    2004-12-01

    Seven brands of chloroquine phosphate tablets sourced from different retail outlets in the South-West Nigerian market were analysed in order to determine their physicochemical equivalence. The assessment parameters included uniformity of weight, friability, crushing strength, disintegration and dissolution tests and chemical assay of the tablets. All the brands passed the British Pharmacopoeia tests for weight uniformity, disintegration time and dissolution rate. Two brands, C and E passed the minimum criterion for crushing strength, four brands passed the friability test and two brands exceeded the specified amount of active drug content for chloroquine tablets. Only one brand C out of the seven brands that were analysed passed all the BP quality specifications. Hence none of the seven brands analysed could said to be physically and chemically equivalent. This study highlights the need for constant market monitoring of new products in order to ascertain their quality. PMID:15977447

  14. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Manic, Gwenola; Obrist, Florine; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) is a highly conserved mechanism for the lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components. Autophagy is critical for the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis, both in baseline conditions and in the context of adaptive responses to stress. In line with this notion, defects in the autophagic machinery have been etiologically associated with various human disorders including infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. Once tumors are established, however, autophagy sustains the survival of malignant cells, hence representing an appealing target for the design of novel anticancer regimens. Accordingly, inhibitors of autophagy including chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been shown to mediate substantial antineoplastic effects in preclinical models, especially when combined with chemo- or radiotherapeutic interventions. The pharmacological profile of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, however, appear to involve mechanisms other than autophagy inhibition. Here, we discuss the dual role of autophagy in oncogenesis and tumor progression, and summarize the results or design of clinical studies recently completed or initiated to evaluate the therapeutic activity of chloroquine derivatives in cancer patients. PMID:27308318

  15. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manic, Gwenola; Obrist, Florine; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) is a highly conserved mechanism for the lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components. Autophagy is critical for the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis, both in baseline conditions and in the context of adaptive responses to stress. In line with this notion, defects in the autophagic machinery have been etiologically associated with various human disorders including infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. Once tumors are established, however, autophagy sustains the survival of malignant cells, hence representing an appealing target for the design of novel anticancer regimens. Accordingly, inhibitors of autophagy including chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have been shown to mediate substantial antineoplastic effects in preclinical models, especially when combined with chemo- or radiotherapeutic interventions. The pharmacological profile of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, however, appear to involve mechanisms other than autophagy inhibition. Here, we discuss the dual role of autophagy in oncogenesis and tumor progression, and summarize the results or design of clinical studies recently completed or initiated to evaluate the therapeutic activity of chloroquine derivatives in cancer patients. PMID:27308318

  16. Role of copper transporters in resistance to platinating agents

    PubMed Central

    Rabik, Cara A.; Maryon, Edward B.; Kasza, Kristen; Shafer, John T.; Bartnik, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Copper transporters have been proposed to be involved in cellular import and export of platinating agents. Expression of the human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is thought to result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, whereas expression of ATP7A and ATP7B are thought to be involved in resistance to cisplatin either by sequestering drug away from its targets (ATP7A) or by exporting the drug from the cell (ATP7B). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of cells expressing copper transporters to cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. We also examined whether O6-benzylguanine, a modulator of platinating agent cytotoxicity, enhanced sensitivity of cells with or without the transporters to cisplatin. Overexpression of hCtr1 in the HEK293 cell line did not result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, either alone or following treatment with O6-benzylguanine. In contrast, overexpression of ATP7A and ATP7B in Me32a fibroblasts resulted in increased resistance to cisplatin, but not to carboplatin or oxaliplatin. ATP7A-expressing cells (MeMNK) showed a significant enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity following O6-benzylguanine treatment, but ATP7B-expressing cells (MeWND) did not. Notably, expression of either ATP7A or ATP7B did not result in a change in total cytoplasmic platinum levels following treatment with BG plus cisplatin. The mechanism of BG enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity is not likely through regulation of copper transporters. PMID:18998134

  17. Membrane transporters and drought resistance – a complex issue

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyniak, Karolina M.; Jasiński, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved complex adaptation strategies to survive changes in water status in the environment. Understanding the molecular nature of such adaptive changes allows the development of rapid innovations to improve crop performance. Plant membrane transport systems play a significant role when adjusting to water scarcity. Here we put proteins participating in transmembrane allocations of various molecules in the context of stomatal, cuticular, and root responses, representing a part of the drought resistance strategy. Their role in the transport of signaling molecules, ions or osmolytes is summarized and the challenge of the forthcoming research, resulting from the recent discoveries, is highlighted. PMID:25538721

  18. Predictors of the failure of treatment with chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, in children with acute, uncomplicated, Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Sowunmi, A; Fateye, B A; Adedeji, A A; Fehintola, F A; Gbotosho, G O; Happi, T C; Oduola, A M J

    2005-06-01

    Resistance to chloroquine in Plasmodium falciparum can be reversed, both in vitro and in vivo, by chlorpheniramine, a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist. This reversal raises the possibility of using chlorpheniramine to prolong the clinical usefulness of chloroquine in resource-poor communities. The factors that identify children at risk of treatment failure after being given chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine have now been evaluated in 281 children with uncomplicated, P. falciparum malaria. The children, who had taken part in six trials of antimalarial drugs between February 1996 and September 1999, in a hyper-endemic area of south-western Nigeria, were enrolled prospectively for the present study. Following treatment with chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, 13 (5%) of the children failed treatment by day 7 or 14. In a multivariate analysis, an age of < or =3 years (adjusted odds ratio = 11.1; 95% confidence interval = 2.2-55.3; P = 0.003) and a parasitaemia that took >3 days to clear (adjusted odds ratio=7.9; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-49.4; P = 0.027) were found to be independent predictors of treatment failure. In addition, compared with the children who had a lower axillary temperature then, the children who had an axillary temperature of > or =38 degrees C 2 days after commencing treatment were significantly more likely to be treatment failures. In resource-poor communities using chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, the easily identifiable predictors of treatment failure might be used to identify children requiring alternative antimalarial drugs.

  19. Pentacycloundecylamines and conjugates thereof as chemosensitizers and reversed chloroquine agents.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jacques; Fortuin, Elton E; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J; Malan, Sarel F

    2014-12-01

    The control of malaria has been complicated by increased resistance of the malaria parasite to existing antimalarials such as chloroquine (CQ). Herein, we report the ability of NGP1-01, the prototype pentacycloundecylamine (PCU), to reverse CQ resistance (>50%) and act as a chemosensitizer. Based on this finding we set out to synthesize a small series of novel agents comprising of a PCU moiety as the reversal agent conjugated to a CQ-like aminoquinoline (AM) molecule and evaluate the potential of these PCU-AM derivatives as reversed CQ agents. PCU-AM derivatives 1-3 showed anti-plasmodial IC50 values in the ranges of 3.74-17.6 nM and 27.6-253.5 nM against CQ-sensitive (D10) and CQ-resistant strains (Dd2) of Plasmodium falciparum, respectively. Compound 1 presented with the best antiplasmodial activity at low nM concentrations against both strains and was found to be 5 fold more active against the resistant strain than CQ. Compound 1 can be considered as a lead compound to develop reversed CQ agents with improved pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:25451997

  20. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-06-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa{endash}Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Chloroquine-containing organoruthenium complexes are fast-acting multistage antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Taís S; Colina-Vegas, Legna; DA Paixão, Marcelo; Navarro, Maribel; Barreto, Breno C; Oliveira, Poliana C M; Macambira, Simone G; Machado, Marta; Prudêncio, Miguel; D'Alessandro, Sarah; Basilico, Nicoletta; Moreira, Diogo R M; Batista, Alzir A; Soares, Milena B P

    2016-10-01

    We report the pharmacological activity of organoruthenium complexes containing chloroquine (CQ) as a chelating ligand. The complexes displayed intraerythrocytic activity against CQ-sensitive 3D7 and CQ-resistant W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum, with potency and selectivity indexes similar to those of CQ. Complexes displayed activity against all intraerythrocytic stages, but moderate activity against Plasmodium berghei liver stages. However, unlike CQ, organoruthenium complexes impaired gametocyte viability and exhibited fast parasiticidal activity against trophozoites for P. falciparum. This functional property results from the ability of complexes to quickly induce oxidative stress. The parasitaemia of P. berghei-infected mice was reduced by treatment with the complex. Our findings demonstrated that using chloroquine for the synthesis of organoruthenium complexes retains potency and selectivity while leading to an increase in the spectrum of action and parasite killing rate relative to CQ.

  2. Antimuscarinic effects of chloroquine in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Habara, Y.; Williams, J.A.; Hootman, S.R.

    1986-06-13

    Chloroquine inhibited carbachol-induced amylase release in a dose-dependent fashion in rat pancreatic acini; cholecystokinin- and bombesin-induced secretory responses were almost unchanged by the antimalarial drug. The inhibition of carbachol-induced amylase release by chloroquine was competitive in nature with a K/sub i/ of 11.7 ..mu..M. Chloroquine also inhibited (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding to acinar muscarinic receptors. The IC/sub 50/ for chloroquine inhibition of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding was lower than that for carbachol or the other antimalarial drugs, quinine and quinidine. These results demonstrate that chloroquine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist in the exocrine pancreas.

  3. Copper transport systems are involved in multidrug resistance and drug transport.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Akiyama, Shin-ichi

    2008-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace element and several copper containing proteins are indispensable for such processes as oxidative respiration, neural development and collagen remodeling. Copper metabolism is precisely regulated by several transporters and chaperone proteins. Copper Transport Protein 1 (CTR1) selectively uptakes copper into cells. Subsequently three chaperone proteins, HAH1 (human atx1 homologue 1), Cox17p and CCS (copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase) transport copper to the Golgi apparatus, mitochondria and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase respectively. Defects in the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B are responsible for Menkes disease and Wilson's disease respectively. These proteins transport copper via HAH1 to the Golgi apparatus to deliver copper to cuproenzymes. They also prevent cellular damage from an excess accumulation of copper by mediating the efflux of copper from the cell. There is increasing evidence that copper transport mechanisms may play a role in drug resistance. We, and others, found that ATP7A and ATP7B are involved in drug resistance against the anti-tumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (CDDP). A relationship between the expression of ATP7A or ATP7B in tumors and CDDP resistance is supported by clinical studies. In addition, the copper uptake transporter CTR1 has also been reported to play a role in CDDP sensitivity. Furthermore, we have recently found that the effect of ATP7A on drug resistance is not limited to CDDP. Using an ex vivo drug sensitivity assay, the histoculture drug response assay (HDRA), the expression of ATP7A in human surgically resected colon cancer cells correlated with sensitivity to 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38). ATP7A-overexpressing cells are resistant to many anticancer drugs including SN-38, 7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino] carbonyloxycamptothecin (CPT-11), vincristine, paclitaxel, etoposide, doxorubicin (Dox), and mitoxantron. The mechanism by which ATP7A and copper

  4. A Study of Transport Airplane Crash-Resistant Fuel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor); Robertson, S. H.; Johnson, N. B.; Hall, D. S.; Rimson, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study, funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), of transport airplane crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS). The report covers the historical studies related to aircraft crash fires and fuel containment concepts undertaken by the FAA, NASA, and the U.S. Army, which ultimately led to the current state of the art in CRFS technology. It describes the basic research, testing, field investigations and production efforts which have led to the highly successful military CRFS, which has saved many lives and reduced costs of accidents. Current CRFS technology used in transport category airplanes is defined and compared to the available state-of-the-art technology. The report provides information to the FAA and other government organizations which can help them plan their efforts to improve the state of crash fire protection in the transport airplane fleet. The report provides guidance to designers looking for information about CRFS design problems, analysis tools to use for product improvement, and a summary of current and proposed regulations for transport category airplane fuel systems.

  5. ABC transporters as multidrug resistance mechanisms and the development of chemosensitizers for their reversal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems related with anticancer chemotherapy is resistance against anticancer drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that are responsible for drug resistance and a low bioavailability of drugs by pumping a variety of drugs out cells at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. One strategy for reversal of the resistance of tumor cells expressing ABC transporters is combined use of anticancer drugs with chemosensitizers. In this review, the physiological functions and structures of ABC transporters, and the development of chemosensitizers are described focusing on well-known proteins including P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance associated protein, and breast cancer resistance protein. PMID:16202168

  6. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  7. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Cristian; Minelli, Alessandra; Scassellati, Catia; Bortolomasi, Marco; Segala, Matilde; Sartori, Riccardo; Giacopuzzi, Mario; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2010-08-16

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) is a serious mental illness that is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide. In addition, approximately 15% of depression patients are defined treatment-resistant (TRD). Preclinical and genetic studies show that serotonin modulation dysfunction exists in patients with TRD. Some polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis/treatment of MDD; however, no data are available concerning TRD. Therefore, in order to investigate the possible influence of SLC6A4 polymorphisms on the risk of TRD, we genotyped 310 DSM-IV MDD treatment-resistant patients and 284 healthy volunteers. We analysed the most studied polymorphism 5-HTTLPR (L/S) and a single nucleotide substitution, rs25531 (A/G), in relation to different functional haplotype combinations. However the correct mapping of rs25531 is still debated whether it is within or outside the insertion. Our sequencing analysis showed that rs25531 is immediately outside of the 5-HTTLPR segment. Differences in 5-HTTLPR allele (p=0.04) and in L allele carriers (p<0.05) were observed between the two groups. Concerning the estimated haplotype analyses, L(A)L(A) homozygote haplotype was more represented among the control subjects (p=0.01, OR=0.64 95%CI: 0.45-0.91). In conclusion, this study reports a protective effect of the L(A)L(A) haplotype on TRD, supporting the hypothesis that lower serotonin transporter transcription alleles are correlated to a common resistant depression mechanism.

  8. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine versus chloroquine to treat vivax malaria in Afghanistan: an open randomized, non-inferiority, trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Afghanistan's national guidelines recommend chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax infection, the parasite responsible for the majority of its malaria burden. Chloroquine resistance in P. vivax is emerging in Asia. Therapeutic responses across Afghanistan have not been evaluated in detail. Methods Between July 2007 and February 2009, an open-label, randomized controlled trial of chloroquine and dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine in patients aged three months and over with slide-confirmed P. vivax mono-infections was conducted. Consistent with current national guidelines, primaquine was not administered. Subjects were followed up daily during the acute phase of illness (days 0-3) and weekly until day 56. The primary endpoint was the overall cumulative parasitological failure rate at day 56 after the start of treatment, with the hypothesis being that dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine was non-inferior compared to chloroquine (Δ = 5% difference in proportion of failures). Results Of 2,182 individuals with positive blood films for P. vivax, 536 were enrolled in the trial. The day 28 cure rate was 100% in both treatment groups. Parasite clearance was more rapid with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine than chloroquine. At day 56, there were more recurrent infections in the chloroquine arm (8.9%, 95% CI 6.0-13.1%) than the dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine arm (2.8%, 95% CI 1.4-5.8%), a difference in cumulative recurrence rate of 6.1% (2-sided 90%CI +2.6 to +9.7%). The log-rank test comparing the survival curves confirmed the superiority of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine over chloroquine (p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that a lower initial haemoglobin concentration was also independently associated with recurrence. Both regimens were well tolerated and no serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions Chloroquine remains an efficacious treatment for the treatment of vivax malaria in Afghanistan. In a setting where radical therapy cannot be

  9. Chloroquine induces empty capsid formation during poliovirus eclipse.

    PubMed Central

    Kronenberger, P; Vrijsen, R; Boeyé, A

    1991-01-01

    The poliovirus capsid (160S) is modified during eclipse in HeLa cells, which results in at least three types of particles having sedimentation coefficients of 135, 110, and 80S. The lysosomotropic agent chloroquine redirected the production of eclipse products from 135 and 110S particles (containing RNA) to 80S particles (without RNA). The effect started at 5 microM and was fully developed with 20 microM chloroquine. Viral protein synthesis and virion production remained unaffected. The results show that chloroquine can redirect the processing of input virions without interfering with productive uncoating. Images PMID:1658391

  10. In utero exposure to chloroquine alters sexual development in the male fetal rat

    SciTech Connect

    Clewell, Rebecca A. Pluta, Linda; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-06-15

    Chloroquine (CQ), a drug that has been used extensively for the prevention and treatment of malaria, is currently considered safe for use during pregnancy. However, CQ has been shown to disrupt steroid homeostasis in adult rats and similar compounds, such as quinacrine, inhibit steroid production in the Leydig cell in vitro. To explore the effect of in utero CQ exposure on fetal male sexual development, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a daily dose of either water or chloroquine diphosphate from GD 16-18 by oral gavage. Chloroquine was administered as 200 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16, followed by two maintenance doses of 100 mg/kg CQ base on GD 16 and 18. Three days of CQ treatment resulted in reduced maternal and fetal weight on GD 19 and increased necrosis and steatosis in the maternal liver. Fetal livers also displayed mild lipid accumulation. Maternal serum progesterone was increased after CQ administration. Fetal testes testosterone, however, was significantly decreased. Examination of the fetal testes revealed significant alterations in vascularization and seminiferous tubule development after short-term CQ treatment. Anogenital distance was not altered. Microarray and RT-PCR showed down-regulation of several genes associated with cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis in the fetal testes. This study indicates that CQ inhibits testosterone synthesis and normal testis development in the rat fetus at human relevant doses.

  11. P-glycoproteins and other multidrug resistance transporters in the pharmacology of anthelmintics: Prospects for reversing transport-dependent anthelmintic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lespine, Anne; Ménez, Cécile; Bourguinat, Catherine; Prichard, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic helminths cause significant disease in animals and humans. In the absence of alternative treatments, anthelmintics remain the principal agents for their control. Resistance extends to the most important class of anthelmintics, the macrocyclic lactone endectocides (MLs), such as ivermectin, and presents serious problems for the livestock industries and threatens to severely limit current parasite control strategies in humans. Understanding drug resistance is important for optimizing and monitoring control, and reducing further selection for resistance. Multidrug resistance (MDR) ABC transporters have been implicated in ML resistance and contribute to resistance to a number of other anthelmintics. MDR transporters, such as P-glycoproteins, are essential for many cellular processes that require the transport of substrates across cell membranes. Being overexpressed in response to chemotherapy in tumour cells and to ML-based treatment in nematodes, they lead to therapy failure by decreasing drug concentration at the target. Several anthelmintics are inhibitors of these efflux pumps and appropriate combinations can result in higher treatment efficacy against parasites and reversal of resistance. However, this needs to be balanced against possible increased toxicity to the host, or the components of the combination selecting on the same genes involved in the resistance. Increased efficacy could result from modifying anthelmintic pharmacokinetics in the host or by blocking parasite transporters involved in resistance. Combination of anthelmintics can be beneficial for delaying selection for resistance. However, it should be based on knowledge of resistance mechanisms and not simply on mode of action classes, and is best started before resistance has been selected to any member of the combination. Increasing knowledge of the MDR transporters involved in anthelmintic resistance in helminths will play an important role in allowing for the identification of markers

  12. Clinical and parasitological response to oral chloroquine and primaquine in uncomplicated human Plasmodium knowlesi infections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium knowlesi is a cause of symptomatic and potentially fatal infections in humans. There are no studies assessing the detailed parasitological response to treatment of knowlesi malaria infections in man and whether antimalarial resistance occurs. Methods A prospective observational study of oral chloroquine and primaquine therapy was conducted in consecutive patients admitted to Kapit Hospital, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo with PCR-confirmed single P. knowlesi infections. These patients were given oral chloroquine for three days, and at 24 hours oral primaquine was administered for two consecutive days, primarily as a gametocidal agent. Clinical and parasitological responses were recorded at 6-hourly intervals during the first 24 hours, daily until discharge and then weekly to day 28. Vivax malaria patients were studied as a comparator group. Results Of 96 knowlesi malaria patients who met the study criteria, 73 were recruited to an assessment of the acute response to treatment and 60 completed follow-up over 28 days. On admission, the mean parasite stage distributions were 49.5%, 41.5%, 4.0% and 5.6% for early trophozoites, late trophozoites, schizonts and gametocytes respectively. The median fever clearance time was 26.5 [inter-quartile range 16-34] hours. The mean times to 50% (PCT50) and 90% (PCT90) parasite clearance were 3.1 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 2.8-3.4) hours and 10.3 (9.4-11.4) hours. These were more rapid than in a group of 23 patients with vivax malaria 6.3 (5.3-7.8) hours and 20.9 (17.6-25.9) hours; P = 0.02). It was difficult to assess the effect of primaquine on P. knowlesi parasites, due to the rapid anti-malarial properties of chloroquine and since primaquine was administered 24 hours after chloroquine. No P. knowlesi recrudescences or re-infections were detected by PCR. Conclusions Chloroquine plus primaqine is an inexpensive and highly effective treatment for uncomplicated knowlesi malaria infections in humans and there is

  13. Doxorubicin and chloroquine coencapsulated liposomes: preparation and improved cytotoxicity on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liyan; Yao, Mingfei; Gao, Menghua; Zhao, Qinghe

    2012-09-01

    Doxorubicin, as a widely used chemotherapeutic, always causes multidrug resistance in human cancer cells. To circumvent drug resistance, we developed a novel formulation where doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and chloroquine phosphate (CQ) were simultaneously loaded into liposomes by a pH-gradient method where CQ played the role of a chemical sensitizer. The various factors were investigated to optimize the formulation and manufacturing conditions of DOX and CQ coencapsulated liposomes (DCL). The resultant DCLs achieved the high encapsulation efficiency of both drugs over 90%. Further, DCLs significantly displayed resistance reversal action on a doxorubicin-resistant human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/ADR) through the cooperation of CQ with DOX. The reversal fold of DCL with the DOX/CQ/soybean phosphatidylcholine weight ratio of 0.5:1:50 was 5.7, compared to free DOX. These results demonstrate that DCL is a promising formulation for the treatment of DOX-resistant breast cancer. PMID:22607110

  14. P type porous silicon resistivity and carrier transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ménard, S.; Fèvre, A.; Billoué, J.; Gautier, G.

    2015-09-14

    The resistivity of p type porous silicon (PS) is reported on a wide range of PS physical properties. Al/PS/Si/Al structures were used and a rigorous experimental protocol was followed. The PS porosity (P{sub %}) was found to be the major contributor to the PS resistivity (ρ{sub PS}). ρ{sub PS} increases exponentially with P{sub %}. Values of ρ{sub PS} as high as 1 × 10{sup 9} Ω cm at room temperature were obtained once P{sub %} exceeds 60%. ρ{sub PS} was found to be thermally activated, in particular, when the temperature increases from 30 to 200 °C, a decrease of three decades is observed on ρ{sub PS}. Based on these results, it was also possible to deduce the carrier transport mechanisms in PS. For P{sub %} lower than 45%, the conduction occurs through band tails and deep levels in the tissue surrounding the crystallites. When P{sub %} overpasses 45%, electrons at energy levels close to the Fermi level allow a hopping conduction from crystallite to crystallite to appear. This study confirms the potential of PS as an insulating material for applications such as power electronic devices.

  15. Purification of a Multidrug Resistance Transporter for Crystallization Studies

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Law, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallization of integral membrane proteins is a challenging field and much effort has been invested in optimizing the overexpression and purification steps needed to obtain milligram amounts of pure, stable, monodisperse protein sample for crystallography studies. Our current work involves the structural and functional characterization of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance transporter MdtM, a member of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). Here we present a protocol for isolation of MdtM to increase yields of recombinant protein to the milligram quantities necessary for pursuit of structural studies using X-ray crystallography. Purification of MdtM was enhanced by introduction of an elongated His-tag, followed by identification and subsequent removal of chaperonin contamination. For crystallization trials of MdtM, detergent screening using size exclusion chromatography determined that decylmaltoside (DM) was the shortest-chain detergent that maintained the protein in a stable, monodispersed state. Crystallization trials of MdtM performed using the hanging-drop diffusion method with commercially available crystallization screens yielded 3D protein crystals under several different conditions. We contend that the purification protocol described here may be employed for production of high-quality protein of other multidrug efflux members of the MFS, a ubiquitous, physiologically and clinically important class of membrane transporters. PMID:27025617

  16. Trametinib modulates cancer multidrug resistance by targeting ABCB1 transporter

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Mei, Xiao-Long; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Wei, Meng-Ning; Shi, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of adenine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is one of the main reasons of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells. Trametinib, a novel specific small-molecule mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor, is currently used for the treatment of melanoma in clinic. In this study, we investigated the effect of trametinib on MDR mediated by ABC transporters. Trametinib significantly potentiated the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells overexpressed ABCB1, but not ABCC1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, trametinib did not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, trametinib potently blocked the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. Importantly, trametinib remarkably enhanced the effect of vincristine against the xenografts of ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells in nude mice. The predicted binding mode showed the hydrophobic interactions of trametinib within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. Consequently, our findings may have important implications for use of trametinib in combination therapy for cancer treatment. PMID:25915534

  17. Hair analysis of an unusual case of Chloroquine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Ashiq, Muhammad Zar; Shafi, Humera; Usman, Hafiz Faisal; Wattoo, Sardar Ali; Sarwar, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad Ashraf

    2016-03-01

    A dead body of middle aged man was exhumed from 6.5 month earth-grave. Autopsy findings were non-specific as the body was completely putrefied. Deceased's scalp hair and kidney was sent for toxicological analysis. Hair sample (50mg) was incubated with 1M NaOH (2 ml). Chloroquine was detected in hair and kidney during basic drug screen performed on GC/MS. For confirmation and quantitation, chloroquine was extracted using Hypersep verify CX SPE cartridges while mass detector was operated in SIM mode using the ions of m/z 245.0, 290.1, 319.0 for chloroquine while ions of m/z 260 and 455 were monitored for nalorphine (internal standard). Chloroquine was present in high concentration in hair (211 ng/mg) as well as in kidney (37.3mg/kg). Moreover, chloroquine was not detected in the wash solvents, suggesting ingestion of the drug rather than an external contamination of hair. These findings strongly suggested the acute exposure of higher doses of chloroquine to the deceased before death. PMID:26980246

  18. Spin-dependent heat transport and thermal boundary resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Taehee

    In this thesis, thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations has been studied. In order to make different magnetic configurations, we developed a spin valve structure, which has high MR ratio and low saturation field. The high MR ratio was achieved using Co/Cu multilayer and 21A or 34A thick Cu layer. The low saturation field was obtained by implementing different coercivities of the successive ferromagnetic layers. For this purpose, Co/Cu/Cu tri-layered structure was used with the thicknesses of the Co layers; 15 A and 30 A. For the thermal conductivity measurement, a three-omega method was employed with a thermally isolated microscale rod. We fabricated the microscale rod using optical lithography and MEMS process. Then the rod was wire-bonded to a chip-carver for further electrical measurement. For the thermal conductivity measurement, we built the three-omega measurement system using two lock-in amplifiers and two differential amplifiers. A custom-made electromagnet was added to the system to investigate the impact of magnetic field. We observed titanic thermal conductivity change depending on the magnetic configurations of the Co/Cu/Co multilayer. The thermal conductivity change was closely correlated with that of the electric conductivity in terms of the spin orientation, but the thermal conductivity was much more sensitive than that of the electric conductivity. The relative thermal conductivity change was 50% meanwhile that of electric resistivity change was 8.0%. The difference between the two ratios suggests that the scattering mechanism for charge and heat transport in the Co/Cu/Co multilayer is different. The Lorentz number in Weidemann-Franz law is also spin-dependent. Thermal boundary resistance between metal and dielectrics was also studied in this thesis. The thermal boundary resistance becomes critical for heat transport in a nanoscale because the thermal boundary resistance can potentially determine overall heat transport

  19. 71 FR 16677 - Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-04-03

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 121 RIN 2120-AI75 Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed... comply with the fire penetration resistance requirements of thermal/acoustic insulation used in transport... flammability requirements for thermal/acoustic insulation installed in the fuselage of transport...

  20. Quality of chloroquine tablets available in Africa

    PubMed Central

    SAWADOGO, C W; AMOOD AL-KAMARANY, M; AL-MEKHLAFI, H M; ELKARBANE, M; AL-ADHROEY, A H; CHERRAH, Y; BOUKLOUZE, A

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is the biggest killer of African children, yet it is cheaply preventable and curable with insecticides spraying, impregnated bednets and effective drugs. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of Chloroquine (CQ) tablets available in selected African countries. Twenty-six samples of antimalarial CQ tablet of 100, 150 and 250 mg were collected from 12 African countries and evaluated for their quality in the Drugs Quality Control Laboratory of Rabat, Morocco. The identification and dosage of active pharmaceutical ingredients in the tablets, dissolution rate, hardness and the friability of CQ tablets were performed according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (Eur.Ph.) recommended methods. The results showed that 7.7% of the sampled CQ tablets available in Burkina Faso were of low quality. Failure in dissolution profile was found in 50% of CQ tablets sampled from Benin, Burkina Faso, Comoros Union, Mali and Senegal. The findings showed poor quality of CQ tablets available in the African market. This problem may affect the efforts to control malaria in Africa. Efficient regulatory systems of drugs quality control should be implemented. PMID:22117854

  1. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cnubben, Nicole H P; Wortelboer, Heleen M; van Zanden, Jelmer J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; van Bladeren, Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes their effectiveness. This is typically the case in the development of cellular resistance to anticancer drugs. Inhibitors of these transporters are thus potentially useful tools to reverse this transporter-mediated cellular resistance to anticancer drugs and, eventually, to enhance the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with drug-resistant cancer. This review highlights the various types of inhibitors of several multidrug resistance-related ABC proteins, and demonstrates that the metabolism of inhibitors, as illustrated by recent data obtained for various natural compound inhibitors, may have considerable implications for their effect on drug transport and their potential for treatment of drug resistance.

  2. Autophagy and Transporter-Based Multi-Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyank; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Degenhardt, Kurt; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    All the therapeutic strategies for treating cancers aim at killing the cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death type I). Defective apoptosis endow tumor cells with survival. The cell can respond to such defects with autophagy. Autophagy is a cellular process by which cytoplasmic material is either degraded to maintain homeostasis or recycled for energy and nutrients in starvation. A plethora of evidence has shown that the role of autophagy in tumors is complex. A lot of effort is needed to underline the functional status of autophagy in tumor progression and treatment, and elucidate how to tweak autophagy to treat cancer. Furthermore, during the treatment of cancer, the limitation for the cure rate and survival is the phenomenon of multi drug resistance (MDR). The development of MDR is an intricate process that could be regulated by drug transporters, enzymes, anti-apoptotic genes or DNA repair mechanisms. Reports have shown that autophagy has a dual role in MDR. Furthermore, it has been reported that activation of a death pathway may overcome MDR, thus pointing the importance of other death pathways to regulate tumor cell progression and growth. Therefore, in this review we will discuss the role of autophagy in MDR tumors and a possible link amongst these phenomena. PMID:24710490

  3. ATP-dependent transport of vinblastine in vesicles from human multidrug-resistant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horio, M.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I. )

    1988-05-01

    Resistance of human cancer cells to multiple cytotoxic hydrophobic agents (multidrug resistance) is due to overexpression of the MDR1 gene, whose product is the plasma membrane P-glycoprotein. Plasma membrane vesicles partially purified from multidrug-resistant human KB carcinoma cells, but not from drug-sensitive cells, accumulate ({sup 3}H)vinblastine in an ATP-dependent manner. This transport is osmotically sensitive, with an apparent K{sub m} of 38 {mu}M for ATP and of {approx} 2 {mu}M for vinblastine. The nonhydrolyzable analog adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate does not substitute for ATP but is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for the transport process. Vanadate, and ATPase inhibitor, is a potent noncompetitive inhibitor of transport. These results indicate that hydrolysis of ATP is probably required for active transport vinblastine. Several other drugs to which multidrug-resistant cell lines are resistant inhibit transport, with relative potencies as follows: vincristine > actinomycin D > daunomycin > colchicine = puromycin. Verapamil and quinidine, which reverse the multidrug-resistance phenotype, are good inhibitors of the transport process. These results confirm that multidrug-resistant cells express an energy-dependent plasma membrane transporter for hydrophobic drugs, and establish a system for the detailed biochemical analysis of this transport process.

  4. Effect of chloroquine on the urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ilo, Cajetan E; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Agbakoba, Nneka; Brown, Sinye A; Maduagwuna, Chinonye A; Agbasi, Patrick U; Orisakwe, Orish E; Orisakweph, Orish E

    2008-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an inexpensive antibacterial, whereas chloroquine is an inexpensive antimalarial. The coadministration of chloroquine and ciprofloxacin is easily encountered because both drugs are commonly prescribed to patients in the tropics. Five healthy male volunteers aged 19 to 31 years who were not taking any of the prescribed medications and who had no sensitivity to either ciprofloxacin or chloroquine each received 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally with 250 mL of water, and after a 2-week washout period, 500 mg ciprofloxacin plus 600 mg chloroquine was administered orally with 250 mL of water after providing informed consent. A urine sample (7 mL) was collected just before taking the drug at 8:00 AM representing 0 hour and continued afterward at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours the next day. The samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations by diffusion through agar technique were used for the assay of urine ciprofloxacin. The rate of ciprofloxacin excretion and cumulative urine ciprofloxacin were significantly increased. The coadministration of chloroquine increased the cumulative urinary concentration and excretion rate of ciprofloxacin.

  5. Effect of chloroquine on the urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Ilo, Cajetan E; Ezejiofor, Ndidi A; Agbakoba, Nneka; Brown, Sinye A; Maduagwuna, Chinonye A; Agbasi, Patrick U; Orisakwe, Orish E; Orisakweph, Orish E

    2008-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an inexpensive antibacterial, whereas chloroquine is an inexpensive antimalarial. The coadministration of chloroquine and ciprofloxacin is easily encountered because both drugs are commonly prescribed to patients in the tropics. Five healthy male volunteers aged 19 to 31 years who were not taking any of the prescribed medications and who had no sensitivity to either ciprofloxacin or chloroquine each received 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally with 250 mL of water, and after a 2-week washout period, 500 mg ciprofloxacin plus 600 mg chloroquine was administered orally with 250 mL of water after providing informed consent. A urine sample (7 mL) was collected just before taking the drug at 8:00 AM representing 0 hour and continued afterward at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours the next day. The samples were stored at -20 degrees C until analyzed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations by diffusion through agar technique were used for the assay of urine ciprofloxacin. The rate of ciprofloxacin excretion and cumulative urine ciprofloxacin were significantly increased. The coadministration of chloroquine increased the cumulative urinary concentration and excretion rate of ciprofloxacin. PMID:18806516

  6. The diversity of membrane transporters encoded in bacterial arsenic-resistance operons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shiyang; Lilley, Ross McCausland; Zhang, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Transporter-facilitated arsenite extrusion is the major pathway of arsenic resistance within bacteria. So far only two types of membrane-bound transporter proteins, ArsB and ArsY (ACR3), have been well studied, although the arsenic transporters in bacteria display considerable diversity. Utilizing accumulated genome sequence data, we searched arsenic resistance (ars) operons in about 2,500 bacterial strains and located over 700 membrane-bound transporters which are encoded in these operons. Sequence analysis revealed at least five distinct transporter families, with ArsY being the most dominant, followed by ArsB, ArsP (a recently reported permease family), Major Facilitator protein Superfamily (MFS) and Major Intrinsic Protein (MIP). In addition, other types of transporters encoded in the ars operons were found, but in much lower frequencies. The diversity and evolutionary relationships of these transporters with regard to arsenic resistance will be discussed. PMID:26020003

  7. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jorge L; Jos, Angeles; del Peso, Ana; Salguero, Manuel; López-Artíguez, Miguel; Repetto, Guillermo

    2005-10-15

    There is limited information available about the potential environmental effects of chloroquine (CQ), a widely used antimalarial agent and a promising inexpensive drug in the management of HIV disease. The acute effects of CQ were studied using four ecotoxicological model systems. The most sensitive bioindicator was the immobilization of the cladoceran Daphnia magna, with an EC50 of 12 microM CQ at 72 h and a non-observed adverse effect level of 2.5 microM CQ, followed very closely by the decrease of the uptake of neutral red and the reduction of the lysosomal function in the fish cell line PLHC-1 derived from the top minnow Poeciliopsis lucida, probably due to the selective accumulation of the drug into the lysosomes. There was significant cellular stress as indicated by the increases on metallothionein and glucose-6P dehydrogenase levels after 24 h of exposure and succinate dehydrogenase activity mainly after 48 h. No changes were observed for ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. The least sensitive model was the inhibition of bioluminescence in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri. An increase of more than five-fold in the toxicity from 24 to 72 h of exposure was observed for the inhibition of the growth in the alga Chlorella vulgaris and the content of total protein and MTS tetrazolium salt metabolization in PLHC-1 cells. At the morphological level, the most evident alterations in PLHC-1 cultures were hydropic degeneration from 25 microM CQ after 24h of exposure and the presence of many cells with pyknotic nuclei, condensed cytoplasm and apoptosis with concentrations higher than 50 microM CQ after 48 h of exposure. In conclusion, CQ should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms. PMID:16153718

  8. Efficacy of Chloroquine for the Treatment of Vivax malaria in Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Habtamu Bedimo; Beyene, Melkamu Bedimo; Ebstie, Yehenew Asmamaw; Desalegn, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance to anti-malarials is a major challenge for effective malaria control in sub-Saharan Africa. This triggered a need for routine monitoring of the efficacy of the antimalarial drugs every two years in all malaria endemic countries. Chloroquine remained the drug of choice for the treatment of vivax malaria in Ethiopia. Though, a strong scientific evidence of chloroquine resistance to P.vivax that could have brought change of treatment regimen is yet to be established in Ethiopia, continuous and regular monitoring of drug’s efficacy is critical for establishing rational anti-malarial drug policies. This study therefore, assessed the therapeutic efficacy of Chloroquine (CQ) for the treatment of Plasmodium vivax infections in Northwestern Ethiopia. Methods An observational, 28- day therapeutic clinical efficacy study was conducted from August to December, 2014, in Northwest Ethiopia. Patients confirmed to have monoinfection of vivax malaria, aged above 6 months were included. All subjects were treated with standard chloroquine dose of 25 mg/kg for three (3) days. Parasitological and clinical outcomes of treated patients were then evaluated on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 during the entire 28-day follow-up period. A portable spectrophotometer (HemoCue Hb 301 System, Sweden) was used to estimate hemoglobin concentration. Results A total of 69 subjects had completed follow up. Some 57/69 (82.6%) had fever at enrolment and the rest 12 patients 48 hours before enrollment. Out of total, 65/69 (94.2%) and 66/69 (95.6%) of the study subjects were free of fever by day 1 and day 2 respectively but fever was cleared in all subjects by day 3. At base line the mean asexual parasitemia was 3540 parasites/μL of blood. Parasite carriage on day 3 was 3%. The overall cure rate (an adequate and clinical parasitological response) was very high (97%) [(95% CI = 93.1–99.4)]. The time to parasite, fever and gametocyte clearance as expressed in mean (SD) was 35 (3

  9. An investigation into the suitability of amidated pectin hydrogel beads as a delivery matrix for chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Munjeri, O; Hodza, P; Osim, E E; Musabayane, C T

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to delay the release of chloroquine to distal parts of the gastrointestinal tract by using a multiparticulate hydrogel formulation. Amidated pectin chloroquine beads (PC) with varying pectin-to-chloroquine ratios (PC) w/w loadings of 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 in the dried beads were prepared by the gelation of drug-loaded pectin solutions in the presence of calcium. In vitro release studies of chloroquine from pectin-chloroquine hydrogel beads and chloroquine diphosphate powder were carried out in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The total release of the entrapped chloroquine from the hydrogel beads was achieved between 4 and 7 h in simulated intestinal fluid, but total release was not achieved in simulated gastric fluid. However, total release from chloroquine diphosphate powder was achieved by 1.5 and 2 h in gastric and intestinal fluids, respectively. The plasma pharmacokinetics of chloroquine from pectin hydrogel beads and chloroquine diphosphate solution following single or repeated dosing were compared in male Sprague-Dawley rats over a period of 60 h. Oral administration of the hyrogel beads to rats produced maximum plasma concentrations by 7 h, but highest plasma concentrations following chloroquine solution administration were observed by 2 h. The dissolution data and appearance of significant plasma concentrations of chloroquine 2 to 4 h after oral administration suggests release in duodenum, jejunum, or ileum.

  10. Chloride anion transporters inhibit growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Share, Andrew I; Patel, Khushali; Nativi, Cristina; Cho, Eun J; Francesconi, Oscar; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Roelens, Stefano; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-06-18

    A series of aminopyrrolic receptors were tested as anion transporters using POPC liposome model membranes. Many were found to be effective Cl(-) transporters and to inhibit clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus growth in vitro. The best transporters proved effective against the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, Mu50 and HP1173. Tris-thiourea tren-based chloride transporters were also shown to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in vitro.

  11. Bacterial glyphosate resistance conferred by overexpression of an E. coli membrane efflux transporter.

    PubMed

    Staub, Jeffrey M; Brand, Leslie; Tran, Minhtien; Kong, Yifei; Rogers, Stephen G

    2012-04-01

    Glyphosate herbicide-resistant crop plants, introduced commercially in 1994, now represent approximately 85% of the land area devoted to transgenic crops. Herbicide resistance in commercial glyphosate-resistant crops is due to expression of a variant form of a bacterial 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase with a significantly decreased binding affinity for glyphosate at the target site of the enzyme. As a result of widespread and recurrent glyphosate use, often as the only herbicide used for weed management, increasing numbers of weedy species have evolved resistance to glyphosate. Weed resistance is most often due to changes in herbicide translocation patterns, presumed to be through the activity of an as yet unidentified membrane transporter in plants. To provide insight into glyphosate resistance mechanisms and identify a potential glyphosate transporter, we screened Escherichia coli genomic DNA for alternate sources of glyphosate resistance genes. Our search identified a single non-target gene that, when overexpressed in E. coli and Pseudomonas, confers high-level glyphosate resistance. The gene, yhhS, encodes a predicted membrane transporter of the major facilitator superfamily involved in drug efflux. We report here that an alternative mode of glyphosate resistance in E. coli is due to reduced accumulation of glyphosate in cells that overexpress this membrane transporter and discuss the implications for potential alternative resistance mechanisms in other organisms such as plants.

  12. Effects of chloroquine on the adrenocortical function. II. Histological, histochemical and biochemical changes in the suprarenal gland of rats on long-term administration of chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, M; Bayer, A

    1976-01-01

    White female Wistar rats were used in order to study the influence of long-term oral application of 7-chloro-4-(4-diethylamino-1-methylbutylamino) quinoline (chloroquine) in doses of 30, 40 and 80 mg of base/kg upon the suprarenal gland. Histological, histochemical and biochemical findings give evidence of adrenocortical activation induced by chloroquine at all dose levels tested. The differences between the signs of adrenocortical activation as observed after the various doses were only those of quantity and time onset. The results indicate that the stimulation of the suprarenal cortex produced by repeated administration of chloroquine is not solely a manifestation of toxic action of chloroquine.

  13. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  14. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  15. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  16. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  17. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... euthanasia. (3) Limitations. Not for use in animals intended for food. Federal law restricts this drug to...

  18. Effect of chloroquine on feline infectious peritonitis virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Katoh, Yasuichiroh; Doki, Tomoyoshi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2013-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a feline coronavirus-induced fatal disease in domestic and wild cats. Several studies have investigated potential treatments for FIP. However, there have been no reports on agents that have exhibited a therapeutic effect. Recently, chloroquine has been reported to antiviral effect. We investigated whether chloroquine can be used to treat FIP in vitro and in vivo. It was demonstrated that chloroquine has inhibitory effect against the replication of FIPV and anti-inflammatory effect in vitro. In vivo study using cats with experimentally induced FIP, the clinical score of chloroquine-treatment groups were better than in chloroquine-untreated group. However, alanine aminotransferase levels increased in the chloroquine-treated groups. It will be necessary to further investigate the possibility of FIP treatment with a combination of chloroquine and other agents.

  19. Phosphate transport and arsenate resistance in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, T.

    1988-03-01

    Cells of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis starved for phosphate for 3 days took up phosphate at about 100 times the rate of unstarved cells.Kinetic data suggested that a new transport system had been induced by starvation for phosphate. The inducible phosphate transport system was quickly repressed by addition of P/sub i/. Phosphate-starved cells were more sensitive to the toxic effects of arsenate than were unstarved cells, but phosphate could alleviate some of the toxicity. Arsenate was a noncompetitive inhibitor of phosphate transport; however, the apparent K/sub i/ values were high, particularly for phosphate-replete cells. Preincubation of phosphate-starved cells with arsenate caused subsequent inhibition of phosphate transport, suggesting that intracellular arsenate inhibited phosphate transport. This effect was not seen in phosphate-replete cells.

  20. A novel ABCG-like transporter of Trypanosoma cruzi is involved in natural resistance to benznidazole

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Bianca; Araujo, Rafael Gomes Aquino; Moreno, Margoth; Franco, Jaques; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique Nascimento; Nunes, Solange Lessa; Silva, Marcelo Nunes; Ienne, Susan; Machado, Carlos Renato; Brandão, Adeilton

    2015-01-01

    Benznidazole (BZ) is one of the two drugs used for Chagas disease treatment. Nevertheless therapeutic failures of BZ have been reported, which were mostly attributed to variable drug susceptibility among Trypanosoma cruzi strains. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are involved in a variety of translocation processes and some members have been implicated in drug resistance. Here we report the characterisation of the first T. cruzi ABCG transporter gene, named TcABCG1, which is over-expressed in parasite strains naturally resistant to BZ. Comparison of TcABCG1 gene sequence of two TcI BZ-resistant strains with CL Brener BZ-susceptible strain showed several single nucleotide polymorphisms, which determined 11 amino acid changes. CL Brener transfected with TcI transporter genes showed 40-47% increased resistance to BZ, whereas no statistical significant increment in drug resistance was observed when CL Brener was transfected with the homologous gene. Only in the parasites transfected with TcI genes there was 2-2.6-fold increased abundance of TcABCG1 transporter protein. The analysis in wild type strains also suggests that the level of TcABCG1 transporter is related to BZ natural resistance. The characteristics of untranslated regions of TcABCG1 genes of BZ-susceptible and resistant strains were investigated by computational tools. PMID:25946152

  1. Impact of Chloroquine on Viral Load in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Semrau, Katherine; Kuhn, Louise; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Shutes, Erin; Vwalika, Cheswa; Ghosh, Mrinal; Aldrovandi, Grace; Thea, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The anti-malarial agent chloroquine has activity against HIV. We compared the effect of chloroquine (n = 18) to an anti-malarial agent without known anti-HIV-activity, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (n = 12), on breast milk HIV RNA levels among HIV-infected breastfeeding women in Zambia. After adjusting for CD4 count and plasma viral load, chloroquine was associated with a trend towards lower levels of HIV RNA in breast milk compared with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (P 0.05). Higher breastmilk viral load was also observed among women receiving presumptive treatment = for symptomatic malaria compared with asymptomatic controls and among controls reporting fever in the prior week. Further research is needed to determine the potential role of chloroquine in prevention of HIV transmission through breastfeeding. Impacte de la chloroquine sur la charge virale dans le lait maternelle La chloroquine, agent antimalarique, a une activité contre le VIH. Nous avons comparé l’effet de la chloroquine à celui d’un autre agent antimalarique, la sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, dont l’activité sur le VIH n’est pas connue, en mesurant les taux d’ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel de femmes allaitantes infectées par le VIH en Zambie. Après ajustement pour les taux de CD4 et la charge virale dans le plasma, la chloroquine comparée à la sulfadoxine pyrimethamine était associée à une tendance vers des teneurs plus bas en ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel (P = 0,05). Des charges virales plus élevées dans le lait maternel étaient aussi observées chez des femmes recevant un traitement présomptif pour des symptômes de malaria par rapport aux contrôles asymptomatiques et par rapport à des contrôles rapportant de la fièvre durant la première semaine. Des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer le rôle potentiel de la chloroquine dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH par l’allaitement maternel. mots clésVIH, malaria, allaitement maternel

  2. Chloroquine eliminates cancer stem cells through deregulation of Jak2 and DNMT1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong Soon; Blanco, Elvin; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Rodriguez, Angel A.; Zhao, Hong; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jin, Guangxu; Landis, Melissa D.; Burey, Lacey A.; Qian, Wei; Granados, Sergio M.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Wong, Helen H.; Ferrari, Mauro; Wong, Stephen TC; Chang, Jenny C.

    2014-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is known to contain a high percentage of CD44+/CD24−/low cancer stem cells (CSC), corresponding with a poor prognosis despite systemic chemotherapy. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial drug, is a lysotropic reagent which inhibits autophagy. CQ was identified as a potential CSC inhibitor through in silico gene expression signature analysis of the CD44+/CD24−/low CSC population. Autophagy plays a critical role in adaptation to stress conditions in cancer cells, and is related with drug resistance and CSC maintenance. Thus the objectives of this study were to examine the potential enhanced efficacy arising from addition of chloroquine (CQ) to standard chemotherapy (paclitaxel) in TNBC and to identify the mechanism by which CQ eliminates CSCs in TNBCs. Herein, we report that CQ sensitizes TNBC cells to paclitaxel through inhibition of autophagy and reduces the CD44+/CD24−/low CSC population in both preclinical and clinical settings. Also, we are the first to report a mechanism by which CQ regulates the CSCs in TNBC through inhibition of the Janus-activated kinase 2 (Jak2) - Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway by reducing the expression of Jak2 and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). PMID:24809620

  3. 71 FR 18255 - Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-04-11

    ... operators to comply with the fire penetration resistance requirements of thermal/acoustic insulation used in... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 121 RIN 2120-AI75 Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...

  4. The ABC gene family in arthropods: comparative genomics and role in insecticide transport and resistance.

    PubMed

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    About a 100 years ago, the Drosophila white mutant marked the birth of Drosophila genetics. The white gene turned out to encode the first well studied ABC transporter in arthropods. The ABC gene family is now recognized as one of the largest transporter families in all kingdoms of life. The majority of ABC proteins function as primary-active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP while transporting a large diversity of substrates across lipid membranes. Although extremely well studied in vertebrates for their role in drug resistance, less is known about the role of this family in the transport of endogenous and exogenous substances in arthropods. The ABC families of five insect species, a crustacean and a chelicerate have been annotated in some detail. We conducted a thorough phylogenetic analysis of the seven arthropod and human ABC protein subfamilies, to infer orthologous relationships that might suggest conserved function. Most orthologous relationships were found in the ABCB half transporter, ABCD, ABCE and ABCF subfamilies, but specific expansions within species and lineages are frequently observed and discussed. We next surveyed the role of ABC transporters in the transport of xenobiotics/plant allelochemicals and their involvement in insecticide resistance. The involvement of ABC transporters in xenobiotic resistance in arthropods is historically not well documented, but an increasing number of studies using unbiased differential gene expression analysis now points to their importance. We give an overview of methods that can be used to link ABC transporters to resistance. ABC proteins have also recently been implicated in the mode of action and resistance to Bt toxins in Lepidoptera. Given the enormous interest in Bt toxicology in transgenic crops, such findings will provide an impetus to further reveal the role of ABC transporters in arthropods.

  5. Fate and transport of veterinary antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance gene from fields receiving poultry manure during storm events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobials are used in production agriculture to treat disease and promote animal growth, but the presence of antibiotics in the environment raises concern about widespread antibiotic resistance. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin, tetracycline, enterococci resistant to...

  6. The role of ABC transporters in drug resistance, metabolism and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Glavinas, Hristos; Krajcsi, Péter; Cserepes, Judit; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2004-01-01

    ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters form a special family of membrane proteins, characterized by homologous ATP-binding, and large, multispanning transmembrane domains. Several members of this family are primary active transporters, which significantly modulate the absorption, metabolism, cellular effectivity and toxicity of pharmacological agents. This review provides a general overview of the human ABC transporters, their expression, localization and basic mechanism of action. Then we shortly deal with the human ABC transporters as targets of therapeutic interventions in medicine, including cancer drug resistance, lipid and other metabolic disorders, and even gene therapy applications. We place a special emphasis on the three major groups of ABC transporters involved in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). These are the classical P-glycoprotein (MDR1, ABCB1), the multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRPs, in the ABCC subfamily), and the ABCG2 protein, an ABC half-transporter. All these proteins catalyze an ATP-dependent active transport of chemically unrelated compounds, including anticancer drugs. MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) and ABCG2 preferentially extrude large hydrophobic, positively charged molecules, while the members of the MRP family can extrude both hydrophobic uncharged molecules and water-soluble anionic compounds. Based on the physiological expression and role of these transporters, we provide examples for their role in Absorption-Distribution-Metabolism-Excretion (ADME) and toxicology, and describe several basic assays which can be applied for screening drug interactions with ABC transporters in the course of drug research and development.

  7. Multidrug resistance in parasites: ABC transporters, P-glycoproteins and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Jones, P M; George, A M

    2005-04-30

    Parasitic diseases, caused by protozoa, helminths and arthropods, rank among the most important problems in human and veterinary medicine, and in agriculture, leading to debilitating sicknesses and loss of life. In the absence of vaccines and with the general failure of vector eradication programs, drugs are the main line of defence, but the newest drugs are being tracked by the emergence of resistance in parasites, sharing ominous parallels with multidrug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Any of a number of mechanisms will elicit a drug resistance phenotype in parasites, including: active efflux, reduced uptake, target modification, drug modification, drug sequestration, by-pass shunting, or substrate competition. The role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms is being subjected to more scrutiny, due in part to the established roles of certain ABC transporters in human diseases, and also to an increasing portfolio of ABC transporters from parasite genome sequencing projects. For example, over 100 ABC transporters have been identified in the Escherichia coli genome, but to date only about 65 in all parasitic genomes. Long established laboratory investigations are now being assisted by molecular biology, bioinformatics, and computational modelling, and it is in these areas that the role of ABC transporters in parasitic multidrug resistance mechanisms may be defined and put in perspective with that of other proteins. We discuss ABC transporters in parasites, and conclude with an example of molecular modelling that identifies a new interaction between the structural domains of a parasite P-glycoprotein. PMID:15826647

  8. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA.

    PubMed

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-09-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters.

  9. Substrate-bound structure of the E. coli multidrug resistance transporter MdfA

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Jie; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Yue; Fan, Junping; Wang, Xianping; Zhao, Yongfang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a serious threat to public health. Proton motive force-driven antiporters from the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) constitute a major group of multidrug-resistance transporters. Currently, no reports on crystal structures of MFS antiporters in complex with their substrates exist. The E. coli MdfA transporter is a well-studied model system for biochemical analyses of multidrug-resistance MFS antiporters. Here, we report three crystal structures of MdfA-ligand complexes at resolutions up to 2.0 Å, all in the inward-facing conformation. The substrate-binding site sits proximal to the conserved acidic residue, D34. Our mutagenesis studies support the structural observations of the substrate-binding mode and the notion that D34 responds to substrate binding by adjusting its protonation status. Taken together, our data unveil the substrate-binding mode of MFS antiporters and suggest a mechanism of transport via this group of transporters. PMID:26238402

  10. Differential zinc transport into testis and brain of cadmium-sensitive and -resistant murine strains.

    PubMed

    King, L M; Banks, W A; George, W J

    2000-01-01

    Recently, we showed that murine strain differences to the testicular toxicity of cadmium (Cd) are the result of variable transport of Cd across the blood-testis barrier. Because Cd is a nonessential trace element, it must be using the transporter for an endogenous substance. The objectives for this study were to determine the natural ligand for the transport system used by Cd to enter testis and brain, and to determine whether the transport of that natural ligand also differs among Cd-sensitive and -resistant murine strains. Because zinc (Zn) and Cd are cations of similar size and charge, and because Cd has been shown to inhibit Zn uptake in a variety of systems, we hypothesized that Cd was using Zn transporters to enter tissues. In this study we characterized Zn transport into the testis and brain of Cd-sensitive and -resistant murine strains. We found that the transport of 65Zn into testis and brain of Cd-resistant A/J mice was significantly reduced compared with that in Cd-sensitive 129/J mice. In 129/J mice, unlabeled CdCl2 significantly reduced 65Zn transport by 56% in testes and by 47% in brain. Pretreatment with Zn had no significant effect on 109Cd transport rates into testes or brain of 129/J or A/J mice, but did reduce the percentage of the injected 109Cd dose in testes of 129/J mice by 44% within 60 minutes. From these results we can conclude that Cd is using transport systems that normally function to regulate Zn levels in testes and brain. Murine strain resistance to the testicular effects of Cd is associated with a concomitant attenuation of the Zn transport system in testis.

  11. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  12. Transport of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in a public rural karst water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroche, Emilie; Petit, Fabienne; Fournier, Matthieu; Pawlak, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    SummaryThe goal of this study was to determine the conditions promoting the transport of antibiotic-resistant faecal bacteria, in a rural karst system providing drinking water (Northwest France). For this purpose, the resistance of the Escherichia coli population (436 isolates) to 17 antibiotics was investigated by analysing water samples from four representative interconnected sites: a creek, a swallow hole, a spring, and a well. The samples were collected during four contrasting hydrologic and grazing periods. The transport of resistant E. coli from the creek to the well appeared to be dominated by run-off and leaching phenomena. Less than 7% of the E. coli isolated during a wet period without grazing or during a dry period with grazing were antibiotic-resistant, whereas, during rainfall events with grazing, between 30% and 55% of the E. coli detected were resistant; 10-23% of these isolates were resistant to two or three antibiotics. The resistance most often found was to either chloramphenicol or tetracycline. To better describe the dynamics of the antibiotic-resistant population of E. coli entering the karst aquifer, the swallow hole was monitored over a 24-h period during a rainfall event (90 isolates). The antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates and the occurrence of class 1 integrons, genetic elements involved multi-resistance, were determined. The origin of this E. coli population was also investigated. This monitoring demonstrated that multi-antibiotic-resistant E. coli, representing 23% of the total population, infiltrated the karst aquifer at the peak of a rainfall event, with some isolates being resistant to up to eight antibiotics. No intI1 gene was detected. The search for the origin of the resistant E. coli isolated during this rainfall event demonstrated that they were of both animal and human origin. This work demonstrates that drinking water resources taken from the groundwater in a rural karst terrain is vulnerable to contamination by

  13. Transcription factors that mediate epithelial–mesenchymal transition lead to multidrug resistance by upregulating ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, M; Stephens, M A; Pathak, H; Rangarajan, A

    2011-01-01

    Development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major deterrent in the effective treatment of metastatic cancers by chemotherapy. Even though MDR and cancer invasiveness have been correlated, the molecular basis of this link remains obscure. We show here that treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs increases the expression of several ATP binding cassette transporters (ABC transporters) associated with MDR, as well as epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, selectively in invasive breast cancer cells, but not in immortalized or non-invasive cells. Interestingly, the mere induction of an EMT in immortalized and non-invasive cell lines increased their expression of ABC transporters, migration, invasion, and drug resistance. Conversely, reversal of EMT in invasive cells by downregulating EMT-inducing transcription factors reduced their expression of ABC transporters, invasion, and rendered them more chemosensitive. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the promoters of ABC transporters carry several binding sites for EMT-inducing transcription factors, and overexpression of Twist, Snail, and FOXC2 increases the promoter activity of ABC transporters. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed that Twist binds directly to the E-box elements of ABC transporters. Thus, our study identifies EMT inducers as novel regulators of ABC transporters, thereby providing molecular insights into the long-standing association between invasiveness and MDR. Targeting EMT transcription factors could hence serve as novel strategies to curb both metastasis and the associated drug resistance. PMID:21734725

  14. Slower phloem transport in gymnosperm trees can be attributed to higher sieve element resistance.

    PubMed

    Liesche, Johannes; Windt, Carel; Bohr, Tomas; Schulz, Alexander; Jensen, Kaare H

    2015-04-01

    In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Angiosperm and gymnosperm trees have a fundamentally different phloem anatomy with respect to cell size, shape and connectivity. Whether these differences have an effect on the physiology of carbohydrate transport, however, is not clear. A meta-analysis of the experimental data on phloem transport speed in trees yielded average speeds of 56 cm h(-1) for angiosperm trees and 22 cm h(-1) for gymnosperm trees. Similar values resulted from theoretical modeling using a simple transport resistance model. Analysis of the model parameters clearly identified sieve element (SE) anatomy as the main factor for the significantly slower carbohydrate transport speed inside the phloem in gymnosperm compared with angiosperm trees. In order to investigate the influence of SE anatomy on the hydraulic resistance, anatomical data on SEs and sieve pores were collected by transmission electron microscopy analysis and from the literature for 18 tree species. Calculations showed that the hydraulic resistance is significantly higher in the gymnosperm than in angiosperm trees. The higher resistance is only partially offset by the considerably longer SEs of gymnosperms.

  15. Resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, L.D.; Sandberg, S.K.

    2000-04-01

    The authors demonstrate the use of resistivity/induced polarization (IP) monitoring of salt transport under natural hydraulic loads. Electrical monitoring of saline tracer transport during forced injection has been demonstrated previously. Detection of tracer transport under natural hydraulic loading is difficult because neither the hydraulic load nor the tracer resistivity can be controlled. In one study, the authors identify the electrical response to salt transport in a dynamic beach environment. Resistivity/IP imagine resolved the structure of the saltwater-freshwater interface and evidence for tide-induced groundwater transport. Resistivity increases in the near surface and at depth, upbeach of the high-tide mark, accompanied by tidal transgression. They attribute this to desaturation and decreasing salinity in the near surface and to decreasing salinity at depth, despite tidal transgression. Monitoring of groundwater levels indicates a phase lag between the tide level and groundwater level, supporting the electrical data. IP was insensitive to groundwater salinity variation. In a second study, the authors identify the electrical response to recharge-induced salt transport from a road-sale storage facility. Conductivity and IP models for monitoring lines, located on the basis of an EM31 survey, resolved the subsurface salt distribution, IP modeling resolved the sediment-bedrock interface. Modeling of monthly conductivity differences revealed conductivity increases and decreases at the locations of salt contamination, which correlate with the recharge pattern. They attribute near-surface conductivity increases after heavy rainfall to increasing saturation and ion dissolution. Corresponding conductivity decreases at depth are attributed to flushing of the bedrock with freshwater. Essentially, the opposite response was observed during a quiet monitoring period following heavy recharge. Near-surface IP changes are consistent with this interpretation. Salt

  16. Efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Mejia Torres, Rosa Elena; Banegas, Engels Ilich; Mendoza, Meisy; Diaz, Cesar; Bucheli, Sandra Tamara Mancero; Fontecha, Gustavo A; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Goldman, Ira; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Zambrano, Jose Orlinder Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is officially used for the primary treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Honduras. In this study, the therapeutic efficacy of CQ for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in the municipality of Puerto Lempira, Gracias a Dios, Honduras was evaluated using the Pan American Health Organization-World Health Organization protocol with a follow-up of 28 days. Sixty-eight patients from 6 months to 60 years of age microscopically diagnosed with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria were included in the final analysis. All patients who were treated with CQ (25 mg/kg over 3 days) cleared parasitemia by day 3 and acquired no new P. falciparum infection within 28 days of follow-up. All the parasite samples sequenced for CQ resistance mutations (pfcrt) showed only the CQ-sensitive genotype (CVMNK). This finding shows that CQ remains highly efficacious for the treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Gracias a Dios, Honduras.

  17. Experimental study on the resistance of a transport ship navigating in level ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Jianqiao; Ji, Shaopeng; Tian, Yukui

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the resistance of a transport ship navigating in Arctic waters by conducting a series of model tests in an ice tank at Tianjin University. The laboratory-scale model ship was mounted on a rigid carriage using a one-directional load cell and then towed through an ice sheet at different speeds. We observed the ice-breaking process at different parts of the ship and motion of the ice floes and measured the resistances under different speeds to determine the relationship between the ice-breaking process and the ice resistance. The bending failure at the shoulder area was found to cause maximum resistance. Furthermore, we introduced the analytical method of Lindqvist (1989) for estimating ice resistance and then compared these calculated results with those from our model tests. The results indicate that the calculated total resistances are higher than those we determined in the model tests.

  18. Research Progress on the Role of ABC Transporters in the Drug Resistance Mechanism of Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jie; Mao, Ding-an; Liu, Li-qun

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intractable epilepsy is not fully clear. In recent years, both animal and clinical trials have shown that the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is increased in patients with intractable epilepsy; additionally, epileptic seizures can lead to an increase in the number of sites that express ABC transporters. These findings suggest that ABC transporters play an important role in the drug resistance mechanism of epilepsy. ABC transporters can perform the funcions of a drug efflux pump, which can reduce the effective drug concentration at epilepsy lesions by reducing the permeability of the blood brain barrier to antiepileptic drugs, thus causing resistance to antiepileptic drugs. Given the important role of ABC transporters in refractory epilepsy drug resistance, antiepileptic drugs that are not substrates of ABC transporters were used to obtain ABC transporter inhibitors with strong specificity, high safety, and few side effects, making them suitable for long-term use; therefore, these drugs can be used for future clinical treatment of intractable epilepsy. PMID:26491660

  19. UDP-galactose and acetyl-CoA transporters as Plasmodium multidrug resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; LaMonte, Gregory; Lee, Marcus C S; Reimer, Christin; Tan, Bee Huat; Corey, Victoria; Tjahjadi, Bianca F; Chua, Adeline; Nachon, Marie; Wintjens, René; Gedeck, Peter; Malleret, Benoit; Renia, Laurent; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Yeung, Bryan K S; Chow, Eric D; Lim, Liting; Fidock, David A; Diagana, Thierry T; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Bifani, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A molecular understanding of drug resistance mechanisms enables surveillance of the effectiveness of new antimicrobial therapies during development and deployment in the field. We used conventional drug resistance selection as well as a regime of limiting dilution at early stages of drug treatment to probe two antimalarial imidazolopiperazines, KAF156 and GNF179. The latter approach permits the isolation of low-fitness mutants that might otherwise be out-competed during selection. Whole-genome sequencing of 24 independently derived resistant Plasmodium falciparum clones revealed four parasites with mutations in the known cyclic amine resistance locus (pfcarl) and a further 20 with mutations in two previously unreported P. falciparum drug resistance genes, an acetyl-CoA transporter (pfact) and a UDP-galactose transporter (pfugt). Mutations were validated both in vitro by CRISPR editing in P. falciparum and in vivo by evolution of resistant Plasmodium berghei mutants. Both PfACT and PfUGT were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescence microscopy. As mutations in pfact and pfugt conveyed resistance against additional unrelated chemical scaffolds, these genes are probably involved in broad mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance. PMID:27642791

  20. UDP-galactose and acetyl-CoA transporters as Plasmodium multidrug resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Michelle Yi-Xiu; LaMonte, Gregory; Lee, Marcus C S; Reimer, Christin; Tan, Bee Huat; Corey, Victoria; Tjahjadi, Bianca F; Chua, Adeline; Nachon, Marie; Wintjens, René; Gedeck, Peter; Malleret, Benoit; Renia, Laurent; Bonamy, Ghislain M C; Ho, Paul Chi-Lui; Yeung, Bryan K S; Chow, Eric D; Lim, Liting; Fidock, David A; Diagana, Thierry T; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Bifani, Pablo

    2016-09-19

    A molecular understanding of drug resistance mechanisms enables surveillance of the effectiveness of new antimicrobial therapies during development and deployment in the field. We used conventional drug resistance selection as well as a regime of limiting dilution at early stages of drug treatment to probe two antimalarial imidazolopiperazines, KAF156 and GNF179. The latter approach permits the isolation of low-fitness mutants that might otherwise be out-competed during selection. Whole-genome sequencing of 24 independently derived resistant Plasmodium falciparum clones revealed four parasites with mutations in the known cyclic amine resistance locus (pfcarl) and a further 20 with mutations in two previously unreported P. falciparum drug resistance genes, an acetyl-CoA transporter (pfact) and a UDP-galactose transporter (pfugt). Mutations were validated both in vitro by CRISPR editing in P. falciparum and in vivo by evolution of resistant Plasmodium berghei mutants. Both PfACT and PfUGT were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescence microscopy. As mutations in pfact and pfugt conveyed resistance against additional unrelated chemical scaffolds, these genes are probably involved in broad mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance.

  1. Auxin transport in an auxin-resistant mutant of arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.; Benning, C.; Estelle, M.

    1987-04-01

    The authors are studying a group of allelic recessive mutations in Arabidopsis called axr-1. Homozygous axr-1 plants are resistant to exogenously applied auxin. In addition, axr-1 mutations all confer a number of development abnormalities including an apparent reduction in apical dominance, loss of normal geotropic response, and a failure to self-fertilize due to a decrease in stamen elongation. In order to determine whether this pleiotropic phenotype is due to an alteration in auxin transport they have adapted the agar block transport assay for use in Arabidopsis stem segments. Their results indicate that as in other plant species, auxin transport is strongly polar in Arabidopsis stem segments. In addition transport is inhibited by the well characterized auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and the artificial auxin 2,4-D. These results as well as the characterization of transport in axr-1 plants will be presented.

  2. Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a "multitasking" ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter.

    PubMed

    Cole, Susan P C

    2014-11-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases.

  3. A recently evolved hexose transporter variant confers resistance to multiple pathogens in wheat.

    PubMed

    Moore, John W; Herrera-Foessel, Sybil; Lan, Caixia; Schnippenkoetter, Wendelin; Ayliffe, Michael; Huerta-Espino, Julio; Lillemo, Morten; Viccars, Libby; Milne, Ricky; Periyannan, Sambasivam; Kong, Xiuying; Spielmeyer, Wolfgang; Talbot, Mark; Bariana, Harbans; Patrick, John W; Dodds, Peter; Singh, Ravi; Lagudah, Evans

    2015-12-01

    As there are numerous pathogen species that cause disease and limit yields of crops, such as wheat (Triticum aestivum), single genes that provide resistance to multiple pathogens are valuable in crop improvement. The mechanistic basis of multi-pathogen resistance is largely unknown. Here we use comparative genomics, mutagenesis and transformation to isolate the wheat Lr67 gene, which confers partial resistance to all three wheat rust pathogen species and powdery mildew. The Lr67 resistance gene encodes a predicted hexose transporter (LR67res) that differs from the susceptible form of the same protein (LR67sus) by two amino acids that are conserved in orthologous hexose transporters. Sugar uptake assays show that LR67sus, and related proteins encoded by homeoalleles, function as high-affinity glucose transporters. LR67res exerts a dominant-negative effect through heterodimerization with these functional transporters to reduce glucose uptake. Alterations in hexose transport in infected leaves may explain its ability to reduce the growth of multiple biotrophic pathogen species.

  4. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using 14C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  5. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  6. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR.

  7. The LABCG2 Transporter from the Protozoan Parasite Leishmania Is Involved in Antimony Resistance.

    PubMed

    Perea, Ana; Manzano, José Ignacio; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    Treatment for leishmaniasis, which is caused by Leishmania protozoan parasites, currently relies on a reduced arsenal of drugs. However, the significant increase in the incidence of drug therapeutic failure and the growing resistance to first-line drugs like antimonials in some areas of Northern India and Nepal limit the control of this parasitic disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance in Leishmania is now a matter of urgency to optimize drugs used and to identify novel drug targets to block or reverse resistant mechanisms. Some members of the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in Leishmania have been associated with drug resistance. In this study, we have focused our interest to characterize LABCG2's involvement in drug resistance in Leishmania. Leishmania major parasites overexpressing the ABC protein transporter LABCG2 were generated in order to assess how LABCG2 is involved in drug resistance. Assays of susceptibility to different leishmanicidal agents were carried out. Analysis of the drug resistance profile revealed that Leishmania parasites overexpressing LABCG2 were resistant to antimony, as they demonstrated a reduced accumulation of Sb(III) due to an increase in drug efflux. Additionally, LABCG2 was able to transport thiols in the presence of Sb(III) Biotinylation assays using parasites expressing LABCG2 fused with an N-terminal green fluorescent protein tag revealed that LABCG2 is partially localized in the plasma membrane; this supports data from previous studies which suggested that LABCG2 is localized in intracellular vesicles that fuse with the plasma membrane during exocytosis. In conclusion, Leishmania LABCG2 probably confers antimony resistance by sequestering metal-thiol conjugates within vesicles and through further exocytosis by means of the parasite's flagellar pocket.

  8. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  9. 72 FR 1438 - Fire Penetration Resistance of Thermal/Acoustic Insulation Installed on Transport Category Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2007-01-12

    ... the fire penetration resistance requirements of thermal/ acoustic insulation used in transport... service. Section 25.856(b), in turn, requires that thermal/acoustic insulation installed in the lower half... the new thermal acoustic insulation standards would spare manufactures an added setup cost of...

  10. Performance of Four Transport and Storage Systems for Molecular Detection of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabodoarivelo, Marie Sylvianne; Imperiale, Bélen; andrianiavomikotroka, Rina; Brandao, Angela; Kumar, Parveen; Singh, Sarman; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Morcillo, Nora; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Vandamme, Peter; Martin, Anandi

    2015-01-01

    Background Detection of drug-resistant tuberculosis is essential for the control of the disease but it is often hampered by the limitation of transport and storage of samples from remote locations to the reference laboratory. We performed a retrospective field study to evaluate the performance of four supports enabling the transport and storage of samples to be used for molecular detection of drug resistance using the GenoType MTBDRplus. Methods Two hundred Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were selected and spotted on slides, FTA cards, GenoCards, and in ethanol. GenoType MTBDRplus was subsequently performed with the DNA extracted from these supports. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared to the results obtained by drug susceptibility testing. Results For all supports, the overall sensitivity and specificity for detection of resistance to RIF was between 95% and 100%, and for INH between 95% and 98%. Conclusion The four transport and storage supports showed a good sensitivity and specificity for the detection of resistance to RIF and INH in M. tuberculosis strains using the GenoType MTBDRplus. These supports can be maintained at room temperature and could represent an important alternative cost-effective method useful for rapid molecular detection of drug-resistant TB in low-resource settings. PMID:26431352

  11. Transport proteins determine drug sensitivity and resistance in a protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Settimo, Luca; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in pathogenic protozoa is very often caused by changes to the ‘transportome’ of the parasites. In Trypanosoma brucei, several transporters have been implicated in uptake of the main classes of drugs, diamidines and melaminophenyl arsenicals. The resistance mechanism had been thought to be due to loss of a transporter known to carry both types of agents: the aminopurine transporter P2, encoded by the gene TbAT1. However, although loss of P2 activity is well-documented as the cause of resistance to the veterinary diamidine diminazene aceturate (DA; Berenil®), cross-resistance between the human-use arsenical melarsoprol and the diamidine pentamidine (melarsoprol/pentamidine cross resistance, MPXR) is the result of loss of a separate high affinity pentamidine transporter (HAPT1). A genome-wide RNAi library screen for resistance to pentamidine, published in 2012, gave the key to the genetic identity of HAPT1 by linking the phenomenon to a locus that contains the closely related T. brucei aquaglyceroporin genes TbAQP2 and TbAQP3. Further analysis determined that knockdown of only one pore, TbAQP2, produced the MPXR phenotype. TbAQP2 is an unconventional aquaglyceroporin with unique residues in the “selectivity region” of the pore, and it was found that in several MPXR lab strains the WT gene was either absent or replaced by a chimeric protein, recombined with parts of TbAQP3. Importantly, wild-type AQP2 was also absent in field isolates of T. b. gambiense, correlating with the outcome of melarsoprol treatment. Expression of a wild-type copy of TbAQP2 in even the most resistant strain completely reversed MPXR and re-introduced HAPT1 function and transport kinetics. Expression of TbAQP2 in Leishmania mexicana introduced a pentamidine transport activity indistinguishable from HAPT1. Although TbAQP2 has been shown to function as a classical aquaglyceroporin it is now clear that it is also a high affinity drug transporter, HAPT1. We discuss here a

  12. Therapeutic Responses of Plasmodium vivax Malaria to Chloroquine and Primaquine Treatment in Northeastern Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lili; Wang, Ying; Parker, Daniel M.; Gupta, Bhavna; Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Huaie; Fan, Qi; Cao, Yaming; Xiao, Yuping; Lee, Ming-chieh; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun; Baird, J. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine-primaquine (CQ-PQ) continues to be the frontline therapy for radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria. Emergence of CQ-resistant (CQR) P. vivax parasites requires a shift to artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), which imposes a significant financial, logistical, and safety burden. Monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of CQ is thus important. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of CQ-PQ for P. vivax malaria in northeast Myanmar. We recruited 587 patients with P. vivax monoinfection attending local malaria clinics during 2012 to 2013. These patients received three daily doses of CQ at a total dose of 24 mg of base/kg of body weight and an 8-day PQ treatment (0.375 mg/kg/day) commencing at the same time as the first CQ dose. Of the 401 patients who finished the 28-day follow-up, the cumulative incidence of recurrent parasitemia was 5.20% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.04% to 7.36%). Among 361 (61%) patients finishing a 42-day follow-up, the cumulative incidence of recurrent blood-stage infection reached 7.98% (95% CI, 5.20% to 10.76%). The cumulative risk of gametocyte carriage at days 28 and 42 was 2.21% (95% CI, 0.78% to 3.64%) and 3.93% (95% CI, 1.94% to 5.92%), respectively. Interestingly, for all 15 patients with recurrent gametocytemia, this was associated with concurrent asexual stages. Genotyping of recurrent parasites at the merozoite surface protein 3α gene locus from 12 patients with recurrent parasitemia within 28 days revealed that 10 of these were the same genotype as at day 0, suggesting recrudescence or relapse. Similar studies in 70 patients in the same area in 2007 showed no recurrent parasitemias within 28 days. The sensitivity to chloroquine of P. vivax in northeastern Myanmar may be deteriorating. PMID:25512415

  13. Heat and mass transport resistances in vacuum membrane distillation per drop

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Sarti, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is a separation process based on the use of microporous hydrophobic membranes. The membrane is located between an aqueous phase and a permeate, which is kept under vacuum at pressure values below the equilibrium vapor pressure of the feed. The liquid stream vaporizes at one side of the membrane, and the vapors diffuse through the gas phase inside the membrane pores. The process rate and performance are affected highly by the transport phenomena both in the liquid phase and through the membrane. Heat- and mass-transfer resistance in the liquid phase, as well as mass-transfer resistance through the membrane, play an important role in determining the process performance. Based on VMD experimental data for several binary aqueous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds, a simple criterion to investigate the role of each transport resistance on the separation efficiency is discussed.

  14. A Transporter Interactome Is Essential for the Acquisition of Antimicrobial Resistance to Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Yonatan; Steiner-Mordoch, Sonia; Alon Cudkowicz, Noemie; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has escalated and drug-resistant infections are named among the most urgent problems facing clinicians today. Our experiments here identify a transporter interactome and portray its essential function in acquisition of antimicrobial resistance. By exposing E. coli cells to consecutive increasing concentrations of the fluoroquinolone norfloxacin we generated in the laboratory highly resistant strains that carry multiple mutations, most of them identical to those identified in clinical isolates. With this experimental paradigm, we show that the MDTs function in a coordinated mode to provide an essential first-line defense mechanism, preventing the drug reaching lethal concentrations, until a number of stable efficient alterations occur that allow survival. Single-component efflux transporters remove the toxic compounds from the cytoplasm to the periplasmic space where TolC-dependent transporters expel them from the cell. We postulate a close interaction between the two types of transporters to prevent rapid leak of the hydrophobic substrates back into the cell. The findings change the prevalent concept that in Gram-negative bacteria a single multidrug transporter, AcrAB-TolC type, is responsible for the resistance. The concept of a functional interactome, the process of identification of its members, the elucidation of the nature of the interactions and its role in cell physiology will change the existing paradigms in the field. We anticipate that our work will have an impact on the present strategy searching for inhibitors of AcrAB-TolC as adjuvants of existing antibiotics and provide novel targets for this urgent undertaking. PMID:27050393

  15. Multidrug Transporters and Alterations in Sterol Biosynthesis Contribute to Azole Antifungal Resistance in Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Elizabeth L; Manigaba, Kayihura; Parker, Josie E; Barker, Katherine S; Kelly, Stephen L; Rogers, P David

    2015-10-01

    While much is known concerning azole resistance in Candida albicans, considerably less is understood about Candida parapsilosis, an emerging species of Candida with clinical relevance. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of azole resistance in a collection of resistant C. parapsilosis clinical isolates in order to determine which genes might play a role in this process within this species. We examined the relative expression of the putative drug transporter genes CDR1 and MDR1 and that of ERG11. In isolates overexpressing these genes, we sequenced the genes encoding their presumed transcriptional regulators, TAC1, MRR1, and UPC2, respectively. We also sequenced the sterol biosynthesis genes ERG3 and ERG11 in these isolates to find mutations that might contribute to this phenotype in this Candida species. Our findings demonstrate that the putative drug transporters Cdr1 and Mdr1 contribute directly to azole resistance and suggest that their overexpression is due to activating mutations in the genes encoding their transcriptional regulators. We also observed that the Y132F substitution in ERG11 is the only substitution occurring exclusively among azole-resistant isolates, and we correlated this with specific changes in sterol biosynthesis. Finally, sterol analysis of these isolates suggests that other changes in sterol biosynthesis may contribute to azole resistance in C. parapsilosis.

  16. Antimalarial activity of ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) arene complexes with mono- and bidentate chloroquine analogue ligands.

    PubMed

    Ekengard, Erik; Glans, Lotta; Cassells, Irwin; Fogeron, Thibault; Govender, Preshendren; Stringer, Tameryn; Chellan, Prinessa; Lisensky, George C; Hersh, William H; Doverbratt, Isa; Lidin, Sven; de Kock, Carmen; Smith, Peter J; Smith, Gregory S; Nordlander, Ebbe

    2015-11-28

    Eight new ruthenium and five new osmium p-cymene half-sandwich complexes have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated for antimalarial activity. All complexes contain ligands that are based on a 4-chloroquinoline framework related to the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Ligands HL(1-8) are salicylaldimine derivatives, where HL(1) = N-(2-((2-hydroxyphenyl)methylimino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, and HL(2-8) contain non-hydrogen substituents in the 3-position of the salicylaldimine ring, viz. F, Cl, Br, I, NO2, OMe and (t)Bu for HL(2-8), respectively. Ligand HL(9) is also a salicylaldimine-containing ligand with substitutions in both 3- and 5-positions of the salicylaldimine moiety, i.e. N-(2-((2-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)methyl-imino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine, while HL(10) is N-(2-((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylamino)ethyl)-7-chloroquinolin-4-amine) The half sandwich metal complexes that have been investigated are [Ru(η(6)-cym)(L(1-8))Cl] (Ru-1-Ru-8, cym = p-cymene), [Os(η(6)-cym)(L(1-3,5,7))Cl] (Os-1-Os-3, Os-5, and Os-7), [M(η(6)-cym)(HL(9))Cl2] (M = Ru, Ru-HL(9); M = Os, Os-HL(9)) and [M(η(6)-cym)(L(10))Cl]Cl (M = Ru, Ru-10; M = Os, Os-10). In complexes Ru-1-Ru-8 and Ru-10, Os-1-Os-3, Os-5 and Os-7 and Os-10, the ligands were found to coordinate as bidentate N,O- and N,N-chelates, while in complexes Ru-HL(9) and Os-HL(9), monodentate coordination of the ligands through the quinoline nitrogen was established. The antimalarial activity of the new ligands and complexes was evaluated against chloroquine sensitive (NF54 and D10) and chloroquine resistant (Dd2) Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite strains. Coordination of ruthenium and osmium arene moieties to the ligands resulted in lower antiplasmodial activities relative to the free ligands, but the resistance index is better for the ruthenium complexes compared to chloroquine. Overall, osmium complexes appeared to be less active than the corresponding ruthenium complexes. PMID:26491831

  17. Chloroquine impairs visual transduction via modulation of acid sensing ion channel 1a.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Fei, Jianchun; Lei, Zhen; Liu, Kejing; Wu, Jianbo; Meng, Tao; Yu, Jingui; Li, Jingxin

    2014-08-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are extracellular pH sensors activated by protons, which influence retinal activity and phototransduction. Among all ASICs, ASIC1a is abundantly expressed in the retina and involved in normal retinal activity. Chloroquine, which has been used in the treatment of malaria, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, has been shown to be toxic to the retina. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of chloroquine in phototransduction by measuring the electroretinogram (ERG). The effect of chloroquine on acid-evoked currents in either isolated rat retinal ganglion neurons (RGNs) or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with ASIC1a were assessed using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Chloroquine reduced the b-wave of scotopic 0.01 and photopic 3.0 and amplitudes of oscillatory potentials (OPs), an effect which was almost completely reversed by PcTx1, an ASIC1a-specific channel blocker. Further, patch-clamp experiments demonstrated that chloroquine reduced the peak current amplitude and prolonged the activation and desensitization of ASIC1a currents. These chloroquine-induced effects on the kinetics of ASIC 1a were dose-, pH- and Ca(2+)-dependent. Taken together, these results demonstrate that chloroquine affects vision conduction by directly modifying the kinetics of ASIC1a. Such a mechanism, may, in part, explain the retinal toxicity of chloroquine.

  18. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  19. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  20. Transdermal delivery of chloroquine by amidated pectin hydrogel matrix patch in the rat.

    PubMed

    Musabayane, C T; Munjeri, O; Matavire, T P

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the suitability of amidated pectin matrix patch for transdermal chloroquine delivery in an effort to mask the bitter taste when orally administered. Chloroquine has easily measurable outputs that are linked to increased renal Na+ excretion. We thus monitored urinary Na+ output in separate groups intravenously administered chloroquine or topically applied pectin hydrogel chloroquine matrix patch. Male groups of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were placed on a continuous jugular infusion of 0.077 M NaCl at 150 microL min(-1). After 3 h equilibration period, consecutive 20 min urine collections were made over the subsequent 4 h of 1 h control, 1 h 20 min treatment, and 1 h 40 min recovery periods for measurements of urine flow and Na+ and K+ excretion rates. The effects of intravenous chloroquine infusion or topical application of pectin hydrogel chloroquine matrix patch were examined in rats in which the drug was added to the infusate or patch applied onto the shaved area during the 1 h 20 min treatment period. The animals were switched back to the infusate alone for the final 1 h 40 min recovery period. Vehicle infused animals acted as controls. Trunk blood was collected after the treatment period from parallel groups for chloroquine measurements. The plasma chloroquine concentrations following iv chloroquine or application of pectin chloroquine hydrogel matrix patch were 9.3 +/- 0.8 mg L(-1) and 7.3 +/- 1.1 mg L(-1) respectively (n = 7 in both groups). Chloroquine infusion and pectin chloroquine patch significantly (p < 0.01) increased Na+ excretion to peak values of 14.1 +/- 0.9 micromol min(-1). and 20.35 +/- 1.0 micromol min(-1), respectively by comparison with controls (9.1 +/- 0.9 micromol min(-1)), at the corresponding period. The results suggest that the pectin chloroquine patch matrix preparation has potential applications for transdermal delivery of chloroquine and perhaps in the management of malaria.

  1. Quantum transport investigation of anomalous Hall resistance in four-probe magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Kui; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yu; Yu, Guanghua; Guo, Hong

    2016-08-01

    We report first principles investigations of the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Fe and Ni four-probe crossbar nanostructures where the boundary scattering is a very important mechanism for the predicted AHE resistance. The results allow us to understand nanoscopic AHE physics in terms of how quantized channels are scattered by boundaries to contribute to the AHE resistance, the spin orbit interaction (SOI) versus boundary scattering, the spin texture of the scattered channels, and the symmetry of the scattering matrices. From individual transport channels we find that electrons are pushed in the transverse direction deep inside the incoming probe by the SOI, and strongly scattered by the crossbar boundaries to negotiate corners and enter into voltage probes. The combined SOI and boundary scattering lead to opposite signs of the AHE resistance for Fe and Ni. The spin texture is largely collinear deep inside the probes, but is complicated after boundary scattering. The calculated AHE resistance satisfies an Onsager-like symmetry relation.

  2. Electronic transport in single crystals and polycrystalline Al3Zr: Effect of disorder upon resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B.; Chashka, K. B.; Patlagan, L.; Bazalitsky, G.; Reisner, G. M.

    2003-07-01

    We report on electronic transport measurements carried out on Al3Zr single crystals and a polycrystal. The resistivities of the most conductive samples follow the Bloch-Grüneisen temperature dependence with very similar characteristic temperatures θR around 417 K. Excess Zr and some additional impurities/disorder are responsible for a wide spread of residual resistivities (ρ0) in the crystals. In samples with large ρ0, resistivity seems to be dominated over wide ranges of temperature by scattering from vibrating impurities (a mechanism known as electron-phonon-impurity interference). At low temperatures the contribution of the interference term to resistivity is Δρimp=Bρ0T2. The very large value of B (as compared with the few data available for other metals) and large ρ0 in this group of samples enabled detection of this unusual electronic scattering up to relatively high temperatures.

  3. Piperaquine and Lumefantrine resistance in Plasmodium berghei ANKA associated with increased expression of Ca2+/H+ antiporter and glutathione associated enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kiboi, Daniel; Irungu, Beatrice; Orwa, Jennifer; Kamau, Luna; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella; Ngángá, Joseph; Nzila, Alexis

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance of two antimalarial drugs piperaquine (PQ) and lumefantrine (LM) using the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei as a surrogate of the human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. We analyzed the whole coding sequence of Plasmodium berghei chloroquine resistance transporter (Pbcrt) and Plasmodium berghei multidrug resistance gene 1(Pbmdr-1) for polymorphisms. These genes are associated with quinoline resistance in Plasmodium falciparum. No polymorphic changes were detected in the coding sequences of Pbcrt and Pbmdr1 or in the mRNA transcript levels of Pbmdr1. However, our data demonstrated that PQ and LM resistance is achieved by multiple mechanisms that include elevated mRNA transcript levels of V-type H(+) pumping pyrophosphatase (vp2), Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (vcx1), gamma glutamylcysteine synthetase (ggcs) and glutathione-S-transferase (gst) genes, mechanisms also known to contribute to chloroquine resistance in P. falciparum and rodent malaria parasites. The increase in ggcs and gst transcript levels was accompanied by high glutathione (GSH) levels and elevated activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Pbcrt and Pbmdr1 are not associated with PQ and LM resistance in P. berghei ANKA, while vp2, vcx1, ggcs and gst may mediate resistance directly or modulate functional mutations in other unknown genes. PMID:25448357

  4. In vitro establishment of ivermectin-resistant Rhipicephalus microplus cell line and the contribution of ABC transporters on the resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Paula C; Carvalho, Danielle D; Daffre, Sirlei; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Masuda, Aoi

    2014-08-29

    The cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus is one of the most economically damaging livestock ectoparasites, and its widespread resistance to acaricides is a considerable challenge to its control. In this scenario, the establishment of resistant cell lines is a useful approach to understand the mechanisms involved in the development of acaricide resistance, to identify drug resistance markers, and to develop new acaricides. This study describes the establishment of an ivermectin (IVM)-resistant R. microplus embryonic cell line, BME26-IVM. The resistant cells were obtained after the exposure of IVM-sensitive BME26 cells to increasing doses of IVM in a step-wise manner, starting from an initial non-toxic concentration of 0.5 μg/mL IVM, and reaching 6 μg/mL IVM after a 46-week period. BME26-IVM cell line was 4.5 times more resistant to IVM than the parental BME26 cell line (lethal concentration 50 (LC50) 15.1 ± 1.6 μg/mL and 3.35 ± 0.09 μg/mL, respectively). As an effort to determine the molecular mechanisms governing resistance, the contribution of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was investigated. Increased expression levels of ABC transporter genes were found in IVM-treated cells, and resistance to IVM was significantly reduced by co-incubation with 5 μM cyclosporine A (CsA), an ABC transporter inhibitor, suggesting the involvement of these proteins in IVM-resistance. These results are similar to those already described in IVM-resistant tick populations, and suggest that similar resistance mechanisms are involved in vitro and in vivo. They reinforce the hypothesis that ABC transporters are involved in IVM resistance and support the use of BME26-IVM as an in vitro approach to study acaricide resistance mechanisms. PMID:24956999

  5. New Approaches to Overcome Transport Related Drug Resistance in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Salcedo, Jose A.; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Valverde-Pozo, Javier; Soriano, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania and Trypanosoma are members of the Trypanosomatidae family that cause severe human infections such as leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and sleeping sickness affecting millions of people worldwide. Despite efforts to eradicate them, migrations are expanding these infections to developing countries. There are no vaccines available and current treatments depend only on chemotherapy. Drug resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of these diseases given that existing drugs are old and limited, with some having severe side effects. Most resistance mechanisms developed by these parasites are related with a decreased uptake or increased efflux of the drug due to mutations or altered expression of membrane transporters. Different new approaches have been elaborated that can overcome these mechanisms of resistance including the use of inhibitors of efflux pumps and drug carriers for both active and passive targeting. Here we review new formulations that have been successfully applied to circumvent resistance related to drug transporters, opening alternative ways to solve drug resistance in protozoan parasitic diseases. PMID:27733833

  6. Contributions of Aspergillus fumigatus ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Proteins to Drug Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sanjoy; Diekema, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In yeast cells such as those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins has been found to be increased and correlates with a concomitant elevation in azole drug resistance. In this study, we investigated the roles of two Aspergillus fumigatus proteins that share high sequence similarity with S. cerevisiae Pdr5, an ABC transporter protein that is commonly overproduced in azole-resistant isolates in this yeast. The two A. fumigatus genes encoding the ABC transporters sharing the highest sequence similarity to S. cerevisiae Pdr5 are called abcA and abcB here. We constructed deletion alleles of these two different ABC transporter-encoding genes in three different strains of A. fumigatus. Loss of abcB invariably elicited increased azole susceptibility, while abcA disruption alleles had variable phenotypes. Specific antibodies were raised to both AbcA and AbcB proteins. These antisera allowed detection of AbcB in wild-type cells, while AbcA could be visualized only when overproduced from the hspA promoter in A. fumigatus. Overproduction of AbcA also yielded increased azole resistance. Green fluorescent protein fusions were used to provide evidence that both AbcA and AbcB are localized to the plasma membrane in A. fumigatus. Promoter fusions to firefly luciferase suggested that expression of both ABC transporter-encoding genes is inducible by azole challenge. Virulence assays implicated AbcB as a possible factor required for normal pathogenesis. This work provides important new insights into the physiological roles of ABC transporters in this major fungal pathogen. PMID:24123268

  7. MFS transporters of Candida species and their role in clinical drug resistance.

    PubMed

    K Redhu, Archana; Shah, Abdul H; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    ABC (ATP-binding cassette) and MFS (major facilitator superfamily) exporters, belonging to two different superfamilies, are one of the most prominent contributors of multidrug resistance (MDR) in yeast. While the role of ABC efflux pump proteins in the development of MDR is well documented, the MFS transporters which are also implicated in clinical drug resistance have not received due attention. The MFS superfamily is the largest known family of secondary active membrane carriers, and MFS exporters are capable of transporting a host of substrates ranging from small molecules, including organic and inorganic ions, to complex biomolecules, such as peptide and lipid moieties. A few of the members of the drug/H(+) antiporter family of the MFS superfamily function as multidrug transporters and employ downhill transport of protons to efflux their respective substrates. This review focuses on the recent developments in MFS of Candida and highlights their role in drug transport by using the example of the relatively well characterized promiscuous Mdr1 efflux pump of the pathogenic yeast C. albicans. PMID:27188885

  8. Putative ABC transporter responsible for acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis of the membrane fraction of Acetobacter aceti revealed the presence of several proteins that were produced in response to acetic acid. A 60-kDa protein, named AatA, which was mostly induced by acetic acid, was prepared; aatA was cloned on the basis of its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. AatA, consisting of 591 amino acids and containing ATP-binding cassette (ABC) sequences and ABC signature sequences, belonged to the ABC transporter superfamily. The aatA mutation with an insertion of the neomycin resistance gene within the aatA coding region showed reduced resistance to acetic acid, formic acid, propionic acid, and lactic acid, whereas the aatA mutation exerted no effects on resistance to various drugs, growth at low pH (adjusted with HCl), assimilation of acetic acid, or resistance to citric acid. Introduction of plasmid pABC101 containing aatA under the control of the Escherichia coli lac promoter into the aatA mutant restored the defect in acetic acid resistance. In addition, pABC101 conferred acetic acid resistance on E. coli. These findings showed that AatA was a putative ABC transporter conferring acetic acid resistance on the host cell. Southern blot analysis and subsequent nucleotide sequencing predicted the presence of aatA orthologues in a variety of acetic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Acetobacter and Gluconacetobacter. The fermentation with A. aceti containing aatA on a multicopy plasmid resulted in an increase in the final yield of acetic acid.

  9. Characterization of a Highly Hop-Resistant Lactobacillus brevis Strain Lacking Hop Transport

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Gänzle, Michael G.; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2006-01-01

    Resistance to hops is a prerequisite for lactic acid bacteria to spoil beer. In this study we analyzed mechanisms of hop resistance of Lactobacillus brevis at the metabolism, membrane physiology, and cell wall composition levels. The beer-spoiling organism L. brevis TMW 1.465 was adapted to high concentrations of hop compounds and compared to a nonadapted strain. Upon adaptation to hops the metabolism changed to minimize ethanol stress. Fructose was used predominantly as a carbon source by the nonadapted strain but served as an electron acceptor upon adaptation to hops, with concomitant formation of acetate instead of ethanol. Furthermore, hop adaptation resulted in higher levels of lipoteichoic acids (LTA) incorporated into the cell wall and altered composition and fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The putative transport protein HitA and enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway were overexpressed upon hop adaptation. HorA was not expressed, and the transport of hop compounds from the membrane to the extracellular space did not account for increased resistance to hops upon adaptation. Accordingly, hop resistance is a multifactorial dynamic property, which can develop during adaptation. During hop adaptation, arginine catabolism contributes to energy and generation of the proton motive force until a small fraction of the population has established structural improvements. This acquired hop resistance is energy independent and involves an altered cell wall composition. LTA shields the organism from accompanying stresses and provides a reservoir of divalent cations, which are otherwise scarce as a result of their complexation by hop acids. Some of the mechanisms involved in hop resistance overlap with mechanisms of pH resistance and ethanol tolerance and as a result enable beer spoilage by L. brevis. PMID:17021196

  10. ADS1 encodes a MATE-transporter that negatively regulates plant disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinli; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Chini, Andrea; Nurmberg, Pedro L; Hein, Ingo; Lacomme, Christophe; Birch, Paul R J; Hussain, Adil; Yun, Byung-Wook; Loake, Gary J

    2011-10-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins comprise the most recently identified family of multidrug transporters. In plants, the numbers of MATE proteins has undergone a remarkable expansion, underscoring the importance of these transporters within this kingdom. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of Activated Disease Susceptibility 1 (ADS1) which encodes a putative MATE transport protein. An activation tagging screen uncovered the ads1-Dominant (ads1-D) mutant, which was subsequently characterized by molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches. The ads1-D mutant was compromised in both basal and nonhost resistance against microbial pathogens. Further, plant defence responses conferred by RPS4 were also disabled in ads1-D plants. By contrast, depletion of ADS1 transcripts by RNA-interference (RNAi) promoted basal disease resistance. Unexpectedly, ads1-D plants were found to constitutively accumulate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs). However, analysis of ads1-D Arabidopsis thaliana respiratory burst oxidase (atrboh) double and triple mutants indicated that an increase in ROIs did not impact ads1-D-mediated disease susceptibility. Our findings imply that ADS1 negatively regulates the accumulation of the plant immune activator salicylic acid (SA) and cognate Pathogenesis-Related 1 (PR1) gene expression. Collectively, these data highlight an important role for MATE proteins in the establishment of plant disease resistance. PMID:21762165

  11. A branched chain amino acid metabolite drives vascular transport of fat and causes insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cholsoon; Oh, Sungwhan F; Wada, Shogo; Rowe, Glenn C; Liu, Laura; Chan, Mun Chun; Rhee, James; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kim, Boa; Ibrahim, Ayon; Baca, Luisa G; Kim, Esl; Ghosh, Chandra C; Parikh, Samir M; Jiang, Aihua; Chu, Qingwei; Forman, Daniel E.; Lecker, Stewart H.; Krishnaiah, Saikumari; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Weljie, Aalim M; Baur, Joseph A; Kasper, Dennis L; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data implicate branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear.1–3 Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from excess accumulation of lipid species4, a process that requires blood-borne lipids to first traverse the blood vessel wall. Little is known, however, of how this trans-endothelial transport occurs or is regulated. Here, we leverage PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator that regulates broad programs of FA consumption, to identify 3-hydroxy-isobutyrate (3-HIB), a catabolic intermediate of the BCAA valine, as a novel paracrine regulator of trans-endothelial fatty acids (FA) transport. 3-HIB is secreted from muscle cells, activates endothelial FA transport, stimulates muscle FA uptake in vivo, and promotes muscle lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in animals. Conversely, inhibiting the synthesis of 3-HIB in muscle cells blocks the promotion of endothelial FA uptake. 3-HIB levels are elevated in muscle from db/db mice and from subjects with diabetes. These data thus unveil a novel mechanism that regulates trans-endothelial flux of FAs, revealing 3-HIB as a new bioactive signaling metabolite that links the regulation of FA flux to BCAA catabolism and provides a mechanistic explanation for how increased BCAA catabolic flux can cause diabetes. PMID:26950361

  12. A branched-chain amino acid metabolite drives vascular fatty acid transport and causes insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jang, Cholsoon; Oh, Sungwhan F; Wada, Shogo; Rowe, Glenn C; Liu, Laura; Chan, Mun Chun; Rhee, James; Hoshino, Atsushi; Kim, Boa; Ibrahim, Ayon; Baca, Luisa G; Kim, Esl; Ghosh, Chandra C; Parikh, Samir M; Jiang, Aihua; Chu, Qingwei; Forman, Daniel E; Lecker, Stewart H; Krishnaiah, Saikumari; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Weljie, Aalim M; Baur, Joseph A; Kasper, Dennis L; Arany, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data implicate branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in the development of insulin resistance, but the mechanisms that underlie this link remain unclear. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle stems from the excess accumulation of lipid species, a process that requires blood-borne lipids to initially traverse the blood vessel wall. How this trans-endothelial transport occurs and how it is regulated are not well understood. Here we leveraged PPARGC1a (also known as PGC-1α; encoded by Ppargc1a), a transcriptional coactivator that regulates broad programs of fatty acid consumption, to identify 3-hydroxyisobutyrate (3-HIB), a catabolic intermediate of the BCAA valine, as a new paracrine regulator of trans-endothelial fatty acid transport. We found that 3-HIB is secreted from muscle cells, activates endothelial fatty acid transport, stimulates muscle fatty acid uptake in vivo and promotes lipid accumulation in muscle, leading to insulin resistance in mice. Conversely, inhibiting the synthesis of 3-HIB in muscle cells blocks the ability of PGC-1α to promote endothelial fatty acid uptake. 3-HIB levels are elevated in muscle from db/db mice with diabetes and from human subjects with diabetes, as compared to those without diabetes. These data unveil a mechanism in which the metabolite 3-HIB, by regulating the trans-endothelial flux of fatty acids, links the regulation of fatty acid flux to BCAA catabolism, providing a mechanistic explanation for how increased BCAA catabolic flux can cause diabetes. PMID:26950361

  13. Reemergence of chloroquine (CQ) analogs as multi-targeting antimalarial agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Mushtaque, Md; Shahjahan

    2015-01-27

    Amongst several communicable diseases (CDs), malaria is one of the deadliest parasitic disease all over the world, particularly in African and Asian countries. To curb this menace, numbers of antimalarial agents are being sold as over the counter (OTC) drugs. Chloroquine (CQ) is one of them and is one of the oldest, cheapest, and easily available synthetic agents used to curb malaria. Unfortunately, after the reports of CQ-resistance against different strains of malarial parasite strains worldwide, scientist are continuously modifying the core structure of CQ to get an efficient drug. Interestingly, several new drugs have been emerged in due course having unique and enhanced properties (like dual stage inhibitors, resistance reversing ability etc.) and are ready to enter into the clinical trial. In this course, some new agents have also been discovered which are; though inactive against CQS strain, highly active against CQR strains. The present article describes the role of modification of the core structure of CQ and its effects on the biological activities. Moreover, the attempt has also been made to predict the future prospects of such drugs to reemerge as antimalarial agents. PMID:25461328

  14. Comparative study of interactions between chloroquine and chlorpheniramine or promethazine in healthy volunteers: a potential combination-therapy phenomenon for resuscitating chloroquine for malaria treatment in Africa.

    PubMed

    Gbotosho, G O; Happi, C T; Sijuade, A; Ogundahunsi, O A T; Sowunmi, A; Oduola, A M J

    2008-01-01

    Although, in in-vitro and limited in-vivo studies, chlorpheniramine (CP) and promethazine (PR) have each been shown to reverse chloroquine (CQ) resistance, the pharmacokinetic basis of this reversal has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 15 healthy volunteers were randomly allotted to receive standard doses of CQ alone or in combination with CP or PR. Blood samples were collected from each volunteer at 21 time-points, from immediately before to 168 h after the initial dose. These samples were used to follow the changes in the plasma and erythrocytic concentrations of CQ. The ratio between the mean maximum CQ concentration in the erythrocytes and that in the plasma was 4.2 for the volunteers given CQ alone, 7.3 in those given CQ-CP, and 3.2 in those given CQ-PR. CP significantly enhanced the erythrocytic accumulation of CQ, increasing the maximum CQ concentration observed in the erythrocytes by 24% (P = 0.02). The bio-availability of CQ was also significantly increased in the presence of CP, with the mean value for the area under the curve, of erythrocytic concentration v. time, increasing from 99,921 to 214,516 ng/ml.h (P=0.001). The mean half-life of CQ in the erythrocytes also increased when CP was used, from 51 to 100 h, but this change was not statistically significant (P=0.83). In contrast to CP, PR had no statistically significant effect on the disposition of CQ. As CP clearly enhances disposition of CQ, a combination of CQ with CP may be useful in the management of CQ-resistant infections. Detailed toxicological studies are required to understand the full clinical implications of CP's elevation of erythrocytic CQ concentrations.

  15. The multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 transports methoxychlor and protects the seminiferous epithelium from injury.

    PubMed

    Tribull, Tiffany E; Bruner, Richard H; Bain, Lisa J

    2003-04-30

    We examined the ability of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) to transport pesticides, as this transporter mediates the cellular efflux of a variety of xenobiotics, typically as glucuronide, sulfate, or glutathione conjugates. NIH3T3 cells stably expressing MRP1 were 3.37-fold more resistant to the toxicity of fenitrothion, 3.12-fold more resistant to chlorpropham, and 2.5-fold more resistant to methoxychlor, a pesticide with estrogenic and anti-androgenic metabolites. The cells expressing MRP1 also eliminated methoxychlor two times more rapidly than their mock-transfected counterparts. We then examined whether mrp1 expression could alter the toxicity of methoxychlor in vivo using male FVB/mrp1 knockout mice (FVB/mrp1-/-). Both control and knockout mice were fed 25 mg/kg methoxychlor in honey for 39 days, and its effects on testicular morphology were examined. Methoxychlor treatment did not significantly affect testicular morphology in the FVB mice, but markedly reduced the number of developing spermatocytes in the FVB/mrp1-/- mice. These results suggest that MRPI may play a role in protecting the seminiferous tubules from methoxychlor-induced damage.

  16. Mutant pfcrt "SVMNT" haplotype and wild type pfmdr1 "N86" are endemic in Plasmodium vivax dominated areas of India under high chloroquine exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chloroquine resistance (CQR) phenotype in Plasmodium falciparum is associated with mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr-1 genes. Mutations at amino acid position 72-76 of pfcrt gene, here defined as pfcrt haplotype are associated with the geographic origin of chloroquine resistant parasite. Here, mutations at 72-76 and codon 220 of pfcrt gene and N86Y pfmdr-1 mutation were studied in blood samples collected across 11 field sites, inclusive of high and low P. falciparum prevalent areas in India. Any probable correlation between these mutations and clinical outcome of CQ treatment was also investigated. Methods Finger pricked blood spotted on Whatman No.3 papers were collected from falciparum malaria patients of high and low P. falciparum prevalent areas. For pfcrt haplotype investigation, the parasite DNA was extracted from blood samples and used for PCR amplification, followed by partial sequencing of the pfcrt gene. For pfmdr-1 N86Y mutation, the PCR product was subjected to restriction digestion with AflIII endonuclease enzyme. Results In 240 P. falciparum isolates with reported in vivo CQ therapeutic efficacy, the analysis of mutations in pfcrt gene shows that mutant SVMNT-S (67.50%) and CVIET-S (23.75%) occurred irrespective of clinical outcome and wild type CVMNK-A (7.91%) occurred only in adequate clinical and parasitological response samples. Of 287 P. falciparum isolates, SVMNTS 192 (66.89%) prevailed in all study sites and showed almost monomorphic existence (98.42% isolates) in low P. falciparum prevalent areas. However, CVIETS-S (19.51%) and CVMNK-A (11.84%) occurrence was limited to high P. falciparum prevalent areas. Investigation of pfmdr-1 N86Y mutation shows no correlation with clinical outcomes. The wild type N86 was prevalent in all the low P. falciparum prevalent areas (94.48%). However, mutant N86Y was comparably higher in numbers at the high P. falciparum prevalent areas (42.76%). Conclusions The wild type pfcrt gene is linked to chloroquine

  17. Transport cycle intermediate in small multidrug resistance protein is revealed by substrate fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Basting, Daniel; Lorch, Mark; Lehner, Ines; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2008-02-01

    Efflux pumps of the small multidrug resistance family bind cationic, lipophilic antibiotics and transport them across the membrane in exchange for protons. The transport cycle must involve various conformational states of the protein needed for substrate binding, translocation, and release. A fluorescent substrate will therefore experience a significant change of environment while being transported, which influences its fluorescence properties. Thus the substrate itself can report intermediate states that form during the transport cycle. We show the existence of such a substrate-transporter complex for the EmrE homolog Mycobacterium tuberculosis TBsmr and its substrate ethidium bromide. The pH gradient needed for antiport has been generated by co-reconstituting TBsmr with bacteriorhodopsin. Sample illumination generates a DeltapH, which results in enhanced ethidium fluorescence intensity, which is abolished when DeltapH or DeltaPsi is collapsed or when the essential residue Glu-13 in TBsmr is exchanged with Ala. This observation shows the formation of a pH-dependent, transient substrate-protein complex between binding and release of ethidium. We have further characterized this state by determining the K(d), by inhibiting ethidium transport through titration with nonfluorescent substrate and by fluorescence anisotropy measurements. Our findings support a model with a single occluded intermediate state in which the substrate is highly immobile.

  18. Chloroquine-induced bull's eye maculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis: related to disease duration?

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Samuel K; Maia, Otacílio O; Tizziani, Vivian A P; Morita, Celso; Kochen, Jussara A L; Takahashi, Walter Y; Laurindo, Ieda M M

    2007-08-01

    Chloroquine diphosphate has been used in the treatment of various rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. The most important of its side effects is retinopathy. If not diagnosed early, this lesion can evolve into irreversible bull's eye maculopathy and visual loss. The aim of this study was to define the outcome of chloroquine-induced maculopathy after cessation of chloroquine therapy and also to identify the risk factors involved in case of retinopathy evolution. The design of this cohort study was longitudinal and retrospective. Over the period spanning 2000 to 2005, out of 607 medical records of patients with rheumatoid arthritis followed in our Division of Rheumatology, 27 had been diagnosed with chloroquine-induced maculopathy through clinical funduscopy with pupil dilation. In all cases, there was immediate chloroquine intake cessation. After a mean time of 5 years, 16 of these patients were available for follow-up and underwent a new ophthalmologic evaluation by funduscopy, using biomicroscopy and angiofluorescein when necessary. Sequelae maculopathy were reconfirmed in all 16 cases, but progression to advanced stage (bull's eye maculopathy) was found in half of the cohort, even though chloroquine had been suspended. All patients complained of visual alterations, but without progression. Comparison between patient groups with and without bull's eye maculopathy revealed a statistically significant longer rheumatoid arthritis disease history in the former group. Also, the bull's eye group had higher dose intakes of chloroquine and over a longer period compared to the other group, but not statistically significant. This study corroborates the progression of maculopathy even after cessation of chloroquine intake, pointing out the need for careful screening in the high-risk patients. Furthermore, it indicates that duration of rheumatoid arthritis disease could be a possible factor linked to worse prognosis of chloroquine-induced maculopathy.

  19. Frequency of pruritus in Plasmodium vivax malaria patients treated with chloroquine in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Bussaratid, V; Walsh, D S; Wilairatana, P; Krudsood, S; Silachamroon, U; Looareesuwan, S

    2000-10-01

    Chloroquine-induced itch in black-skinned African malaria patients is common and frequently leads to poor compliance or treatment defaulting.To assess the frequency and severity of chloroquine-induced pruritus in an Asian population, we reviewed case records of 1189 Plasmodium vivax malaria patients treated with chloroquine (25 mg/kg over 3 days) at the Bangkok Hospital for Tropical Diseases from 1992 through 1997. The majority of patients were Thais or ethnic Burmese (light brown skin), referred from the western border of Thailand. Overall, there were 23 patients (1.9%) with complaints of pruritus during chloroquine therapy. Of these, 12 (52%) had palm and sole involvement, eight (35%) had generalized pruritus including the palms and soles, and three (13%) had palm itching only. One patient developed pruritus on the palms and soles on two consecutive admissions. The pruritus did not interfere with daily activity, was reduced in intensity by anti-histamine therapy, and did not affect the patient's willingness to complete the chloroquine regimen. Therapeutic responses in the 23 patients with chloroquine itch was similar to those without itch. Among the itch patients, there was no association with gender or level of parasitaemias. Our findings indicate that the frequency of chloroquine-induced pruritus in Asian patients treated with chloroquine for P. vivax malaria is low in comparison with black-skinned Africans.This may be related to pharmacogenetic factors, the infective Plasmodium species, drug metabolism or drug-parasite interactions, or a lower affinity of chloroquine for less pigmented skin.

  20. An ABC Transporter Mutation Is Correlated with Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gahan, Linda J.; Pauchet, Yannick; Vogel, Heiko; Heckel, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are commercially successful in reducing pest damage, yet knowledge of resistance mechanisms that threaten their sustainability is incomplete. Insect resistance to the pore-forming Cry1Ac toxin is correlated with the loss of high-affinity, irreversible binding to the mid-gut membrane, but the genetic factors responsible for this change have been elusive. Mutations in a 12-cadherin-domain protein confer some Cry1Ac resistance but do not block this toxin binding in in vitro assays. We sought to identify mutations in other genes that might be responsible for the loss of binding. We employed a map-based cloning approach using a series of backcrosses with 1,060 progeny to identify a resistance gene in the cotton pest Heliothis virescens that segregated independently from the cadherin mutation. We found an inactivating mutation of the ABC transporter ABCC2 that is genetically linked to Cry1Ac resistance and is correlated with loss of Cry1Ac binding to membrane vesicles. ABC proteins are integral membrane proteins with many functions, including export of toxic molecules from the cell, but have not been implicated in the mode of action of Bt toxins before. The reduction in toxin binding due to the inactivating mutation suggests that ABCC2 is involved in membrane integration of the toxin pore. Our findings suggest that ABC proteins may play a key role in the mode of action of Bt toxins and that ABC protein mutations can confer high levels of resistance that could threaten the continued utilization of Bt–expressing crops. However, such mutations may impose a physiological cost on resistant insects, by reducing export of other toxins such as plant secondary compounds from the cell. This weakness could be exploited to manage this mechanism of Bt resistance in the field. PMID:21187898

  1. Hydrophobic Organic Hole Transporters for Improved Moisture Resistance in Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Leijtens, Tomas; Giovenzana, Tommaso; Habisreutinger, Severin N; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Noel, Nakita K; Kamino, Brett A; Sadoughi, Golnaz; Sellinger, Alan; Snaith, Henry J

    2016-03-01

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductor materials have recently made rapid improvements in performance, with the best cells performing at over 20% efficiency. With such rapid progress, questions such as cost and solar cell stability are becoming increasingly important to address if this new technology is to reach commercial deployment. The moisture sensitivity of commonly used organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has especially raised concerns. Here, we demonstrate that the hygroscopic lithium salt commonly used as a dopant for the hole transport material in perovskite solar cells makes the top layer of the devices hydrophilic and causes the solar cells to rapidly degrade in the presence of moisture. By using novel, low cost, and hydrophobic hole transporters in conjunction with a doping method incorporating a preoxidized salt of the respective hole transporters, we are able to prepare efficient perovskite solar cells with greatly enhanced water resistance.

  2. Recycling antimalarial leads for cancer: Antiproliferative properties of N-cinnamoyl chloroquine analogues.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Bianca C; Fernandes, Iva; Mateus, Nuno; Teixeira, Cátia; Gomes, Paula

    2013-12-15

    Cinnamic acids and quinolines are known as useful scaffolds in the discovery of antitumor agents. Therefore, N-cinnamoylated analogues of chloroquine, recently reported as potent dual-action antimalarials, were evaluated against three different cancer cell lines: MKN-28, Caco-2, and MCF-7. All compounds display anti-proliferative activity in the micromolar range against the three cell lines tested, and most of them were more active than their parent drug, chloroquine, against all cell lines tested. Hence, N-cinnamoyl-chloroquine analogues are a good start towards development of affordable antitumor leads. PMID:24184076

  3. Telatinib reverses chemotherapeutic multidrug resistance mediated by ABCG2 efflux transporter in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sodani, Kamlesh; Patel, Atish; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Singh, Satyakam; Yang, Dong-Hua; Kathawala, Rishil J; Kumar, Priyank; Talele, Tanaji T; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a phenomenon where cancer cells become simultaneously resistant to anticancer drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action. MDR has been shown to be associated with overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Here, we report that telatinib, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, enhances the anticancer activity of ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs by inhibiting ABCG2 efflux transporter activity. Co-incubation of ABCG2-overexpressing drug resistant cell lines with telatinib and ABCG2 substrate anticancer drugs significantly reduced cellular viability, whereas telatinib alone did not significantly affect drug sensitive and drug resistant cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM did not significantly alter the expression of ABCG2 in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. Telatinib at 1 μM significantly enhanced the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-mitoxantrone (MX) in ABCG2-overexpressing cell lines. In addition, telatinib at 1 μM significantly reduced the rate of [3H]-MX efflux from ABCG2-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, telatinib significantly inhibited ABCG2-mediated transport of [3H]-E217βG in ABCG2 overexpressing membrane vesicles. Telatinib stimulated the ATPase activity of ABCG2 in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating that telatinib might be a substrate of ABCG2. Binding interactions of telatinib were found to be in transmembrane region of homology modeled human ABCG2. In addition, telatinib (15 mg/kg) with doxorubicin (1.8 mg/kg) significantly decreased the growth rate and tumor size of ABCG2 overexpressing tumors in a xenograft nude mouse model. These results, provided that they can be translated to humans, suggesting that telatinib, in combination with specific ABCG2 substrate drugs may be useful in treating tumors that overexpress ABCG2. PMID:24565910

  4. Antibiotics, Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes: Aerial Transport from Cattle Feed Yards via Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    McEachran, Andrew D.; Blackwell, Brett R.; Hanson, J. Delton; Wooten, Kimberly J.; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cox, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance has become a global health threat and is often linked with overuse and misuse of clinical and veterinary chemotherapeutic agents. Modern industrial-scale animal feeding operations rely extensively on veterinary pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, to augment animal growth. Following excretion, antibiotics are transported through the environment via runoff, leaching, and land application of manure; however, airborne transport from feed yards has not been characterized. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARG), and ruminant-associated microbes are aerially dispersed via particulate matter (PM) derived from large-scale beef cattle feed yards. Methods: PM was collected downwind and upwind of 10 beef cattle feed yards. After extraction from PM, five veterinary antibiotics were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, ARG were quantified via targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and microbial community diversity was analyzed via 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing. Results: Airborne PM derived from feed yards facilitated dispersal of several veterinary antibiotics, as well as microbial communities containing ARG. Concentrations of several antibiotics in airborne PM immediately downwind of feed yards ranged from 0.5 to 4.6 μg/g of PM. Microbial communities of PM collected downwind of feed yards were enriched with ruminant-associated taxa and were distinct when compared to upwind PM assemblages. Furthermore, genes encoding resistance to tetracycline antibiotics were significantly more abundant in PM collected downwind of feed yards as compared to upwind. Conclusions: Wind-dispersed PM from feed yards harbors antibiotics, bacteria, and ARGs. Citation: McEachran AD, Blackwell BR, Hanson JD, Wooten KJ, Mayer GD, Cox SB, Smith PN. 2015. Antibiotics, bacteria, and antibiotic

  5. [Chloroquine influence on lipid metabolism and selected laboratory parameters].

    PubMed

    Woźniacka, Anna; Lesiak, Aleksandra; Smigielski, Janusz; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease with complex pathogenesis, various clinical presentation and chronic course with relapses. Mode of treatment depends on the disease activity and kind of internal organ involvement. In most cases clinical remission could be obtained after antimalarials, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, and photoprotection use. Despite the approved antimalarials therapeutic value, the mechanisms by which they provide benefit in lupus, patients are not fully understood. Literature data indicate that they can influence lipid metabolism. The aim of the performed study was the objective evaluation of the influence of 3-month chloroquine treatment (Arechin, 250 mg/day) on lipid metabolism and selected laboratory parameters. In 34 patients with SLE clinical and laboratory evaluation was performed twice, before and after 3-month treatment. After 3 months significantly lower total cholesterol level was observed (mean value 184.91 mg%, 165.26 mg%, p < 0.001). Also LDL level was evidently lowered (111.27 mg%, 99.25 mg%). Similar tendency was noticed in triglycerides, which level after 3 months decreased from the average 152.38 mg% to 104.97 mg%, p < 0.001. Moreover the lowering of sedimentation rate, increasing hemoglobin level and lengthening coagulation time was perceived. The results of the study indicate the influence of chloroquine on decreasing of the disease activity, its anti-inflammatory properties and mainly the drug impact on lipid metabolism. Not only does antimalarials treatment reduce the risk of atherosclerosis development but it also minimizes corticosteroids side effects, which are considered to be the basic medication in lupus patients. PMID:16541717

  6. Electrical resistivity tomography as monitoring tool for unsaturated zone transport: an example of preferential transport of deicing chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive spatially resolved monitoring techniques may hold the key to observe heterogeneous flow and transport behavior of contaminants in soils. In this study, time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during an infiltration experiment with deicing chemical in a small field lysimeter. Deicing chemicals like potassium formate, which frequently impact soils on airport sites, were infiltrated during snow melt. Chemical composition of seepage water and the electrical response was recorded over the spring period 2010. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs are able to show the infiltration of the melt water loaded with ionic constituents of deicing chemicals and their degradation product hydrogen carbonate. The tomographs indicate early breakthrough behavior in parts of the profile. Groundtruthing with pore fluid conductivity and water content variations shows disagreement between expected and observed bulk conductivity. This was attributed to the different sampling volume of traditional methods and ERT due to a considerable fraction of immobile water in the soil. The results show that ERT can be used as a soil monitoring tool on airport sites if assisted by common soil monitoring techniques. PMID:24194415

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography as monitoring tool for unsaturated zone transport: an example of preferential transport of deicing chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive spatially resolved monitoring techniques may hold the key to observe heterogeneous flow and transport behavior of contaminants in soils. In this study, time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during an infiltration experiment with deicing chemical in a small field lysimeter. Deicing chemicals like potassium formate, which frequently impact soils on airport sites, were infiltrated during snow melt. Chemical composition of seepage water and the electrical response was recorded over the spring period 2010. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs are able to show the infiltration of the melt water loaded with ionic constituents of deicing chemicals and their degradation product hydrogen carbonate. The tomographs indicate early breakthrough behavior in parts of the profile. Groundtruthing with pore fluid conductivity and water content variations shows disagreement between expected and observed bulk conductivity. This was attributed to the different sampling volume of traditional methods and ERT due to a considerable fraction of immobile water in the soil. The results show that ERT can be used as a soil monitoring tool on airport sites if assisted by common soil monitoring techniques.

  8. Multidrug-Resistance Transporter AbcA Secretes Staphylococcus aureus Cytolytic Toxins.

    PubMed

    Yoshikai, Hirono; Kizaki, Hayato; Saito, Yuki; Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-01-15

    Phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are Staphylococcus aureus cytolytic toxins that lyse erythrocytes and neutrophils and have important functions in the S. aureus infectious process. The molecular mechanisms of PSM secretion, however, are not well understood. Here we report that knockout of the multidrug-resistance ABC transporter AbcA, which contributes to S. aureus resistance against antibiotics and chemicals, diminished the secreted amount of PSM, leading to the accumulation of PSM in the intracellular fraction. The amount of PSM in the culture supernatants of the abcA knockout mutants was restored by introduction of the wild-type abcA gene, whereas it was not completely restored by introduction of mutant abcA genes encoding AbcA mutant proteins carrying amino acid substitutions in the adenosine triphosphate binding motifs. The abcA knockout mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. These findings suggest that the multidrug resistance transporter AbcA secretes PSMs and contributes to S. aureus virulence.

  9. Multidrug-Resistance Transporter AbcA Secretes Staphylococcus aureus Cytolytic Toxins.

    PubMed

    Yoshikai, Hirono; Kizaki, Hayato; Saito, Yuki; Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-01-15

    Phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are Staphylococcus aureus cytolytic toxins that lyse erythrocytes and neutrophils and have important functions in the S. aureus infectious process. The molecular mechanisms of PSM secretion, however, are not well understood. Here we report that knockout of the multidrug-resistance ABC transporter AbcA, which contributes to S. aureus resistance against antibiotics and chemicals, diminished the secreted amount of PSM, leading to the accumulation of PSM in the intracellular fraction. The amount of PSM in the culture supernatants of the abcA knockout mutants was restored by introduction of the wild-type abcA gene, whereas it was not completely restored by introduction of mutant abcA genes encoding AbcA mutant proteins carrying amino acid substitutions in the adenosine triphosphate binding motifs. The abcA knockout mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. These findings suggest that the multidrug resistance transporter AbcA secretes PSMs and contributes to S. aureus virulence. PMID:26160745

  10. Identification of cadmium-resistant fungi related to Cd transportation in bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Luo, Hongji; Du, Zhimin; Hu, Longxing; Fu, Jinmin

    2014-12-01

    Phytoremediation utilizing plants and microbes has been increasingly adopted as a green technology for cleaning up heavy metal polluted soils. Cd polluted soil and native bermudagrass from Liuyang and Zhuzhou in Hunan province of China were collected to investigate microbial diversity and isolate Cd resistant fungi, and then to determine the effect of Cd resistant fungi on Cd tolerance and transportation of bermudagrass. The functional diversity of microorganisms was evaluated using the BIOLOG Eco method. Cd-resistant fungi strain was isolated and identified as Aspergillus aculeatus based on the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region sequence analysis. Bermudagrass was exposed to control, Cd only, and Cd plus A. aculeatus (Cd + A. aculeatus) with growth matrix (sawdust/sand = 3/1 in volume). Results indicated that Cd + A. aculeatus treated bermudagrass exhibited a higher photosynthetic activity compared to Cd only treated plants. Inoculation of A. aculeatus resulted in a decrease in stem and leaf Cd concentrations, to a greater extent for Cd-sensitive than for Cd-tolerant genotype. However, inoculation of A. aculeatus increased root Cd concentration under Cd stress conditions, significantly elevated soil pH, and decreased soil water-soluble Cd concentration. These results suggested that A. aculeatus might be potentially applied to improve Cd tolerance and to reduce Cd transportation to shoot of bermudagrass. PMID:25461949

  11. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; Gosink, Luke; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequence similarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first show that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir. PMID:26913187

  12. Seasonal Variations in Antibiotic Resistance Gene Transport in the Almendares River, Havana, Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Charles W.; Lima, Lazaro; Olivares-Rieumont, Susana; Bowen, Emma; Werner, David; Graham, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have quantified antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in rivers and streams around the world, and significant relationships have been shown that relate different pollutant outputs and increased local ARG levels. However, most studies have not considered ambient flow conditions, which can vary dramatically especially in tropical countries. Here, ARG were quantified in water column and sediment samples during the dry- and wet-seasons to assess how seasonal and other factors influence ARG transport down the Almendares River (Havana, Cuba). Eight locations were sampled and stream flow estimated during both seasons; qPCR was used to quantify four tetracycline, two erythromycin, and three beta-lactam resistance genes. ARG concentrations were higher in wet-season versus dry-season samples, which combined with higher flows, indicated much greater ARG transport downstream during the wet-season. However, water column ARG levels were more spatially variable in the dry-season than the wet-season, with the proximity of waste outfalls strongly influencing local ARG levels. Results confirm that dry-season sampling provides a useful picture of the impact of individual waste inputs on local stream ARG levels, whereas the majority of ARGs in this tropical river were transported downstream during the wet-season, possibly due to re-entrainment of ARG from sediments. PMID:23189074

  13. Effects of chloroquine on viral infections: an old drug against today's diseases?

    PubMed

    Savarino, Andrea; Boelaert, Johan R; Cassone, Antonio; Majori, Giancarlo; Cauda, Roberto

    2003-11-01

    Chloroquine is a 9-aminoquinoline known since 1934. Apart from its well-known antimalarial effects, the drug has interesting biochemical properties that might be applied against some viral infections. Chloroquine exerts direct antiviral effects, inhibiting pH-dependent steps of the replication of several viruses including members of the flaviviruses, retroviruses, and coronaviruses. Its best-studied effects are those against HIV replication, which are being tested in clinical trials. Moreover, chloroquine has immunomodulatory effects, suppressing the production/release of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6, which mediate the inflammatory complications of several viral diseases. We review the available information on the effects of chloroquine on viral infections, raising the question of whether this old drug may experience a revival in the clinical management of viral diseases such as AIDS and severe acute respiratory syndrome, which afflict mankind in the era of globalisation.

  14. ABCC transporters mediate insect resistance to multiple Bt toxins revealed by bulk segregant analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively recent evidence indicates that ABCC2 transporters play a main role in the mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A-type proteins. Mapping of major Cry1A resistance genes has linked resistance to the ABCC2 locus in Heliothis virescens, Plutella xylostella, Trichoplusia ni and Bombyx mori, and mutations in this gene have been found in three of these Bt-resistant strains. Results We have used a colony of Spodoptera exigua (Xen-R) highly resistant to a Bt commercial bioinsecticide to identify regions in the S. exigua genome containing loci for major resistance genes by using bulk segregant analysis (BSA). Results reveal a region containing three genes from the ABCC family (ABBC1, ABBC2 and ABBC3) and a mutation in one of them (ABBC2) as responsible for the resistance of S. exigua to the Bt commercial product and to its key Spodoptera-active ingredients, Cry1Ca. In contrast to all previously described mutations in ABCC2 genes that directly or indirectly affect the extracellular domains of the membrane protein, the ABCC2 mutation found in S. exigua affects an intracellular domain involved in ATP binding. Functional analyses of ABBC2 and ABBC3 support the role of both proteins in the mode of action of Bt toxins in S. exigua. Partial silencing of these genes with dsRNA decreased the susceptibility of wild type larvae to both Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca. In addition, reduction of ABBC2 and ABBC3 expression negatively affected some fitness components and induced up-regulation of arylphorin and repat5, genes that respond to Bt intoxication and that are found constitutively up-regulated in the Xen-R strain. Conclusions The current results show the involvement of different members of the ABCC family in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis proteins and expand the role of the ABCC2 transporter in B. thuringiensis resistance beyond the Cry1A family of proteins to include Cry1Ca. PMID:24912445

  15. Chloroquine has tumor-inhibitory and tumor-promoting effects in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Johanna; Sandholm, Jouko; Kauppila, Joonas H; Lehenkari, Petri; Harris, Kevin W; Selander, Katri S

    2013-12-01

    Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) is an intracellular DNA receptor that is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. We previously demonstrated that low tumor TLR9 expression upon diagnosis is associated with significantly shortened disease-specific survival times in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). There are no targeted therapies for this subgroup of patients whose prognosis is among the worst in breast cancer. Due to the previously detected in vitro anti-invasive effects of chloroquine in these cell lines, the present study aimed to investigate the in vivo effects of chloroquine against two clinical subtypes of TNBC that differ in TLR9 expression. Chloroquine suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression and protein activity, whereas MMP-13 mRNA expression and proteolytic activity were increased. Despite enhancing TLR9 mRNA expression, chloroquine suppressed TLR9 protein expression in vitro. Daily treatment of mice with intraperitoneal (i.p.) chloroquine (80 mg/kg/day) for 22 days, did not inhibit the growth of control siRNA or TLR9 siRNA MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In conclusion, despite the favorable in vitro effects on TNBC invasion and viability, particularly in hypoxic conditions, chloroquine does not prevent the growth of the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with high or low TLR9 expression levels in vivo. This may be explained by the activating effects of chloroquine on MMP-13 expression or by the fact that chloroquine, by suppressing TLR9 expression, permits the activation of currently unknown molecular pathways, which allow the aggressive behavior of TNBC cells with low TLR9 expression in hypoxia. PMID:24273604

  16. Chloroquine has tumor-inhibitory and tumor-promoting effects in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    TUOMELA, JOHANNA; SANDHOLM, JOUKO; KAUPPILA, JOONAS H.; LEHENKARI, PETRI; HARRIS, KEVIN W.; SELANDER, KATRI S.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) is an intracellular DNA receptor that is widely expressed in breast and other cancers. We previously demonstrated that low tumor TLR9 expression upon diagnosis is associated with significantly shortened disease-specific survival times in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). There are no targeted therapies for this subgroup of patients whose prognosis is among the worst in breast cancer. Due to the previously detected in vitro anti-invasive effects of chloroquine in these cell lines, the present study aimed to investigate the in vivo effects of chloroquine against two clinical subtypes of TNBC that differ in TLR9 expression. Chloroquine suppressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression and protein activity, whereas MMP-13 mRNA expression and proteolytic activity were increased. Despite enhancing TLR9 mRNA expression, chloroquine suppressed TLR9 protein expression in vitro. Daily treatment of mice with intraperitoneal (i.p.) chloroquine (80 mg/kg/day) for 22 days, did not inhibit the growth of control siRNA or TLR9 siRNA MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. In conclusion, despite the favorable in vitro effects on TNBC invasion and viability, particularly in hypoxic conditions, chloroquine does not prevent the growth of the triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with high or low TLR9 expression levels in vivo. This may be explained by the activating effects of chloroquine on MMP-13 expression or by the fact that chloroquine, by suppressing TLR9 expression, permits the activation of currently unknown molecular pathways, which allow the aggressive behavior of TNBC cells with low TLR9 expression in hypoxia. PMID:24273604

  17. A diversity of Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus spp. in a Public Transportation System

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Pamela J.; Simon, Dawn M.; Millar, Jess A.; Alexander, H. Forrest; Franklin, Darleen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our goal was to determine the diversity and abundance of Staphylococcus bacteria on different components of a public transportation system in a mid-sized US city (Portland, Oregon) and to examine the level of drug resistance in these bacteria. Methods We collected 70 samples from 2 cm × 4 cm sections from seven different areas on buses and trains in Portland, USA, taking 10 samples from each area. We isolated a subset of 14 suspected Staphylococcus spp. colonies based on phenotype, and constructed a phylogeny from16S rRNA sequences to assist in identification. We used the Kirbye–Bauer disk diffusion method to determine resistance levels to six common antibiotics. Results We found a range of pathogenic Staphylococcus species. The mean bacterial colony counts were 97.1 on bus and train floors, 80.1 in cloth seats, 9.5 on handrails, 8.6 on seats and armrests at bus stops, 3.8 on the underside of seats, 2.2 on windows, and 1.8 on vinyl seats per 8 cm2 sample area. These differences were significant (p < 0.001). Of the 14 isolates sequenced, 11 were staphylococci, and of these, five were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, while only two displayed intermediate resistance to bacitracin. All 11 isolates were sensitive to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and tetracycline. Conclusions We found six different strains of Staphylococcus, and while there were varying levels of drug resistance, we did not find extensive levels of multidrug-resistant bacteria, and no S. aureus was found. We found floors and cloth seats to be areas on buses and trains that showed particularly high levels of bacteria. PMID:24159474

  18. Chloroquine eliminates cancer stem cells through deregulation of Jak2 and DNMT1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Soon; Blanco, Elvin; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Rodriguez, Angel A; Zhao, Hong; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming; Chen, Chun-Liang; Jin, Guangxu; Landis, Melissa D; Burey, Lacey A; Qian, Wei; Granados, Sergio M; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Wong, Helen H; Ferrari, Mauro; Wong, Stephen T C; Chang, Jenny C

    2014-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is known to contain a high percentage of CD44(+) /CD24(-/low) cancer stem cells (CSCs), corresponding with a poor prognosis despite systemic chemotherapy. Chloroquine (CQ), an antimalarial drug, is a lysotropic reagent which inhibits autophagy. CQ was identified as a potential CSC inhibitor through in silico gene expression signature analysis of the CD44(+) /CD24(-/low) CSC population. Autophagy plays a critical role in adaptation to stress conditions in cancer cells, and is related with drug resistance and CSC maintenance. Thus, the objectives of this study were to examine the potential enhanced efficacy arising from addition of CQ to standard chemotherapy (paclitaxel) in TNBC and to identify the mechanism by which CQ eliminates CSCs in TNBCs. Herein, we report that CQ sensitizes TNBC cells to paclitaxel through inhibition of autophagy and reduces the CD44(+) /CD24(-/low) CSC population in both preclinical and clinical settings. Also, we are the first to report a mechanism by which CQ regulates the CSCs in TNBC through inhibition of the Janus-activated kinase 2 (Jak2)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway by reducing the expression of Jak2 and DNA methyltransferase 1. PMID:24809620

  19. Electrical transport properties of TiCoSb half-Heusler phases that exhibit high resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Y.; Ponnambalam, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Pope, A. L.; Poon, S. J.; Tritt, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    Electrical transport measurements have been performed on doped and undoped TiCoSb half-Heusler phases. The semiconducting properties are found to be more robust than those reported for MNiSn (M = Ti, Zr, Hf ). Undoped TiCoSb phases exhibit large n-type Seebeck coefficients and high resistivities that reach -500 µV K-1 at 300 K and ~1500 Ω cm at 4.2 K, respectively. A tendency towards carrier localization is seen in several disordered phases. The effects due to n-type and p-type dopants are readily manifested in the thermopower, from which moderately heavy electron and hole band masses are inferred. The unusual properties measured are consistent with the prediction of a wide bandgap for the TiCoSb phase. A resistivity minimum is observed at 500-600 K for undoped and V-doped TiCoSb. Consequently, the semiconducting gap has not been determined.

  20. A new homolog of FocA transporters identified in cadmium-resistant Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Delomenie, Claudine; Foti, Emilie; Floch, Enora; Diderot, Vimala; Porquet, Dominique; Dupuy, Corinne; Bonaly, Jacqueline . E-mail: Jacqueline.bonaly@u-psud.fr

    2007-06-29

    To better understand the cellular mechanism of stress resistance to various pollutants (cadmium, pentachlorophenol), we undertook a survey of the Euglena gracilis transcriptome by mRNA differential display and cDNA cloning. We performed a real-time RT-PCR analysis upon four selected genes. One of them significantly changed its expression level in response to stress treatments: B25 gene was overexpressed in Cd-resistant cells whereas it was down-regulated in PCP-adapted cells. By Race assays we obtained for B25 a 1093 bp cDNA. The deduced protein was identified as a bacterial formate/nitrite transporter (FocA) homolog and the gene was named EgFth. From all the data, we concluded that EgFth overexpression was related to chronic exposure to cadmium.

  1. Resistance to Water Transport in Shoots of Vitis vinifera L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Hans R.; Matthews, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    Apparent resistances to water transport in the liquid phase were determined from measurements of soil, root, basal shoot internode, shoot apex, and leaf water potentials and water flux in Vitis vinifera (cv White Riesling) during soil drying. Predawn water potential differences (ΔΨ) in the shoots accounted for 20% of the total ΔΨ between the soil and the shoot apex when plants were well-watered but increased to about 90% when shoot growth ceased. The ΔΨ from soil to root was essentially constant during this period. At low water potential, the ΔΨ in the shoot was persistent when transpiration was low (predawn) or completely prevented (plant bagging). The apparent hydraulic resistance between the basal shoot internode and most rapidly expanding leaf (or shoot apex) increased several-fold when water was withheld. Leaf and internode expansion both exhibited high sensitivity to increasing hydraulic resistance. Measurements of pneumatic resistance to air flow through frozen internode segments indicated progressive vapor-filling of vessels as soil drying progressed. From these observations and others in the literature, it was suggested that embolization may be a common occurrence and play an important role in the inhibition of shoot growth at moderate water deficits. PMID:16666373

  2. Antitumor and antimetastatic activities of chloroquine diphosphate in a murine model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Du; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Deng, Xiao-Qiang; Mao, Yong-Qiu; Shi, Wei; Tang, Qing-Qing; Li, Zheng-Guang; Zheng, Yu-Zhu; Yang, Sheng-Yong; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2010-11-01

    Metastatic breast cancers are hard to treat and almost always fatal. Chloroquine diphosphate, a derivative of quinine, has long been used as a potent and commonly used medicine against different human diseases. We therefore investigated the effects of chloroquine diphosphate on a highly metastatic mouse mammary carcinoma cell line. In vitro treatment of 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells with chloroquine diphosphate resulted in significant inhibition of cellular proliferation and viability, and induction of apoptosis in 4T1 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further analysis indicated that induction of apoptosis was associated with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The effect of chloroquine diphosphate was then examined using a mice model in which 4T1 cells were implanted subcutaneously. Chloroquine diphosphate (25mg/kg and 50mg/kg, respectively) significantly inhibited the growth of the implanted 4T1 tumor cells and induced apoptosis in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, the metastasis of tumor cells to the lungs was inhibited significantly and the survival of the mice enhanced. These data suggested that chloroquine diphosphate might have chemotherapeutic efficacy against breast cancer including inhibition of metastasis. PMID:20888174

  3. The role of coherent vorticity in turbulent transport in resistive drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, W. J. T.; Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Schneider, K.

    2008-07-15

    The coherent vortex extraction method, a wavelet technique for extracting coherent vortices out of turbulent flows, is applied to simulations of resistive drift-wave turbulence in magnetized plasma (Hasegawa-Wakatani system). The aim is to retain only the essential degrees of freedom, responsible for the transport. It is shown that the radial density flux is carried by these coherent modes. In the quasi-hydrodynamic regime, coherent vortices exhibit depletion of the polarization-drift nonlinearity and vorticity strongly dominates strain, in contrast to the quasiadiabatic regime.

  4. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist doxazosin on MDR1-mediated multidrug resistance and transcellular transport.

    PubMed

    Takara, Kohji; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Kakumoto, Mikio; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Hironao; Okumura, Katsuhiko; Ohnishi, Noriaki; Yokoyama, Teruyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of doxazosin, an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, on P-glycoprotein/MDR1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) and the transport of anticancer drugs. The effects of doxazosin, prazosin, and terazosin on MDR1-mediated MDR were assessed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells and the MDR1-overexpressing derivative Hvrl00-6, established by stepwise increases of the vinblastine concentration in the culture medium. The effects of doxazosin on the transcellular transport and intracellular accumulation of [3H]vinblastine, [3H]daunorubicin, and [3H]digoxin, all MDR1 substrates, were evaluated using LLC-GA5-COL150 cell monolayers, established by transfection of human MDR1 cDNA into porcine kidney epithelial LLC-PK1 cells. The sensitivity to vinblastine and paclitaxel of Hvrl00-6 cells was increased at 3.4- and 17.5-fold, respectively, by the addition of 1 microM doxazosin, whereas prazosin and terazosin had weaker or no such effects. Prazosin at 1 microM had a reversal effect on the sensitivity to vinblastine, whereas terazosin had no effect. In transport experiments, doxazosin concentration dependently increased the apical-to-basal transport of radiolabeled drugs in LLC-GA5-COL150 cells, but did not show remarkable effects on the basal-to-apical transport. In addition, doxazosin restored the intracellular accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner in LLC-GA5-COL150 cells. Doxazosin may partly reverse MDR by inhibiting MDR1-mediated transport, making it a candidate lead compound in the development of a reversing agent for MDR.

  5. Functional Evidence of Multidrug Resistance Transporters (MDR) in Rodent Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Molinas, Adrien; Sicard, Gilles; Jakob, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) are membrane transporter proteins which function as efflux pumps at cell membranes and are considered to exert a protective function against the entry of xenobiotics. While evidence for Pgp and MRP transporter activity is reported for olfactory tissue, their possible interaction and participation in the olfactory response has not been investigated. Principal Findings Functional activity of putative MDR transporters was assessed by means of the fluorometric calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein-AM) accumulation assay on acute rat and mouse olfactory tissue slices. Calcein-AM uptake was measured as fluorescence intensity changes in the presence of Pgp or MRP specific inhibitors. Epifluorescence microscopy measured time course analysis in the olfactory epithelium revealed significant inhibitor-dependent calcein uptake in the presence of each of the selected inhibitors. Furthermore, intracellular calcein accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons was also significantly increased in the presence of either one of the Pgp or MRP inhibitors. The presence of Pgp or MRP1 encoding genes in the olfactory mucosa of rat and mouse was confirmed by RT-PCR with appropriate pairs of species-specific primers. Both transporters were expressed in both newborn and adult olfactory mucosa of both species. To assess a possible involvement of MDR transporters in the olfactory response, we examined the electrophysiological response to odorants in the presence of the selected MDR inhibitors by recording electroolfactograms (EOG). In both animal species, MRPs inhibitors induced a marked reduction of the EOG magnitude, while Pgp inhibitors had only a minor or no measurable effect. Conclusions The findings suggest that both Pgp and MRP transporters are functional in the olfactory mucosa and in olfactory receptor neurons. Pgp and MRPs may be cellular constituents of olfactory receptor neurons and represent potential

  6. Molecular Surveillance as Monitoring Tool for Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Suriname

    PubMed Central

    Adhin, Malti R.; Labadie-Bracho, Mergiory; Bretas, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this translational study was to show the use of molecular surveillance for polymorphisms and copy number as a monitoring tool to track the emergence and dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance. A molecular baseline for Suriname was established in 2005, with P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance (pfmdr1) markers and copy number in 40 samples. The baseline results revealed the existence of a uniformly distributed mutated genotype corresponding with the fully mefloquine-sensitive 7G8-like genotype (Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y) and a fixed pfmdr1 N86 haplotype. All samples harbored the pivotal pfcrtK76T mutation, showing that chloroquine reintroduction should not yet be contemplated in Suriname. After 5 years, 40 samples were assessed to trace temporal changes in the status of pfmdr1 polymorphisms and copy number and showed minor genetic alterations in the pfmdr1 gene and no significant changes in copy number, thus providing scientific support for prolongation of the current drug policy in Suriname. PMID:23836573

  7. Role of Different Pfcrt and Pfmdr-1 Mutations in Conferring Resistance to Antimalaria Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Ibraheem, Zaid O.; Abd Majid, R.; Noor, S. Mohd.; Sedik, H. Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drugs resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum has augmented the scourge of malaria in endemic areas. Antimalaria drugs act on different intracellular targets. The majority of them interfere with digestive vacuoles (DVs) while others affect other organelles, namely, apicoplast and mitochondria. Prevention of drug accumulation or access into the target site is one of the mechanisms that plasmodium adopts to develop resistance. Plasmodia are endowed with series of transporters that shuffle drugs away from the target site, namely, pfmdr (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance transporter) and pfcrt (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter) which exist in DV membrane and are considered as putative markers of CQ resistance. They are homologues to human P-glycoproteins (P-gh or multidrug resistance system) and members of drug metabolite transporter (DMT) family, respectively. The former mediates drifting of xenobiotics towards the DV while the latter chucks them outside. Resistance to drugs whose target site of action is intravacuolar develops when the transporters expel them outside the DVs and vice versa for those whose target is extravacuolar. In this review, we are going to summarize the possible pfcrt and pfmdr mutation and their role in changing plasmodium sensitivity to different anti-Plasmodium drugs. PMID:25506039

  8. Role of Different Pfcrt and Pfmdr-1 Mutations in Conferring Resistance to Antimalaria Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Zaid O; Abd Majid, R; Noor, S Mohd; Sedik, H Mohd; Basir, R

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drugs resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum has augmented the scourge of malaria in endemic areas. Antimalaria drugs act on different intracellular targets. The majority of them interfere with digestive vacuoles (DVs) while others affect other organelles, namely, apicoplast and mitochondria. Prevention of drug accumulation or access into the target site is one of the mechanisms that plasmodium adopts to develop resistance. Plasmodia are endowed with series of transporters that shuffle drugs away from the target site, namely, pfmdr (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance transporter) and pfcrt (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter) which exist in DV membrane and are considered as putative markers of CQ resistance. They are homologues to human P-glycoproteins (P-gh or multidrug resistance system) and members of drug metabolite transporter (DMT) family, respectively. The former mediates drifting of xenobiotics towards the DV while the latter chucks them outside. Resistance to drugs whose target site of action is intravacuolar develops when the transporters expel them outside the DVs and vice versa for those whose target is extravacuolar. In this review, we are going to summarize the possible pfcrt and pfmdr mutation and their role in changing plasmodium sensitivity to different anti-Plasmodium drugs. PMID:25506039

  9. [A new approach to overcoming the drug resistance of the causative agents of malaria].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V S; Rabinovich, S A

    1990-01-01

    Progressively expanding area of multiresistant falciparum malaria and the profile of its resistance to drugs successively implemented into practice necessitate the elaboration of approaches to the "revival" of the drugs used. As with neoplastic cells, a correlation between plasmodium multiresistance with increased "outflow" of specific drugs from the cell is suggested, which is blocked by inhibition of Ca2+ transport. Reversion of resistance to chloroquine by a combination with Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil, tricyclic antidepressants (desipramine, protritreline, etc.), tricyclic antihistamine drugs (cyproheptadine), and reversion of resistance to sulfadoxine in combination with the antihistamine drug ketodiphene have been shown in vivo and in vitro. The function of Ca2+ channels is directly related to Ca2(+)-, Mg2(+)-dependent ATPase. Ph-metric techniques elaborated in the USSR make it possible to evaluate its activity, determine the inhibitors, differentiate them according to the effect. The authors have established reversion of P. berghei resistance to chloroquine, with the tricyclic antidepressants azaphen, aminazin, triftazin correlating with the degree of Ca2+, Mg2(+)-ATPase inhibition and to praziquantel, whose effect might be associated with the increased permeability of the cellular membrane to Ca2+. The inhibitors of Ca2+ transport have various parasitocidal activities which might be accounted for by the deficiency of this cation necessary for plasmodium development. The task is to elaborate safe optimum antimalarial drug/modulator of Ca2+ transport combinations. Multiresistance (genetically predetermined multifactorial cellular changes) may be associated with enhanced synthesis of transmembrane glycoprotein with varying molecular mass depending on the direction of resistance. PMID:2266896

  10. Chloroquine improves survival and hematopoietic recovery following lethal low dose- rate radiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang, Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We have previously shown that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hr. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 μg per 17 g of body weight, 24 hrs and 4 hrs before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retro orbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methyl cellulose colony forming assay of whole bone marrow cells as well as FACS analysis of lineage depleted cells was used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results Mice pretreated with chloroquine prior to radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate compared to mice treated with radiation alone (80 vs.31 percent, p=0.0026). Chloroquine administration prior to radiation did not impact the survival of ATM null mice (p=0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after the transplantation (4.2 percent vs. 0.4 percent, p=0.015). Conclusion Chloroquine administration prior to radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect like the in vitro effect is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection against the

  11. Chloroquine Improves Survival and Hematopoietic Recovery After Lethal Low-Dose-Rate Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lim Yiting; Hedayati, Mohammad; Merchant, Akil A.; Zhang Yonggang; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan M.; Kastan, Michael B.; Matsui, William; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the antimalarial agent chloroquine can abrogate the lethal cellular effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation in vitro, most likely by activating the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein. Here, we demonstrate that chloroquine treatment also protects against lethal doses of LDR radiation in vivo. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with a total of 12.8 Gy delivered at 9.4 cGy/hour. ATM null mice from the same background were used to determine the influence of ATM. Chloroquine was administered by two intraperitoneal injections of 59.4 {mu}g per 17 g of body weight, 24 hours and 4 hours before irradiation. Bone marrow cells isolated from tibia, fibula, and vertebral bones were transplanted into lethally irradiated CD45 congenic recipient mice by retroorbital injection. Chimerism was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro methylcellulose colony-forming assay of whole bone marrow cells and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of lineage depleted cells were used to assess the effect of chloroquine on progenitor cells. Results: Mice pretreated with chloroquine before radiation exhibited a significantly higher survival rate than did mice treated with radiation alone (80% vs. 31%, p = 0.0026). Chloroquine administration before radiation did not affect the survival of ATM null mice (p = 0.86). Chloroquine also had a significant effect on the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from the irradiated donor mice 6 weeks after transplantation (4.2% vs. 0.4%, p = 0.015). Conclusion: Chloroquine administration before radiation had a significant effect on the survival of normal but not ATM null mice, strongly suggesting that the in vivo effect, like the in vitro effect, is also ATM dependent. Chloroquine improved the early engraftment of bone marrow cells from LDR-irradiated mice, presumably by protecting the progenitor cells from radiation injury. Chloroquine thus could serve as a very useful drug for protection

  12. The application of electrical resistance measurements to water transport in lime-masonry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, R. J.; Allen, G. C.; Carter, M. A.; Wilson, M. A.; Ince, C.; El-Turki, A.

    2012-03-01

    The paper describes an experimental determination of impedance spectroscopy derived resistance measurements to record water transport in lime-masonry systems. It strongly supports the use of Sharp Front theory and Boltzmann's distribution law of statistical thermodynamics to corroborate the data obtained. A novel approach is presented for the application of impedance measurements to the water transport between freshly mixed mortars and clay brick substrates. Once placed, fresh mortar is dewatered by brick and during this time the volume fraction water content of the mortar is reduced. An equation is derived relating this change in water content to the bulk resistance of the mortar. Experimental measurements on hydraulic lime mortars placed in contact with brick prisms confirm the theoretical predictions. Further, the results indicate the time at which dewatering of a mortar bed of given depth is completed. The technique has then potential to be applied for in situ monitoring of dewatering as a means of giving insight into the associated changes in mechanical and chemical properties.

  13. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  14. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development. PMID:25084057

  15. Energy budgets and resistances to energy transport in sparsely vegetated rangeland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    Partitioning available energy between plants and bare soil in sparsely vegetated rangelands will allow hydrologists and others to gain a greater understanding of water use by native vegetation, especially phreatophytes. Standard methods of conducting energy budget studies result in measurements of latent and sensible heat fluxes above the plant canopy which therefore include the energy fluxes from both the canopy and the soil. One-dimensional theoretical numerical models have been proposed recently for the partitioning of energy in sparse crops. Bowen ratio and other micrometeorological data collected over phreatophytes growing in areas of shallow ground water in central Nevada were used to evaluate the feasibility of using these models, which are based on surface and within-canopy aerodynamic resistances, to determine heat and water vapor transport in sparsely vegetated rangelands. The models appear to provide reasonably good estimates of sensible heat flux from the soil and latent heat flux from the canopy. Estimates of latent heat flux from the soil were less satisfactory. Sensible heat flux from the canopy was not well predicted by the present resistance formulations. Also, estimates of total above-canopy fluxes were not satisfactory when using a single value for above-canopy bulk aerodynamic resistance. ?? 1992.

  16. Dam-break flows with resistance as agents of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmett, M.; Moodie, T. B.

    2008-08-01

    When a semi-infinite body of fluid initially at rest behind a vertical retaining wall is suddenly released by the removal of the barrier, the resulting flow over either a horizontal or a sloping bed is referred to as a dam-break flow. When resistance to the flow is neglected, the exact solution in the case of a horizontal bed with or without "tail water" may be obtained on the basis of shallow-water theory via the method of characteristics, and the results are well known. The inclusion of the effects of resistance in the form of basal friction that are needed in order to bring the mathematical solutions into closer harmony with the experimental results modifies the wave speed and flow profile near the head of the wave significantly and the simple exact solution of the shallow-water equations can no longer be employed as a reasonable description of the flow field. It is our intention here to study dam-break flows as agents of sediment transport taking into account basal friction and the attendant changes in depth profiles near the head, as well as the effects of particle concentrations on the flow dynamics including both erosion and deposition of particles arising through the interaction of the flow with the bed material. We shall consider shallow flows over dry beds and investigate the effects of changes in the depositional and erosional models employed as well as in the nature of the drag acting on the flow. These models offer some insight into the transport of sediment in the worst case scenario of complete and instantaneous collapse of a dam. They are also anticipated to provide information on other sheet flow events where particle transport plays a significant role in the flow dynamics.

  17. A Computational Approach towards the Understanding of Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Saumya K.; Prasanth Kumar, Sivakumar; Highland, Hyacinth N.; Jasrai, Yogesh T.; Pandya, Himanshu A.; Desai, Ketaki R.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum tremendously affected the chemotherapy worldwide while the intense distribution of chloroquine-resistant strains in most of the endemic areas added more complications in the treatment of malaria. The situation has even worsened by the lack of molecular mechanism to understand the resistance conferred by Plasmodia species. Recent studies have suggested the association of antimalarial resistance with P. falciparum multidrug resistance protein 1 (PfMDR1), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter and a homologue of human P-glycoprotein 1 (P-gp1). The present study deals about the development of PfMDR1 computational model and the model of substrate transport across PfMDR1 with insights derived from conformations relative to inward- and outward-facing topologies that switch on/off the transportation system. Comparison of ATP docked positions and its structural motif binding properties were found to be similar among other ATPases, and thereby contributes to NBD domains dimerization, a unique structural agreement noticed in Mus musculus Pgp and Escherichia coli MDR transporter homolog (MsbA). The interaction of leading antimalarials and phytochemicals within the active pocket of both wild-type and mutant-type PfMDR1 demonstrated the mode of binding and provided insights of less binding affinity thereby contributing to parasite's resistance mechanism. PMID:25937947

  18. Acidic extracellular pH neutralizes the autophagy-inhibiting activity of chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Paola; Strambi, Angela; Zipoli, Chiara; Hägg-Olofsson, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Linder, Stig; De Milito, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Acidic pH is an important feature of tumor microenvironment and a major determinant of tumor progression. We reported that cancer cells upregulate autophagy as a survival mechanism to acidic stress. Inhibition of autophagy by administration of chloroquine (CQ) in combination anticancer therapies is currently evaluated in clinical trials. We observed in 3 different human cancer cell lines cultured at acidic pH that autophagic flux is not blocked by CQ. This was consistent with a complete resistance to CQ toxicity in cells cultured in acidic conditions. Conversely, the autophagy-inhibiting activity of Lys-01, a novel CQ derivative, was still detectable at low pH. The lack of CQ activity was likely dependent on a dramatically reduced cellular uptake at acidic pH. Using cell lines stably adapted to chronic acidosis we could confirm that CQ lack of activity was merely caused by acidic pH. Moreover, unlike CQ, Lys-01 was able to kill low pH-adapted cell lines, although higher concentrations were required as compared with cells cultured at normal pH conditions. Notably, buffering medium pH in low pH-adapted cell lines reverted CQ resistance. In vivo analysis of tumors treated with CQ showed that accumulation of strong LC3 signals was observed only in normoxic areas but not in hypoxic/acidic regions. Our observations suggest that targeting autophagy in the tumor environment by CQ may be limited to well-perfused regions but not achieved in acidic regions, predicting possible limitations in efficacy of CQ in antitumor therapies. PMID:24492472

  19. Photophysical properties and photobiological behavior of amodiaquine, primaquine and chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Viola, Giampietro; Salvador, Alessia; Cecconet, Laura; Basso, Giuseppe; Vedaldi, Daniela; Dall'Acqua, Francesco; Aloisi, Gian Gaetano; Amelia, Matteo; Barbafina, Arianna; Latterini, Loredana; Elisei, Fausto

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the results of a coupled photophysical and photobiological study aimed at understanding the phototoxicity mechanism of the antimalarial drugs amodiaquine (AQ), primaquine (PQ) and chloroquine (CQ). Photophysical experiments were carried out in aqueous solutions by steady-state and time-resolved spectrometric techniques to obtain information on the different decay pathways of the excited states of the drugs and on the transient species formed upon laser irradiation. The results showed that all three drugs possess very low fluorescence quantum yields (10(-2)-10(-4)). Laser flash photolysis experiments proved the occurrence of photoionization processes leading to the formation of a radical cation in all three systems. In the case of AQ the lowest triplet state was also detected. Together with the photophysical properties the photobiological properties of the antimalarial drugs were investigated under UV irradiation, on various biological targets through a series of in vitro assays. Phototoxicity on mouse 3T3 fibroblast and human keratinocyte cell lines NCTC-2544 was detected for PQ and CQ but not for AQ. In particular, PQ- and CQ-induced apoptosis was revealed by the externalization of phosphatidylserine. Furthermore, upon UV irradiation, the drugs caused significant variations of the mitochondrial potential (Deltapsi(mt)) measured by flow cytometry. The photodamages produced by the drugs were also evaluated on proteins, lipids and DNA. The combined approaches were useful in understanding the mechanism of phototoxicity induced by these antimalarial drugs. PMID:18028216

  20. Properties of binding sites for chloroquine in liver lysosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Colombo, M I; Bertini, F

    1988-12-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial and antirheumatic drug that accumulates in lysosomes. We purified liver lysosomal membranes of tritosomes from albino mice injected with Triton WR 1339. The membranes were used for the binding assay with CQ in 0.01 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.4). This binding was saturable, with a KD value of 6.2 microM. To understand the nature of CQ affinity, the binding was done under conditions that alter membrane structure and composition. Changes in pH, high ionic strength, and bivalent cations reversibly decreased the binding, while the effect of non-ionic detergents was partially reversed. The cationic detergent Hyamine strongly decreased the binding, and its effect was trypsin and neuraminidase had no effect. The results indicate the existence of binding sites for CQ in liver lysosomal membranes, which were strongly affected by changes of charge in the molecules involved in the binding. The treatment with the enzymes suggests that loss of polar groups of phospholipids increases the affinity of CQ by exposing protein sites located deep in the membrane, or by permiting a closer interaction between the drug and membrane lipids. CQ lysosomotropism and other effects of CQ on the lysosomal apparatus studied by other authors may be due not only to its accumulation inside the acid milieu of the lysosomes, in the same manner as other weak bases, but also to the affinity of CQ for binding sites in the lysosomal membrane. PMID:3192634

  1. Biphasic activity of chloroquine in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Deokbae; Lee, Youngki

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation process that is involved in tumor development and normal development. Autophagy is induced in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced cancer cell death or survival. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial devrepug, is a lysosomotropic agent and is currently used as a potential anticancer agent as well as an autophagy inhibitor. Here, we evaluate the characteristics of these dual activities of CQ using human colorectal cancer cell line HCT15. The results show that CQ inhibited cell viability in dose-and time-dependent manner in the range between 20 to 80 uM, while CQ did not show any antiproliferative activity at 5 and 10 uM. Cotreatment of CQ with antitumor agent NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, rescued the cell viability at low concentrations meaning that CQ acted as an autophagy inhibitor, but CQ induced the lethal effect at high concentrations. Acridine orange staining revealed that CQ at high doses induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). High doses of CQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cotreatment of antioxidants, such as NAC and trolox, with high doses of CQ rescued the cell viability. These results suggest that CQ may exert its dual activities, as autophagy inhibitor or LMP inducer, in concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25949192

  2. Biphasic Activity of Chloroquine in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Deokbae; Lee, Youngki

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation process that is involved in tumor development and normal development. Autophagy is induced in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced cancer cell death or survival. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial devrepug, is a lysosomotropic agent and is currently used as a potential anticancer agent as well as an autophagy inhibitor. Here, we evaluate the characteristics of these dual activities of CQ using human colorectal cancer cell line HCT15. The results show that CQ inhibited cell viability in dose-and time-dependent manner in the range between 20 to 80 uM, while CQ did not show any antiproliferative activity at 5 and 10 uM. Cotreatment of CQ with antitumor agent NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, rescued the cell viability at low concentrations meaning that CQ acted as an autophagy inhibitor, but CQ induced the lethal effect at high concentrations. Acridine orange staining revealed that CQ at high doses induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). High doses of CQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cotreatment of antioxidants, such as NAC and trolox, with high doses of CQ rescued the cell viability. These results suggest that CQ may exert its dual activities, as autophagy inhibitor or LMP inducer, in concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25949192

  3. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  4. Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo studies of electron transport in resistive plate chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjaković, D.; Petrović, Z. Lj; White, R. D.; Dujko, S.

    2014-10-01

    A multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulation technique are used to investigate electron transport in Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments at CERN and elsewhere. Using cross sections for electron scattering in C2H2F4, iso-C4H10 and SF6 as an input in our Boltzmann and Monte Carlo codes, we have calculated data for electron transport as a function of reduced electric field E/N in various C2H2F4/iso-C4H10/SF6 gas mixtures used in RPCs in the ALICE, CMS and ATLAS experiments. Emphasis is placed upon the explicit and implicit effects of non-conservative collisions (e.g. electron attachment and/or ionization) on the drift and diffusion. Among many interesting and atypical phenomena induced by the explicit effects of non-conservative collisions, we note the existence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the bulk drift velocity component with no indication of any NDC for the flux component in the ALICE timing RPC system. We systematically study the origin and mechanisms for such phenomena as well as the possible physical implications which arise from their explicit inclusion into models of RPCs. Spatially-resolved electron transport properties are calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation technique in order to understand these phenomena.

  5. Characterization of multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein transport function with an organotechnetium cation

    SciTech Connect

    Piwnica-Worms, D.; Vallabhaneni, V.R.; Kronauge, J.F.

    1995-09-26

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in mammalian cells and tumors is associated with overexpression of an {approximately}170 integral membrane efflux transporter, the MDR1 P-glycoprotein. Hexakis(2-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile) technetium(I) (Tc-SESTAMIBI), a {gamma}-emitting lipophilic cationic metallopharmaceutical, has recently been shown to be a P-glycoprotein transport substrate. Exploiting the negligible lipid membrane adsorption properties of this organometallic substrate, we studied the transport kinetics, pharmacology, drug binding, and modulation of P-glycoprotein in cell preparations derived from a variety of species and selection strategies, including SW-1573, V79, Alex, and CHO drug-sensitive cells and in 77A, LZ-8, and Alex/A.5 MDR cells. Rapid cell accumulation (T{sub 1/2} {approx} 6 min) of the agent to a steady state was observed which was inversely proportional to immunodetectable levels of P-glycoprotein. Many MDR cytotoxic agents inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated Tc-SESTAMIBI efflux, thereby enhancing organometallic cation accumulation. 70 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Separating the roles of acropetal and basipetal auxin transport on gravitropism with mutations in two Arabidopsis multidrug resistance-like ABC transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel R; Miller, Nathan D; Splitt, Bessie L; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P

    2007-06-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90 degrees reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation.

  7. Separating the Roles of Acropetal and Basipetal Auxin Transport on Gravitropism with Mutations in Two Arabidopsis Multidrug Resistance-Like ABC Transporter Genes[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R.; Miller, Nathan D.; Splitt, Bessie L.; Wu, Guosheng; Spalding, Edgar P.

    2007-01-01

    Two Arabidopsis thaliana ABC transporter genes linked to auxin transport by various previous results were studied in a reverse-genetic fashion. Mutations in Multidrug Resistance-Like1 (MDR1) reduced acropetal auxin transport in roots by 80% without affecting basipetal transport. Conversely, mutations in MDR4 blocked 50% of basipetal transport without affecting acropetal transport. Developmental and auxin distribution phenotypes associated with these altered auxin flows were studied with a high-resolution morphometric system and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vertically grown mdr1 roots produced positive and negative curvatures threefold greater than the wild type, possibly due to abnormal auxin distribution observed in the elongation zone. However, upon 90° reorientation, mdr1 gravitropism was inseparable from the wild type. Thus, acropetal auxin transport maintains straight growth but contributes surprisingly little to gravitropism. Conversely, vertically maintained mdr4 roots grew as straight as the wild type, but their gravitropism was enhanced. Upon reorientation, curvature in this mutant developed faster, was distributed more basally, and produced a greater total angle than the wild type. An amplified auxin asymmetry may explain the mdr4 hypertropism. Double mutant analysis indicated that the two auxin transport streams are more independent than interdependent. The hypothesis that flavanols regulate MDR-dependent auxin transport was supported by the epistatic relationship of mdr4 to the tt4 phenylpropanoid pathway mutation. PMID:17557805

  8. A Fluorescent Transport Assay Enables Studying AmpG Permeases Involved in Peptidoglycan Recycling and Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Perley-Robertson, G Evan; Yadav, Anuj K; Winogrodzki, Judith L; Stubbs, Keith A; Mark, Brian L; Vocadlo, David J

    2016-09-16

    Inducible AmpC β-lactamases deactivate a broad-spectrum of β-lactam antibiotics and afford antibiotic resistance in many Gram-negative bacteria. The disturbance of peptidoglycan recycling caused by β-lactam antibiotics leads to accumulation of GlcNAc-1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides, which are transported by AmpG to the cytoplasm where they are processed into AmpC inducers. AmpG transporters are poorly understood; however, their loss restores susceptibility toward β-lactam antibiotics, highlighting AmpG as a potential target for resistance-attenuating therapeutics. We prepare a GlcNAc-1,6-anhydroMurNAc-fluorophore conjugate and, using live E. coli spheroplasts, quantitatively analyze its transport by AmpG and inhibition of this process by a competing substrate. Further, we use this transport assay to evaluate the function of two AmpG homologues from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and show that P. aeruginosa AmpG (Pa-AmpG) but not AmpP (Pa-AmpP) transports this probe substrate. We corroborate these results by AmpC induction assays with Pa-AmpG and Pa-AmpP. This fluorescent AmpG probe and spheroplast-based transport assay will enable improved understanding of PG recycling and of permeases from the major facilitator superfamily of transport proteins and may aid in identification of AmpG antagonists that combat AmpC-mediated resistance toward β-lactam antibiotics.

  9. Adjudin disrupts spermatogenesis by targeting drug transporters: Lesson from the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP).

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaojing; Cheng, Yan-Ho; Jenardhanan, Pranitha; Mruk, Dolores D; Mathur, Premendu P; Xia, Weiliang; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C Yan

    2013-04-01

    For non-hormonal male contraceptives that exert their effects in the testis locally instead of via the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, such as adjudin that disrupts germ cell adhesion, a major hurdle in their development is to improve their bioavailability so that they can be efficiently delivered to the seminiferous epithelium by transporting across the blood-testis barrier (BTB). If this can be done, it would widen the gap between their efficacy and general toxicity. However, Sertoli cells that constitute the BTB, peritubular myoid cells in the tunica propria, germ cells at different stages of their development, as well as endothelial cells that constitute the microvessels in the interstitium are all equipped with multiple drug transporters, most notably efflux drug transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-related protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) that can actively prevent drugs (e.g., adjudin) from entering the seminiferous epithelium to exert their effects. Recent studies have shown that BCRP is highly expressed by endothelial cells of the microvessels in the interstitium in the testis and also peritubular myoid cells in tunica propria even though it is absent from Sertoli cells at the site of the BTB. Furthermore, BCRP is also expressed spatiotemporally by Sertoli cells and step 19 spermatids in the rat testis and stage-specifically, limiting to stage VII‒VIII of the epithelial cycle, and restricted to the apical ectoplasmic specialization [apical ES, a testis-specific F-actin-rich adherens junction (AJ)]. Interestingly, adjudin was recently shown to be capable of downregulating BCRP expression at the apical ES. In this Opinion article, we critically discuss the latest findings on BCRP; in particular, we provide some findings utilizing molecular modeling to define the interacting domains of BCRP with adjudin. Based on this information, it is hoped that the next generation of adjudin analogs to be

  10. Chloroquine activates the p53 pathway and induces apoptosis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ella L.; Wüstenberg, Robin; Rübsam, Anne; Schmitz-Salue, Christoph; Warnecke, Gabriele; Bücker, Eva-Maria; Pettkus, Nadine; Speidel, Daniel; Rohde, Veit; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Deppert, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. The currently available treatments offer only a palliative survival advantage and the need for effective treatments remains an urgent priority. Activation of the p53 growth suppression/apoptotic pathway is one of the promising strategies in targeting glioma cells. We show that the quinoline derivative chloroquine activates the p53 pathway and suppresses growth of glioma cells in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic (U87MG) human glioblastoma mouse model. Induction of apoptosis is one of the mechanisms underlying the effects of chloroquine on suppressing glioma cell growth and viability. siRNA-mediated downregulation of p53 in wild-type but not mutant p53 glioblastoma cells substantially impaired chloroquine-induced apoptosis. In addition to its p53-activating effects, chloroquine may also inhibit glioma cell growth via p53-independent mechanisms. Our results clarify the mechanistic basis underlying the antineoplastic effect of chloroquine and reveal its therapeutic potential as an adjunct to glioma chemotherapy. PMID:20308316

  11. Chloroquine targets pancreatic cancer stem cells via inhibition of CXCR4 and hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Balic, Anamaria; Sørensen, Morten Dræby; Trabulo, Sara Maria; Sainz, Bruno; Cioffi, Michele; Vieira, Catarina R; Miranda-Lorenzo, Irene; Hidalgo, Manuel; Kleeff, Joerg; Erkan, Mert; Heeschen, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest carcinomas and is characterized by highly tumorigenic and metastatic cancer stem cells (CSC). CSCs evade available therapies, which preferentially target highly proliferative and more differentiated progenies, leaving behind CSCs as a putative source for disease relapse. Thus, to identify potentially more effective treatment regimens, we screened established and new compounds for their ability to eliminate CSCs in primary pancreatic cancer (stem) cells in vitro and corresponding patient-derived pancreatic cancer tissue xenografts in vivo. Intriguingly, we found that in vitro treatment with the antimalarial agent chloroquine significantly decreased CSCs, translating into diminished in vivo tumorigenicity and invasiveness in a large panel of pancreatic cancers. In vivo treatment in combination with gemcitabine was capable of more effectively eliminating established tumors and improved overall survival. The inhibitory effect of chloroquine was not related to inhibition of autophagy, but was due to inhibition of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling, resulting in reduced phosphorylation of ERK and STAT3. Furthermore, chloroquine showed potent inhibition of hedgehog signaling by decreasing the production of Smoothened, translating into a significant reduction in sonic hedgehog-induced chemotaxis and downregulation of downstream targets in CSCs and the surrounding stroma. Our study demonstrates that via to date unreported effects, chloroquine is an effective adjuvant therapy to chemotherapy, offering more efficient tumor elimination and improved cure rates. Chloroquine should be further explored in the clinical setting as its success may help to more rapidly improve the poor prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24785258

  12. Chloroquine in cancer therapy: a double-edged sword of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomonori; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Takahashi, Atsushi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic cellular recycling system that is responsible for degrading damaged or unnecessary cellular organelles and proteins. Cancer cells are thought to use autophagy as a source of energy in the unfavorable metastatic environment, and a number of clinical trials are now revealing the promising role of chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, as a novel antitumor drug. On the other hand, however, the kidneys are highly vulnerable to chemotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have shown that autophagy plays a protective role against acute kidney injury, including cisplatin-induced kidney injury, and thus, we suspect that the use of chloroquine in combination with anticancer drugs may exacerbate kidney damage. Moreover, organs in which autophagy also plays a homeostatic role, such as the neurons, liver, hematopoietic stem cells, and heart, may be sensitive to the combined use of chloroquine and anticancer drugs. Here, we summarize the functions of autophagy in cancer and kidney injury, especially focusing on the use of chloroquine to treat cancer, and address the possible side effects in the combined use of chloroquine and anticancer drugs. PMID:23288916

  13. ABT-737, a Bcl-2 Selective Inhibitor, and Chloroquine Synergistically Kill Renal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Pei; Jia, Jinpeng; Li, Jijun; Song, Yan; Zhang, Yiyan; Chen, Fengkun

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common malignancy in the kidney in the world, and the 5-year overall survival for patients remains poor due to the lack of effective treatment strategies. Although ABT-737, as a Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor, has recently emerged as a novel cancer therapeutic reagent, apoptosis induced by ABT-737 is often blocked in several types of cancer cells. This study investigated whether the combination of the small-molecule BH3 mimetic ABT-737 and the lysosome inhibitor chloroquine was an effective strategy for treating renal cancer cells. We found that the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine synergistically decreased cell viability when compared to treatment with either single reagent. Cell apoptosis induced by a combined treatment was markedly inhibited by the caspase inhibitors z-DEVD-FMK and z-VAD-FMK. It was also inhibited by cathepsin inhibitor E-64 and CTSI (cathepsin inhibitor), which suggested that apoptosis was dependent on the cascade of caspase activation and cathepsins released from lysosomes. Furthermore, we found that ABT-737 could increase the cell level of ROS, which triggers cathepsin-mediated cell death and augments the role of chloroquine in cell death. So the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine was an effective strategy for the treatment of renal cancer cells, and this combined strategy may widen the therapeutic window of ABT-737 and chloroquine as well as enhance the clinical efficacy of synergistic drug combinations. PMID:27178823

  14. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ratikan, Josephine Anna; Sayre, James William

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy.

  15. Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of phosphorene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistance behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Ajanta; Singh, Akansha; Sen, Prasenjit; Kibey, Aniruddha; Kshirsagar, Anjali; Kanhere, Dilip G.

    2016-08-01

    Structural, electronic, mechanical, and transport properties of two different types of phosphorene nanoribbons are calculated within the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function formalisms. Armchair nanoribbons turn out to be semiconductors at all widths considered. Zigzag nanoribbons are metallic in their layer-terminated structure, but undergo Peierls-like transition at the edges. Armchair nanoribbons have smaller Young's modulus compared to a monolayer, while zigzag nanoribbons have larger Young's modulus. Edge reconstruction further increases the Young's modulus of zigzag nanoribbons. A two-terminal device made of zigzag nanoribbons show negative differential resistance behavior that is robust with respect to edge reconstruction. We have also calculated the I -V characteristics for two nonzero gate voltages. The results show that the zigzag nanoribbons display strong p -type character.

  16. The varied functions of aluminium-activated malate transporters-much more than aluminium resistance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony J; Baker, Alison; Muench, Stephen P

    2016-06-15

    The ALMT (aluminium-activated malate transporter) family comprises a functionally diverse but structurally similar group of ion channels. They are found ubiquitously in plant species, expressed throughout different tissues, and located in either the plasma membrane or tonoplast. The first family member identified was TaALMT1, discovered in wheat root tips, which was found to be involved in aluminium resistance by means of malate exudation into the soil. However, since this discovery other family members have been shown to have many other functions such as roles in stomatal opening, general anionic homoeostasis, and in economically valuable traits such as fruit flavour. Recent evidence has also shown that ALMT proteins can act as key molecular actors in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) signalling, the first evidence that GABA can act as a signal transducer in plants. PMID:27284052

  17. Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Associated Metabolic Perturbations in Haploinsufficient Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Nadia; Carneiro, Lionel; Favrod, Céline; Preitner, Frédéric; Thorens, Bernard; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Dix, Laure; Pralong, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 or SLC16A1) is a carrier of short-chain fatty acids, ketone bodies, and lactate in several tissues. Genetically modified C57BL/6J mice were produced by targeted disruption of the mct1 gene in order to understand the role of this transporter in energy homeostasis. Null mutation was embryonically lethal, but MCT1+/− mice developed normally. However, when fed high fat diet (HFD), MCT1+/− mice displayed resistance to development of diet-induced obesity (24.8% lower body weight after 16 weeks of HFD), as well as less insulin resistance and no hepatic steatosis as compared to littermate MCT1+/+ mice used as controls. Body composition analysis revealed that reduced weight gain in MCT1+/− mice was due to decreased fat accumulation (50.0% less after 9 months of HFD) notably in liver and white adipose tissue. This phenotype was associated with reduced food intake under HFD (12.3% less over 10 weeks) and decreased intestinal energy absorption (9.6% higher stool energy content). Indirect calorimetry measurements showed ∼ 15% increase in O2 consumption and CO2 production during the resting phase, without any changes in physical activity. Determination of plasma concentrations for various metabolites and hormones did not reveal significant changes in lactate and ketone bodies levels between the two genotypes, but both insulin and leptin levels, which were elevated in MCT1+/+ mice when fed HFD, were reduced in MCT1+/− mice under HFD. Interestingly, the enhancement in expression of several genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver of MCT1+/+ mice under high fat diet was prevented in the liver of MCT1+/− mice under the same diet, thus likely contributing to the observed phenotype. These findings uncover the critical role of MCT1 in the regulation of energy balance when animals are exposed to an obesogenic diet. PMID:24367518

  18. Effect of Prostaglandin E2 on Multidrug Resistance Transporters In Human Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gene T.; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen; He, Lily; Weiner, Carl P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, a major product of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, acts as an immunomodulator at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. It exerts biologic function through interaction with E-prostanoid (EP) receptors localized to the placenta. The activation of the COX-2/PGE2/EP signal pathway can alter the expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, multidrug resistance protein 1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp); gene: ABCB1], and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP; gene: ABCG2), which function to extrude drugs and xenobiotics from cells. In the placenta, PGE2-mediated changes in ABC transporter expression could impact fetal drug exposure. Furthermore, understanding the signaling cascades involved could lead to strategies for the control of Pgp and BCRP expression levels. We sought to determine the impact of PGE2 signaling mechanisms on Pgp and BCRP in human placental cells. The treatment of placental cells with PGE2 up-regulated BCRP expression and resulted in decreased cellular accumulation of the fluorescent substrate Hoechst 33342. Inhibiting the EP1 and EP3 receptors with specific antagonists attenuated the increase in BCRP. EP receptor signaling results in activation of transcription factors, which can affect BCRP expression. Although PGE2 decreased nuclear factor κ-light chain-enhancer of activated B activation and increased activator protein 1, chemical inhibition of these inflammatory transcription factors did not blunt BCRP up-regulation by PGE2. Though PGE2 decreased Pgp mRNA, Pgp expression and function were not significantly altered. Overall, these findings suggest a possible role for PGE2 in the up-regulation of placental BCRP expression via EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling cascades. PMID:25261564

  19. Chloroquine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy independent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Maycotte, Paola; Aryal, Suraj; Cummings, Christopher T; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Morgan, Michael J; Thorburn, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a 4-aminoquinoline drug used for the treatment of diverse diseases. It inhibits lysosomal acidification and therefore prevents autophagy by blocking autophagosome fusion and degradation. In cancer treatment, CQ is often used in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation because it has been shown to enhance the efficacy of tumor cell killing. Since CQ and its derivatives are the only inhibitors of autophagy that are available for use in the clinic, multiple ongoing clinical trials are currently using CQ or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for this purpose, either alone, or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here we show that in the mouse breast cancer cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, autophagy is induced by the DNA damaging agent cisplatin or by drugs that selectively target autophagy regulation, the PtdIns3K inhibitor LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In combination with these drugs, CQ sensitized to these treatments, though this effect was more evident with LY294002 and rapamycin treatment. Surprisingly, however, in these experiments CQ sensitization occurred independent of autophagy inhibition, since sensitization was not mimicked by Atg12, Beclin 1 knockdown or bafilomycin treatment, and occurred even in the absence of Atg12. We therefore propose that although CQ might be helpful in combination with cancer therapeutic drugs, its sensitizing effects can occur independently of autophagy inhibition. Consequently, this possibility should be considered in the ongoing clinical trials where CQ or HCQ are used in the treatment of cancer, and caution is warranted when CQ treatment is used in cytotoxic assays in autophagy research. PMID:22252008

  20. Chloroquine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Aryal, Suraj; Cummings, Christopher T; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Morgan, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a 4-aminoquinoline drug used for the treatment of diverse diseases. It inhibits lysosomal acidification and therefore prevents autophagy by blocking autophagosome fusion and degradation. In cancer treatment, CQ is often used in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation because it has been shown to enhance the efficacy of tumor cell killing. Since CQ and its derivatives are the only inhibitors of autophagy that are available for use in the clinic, multiple ongoing clinical trials are currently using CQ or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for this purpose, either alone, or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here we show that in the mouse breast cancer cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, autophagy is induced by the DNA damaging agent cisplatin or by drugs that selectively target autophagy regulation, the PtdIns3K inhibitor LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In combination with these drugs, CQ sensitized to these treatments, though this effect was more evident with LY294002 and rapamycin treatment. Surprisingly, however, in these experiments CQ sensitization occurred independent of autophagy inhibition, since sensitization was not mimicked by Atg12, Beclin 1 knockdown or bafilomycin treatment, and occurred even in the absence of Atg12. We therefore propose that although CQ might be helpful in combination with cancer therapeutic drugs, its sensitizing effects can occur independently of autophagy inhibition. Consequently, this possibility should be considered in the ongoing clinical trials where CQ or HCQ are used in the treatment of cancer, and caution is warranted when CQ treatment is used in cytotoxic assays in autophagy research. PMID:22252008

  1. Transport of the coumarin metabolite 7-hydroxycoumarin glucuronide is mediated via multidrug resistance-associated proteins 3 and 4.

    PubMed

    Wittgen, Hanneke G M; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; van den Broek, Petra H H; Siissalo, Sanna; Groothuis, Geny M M; de Graaf, Inge A M; Koenderink, Jan B; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-06-01

    Coumarin (1,2-benzopyrone) is a natural compound that has been used as a fragrance in the food and perfume industry and could have therapeutic usefulness in the treatment of lymphedema and different types of cancer. Several previous pharmacokinetic studies of coumarin have been performed in humans, which revealed extensive first-pass metabolism of the compound. 7-Hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) and its glucuronide (7-HC-G) are the main metabolites formed in humans, and via this route, 80 to 90% of the absorbed coumarin is excreted into urine, mainly as 7-HC-G. Active transport processes play a role in the urinary excretion of 7-HC-G; however, until now, the transporters involved remained to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether the efflux transporters multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP)1-4, breast cancer resistance protein, or P-glycoprotein play a role in 7-HC and 7-HC-G transport. For this purpose, we measured uptake of the metabolites into membrane vesicles overexpressing these transporters. Our results showed that 7-HC is not transported by any of the efflux transporters tested, whereas 7-HC-G was a substrate of MRP3 and MRP4. These results are in line with the pharmacokinetic profile of coumarin and suggest that MRP3 and MRP4 are the main transporters involved in the excretion of the coumarin metabolite 7-HC-G from liver and kidney.

  2. Monitoring snowmelt induced unsaturated flow and transport using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Helen K.; Hardbattle, Carol; Binley, Andrew; Winship, Peter; Jakobsen, Leif

    2002-10-01

    The flow and transport of a non-reactive tracer and melt water was monitored in a heterogeneous coarse sandy unsaturated zone in southeastern Norway, during the snowmelt of 2001. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) as well as conventional suction cup techniques was employed. A frozen solution of NaBr in water was supplied as a line source on the ground surface above two parallel vertical profiles monitored by the two measurement systems prior to the onset of snowmelt. The two monitored vertical profiles were separated by approximately 1 m. The results were analysed by visual comparison of images and by the use of spatial moments analysis. The two measurement approaches showed that the system was affected by the presence of preferential flow paths during the early stages of the snowmelt, perhaps due to ice near the surface, but the major part of the plume moves uniformly later in the snow-melting period. After most of the tracer plume has reached the depth monitored by both systems (i.e. below 0.4 m depth) there is a good consistency between the two datasets. Spatial moment calculations on the basis of ERT cannot be used to describe the movement of tracer alone, as the resistivity is affected by changes in both saturation levels and tracer concentration. Nevertheless, ERT appears to be an appropriate method to characterise regions of localised high infiltration in this type of soil. The method therefore constitutes a possible alternative and supplement to suction cups in a monitoring system.

  3. Exposure of Campylobacter jejuni to 6 degrees C: effects on heat resistance and electron transport activity.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Rebecca-Ayme; Cogan, Tristan; Humphrey, Tom

    2010-04-01

    Human infection with Campylobacter jejuni is frequently associated with the consumption of foods, especially chicken meat, which have been exposed to a range of temperatures during processing, storage, and cooking. Despite the public health importance of C. jejuni, little is known about the effects of cold exposure (refrigeration) on the subsequent ability of this pathogen to survive heat challenge. This work examined the effect of rapid exposure to 6 degrees C for 24 h on the heat resistance at 52 degrees C of 19 C. jejuni strains originally isolated from various sources. The resulting death curves were analyzed with the Weibull model. Unlike cold-exposed cells of Escherichia coli and Salmonella, which have been reported to show significant increased sensitivity to heat, such exposure had only a marginal effect on heat resistance of the C. jejuni strains in this study. A possible explanation for this effect is that rapid chilling renders C. jejuni cells unable to adapt to reduced temperatures in an active manner. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that exposure to 6 degrees C for 24 h resulted in a significant and marked reduction in electron transport system activity when compared with controls at 37 degrees C.

  4. Multidrug resistance-associated ABC transporters - too much of one thing, good for nothing.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Jirina; Lanova, Martina; Pachernik, Jiri

    2012-08-01

    Abstract Overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in cancer cells results in multidrug resistance (MDR) which leads to unsuccessful chemotherapy. The most important MDR-associated members of ABC superfamily are ABC B1/P-glycoprotein/MDR1, ABC C1/multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), and ABC G2/BCRP. This study is not only focused on function, substrates, and localization of these popular proteins but also on other ABC C family members such as ABC C2-6/MRP2-6 and ABC C7/CFTR. Current research is mainly oriented on the cancer-promoting role of these proteins, but important lessons could also be learned from the physiological roles of these proteins or from polymorphisms affecting their function. Thorough knowledge of structure and detailed mechanism of efflux can aid in the discovery of new chemotherapy targets in the future. Although the best way on how to deal with MDR would be to prevent its development, we describe some new promising strategies on how to conquer both inherited and induced MDRs.

  5. Report on audit of the Department of Energy`s Transportation Accident Resistant Container Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) has ultimate responsibility for the safety of all nuclear explosives and weapons operations conducted by the Department and its contractors. The Department also has joint responsibility for the safety of nuclear weapons in the custody of the Armed Services. Since the 1970s, the Department has designed, developed, and produced accident resistant containers to promote safety when transporting certain types of nuclear weapons by air. After successfully developing and modifying accident resistant containers for use on Army helicopters, the Department subsequently designed, modified, and produced similar containers for the United States Air Force. Because the Department spent millions of dollars on this project, we conducted the audit to determine if the Department had adequate controls in place to preclude the development and production of projects which did not have customer agreement or meet customer requirements. One goal of the Department`s Strategic Plan is to ensure that customer expectations are met by having them participate in the planning process. Although nuclear safety responsibility was shared with the Department of Defense, the Department designed and produced 87 accident resistant containers for about $29 million when the customer did not want them and expressed no desire to use these containers. This occurred because the Department unilaterally decided to produce containers without ensuring that the containers met customer expectations. There may be circumstances where the Department will do some preliminary design and testing before agreeing with the Department of Defense on requirements. However, the Departments of Energy and Defense should reach agreement on the requirement for products before final design and production, otherwise funds will be spent unnecessarily.

  6. The role of transport processes in survival of lactic acid bacteria. Energy transduction and multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Konings, W N; Lolkema, J S; Bolhuis, H; van Veen, H W; Poolman, B; Driessen, A J

    1997-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria play an essential role in many food fermentation processes. They are anaerobic organisms which obtain their metabolic energy by substrate phosphorylation. In addition three secondary energy transducing processes can contribute to the generation of a proton motive force: proton/substrate symport as in lactic acid excretion, electrogenic precursor/product exchange as in malolactic and citrolactic fermentation and histidine/histamine exchange, and electrogenic uniport as in malate and citrate uptake in Leuconostoc oenos. In several of these processes additional H+ consumption occurs during metabolism leading to the generation of a pH gradient, internally alkaline. Lactic acid bacteria have also developed multidrug resistance systems. In Lactococcus lactis three toxin excretion systems have been characterized: cationic toxins can be excreted by a toxin/proton antiport system and by an ABC-transporter. This cationic ABC-transporter has surprisingly high structural and functional analogy with the human MDR1-(P-glycoprotein). For anions an ATP-driven ABC-like excretion systems exist.

  7. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10‑4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed.

  8. Thermal and Thermoelectric Transport in Highly Resistive Single Sb2Se3 Nanowires and Nanowire Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ting-Yu; Shellaiah, Muthaiah; Sun, Kien Wen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured the thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of single Sb2Se3 nanowires and nanowire bundles with a high resistivity (σ ~ 4.37 × 10−4 S/m). Microdevices consisting of two adjacent suspended silicon nitride membranes were fabricated to measure the thermal transport properties of the nanowires in vacuum. Single Sb2Se3 nanowires with different diameters and nanowire bundles were carefully placed on the device to bridge the two membranes. The relationship of temperature difference on each heating/sensing suspension membranes with joule heating was accurately determined. A single Sb2Se3 nanowire with a diameter of ~ 680 nm was found to have a thermal conductivity (kNW) of 0.037 ± 0.002 W/m·K. The thermal conductivity of the nanowires is more than an order of magnitude lower than that of bulk materials (k ~ 0.36–1.9 W/m·K) and highly conductive (σ ~ 3 × 104 S/m) Sb2Se3 single nanowires (k ~ 1 W/m·K). The measured Seebeck coefficient with a positive value of ~ 661 μV/K is comparable to that of highly conductive Sb2Se3 single nanowires (~ 750 μV/K). The thermal transport between wires with different diameters and nanowire bundles was compared and discussed. PMID:27713527

  9. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in Candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca2+ did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport. PMID:26220356

  10. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca(2+) did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

  11. Mutation of G234 amino acid residue in candida albicans drug-resistance-related protein Rta2p is associated with fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shi-Qun; Miao, Qi; Li, Li-Ping; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Yan, Lan; Jia, Yu; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Widespread and repeated use of azoles has led to the rapid development of drug resistance in Candida albicans. Our previous study found Rta2p, a membrane protein with 7 transmembrane domains, was involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in C. albicans. Conserved amino acids in the transmembrane domain of Rta2p were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis. The sensitivity of C. albicans to fluconazole in vitro was examined by minimum inhibitory concentration and killing assay, and the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole in vivo was performed by systemic mice candidiasis model. Furthermore, dihydrosphingosine transport activity was detected by NBD labeled D-erythro-dihydrosphingosine uptake and release assay, and the sensitivity to sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitors. We successfully constructed 14 mutant strains of Rta2p, screened them by minimum inhibitory concentration and found Ca(2+) did not completely induce fluconazole resistance with G158E and G234S mutations. Furthermore, we confirmed that G234S mutant enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of fluconazole against systemic candidiasis and significantly increased the accumulation of dihydrosphingosine by decreasing its release. However, G158E mutant didn't affect drug therapeutic efficacy in vivo and dihydrosphingosine transport in C. albicans. G234 of Rta2p in C. albicans is crucial in calcineurin-mediated fluconazole resistance and dihydrosphingosine transport. PMID:26220356

  12. Metabolic and structural consequences of ethanol and chloroquin administration during gestation on the developing fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.; Rawat, A.K.

    1987-05-01

    In the present study the effects of ethanol and chloroquin administration during gestation have been investigated on the developing rat fetus. Ethanol was given in liquid Sustacal diet as 30% of calories and controls were fed isocaloric sucrose-diet. Chloroquin was given intragastrically corresponding controls received saline. Chloroquin resulted in prenatal growth retardation leading to maximum decrease of 46% in body weight of the fetus. It also resulted in 30% higher incidence of hepatomegaly; 15% higher incidence of liquification of visceral organs; 34% decrease in the ossification of sternum; 9% higher defects of cleft palate, wrist drop, clubbed foot and brain liquification compared to the corresponding controls. Ethanol resulted in pre and post-natal growth retardation, cleft palate, still births and lowered brain weights. Fetuses from the ethanol-fed group also showed inhibited protein synthesis, RNA and DNA synthesis in the brain compared to the controls.

  13. Chloroquine enhanced the anticancer capacity of VNP20009 by inhibiting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Xu, Qiaoqiao; Zhang, Zhuangzhuang; Cheng, Wei; Cao, Wenmin; Jiang, Chizhou; Han, Chao; Li, Jiahuang; Hua, Zichun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based living anticancer agents have emerged as promising therapeutics. However, the functional role of autophagy in bacterial cancer therapy has been little investigated. In this study, Salmonella VNP20009 induced autophagy in B16F10 cells, which is an unfavorable factor in bacterial cancer therapy. Inhibiting the induction of autophagy by chloroquine or siRNA in bacterial cancer therapy dose- and time-dependently promoted cell death. The combined therapy of VNP20009 and chloroquine not only enhanced the bacterial tumor targeting ability but also facilitated the infiltration of immune cells into the tumor. Our results showed that the combined therapy of VNP20009 and chloroquine could significantly inhibit tumor growth and prolong mouse survival time. This study provides a novel strategy for improving the anti-cancer efficacy of bacterial cancer therapy. PMID:27412722

  14. A Silent ABC Transporter Isolated from Streptomyces rochei F20 Induces Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Moreno, Miguel A.; Carbó, Lázaro; Cuesta, Trinidad; Vallín, Carlos; Malpartida, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    In the search for heterologous activators for actinorhodin production in Streptomyces lividans, 3.4 kb of DNA from Streptomyces rochei F20 (a streptothricin producer) were characterized. Subcloning experiments showed that the minimal DNA fragment required for activation was 0.4 kb in size. The activation is mediated by increasing the levels of transcription of the actII-ORF4 gene. Sequencing of the minimal activating fragment did not reveal any clues about its mechanism; nevertheless, it was shown to overlap the 3′ end of two convergent genes, one of whose translated products (ORF2) strongly resembles that of other genes belonging to the ABC transporter superfamily. Computer-assisted analysis of the 3.4-kb DNA sequence showed the 3′ terminus of an open reading frame (ORF), i.e., ORFA, and three complete ORFs (ORF1, ORF2, and ORFB). Searches in the databases with their respective gene products revealed similarities for ORF1 and ORF2 with ATP-binding proteins and transmembrane proteins, respectively, which are found in members of the ABC transporter superfamily. No similarities for ORFA and ORFB were found in the databases. Insertional inactivation of ORF1 and ORF2, their transcription analysis, and their cloning in heterologous hosts suggested that these genes were not expressed under our experimental conditions; however, cloning of ORF1 and ORF2 together (but not separately) under the control of an expressing promoter induced resistance to several chemically different drugs: oleandomycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, doxorubicin, and tetracycline. Thus, this genetic system, named msr, is a new bacterial multidrug ABC transporter. PMID:9696745

  15. Chloroquine retinopathy: pattern of presentation in Ibadan, Sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Oluleye, T S; Babalola, Y; Ijaduola, M

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundSelf-medication with chloroquine is common in Ibadan, Sub-Sahara Africa. Retinopathy from chloroquine is not uncommon. The aim was to determine the pattern of presentation.MethodologyCases of Chloroquine retinopathy seen at the Retina and Vitreous Unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. Information on age, sex, duration of chloroquine use, and visual loss were retrieved. Visual acuity at presentation, anterior, and posterior segment findings were documented. The results were analyzed using proportions and percentages.ResultsFourteen cases were seen during the study period. Mean age was 50.7 years. Male to female ratio was 3.5 : 1. Average duration of visual loss before presentation was 2.7 years. Average duration of self-medication with chloroquine was 5.3 years. Presenting visual acuity showed 2(14%) cases of bilateral blindness(VA<3/60 in both eyes); 5(35.7%) cases of uniocular blindness; three cases of bilateral low vision(VA worse than 6/18 but better than 3/60). Anterior segment examination showed abnormal sluggish pupillary reaction in those with severe affectation. Dilated fundoscopy showed features ranging from mild macular pigmentary changes and bulls eye maculopathy to overt extensive retinal degeneration involving the posterior pole, attenuation of retinal vessels, optic atrophy, and beaten bronze appearance of atrophic maculopathy.ConclusionChloroquine retinopathy is not uncommon in Ibadan, Sub-Sahara Africa. Bulls eye maculopathy, extensive retinal, and macular degeneration with optic atrophy are the main presentations. Public health education is imperative. PMID:26427986

  16. Combination treatment with ABT-737 and chloroquine in preclinical models of small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New therapies are urgently needed for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Chemotherapy and targeted therapies, including the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737, may induce tumor cell autophagy. Autophagy can promote survival of cancer cells under stress and comprise a pathway of escape from cytotoxic therapies. Methods We explored the combination of ABT-737 and chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, in preclinical models of SCLC. These included cell culture analyses of viability and of autophagic and apoptotic pathway induction, as well as in vivo analyses of efficacy in multiple xenograft models. Results Combination treatment of SCLC lines with ABT-737 and chloroquine decreased viability and increased caspase-3 activation over treatment with either single agent. ABT-737 induced several hallmarks of autophagy. However, knockdown of beclin-1, a key regulator of entry into autophagy, diminished the efficacy of ABT-737, suggesting either that the effects of chloroquine were nonspecific or that induction but not completion of autophagy is necessary for the combined effect of ABT-737 and chloroquine. ABT-737 and chloroquine in SCLC cell lines downregulated Mcl-1 and upregulated NOXA, both of which may promote apoptosis. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that chloroquine could enhance ABT-737-mediated tumor growth inhibition against NCI-H209 xenografts, but did not alter ABT-737 response in three primary patient-derived xenograft models. Conclusion These data suggest that although ABT-737 can induce autophagy in SCLC, autophagic inhibition by choroquine does not markedly alter in vivo response to ABT-737 in relevant preclinical models, arguing against this as a treatment strategy for SCLC. PMID:23452820

  17. TetAB(46), a predicted heterodimeric ABC transporter conferring tetracycline resistance in Streptococcus australis isolated from the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Ciric, Lena; Lerner, Avigdor; Seville, Lorna A.; Roberts, Adam P.; Mullany, Peter; Allan, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To identify the genes responsible for tetracycline resistance in a strain of Streptococcus australis isolated from pooled saliva from healthy volunteers in France. S. australis is a viridans Streptococcus, originally isolated from the oral cavity of children in Australia, and subsequently reported in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and as a cause of invasive disease in an elderly patient. Methods Agar containing 2 mg/L tetracycline was used for the isolation of tetracycline-resistant organisms. A genomic library in Escherichia coli was used to isolate the tetracycline resistance determinant. In-frame deletions and chromosomal repair were used to confirm function. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by agar dilution and disc diffusion assay. Results The tetracycline resistance determinant from S. australis FRStet12 was isolated from a genomic library in E. coli and DNA sequencing showed two open reading frames predicted to encode proteins with similarity to multidrug resistance-type ABC transporters. Both genes were required for tetracycline resistance (to both the naturally occurring and semi-synthetic tetracyclines) and they were designated tetAB(46). Conclusions This is the first report of a predicted ABC transporter conferring tetracycline resistance in a member of the oral microbiota. PMID:22941900

  18. Therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum in Haiti after many decades of its use.

    PubMed

    Okech, Bernard A; Existe, Alexandre; Romain, Jean R; Memnon, Gladys; Victor, Yves Saint; de Rochars, Madsen Beau; Fukuda, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) has been used for malaria treatment in Haiti for several decades, but reports of CQ resistance are scarce. The efficacy of CQ in patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum undergoing treatment in Haiti was evaluated. Malaria patients were enrolled, treated with CQ, and monitored over a 42-day period. The treatment outcomes were evaluated on day 28 by microscopy. The P. falciparum slide-confirmed rate was 9.5% (121 of 1,277). Malaria infection was seasonal, with peak observations between October and January; 88% (107 of 121) of patients consented to participate. Sixty patients successfully completed the 42-day follow-up, whereas 47 patients withdrew consent or were lost to follow-up. The mean parasite density declined rapidly within the first few days after treatment. Seven patients did not clear their malaria infections and were clinically asymptomatic; therefore, they were considered late parasitological failures. About 90% (95% confidence interval = 84.20-97.90) of patients had no detectable parasitemia by day 28 and remained malaria-free to day 42. Testing for recrudescence, reinfection, and CQ serum levels was not done in the seven patients, and therefore, their CQ resistance status is unresolved. CQ resistance surveillance by patient follow-up, in vitro drug sensitivity studies, and molecular markers is urgently needed in Haiti.

  19. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure.

  20. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure. PMID:26014942

  1. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L.; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T.; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D.; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure. PMID:26014942

  2. Chloroquine enhances the chemotherapeutic activity of 5-fluorouracil in a colon cancer cell line via cell cycle alteration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Yoon, Jin Sun; Won, Young-Woong; Park, Byeong-Bae; Lee, Young Yiul

    2012-07-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles for recycling. The role of autophagy in tumorigenesis is controversial because autophagy can be either protective or damaging to tumor cells, and its effects may change during tumor progression. A number of cancer cell lines have been exposed to chloroquine, an anti-malarial drug, with the aim of inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell death. In addition, chloroquine inhibits a late phase of autophagy. This study was conducted to investigate the anti-cancer effect of autophagy inhibition, using chloroquine together with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a colon cancer cell line. Human colon cancer DLD-1 cells were treated with 5-FU (10 μΜ) or chloroquine (100 μΜ), or a combination of both. Autophagy was evaluated by western blot analysis of microtubule-associated protein light chain3 (LC3). Proliferative activity, alterations of the cell cycle, and apoptosis were measured by MTT assays, flow cytometry, and western blotting. LC3-II protein increased after treatment with 5-FU, and chloroquine potentiated the cytotoxicity of 5-FU. MTT assays showed that 5-FU inhibited proliferation of the DLD-1 cells and that chloroquine enhanced this inhibitory effect of 5-FU. The combination of 5-FU and chloroquine induced G1 arrest, up-regulation of p27 and p53, and down-regulation of CDK2 and cyclin D1. These results suggest that chloroquine may potentiate the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU via cell cycle inhibition. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU in colon cancer cells. Supplementation of conventional chemotherapy with chloroquine may provide a new cancer therapy modality. PMID:22716215

  3. Microarray-based detection and expression analysis of ABC and SLC transporters in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Ruciński, Marcin; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-04-01

    Multiple drug resistance of cancer cells is multifactorial. A microarray technique may provide information about new candidate genes playing a role in drug resistance. Drug membrane transporters from ABC and SLC families play a main role in this phenomenon. This study demonstrates alterations in ABC and SLC gene expression levels in methotrexate, cisplatin, doxorubicin, vincristine, topotecan and paclitaxel-resistant variant of W1 ovarian cancer cell line. Resistant W1 cell lines were derived by stepwise selection of cells in increasing concentration of drugs. Affymetrix GeneChip(®) Human Genome U219 Array Strip was used for hybridizations. Statistical significance was determined by independent sample t-test. The genes having altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scater plot. Genes up/downregulated more than threefolds were selected and listed. Among ABC genes, seven were upregulated and three were downregulated. Three genes: ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCG2 were upregulated very significantly (over tenfold). One ABCA8 was significantly downregulated. Among 38 SLC genes, 18 were upregulated, 16 were downregulated and four were up- or downregulated dependent on the cell line. Expression of 10 SLC genes was changed very significantly (over tenfold). Four genes were significantly increased: SLC6A1, SLC9A2, SLC12A1, SLC16A6 and six genes were significantly decreased: SLC2A14, SLC7A3, SLC7A8, SLC7A11, SLC16A14, SLC38A9. Based on the expression profiles, our results provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and expression of membrane transporters involved in drug resistance. Correlation of specific drug transporter with drug resistance requires further analysis.

  4. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  5. The cellular uptake mechanism, intracellular transportation, and exocytosis of polyamidoamine dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Mengjun; Sun, Yuqi; Zhang, Xiaojun; Guan, Guannan; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Mingxi; Chen, Dawei; Hu, Haiyang

    2016-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers, which can deliver drugs and genetic materials to resistant cells, are attracting increased research attention, but their transportation behavior in resistant cells remains unclear. In this paper, we performed a systematic analysis of the cellular uptake, intracellular transportation, and efflux of PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers in multidrug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR cells) using sensitive breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) as the control. We found that the uptake rate of PAMAM-NH2 was much lower and exocytosis of PAMAM-NH2 was much greater in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells due to the elimination of PAMAM-NH2 from P-glycoprotein and the multidrug resistance-associated protein in MCF-7/ADR cells. Macropinocytosis played a more important role in its uptake in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. PAMAM-NH2 aggregated and became more degraded in the lysosomal vesicles of the MCF-7/ADR cells than in those of the MCF-7 cells. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex were found to participate in the exocytosis rather than endocytosis process of PAMAM-NH2 in both types of cells. Our findings clearly showed the intracellular transportation process of PAMAM-NH2 in MCF-7/ADR cells and provided a guide of using PAMAM-NH2 as a drug and gene vector in resistant cells. PMID:27536106

  6. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field.

  7. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field. PMID:26908582

  8. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter in Nicotiana tabacum is involved in defense against the herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Manuela D; Siegmund, Stephanie E G; Drozak, Anna; Trombik, Tomasz; Bultreys, Alain; Baldwin, Ian T; Boutry, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters are a group of membrane proteins belonging to the ABCG sub-family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. There is clear evidence for the involvement of plant ABC transporters in resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens, but not in the biotic stress response to insect or herbivore attack. Here, we describe a PDR transporter, ABCG5/PDR5, from Nicotiana tabacum. GFP fusion and subcellular fractionation studies revealed that ABCG5/PDR5 is localized to the plasma membrane. Staining of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ABCG5/PDR5 transcription promoter and immunoblotting of wild-type plants showed that, under standard growth conditions, ABCG5/PDR5 is highly expressed in roots, stems and flowers, but is only expressed at marginal levels in leaves. Interestingly, ABCG5/PDR5 expression is induced in leaves by methyl jasmonate, wounding, pathogen infiltration, or herbivory by Manduca sexta. To address the physiological role of ABCG5/PDR5, N. tabacum plants silenced for the expression of ABCG5/PDR5 were obtained. No phenotypic modification was observed under standard conditions. However, a small increase in susceptibility to the fungus Fusarium oxysporum was observed. A stronger effect was observed in relation to herbivory: silenced plants allowed better growth and faster development of M. sexta larvae than wild-type plants, indicating an involvement of this PDR transporter in resistance to M. sexta herbivory.

  9. Genetic architecture of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Olivo; Amato, Roberto; Ashley, Elizabeth A; MacInnis, Bronwyn; Almagro-Garcia, Jacob; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Lim, Pharath; Mead, Daniel; Oyola, Samuel O; Dhorda, Mehul; Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles; Manske, Magnus; Stalker, Jim; Drury, Eleanor; Campino, Susana; Amenga-Etego, Lucas; Thanh, Thuy-Nhien Nguyen; Tran, Hien Tinh; Ringwald, Pascal; Bethell, Delia; Nosten, Francois; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Chuor, Char Meng; Nguon, Chea; Suon, Seila; Sreng, Sokunthea; Newton, Paul N; Mayxay, Mayfong; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Hongvanthong, Bouasy; Htut, Ye; Han, Kay Thwe; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Faiz, Md Abul; Fanello, Caterina I; Onyamboko, Marie; Mokuolu, Olugbenga A; Jacob, Christopher G; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher V; Day, Nicholas P; Dondorp, Arjen M; Spencer, Chris C A; McVean, Gilean; Fairhurst, Rick M; White, Nicholas J; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2015-03-01

    We report a large multicenter genome-wide association study of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin, the frontline antimalarial drug. Across 15 locations in Southeast Asia, we identified at least 20 mutations in kelch13 (PF3D7_1343700) affecting the encoded propeller and BTB/POZ domains, which were associated with a slow parasite clearance rate after treatment with artemisinin derivatives. Nonsynonymous polymorphisms in fd (ferredoxin), arps10 (apicoplast ribosomal protein S10), mdr2 (multidrug resistance protein 2) and crt (chloroquine resistance transporter) also showed strong associations with artemisinin resistance. Analysis of the fine structure of the parasite population showed that the fd, arps10, mdr2 and crt polymorphisms are markers of a genetic background on which kelch13 mutations are particularly likely to arise and that they correlate with the contemporary geographical boundaries and population frequencies of artemisinin resistance. These findings indicate that the risk of new resistance-causing mutations emerging is determined by specific predisposing genetic factors in the underlying parasite population.

  10. Molecular characterization of the MRPA transporter and antimony uptake in four New World Leishmania spp. susceptible and resistant to antimony☆

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Douglas S.; Monte Neto, Rubens L.; Andrade, Juvana M.; Santi, Ana Maria M.; Reis, Priscila G.; Frézard, Frédéric; Murta, Silvane M.F.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been associated with drug resistance in various diseases. The MRPA gene, a transporter of ABCC subfamily, is involved in the resistance by sequestering metal-thiol conjugates in intracellular vesicles of Leishmania parasite. In this study, we performed the molecular characterization of the MRPA transporter, analysis of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and aquaglyceroporin-1 (AQP1) expression, and determination of antimony level in antimony-susceptible and -resistant lines of L. (V.) guyanensis, L. (L.) amazonensis, L. (V.) braziliensis and L. (L.) infantum. PFGE analysis revealed an association of chromosomal amplification of MRPA gene with the drug resistance phenotype in all SbIII-resistant Leishmania lines analyzed. Levels of mRNA from MRPA gene determined by real-time quantitative RT-PCR showed an increased expression of two fold in SbIII-resistant lines of Leishmania guyanensis, Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis. Western blot analysis revealed that Pgp is increased in the SbIII-resistant L. guyanensis and L. amazonensis lines. The intracellular level of antimony quantified by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry showed a reduction in the accumulation of this element in SbIII-resistant L. guyanensis, L. amazonensis and L. braziliensis lines when compared to their susceptible counterparts. Interestingly, a down-regulation of AQP1 protein was observed in the SbIII-resistant L. guyanensis and L. amazonensis lines, contributing for decreasing of SbIII entry in these lines. In addition, efflux experiments revealed that the rates of SbIII efflux are higher in the SbIII-resistant lines of L. guyanensis and L. braziliensis, that may explain also the low SbIII concentration within of these parasites. The BSO, an inhibitor of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase enzyme, reversed the SbIII-resistance phenotype of L. braziliensis and caused an increasing in the Sb intracellular level in the LbSbR line. Our data

  11. Functional Linkage between Genes That Regulate Osmotic Stress Responses and Multidrug Resistance Transporters: Challenges and Opportunities for Antibiotic Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    All cells need to protect themselves against the osmotic challenges of their environment by maintaining low permeability to ions across their cell membranes. This is a basic principle of cellular function, which is reflected in the interactions among ion transport and drug efflux genes that have arisen during cellular evolution. Thus, upon exposure to pore-forming antibiotics such as amphotericin B (AmB) or daptomycin (Dap), sensitive cells overexpress common resistance genes to protect themselves from added osmotic challenges. These genes share pathway interactions with the various types of multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter genes, which both preserve the native lipid membrane composition and at the same time eliminate disruptive hydrophobic molecules that partition excessively within the lipid bilayer. An increased understanding of the relationships between the genes (and their products) that regulate osmotic stress responses and MDR transporters will help to identify novel strategies and targets to overcome the current stalemate in drug discovery. PMID:24295980

  12. Delayed insulin transport across endothelium in insulin-resistant JCR:LA-cp rats.

    PubMed

    Wascher, T C; Wölkart, G; Russell, J C; Brunner, F

    2000-05-01

    Capillary endothelial cells are thought to limit the transport of insulin across the endothelium, resulting in attenuated insulin action at target sites. Whether endothelial insulin transport is altered in dysglycemic insulin-resistant states is not clear and was therefore investigated in the JCR:LA-cp corpulent male rat, which exhibits the metabolic syndrome of obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia. Lean littermates that did not develop these alterations served as controls. Animals of both groups were normotensive (mean arterial pressure 136+/-2 mmHg). Hearts from obese and lean rats aged 7 (n = 6) or 18 (n = 8) weeks were perfused in vitro at 10 ml/min per gram wet wt over 51 min with Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 0.1 or 0.5 U human insulin/l (equivalent to 0.6 and 3 nmol/l). Interstitial fluid was collected using a validated method, and interstitial insulin was determined with a radioimmunoassay. At 0.1 U/l, insulin transfer velocity was similar in both experimental groups (half-times of transfer: 11+/-0.2 min in obese and 18+/-4 min in lean rats; NS), but at 0.5 U/l, the respective half-times were 7+/-1 min in lean and 13+/-2 min in obese rats (P < 0.05). The steady-state level of insulin in the interstitium was 34+/-1% of the vascular level at 0.1 U/l and reached the vascular level (102+/-2%) at 0.5 U/l in both lean and obese rats. In rats aged 18 weeks, the half-times of insulin transfer were 31+/-2 and 14+/-l min in obese rats and 10+/-0.3 and 7+/-0.3 min in lean rats (P < 0.05). Again, interstitial steady-state levels were similar in both groups. Finally, postprandial insulin dynamics were simulated over a period of 120 min with a peak concentration of 0.8 U/l in rats aged 27 weeks (n = 4). The maximal interstitial level was 0.38+/-0.02 U/l in lean rats and 0.24+/-0.02 U/l in obese rats (P < 0.05), and a similar difference was noted throughout insulin infusion (areas under the transudate concentration-time curves: 17 and 11 U

  13. A Novel ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Involved in Multidrug Resistance in the Phytopathogenic Fungus Penicillium digitatum

    PubMed Central

    Nakaune, Ryoji; Adachi, Kiichi; Nawata, Osamu; Tomiyama, Masamitsu; Akutsu, Katsumi; Hibi, Tadaaki

    1998-01-01

    Demethylation inhibitor (DMI)-resistant strains of the plant pathogenic fungus Penicillium digitatum were shown to be simultaneously resistant to cycloheximide, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4NQO), and acriflavine. A PMR1 (Penicillium multidrug resistance) gene encoding an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (P-glycoprotein) was cloned from a genomic DNA library of a DMI-resistant strain (LC2) of Penicillium digitatum by heterologous hybridization with a DNA fragment containing an ABC-encoding region from Botrytis cinerea. Sequence analysis revealed significant amino acid homology to the primary structures of PMR1 (protein encoded by the PMR1 gene) and ABC transporters of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (PDR5 and SNQ2), Schizosaccharomyces pombe (HBA2), Candida albicans (CDR1), and Aspergillus nidulans (AtrA and AtrB). Disruption of the PMR1 gene of P. digitatum DMI-resistant strain LC2 demonstrated that PMR1 was an important determinant of resistance to DMIs. The effective concentrations inhibiting radial growth by 50% (EC50s) and the MICs of fenarimol and bitertanol for the PMR1 disruptants (Δpmr1 mutants) were equivalent to those for DMI-sensitive strains. Northern blot analysis indicated that severalfold more PMR1 transcript accumulated in the DMI-resistant strains compared with those in DMI-sensitive strains in the absence of fungicide. In both DMI-resistant and -sensitive strains, transcription of PMR1 was strongly enhanced within 10 min after treatment with the DMI fungicide triflumizole. These results suggested that the toxicant efflux system comprised of PMR1 participates directly in the DMI resistance of the fungus. PMID:9758830

  14. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  15. Phonon cross-plane transport and thermal boundary resistance: effect of heat source size and thermal boundary resistance on phonon characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2016-09-01

    Phonon cross-plane transport across silicon and diamond thin films pair is considered, and thermal boundary resistance across the films pair interface is examined incorporating the cut-off mismatch and diffusive mismatch models. In the cut-off mismatch model, phonon frequency mismatch for each acoustic branch is incorporated across the interface of the silicon and diamond films pair in line with the dispersion relations of both films. The frequency-dependent and transient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation is presented, and the equilibrium phonon intensity ratios at the silicon and diamond film edges are predicted across the interface for each phonon acoustic branch. Temperature disturbance across the edges of the films pair is incorporated to assess the phonon transport characteristics due to cut-off and diffusive mismatch models across the interface. The effect of heat source size, which is allocated at high-temperature (301 K) edge of the silicon film, on the phonon transport characteristics at the films pair interface is also investigated. It is found that cut-off mismatch model predicts higher values of the thermal boundary resistance across the films pair interface as compared to that of the diffusive mismatch model. The ratio of equilibrium phonon intensity due to the cut-off mismatch over the diffusive mismatch models remains >1 at the silicon edge, while it becomes <1 at the diamond edge for all acoustic branches.

  16. Within-host competition and drug resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Mary; Morton, Lindsay; Duah, Nancy; Quashie, Neils; Abuaku, Benjamin; Koram, Kwadwo A; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Plucinski, Mateusz; Gutman, Julie; Lyaruu, Peter; Kachur, S Patrick; de Roode, Jacobus C; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-03-16

    Infections with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum typically comprise multiple strains, especially in high-transmission areas where infectious mosquito bites occur frequently. However, little is known about the dynamics of mixed-strain infections, particularly whether strains sharing a host compete or grow independently. Competition between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains, if it occurs, could be a crucial determinant of the spread of resistance. We analysed 1341 P. falciparum infections in children from Angola, Ghana and Tanzania and found compelling evidence for competition in mixed-strain infections: overall parasite density did not increase with additional strains, and densities of individual chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine-resistant (CQR) strains were reduced in the presence of competitors. We also found that CQR strains exhibited low densities compared with CQS strains (in the absence of chloroquine), which may underlie observed declines of chloroquine resistance in many countries following retirement of chloroquine as a first-line therapy. Our observations support a key role for within-host competition in the evolution of drug-resistant malaria. Malaria control and resistance-management efforts in high-transmission regions may be significantly aided or hindered by the effects of competition in mixed-strain infections. Consideration of within-host dynamics may spur development of novel strategies to minimize resistance while maximizing the benefits of control measures.

  17. Within-host competition and drug resistance in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Mary; Morton, Lindsay; Duah, Nancy; Quashie, Neils; Abuaku, Benjamin; Koram, Kwadwo A; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Plucinski, Mateusz; Gutman, Julie; Lyaruu, Peter; Kachur, S Patrick; de Roode, Jacobus C; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2016-03-16

    Infections with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum typically comprise multiple strains, especially in high-transmission areas where infectious mosquito bites occur frequently. However, little is known about the dynamics of mixed-strain infections, particularly whether strains sharing a host compete or grow independently. Competition between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains, if it occurs, could be a crucial determinant of the spread of resistance. We analysed 1341 P. falciparum infections in children from Angola, Ghana and Tanzania and found compelling evidence for competition in mixed-strain infections: overall parasite density did not increase with additional strains, and densities of individual chloroquine-sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine-resistant (CQR) strains were reduced in the presence of competitors. We also found that CQR strains exhibited low densities compared with CQS strains (in the absence of chloroquine), which may underlie observed declines of chloroquine resistance in many countries following retirement of chloroquine as a first-line therapy. Our observations support a key role for within-host competition in the evolution of drug-resistant malaria. Malaria control and resistance-management efforts in high-transmission regions may be significantly aided or hindered by the effects of competition in mixed-strain infections. Consideration of within-host dynamics may spur development of novel strategies to minimize resistance while maximizing the benefits of control measures. PMID:26984625

  18. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J.; Heckel, David G.; Walsh, Thomas K.; Downes, Sharon; James, William J.; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K.; Gordon, Karl H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  19. Insect Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab Is Conferred by Mutations in an ABC Transporter Subfamily A Protein.

    PubMed

    Tay, Wee Tek; Mahon, Rod J; Heckel, David G; Walsh, Thomas K; Downes, Sharon; James, William J; Lee, Sui-Fai; Reineke, Annette; Williams, Adam K; Gordon, Karl H J

    2015-11-01

    The use of conventional chemical insecticides and bacterial toxins to control lepidopteran pests of global agriculture has imposed significant selection pressure leading to the rapid evolution of insecticide resistance. Transgenic crops (e.g., cotton) expressing the Bt Cry toxins are now used world wide to control these pests, including the highly polyphagous and invasive cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera. Since 2004, the Cry2Ab toxin has become widely used for controlling H. armigera, often used in combination with Cry1Ac to delay resistance evolution. Isolation of H. armigera and H. punctigera individuals heterozygous for Cry2Ab resistance in 2002 and 2004, respectively, allowed aspects of Cry2Ab resistance (level, fitness costs, genetic dominance, complementation tests) to be characterised in both species. However, the gene identity and genetic changes conferring this resistance were unknown, as was the detailed Cry2Ab mode of action. No cross-resistance to Cry1Ac was observed in mutant lines. Biphasic linkage analysis of a Cry2Ab-resistant H. armigera family followed by exon-primed intron-crossing (EPIC) marker mapping and candidate gene sequencing identified three independent resistance-associated INDEL mutations in an ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter gene we named HaABCA2. A deletion mutation was also identified in the H. punctigera homolog from the resistant line. All mutations truncate the ABCA2 protein. Isolation of further Cry2Ab resistance alleles in the same gene from field H. armigera populations indicates unequal resistance allele frequencies and the potential for Bt resistance evolution. Identification of the gene involved in resistance as an ABC transporter of the A subfamily adds to the body of evidence on the crucial role this gene family plays in the mode of action of the Bt Cry toxins. The structural differences between the ABCA2, and that of the C subfamily required for Cry1Ac toxicity, indicate differences in the detailed mode

  20. Experiments on the resistance of a large transport vessel navigating in the Arctic region in pack ice conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Yinghui; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we carried out model tests to investigate the ice failure process and the resistance experienced by a transport vessel navigating in the Arctic region in pack ice conditions. We tested different navigation velocities, ice plate sizes, and ice concentrations. During the tests, we closely observed several phenomena, including the modes of interaction of the ice ship and the moving and failure modes of ice. We also measured the vessel resistances under different conditions. The test results indicate that the navigation velocity is a significant determinant of the moving and failure modes of ice. Moreover, vessel resistance is remarkably dependent on the ice concentration and navigation velocity. The variances of the mean and maximum resistance are also compared and discussed in detail.

  1. Experiments on the resistance of a large transport vessel navigating in the Arctic region in pack ice conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Li, Wei; Wang, Yinghui; Wu, Baoshan

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we carried out model tests to investigate the ice failure process and the resistance experienced by a transport vessel navigating in the Arctic region in pack ice conditions. We tested different navigation velocities, ice plate sizes, and ice concentrations. During the tests, we closely observed several phenomena, including the modes of interaction of the ice ship and the moving and failure modes of ice. We also measured the vessel resistances under different conditions. The test results indicate that the navigation velocity is a significant determinant of the moving and failure modes of ice. Moreover, vessel resistance is remarkably dependent on the ice concentration and navigation velocity. The variances of the mean and maximum resistance are also compared and discussed in detail.

  2. Prolonged neuropsychiatric effects following management of chloroquine intoxication with psychotropic polypharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Nicole M; Nevin, Remington L; Stahl, Stephen; Block, Jerald; Shugarts, Sarah; Wu, Alan H B; Dominy, Stephen; Solano-Blanco, Miguel Alonso; Kappelman-Culver, Sharon; Lee-Messer, Christopher; Maldonado, Jose; Maxwell, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Susceptibility to quinoline antimalarial intoxication may reflect individual genetic and drug-induced variation in neuropharmacokinetics. In this report, we describe a case of chloroquine intoxication that appeared to be prolonged by subsequent use of multiple psychotropic medications. This case highlights important new considerations for the management of quinoline antimalarial intoxication. PMID:26185633

  3. Chitosan conjugated chloroquine: proficient to protect the induction of liver apoptosis during malaria.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Satyajit; Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Das, Sabyasachi; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar; Majumdar, Subrata; Roy, Somenath

    2015-03-01

    Chitosan has impelled continuous motion by its unique physicochemical and biological characteristics. In our study, chitosan-tripolyphosphate (CS-TPP) particles was conjugated with an undervalued antimalarial drug, chloroquine to find out the proficiency against ROS mediated caspase activation and apoptosis in liver during Plasmodium berghei NK65 infection. The transmission electron microscopic image illustrated the size range of particle was less than 50 nm and the particle showed the blood compatibility. ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential, anti apoptotic and pro apoptotic protein level of CS-TPP conjugated chloroquine treated group revealed that CS-TPP conjugation amplified the protective capability of chloroquine. FACS study by annexin v-FITC and PI staining reveals chloroquine treatment reduces significantly (P<0.05) the apoptotic cells by 25.31%; whereas chitosan-tripolyphosphate conjugated nanochloroquine decreases by 61.56% apoptotic cell against P. berghei induced liver apoptosis. This study suggests that proficiency of conventional antimalarial drug may escalate by delivery with chitosan nanoparticles to portray defense possessions against malarial damage.

  4. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  5. Chloroquine stimulates nitric oxide synthesis in murine, porcine, and human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghigo, D; Aldieri, E; Todde, R; Costamagna, C; Garbarino, G; Pescarmona, G; Bosia, A

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical involved in the regulation of many cell functions and in the expression of several diseases. We have found that the antimalarial and antiinflammatory drug, chloroquine, is able to stimulate NO synthase (NOS) activity in murine, porcine, and human endothelial cells in vitro: the increase of enzyme activity is dependent on a de novo synthesis of some regulatory protein, as it is inhibited by cycloheximide but is not accompanied by an increased expression of inducible or constitutive NOS isoforms. Increased NO synthesis is, at least partly, responsible for chloroquine-induced inhibition of cell proliferation: indeed, NOS inhibitors revert the drug-evoked blockage of mitogenesis and ornithine decarboxylase activity in murine and porcine endothelial cells. The NOS-activating effect of chloroquine is dependent on its weak base properties, as it is exerted also by ammonium chloride, another lysosomotropic agent. Both compounds activate NOS by limiting the availability of iron: their stimulating effects on NO synthesis and inhibiting action on cell proliferation are reverted by iron supplementation with ferric nitrilotriacetate, and are mimicked by incubation with desferrioxamine. Our results suggest that NO synthesis can be stimulated in endothelial cells by chloroquine via an impairment of iron metabolism. PMID:9691096

  6. Expression of Plasmodium vivax crt-o Is Related to Parasite Stage but Not Ex Vivo Chloroquine Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pava, Zuleima; Handayuni, Irene; Wirjanata, Grennady; To, Sheren; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is present in most countries where P. vivax infection is endemic, but the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Increased expression of P. vivax crt-o (pvcrt-o) has been correlated with in vivo CQ resistance in an area with low-grade resistance. We assessed pvcrt-o expression in isolates from Papua (Indonesia), where P. vivax is highly CQ resistant. Ex vivo drug susceptibilities to CQ, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate were determined using a modified schizont maturation assay. Expression levels of pvcrt-o were measured using a novel real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Large variations in pvcrt-o expression were observed across the 51 isolates evaluated, with the fold change in expression level ranging from 0.01 to 59 relative to that seen with the P. vivax β-tubulin gene and from 0.01 to 24 relative to that seen with the P. vivax aldolase gene. Expression was significantly higher in isolates with the majority of parasites at the ring stage of development (median fold change, 1.7) compared to those at the trophozoite stage (median fold change, 0.5; P < 0.001). Twenty-nine isolates fulfilled the criteria for ex vivo drug susceptibility testing and showed high variability in CQ responses (median, 107.9 [range, 6.5 to 345.7] nM). After controlling for the parasite stage, we found that pvcrt-o expression levels did not correlate with the ex vivo response to CQ or with that to any of the other antimalarials tested. Our results highlight the importance of development-stage composition for measuring pvcrt-o expression and suggest that pvcrt-o transcription is not a primary determinant of ex vivo drug susceptibility. A comprehensive transcriptomic approach is warranted for an in-depth investigation of the role of gene expression levels and P. vivax drug resistance. PMID:26525783

  7. Expression of Plasmodium vivax crt-o Is Related to Parasite Stage but Not Ex Vivo Chloroquine Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pava, Zuleima; Handayuni, Irene; Wirjanata, Grennady; To, Sheren; Trianty, Leily; Noviyanti, Rintis; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Auburn, Sarah; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2015-11-02

    Chloroquine (CQ)-resistant Plasmodium vivax is present in most countries where P. vivax infection is endemic, but the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Increased expression of P. vivax crt-o (pvcrt-o) has been correlated with in vivo CQ resistance in an area with low-grade resistance. We assessed pvcrt-o expression in isolates from Papua (Indonesia), where P. vivax is highly CQ resistant. Ex vivo drug susceptibilities to CQ, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate were determined using a modified schizont maturation assay. Expression levels of pvcrt-o were measured using a novel real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR method. Large variations in pvcrt-o expression were observed across the 51 isolates evaluated, with the fold change in expression level ranging from 0.01 to 59 relative to that seen with the P. vivax β-tubulin gene and from 0.01 to 24 relative to that seen with the P. vivax aldolase gene. Expression was significantly higher in isolates with the majority of parasites at the ring stage of development (median fold change, 1.7) compared to those at the trophozoite stage (median fold change, 0.5; P < 0.001). Twenty-nine isolates fulfilled the criteria for ex vivo drug susceptibility testing and showed high variability in CQ responses (median, 107.9 [range, 6.5 to 345.7] nM). After controlling for the parasite stage, we found that pvcrt-o expression levels did not correlate with the ex vivo response to CQ or with that to any of the other antimalarials tested. Our results highlight the importance of development-stage composition for measuring pvcrt-o expression and suggest that pvcrt-o transcription is not a primary determinant of ex vivo drug susceptibility. A comprehensive transcriptomic approach is warranted for an in-depth investigation of the role of gene expression levels and P. vivax drug resistance.

  8. Efficacy of Pyrimethamine/Sulfadoxine versus Chloroquine for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Falciparum Malaria in Children Aged Under 5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, W; Jiang, H; Xiong, Z; Jiang, Z; Chen, H

    2013-01-01

    The children aged under 5 years from vast African areas badly suffer from falciparum malaria and many of them die of this disease. Therapeutic efficacy of anti-malaria drugs, especially pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine (PS) and chloroquine (CQ) to falciparum malaria is frequently evaluated and reported in recent 10 years. Unfortunately, to date, these widespread materials and researches have not been systematically collected and analyzed. In our study, two investigators were employed to widely and independently gather researches on efficacy of PS vs. CQ mono-therapy of falciparum malaria in children aged below 5 years in unpublished and published databases. Meta-analyses were conducted in categories of PS group and CQ group respectively. Pooled OR of PS vs. CQ was 0.11 (95%CI, 0.05-0.24). PS showed higher therapeutic efficacy to falciparum malaria in less-than-5-year children than CQ. Random model was chosen to analyze for the heterogeneity existence between different studies. Subgroup analyses were performed, but heterogeneity was still presented. Heterogeneity might be caused by different resistance of falciparum malaria to PS and CQ in different settings. Malaria type associated with parasite species, basic information of PS and CQ, and PS & CQ resistant malaria control measures were demonstrated and discussed respectively in detail in this article. PMID:23682255

  9. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. Methods HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. Results 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti

  10. Estimation of electrode ionomer oxygen permeability and ionomer-phase oxygen transport resistance in polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Satheesh; Parrondo, Javier; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-09-28

    The oxygen permeability of perfluorinated and hydrocarbon polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs; Nafion®, SPEEK and SPSU), which are used as electrolytes and electrode ionomers in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), was estimated using chronoamperometry using a modified fuel cell set-up. A thin, cylindrical microelectrode was embedded into the PEM and used as the working electrode. The PEM was sandwiched between 2 gas diffusion electrodes, one of which was catalyzed and served as the counter and pseudo-reference electrode. Independently, from fuel cell experiments, the oxygen transport resistance arising due to transport through the ionomer film covering the catalyst active sites was estimated at the limiting current and decoupled from the overall mass transport resistance. The in situ oxygen permeability measured at 80 °C and 75% RH of perfluorinated ionomers such as Nafion® (3.85 × 10(12) mol cm(-1) s(-1)) was observed to be an order of magnitude higher than that of hydrocarbon-based PEMs such as SPEEK (0.27 × 10(12) mol cm(-1) s(-1)) and SPSU (0.15 × 10(12) mol cm(-1) s(-1)). The obtained oxygen transport (through ionomer film) resistance values (Nafion® - 1.6 s cm(-1), SPEEK - 2.2 s cm(-1) and SPSU - 3.0 s cm(-1); at 80 °C and 75% RH) correlated well with the measured oxygen permeabilities in these ion-containing polymers.

  11. Fluid modeling of resistive plate chambers: impact of transport data on development of streamers and induced signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjaković, D.; Petrović, Z. Lj; Dujko, S.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the implementation of transport data in modeling of resistive plate chambers (RPCs), which are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments. Particularly, we stress the importance of making a distinction between flux and bulk transport data when non-conservative collisions, such as attachment and/or ionization, are present. A 1.5-dimensional fluid model with photoionization is employed to demonstrate how the duality of transport data affects the calculated signals of the ATLAS triggering RPC and ALICE timing RPC used at CERN, and also a timing RPC with high \\text{S}{{\\text{F}}6} content. It is shown that in the case of timing RPCs, the difference between the induced charges calculated using flux and bulk transport data can reach several hundred percent at lower operating electric fields. The effects of photoionization and space charge are also discussed.

  12. Single dose disposition of chloroquine in kwashiorkor and normal children--evidence for decreased absorption in kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Walker, O; Dawodu, A H; Salako, L A; Alván, G; Johnson, A O

    1987-04-01

    The single dose disposition of chloroquine was studied in five children with kwashiorkor and six normal control children after an oral dose of 10 mg kg-1 of chloroquine base. Plasma concentrations of chloroquine and its main metabolite were assayed by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). Chloroquine was detectable for up to 21 days in all the subjects. Chloroquine was detectable in all the subjects within 30 min after giving the drug except in one subject. Peak levels were reached between 0.5 and 8 h in all the subjects (with no significant difference in the tmax between the two groups of children). Peak plasma chloroquine concentrations in the children with kwashiorkor varied from 9 ng ml-1 to 95 ng ml-1 (mean 40 +/- 34 ng ml-1). Peak chloroquine concentrations in the controls varied between 69 ng ml-1 and 330 ng ml-1 (mean 134 +/- 99 ng ml-1). The mean AUC in the kwashiorkor children was significantly lower than the mean AUC in the control children (P less than 0.001). Peak plasma desethylchloroquine concentrations in the children with kwashiorkor varied between 3 and 13 ng ml-1 (mean 6 +/- 9 ng ml-1) while in the controls the concentrations varied between 14 and 170 ng ml-1 (mean 50 +/- 61 ng ml-1). There was no significant difference in the half-life of chloroquine between the kwashiorkor children and the normal control children. The possible influence of a different binding and distribution pattern of chloroquine in kwashiorkor could not be assessed in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Heterocyclic cyclohexanone monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin can inhibit the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a phytochemical that inhibits the xenobiotic ABC efflux transporters implicated in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 1 and 5 (MRP1 and MRP5). The use of CUR in the clinic however, is complicated by its instability and poor pharmacokinetic profile. Monocarbonyl analogs of CUR (MACs) are compounds without CUR's unstable β-diketone moiety and were reported to have improved stability and in vivo disposition. Whether the MACs can be used as MDR reversal agents is less clear, as the absence of a β-diketone may negatively impact transporter inhibition. In this study, we investigated 23 heterocyclic cyclohexanone MACs for inhibitory effects against P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP5. Using flow cytometry and resistance reversal assays, we found that many of these compounds inhibited the transport activity of the ABC transporters investigated, often with much greater potency than CUR. Overall the analogs were most effective at inhibiting BCRP and we identified three compounds, A12 (2,6-bis((E)-2,5-dimethoxy-benzylidene)cyclohexanone), A13 (2,6-bis((E)-4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidene)-cyclohexanone) and B11 (3,5-bis((E)-2-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidin-4-one), as the most promising BCRP inhibitors. These compounds inhibited BCRP activity in a non-cell line, non-substrate-specific manner. Their inhibition occurred by direct transporter interaction rather than modulating protein or cell surface expression. From these results, we concluded that MACs, such as the heterocyclic cyclohexanone analogs in this study, also have potential as MDR reversal agents and may be superior alternatives to the unstable parent compound, CUR.

  14. Disposition of chloroquine in man after single intravenous and oral doses.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, L L; Walker, O; Alván, G; Beermann, B; Estevez, F; Gleisner, L; Lindström, B; Sjöqvist, F

    1983-04-01

    1 Chloroquine was given in 300 mg single doses as an i.v. infusion, an oral solution and as tablets at intervals of at least 56 days to 11 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of chloroquine and its metabolite desethylchloroquine were measured in plasma, erythrocytes and urine using h.p.l.c. 2 Chloroquine was detectable in all plasma samples up to 23 days and occasionally up to 52 days after dosage. Urinary concentrations were monitored up to 119 days. The disposition pattern was multiexponential reflecting extensive tissue binding of the drug. 3 After i.v. dosing the volume of distribution ranged from 116 to 285 l/kg and the apparent terminal half-life from 146 to 333 h. Total plasma clearance +/- s.d. was 712 +/- 166 ml/min and renal clearance 412 +/- 139 ml/min. The mean estimated urinary recovery of chloroquine was 47%, 42% and 46% after i.v., oral solution and tablets indicating nearly complete bioavailability. The corresponding figures for the metabolite were 7%, 10% and 12%. 4 The disposition of chloroquine in erythrocytes was parallel to that in plasma. The concentrations in erythrocytes were consistently 2 to 5 times higher than in plasma. 5 Subjective side effects like difficulties with swallowing and accommodation, diplopia and fatigue occurred during intravenous infusion and were closely related to plasma concentrations. No effect was seen on the electrocardiogram, mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate. No adverse reactions were observed after the oral doses. High frequency audiometry did not reveal any significant hearing impairment for the group as a whole.

  15. Synergistic killing effect of chloroquine and androgen deprivation in LNCaP cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaini, Ramesh R.; Hu, Chien-An A.

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine inhibited the function of autolysosomes and decreases the cytosolic ATP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine induced nuclear and DNA fragmentation in androgen deprived LNCaP. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chloroquine may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy in PCa patients. -- Abstract: Modulation of autophagy is a new paradigm in cancer therapeutics. Recently a novel function of chloroquine (CLQ) in inhibiting degradation of autophagic vesicles has been revealed, which raises the question whether CLQ can be used as an adjuvant in targeting autophagic pro-survival mechanism in prostate cancer (PCa). We previously showed that autophagy played a protective role during hormone ablation therapy, in part, by consuming lipid droplets in PCa cells. In addition, blocking autophagy by genetic and pharmacological means in the presence of androgen deprivation caused cell death in PCa cells. To further investigate the importance of autophagy in PCa survival and dissect the role of CLQ in PCa death, we treated hormone responsive LNCaP cells with CLQ in combination with androgen deprivation. We observed that CLQ synergistically killed LNCaP cells during androgen deprivation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We further confirmed that CLQ inhibited the maturation of autophagic vesicles and decreased the cytosolic ATP. Moreover, CLQ induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, a hallmark of apoptosis, in androgen deprived LNCaP cells. Taken together, our finding suggests that CLQ may be an useful adjuvant in hormone ablation therapy to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Fungicide efflux and the MgMFS1 transporter contribute to the multidrug resistance phenotype in Zymoseptoria tritici field isolates.

    PubMed

    Omrane, Selim; Sghyer, Hind; Audéon, Colette; Lanen, Catherine; Duplaix, Clémentine; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Fillinger, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Septoria leaf blotch is mainly controlled by fungicides. Zymoseptoria tritici, which is responsible for this disease, displays strong adaptive capacity to fungicide challenge. It developed resistance to most fungicides due to target site modifications. Recently, isolated strains showed cross-resistance to fungicides with unrelated modes of action, suggesting a resistance mechanism known as multidrug resistance (MDR). We show enhanced prochloraz efflux, sensitive to the modulators amitryptiline and chlorpromazine, for two Z. tritici strains, displaying an MDR phenotype in addition to the genotypes CYP51(I381V Y461H) or CYP51(I381V ΔY459/) (G460) , respectively, hereafter named MDR6 and MDR7. Efflux was also inhibited by verapamil in the MDR7 strain. RNA sequencing lead to the identification of several transporter genes overexpressed in both MDR strains. The expression of the MgMFS1 gene was the strongest and constitutively high in MDR field strains. Its inactivation in the MDR6 strain abolished resistance to fungicides with different modes of action supporting its involvement in MDR in Z. tritici. A 519 bp insert in the MgMFS1 promoter was detected in half of the tested MDR field strains, but absent from sensitive field strains, suggesting that the insert is correlated with the observed MDR phenotype. Besides MgMfs1, other transporters and mutations may be involved in MDR in Z. tritici.

  17. Comparison of transport in lysimeters with undisturbed loamy sand and silty soil using non invasive imaging with electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garre, S.; Köstel, J.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.

    2009-04-01

    The transport of chemicals through soil is subject to the 3-D structure of the soil hydraulic properties (e.g. unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function) and state variables (e.g. water content). Although this is known for decades, it is still difficult to quantitatively predict solute transport especially when preferential flow or fingering occurs. One reason for this is the shortcoming of 3-D data on both the solute transport process itself and its determining parameters. Lysimeters provide excellent means to control the boundary conditions and are accessible from all sides. Filled with undisturbed soil and equipped with geophysical imaging devices they provide a valuable tool to visualize and better understand solute transport in natural soils. In our study we conducted solute tracer step experiments on two distinct undisturbed unsaturated field soils (gleyic Cambisol and orthic Luvisol). The boundary conditions were set to constant irrigation (1.5 cm/day) at the top and a constant suction at the bottom. Tracer breakthrough was monitored using 3-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR). We used the effluent tracer breakthrough and TDR measured breakthrough as a ground truth for the ERT data. From these data, apparent convection-dispersion transport parameters were derived. We found considerably different transport velocities and dispersivities for the two soils. In the orthic Luvisol, distinct preferential transport paths were visualized and followed in time. In the gleyic Cambisol we observed minor heterogeneities in the transport front which were aligned to the plowing direction. The study demonstrates the usefulness of ERT to characterize and compare the 3-D spatio-temporal evolution of solute fronts. The results are beneficial to investigate relationships between soil structure and the transport process and to explain the scale dependency of the transport processes from the spatial structure of the process at a smaller

  18. Mechanistic differences between GSH transport by multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) and GSH modulation of MRP1-mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Rothnie, Alice; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Lau, Andrea Y T; Deeley, Roger G; Cole, Susan P C

    2008-12-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is an ATP-dependent polytopic membrane protein that transports many anticancer drugs and organic anions. Its transport mechanism is multifaceted, especially with respect to the participation of GSH. For example, vincristine is cotransported with GSH, estrone sulfate transport is stimulated by GSH, or MRP1 can transport GSH alone, and this can be stimulated by compounds such as verapamil or apigenin. Thus, the interactions between GSH and MRP1 are mechanistically complex. To examine the similarities and differences among the various GSH-associated mechanisms of MRP1 transport, we have measured first the effect of GSH and several GSH-associated substrates/modulators on the binding and hydrolysis of ATP by MRP1 using 8-azidoadenosine-5'-[(32)P]-triphosphate ([(32)P]azidoATP) analogs, and second the initial binding of GSH and GSH-associated substrates/modulators to MRP1. We observed that GSH or its nonreducing derivative S-methylGSH (S-mGSH), but none of the GSH-associated substrate/modulators, caused a significant increase in [gamma-(32)P]azidoATP labeling of MRP1. Moreover, GSH and S-mGSH decreased levels of orthovanadate-induced trapping of [alpha-(32)P]azidoADP. [alpha-(32)P]azidoADP.Vi trapping was also decreased by estone sulfate, whereas vincristine, verapamil, and apigenin had no apparent effects on nucleotide interactions with MRP1. Furthermore, estrone sulfate and S-mGSH enhanced the effect of each other 15- and 10-fold, respectively. Second, although GSH binding increased the apparent affinity of MRP1 for all GSH-associated substrates/modulators tested, only estrone sulfate had a reciprocal effect on the apparent affinity of MRP1 for GSH. Overall, these results indicate significant mechanistic differences between MRP1-mediated transport of GSH and the ability of GSH to modulate MRP1 transport. PMID:18768387

  19. Evidence for Polaron Transport from Hall Effect, Resistivity and Thermopower in CMR Perovskite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaime, Marcelo

    1998-03-01

    The experimental transport properties of so called colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) perovskite materials of composition A_1-xB_xMnO3 (A: La, Gd ; B: Sr,Ca,Pb) with x ~ 0.33, classically described in the context of the double exchange model by Zener(C. Zener, Phys. Rev. 82), 403 (1951), were studied over an extensive temperature range from a small fraction of the Curie temperature (T_C) to several times T_C. In the ferromagnetic state of La_2/3(Ca,Pb)_1/3MnO3 single crystals the resistivity reveals electron-magnon scattering processes that vanish below 20 K. The failure of single magnon scattering processes to be completely suppressed suggests the persistence of partially spin-polarized electronic bands at low temperatures. In this regime the thermopower shows evidence for mass-enhanced hole-like transport. Our high temperature thermopower measurements(M. Jaime et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 68), 1576 (1996); Phys. Rev. B54, 11914 (1996), on the other hand, were the first unmistakable evidence for polaronic effects in CMR. Confirming the thermopower results, the Hall coefficient of Gd-doped La_2/3Ca_1/3MnO3 exhibits Arrhenius behavior over a temperature range from 2 TC to 4 T_C, with an activation energy very close to 2/3 that of the electrical conductivity. Although both the doping level and thermoelectric coefficient indicate hole-like conduction, the Hall coefficient is electron-like. This unusual result provides strong evidence in favor of small-polaronic conduction in the paramagnetic regime of the manganites(M. Jaime et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 78) 951 (1997). La_2/3(Ca,Pb)_1/3MnO3 single crystals high temperature thermopower Hall coefficient of Gd-doped La_2/3Ca_1/3MnO_3 http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/cond-mat/9609194

  20. CFP, the putative cercosporin transporter of Cercospora kikuchii, is required for wild type cercosporin production, resistance, and virulence on soybean.

    PubMed

    Callahan, T M; Rose, M S; Meade, M J; Ehrenshaft, M; Upchurch, R G

    1999-10-01

    Many species of the fungal genus Cercospora, including the soybean pathogen C. kikuchii, produce the phytotoxic polyketide cercosporin. Cercosporin production is induced by light. Previously, we identified several cDNA clones of mRNA transcripts that exhibited light-enhanced accumulation in C. kikuchii. Targeted disruption of the genomic copy of one of these, now designated CFP (cercosporin facilitator protein), results in a drastic reduction in cercosporin production, greatly reduced virulence of the fungus to soybean, and increased sensitivity to exogenous cercosporin. Sequence analysis of CFP reveals an 1,821-bp open reading frame encoding a 65.4-kDa protein similar to several members of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of integral membrane transporter proteins known to confer resistance to various antibiotics and toxins in fungi and bacteria. We propose that CFP encodes a cercosporin transporter that contributes resistance to cercosporin by actively exporting cercosporin, thus maintaining low cellular concentrations of the toxin.

  1. Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1), a “Multitasking” ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Susan P. C.

    2014-01-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) encoded by ABCC1 was originally discovered as a cause of multidrug resistance in tumor cells. However, it is now clear that MRP1 serves a broader role than simply mediating the ATP-dependent efflux of drugs from cells. The antioxidant GSH and the pro-inflammatory cysteinyl leukotriene C4 have been identified as key physiological organic anions effluxed by MRP1, and an ever growing body of evidence indicates that additional lipid-derived mediators are also substrates of this transporter. As such, MRP1 is a multitasking transporter that likely influences the etiology and progression of a host of human diseases. PMID:25281745

  2. Induction of multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2 by prolactin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alex Man Lai; Dalvi, Pooja; Lu, Xiaoli; Yang, Mingdong; Riddick, David S; Matthews, Jason; Clevenger, Charles V; Ross, Douglas D; Harper, Patricia A; Ito, Shinya

    2013-02-01

    The multidrug transporter, breast cancer resistance protein, ABCG2, is up-regulated in certain chemoresistant cancer cells and in the mammary gland during lactation. We investigated the role of the lactogenic hormone prolactin (PRL) in the regulation of ABCG2. PRL dose-dependently induced ABCG2 expression in T-47D human breast cancer cells. This induction was significantly reduced by short-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of the down-stream signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT5) also blunted the induction of ABCG2 by PRL, suggesting a role for the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in PRL-induced ABCG2 expression. Corroborating these findings, we observed PRL-stimulated STAT5 recruitment to a region containing a putative γ-interferon activation sequence (GAS) element at -434 base pairs upstream of the ABCG2 transcription start site. Introduction of a single mutation to the -434 GAS element significantly attenuated PRL-stimulated activity of a luciferase reporter driven by the ABCG2 gene promoter and 5'-flanking region containing the -434 GAS motif. In addition, this GAS element showed strong copy number dependency in its response to PRL treatment. Interestingly, inhibitors against the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide-3-kinase signaling pathways significantly decreased the induction of ABCG2 by PRL without altering STAT5 recruitment to the GAS element. We conclude that the JAK2/STAT5 pathway is required but not sufficient for the induction of ABCG2 by PRL.

  3. Role of an Archaeal PitA Transporter in the Copper and Arsenic Resistance of Metallosphaera sedula, an Extreme Thermoacidophile

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Samuel; Ai, Chenbing; Wheaton, Garrett; Tevatia, Rahul; Eckrich, Valerie; Kelly, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaea, such as Metallosphaera sedula, are lithoautotrophs that occupy metal-rich environments. In previous studies, an M. sedula mutant lacking the primary copper efflux transporter, CopA, became copper sensitive. In contrast, the basis for supranormal copper resistance remained unclear in the spontaneous M. sedula mutant, CuR1. Here, transcriptomic analysis of copper-shocked cultures indicated that CuR1 had a unique regulatory response to metal challenge corresponding to the upregulation of 55 genes. Genome resequencing identified 17 confirmed mutations unique to CuR1 that were likely to change gene function. Of these, 12 mapped to genes with annotated function associated with transcription, metabolism, or transport. These mutations included 7 nonsynonymous substitutions, 4 insertions, and 1 deletion. One of the insertion mutations mapped to pseudogene Msed_1517 and extended its reading frame an additional 209 amino acids. The extended mutant allele was identified as a homolog of Pho4, a family of phosphate symporters that includes the bacterial PitA proteins. Orthologs of this allele were apparent in related extremely thermoacidophilic species, suggesting M. sedula naturally lacked this gene. Phosphate transport studies combined with physiologic analysis demonstrated M. sedula PitA was a low-affinity, high-velocity secondary transporter implicated in copper resistance and arsenate sensitivity. Genetic analysis demonstrated that spontaneous arsenate-resistant mutants derived from CuR1 all underwent mutation in pitA and nonselectively became copper sensitive. Taken together, these results point to archaeal PitA as a key requirement for the increased metal resistance of strain CuR1 and its accelerated capacity for copper bioleaching. PMID:25092032

  4. The role of ATP-binding cassette transporter A2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aberuyi, N; Rahgozar, S; Moafi, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most prevalent hematologic malignancies in children. Although the cure rate of ALL has improved over the past decades, the most important reason for ALL treatment failure is multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomenon. The current study aims to explain the mechanisms involved in multidrug resistance of childhood ALL, and introduces ATP-binding cassette transporterA2 (ABCA2) as an ABC transporter gene which may have a high impact on MDR. Benefiting from articles published inreputable journals from1994 to date and experiments newly performed by our group, a comprehensive review is written about ABCA2 and its role in MDR regarding childhood ALL. ABCA2 transports drugs from the cytoplasm into the lysosomal compartment, where they may become degraded and exported from the cell. The aforementioned mechanism may contribute to MDR. It has been reported that ABCA2 may induce resistance to mitoxantrone, estrogen derivatives and estramustine. It is resistant to the aforementioned compounds. Furthermore, the overexpression ofABCA2 in methotrexate, vinblastine and/or doxorubicin treated Jurkat cells are observed in several publications. The recent study of our group showsthatthe overexpression ofABCA2 gene in children with ALL increases the risk of MDR by 15 times. ABCA2 is the second identified member of the ABCA; ABC transporters' subfamily. ABCA2 gene expression profile is suggested to be an unfavorable prognostic factor in ALL treatment. Better understanding of the MDR mechanisms and the factors involved may improve the therapeutic outcome of ALL by modifying the treatment protocols. PMID:25254091

  5. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  6. The novel ABC transporter ABCH1 is a potential target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Zhu, Xun; Xia, Jixing; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests cause serious crop damage and develop high-level resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal Cry toxins. A new promising approach for controlling them and overcoming this resistance is RNA interference (RNAi). The RNAi-based insect control strategy depends on the selection of suitable target genes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel ABC transporter gene PxABCH1 in diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). Phylogenetic analysis showed that PxABCH1 is closely related to ABCA and ABCG subfamily members. Spatial-temporal expression detection revealed that PxABCH1 was expressed in all tissues and developmental stages, and highest expressed in head and male adult. Midgut sequence variation and expression analyses of PxABCH1 in all the susceptible and Bt-resistant P. xylostella strains and the functional analysis by sublethal RNAi demonstrated that Cry1Ac resistance was independent of this gene. Silencing of PxABCH1 by a relatively high dose of dsRNA dramatically reduced its expression and resulted in larval and pupal lethal phenotypes in both susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant P. xylostella strains. To our knowledge, this study provides the first insight into ABCH1 in lepidopterans and reveals it as an excellent target for RNAi-based insect pest control and resistance management. PMID:26333918

  7. Development of mass transport resistance in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) films and particles--a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Fredenberg, Susanne; Jönsson, Monica; Laakso, Timo; Wahlgren, Marie; Reslow, Mats; Axelsson, Anders

    2011-05-16

    Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) is the most frequently used biodegradable polymer in the controlled release of an encapsulated drug. The purpose of this work was to explain the surprisingly slow diffusion through this polymer, and locate the major source of mass transport resistance. Diffusion of human growth hormone (hGH) and glucose through PLG films was undetectable (using a diffusion cell), although the degraded polymer contained several times more water than polymer mass. In vitro release of hGH from PLG-coated particles also showed a surprisingly slow rate of release. Non-porous regions inside the PLG films were detected after three weeks of degradation using dextran-coupled fluorescent probes and confocal microscopy. The findings were supported by scanning electron microscopy. Diffusion through PLG films degraded for five weeks was significantly increased when the porosity of both surfaces was increased due to the presence of ZnCl(2) in the buffer the last 3 days of the degradation period. The results indicated high mass transport resistance inside the films after three weeks of degradation, and at the surfaces after five weeks of degradation. These results should also be applicable to microparticles of different sizes. Knowledge of the reason for transport resistance is important in the development of pharmaceuticals and when modifying the rate of drug release. PMID:21392561

  8. Low resistivity ZnO-GO electron transport layer based CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Zakir; Mujahid, Mohammad; Khan, Ahmed Nawaz; Javaid, Syed Saad; Habib, Amir

    2016-06-01

    Perovskite based solar cells have demonstrated impressive performances. Controlled environment synthesis and expensive hole transport material impede their potential commercialization. We report ambient air synthesis of hole transport layer free devices using ZnO-GO as electron selective contacts. Solar cells fabricated with hole transport layer free architecture under ambient air conditions with ZnO as electron selective contact achieved an efficiency of 3.02%. We have demonstrated that by incorporating GO in ZnO matrix, low resistivity electron selective contacts, critical to improve the performance, can be achieved. We could achieve max efficiency of 4.52% with our completed devices for ZnO: GO composite. Impedance spectroscopy confirmed the decrease in series resistance and an increase in recombination resistance with inclusion of GO in ZnO matrix. Effect of temperature on completed devices was investigated by recording impedance spectra at 40 and 60 oC, providing indirect evidence of the performance of solar cells at elevated temperatures.

  9. Effects of pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, and amodiaquine plus pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine on gametocytes during and after treatment of acute, uncomplicated malaria in children.

    PubMed

    Sowunmi, A; Adedeji, A A; Gbotosho, G O; Fateye, B A; Happi, T C

    2006-12-01

    The effects of pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine (PS), chloroquine plus chlorpheniramine, a H1 receptor antagonist that reverses chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and in vivo (CQCP), and amodiaquine plus pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine (AQPS) on gametocyte production were evaluated in 157 children with acute, symptomatic, uncomplicated falciparum malaria who were treated with these drugs. PS was significantly less effective than CQCP or AQPS at clearing asexual parasitaemia or other symptoms of malaria. Gametocyte carriage on days 3, 7, and 14 were significantly higher in those treated with PS. The ratio of the density (per microl blood) of peripheral young gametocyte (PYG), that is, < or = stage III to peripheral mature gametocyte (PMG), that is, stage IV and V, an index of continuing generation of gametocytes, rose to 1 by day 7 of treatment in those treated with PS, but remained consistently below 1 in the other treatment groups. PYG-PMG density ratio increased significantly from day 0-14 in those treated with PS and CQCP (chi2 = 76, P = 0.000001 and chi2 = 42.2, P = 0.00001, respectively) but decreased significantly in those treated with AQPS (chi2 = 53.2, P = 0.000001). Both PS-sensitive and -resistant infections generated PYG (18 of 29 vs 13 of 20, chi2 = 0.04, P = 0.93) but PYG was present only in those with resistant response to CQCP. Combination of PS with amodiaquine (AQ), that is, (AQPS) resulted in less production of PYG, but in this setting, PYG was not indicative of response to AQPS. These data indicate that PS enhanced production or release of young gametocytes when used alone, but generated less young gametocytes when used in combination with AQ. PYG may be used as an indicator of response to CQCP but not PS or PS-based combination drugs.

  10. Chloroquine inhibits colon cancer cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo via induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuzhu; Zhao, Ying-Lan; Deng, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Shengyong; Mao, Yongqiu; Li, Zhengguang; Jiang, Peidu; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan

    2009-03-01

    The present study was to investigate the anticancer effect of chloroquine on proliferation of mouse colon cancer cell line CT26 in vivo and in vitro and the possible mechanism. We found that chloroquine inhibited CT26 proliferation by concentration- and time-dependent manner. This effect was associated with apoptosis induction and decreased level of phosphorylated p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphorylated Akt. The in vivo study showed chloroquine-reduced tumor volume and prolonged survival time in CT26-bearing mice. These observations indicated chloroquine could inhibit CT26 proliferation by inducing apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, providing its chemotherapeutic potential of human cancers. PMID:19194831

  11. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances multidrug resistance in breast cancer cell lines by translational regulation of ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Arana, Maite Rocío; Villanueva, Silvina Stella Maris; Catania, Viviana Alicia; Theile, Dirk; Ruiz, María Laura; Weiss, Johanna

    2016-06-28

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Multidrug resistance due to overexpression of ABC drug transporters is a common cause of chemotherapy failure and disease recurrence. Genistein (GNT) is a phytoestrogen present in soybeans and hormone supplements. We investigated the effect of GNT on the expression and function of ABC transporters in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Results demonstrated an induction at the protein level of ABCC1 and ABCG2 and of ABCC1 in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, respectively. MCF-7 cells showed a concomitant increase in doxorubicin and mitoxantrone efflux and resistance, dependent on ABCG2 activity. ABCC1 induction by GNT in MDA-MB-231 cells modified neither drug efflux nor chemoresistance due to simultaneous acute inhibition of the transporter activity by GNT. All inductions took place at the translational level, as no increment in mRNA was observed and protein increase was prevented by cycloheximide. miR-181a, already demonstrated to inhibit ABCG2 translation, was down-regulated by GNT, explaining translational induction. Effects were independent of classical estrogen receptors. Results suggest potential nutrient-drug interactions that could threaten chemotherapy efficacy, especially in ABCG2-expressing tumors treated with substrates of this transporter. PMID:27033456

  12. Hyperinsulinemia Enhances Hepatic Expression of the Fatty Acid Transporter Cd36 and Provokes Hepatosteatosis and Hepatic Insulin Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Steneberg, Pär; Sykaras, Alexandros G.; Backlund, Fredrik; Straseviciene, Jurate; Söderström, Ingegerd; Edlund, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis is associated with the development of both hepatic insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Hepatic expression of Cd36, a fatty acid transporter, is enhanced in obese and diabetic murine models and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and thus it correlates with hyperinsulinemia, steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we have explored the effect of hyperinsulinemia on hepatic Cd36 expression, development of hepatosteatosis, insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. A 3-week sucrose-enriched diet was sufficient to provoke hyperinsulinemia, hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia in CBA/J mice. The development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in CBA/J mice on a sucrose-enriched diet was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the transcription factor Pparγ and its target gene Cd36 whereas that of genes implicated in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL secretion was unaltered. Additionally, we demonstrate that insulin, in a Pparγ-dependent manner, is sufficient to directly increase Cd36 expression in perfused livers and isolated hepatocytes. Mouse strains that display low insulin levels, i.e. C57BL6/J, and/or lack hepatic Pparγ, i.e. C3H/HeN, do not develop hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, or dysglycemia on a sucrose-enriched diet, suggesting that elevated insulin levels, via enhanced CD36 expression, provoke fatty liver development that in turn leads to hepatic insulin resistance and dysglycemia. Thus, our data provide evidence for a direct role for hyperinsulinemia in stimulating hepatic Cd36 expression and thus the development of hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. PMID:26085100

  13. Different pH requirements are associated with divergent inhibitory effects of chloroquine on human and avian influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Di Trani, Livia; Savarino, Andrea; Campitelli, Laura; Norelli, Sandro; Puzelli, Simona; D'Ostilio, Daniela; Vignolo, Edoardo; Donatelli, Isabella; Cassone, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Chloroquine is a 4-aminoquinoline previously used in malaria therapy and now becoming an emerging investigational antiviral drug due to its broad spectrum of antiviral activities. To explore whether the low pH-dependency of influenza A viruses might affect the antiviral effects of chloroquine at clinically achievable concentrations, we tested the antiviral effects of this drug on selected human and avian viruses belonging to different subtypes and displaying different pH requirements. Results showed a correlation between the responses to chloroquine and NH4Cl, a lysosomotropic agent known to increase the pH of intracellular vesicles. Time-of-addition experiments showed that the inhibitory effect of chloroquine was maximal when the drug had been added at the time of infection and was lost after 2 h post-infection. This timing approximately corresponds to that of virus/cell fusion. Moreover, there was a clear correlation between the EC50 of chloroquine in vitro and the electrostatic potential of the HA subunit (HA2) mediating the virus/cell fusion process. Overall, the present study highlights the critical importance of a host cell factor such as intravesicular pH in determining the anti-influenza activity of chloroquine and other lysosomotropic agents. PMID:17477867

  14. Antagonistic effects of chloroquine on autophagy occurrence potentiate the anticancer effects of everolimus on renal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, A; Santini, D; Zappavigna, S; Lombardi, A; Misso, G; Boccellino, M; Desiderio, V; Vitiello, P P; Di Lorenzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Caraglia, M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is an aggressive disease often asymptomatic and weakly chemo-radiosensitive. Currently, new biologic drugs are used among which everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, that has been approved for second-line therapy. Since mTOR is involved in the control of autophagy, its antitumor capacity is often limited. In this view, chloroquine, a 4-alkylamino substituted quinoline family member, is an autophagy inhibitor that blocks the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of everolimus alone or in combination with chloroquine on renal cancer cell viability and verified possible synergism. Our results demonstrate that renal cancer cells are differently sensitive to everolimus and chloroquine and the pharmacological combination everolimus/chloroquine was strongly synergistic inducing cell viability inhibition. In details, the pharmacological synergism occurs when chloroquine is administered before everolimus. In addition, we found a flow autophagic block and shift of death mechanisms to apoptosis. This event was associated with decrease of Beclin-1/Bcl-2 complex and parallel reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in combined treatment. At last, we found that the enhancement of apoptosis induced by drug combination occurs through the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation, while the extrinsic pathway is involved only partly following its activation by chloroquine. These results provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma after appropriate clinical trial. PMID:25866016

  15. Antagonistic effects of chloroquine on autophagy occurrence potentiate the anticancer effects of everolimus on renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, A; Santini, D; Zappavigna, S; Lombardi, A; Misso, G; Boccellino, M; Desiderio, V; Vitiello, P P; Di Lorenzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Caraglia, M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is an aggressive disease often asymptomatic and weakly chemo-radiosensitive. Currently, new biologic drugs are used among which everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, that has been approved for second-line therapy. Since mTOR is involved in the control of autophagy, its antitumor capacity is often limited. In this view, chloroquine, a 4-alkylamino substituted quinoline family member, is an autophagy inhibitor that blocks the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of everolimus alone or in combination with chloroquine on renal cancer cell viability and verified possible synergism. Our results demonstrate that renal cancer cells are differently sensitive to everolimus and chloroquine and the pharmacological combination everolimus/chloroquine was strongly synergistic inducing cell viability inhibition. In details, the pharmacological synergism occurs when chloroquine is administered before everolimus. In addition, we found a flow autophagic block and shift of death mechanisms to apoptosis. This event was associated with decrease of Beclin-1/Bcl(-)2 complex and parallel reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl(-)2 in combined treatment. At last, we found that the enhancement of apoptosis induced by drug combination occurs through the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation, while the extrinsic pathway is involved only partly following its activation by chloroquine. These results provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma after appropriate clinical trial. PMID:25866016

  16. Antagonistic effects of chloroquine on autophagy occurrence potentiate the anticancer effects of everolimus on renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, A; Santini, D; Zappavigna, S; Lombardi, A; Misso, G; Boccellino, M; Desiderio, V; Vitiello, P P; Di Lorenzo, G; Zoccoli, A; Pantano, F; Caraglia, M

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is an aggressive disease often asymptomatic and weakly chemo-radiosensitive. Currently, new biologic drugs are used among which everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, that has been approved for second-line therapy. Since mTOR is involved in the control of autophagy, its antitumor capacity is often limited. In this view, chloroquine, a 4-alkylamino substituted quinoline family member, is an autophagy inhibitor that blocks the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of everolimus alone or in combination with chloroquine on renal cancer cell viability and verified possible synergism. Our results demonstrate that renal cancer cells are differently sensitive to everolimus and chloroquine and the pharmacological combination everolimus/chloroquine was strongly synergistic inducing cell viability inhibition. In details, the pharmacological synergism occurs when chloroquine is administered before everolimus. In addition, we found a flow autophagic block and shift of death mechanisms to apoptosis. This event was associated with decrease of Beclin-1/Bcl(-)2 complex and parallel reduction of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl(-)2 in combined treatment. At last, we found that the enhancement of apoptosis induced by drug combination occurs through the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation, while the extrinsic pathway is involved only partly following its activation by chloroquine. These results provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma after appropriate clinical trial.

  17. Role of Pfmdr1 in In Vitro Plasmodium falciparum Susceptibility to Chloroquine, Quinine, Monodesethylamodiaquine, Mefloquine, Lumefantrine, and Dihydroartemisinin

    PubMed Central

    Wurtz, Nathalie; Fall, Bécaye; Pascual, Aurélie; Fall, Mansour; Baret, Eric; Camara, Cheikhou; Nakoulima, Aminata; Diatta, Bakary; Fall, Khadidiatou Ba; Mbaye, Pape Saliou; Diémé, Yaya; Bercion, Raymond; Wade, Boubacar

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Pfmdr1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1) polymorphisms in antimalarial drug resistance is still debated. Here, we evaluate the association between polymorphisms in Pfmdr1 (N86Y, Y184F, S1034C, N1042D, and D1246Y) and Pfcrt (K76T) and in vitro responses to chloroquine (CQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine (LMF), quinine (QN), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) in 174 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal. The Pfmdr1 86Y mutation was identified in 14.9% of the samples, and the 184F mutation was identified in 71.8% of the isolates. No 1034C, 1042N, or 1246Y mutations were detected. The Pfmdr1 86Y mutation was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to MDAQ (P = 0.0023), LMF (P = 0.0001), DHA (P = 0.0387), and MQ (P = 0.00002). The N86Y mutation was not associated with CQ (P = 0.214) or QN (P = 0.287) responses. The Pfmdr1 184F mutation was not associated with various susceptibility responses to the 6 antimalarial drugs (P = 0.168 for CQ, 0.778 for MDAQ, 0.324 for LMF, 0.961 for DHA, 0.084 for QN, and 0.298 for MQ). The Pfmdr1 86Y-Y184 haplotype was significantly associated with increased susceptibility to MDAQ (P = 0.0136), LMF (P = 0.0019), and MQ (P = 0.0001). The additional Pfmdr1 86Y mutation increased significantly the in vitro susceptibility to MDAQ (P < 0.0001), LMF (P < 0.0001), MQ (P < 0.0001), and QN (P = 0.0026) in wild-type Pfcrt K76 parasites. The additional Pfmdr1 86Y mutation significantly increased the in vitro susceptibility to CQ (P = 0.0179) in Pfcrt 76T CQ-resistant parasites. PMID:25199781

  18. A Novel Gene Amplification Causes Upregulation of the PatAB ABC Transporter and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Baylay, Alison J.; Ivens, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the ABC transporter genes patA and patB confers efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and is also linked to pneumococcal stress responses. Although upregulation of patAB has been observed in many laboratory mutants and clinical isolates, the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of these genes are unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify the cause of high-level constitutive overexpression of patAB in M184, a multidrug-resistant mutant of S. pneumoniae R6. Using a whole-genome transformation and sequencing approach, we identified a novel duplication of a 9.2-kb region of the M184 genome which included the patAB genes. This duplication did not affect growth and was semistable with a low segregation rate. The expression levels of patAB in M184 were much higher than those that could be fully explained by doubling of the gene dosage alone, and inactivation of the first copy of patA had no effect on multidrug resistance. Using a green fluorescent protein reporter system, increased patAB expression was ascribed to transcriptional read-through from a tRNA gene upstream of the second copy of patAB. This is the first report of a large genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae and also of a genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance by a promoter switching mechanism. PMID:25779578

  19. Increased Systemic Exposure of Methotrexate by a Polyphenol-Rich Herb via Modulation on Efflux Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Ping; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Shia, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Yo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Scutellariae radix (SR, roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), a popular Chinese medicine, contains plenty of flavonoids such as baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, and wogonin. Methotrexate (MTX), an important immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic index, is a substrate of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). This study investigated the effect of SR on MTX pharmacokinetics and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were orally administered MTX alone and with 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg of SR. The serum concentrations of MTX were determined by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Cell models were used to explore the involvement of MRP2 and BCRP in the interaction. The results showed that 1.0 g/kg of SR significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-30), AUC(0-2880), and mean residence time (MRT) of MTX by 50%, 45%, 501%, and 347%, respectively, and 2.0 g/kg of SR significantly enhanced the AUC(0-2880) and MRT by 242% and 293%, respectively, but decreased AUC(0-30) by 41%. Cell line studies indicated that SR activated the BCRP-mediated efflux transport, whereas the serum metabolites of SR inhibited both the BCRP- and MRP2-mediated efflux transports. In conclusion, SR ingestion increased the systemic exposure and MRT of MTX via modulation on MRP2 and BCRP. PMID:26852865

  20. Increased Systemic Exposure of Methotrexate by a Polyphenol-Rich Herb via Modulation on Efflux Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Ping; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Shia, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Yo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Scutellariae radix (SR, roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), a popular Chinese medicine, contains plenty of flavonoids such as baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, and wogonin. Methotrexate (MTX), an important immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic index, is a substrate of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). This study investigated the effect of SR on MTX pharmacokinetics and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were orally administered MTX alone and with 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg of SR. The serum concentrations of MTX were determined by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Cell models were used to explore the involvement of MRP2 and BCRP in the interaction. The results showed that 1.0 g/kg of SR significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-30), AUC(0-2880), and mean residence time (MRT) of MTX by 50%, 45%, 501%, and 347%, respectively, and 2.0 g/kg of SR significantly enhanced the AUC(0-2880) and MRT by 242% and 293%, respectively, but decreased AUC(0-30) by 41%. Cell line studies indicated that SR activated the BCRP-mediated efflux transport, whereas the serum metabolites of SR inhibited both the BCRP- and MRP2-mediated efflux transports. In conclusion, SR ingestion increased the systemic exposure and MRT of MTX via modulation on MRP2 and BCRP.

  1. HKT transporters mediate salt stress resistance in plants: from structure and function to the field.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Shin; Horie, Tomoaki; Hauser, Felix; Deinlein, Ulrich; Schroeder, Julian I; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Plant cells are sensitive to salinity stress and do not require sodium as an essential element for their growth and development. Saline soils reduce crop yields and limit available land. Research shows that HKT transporters provide a potent mechanism for mediating salt tolerance in plants. Knowledge of the molecular ion transport and regulation mechanisms and the control of HKT gene expression are crucial for understanding the mechanisms by which HKT transporters enhance crop performance under salinity stress. This review focuses on HKT transporters in monocot plants and in Arabidopsis as a dicot plant, as a guide to efforts toward improving salt tolerance of plants for increasing the production of crops and bioenergy feedstocks.

  2. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  3. Role of a putative amino acid transporter in fungal disease resistance in alfalfa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accessions of the model legume Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa, were identified that are resistant to several foliar pathogens, and microarray technology was used to identify genes specifically expressed in the resistance response. A large proportion of the up-regulated genes had on...

  4. Macroautophagy is dispensable for growth of KRAS mutant tumors and chloroquine efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Christina H.; Wang, Zuncai; Tkach, Diane; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Ugwonali, Savuth; Liu, Shanming; Fitzgerald, Stephanie L.; George, Elizabeth; Frias, Elizabeth; Cochran, Nadire; De Jesus, Rowena; McAllister, Gregory; Hoffman, Gregory R.; Bray, Kevin; Lemon, LuAnna; Lucas, Judy; Fantin, Valeria R.; Abraham, Robert T.; Murphy, Leon O.; Nyfeler, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a key stress-response pathway that can suppress or promote tumorigenesis depending on the cellular context. Notably, Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS)-driven tumors have been reported to rely on macroautophagy for growth and survival, suggesting a potential therapeutic approach of using autophagy inhibitors based on genetic stratification. In this study, we evaluated whether KRAS mutation status can predict the efficacy to macroautophagy inhibition. By profiling 47 cell lines with pharmacological and genetic loss-of-function tools, we were unable to confirm that KRAS-driven tumor lines require macroautophagy for growth. Deletion of autophagy-related 7 (ATG7) by genome editing completely blocked macroautophagy in several tumor lines with oncogenic mutations in KRAS but did not inhibit cell proliferation in vitro or tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, ATG7 knockout did not sensitize cells to irradiation or to several anticancer agents tested. Interestingly, ATG7-deficient and -proficient cells were equally sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of chloroquine, a lysosomotropic agent often used as a pharmacological tool to evaluate the response to macroautophagy inhibition. Moreover, both cell types manifested synergistic growth inhibition when treated with chloroquine plus the tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib or sunitinib, suggesting that the antiproliferative effects of chloroquine are independent of its suppressive actions on autophagy. PMID:26677873

  5. The anticancer activity of chloroquine-gold nanoparticles against MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Prachi; Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Ramirez-Vick, Jaime E; Ansari, Z A; Shanker, Virendra; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Singh, Surinder P

    2012-06-15

    In the present study, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid-modified gold nanoparticles (∼7 nm) were conjugated with chloroquine to explore their potential application in cancer therapeutics. The anticancer activity of chloroquine-gold nanoparticle conjugates (GNP-Chl) was demonstrated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The MCF-7 cells were treated with different concentrations of GNP-Chl conjugates, and the cell viability was assayed using trypan blue, resulting in an IC(50) value of 30 ± 5 μg/mL. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the major pathway of cell death was necrosis, which was mediated by autophagy. The drug release kinetics of GNP-Chl conjugates revealed the release of chloroquine at an acidic pH, which was quantitatively estimated using optical absorbance spectroscopy. The nature of stimuli-responsive drug release and the inhibition of cancer cell growth by GNP-Chl conjugates could pave the way for the design of combinatorial therapeutic agents, particularly nanomedicine, for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22445746

  6. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  7. Disruption of the ammonium transporter AMT1.1 alters basal defenses generating resistance against Pseudomonas syringae and Plectosphaerella cucumerina

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Victoria; Gamir, Jordi; Camañes, Gemma; Cerezo, Miguel; Sánchez-Bel, Paloma; Flors, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the high-affinity nitrate transporter NRT2.1 activates the priming defense against Pseudomonas syringae, resulting in enhanced resistance. In this study, it is demonstrated that the high-affinity ammonium transporter AMT1.1 is a negative regulator of Arabidopsis defense responses. The T-DNA knockout mutant amt1.1 displays enhanced resistance against Plectosphaerella cucumerina and reduced susceptibility to P. syringae. The impairment of AMT1.1 induces significant metabolic changes in the absence of challenge, suggesting that amt1.1 retains constitutive defense responses. Interestingly, amt1.1 combats pathogens differently depending on the lifestyle of the pathogen. In addition, N starvation enhances the susceptibility of wild type plants and the mutant amt1.1 to P. syringae whereas it has no effect on P. cucumerina resistance. The metabolic changes of amt1.1 against P. syringae are subtler and are restricted to the phenylpropanoid pathway, which correlates with its reduced susceptibility. By contrast, the amt1.1 mutant responds by activating higher levels of camalexin and callose against P. cucumerina. In addition, amt1.1 shows altered levels of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates and other Trp-related compounds following infection by the necrotroph. These observations indicate that AMT1.1 may play additional roles that affect N uptake and plant immune responses. PMID:24910636

  8. The ABC transporter YejABEF is required for resistance to antimicrobial peptides and the virulence of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Bie, Pengfei; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Lin; Cui, Buyun; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to resist the killing effects of host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) plays a vital role in the virulence of pathogens. The Brucella melitensis NI genome has a gene cluster that encodes ABC transport. In this study, we constructed yejA1, yejA2, yejB, yejE, yejF, and whole yej operon deletion mutants, none of which exhibited discernible growth defect in TSB or minimal medium. Unlike their parental strain, the mutants showed a significantly increased sensitivity to acidic stress. The NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF mutants were also more sensitive than B. melitensis NI to polymyxin B, and the expression of yej operon genes was induced by polymyxin B. Moreover, cell and mouse infection assays indicated that NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF have restricted invasion and replication abilities inside macrophages and are rapidly cleared from the spleens of infected mice. These findings indicate that the ABC transporter YejABEF is required for the virulence of Brucella, suggesting that resistance to host antimicrobials is a key mechanism for Brucella to persistently survive in vivo. This study provided insights that led us to further investigate the potential correlation of AMP resistance with the mechanisms of immune escape and persistent infection by pathogens. PMID:27550726

  9. The ABC transporter YejABEF is required for resistance to antimicrobial peptides and the virulence of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Bie, Pengfei; Cheng, Jie; Lu, Lin; Cui, Buyun; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-01-01

    The ability to resist the killing effects of host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) plays a vital role in the virulence of pathogens. The Brucella melitensis NI genome has a gene cluster that encodes ABC transport. In this study, we constructed yejA1, yejA2, yejB, yejE, yejF, and whole yej operon deletion mutants, none of which exhibited discernible growth defect in TSB or minimal medium. Unlike their parental strain, the mutants showed a significantly increased sensitivity to acidic stress. The NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF mutants were also more sensitive than B. melitensis NI to polymyxin B, and the expression of yej operon genes was induced by polymyxin B. Moreover, cell and mouse infection assays indicated that NIΔyejE and NIΔyejABEF have restricted invasion and replication abilities inside macrophages and are rapidly cleared from the spleens of infected mice. These findings indicate that the ABC transporter YejABEF is required for the virulence of Brucella, suggesting that resistance to host antimicrobials is a key mechanism for Brucella to persistently survive in vivo. This study provided insights that led us to further investigate the potential correlation of AMP resistance with the mechanisms of immune escape and persistent infection by pathogens. PMID:27550726

  10. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; Gosink, Luke; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2015-03-09

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequencesimilarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first showmore » that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir.« less

  11. Prediction of multi-drug resistance transporters using a novel sequence analysis method [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Bruillard, Paul; Overall, Christopher C.; Gosink, Luke; Lindemann, Stephen R.

    2015-03-09

    There are many examples of groups of proteins that have similar function, but the determinants of functional specificity may be hidden by lack of sequencesimilarity, or by large groups of similar sequences with different functions. Transporters are one such protein group in that the general function, transport, can be easily inferred from the sequence, but the substrate specificity can be impossible to predict from sequence with current methods. In this paper we describe a linguistic-based approach to identify functional patterns from groups of unaligned protein sequences and its application to predict multi-drug resistance transporters (MDRs) from bacteria. We first show that our method can recreate known patterns from PROSITE for several motifs from unaligned sequences. We then show that the method, MDRpred, can predict MDRs with greater accuracy and positive predictive value than a collection of currently available family-based models from the Pfam database. Finally, we apply MDRpred to a large collection of protein sequences from an environmental microbiome study to make novel predictions about drug resistance in a potential environmental reservoir.

  12. Inhibition of multixenobiotic resistance transporters (MXR) by silver nanoparticles and ions in vitro and in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Georgantzopoulou, Anastasia; Cambier, Sébastien; Serchi, Tommaso; Kruszewski, Marcin; Balachandran, Yekkuni L; Grysan, Patrick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Ziebel, Johanna; Guignard, Cédric; Gutleb, Arno C; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2016-11-01

    The P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), important members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters, protect cells and organisms via efflux of xenobiotics and are responsible for the phenomenon of multidrug or multixenobiotic resistance (MXR). In this study we first evaluated, in vitro, the interaction of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20, 23 and 27nm), Ag 200nm particles and Ag ions (AgNO3) with MXR efflux transporters using MDCKII and the P-gp over-expressing MDCKII-MDR1 cells and calcein-AM as a substrate of the transporters. Next the in vivo modulation of MXR activity was studied in Daphnia magna juveniles with the model P-gp and MRP1 inhibitors verapamil-HCl and MK571, respectively. The common environmental contaminants perfluorooctane sulfonate and bisphenol A, previously observed to interfere with the P-gp in vitro, also inhibited the efflux of calcein in vivo. Small-sized Ag NPs (with biomolecules present on the surface) and AgNO3 inhibited the MXR activity in daphnids and MDCKII-MDR1 cells, but abcb1 gene expression remained unchanged. Both Ag NPs and dissolved ions contributed to the effects. This study provides evidence of the interference of Ag NPs and AgNO3 with the MXR activity both in vitro and in D. magna, and should be taken into account when Ag NP toxicity is assessed. PMID:27376922

  13. Algorithm for resistance to flow and transport in sand-bed channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is developed that relates depth to discharge and determines bed- and suspended-load transport for the entire range of bed forms found in sand-bed channels; equilibrium-state geometry of lower flow regime bedforms is also predicted. A Meyer-Peter-type formulation is used to compute sand transport in the bed-load layer and for computing suspended sand transport, McLean's procedure is adopted. A bed-form classifcation scheme is developed. The algorithm produces overall geometric averages of predicted to observed depth and predicted to observed transport of 1.00. For a verification data set of 855 observations, mostly from rivers and canals, the overall geometric averages of predicted to observed depth and transport are 0.87 and 1.14. -from Author

  14. Identification of ABC transporter genes conferring combined pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance in bovine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan

    2015-06-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of combined pleuromutilin-lincosamide-streptogramin A resistance in 26 unrelated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from dairy cows suffering from mastitis. The 26 pleuromutilin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were screened for the presence of the genes vga(A), vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), vga(E) variant, sal(A), vmlR, cfr, lsa(A), lsa(B), lsa(C), and lsa(E) by PCR. None of the 26 isolates carried the genes vga(B), vga(C), vga(E), vga(E) variant, vmlR, cfr, lsa(A), lsa(B), or lsa(C). Two Staphylococcus haemolyticus and single Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus lentus, and Staphylococcus hominis were vga(A)-positive. Twelve S. aureus, two Staphylococcus warneri, as well as single S. lentus and S. xylosus carried the lsa(E) gene. Moreover, single S. aureus, S. haemolyticus, S. xylosus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were positive for both genes, vga(A) and lsa(E). The sal(A) gene was found in a single Staphylococcus sciuri. All ABC transporter genes were located in the chromosomal DNA, except for a plasmid-borne vga(A) gene in the S. epidermidis isolate. The genetic environment of the lsa(E)-positive isolates was analyzed using previously described PCR assays. Except for the S. warneri and S. xylosus, all lsa(E)-positive isolates harbored a part of the previously described enterococcal multiresistance gene cluster. This is the first report of the novel lsa(E) gene in the aforementioned bovine CoNS species. This is also the first identification of the sal(A) gene in a S. sciuri from a case of bovine mastitis. Moreover, the sal(A) gene was shown to also confer pleuromutilin resistance.

  15. Inhibition by chloroquine of the class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted presentation of endogenous antigens varies according to the cellular origin of the antigen-presenting cells, the nature of the T-cell epitope, and the responding T cell.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platlet, S; Bertolino, P; Deng, H; Gerlier, D; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1993-01-01

    Chloroquine treatment of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was explored as a tool to investigate the processing pathway for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted presentation of the endogenous secreted hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and transmembrane measles virus haemagglutinin (HA). A 72-hr pretreatment of the APC with 25 microM chloroquine blocked the presentation of the HEL(52-61) T-cell epitope generated from endogenous HEL to the I-Ak-restricted 3A9 T-cell hybridoma by MHC class II-transfected L cells expressing the invariant chain (Ii). The presentation of exogenously added HEL peptides was not affected. Under the same conditions, no inhibition of the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the I-Ed-restricted G28 high-avidity T-cell hybridoma, nor of HA when synthesized by L cells, was observed. When B-lymphoid APC were used, inhibition was observed in every case with a low number of B APC pretreated for 48 hr with chloroquine prior to the T-cell stimulation test. Moreover, addition of chloroquine to untreated B APC during the T-cell stimulation assay was sufficient to inhibit completely the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the B10.D24.42 low avidity T-cell hybridoma. Altogether these studies suggest that an apparent resistance of endogenous Ag presentation to chloroquine inhibition may not necessarily indicate the existence of a non-endosomal pathway but may be due to the nature of the T-cell epitope, to the use of 'non-professional' APC such as L cells, to the use of T cells of high avidity, and to high amounts of pre-existing MHC class II-peptide complexes expressed by the APC. We demonstrate here that, at least in conventional APC such as B cells, class II-restricted presentation of both endogenous secreted HEL and transmembrane HA involves an endosomal pathway. PMID:7508420

  16. [The ERG contribution in early diagnosis of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine maculopathy].

    PubMed

    Karkanová, Michala; Matusková, V; Vlková, E; Dosková, H; Uhmannová, R

    2010-04-01

    Derivates of chloroquine (Plaquenil, Delagil), used for long-term treatment of rheumatic diseases, may cause clinically proven irreversible maculopathy, which may progress even after the discontinuation of their application. The optimal early diagnosis of ocular toxicity of chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine drug remains controversial up to now. The aim of this review paper was to evaluate how appropriate is the indication of the electroretinographic (ERG) examination due to the early diagnosis of cumulative drug-related maculopathy. Photopic, pattern, and multifocal ERG (Retiscan, according to the ISCEV methodology) were examined in 10 patients (20 eyes) treated by means of antimalarics, 9 due to the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 1 due to the systemic lupus erythremathodes (SLE). The average age of the patients was 60 +/- 15 years, the treatment period was 10 +/- 11 years; the median of the treatment period was 5 years. The control group consisted of 12 healthy, age matched patients (20 eyes) without any obvious ocular pathology. In all of them, the complete ophthalmologic examination was performed: the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) for far using the Snellen charts, intraocular pressure (IOP) measured by means of the non contact tonometer NIDEK NT-2000, the Amsler grid test, examination of the anterior segment and the posterior segment with the slit lamp. The entry criteria in both groups were BCVA 5/7,5 (0.67) and better, the IOP in the normal range, negative Amsler grid test, anterior segment without significant decrease of the transparency, and physiological posterior segment or with subtle granular pigment dysgrupancies in the macula only. The significant difference between the group treated with chloroquine or hydrochloroquine and the control group at the 1% level of significance was found in following parameters: in the photopic ERG the value of the b wave latency [ms], in pattern ERG, the values of the waves N35 - P50 [microV] and P50 - N95 [micro

  17. Targeting the Warburg effect with a novel glucose transporter inhibitor to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, I-Lu; Chou, Chih-Chien; Lai, Po-Ting; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Shirley, Lawrence A.; Yan, Ribai; Mo, Xiaokui; Bloomston, Mark; Kulp, Samuel K.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    Gemcitabine resistance remains a significant clinical challenge. Here, we used a novel glucose transporter (Glut) inhibitor, CG-5, as a proof-of-concept compound to investigate the therapeutic utility of targeting the Warburg effect to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer. The effects of gemcitabine and/or CG-5 on viability, survival, glucose uptake and DNA damage were evaluated in gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis of gemcitabine resistance and the mechanism of CG-5-induced sensitization to gemcitabine. The effects of CG-5 on gemcitabine sensitivity were investigated in a xenograft tumor model of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer. In contrast to gemcitabine-sensitive pancreatic cancer cells, the resistant Panc-1 and Panc-1GemR cells responded to gemcitabine by increasing the expression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 catalytic subunit (RRM2) through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation. Acting as a pan-Glut inhibitor, CG-5 abrogated this gemcitabine-induced upregulation of RRM2 through decreased E2F1 expression, thereby enhancing gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and inhibition of cell survival. This CG-5-induced inhibition of E2F1 expression was mediated by the induction of a previously unreported E2F1-targeted microRNA, miR-520f. The addition of oral CG-5 to gemcitabine therapy caused greater suppression of Panc-1GemR xenograft tumor growth in vivo than either drug alone. Glut inhibition may be an effective strategy to enhance gemcitabine activity for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24879635

  18. Targeting the Warburg effect with a novel glucose transporter inhibitor to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, I-Lu; Chou, Chih-Chien; Lai, Po-Ting; Fang, Chun-Sheng; Shirley, Lawrence A; Yan, Ribai; Mo, Xiaokui; Bloomston, Mark; Kulp, Samuel K; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-10-01

    Gemcitabine resistance remains a significant clinical challenge. Here, we used a novel glucose transporter (Glut) inhibitor, CG-5, as a proof-of-concept compound to investigate the therapeutic utility of targeting the Warburg effect to overcome gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer. The effects of gemcitabine and/or CG-5 on viability, survival, glucose uptake and DNA damage were evaluated in gemcitabine-sensitive and gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis of gemcitabine resistance and the mechanism of CG-5-induced sensitization to gemcitabine. The effects of CG-5 on gemcitabine sensitivity were investigated in a xenograft tumor model of gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer. In contrast to gemcitabine-sensitive pancreatic cancer cells, the resistant Panc-1 and Panc-1(GemR) cells responded to gemcitabine by increasing the expression of ribonucleotide reductase M2 catalytic subunit (RRM2) through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation. Acting as a pan-Glut inhibitor, CG-5 abrogated this gemcitabine-induced upregulation of RRM2 through decreased E2F1 expression, thereby enhancing gemcitabine-induced DNA damage and inhibition of cell survival. This CG-5-induced inhibition of E2F1 expression was mediated by the induction of a previously unreported E2F1-targeted microRNA, miR-520f. The addition of oral CG-5 to gemcitabine therapy caused greater suppression of Panc-1(GemR) xenograft tumor growth in vivo than either drug alone. Glut inhibition may be an effective strategy to enhance gemcitabine activity for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Phosphorylation at S384 regulates the activity of the TaALMT1 malate transporter that underlies aluminum resistance in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we examined the role of protein phosphorylation & dephosphorylation in the transport properties of the wheat root malate efflux transporter underlying Al resistance, TaALMT1. Preincubation of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing TaALMT1 with protein kinase inhibitors (K252a and staurospo...

  20. Development, Maintenance, and Reversal of Multiple Drug Resistance: At the Crossroads of TFPI1, ABC Transporters, and HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Terra; Harkness, Troy

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and improved therapies for many cancers are enhancing survival rates. Although many cytotoxic therapies are approved for aggressive or metastatic cancer; response rates are low and acquisition of de novo resistance is virtually universal. For decades; chemotherapeutic treatments for cancer have included anthracyclines such as Doxorubicin (DOX); and its use in aggressive tumors appears to remain a viable option; but drug resistance arises against DOX; as for all other classes of compounds. Our recent work suggests the anticoagulant protein Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor 1α (TFPI1α) plays a role in driving the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR); but not maintenance; of the MDR state. Other factors; such as the ABC transporter drug efflux pumps MDR-1/P-gp (ABCB1) and BCRP (ABCG2); are required for MDR maintenance; as well as development. The patient population struggling with therapeutic resistance specifically requires novel treatment options to resensitize these tumor cells to therapy. In this review we discuss the development, maintenance, and reversal of MDR as three distinct phases of cancer biology. Possible means to exploit these stages to reverse MDR will be explored. Early molecular detection of MDR cancers before clinical failure has the potential to offer new approaches to fighting MDR cancer. PMID:26501324

  1. Acidic extracellular pH neutralizes the autophagy-inhibiting activity of chloroquine: implications for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Paola; Strambi, Angela; Zipoli, Chiara; Hägg-Olofsson, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Linder, Stig; De Milito, Angelo

    2014-04-01

    Acidic pH is an important feature of tumor microenvironment and a major determinant of tumor progression. We reported that cancer cells upregulate autophagy as a survival mechanism to acidic stress. Inhibition of autophagy by administration of chloroquine (CQ) in combination anticancer therapies is currently evaluated in clinical trials. We observed in 3 different human cancer cell lines cultured at acidic pH that autophagic flux is not blocked by CQ. This was consistent with a complete resistance to CQ toxicity in cells cultured in acidic conditions. Conversely, the autophagy-inhibiting activity of Lys-01, a novel CQ derivative, was still detectable at low pH. The lack of CQ activity was likely dependent on a dramatically reduced cellular uptake at acidic pH. Using cell lines stably adapted to chronic acidosis we could confirm that CQ lack of activity was merely caused by acidic pH. Moreover, unlike CQ, Lys-01 was able to kill low pH-adapted cell lines, although higher concentrations were required as compared with cells cultured at normal pH conditions. Notably, buffering medium pH in low pH-adapted cell lines reverted CQ resistance. In vivo analysis of tumors treated with CQ showed that accumulation of strong LC3 signals was observed only in normoxic areas but not in hypoxic/acidic regions. Our observations suggest that targeting autophagy in the tumor environment by CQ may be limited to well-perfused regions but not achieved in acidic regions, predicting possible limitations in efficacy of CQ in antitumor therapies. PMID:24492472

  2. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter is involved in reduced sensitivity to multiple fungicide classes in Sclerotinia homoeocarpa (F.T. Bennett).

    PubMed

    Sang, Hyunkyu; Hulvey, Jon; Popko, James T; Lopes, John; Swaminathan, Aishwarya; Chang, Taehyun; Jung, Geunhwa

    2015-04-01

    Dollar spot, caused by Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, is a prevalent turfgrass disease, and the fungus exhibits widespread fungicide resistance in North America. In a previous study, an ABC-G transporter, ShatrD, was associated with practical field resistance to demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides. Mining of ABC-G transporters, also known as pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters, from RNA-Seq data gave an assortment of transcripts, several with high sequence similarity to functionally characterized transporters from Botrytis cinerea, and others with closest blastx hits from Aspergillus and Monilinia. In addition to ShatrD, another PDR transporter showed significant over-expression in replicated RNA-Seq data, and in a collection of field-resistant isolates, as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. These isolates also showed reduced sensitivity to unrelated fungicide classes. Using a yeast complementation system, we sought to test the hypothesis that this PDR transporter effluxes DMI as well as chemically unrelated fungicides. The transporter (ShPDR1) was cloned into the Gal1 expression vector and transformed into a yeast PDR transporter deletion mutant, AD12345678. Complementation assays indicated that ShPDR1 complemented the mutant in the presence of propiconazole (DMI), iprodione (dicarboximide) and boscalid (SDHI, succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor). Our results indicate that the over-expression of ShPDR1 is correlated with practical field resistance to DMI fungicides and reduced sensitivity to dicarboximide and SDHI fungicides. These findings highlight the potential for the eventual development of a multidrug resistance phenotype in this pathogen. In addition, this study presents a pipeline for the discovery and validation of fungicide resistance genes using de novo next-generation sequencing and molecular biology techniques in an unsequenced plant pathogenic fungus.

  3. Numerical investigation of interfacial mass transport resistance and two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell air channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are efficient and environmentally friendly electrochemical engines. The performance of a PEMFC is adversely affected by oxygen (O2) concentration loss from the air flow channel to the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Oxygen transport resistance at the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and air channel interface is a non-negligible component of the O2 concentration loss. Simplified PEMFC performance models in the available literature incorporate the O2 resistance at the GDL-channel interface as an input parameter. However, this parameter has been taken as a constant so far in the available literature and does not reflect variable PEMFC operating conditions and the effect of two-phase flow in the channels. This study numerically calculates the O2 transport resistance at the GDL-air channel interface and expresses this resistance through the non-dimensional Sherwood number (Sh). Local Sh is investigated in an air channel with multiple droplets and films inside. These water features are represented as solid obstructions and only air flow is simulated. Local variations of Sh in the flow direction are obtained as a function of superficial air velocity, water feature size, and uniform spacing between water features. These variations are expressed with mathematical expressions for the PEMFC performance models to utilize and save computational resources. The resulting mathematical correlations for Sh can be utilized in PEMFC performance models. These models can predict cell performance more accurately with the help of the results of this work. Moreover, PEMFC performance models do not need to use a look-up table since the results were expressed through correlations. Performance models can be kept simplified although their predictions will become more realistic. Since two-phase flow in channels is experienced mostly at lower temperatures, performance optimization at low temperatures can be done easier.

  4. Differential contributions of five ABC transporters to mutidrug resistance, antioxidion and virulence of Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting-Ting; Zhao, Jing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) confers agrochemical compatibility to fungal cells-based mycoinsecticdes but mechanisms involved in MDR remain poorly understood for entomopathogenic fungi, which have been widely applied as biocontrol agents against arthropod pests. Here we characterized the functions of five ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which were classified to the subfamilies ABC-B (Mdr1), ABC-C (Mrp1) and ABC-G (Pdr1, Pdr2 and Pdr5) and selected from 54 full-size ABC proteins of Beauveria bassiana based on their main domain architecture, membrane topology and transcriptional responses to three antifungal inducers. Disruption of each transporter gene resulted in significant reduction in resistance to four to six of eight fungicides or antifungal drugs tested due to their differences in structure and function. Compared with wild-type and complemented (control) strains, disruption mutants of all the five transporter genes became significantly less tolerant to the oxidants menadione and H₂O₂ based on 22-41% and 10-31% reductions of their effective concentrations required for the suppression of 50% colony growth at 25°C. Under a standardized spray, the killing actions of ΔPdr5 and ΔMrp1 mutants against Spodoptera litura second-instar larvae were delayed by 59% and 33% respectively. However, no significant virulence change was observed in three other delta mutants. Taken together, the examined five ABC transporters contribute differentially to not only the fungal MDR but antioxidant capability, a phenotype rarely associated with ABC efflux pumps in previous reports; at least some of them are required for the full virulence of B. bassiana, thereby affecting the fungal biocontrol potential. Our results indicate that ABC pump-dependent MDR mechanisms exist in entomopathogenic fungi as do in yeasts and human and plant pathogenic fungi.

  5. Efficacy of oral and intravenous artesunate in male Tanzanian adults with Plasmodium falciparum malaria and in vitro susceptibility to artemisinin, chloroquine, and mefloquine.

    PubMed

    Alin, M H; Kihamia, C M; Bjorkman, A; Bwijo, B A; Premji, Z; Mtey, G J; Ashton, M

    1995-12-01

    The clinical efficacy of oral and intravenous (iv) artesunate was compared in an open randomized trial in 50 male adult patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Kibaha, Tanzania. Oral artesunate treatment was started with 2 x 50 mg initially followed by 50 mg 12 hr later and then 50 mg twice a day for four days (total dose = 550 mg or 9.6 mg/kg). Intravenous artesunate administration began with 2 x 0.8 mg/kg initially followed by 0.8 mg/kg 12 hr later and then 0.8 mg/kg twice a day for four days (total dose = 8.8 mg/kg). The mean +/- SD parasite clearance times (PCTs) were nearly identical at 23.4 +/- 5.9 hr and 24.2 +/- 7.2 hr after oral and iv administration, respectively. Mean +/- SD fever subsidence times (FSTs) were also similar at 18.7 +/- 8.3 hr and 21.0 +/- 4.8 hr, respectively. All patients remained negative for P. falciparum for at least 14 days. Recrudescence/reinfection occurred between days 21 and 28 in five of 25 patients (20%) after oral treatment and in four of 25 patients (16%) after iv treatment. The mean erythrocyte count and hemoglobin concentration were slightly reduced after iv treatment but remained in the normal range. Otherwise, there was no change in blood biochemistry, hematology, and electrocardiograms monitored prior to and during the last dose. It is concluded that treatment with oral and iv artesunate was equally efficacious and well tolerated. A 24-hr in vitro susceptibility test of P. falciparum to artemisinin, chloroquine, and mefloquine was performed in samples from all patients. The three compounds exhibited 100% inhibition with the exception of three isolates, which showed chloroquine resistance. Parameter estimates of a sigmoid Emax model (drug concentration at which 50% of the growth inhibition occurs [EC50]), the sigmoidicity factor s and EC95 fitted to the growth inhibition data differed between compounds and isolates, indicating different sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates. There was no correlation

  6. The Human Gut Microbiome as a Transporter of Antibiotic Resistance Genes between Continents

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Angelin, Martin; Huss, Mikael; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Kristiansson, Erik; Palmgren, Helena; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of antibiotic resistance dissemination by travel have, by targeting only a select number of cultivable bacterial species, omitted most of the human microbiome. Here, we used explorative shotgun metagenomic sequencing to address the abundance of >300 antibiotic resistance genes in fecal specimens from 35 Swedish students taken before and after exchange programs on the Indian peninsula or in Central Africa. All specimens were additionally cultured for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacteria, and the isolates obtained were genome sequenced. The overall taxonomic diversity and composition of the gut microbiome remained stable before and after travel, but there was an increasing abundance of Proteobacteria in 25/35 students. The relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes increased, most prominently for genes encoding resistance to sulfonamide (2.6-fold increase), trimethoprim (7.7-fold), and beta-lactams (2.6-fold). Importantly, the increase observed occurred without any antibiotic intake. Of 18 students visiting the Indian peninsula, 12 acquired ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, while none returning from Africa were positive. Despite deep sequencing efforts, the sensitivity of metagenomics was not sufficient to detect acquisition of the low-abundant genes responsible for the observed ESBL phenotype. In conclusion, metagenomic sequencing of the intestinal microbiome of Swedish students returning from exchange programs in Central Africa or the Indian peninsula showed increased abundance of genes encoding resistance to widely used antibiotics. PMID:26259788

  7. The Human Gut Microbiome as a Transporter of Antibiotic Resistance Genes between Continents.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Angelin, Martin; Huss, Mikael; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Kristiansson, Erik; Palmgren, Helena; Larsson, D G Joakim; Johansson, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies of antibiotic resistance dissemination by travel have, by targeting only a select number of cultivable bacterial species, omitted most of the human microbiome. Here, we used explorative shotgun metagenomic sequencing to address the abundance of >300 antibiotic resistance genes in fecal specimens from 35 Swedish students taken before and after exchange programs on the Indian peninsula or in Central Africa. All specimens were additionally cultured for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacteria, and the isolates obtained were genome sequenced. The overall taxonomic diversity and composition of the gut microbiome remained stable before and after travel, but there was an increasing abundance of Proteobacteria in 25/35 students. The relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes increased, most prominently for genes encoding resistance to sulfonamide (2.6-fold increase), trimethoprim (7.7-fold), and beta-lactams (2.6-fold). Importantly, the increase observed occurred without any antibiotic intake. Of 18 students visiting the Indian peninsula, 12 acquired ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, while none returning from Africa were positive. Despite deep sequencing efforts, the sensitivity of metagenomics was not sufficient to detect acquisition of the low-abundant genes responsible for the observed ESBL phenotype. In conclusion, metagenomic sequencing of the intestinal microbiome of Swedish students returning from exchange programs in Central Africa or the Indian peninsula showed increased abundance of genes encoding resistance to widely used antibiotics.

  8. Characterization of an ABCG-like transporter from the protozoan parasite Leishmania with a role in drug resistance and transbilayer lipid movement.

    PubMed

    Castanys-Muñoz, Esther; Pérez-Victoria, José María; Gamarro, Francisco; Castanys, Santiago

    2008-10-01

    Leishmaniasis treatment is hampered by the increased appearance of treatment failure. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are usually involved in drug resistance both in tumor cells and in microorganisms. Here we report the characterization of an ABCG-like transporter, LiABCG6, localized mainly at the plasma membrane in Leishmania protozoan parasites. When overexpressed, this half-transporter confers significant resistance to the leishmanicidal agents miltefosine and sitamaquine. This resistance phenotype is mediated by a reduction in intracellular drug accumulation. LiABCG6 also reduces the accumulation of short-chain fluorescent phospholipid analogues of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. As a whole, these results suggest that LiABCG6 could be implicated in phospholipid trafficking and drug resistance.

  9. Sensitive radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the simultaneous determination of chloroquine and its metabolites in biological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Escande, C.; Chevalier, P.; Verdier, F.; Bourdon, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Two new methods for the simultaneous determination of chloroquine and its two main metabolites (monodesethylchloroquine and bisdesethylchloroquine) in biological samples, radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are described. Antiserum is produced in rabbits immunized with N-(2-carboxyethyl)desethylchloroquine:protein conjugate. Besides chloroquine, this antiserum recognizes with good affinity the two main metabolites, monodesethylchloroquine and bisdesethylchloroquine (70 and 40% of crossreaction, respectively). Amodiaquine cross reacts by 4.5%; cross reactions with monodesethylamodiaquine, bisdesethylamodiaquine, and other antimalarial drugs are less than 1%. No extraction step or sample preparation is required for either system. Sensitivity limits are, respectively, 0.70 nM (3 pg of chloroquine sulfate measured in 10 microL of plasma sample) for RIA, and 10 nM (22 pg of chloroquine sulfate measured in 5 microL of plasma sample) for ELISA. The interassay coefficients of variation are, respectively, less than 10 and less than 16% for RIA and ELISA in the range 14-410 nM (6-180 ng/mL). The results of both methods are well correlated (r = 0.97) and correlate with spectrophotometry (r = 0.98) and HPLC results (r = 0.93). Because of their high sensitivity, both methods can be used in the case of chloroquine poisoning and in the control of malaria prophylaxis and treatment.

  10. A Randomized Comparison of Chloroquine versus Dihydroartemisinin–Piperaquine for the Treatment of Plasmodium vivax Infection in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Thuan, Phung Duc; Ca, Nguyen Thuy Nha; Van Toi, Pham; Nhien, Nguyen Thanh Thuy; Thanh, Ngo Viet; Anh, Nguyen Duc; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Thai, Cao Quang; Hong Thai, Le; Hoa, Nhu Thi; Thanh Dong, Le; Loi, Mai Anh; Son, Do Hung; Khanh, Tran Tinh Ngoc; Dolecek, Christiane; Nhan, Ho Thi; Wolbers, Marcel; Thwaites, Guy; Farrar, Jeremy; White, Nicholas J.; Hien, Tran Tinh

    2016-01-01

    A total of 128 Vietnamese patients with symptomatic Plasmodium vivax mono-infections were enrolled in a prospective, open-label, randomized trial to receive either chloroquine or dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine (DHA-PPQ). The proportions of patients with adequate clinical and parasitological responses were 47% in the chloroquine arm (31 of 65 patients) and 66% in the DHA-PPQ arm (42 of 63 patients) in the Kaplan–Meier intention-to-treat analysis (absolute difference 19%, 95% confidence interval = 0–37%), thus establishing non-inferiority of DHA-PPQ. Fever clearance time (median 24 versus 12 hours, P = 0.02), parasite clearance time (median 36 versus 18 hours, P < 0.001), and parasite clearance half-life (mean 3.98 versus 1.80 hours, P < 0.001) were all significantly shorter in the DHA-PPQ arm. All cases of recurrent parasitemia in the chloroquine arm occurred from day 33 onward, with corresponding whole blood chloroquine concentration lower than 100 ng/mL in all patients. Chloroquine thus remains efficacious for the treatment of P. vivax malaria in southern Vietnam, but DHA-PPQ provides more rapid symptomatic and parasitological recovery. PMID:26856909

  11. A Randomized Comparison of Chloroquine Versus Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine for the Treatment of Plasmodium vivax Infection in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thuan, Phung Duc; Ca, Nguyen Thuy Nha; Van Toi, Pham; Nhien, Nguyen Thanh Thuy; Thanh, Ngo Viet; Anh, Nguyen Duc; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Thai, Cao Quang; Thai, Le Hong; Hoa, Nhu Thi; Dong, Le Thanh; Loi, Mai Anh; Son, Do Hung; Khanh, Tran Tinh Ngoc; Dolecek, Christiane; Nhan, Ho Thi; Wolbers, Marcel; Thwaites, Guy; Farrar, Jeremy; White, Nicholas J; Hien, Tran Tinh

    2016-04-01

    A total of 128 Vietnamese patients with symptomatic Plasmodium vivax mono-infections were enrolled in a prospective, open-label, randomized trial to receive either chloroquine or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ). The proportions of patients with adequate clinical and parasitological responses were 47% in the chloroquine arm (31 of 65 patients) and 66% in the DHA-PPQ arm (42 of 63 patients) in the Kaplan-Meier intention-to-treat analysis (absolute difference 19%, 95% confidence interval = 0-37%), thus establishing non-inferiority of DHA-PPQ. Fever clearance time (median 24 versus 12 hours,P= 0.02), parasite clearance time (median 36 versus 18 hours,P< 0.001), and parasite clearance half-life (mean 3.98 versus 1.80 hours,P< 0.001) were all significantly shorter in the DHA-PPQ arm. All cases of recurrent parasitemia in the chloroquine arm occurred from day 33 onward, with corresponding whole blood chloroquine concentration lower than 100 ng/mL in all patients. Chloroquine thus remains efficacious for the treatment of P. vivax malaria in southern Vietnam, but DHA-PPQ provides more rapid symptomatic and parasitological recovery. PMID:26856909

  12. A proteomic approach to study Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium putative transporter YjeH associated with ceftriaxone resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wensi S. Lin, Y.-H.; Shih, C.-C.

    2007-09-28

    Mutant 6B7 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has a transposon inserted in the putative transporter gene yjeH and shows a more-than-fourfold reduction in resistance to ceftriaxone. In this report we have used proteomic analysis to compare outer membrane protein profiles between this mutant and its parental strain R200. Five identified proteins were found to be altered. Of these proteins, the level of expression of the porin OmpD was increased and those of the putative outer membrane proteins STM1530 and STM3031, a subunit of the proton-pumping oxidoreductase NuoB and the heat shock protein MopA were decreased in 6B7 strain. Although the function of the yjeH gene remains unknown, a complementation assay suggested that the OmpD, STM1530, STM3031, NuoB, and MopA proteins are associated with ceftriaxone resistance and the expression of these proteins is influenced by the putative transporter gene yjeH in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium.

  13. Proline Modulates the Trypanosoma cruzi Resistance to Reactive Oxygen Species and Drugs through a Novel D, L-Proline Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sayé, Melisa; Miranda, Mariana R.; di Girolamo, Fabio; de los Milagros Cámara, María; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, has a metabolism largely based on the consumption of glucose and proline. This amino acid is essential for host cells infection and intracellular differentiation. In this work we identified a proline transporter (TcAAAP069) by yeasts complementation assays and overexpression in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. TcAAAP069 is mono-specific for proline but presents an unusual feature; the lack of stereospecificity, because it is competitively inhibited by the D- enantiomer. Parasites overexpressing TcAAAP069 have an increased intracellular proline concentration, 2.6-fold higher than controls, as a consequence of a higher proline transport rate. Furthermore, augmented proline concentration correlates with an improved resistance to trypanocidal drugs and also to reactive oxygen species including hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, emulating natural physiological situations. The IC50s for nifurtimox, benznidazole, H2O2 and NO. were 125%, 68%, 44% and 112% higher than controls, respectively. Finally, proline metabolism generates a higher concentration (48%) of ATP in TcAAAP069 parasites. Since proline participates on essential energy pathways, stress and drug resistance responses, these results provide a novel target for the development of new drugs for the treatments for Chagas' disease. PMID:24637744

  14. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ) against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt)-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps)-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9). The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African) CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum parasites from Yemen

  15. The multidrug-resistance transporter Abcc3 protects NK cells from chemotherapy in a murine model of malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Sara; Cantini, Gabriele; Kapetis, Dimos; Cazzato, Emanuela; Di Ianni, Natalia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Pellegatta, Serena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abcc3, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, plays a role in multidrug resistance. Here, we found that Abcc3 is highly expressed in blood-derived NK cells but not in CD8+ T cells. In GL261 glioma-bearing mice treated with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) for 5 d, an early increased frequency of NK cells was observed. We also found that Abcc3 is strongly upregulated and functionally active in NK cells from mice treated with TMZ compared to controls. We demonstrate that Abcc3 is critical for NK cell survival during TMZ administration; more importantly, Akt, involved in lymphocyte survival, is phosphorylated only in NK cells expressing Abcc3. The resistance of NK cells to chemotherapy was accompanied by increased migration and homing in the brain at early time points. Cytotoxicity, evaluated by IFNγ production and specific lytic activity against GL261 cells, increased peripherally in the later phases, after conclusion of TMZ treatment. Intra-tumor increase of the NK effector subset as well as in IFNγ, granzymes and perforin-1 expression, were found early and persisted over time, correlating with a profound modulation on glioma microenvironment induced by TMZ. Our findings reveal an important involvement of Abcc3 in NK cell resistance to chemotherapy and have important clinical implications for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:27467914

  16. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S.; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha−1) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance. PMID:27104532

  17. Environmental Conditions Influence Induction of Key ABC-Transporter Genes Affecting Glyphosate Resistance Mechanism in Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Tani, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias S; Bilalis, Dimitrios

    2016-04-20

    Conyza canadensis has been reported to be the most frequent weed species that evolved resistance to glyphosate in various parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions (temperature and light) on the expression levels of the EPSPS gene and two major ABC-transporter genes (M10 and M11) on glyphosate susceptible (GS) and glyphosate resistant (GR) horseweed populations, collected from several regions across Greece. Real-time PCR was conducted to determine the expression level of the aforementioned genes when glyphosate was applied at normal (1×; 533 g·a.e.·ha(-1)) and high rates (4×, 8×), measured at an early one day after treatment (DAT) and a later stage (four DAT) of expression. Plants were exposed to light or dark conditions, at three temperature regimes (8, 25, 35 °C). GR plants were made sensitive when exposed to 8 °C with light; those sensitized plants behaved biochemically (shikimate accumulation) and molecularly (expression of EPSPS and ABC-genes) like the GS plants. Results from the current study show the direct link between the environmental conditions and the induction level of the above key genes that likely affect the efficiency of the proposed mechanism of glyphosate resistance.

  18. Influence of ATP-binding cassette transporters in root exudation of phytoalexins, signals, and disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roots of plants secrete compounds as a way to exchange information with organ-isms living in the soil. Here, we report the involvement of seven root-expressed ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters corresponding to both full and half-size molecules (Atabcg36, Atabcg37, Atabcc5, Atabcf1, Atabcf3...

  19. Multiple transport systems mediate virus-induced acquired resistance to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we report the phenomenon of acquired cross-tolerance to oxidative (UV-C and H2O2) stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with Potato virus X (PVX) and investigate the functional expression of transport systems in mediating this phenomenon. By combining multiple approaches, we...

  20. Negative differential resistance in GeSi core-shell transport junctions: the role of local sp(2) hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nuo; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaobin; Kong, Xianghua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Guo, Hong

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation of nonlinear quantum transport properties of Au/GeSi/Au junctions. For GeSi semiconducting core-shell structures brought into contact with Au electrodes, a very unusual behavior is that the tunneling transport is on-resonance right at equilibrium. This resonance is not due to the alignment of a quantum level in GeSi to the electrochemical potential of Au, but due to the alignment of very sharp DOS features - hot spots, localized at the two Au/GeSi interfaces of the device. An applied bias voltage shifts the hot spots relative to each other which gives rise to substantial negative differential resistance (NDR). The hot spots localized at the two interfaces were found to be due to the unbonded pz orbital of a sp(2) hybridized interface Si atom which is surrounded by three non-sp(2) hybridized neighbors. The mechanism of inducing hot spots and NDR by a local structure unit is not limited to the GeSi. The results suggest an interesting scheme for constructing NDR devices by orbital manipulation, to be more explicit, for example, by designing local structural units having unbonded orbitals at the interfaces between electrodes and the central region of the transport junction.

  1. Negative differential resistance in GeSi core-shell transport junctions: the role of local sp(2) hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nuo; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaobin; Kong, Xianghua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Guo, Hong

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation of nonlinear quantum transport properties of Au/GeSi/Au junctions. For GeSi semiconducting core-shell structures brought into contact with Au electrodes, a very unusual behavior is that the tunneling transport is on-resonance right at equilibrium. This resonance is not due to the alignment of a quantum level in GeSi to the electrochemical potential of Au, but due to the alignment of very sharp DOS features - hot spots, localized at the two Au/GeSi interfaces of the device. An applied bias voltage shifts the hot spots relative to each other which gives rise to substantial negative differential resistance (NDR). The hot spots localized at the two interfaces were found to be due to the unbonded pz orbital of a sp(2) hybridized interface Si atom which is surrounded by three non-sp(2) hybridized neighbors. The mechanism of inducing hot spots and NDR by a local structure unit is not limited to the GeSi. The results suggest an interesting scheme for constructing NDR devices by orbital manipulation, to be more explicit, for example, by designing local structural units having unbonded orbitals at the interfaces between electrodes and the central region of the transport junction. PMID:27546305

  2. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Partricia; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research and development of high temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential of converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as an important area for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is Part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main focuses in Part I are on two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  3. Transport Properties of Bulk Thermoelectrics—An International Round-Robin Study, Part I: Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D.; Böttner, Harald; König, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolet, Alex; Senawiratne, Jayantha; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Gilbert, Patricia; Sharp, Jeff W.; Lo, Jason; Kleinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo

    2013-04-01

    Recent research and development of high-temperature thermoelectric materials has demonstrated great potential for converting automobile exhaust heat directly into electricity. Thermoelectrics based on classic bismuth telluride have also started to impact the automotive industry by enhancing air-conditioning efficiency and integrated cabin climate control. In addition to engineering challenges of making reliable and efficient devices to withstand thermal and mechanical cycling, the remaining issues in thermoelectric power generation and refrigeration are mostly materials related. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, still needs to be improved from the current value of 1.0 to 1.5 to above 2.0 to be competitive with other alternative technologies. In the meantime, the thermoelectric community could greatly benefit from the development of international test standards, improved test methods, and better characterization tools. Internationally, thermoelectrics have been recognized by many countries as a key component for improving energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the Implementing Agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) identified thermoelectric materials as an important area in 2009. This paper is part I of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk thermoelectrics. The main foci in part I are the measurement of two electronic transport properties: Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity.

  4. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Olafson, Katy N; Ketchum, Megan A; Rimer, Jeffrey D; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-04-21

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼10(4)× less than hematin's physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials. PMID:25831526

  5. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Olafson, Katy N; Ketchum, Megan A; Rimer, Jeffrey D; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-04-21

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼10(4)× less than hematin's physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials.

  6. Chloroquine Analog Interaction with C2- and Iota-Toxin in Vitro and in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Kronhardt, Angelika; Beitzinger, Christoph; Barth, Holger; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    C2-toxin from Clostridium botulinum and Iota-toxin from Clostridium perfringens belong both to the binary A-B-type of toxins consisting of two separately secreted components, an enzymatic subunit A and a binding component B that facilitates the entry of the corresponding enzymatic subunit into the target cells. The enzymatic subunits are in both cases actin ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify R177 of globular actin finally leading to cell death. Following their binding to host cells' receptors and internalization, the two binding components form heptameric channels in endosomal membranes which mediate the translocation of the enzymatic components Iota a and C2I from endosomes into the cytosol of the target cells. The binding components form ion-permeable channels in artificial and biological membranes. Chloroquine and related 4-aminoquinolines were able to block channel formation in vitro and intoxication of living cells. In this study, we extended our previous work to the use of different chloroquine analogs and demonstrate that positively charged aminoquinolinium salts are able to block channels formed in lipid bilayer membranes by the binding components of C2- and Iota-toxin. Similarly, these molecules protect cultured mammalian cells from intoxication with C2- and Iota-toxin. The aminoquinolinium salts did presumably not interfere with actin ADP-ribosylation or receptor binding but blocked the pores formed by C2IIa and Iota b in living cells and in vitro. The blocking efficiency of pores formed by Iota b and C2IIa by the chloroquine analogs showed interesting differences indicating structural variations between the types of protein-conducting nanochannels formed by Iota b and C2IIa. PMID:27517960

  7. Chloroquine Analog Interaction with C2- and Iota-Toxin in Vitro and in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kronhardt, Angelika; Beitzinger, Christoph; Barth, Holger; Benz, Roland

    2016-01-01

    C2-toxin from Clostridium botulinum and Iota-toxin from Clostridium perfringens belong both to the binary A-B-type of toxins consisting of two separately secreted components, an enzymatic subunit A and a binding component B that facilitates the entry of the corresponding enzymatic subunit into the target cells. The enzymatic subunits are in both cases actin ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify R177 of globular actin finally leading to cell death. Following their binding to host cells’ receptors and internalization, the two binding components form heptameric channels in endosomal membranes which mediate the translocation of the enzymatic components Iota a and C2I from endosomes into the cytosol of the target cells. The binding components form ion-permeable channels in artificial and biological membranes. Chloroquine and related 4-aminoquinolines were able to block channel formation in vitro and intoxication of living cells. In this study, we extended our previous work to the use of different chloroquine analogs and demonstrate that positively charged aminoquinolinium salts are able to block channels formed in lipid bilayer membranes by the binding components of C2- and Iota-toxin. Similarly, these molecules protect cultured mammalian cells from intoxication with C2- and Iota-toxin. The aminoquinolinium salts did presumably not interfere with actin ADP-ribosylation or receptor binding but blocked the pores formed by C2IIa and Iota b in living cells and in vitro. The blocking efficiency of pores formed by Iota b and C2IIa by the chloroquine analogs showed interesting differences indicating structural variations between the types of protein-conducting nanochannels formed by Iota b and C2IIa. PMID:27517960

  8. A combination of curcumin with either gramicidin or ouabain selectively kills cells that express the multidrug resistance-linked ABCG2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Rao, Divya K; Liu, Haiyan; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Mayer, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces a strategy to kill selectively multidrug-resistant cells that express the ABCG2 transporter (also called breast cancer resistance protein, or BCRP). The approach is based on specific stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by ABCG2 transporters with subtoxic doses of curcumin combined with stimulation of ATP hydrolysis by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with subtoxic doses of gramicidin A or ouabain. After 72 h of incubation with the drug combinations, the resulting overconsumption of ATP by both pathways inhibits the efflux activity of ABCG2 transporters, leads to depletion of intracellular ATP levels below the viability threshold, and kills resistant cells selectively over cells that lack ABCG2 transporters. This strategy, which was also tested on a clinically relevant human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7/FLV1), exploits the overexpression of ABCG2 transporters and induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death selectively in resistant cells. This work thus introduces a novel strategy to exploit collateral sensitivity (CS) with a combination of two clinically used compounds that individually do not exert CS. Collectively, this work expands the current knowledge on ABCG2-mediated CS and provides a potential strategy for discovery of CS drugs against drug-resistant cancer cells.

  9. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-04-16

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  10. A clinical trial of malaria prophylaxis using a single dose of chloroquine at different intervals in an endemic malarious area.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, C S

    1980-10-01

    A controlled trial of chloroquine prophylaxis was carried out to find whether this drug could be administered at intervals longer than the conventional ones recommended, in endemic malarious areas. Statistically significant results obtained show that chloroquine at suitable doses could be used successfully at intervals of 3 months. The possibility of chloroquine and acquired immunity acting together synergistically is discussed. The author is of the opinion that with this dose regime, the community would still be able to build up substantial immunity, so that in the event of the drug being discontinued, the community would not be faced with the problem of overwhelming malarial infections. The various advantages in using this regime are also considered.

  11. Key concepts behind forming-free resistive switching incorporated with rectifying transport properties.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Yao; Ou, Xin; Luo, Wenbo; Mücklich, Arndt; Bürger, Danilo; Zhou, Shengqiang; Wu, Chuangui; Chen, Yuanfu; Zhang, Wanli; Helm, Manfred; Mikolajick, Thomas; Schmidt, Oliver G; Schmidt, Heidemarie

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the effect of Ti diffusion on the bipolar resistive switching in Au/BiFeO3/Pt/Ti capacitor-like structures. Polycrystalline BiFeO3 thin films are deposited by pulsed laser deposition at different temperatures on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates. From the energy filtered transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry it is observed that Ti diffusion occurs if the deposition temperature is above 600°C. The current-voltage (I-V) curves indicate that resistive switching can only be achieved in Au/BiFeO3/Pt/Ti capacitor-like structures where this Ti diffusion occurs. The effect of Ti diffusion is confirmed by the BiFeO3 thin films deposited on Pt/sapphire and Pt/Ti/sapphire substrates. The resistive switching needs no electroforming process, and is incorporated with rectifying properties which is potentially useful to suppress the sneak current in a crossbar architecture. Those specific features open a promising alternative concept for nonvolatile memory devices as well as for other memristive devices like synapses in neuromorphic circuits.

  12. Response of microscale turbulence and transport to the evolution of resistive magnetohydrodynamic magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiquan Kishimoto, Y.; Wang, Z. X.

    2014-02-15

    Nonlinear evolution of microscale turbulence interacting with a naturally growing MHD magnetic island is simulated based on a Landau-fluid model. Here, we report on a new short wavelength magnetic-island-induced ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability triggered by a critical threshold of magnetic island width in multiscale turbulence, which is referred to as sw-MITG mode. The sw-MITG mode is characterized by a substantially low stability threshold and a global structure propagating along the ion diamagnetic drift direction. Its generation results from the response of microscale fluctuations to turbulent cross-field heat transport associated with increasing boundary layer width about the island separatrix. An intermittency of heat transport is caused by the sw-MITG mode interacting with dynamical magnetic island and microturbulence.

  13. Effect of chloroquine wash-out period of photosensitizers in the skin and selected organs in rats.

    PubMed

    Zima, T; Jirsa, M; Jirsa, M; Jirásková, M; Bradová, V; Stádník, B

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade, photodynamic therapy has become an alternative method for the diagnosis and therapy of tumors. In human medicine hematoporphyrin derivatives, sulfonated hydrophilic meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPPS4) and an oligomer of hematoporphyrin (Photosan 3), are widely used. Chloroquine is used for the treatment of porphyria cutanea tarda for its power to release porphyrins from the liver tissue. The kinetics of two porphyrin photosensitizers TPPS4 and Photosan 3 in the skin and some organs as well as the effect of chloroquine on the porphyrin excretion and their accumulation in skin and organs of Wistar rats were studied. TPPS4 exhibited maximum fluorescence in skin 48 h after application with decreasing to basal level from the 8th to the 14th day. Maximum fluorescence was reached at 72 hours after Photosan 3 application and it decreased to basal level during 96 hours after application. TPPS4 caused significantly higher fluorescence compared to Photosan 3. Chloroquine after oral administration did not change the fluorescence of skin, but it significantly decreased the TPPS4 concentration in rat organs if chloroquine treatment started 3 days or 2 weeks after TPPS4 application. Chloroquine significantly decreased the serum TPPS4 concentration during the period of 28 days. Fluorescence of skin was significantly higher and lasted longer after application of TPPS4 compared to Photosan 3. Chloroquine after oral administration did not influence the fluorescence of the skin, but it significantly decreased the TPPS4 concentration in rat organs. This effect could be useful in photodynamic therapy for mobilizing exogenous porphyrins from tissues after parenteral photodynamic therapy. PMID:14984321

  14. RLIP76 Transports Sunitinib and Sorafenib and Mediates Drug Resistance in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sharad S.; Sehrawat, Archana; Sahu, Mukesh; Singhal, Preeti; Vatsyayan, Rit; Lelsani, Poorna Chandra Rao; Yadav, Sushma; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    RLIP76 is a stress-responsive membrane protein implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. It represents the predominant glutathione-conjugate (GS-E) transporter in cells. We have shown that RLIP76 plays a crucial role in defending cancer cells from radiation and chemotherapeutic toxin-mediated apoptosis, and that its inhibition by antibodies or depletion by siRNA or antisense causes apoptosis in a number of cancer cell types. Recently, we have demonstrated for the first time that the striking anti-neoplastic effects with no evident toxicity in terms of either weight loss or metabolic effects are also demonstrable for the antibody, antisense and siRNA in a renal cell xenografts model of Caki-2 cells (Singhal et al., Cancer Res., 2009, 69: 4244). Present studies were performed to determine if RLIP76 targeting is more broadly applicable in other kidney cancer cell lines, to compare the signaling effects of RLIP76 antisense with kinase inhibitors used in treatment of renal cell carcinoma, and to determine whether kinase inhibitors were substrates for transport by RLIP76. Results of these studies show that sorafenib as well as sunitinib are substrates for transport by RLIP76 thus are competitive inhibitors of GS-E transport. Furthermore, kinase inhibition in the ERK as well as PI3K pathways by RLIP76 depletion is more profound and consistent and is more widely apparent in a number of renal carcinoma cell lines. These studies offer strong support for our overall hypothesis that RLIP76 is an overarching anti-apoptosis mechanism that, if inhibited, can be more broadly effective in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. PMID:19626587

  15. Current clinical efficacy of chloroquine for the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum infections in urban Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania.

    PubMed Central

    Premji, Z.; Makwaya, C.; Minjas, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    Reported is the use of a 14-day WHO protocol, which takes into account the clinical, parasitological and haematological responses to antimalarial drugs, to determine the efficacy of chloroquine in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in young children (n = 200) in urban Dar es Salaam. Chloroquine failure was found in 43% of the children. Of these, 12.5% were considered to be early treatment failures and were given a single dose of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Fever subsided in all children treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and there were no parasitological failures. In addition, children treated with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine because of early treatment failure with chloroquine had better haematological recovery than the chloroquine-sensitive group. It is concluded that chloroquine can no longer be considered an effective therapy for P. falciparum malaria in young children in Dar es Salaam. PMID:10534897

  16. The Efflux Pump Inhibitor Reserpine Selects Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains That Overexpress the ABC Transporters PatA and PatB▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Mark I.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One way to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms is the use of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Spontaneous mutants resistant to the EPI reserpine selected from Streptococcus pneumoniae NCTC 7465 and R6 at a frequency suggestive of a single mutational event were also multidrug resistant. No mutations in pmrA (which encodes the efflux protein PmrA) were detected, and the expression of pmrA was unaltered in all mutants. In the reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant mutants, the overexpression of both patA and patB, which encode ABC transporters, was associated with accumulation of low concentrations of antibiotics and dyes. The addition of sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of ABC efflux pumps, or the insertional inactivation of either gene restored wild-type antibiotic susceptibility and wild-type levels of accumulation. Only when patA was insertionally inactivated were both multidrug resistance and reserpine resistance lost. Strains in which patA was insertionally inactivated grew significantly more slowly than the wild type. These data indicate that the overexpression of both patA and patB confers multidrug resistance in S. pneumoniae but that only patA is involved in reserpine resistance. The selection of reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant pneumococci has implications for analogous systems in other bacteria or in cancer. PMID:18362193

  17. Attenuation of high sucrose diet–induced insulin resistance in ABC transporter deficient white mutant of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high sugar diet (HSD) is an experimental model of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in mammals and insects. In Drosophila, HSD-induced IR delays emergence of pupae from larvae and eclosion of imago from pupae. Understanding of mechanisms of IR/T2D is essential for refining T2D prevention and treatment strategies. Dysregulation of tryptophan (Trp)-kynurenine (Kyn) pathway was suggested as one of the mechanisms of IR/T2D development. Rate-limiting enzyme of Trp-Kyn pathway in Drosophila is Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), an evolutionary conserved ortholog of human TDO. We previously reported attenuation of HSD-induced IR in vermilion mutants with inactive TDO. Conversion of Trp to Kyn is regulated not only by TDO activity but by intracellular Trp transport via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter encoded by white gene in Drosophila. In order to evaluate the possible impact of deficient intracellular Trp transport on the inducement of IR by HSD, we compared the effect of HSD on pre-imago development in wild type flies, Canton-Special (C-S), and C-S flies containing white gene, white (C-S). Presence of white gene attenuated (by 50%) HSD-induced delay of pupae emergence from larvae and female and male imago eclosion from pupae. Present study together with our earlier report reveals that both decreased TDO activity (due to vermilion gene mutation) or deficient Trp transport into cell without affecting TDO levels (due to white gene mutation) attenuate HSD-induced development of IR in Drosophila model of T2D. Our data provide further support for hypothesis that dysregulation of Trp-Kyn pathway is one of the pathophysiological mechanisms and potential target for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of IR/T2D. PMID:27375855

  18. Complex polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein 2 gene and its contribution to antimalarial response.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Maria Isabel; Osório, Nuno S; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Franzén, Oscar; Dahlstrom, Sabina; Lum, J Koji; Nosten, Francois; Gil, José Pedro

    2014-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum has the capacity to escape the actions of essentially all antimalarial drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins are known to cause multidrug resistance in a large range of organisms, including the Apicomplexa parasites. P. falciparum genome analysis has revealed two genes coding for the multidrug resistance protein (MRP) type of ABC transporters: Pfmrp1, previously associated with decreased parasite drug susceptibility, and the poorly studied Pfmrp2. The role of Pfmrp2 polymorphisms in modulating sensitivity to antimalarial drugs has not been established. We herein report a comprehensive account of the Pfmrp2 genetic variability in 46 isolates from Thailand. A notably high frequency of 2.8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/kb was identified for this gene, including some novel SNPs. Additionally, we found that Pfmrp2 harbors a significant number of microindels, some previously not reported. We also investigated the potential association of the identified Pfmrp2 polymorphisms with altered in vitro susceptibility to several antimalarials used in artemisinin-based combination therapy and with parasite clearance time. Association analysis suggested Pfmrp2 polymorphisms modulate the parasite's in vitro response to quinoline antimalarials, including chloroquine, piperaquine, and mefloquine, and association with in vivo parasite clearance. In conclusion, our study reveals that the Pfmrp2 gene is the most diverse ABC transporter known in P. falciparum with a potential role in antimalarial drug resistance.

  19. Heterogeneous reactive transport under unsaturated transient conditions characterized by 3D electrical resistivity tomography and advanced lysimeter methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Slater, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we systematically applied a variety of input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We measured breakthroughs of a conservative tracer and of nitrate, originating from the application of a slow release fertilizer and serving as a reactive tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct validation of water content dynamics and tracer breakthrough under transient boundary conditions characterized noninvasively by ERT. We were able to image the advancing infiltration front and the advancing front of tracer and nitrate using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long-term displacement of the solute fronts was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential

  20. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  1. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  2. Defining Plasmodium falciparum Treatment in South West Asia: A Randomized Trial Comparing Artesunate or Primaquine Combined with Chloroquine or SP

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczinski, Kate; Leslie, Toby; Ali, Iftikhar; Durrani, Naeem; Lee, Sue; Barends, Marion; Beshir, Khalid; Ord, Rosalynn; Hallett, Rachel; Rowland, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Antimalarial resistance has led to a global policy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. Despite growing resistance chloroquine (CQ) remained until recently the official first-line treatment for falciparum malaria in Pakistan, with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) second-line. Co-treatment with the gametocytocidal primaquine (PQ) is recommended for transmission control in South Asia. The relative effect of artesunate (AS) or primaquine, as partner drugs, on clinical outcomes and gametocyte carriage in this setting were unknown. Methods A single-blinded, randomized trial among Afghan refugees in Pakistan compared six treatment arms: CQ; CQ+(single-dose)PQ; CQ+(3 d)AS; SP; SP+(single-dose)PQ, and SP+(3 d)AS. The objectives were to compare treatment failure rates and effect on gametocyte carriage, of CQ or SP monotherapy against the respective combinations (PQ or AS). Outcomes included trophozoite and gametocyte clearance (read by light microscopy), and clinical and parasitological failure. Findings A total of 308 (87%) patients completed the trial. Failure rates by day 28 were: CQ 55/68 (81%); CQ+AS 19/67 (28%), SP 4/41 (9.8%), SP+AS 1/41 (2.4%). The addition of PQ to CQ or SP did not affect failure rates (CQ+PQ 49/67 (73%) failed; SP+PQ 5/33 (16%) failed). AS was superior to PQ at clearing gametocytes; gametocytes were seen on d7 in 85% of CQ, 40% of CQ+PQ, 21% of CQ+AS, 91% of SP, 76% of SP+PQ and 23% of SP+AS treated patients. PQ was more effective at clearing older gametocyte infections whereas AS was more effective at preventing emergence of mature gametocytes, except in cases that recrudesced. Conclusions CQ is no longer appropriate by itself or in combination. These findings influenced the replacement of CQ with SP+AS for first-line treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region. The threat of SP resistance remains as SP monotherapy is still common. Three day AS was superior to single-dose PQ for reducing

  3. Dynamics of multi-drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rooney, W

    1992-09-01

    Since the initial report of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine in 1960 in the Thai-Cambodian border resistance to alternative drugs occurred early after their introduction. This development is considered to be the result of population migration and excessive drug pressure along with the presence of a multi-resistance gene within the parasite population. Multi-resistant strains as such have been disseminated throughout the country by returning migrant populations.

  4. The ABC transporter AnrAB contributes to the innate resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to nisin, bacitracin, and various beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Collins, Barry; Curtis, Nicola; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2010-10-01

    A mariner transposon bank was used to identify loci that contribute to the innate resistance of Listeria monocytogenes to the lantibiotic nisin. In addition to highlighting the importance of a number of loci previously associated with nisin resistance (mprF, virRS, and telA), a nisin-sensitive phenotype was associated with the disruption of anrB (lmo2115), a gene encoding the permease component of an ABC transporter. The contribution of anrB to nisin resistance was confirmed by the creation of nonpolar deletion mutants. The loss of this putative multidrug resistance transporter also greatly enhanced sensitivity to bacitracin, gallidermin, and a selection of β-lactam antibiotics. A comparison of the relative antimicrobial sensitivities of a number of mutants established the ΔanrB strain as being one of the most bacitracin-sensitive L. monocytogenes strains identified to date. PMID:20643901

  5. Characterization of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes and genotypes among Salmonella enterica recovered from pigs on farms, from transport trucks, and from pigs after slaughter.

    PubMed

    Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Davies, Peter R; Turkson, Paa-Kobina; Morrow, W E; Funk, Julie A; Altier, Craig; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2004-04-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine antimicrobial resistance patterns among Salmonella serotypes and to evaluate the role of transport trucks in dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant strains of Salmonella. Salmonella from groups of nursery and finishing pigs on farms, from trucks, and from pigs after slaughter were compared using serotyping, patterns of antimicrobial resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. The five farms included in the study yielded 858 isolates representing 27 Salmonella serovars. The most common resistance observed (80% of all isolates) was to tetracycline; resistance to ampicillin (42%), chloramphenicol (31%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (30%), and piperacillin (31%) also were common. We found a correlation between serovar and antimicrobial resistance. High correlation was found between Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen and chloramphenicol resistance (Spearman rank correlation, rho = 0.7). Multidrug resistance was observed primarily in Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen (94%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (93%) and was much less common in the other common serovars, including Salmonella Derby (7%) and Salmonella Heidelberg (8%). Of the 225 isolates exhibiting the most common pentaresistance pattern in this study, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-ampicillin-chloramphenicol-piperacillin-tetracycline, 220 (98%) were Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen, and 86% of the isolates of this serovar had this pattern. Isolates from the trucks were similar, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, to those from the cecum and mesenteric lymph nodes of pigs on two of the farms, suggesting the probable infection of pigs during transport. Class I integrons were also common among various serovars.

  6. An ABC pleiotropic drug resistance transporter of Fusarium graminearum with a role in crown and root diseases of wheat.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Donald M; Stephens, Amber E; Munn, Alan L; Manners, John M

    2013-11-01

    FgABC1 (FGSG_04580) is predicted to encode a pleiotropic drug resistance class ABC transporter in Fusarium graminearum, a globally important pathogen of wheat. Deletion mutants of FgABC1 showed reduced virulence towards wheat in crown and root infection assays but were unaltered in infectivity on barley. Expression of FgABC1 during head blight and crown rot disease increases during the necrotrophic phases of infection suggestive of a role for FgABC1 in late infection stages in different tissue types. Deletion of FgABC1 also led to increased sensitivity of the fungus to the antifungal compound benalaxyl in culture, but the response to known cereal defence compounds, gramine, 2-benzoxazalinone and tryptamine was unaltered. FgABC1 appears to have a role in protecting the fungus from antifungal compounds and is likely to help combat as yet unidentified wheat defence compounds during disease development.

  7. Transport properties of bare and hydrogenated zigzag silicene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistances and perfect spin-filtering effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. F.; Liu, Y. S.; Feng, J. F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, C. W.; Chi, F.

    2014-09-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of the bare and hydrogenated zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). The results show that the ZSiNRs with symmetric (asymmetric) edges prefer the ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic) as their ground states with the semiconductor properties, while the accordingly antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) states exhibit the metallic behaviors. These facts result in a giant magnetoresistance behavior between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in the low bias-voltage regime. Moreover, in the ferromagnetic ZSiNRs with asymmetric edges, a perfect spin-filtering effect with 100% positive electric current polarization can be achieved by altering the bias voltage. In addition, we also find that the negative differential resistances prefer the metastable states. The findings here indicate that the asymmetric and symmetric ZSiNRs are promising materials for spintronic applications.

  8. Transport properties of bare and hydrogenated zigzag silicene nanoribbons: Negative differential resistances and perfect spin-filtering effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X. F.; Liu, Y. S. Feng, J. F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, C. W.; Chi, F.

    2014-09-28

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of the bare and hydrogenated zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs). The results show that the ZSiNRs with symmetric (asymmetric) edges prefer the ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic) as their ground states with the semiconductor properties, while the accordingly antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) states exhibit the metallic behaviors. These facts result in a giant magnetoresistance behavior between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic states in the low bias-voltage regime. Moreover, in the ferromagnetic ZSiNRs with asymmetric edges, a perfect spin-filtering effect with 100% positive electric current polarization can be achieved by altering the bias voltage. In addition, we also find that the negative differential resistances prefer the metastable states. The findings here indicate that the asymmetric and symmetric ZSiNRs are promising materials for spintronic applications.

  9. Regulation of autophagy and chloroquine sensitivity by oncogenic RAS in vitro is context-dependent.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Michael J; Gamez, Graciela; Menke, Christina; Hernandez, Ariel; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Gidan, Freddi; Staskiewicz, Leah; Morgan, Shellie; Cummings, Christopher; Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is an antimalarial drug and late-stage inhibitor of autophagy currently FDA-approved for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Based primarily on its ability to inhibit autophagy, CQ and its derivative, hydroxychloroquine, are currently being investigated as primary or adjuvant therapy in multiple clinical trials for cancer treatment. Oncogenic RAS has previously been shown to regulate autophagic flux, and cancers with high incidence of RAS mutations, such as pancreatic cancer, have been described in the literature as being particularly susceptible to CQ treatment, leading to the hypothesis that oncogenic RAS makes cancer cells dependent on autophagy. This autophagy "addiction" suggests that the mutation status of RAS in tumors could identify patients who would be more likely to benefit from CQ therapy. Here we show that RAS mutation status itself is unlikely to be beneficial in such a patient selection because oncogenic RAS does not always promote autophagy addiction. Moreover, oncogenic RAS can have opposite effects on both autophagic flux and CQ sensitivity in different cells. Finally, for any given cell type, the positive or negative effect of oncogenic RAS on autophagy does not necessarily predict whether RAS will promote or inhibit CQ-mediated toxicity. Thus, although our results confirm that different tumor cell lines display marked differences in how they respond to autophagy inhibition, these differences can occur irrespective of RAS mutation status and, in different contexts, can either promote or reduce chloroquine sensitivity of tumor cells.

  10. Repositioning chloroquine and metformin to eliminate cancer stem cell traits in pre-malignant lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; López-Bonetc, Eugeni; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Del Barco, Sonia; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    Ideal oncology drugs would be curative after a short treatment course if they could eliminate epithelium-originated carcinomas at their non-invasive, pre-malignant stages. Such ideal molecules, which are expected to molecularly abrogate all the instrumental mechanisms acquired by migrating cancer stem cells (CSCs) to by-pass tumour suppressor barriers, might already exist. We here illustrate how system biology strategies for repositioning existing FDA-approved drugs may accelerate our therapeutic capacity to eliminate CSC traits in pre-invasive intraepithelial neoplasias. First, we describe a signalling network signature that overrides bioenergetics stress- and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) phenomena in CSCs residing at pre-invasive lesions. Second, we functionally map the anti-malarial chloroquine and the anti-diabetic metformin (“old drugs”) to their recently recognized CSC targets (“new uses”) within the network. By discussing the preclinical efficacy of chloroquine and metformin to inhibiting the genesis and self-renewal of CSCs we finally underscore the expected translational impact of the “old drugs–new uses” repurposing strategy to open a new CSC-targeted chemoprevention era. PMID:21600837

  11. Repositioning chloroquine and metformin to eliminate cancer stem cell traits in pre-malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; López-Bonetc, Eugeni; Cufí, Sílvia; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Del Barco, Sonia; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2011-01-01

    Ideal oncology drugs would be curative after a short treatment course if they could eliminate epithelium-originated carcinomas at their non-invasive, pre-malignant stages. Such ideal molecules, which are expected to molecularly abrogate all the instrumental mechanisms acquired by migrating cancer stem cells (CSCs) to by-pass tumour suppressor barriers, might already exist. We here illustrate how system biology strategies for rep